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Sample records for core sampling pattern

  1. Core sampling system spare parts assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    Soon, there will be 4 independent core sampling systems obtaining samples from the underground tanks. It is desirable that these systems be available for sampling during the next 2 years. This assessment was prepared to evaluate the adequacy of the spare parts identified for the core sampling system and to provide recommendations that may remediate overages or inadequacies of spare parts

  2. Pollutant plume delineation from tree core sampling using standardized ranks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahyudi, Agung; Bogaert, Patrick; Trapp, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    There are currently contradicting results in the literature about the way chloroethene (CE) concentrations from tree core sampling correlate with those from groundwater measurements. This paper addresses this issue by focusing on groundwater and tree core datasets in CE contaminated site, Czech...... Republic. Preliminary analyses revealed strongly and positively skewed distributions for the tree core dataset, with an intra-tree variability accounting for more than 80% of the total variability, while the spatial analyses based on variograms indicated no obvious spatial pattern for CE concentration...... groundwater and tree core measurements. Nonetheless, tree core sampling and analysis proved to be a quick and inexpensive semi-quantitative method and a useful tool....

  3. Acceptance test procedure for core sample trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure is to provide instruction and documentation for acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks, HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647. The rotary mode core sample trucks were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks will verify that the design requirements have been met. All testing will be non-radioactive and stand-in materials shall be used to simulate waste tank conditions. Compressed air will be substituted for nitrogen during the majority of testing, with nitrogen being used only for flow characterization

  4. Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D.; Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2

  5. Sampling of sediment cores; Muestreo de cores sedimentarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Fernandez, Ana Carolina [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia (Mexico); Diaz Asencio, Misael [Centro de Estudios Ambientales de Cienfuegos (Cuba)

    2012-07-01

    In this chapter we describe techniques for collecting sediment cores for obtaining geochronologies by {sup 210}Pb (100 years) to allow historical reconstruction of environmental changes in the coastal zone. We examine relevant aspects for the sampling design, mainly related to the basic information about the area of interest necessary to choose the perfect place sampling, thereby we can improve the chances of success in meeting the objectives of the study. We also include description of the sampling methods aimed at maximizing the collecting capabilities of undisturbed sedimentary material, emphasizing the recovery of unaltered sediment-water interface. In addition, we describe subsampling procedures and sample handling intended to minimize post-sampling disruption to improve the possibilities of a reconstruction of reliable geochronologies. [Spanish] En este capitulo describimos tecnicas de recogida de cores sedimentarios para la obtencion de geocronologias por {sup 210}Pb (100 anos) que permitan la reconstruccion historica de cambios ambientales en la zona costera. Examinamos los aspectos relevantes para el diseno del muestreo, principalmente relacionados con la informacion basica sobre el area de interes necesaria para escoger el lugar idoneo de muestreo. De ese modo podemos mejorar las posibilidades de exito en el cumplimiento de los objetivos del estudio. Incluimos ademas la descripcion de los metodos de muestreo orientados a maximizar las posibilidades de recogida de material sedimentario no perturbado, poniendo enfasis en la recuperacion inalterada de la interfase agua-sedimento. Asimismo, describimos procedimientos de submuestreo y manipulacion de muestras, con los cuales se pretende minimizar la perturbacion post-muestreo para mejorar las posibilidades de una reconstruccion de geocronologias confiables.

  6. Quantitative NMR measurements on core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Within the frame of an EFP-95 project NMR methods for porosity determination in 2D, and for fluid saturation determination in 1D and 2D have been developed. The three methods have been developed and tested on cleaned core samples of chalk from the Danish North Sea. The main restriction for the use of the methods is the inherently short T2 relaxation constants of rock samples. Referring to measurements conducted at 200 MHz, the 2D porosity determination method is applicable to sample material with T2 relaxation constants down to 5 ms. The 1D fluid saturation determination method is applicable to sample material with T2 relaxation constants down to 3 ms, while the 2D fluid saturation determination method is applicable to material with T2 relaxation constants down to 8 ms. In the case of the 2D methods these constraints as a minimum enables work on the majority of chalk samples of Maastrichtian age. The 1D fluid saturation determination method in addition is applicable to at least some chalk samples of Danian and pre-Maastrichtian age. The spatial resolution of the 2D porosity determination method, the 1D fluid saturation methods, and the 2D fluid saturation method is respectively 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 2 mm. Reproducibility of pixel values is for all three methods 2%- points. (au)

  7. Characteristics of core sampling from crumbing Paleozoic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabashkin, I I; Edelman, Y A; Filippov, V N; Lychev, V N

    1981-01-01

    The results of analysis of core sampling using standard core sampling tools with small and medium inside diameter are cited. It is demonstrated that when using these tools loss of core in Paleozoic deposits promising with regard to oil and gas content does not exceed 25 - 30%. The use of a new core sampling tool with a large inside diameter which includes drill bits of different types and a core lifter ''Krembriy'' SKU-172/100 made it possible to increase core removal approximately 52%. A representative core from a highly crumbling and vesicular rock belinging to groups III - IV in terms of difficulty of core sampling was obtained first. A description of a new core sampling tool is given. The characteristics of the technology of its use which promote preservation of the core are cited. Means of continued improvement of this tool are noted.

  8. Study of the mechanism of clamping and detachment of a core sample by core lever lifters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabashkin, I I; Mizyakin, V M; Nikitin, S V

    1981-01-01

    Geometric dimensions of the basic elements of a core lifter should be determined depending on the clamping conditions. The changes should be determined depending on the conditions of the core sample diameter, critical angle between the lever and the core samples in the necessary depth of submersion of the contact edge of the lever into its surface. The core lifter KTsRZ-80 with eccentric core reception makes it possible to arrange more efficiently the core removing elements on the edge of the band. The use of the core lifters with eccentric plan of arrangement of the levers and their optimal length increases the removal of the core sample.

  9. Tank 241-BY-105 rotary core sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for two rotary-mode core samples from tank 241-BY-105 (BY-105)

  10. Characterization Of Core Sample Collected From The Saltstone Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzi, A.; Duncan, A.

    2010-01-01

    During the month of September 2008, grout core samples were collected from the Saltstone Disposal Facility, Vault 4, cell E. This grout was placed during processing campaigns in December 2007 from Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment Batch 2 salt solution. The 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria sample collected on 11/16/07 represents the salt solution in the core samples. Core samples were retrieved to initiate the historical database of properties of emplaced Saltstone and to demonstrate the correlation between field collected and laboratory prepared samples. Three samples were collected from three different locations. Samples were collected using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit. In April 2009, the core samples were removed from the evacuated sample container, inspected, transferred to PVC containers, and backfilled with nitrogen. Samples furthest from the wall were the most intact cylindrically shaped cored samples. The shade of the core samples darkened as the depth of coring increased. Based on the visual inspection, sample 3-3 was selected for all subsequent analysis. The density and porosity of the Vault 4 core sample, 1.90 g/cm 3 and 59.90% respectively, were comparable to values achieved for laboratory prepared samples. X-ray diffraction analysis identified phases consistent with the expectations for hydrated Saltstone. Microscopic analysis revealed morphology features characteristic of cementitious materials with fly ash and calcium silicate hydrate gel. When taken together, the results of the density, porosity, x-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic analysis support the conclusion that the Vault 4, Cell E core sample is representative of the expected waste form.

  11. Application of a genetic algorithm to core reload pattern optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanker, E.; Tanker, A.Z.

    1994-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is applied to reload pattern optimization of a PWR core. Evaluating all different distributions of a given batch load separately is found slow and ineffective. Allowing patterns from different distributions to combine reproduce, an optimized pattern better than that obtained from from linear programming is found, albeit in a longer time. (authors). 5 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Number of core samples: Mean concentrations and confidence intervals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, L.; Cromar, R.D.; Wilmarth, S.R.; Heasler, P.G.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides estimates of how well the mean concentration of analytes are known as a function of the number of core samples, composite samples, and replicate analyses. The estimates are based upon core composite data from nine recently sampled single-shell tanks. The results can be used when determining the number of core samples needed to ''characterize'' the waste from similar single-shell tanks. A standard way of expressing uncertainty in the estimate of a mean is with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The authors investigate how the width of a 95% CI on the mean concentration decreases as the number of observations increase. Specifically, the tables and figures show how the relative half-width (RHW) of a 95% CI decreases as the number of core samples increases. The RHW of a CI is a unit-less measure of uncertainty. The general conclusions are as follows: (1) the RHW decreases dramatically as the number of core samples is increased, the decrease is much smaller when the number of composited samples or the number of replicate analyses are increase; (2) if the mean concentration of an analyte needs to be estimated with a small RHW, then a large number of core samples is required. The estimated number of core samples given in the tables and figures were determined by specifying different sizes of the RHW. Four nominal sizes were examined: 10%, 25%, 50%, and 100% of the observed mean concentration. For a majority of analytes the number of core samples required to achieve an accuracy within 10% of the mean concentration is extremely large. In many cases, however, two or three core samples is sufficient to achieve a RHW of approximately 50 to 100%. Because many of the analytes in the data have small concentrations, this level of accuracy may be satisfactory for some applications

  13. Tank 10H Saltcake Core Sample Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARTINO, CHRISTOPHERJ

    2004-01-01

    In support of Low-Curie Salt (LCS) process validation at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) has undertaken a program of tank characterization, including salt sampling. As part of this initiative, they sampled the surface and subsurface of Tank 10H saltcake using a series of three 12-inch long sample tubes. These tubes each contain 1-foot long segments of the saltcake from one location, representing the top three feet of saltcake. The primary objective of the characterization that will be useful to the selection and processing of the next waste tanks. Most important is the determination of the Cs-137 concentration and liquid retention properties of Tank 10H saltcake to confirm acceptability of processing. Additional chemical analyses are performed to provide information on salt elemental, ionic, and radiological composition to aid in assessment of the suitability of processing drained and dissolved material and in refining the information in the waste characterization system (WCS)

  14. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1998-01-01

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-113 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment

  15. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-116 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment

  16. Acquisition and Retaining Granular Samples via a Rotating Coring Bit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    frictional force must be greater than the weight of the sample. The bit can be designed with an internal sleeve to serve as a container for granular samples. This tube-shaped component can be extracted upon completion of the sampling, and the bottom can be capped by placing the bit onto a corklike component. Then, upon removal of the internal tube, the top section can be sealed. The novel features of this device are: center dot A mechanism of acquiring and retaining granular samples using a coring bit without a closed door. center dot An acquisition bit that has internal structure such as a waffle pattern for compartmentalizing or helical internal flute to propel the sample inside the bit and help in acquiring and retaining granular samples. center dot A bit with an internal spiral into which the various particles wedge. center dot A design that provides a method of testing frictional properties of the granular samples and potentially segregating particles based on size and density. A controlled acceleration or deceleration may be used to drop the least-frictional particles or to eventually shear the unconsolidated material near the bit center.

  17. Analytical results of Tank 38H core samples -- Fall 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swingle, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Two samples were pulled from Tank 38H in the Fall of 1999: a variable depth sample (VDS) of the supernate was pulled in October and a core sample from the salt layer was pulled in December. Analysis of the rinse from the outside of the core sample indicated no sign of volatile or semivolatile organics. Both supernate and solids from the VDS and the dried core sample solids were analyzed for isotopes which could pose a criticality concern and also for elements which could serve as neutron poisons, as well as other elements. Results of the elemental analyses of these samples show significant elements present to mitigate the potential for nuclear criticality. However, it should be noted the results given for the VDS solids elemental analyses may be higher than the actual concentration in the solids, since the filter paper was dissolved along with the sample solids

  18. Tank 101-SY Window E core sample: Interpretation of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    A full depth core sample was taken for tank 241-SY-101 in December 1991 during a time period called ''Window E.'' This was the second full depth core sample from this tank during the year. The core had two major portions that are known as the convective zone and the nonconvective zone. A crust was on the top of tank but as poorly sampled. The analysis of the Window E core sample stressed segment composite chemical analysis instead of segment by segment as in Window C. Adiabatic calorimetry on samples from both cores showed a slow self heating reaction above 150 degrees C on dried samples. The exothermic events were milder than similar synthetic samples. The chemical and physical properties complemented the information from Window C. The Window E material from the convective zone was more viscous than the Window C convective zone material. The nonconvective zone viscosities were similar for both cores. Heating and dilution tests were made to test mitigation concepts

  19. Tank 101-SY Window E core sample: Interpretation of results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    A full depth core sample was taken for tank 241-SY-101 in December 1991 during a time period called ``Window E.`` This was the second full depth core sample from this tank during the year. The core had two major portions that are known as the convective zone and the nonconvective zone. A crust was on the top of tank but as poorly sampled. The analysis of the Window E core sample stressed segment composite chemical analysis instead of segment by segment as in Window C. Adiabatic calorimetry on samples from both cores showed a slow self heating reaction above 150{degrees}C on dried samples. The exothermic events were milder than similar synthetic samples. The chemical and physical properties complemented the information from Window C. The Window E material from the convective zone was more viscous than the Window C convective zone material. The nonconvective zone viscosities were similar for both cores. Heating and dilution tests were made to test mitigation concepts.

  20. A core handling device for the Mars Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Owen

    1989-01-01

    A core handling device for use on Mars is being designed. To provide a context for the design study, it was assumed that a Mars Rover/Sample Return (MRSR) Mission would have the following characteristics: a year or more in length; visits by the rover to 50 or more sites; 100 or more meter-long cores being drilled by the rover; and the capability of returning about 5 kg of Mars regolith to Earth. These characteristics lead to the belief that in order to bring back a variegated set of samples that can address the range of scientific objetives for a MRSR mission to Mars there needs to be considerable analysis done on board the rover. Furthermore, the discrepancy between the amount of sample gathered and the amount to be returned suggests that there needs to be some method of choosing the optimal set of samples. This type of analysis will require pristine material-unaltered by the drilling process. Since the core drill thermally and mechanically alters the outer diameter (about 10 pct) of the core sample, this outer area cannot be used. The primary function of the core handling device is to extract subsamples from the core and to position these subsamples, and the core itself if needed, with respect to the various analytical instruments that can be used to perform these analyses.

  1. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  2. Year 2000 compliance status report for core sampling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Several pieces of equipment that support core sampling activities are ''date aware'' and could be affected by the roll over to the year 2000. This report documents the testing and remedial efforts for this equipment

  3. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering

  4. WWER core pattern enhancement using adaptive improved harmony search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, T. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghaie, M., E-mail: M_Aghaie@sbu.ac.ir [Nuclear Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Norouzi, A. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The classical and improved harmony search algorithms are introduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advantage of IHS is demonstrated in Shekel's Foxholes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CHS and IHS are compared with other Heuristic algorithms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adaptive improved harmony search is applied for two cases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cases of WWER core are optimized in BOC FA pattern. - Abstract: The efficient operation and fuel management of PWRs are of utmost importance. Core performance analysis constitutes an essential phase in core fuel management optimization. Finding an optimum core arrangement for loading of fuel assemblies, FAs, in a nuclear core is a complex problem. In this paper, application of classical harmony search (HS) and adaptive improved harmony search (IHS) in loading pattern (LP) design, for pressurized water reactors, is described. In this analysis, finding the best core pattern, which attains maximum multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, by considering maximum allowable power picking factors (PPF) is the main objective. Therefore a HS based, LP optimization code is prepared and CITATION code which is a neutronic calculation code, applied to obtain effective multiplication factor, neutron fluxes and power density in desired cores. Using adaptive improved harmony search and neutronic code, generated LP optimization code, could be applicable for PWRs core with many numbers of FAs. In this work, at first step, HS and IHS efficiencies are compared with some other heuristic algorithms in Shekel's Foxholes problem and capability of the adaptive improved harmony search is demonstrated. Results show, efficient application of IHS. At second step, two WWER cases are studied and then IHS proffered improved core patterns with regard to mentioned objective functions.

  5. WWER core pattern enhancement using adaptive improved harmony search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazari, T.; Aghaie, M.; Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Norouzi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The classical and improved harmony search algorithms are introduced. ► The advantage of IHS is demonstrated in Shekel's Foxholes. ► The CHS and IHS are compared with other Heuristic algorithms. ► The adaptive improved harmony search is applied for two cases. ► Two cases of WWER core are optimized in BOC FA pattern. - Abstract: The efficient operation and fuel management of PWRs are of utmost importance. Core performance analysis constitutes an essential phase in core fuel management optimization. Finding an optimum core arrangement for loading of fuel assemblies, FAs, in a nuclear core is a complex problem. In this paper, application of classical harmony search (HS) and adaptive improved harmony search (IHS) in loading pattern (LP) design, for pressurized water reactors, is described. In this analysis, finding the best core pattern, which attains maximum multiplication factor, k eff , by considering maximum allowable power picking factors (PPF) is the main objective. Therefore a HS based, LP optimization code is prepared and CITATION code which is a neutronic calculation code, applied to obtain effective multiplication factor, neutron fluxes and power density in desired cores. Using adaptive improved harmony search and neutronic code, generated LP optimization code, could be applicable for PWRs core with many numbers of FAs. In this work, at first step, HS and IHS efficiencies are compared with some other heuristic algorithms in Shekel's Foxholes problem and capability of the adaptive improved harmony search is demonstrated. Results show, efficient application of IHS. At second step, two WWER cases are studied and then IHS proffered improved core patterns with regard to mentioned objective functions.

  6. Test plan for core sampling drill bit temperature monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    At WHC, one of the functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System division is sampling waste tanks to characterize their contents. The push-mode core sampling truck is currently used to take samples of liquid and sludge. Sampling of tanks containing hard salt cake is to be performed with the rotary-mode core sampling system, consisting of the core sample truck, mobile exhauster unit, and ancillary subsystems. When drilling through the salt cake material, friction and heat can be generated in the drill bit. Based upon tank safety reviews, it has been determined that the drill bit temperature must not exceed 180 C, due to the potential reactivity of tank contents at this temperature. Consequently, a drill bit temperature limit of 150 C was established for operation of the core sample truck to have an adequate margin of safety. Unpredictable factors, such as localized heating, cause this buffer to be so great. The most desirable safeguard against exceeding this threshold is bit temperature monitoring . This document describes the recommended plan for testing the prototype of a drill bit temperature monitor developed for core sampling by Sandia National Labs. The device will be tested at their facilities. This test plan documents the tests that Westinghouse Hanford Company considers necessary for effective testing of the system

  7. Development of core sampling technique for ITER Type B radwaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. G.; Hong, K. P.; Oh, W. H.; Park, M. C.; Jung, S. H.; Ahn, S. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Type B radwaste (intermediate level and long lived radioactive waste) imported from ITER vacuum vessel are to be treated and stored in basement of hot cell building. The Type B radwaste treatment process is composed of buffer storage, cutting, sampling/tritium measurement, tritium removal, characterization, pre-packaging, inspection/decontamination, and storage etc. The cut slices of Type B radwaste components generated from cutting process undergo sampling process before and after tritium removal process. The purpose of sampling is to obtain small pieces of samples in order to investigate the tritium content and concentration of Type B radwaste. Core sampling, which is the candidates of sampling technique to be applied to ITER hot cell, is available for not thick (less than 50 mm) metal without use of coolant. Experimented materials were SS316L and CuCrZr in order to simulate ITER Type B radwaste. In core sampling, substantial secondary wastes from cutting chips will be produced unavoidably. Thus, core sampling machine will have to be equipped with disposal system such as suction equipment. Core sampling is considered an unfavorable method for tool wear compared to conventional drilling.

  8. Preliminaries on core image analysis using fault drilling samples; Core image kaiseki kotohajime (danso kussaku core kaisekirei)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, T; Ito, H [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper introduces examples of image data analysis on fault drilling samples. The paper describes the following matters: core samples used in the analysis are those obtained from wells drilled piercing the Nojima fault which has moved in the Hygoken-Nanbu Earthquake; the CORESCAN system made by DMT Corporation, Germany, used in acquiring the image data consists of a CCD camera, a light source and core rotation mechanism, and a personal computer, its resolution being about 5 pixels/mm in both axial and circumferential directions, and 24-bit full color; with respect to the opening fractures in core samples collected by using a constant azimuth coring, it was possible to derive values of the opening width, inclination angle, and travel from the image data by using a commercially available software for the personal computer; and comparison of this core image with the BHTV record and the hydrophone VSP record (travel and inclination obtained from the BHTV record agree well with those obtained from the core image). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Statistical evaluations of current sampling procedures and incomplete core recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasler, P.G.; Jensen, L.

    1994-03-01

    This document develops two formulas that describe the effects of incomplete recovery on core sampling results for the Hanford waste tanks. The formulas evaluate incomplete core recovery from a worst-case (i.e.,biased) and best-case (i.e., unbiased) perspective. A core sampler is unbiased if the sample material recovered is a random sample of the material in the tank, while any sampler that preferentially recovers a particular type of waste over others is a biased sampler. There is strong evidence to indicate that the push-mode sampler presently used at the Hanford site is a biased one. The formulas presented here show the effects of incomplete core recovery on the accuracy of composition measurements, as functions of the vertical variability in the waste. These equations are evaluated using vertical variability estimates from previously sampled tanks (B110, U110, C109). Assuming that the values of vertical variability used in this study adequately describes the Hanford tank farm, one can use the formulas to compute the effect of incomplete recovery on the accuracy of an average constituent estimate. To determine acceptable recovery limits, we have assumed that the relative error of such an estimate should be no more than 20%

  10. Generation and Analysis of Constrained Random Sampling Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierzchlewski, Jacek; Arildsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Random sampling is a technique for signal acquisition which is gaining popularity in practical signal processing systems. Nowadays, event-driven analog-to-digital converters make random sampling feasible in practical applications. A process of random sampling is defined by a sampling pattern, which...... indicates signal sampling points in time. Practical random sampling patterns are constrained by ADC characteristics and application requirements. In this paper, we introduce statistical methods which evaluate random sampling pattern generators with emphasis on practical applications. Furthermore, we propose...... algorithm generates random sampling patterns dedicated for event-driven-ADCs better than existed sampling pattern generators. Finally, implementation issues of random sampling patterns are discussed....

  11. Machine Learning of the Reactor Core Loading Pattern Critical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Trontl

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm, and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of a machine learning model which could be used for fast loading pattern evaluation. We employ a recently introduced machine learning technique, support vector regression (SVR, which is a data driven, kernel based, nonlinear modeling paradigm, in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to evaluate the possibility of applying SVR method for reactor core loading pattern modeling. We illustrate the performance of the solution and discuss its applicability, that is, complexity, speed, and accuracy.

  12. Machine Learning of the Reactor Core Loading Pattern Critical Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.

    2008-01-01

    The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm, and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of a machine learning model which could be used for fast loading pattern evaluation. We employ a recently introduced machine learning technique, support vector regression (SVR), which is a data driven, kernel based, nonlinear modeling paradigm, in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to evaluate the possibility of applying SVR method for reactor core loading pattern modeling. We illustrate the performance of the solution and discuss its applicability, that is, complexity, speed, and accuracy

  13. Continuous firefly algorithm applied to PWR core pattern enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursalehi, N., E-mail: npsalehi@yahoo.com [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Moghaddam, H.K. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Numerical results indicate the reliability of CFA for the nuclear reactor LPO. ► The major advantages of CFA are its light computational cost and fast convergence. ► Our experiments demonstrate the ability of CFA to obtain the near optimal loading pattern. -- Abstract: In this research, the new meta-heuristic optimization strategy, firefly algorithm, is developed for the nuclear reactor loading pattern optimization problem. Two main goals in reactor core fuel management optimization are maximizing the core multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) in order to extract the maximum cycle energy and minimizing the power peaking factor due to safety constraints. In this work, we define a multi-objective fitness function according to above goals for the core fuel arrangement enhancement. In order to evaluate and demonstrate the ability of continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to find the near optimal loading pattern, we developed CFA nodal expansion code (CFANEC) for the fuel management operation. This code consists of two main modules including CFA optimization program and a developed core analysis code implementing nodal expansion method to calculate with coarse meshes by dimensions of fuel assemblies. At first, CFA is applied for the Foxholes test case with continuous variables in order to validate CFA and then for KWU PWR using a decoding strategy for discrete variables. Results indicate the efficiency and relatively fast convergence of CFA in obtaining near optimal loading pattern with respect to considered fitness function. At last, our experience with the CFA confirms that the CFA is easy to implement and reliable.

  14. Continuous firefly algorithm applied to PWR core pattern enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursalehi, N.; Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Moghaddam, H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Numerical results indicate the reliability of CFA for the nuclear reactor LPO. ► The major advantages of CFA are its light computational cost and fast convergence. ► Our experiments demonstrate the ability of CFA to obtain the near optimal loading pattern. -- Abstract: In this research, the new meta-heuristic optimization strategy, firefly algorithm, is developed for the nuclear reactor loading pattern optimization problem. Two main goals in reactor core fuel management optimization are maximizing the core multiplication factor (K eff ) in order to extract the maximum cycle energy and minimizing the power peaking factor due to safety constraints. In this work, we define a multi-objective fitness function according to above goals for the core fuel arrangement enhancement. In order to evaluate and demonstrate the ability of continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to find the near optimal loading pattern, we developed CFA nodal expansion code (CFANEC) for the fuel management operation. This code consists of two main modules including CFA optimization program and a developed core analysis code implementing nodal expansion method to calculate with coarse meshes by dimensions of fuel assemblies. At first, CFA is applied for the Foxholes test case with continuous variables in order to validate CFA and then for KWU PWR using a decoding strategy for discrete variables. Results indicate the efficiency and relatively fast convergence of CFA in obtaining near optimal loading pattern with respect to considered fitness function. At last, our experience with the CFA confirms that the CFA is easy to implement and reliable

  15. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ''Engineering Practice Guidelines,'' Appendix M, ''Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.'' Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ''Rock Slinger'' test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted

  16. Machine learning of the reactor core loading pattern critical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.

    2007-01-01

    The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. In this paper we investigate the applicability of a machine learning model which could be used for fast loading pattern evaluation. We employed a recently introduced machine learning technique, Support Vector Regression (SVR), which has a strong theoretical background in statistical learning theory. Superior empirical performance of the method has been reported on difficult regression problems in different fields of science and technology. SVR is a data driven, kernel based, nonlinear modelling paradigm, in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to evaluate the possibility of applying SVR method for reactor core loading pattern modelling. The starting set of experimental data for training and testing of the machine learning algorithm was obtained using a two-dimensional diffusion theory reactor physics computer code. We illustrate the performance of the solution and discuss its applicability, i.e., complexity, speed and accuracy, with a projection to a more realistic scenario involving machine learning from the results of more accurate and time consuming three-dimensional core modelling code. (author)

  17. MTR core loading pattern optimization using burnup dependent group constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Masood

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A diffusion theory based MTR fuel management methodology has been developed for finding superior core loading patterns at any stage for MTR systems, keeping track of burnup of individual fuel assemblies throughout their history. It is based on using burnup dependent group constants obtained by the WIMS-D/4 computer code for standard fuel elements and control fuel elements. This methodology has been implemented in a computer program named BFMTR, which carries out detailed five group diffusion theory calculations using the CITATION code as a subroutine. The core-wide spatial flux and power profiles thus obtained are used for calculating the peak-to-average power and flux-ratios along with the available excess reactivity of the system. The fuel manager can use the BFMTR code for loading pattern optimization for maximizing the excess reactivity, keeping the peak-to-average power as well as flux-ratio within constraints. The results obtained by the BFMTR code have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values for the equilibrium core of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1.

  18. Westinghouse loading pattern search methodology for complex core designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.; Alsop, B.H.; Johansen, B.J.; Morita, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor core designs have become more complex and must meet a plethora of design constraints. Trends have been toward longer cycles with increased discharge burnup, increased burnable absorber (BA) number, mixed BA types, reduced radial leakage, axially blanketed fuel, and multiple-batch feed fuel regions. Obtaining economical reload core loading patterns (LPs) that meet design criteria is a difficult task to do manually. Automated LP search tools are needed. An LP search tool cannot possibly perform an exhaustive search because of the sheer size of the combinatorial problem. On the other hand, evolving complexity of the design features and constraints often invalidates expert rules based on past design experiences. Westinghouse has developed a sophisticated loading pattern search methodology. This methodology is embodied in the LPOP code, which Westinghouse nuclear designers use extensively. The LPOP code generates a variety of LPs meeting design constraints and performs a two-cycle economic evaluation of the generated LPs. The designer selects the most appropriate patterns for fine tuning and evaluation by the design codes. This paper describes the major features of the LPOP methodology that are relevant to fulfilling the aforementioned requirements. Data and examples are also provided to demonstrate the performance of LPOP in meeting the complex design needs

  19. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, F. Jr.; Schatzel, S.J.

    1998-04-21

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas; a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers and a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container; and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use. 5 figs.

  20. δ13C-CH4 in ice core samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperlich, Peter

    Ice core records of δ13C-CH4 reflect the variability of CH4 biogeochemistry in response to climate change and show this system is far more complex than expected. The first part of this work is concerned with the development of analytical techniques that allow 1) precise referencing and 2) measure......Ice core records of δ13C-CH4 reflect the variability of CH4 biogeochemistry in response to climate change and show this system is far more complex than expected. The first part of this work is concerned with the development of analytical techniques that allow 1) precise referencing and 2......) measurements of δ13C-CH4 in ice core samples as is required when δ13C-CH4 records that are measured in several laboratories are merged for analysis. Both the referencing and measurement techniques have been compared to further laboratories which proofed the accuracy of the analytical systems. The second part...

  1. Analysis of core samples from jet grouted soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1995-10-01

    Superplasticized cementitious grouts were tested for constructing subsurface containment barriers using jet grouting in July, 1994. The grouts were developed in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The test site was located close to the Chemical Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM. Sandia was responsible for the placement contract. The jet grouted soil was exposed to the service environment for one year and core samples were extracted to evaluate selected properties. The cores were tested for strength, density, permeability (hydraulic conductivity) and cementitious content. The tests provided an opportunity to determine the performance of the grouts and grout-treated soil. Several recommendations arise from the results of the core tests. These are: (1) grout of the same mix proportions as the final grout should be used as a drilling fluid in order to preserve the original mix design and utilize the benefits of superplasticizers; (2) a high shear mixer should be used for preparation of the grout; (3) the permeability under unsaturated conditions requires consideration when subsurface barriers are used in the vadose zone; and (4) suitable methods for characterizing the permeability of barriers in-situ should be applied

  2. Hybrid expert system implementation to determine core reload patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greek, K.J.; Robinson, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Determining reactor reload fuel patterns is a computationally intensive problem solving process for which automation can be of significant benefit. Often much effort is expended in the search for an optimal loading. While any modern programming language could be used to automate solution, the specialized tools of artificial intelligence (AI) are the most efficient means of introducing the fuel management expert's knowledge into the search for an optimum reload pattern. Prior research in pressurized water reactor refueling strategies developed FORTRAN programs that automated an expert's basic knowledge to direct a search for an acceptable minimum peak power loading. The dissatisfaction with maintenance of compiled knowledge in FORTRAN programs has served as the motivation for the development of the SHUFFLE expert system. SHUFFLE is written in Smalltalk, an object-oriented programming language, and evaluates loadings as it generates them using a two-group, two-dimensional nodal power calculation compiled in a personal computer-based FORTRAN. This paper reviews the object-oriented representation developed to solve the core reload problem with an expert system tool and its operating prototype, SHUFFLE

  3. Sampling of reactor pressure vessel and core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhaeuser, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants is a growing business as a huge number of plants built in the 1970's have now reached their lifetime. It is well known that dismantling a nuclear power plant means an extraordinary expense for the owner respectively operator. Beside the dismantling works for itself, the disposal of activated components and other nuclear waste is very expensive. What comes next is the fact that final disposal facilities are not available yet in most countries meaning a need for interim storage on-site in specially built facilities. It can be concluded that a special attention is paid on producing a minimal radioactive waste volume. For this, optimized dismantling and packaging concepts have to be developed. AREVA is proud of versatile experience in successfully dismantling nuclear components like core internals and reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The basis of a well-founded and optimized dismantling and packaging concept must always be the detailed knowledge of the radiological condition of the component to be and in the best case a 3D activation- model. For keeping the necessary sampling effort as small as possible, but simultaneously as efficient as possible, representative sampling positions are defined in advance by theoretical radiological examinations. For this, a detailed 3D-CAD-model of the components to be dismantled has proven very helpful and effective. Under these aspects a sampling of RPV and its components is necessary to verify the theoretically calculated radiological data. The obtained results of activation and contamination are taken into account for the optimized dismantling and packaging strategy. The precise 3D-activation-model will reduce the necessary number and type of final disposal containers as security factors are minimized leading to a lower shielding effort, too. Besides, components or even parts of components may be subject of release measurement. In the end, costs can be reduced. In this context

  4. Thermal modeling of core sampling in flammable gas waste tanks. Part 1: Push-mode sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Stroh, K.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.

    1997-01-01

    The radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks at Hanford site is routinely being sampled for waste characterization purposes. The push- and rotary-mode core sampling is one of the sampling methods employed. The waste includes mixtures of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite with organic compounds that can produce violent exothermic reactions if heated above 160 C during core sampling. A self-propagating waste reaction would produce very high temperatures that eventually result in failure of the tank and radioactive material releases to environment. A two-dimensional thermal model based on a lumped finite volume analysis method is developed. The enthalpy of each node is calculated from the first law of thermodynamics. A flash temperature and effective contact area concept were introduced to account the interface temperature rise. No maximum temperature rise exceeding the critical value of 60 C was found in the cases studied for normal operating conditions. Several accident conditions are also examined. In these cases it was found that the maximum drill bit temperature remained below the critical reaction temperature as long as a 30 scfm purge flow is provided the push-mode drill bit during sampling in rotary mode. The failure to provide purge flow resulted in exceeding the limiting temperatures in a relatively short time

  5. Two-phase flow pattern and heat transfer during core uncovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osakabe, Masahiro; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1987-01-01

    The low and high power core uncovery patterns were observed in the high-pressure quasi-steady core uncovery experiments in a 25-rod bundle. The boundary between the two patterns was obtained in the experiments. The difference of two patterns was considered to be due to the slug-annular transition below the dryout points. The Osakabe's slug-annular transition model was the good boundary between the two patterns. The small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) experiments were conducted by using the integral experimental facility with the 1,168-rod core. The transient core uncovery pattern was expected as the low power core uncovery pattern based on the quasisteady experiments mentioned above. The transient core uncovery patterns were classified into the boiloff and hydraulic core uncovery. In the boiloff core uncovery, the dryout points were controlled with the mixture level like the quasi-steady state. In the hydraulic core uncovery, the dryout points were not controlled with the mixture level alone, and the multi-dimensional dryout process in the core and the relatively high heat transfer above the dryout points were observed. It was considered that a part of water was remained above the dryout points due to the rapid depression of core liquid level. (author)

  6. Tank 241-U-105 push mode core sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples and two push mode core samples from tank 241-U-105 (U-105)

  7. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. The...

  8. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. Phase 1...

  9. UV patterned nanoporous solid-liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner

    2010-01-01

    Nanoporous Solid-Liquid core waveguides were prepared by UV induced surface modification of hydrophobic nanoporous polymers. With this method, the index contrast (delta n = 0.20) is a result of selective water infiltration. The waveguide core is defined by UV light, rendering the exposed part...

  10. Tank 241-B-203 push mode core sampling and analysis plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, J.

    1995-01-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for two push-mode core samples from tank 241-B-203 (B-203)

  11. Tank 241-B-204 push mode core sampling and analysis plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for two push-mode core samples from tank 241-B-204 (B-204)

  12. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah Sd.

    2001-01-01

    The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the first in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from RCRA borehole bore samples and composite samples. Intact cores from two RCRA boreholes (299-W22-48 and 299-W22-50) near the SX Tank Farm and four, large-quantity grab samples from outcrop sediment on and off the Hanford Site were sampled to better understand the fate of contaminants in the vadose zone beneath underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. Borehole and outcrop samples analyzed for this report are located outside the tank farms, and therefore may be considered standard or background samples from which to compare contaminated sediments within the tank farms themselves. This report presents our interpretation of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of the uncontaminated vadose zone sediments, and variations in the vertical distribution of these properties. The information presented in this report is intended to support preparation of the S-SX Field Investigation Report to be prepared by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. as well as future remediation actions at the S-SX Tank Farm

  13. An Interval Bound Algorithm of optimizing reactor core loading pattern by using reactivity interval schema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Zhaohu; Wang Kan; Yao Dong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We present a new Loading Pattern Optimization method - Interval Bound Algorithm (IBA). → IBA directly uses the reactivity of fuel assemblies and burnable poison. → IBA can optimize fuel assembly orientation in a coupled way. → Numerical experiment shows that IBA outperforms genetic algorithm and engineers. → We devise DDWF technique to deal with multiple objectives and constraints. - Abstract: In order to optimize the core loading pattern in Nuclear Power Plants, the paper presents a new optimization method - Interval Bound Algorithm (IBA). Similar to the typical population based algorithms, e.g. genetic algorithm, IBA maintains a population of solutions and evolves them during the optimization process. IBA acquires the solution by statistical learning and sampling the control variable intervals of the population in each iteration. The control variables are the transforms of the reactivity of fuel assemblies or the worth of burnable poisons, which are the crucial heuristic information for loading pattern optimization problems. IBA can deal with the relationship between the dependent variables by defining the control variables. Based on the IBA algorithm, a parallel Loading Pattern Optimization code, named IBALPO, has been developed. To deal with multiple objectives and constraints, the Dynamic Discontinuous Weight Factors (DDWF) for the fitness function have been used in IBALPO. Finally, the code system has been used to solve a realistic reloading problem and a better pattern has been obtained compared with the ones searched by engineers and genetic algorithm, thus the performance of the code is proved.

  14. Sampling and treatment of rock cores and groundwater under reducing environments of deep underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebashi, Katsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Tanaka, Tadao

    2005-01-01

    A method of sampling and treatment of undisturbed rock cores and groundwater under maintained reducing environments of deep underground was developed and demonstrated in a Neogene's sandy mudstone layer at depth of GL-100 to -200 m. Undisturbed rock cores and groundwater were sampled and transferred into an Ar gas atmospheric glove box with minimized exposure to the atmosphere. The reducing conditions of the sampled groundwater and rock cores were examined in the Ar atmospheric glove box by measuring pH and Eh of the sampled groundwater and sampled groundwater contacting with disk type rock samples, respectively. (author)

  15. Improved orientation sampling for indexing diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Mahler; Schmidt, Søren

    2017-01-01

    to that of optimally distributing points on a four‐dimensional sphere. In doing so, the number of orientation samples needed to achieve a desired indexing accuracy is significantly reduced. Orientation sets at a range of sizes are generated in this way for all Laue groups and are made available online for easy use.......Orientation mapping is a widely used technique for revealing the microstructure of a polycrystalline sample. The crystalline orientation at each point in the sample is determined by analysis of the diffraction pattern, a process known as pattern indexing. A recent development in pattern indexing...... in the presence of noise, it has very high computational requirements. In this article, the computational burden is reduced by developing a method for nearly optimal sampling of orientations. By using the quaternion representation of orientations, it is shown that the optimal sampling problem is equivalent...

  16. Transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate rebiopsy: How many core sampling should be applied to which patient?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akın Soner Amasyali

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: At least 20 cores should be sampled in rebiopsy, especially in the patients diagnosed with benign and HGPIN. However, we believe that standard systematic sampling will be sufficient for the patients diagnosed with ASAP.

  17. Relating the structural strength of concrete sewer pipes and material properties retrieved from core samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanic, N.; Langeveld, J.G.; Salet, Theo; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2016-01-01

    Drill core samples are taken in practice for an analysis of the material characteristics of concrete pipes in order to improve the quality of the decision-making on rehabilitation actions. Earlier research has demonstrated that core sampling is associated with a significant uncertainty. In this

  18. A geostatistical estimation of zinc grade in bore-core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starzec, A.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities and preliminary results of geostatistical interpretation of the XRF determination of zinc in bore-core samples are considered. For the spherical model of the variogram the estimation variance of grade in a disk-shape sample (estimated from the grade on the circumference sample) is calculated. Variograms of zinc grade in core samples are presented and examples of the grade estimation are discussed. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  19. Sampling strategy to develop a primary core collection of apple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... Physiology and Molecular Biology for Fruit, Tree, Beijing 100193, China. ... analyzed on genetic diversity to ensure their represen- .... strategy, cluster and random sampling. .... on isozyme data―A simulation study, Theor.

  20. Experimental Study and Mathematical Modeling of Asphaltene Deposition Mechanism in Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Behbahani T.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental studies were conducted to determine the effect of asphaltene deposition on the permeability reduction and porosity reduction of carbonate, sandstone and dolomite rock samples using an Iranian bottom hole live oil sample which is close to reservoir conditions, whereas in the majority of previous work, a mixture of recombined oil (a mixture of dead oil and associated gas was injected into a core sample which is far from reservoir conditions. The effect of the oil injection rate on asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction was studied. The experimental results showed that an increase in the oil injection flow rate can result in an increase in asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction. Also, it can be observed that at lower injection flow rates, a monotonic decrease in permeability of the rock samples can be attained upon increasing the injection flow rate, while at higher injection rates, after a decrease in rock permeability, an increasing trend is observed before a steady-state condition can be reached. The experimental results also showed that the rock type can affect the amount of asphaltene deposition, and the asphaltene deposition has different mechanisms in sandstone and carbonate core samples. It can be seen that the adsorption and plugging mechanisms have a more important role in asphaltene deposition in carbonate core samples than sandstone core samples. From the results, it can be observed that the pore volumes of the injected crude oil are higher for sandstone cores compared with the carbonate cores. Also, it can be inferred that three depositional types may take place during the crude oil injection, i.e., continuous deposition for low-permeability cores, slow, steady plugging for high-permeability cores and steady deposition for medium-permeability cores. It can be seen from the experimental results that damage to the core samples was found to increase when the production pressures were

  1. Compact multipurpose sub-sampling and processing of in-situ cores with press (pressurized core sub-sampling and extrusion system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, E.; Muller, W.H. [Technical Univ. of Berlin, Berlin (Germany). Chair of Continuum Mechanics and Material Theory

    2008-07-01

    Climate change, declining resources and over-consumption result in a need for sustainable resource allocation, habitat conservation and claim for new technologies and prospects for damage-containment. In order to increase knowledge of the environment and to define potential hazards, it is necessary to get an understanding of the deep biosphere. In addition, the benthic conditions of sediment structure and gas hydrates, temperature, pressure and bio-geochemistry must be maintained during the sequences of sampling, retrieval, transfer, storage and downstream analysis. In order to investigate highly instable gas hydrates, which decomposes under pressure and temperature change, a suite of research technologies have been developed by the Technische Universitat Berlin (TUB), Germany. This includes the pressurized core sub-sampling and extrusion system (PRESS) that was developed in the European Union project called HYACE/HYACINTH. The project enabled well-defined sectioning and transfer of drilled pressure-cores obtained by a rotary corer and fugro pressure corer into transportation and investigation chambers. This paper described HYACINTH pressure coring and the HYACINTH core transfer. Autoclave coring tools and HYACINTH core logging, coring tools, and sub-sampling were also discussed. It was concluded that possible future applications include, but were not limited to, research in shales and other tight formations, carbon dioxide sequestration, oil and gas exploration, coalbed methane, and microbiology of the deep biosphere. To meet the corresponding requirements and to incorporate the experiences from previous expeditions, the pressure coring system would need to be redesigned to adapt it to the new applications. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Natural Radioactivity Pattern of Surabaya Water Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosidi; Agus Taftazani

    2007-01-01

    The gross β radioactivity and natural radionuclide of Surabaya environmental samples pattern have been evaluated. The environmental samples were chosen randomly at 12 locations. The environment samples were water (fresh, estuary and coastal), sediment, eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solms, Mangrove (Rhizophora stylosa), (Moolgarda delicatus) fish and (Johnius (Johnieops) borneensis) (Sharpnose hammer croaker) fish. The water sample was evaporated; the sediment sample was dried and ground; the biotic samples was burnt at the temperature 500 °C ; The gross β measurement using GM detector and the radionuclides has been identified by γ spectrometer. From the investigation results could be concluded that the natural radioactivity of environmental samples was very low. gross-β of water samples were lower than the threshold value of local government regulation of Surabaya no: 2 year 2004 (1 Bq/L). The distribution of gross-β activity of eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solms was higher than the other biotic, water and sediment samples as well as the accumulation of radionuclides in the water organism was taken place. The result of identification using γ spectrometer has detected 7 of radionuclides, i.e 210 Pb, 212 Pb, 214 Pb, 208 Tl, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, and 40 K in all sample. The distribution factor of sediment F D was less than bioaccumulation factor of biotic F B and it indicates that there the radionuclide accumulation migration follows the pattern of water - sediment - biotic sample. (author)

  3. Opportunities and Challenges of Linking Scientific Core Samples to the Geoscience Data Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noren, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Core samples generated in scientific drilling and coring are critical for the advancement of the Earth Sciences. The scientific themes enabled by analysis of these samples are diverse, and include plate tectonics, ocean circulation, Earth-life system interactions (paleoclimate, paleobiology, paleoanthropology), Critical Zone processes, geothermal systems, deep biosphere, and many others, and substantial resources are invested in their collection and analysis. Linking core samples to researchers, datasets, publications, and funding agencies through registration of globally unique identifiers such as International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) offers great potential for advancing several frontiers. These include maximizing sample discoverability, access, reuse, and return on investment; a means for credit to researchers; and documentation of project outputs to funding agencies. Thousands of kilometers of core samples and billions of derivative subsamples have been generated through thousands of investigators' projects, yet the vast majority of these samples are curated at only a small number of facilities. These numbers, combined with the substantial similarity in sample types, make core samples a compelling target for IGSN implementation. However, differences between core sample communities and other geoscience disciplines continue to create barriers to implementation. Core samples involve parent-child relationships spanning 8 or more generations, an exponential increase in sample numbers between levels in the hierarchy, concepts related to depth/position in the sample, requirements for associating data derived from core scanning and lithologic description with data derived from subsample analysis, and publications based on tens of thousands of co-registered scan data points and thousands of analyses of subsamples. These characteristics require specialized resources for accurate and consistent assignment of IGSNs, and a community of practice to establish norms

  4. Automatic optimization of core loading patterns to maximize cycle energy production within operational constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.H.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to automatically determine the core loading pattern which minimizes fuel cycle costs for a pressurized water reactor. Equating fuel cycle cost minimization with core reactivity maximization, the objective is to determine the loading pattern which maximizes core reactivity at end-of-cycle while satisfying the power peaking constraint throughout the cycle and region average discharge burnup limit. The method utilizes a two-dimensional, coarse mesh, finite difference scheme to evaluate core reactivity and fluxes for an initial reference loading pattern as a function of cycle burnup. First order perturbation theory is applied to determine the effects of assembly shuffling on reactivity, power distribution, and end-of-cycle burnup

  5. Determination of the neutron activation profile of core drill samples by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, D; Boden, S; Sima, O; Stanga, D

    2018-04-01

    This paper provides guidance for determining the neutron activation profile of core drill samples taken from the biological shield of nuclear reactors using gamma spectrometry measurements. Thus, it provides guidance for selecting a model of the right form to fit data and using least squares methods for model fitting. The activity profiles of two core samples taken from the biological shield of a nuclear reactor were determined. The effective activation depth and the total activity of core samples along with their uncertainties were computed by Monte Carlo simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. TMI-2 core debris grab samples: Examination and analysis: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.W.; Carlson, E.R.; Cook, B.A.; Ploger, S.A.; Carlson, J.O.

    1986-09-01

    Six samples of particulate debris were removed from the TMI-2 core rubble bed during September and October 1983, and five more samples were obtained in March 1984. The samples (up to 174 g each) were obtained at two locations in the core: H8 (center) and E9 (mid-radius). Ten of the eleven samples were examined at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to obtain data on the physical and chemical nature of the debris and the postaccident condition of the core. Portions of the samples also were subjected to differential thermal analysis at Rockwell Hanford Operations and metallurgical and chemical examinations at Argonne National Laboratories. This report presents results of the examination of the core debris grab samples, including physical, metallurgical, chemical, and radiochemical analyses. The results indicate that temperatures in the core reached at least 3100 K during the TMI-2 accident, fuel melting and significant mixing of core structural material occurred, and large fractions of some radionuclides (e.g., 90 Sr and 144 Ce) were retained in the core

  7. Development of a VVER-1000 core loading pattern optimization program based on perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Mohammad; Vosoughi, Naser

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We use perturbation theory to find an optimum fuel loading pattern in a VVER-1000. ► We provide a software for in-core fuel management optimization. ► We consider two objectives for our method (perturbation theory). ► We show that perturbation theory method is very fast and accurate for optimization. - Abstract: In-core nuclear fuel management is one of the most important concerns in the design of nuclear reactors. Two main goals in core fuel loading pattern design optimization are maximizing the core effective multiplication factor in order to extract the maximum energy, and keeping the local power peaking factor lower than a predetermined value to maintain the fuel integrity. Because of the numerous possible patterns of fuel assemblies in the reactor core, finding the best configuration is so important and challenging. Different techniques for optimization of fuel loading pattern in the reactor core have been introduced by now. In this study, a software is programmed in C language to find an order of the fuel loading pattern of a VVER-1000 reactor core using the perturbation theory. Our optimization method is based on minimizing the radial power peaking factor. The optimization process launches by considering an initial loading pattern and the specifications of the fuel assemblies which are given as the input of the software. The results on a typical VVER-1000 reactor reveal that the method could reach to a pattern with an allowed radial power peaking factor and increases the cycle length 1.1 days, as well.

  8. Operability test procedure for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System Exhausters 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WSaldo, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a procedure for performing operability testing of the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System Exhausters 3 ampersand 4. Upon completion of testing activities an operability testing report will be issued

  9. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through April 1999

  10. Engineering Task Plan to Expand the Environmental Operational Envelope of Core Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan authorizes the development of an Alternative Generation and Analysis (AGA). The AGA will determine how to expand the environmental operating envelope during core sampling operations

  11. Measurement and analysis of reactivity worth of 237Np sample in cores of TCA and FCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mori, Takamasa; Okajima, Shigeaki; Tani, Kazuhiro; Suzaki, Takenori; Saito, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity worth of 22.87 grams of 237 Np oxide sample was measured and analyzed in seven uranium cores in the Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) and two uranium cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The TCA cores provided a systematic variation in the neutron spectrum between the thermal and resonance energy regions. The FCA cores, XXI and XXV, provided a hard neutron spectrum of the fast reactor and a soft one of the resonance energy region, respectively. Analyses were carried out using the JENDL-3.3 nuclear data library with a Monte Carlo method for the TCA cores and a deterministic method for the FCA cores. The ratios of calculated to experimental (C/E) reactivity worth were between 0.97 and 0.91, and showed no apparent dependence on the neutron spectrum. (author)

  12. SAFOD Phase III Core Sampling and Data Management at the Gulf Coast Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lockner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFODproject is yielding new insight into the San Andreas Fault (Zoback et al., 2010; Zoback et al., this issue. SAFOD drilling started in 2002 with a pilot hole, and proceeded with three phrases of drilling and coring during the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2007 (Fig. 1. One key component of theproject is curation, sampling, and documentation of SAFOD core usage at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program’s (IODP Gulf Coast Repository (GCR at Texas A&M University. We present here the milestones accomplished over the past two years of sampling Phase III core at the GCR.

  13. A core-halo pattern of entropy creation in gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Andrew J.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a kinetic theory model of gravitational collapse due to a small perturbation. Solving the relevant equations yields a pattern of entropy destruction in a spherical core around the perturbation, and entropy creation in a surrounding halo. This indicates collisional "de-relaxation" in the core, and collisional relaxation in the halo. Core-halo patterns are ubiquitous in the astrophysics of gravitational collapse, and are found here without any of the prior assumptions of such a pattern usually made in analytical models. Motivated by this analysis, the paper outlines a possible scheme for identifying structure formation in a set of observations or a simulation. This scheme involves a choice of coarse-graining scale appropriate to the structure under consideration, and might aid exploration of hierarchical structure formation, supplementing the usual density-based methods for highlighting astrophysical and cosmological structure at various scales.

  14. Distribution Coeficients (Kd) Generated From A Core Sample Collected From The Saltstone Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-01-01

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K d ), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and Crawford

  15. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and

  16. Genetic algorithm for the optimization of the loading pattern for reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Sheng; Hu Yongming; zheng Wenxiang

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses the application of a genetic algorithm to the optimization of the loading pattern for in-core fuel management with the NP characteristics. The algorithm develops a matrix model for the fuel assembly loading pattern. The burnable poisons matrix was assigned randomly considering the distributed nature of the poisons. A method based on the traveling salesman problem was used to solve the problem. A integrated code for in-core fuel management was formed by combining this code with a reactor physics code

  17. spsann - optimization of sample patterns using spatial simulated annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Rosa, Alessandro; Heuvelink, Gerard; Vasques, Gustavo; Anjos, Lúcia

    2015-04-01

    There are many algorithms and computer programs to optimize sample patterns, some private and others publicly available. A few have only been presented in scientific articles and text books. This dispersion and somewhat poor availability is holds back to their wider adoption and further development. We introduce spsann, a new R-package for the optimization of sample patterns using spatial simulated annealing. R is the most popular environment for data processing and analysis. Spatial simulated annealing is a well known method with widespread use to solve optimization problems in the soil and geo-sciences. This is mainly due to its robustness against local optima and easiness of implementation. spsann offers many optimizing criteria for sampling for variogram estimation (number of points or point-pairs per lag distance class - PPL), trend estimation (association/correlation and marginal distribution of the covariates - ACDC), and spatial interpolation (mean squared shortest distance - MSSD). spsann also includes the mean or maximum universal kriging variance (MUKV) as an optimizing criterion, which is used when the model of spatial variation is known. PPL, ACDC and MSSD were combined (PAN) for sampling when we are ignorant about the model of spatial variation. spsann solves this multi-objective optimization problem scaling the objective function values using their maximum absolute value or the mean value computed over 1000 random samples. Scaled values are aggregated using the weighted sum method. A graphical display allows to follow how the sample pattern is being perturbed during the optimization, as well as the evolution of its energy state. It is possible to start perturbing many points and exponentially reduce the number of perturbed points. The maximum perturbation distance reduces linearly with the number of iterations. The acceptance probability also reduces exponentially with the number of iterations. R is memory hungry and spatial simulated annealing is a

  18. Tank 241-TX-113 rotary mode core sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCain, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identities characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for push mode core samples from tank 241-TX-113 (TX-113). The Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis document identities Retrieval, Pretreatment and Immobilization as an issue that applies to tank TX-113. As a result, a 150 gram composite of solids shall be made and archived for that program. This tank is not on a Watch List

  19. High-level core sample x-ray imaging at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.R.; Keve, J.K.

    1995-10-01

    Waste tank sampling of radioactive high-level waste is required for continued operations, waste characterization, and site safety. Hanford Site tank farms consist of 28 double-shell and 149 single-shell underground storage tanks. The single shell tanks are out-of-service an no longer receive liquid waste. Core samples of salt cake and sludge waste are remotely obtained using truck-mounted, core drill platforms. Samples are recovered from tanks through a 2.25 inch (in.) drill pipe in 26-in. steel tubes, 1.5 in. diameter. Drilling parameters vary with different waste types. Because sample recovery has been marginal an inadequate at times, a system was needed to provide drill truck operators with ''real-time feedback'' about the physical condition of the sample and the percent recovery, prior to making nuclear assay measurements and characterizations at the analytical laboratory. The Westinghouse Hanford Company conducted proof-of-principal radiographic testing to verify the feasibility of a proposed imaging system. Tests were conducted using an iridium 192 radiography source to determine the effects of high radiation on image quality. The tests concluded that samplers with a dose rate in excess of 5000 R/hr could be imaged with only a slight loss of image quality and samples less than 1000 R/hr have virtually no effect on image quality. The Mobile Core Sample X-Ray Examination System, a portable vendor-engineered assembly, has components uniquely configured to produce a real-time radiographic system suitable for safely examining radioactive tank core segments collected at the Hanford Site. The radiographic region of interest extends from the bottom (valve) of the sampler upward 19 to 20 in. The purpose of the Mobile Core Sample X-Ray Examination System is to examine the physical contents of core samples after removal from the tank and prior to placement in an onsite transfer cask

  20. Test of Tree Core Sampling for Screening of Toxic Elements in Soils from a Norwegian Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Rein, Arno; Legind, Charlotte Nielsen

    2011-01-01

    Tree core samples have been used to delineate organic subsurface plumes. In 2009 and 2010, samples were taken at trees growing on a former dump site in Norway and analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn). Concentrations in wood were in averag...

  1. Tank 241-AZ-102 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AZ-102. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the characteristics of the contents of 241-AZ-102. Push mode core samples will be obtained from risers 15C and 24A to provide sufficient material for the chemical analyses and tests required to satisfy these data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory will extrude core samples, composite the liquids and solids, perform chemical analyses, and provide subsamples to the Process Chemistry Laboratory. The Process Chemistry Laboratory will prepare test plans and perform process tests to evaluate the behavior of the 241-AZ-102 waste undergoing the retrieval and treatment scenarios defined in the applicable DQOs. Requirements for analyses of samples originating in the process tests will be documented in the corresponding test plan

  2. Characteristic statistic algorithm (CSA) for in-core loading pattern optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhihong; Hu Yongming; Shi Gong

    2007-01-01

    To solve the problem of PWR in-core loading pattern optimization, a more suitable global optimization algorithm, i.e., Characteristic statistic algorithm (CSA), is used. The searching process of this algorithm and how to apply it to this problem are presented. Loading pattern optimization code SCYCLE is developed. Two different problems on real PWR models are calculated and the results are compared with other algorithms. It is shown that SCYCLE has high efficiency and good global performance on this problem. (authors)

  3. Core belief content examined in a large sample of patients using online cognitive behaviour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millings, Abigail; Carnelley, Katherine B

    2015-11-01

    Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy provides a unique opportunity to collect and analyse data regarding the idiosyncratic content of people's core beliefs about the self, others and the world. 'Beating the Blues' users recorded a core belief derived through the downward arrow technique. Core beliefs from 1813 mental health patients were coded into 10 categories. The most common were global self-evaluation, attachment, and competence. Women were more likely, and men were less likely (than chance), to provide an attachment-related core belief; and men were more likely, and women less likely, to provide a self-competence-related core belief. This may be linked to gender differences in sources of self-esteem. Those who were suffering from anxiety were more likely to provide power- and control-themed core beliefs and less likely to provide attachment core beliefs than chance. Finally, those who had thoughts of suicide in the preceding week reported less competence themed core beliefs and more global self-evaluation (e.g., 'I am useless') core beliefs than chance. Concurrent symptom level was not available. The sample was not nationally representative, and featured programme completers only. Men and women may focus on different core beliefs in the context of CBT. Those suffering anxiety may need a therapeutic focus on power and control. A complete rejection of the self (not just within one domain, such as competence) may be linked to thoughts of suicide. Future research should examine how individual differences and symptom severity influence core beliefs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Core sample descriptions and summary logs of six wells within the Hanford Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.K.; Hanson, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    From February through May, 1976, selected sites on the Hanford Reservation were core drilled. These six holes provide a loose network of observation holes traversing the reservation in an east--west direction between the Columbia River and State Highway 240. This program represents the first attempt to recover cores from the glaciofluviatile material and Ringold Formation beneath the Hanford Reservation. This contains three parts: an introductory text describing the method of inspection and format for written description; summary logs that illustrate in condensed form the rocks penetrated by the wells drilled; and the detailed written descriptions of core samples. 3 figures, 7 tables

  5. Characterization of the first core sample of neutralized current acid waste from double-shell tank 101-AZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, M.E.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    In FY 1989, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) successfully obtained four core samples (totaling seven segments) of neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) from double-shell tanks (DSTs) 101-AZ and 102-AZ. A segment was a 19-in.-long and 1-in.-diameter cylindrical sample of waste. A core sample consisted of enough 19-in.-long segments to obtain the waste of interest. Three core samples were obtained from DST 101-AZ and one core sample from DST 102-AZ. Two DST 101-AZ core samples consisted of two segments per core, and the third core sample consisted of only one segment. The third core consisted of the solids from the bottom of the tank and was used to determine the relative abrasiveness of this NCAW. The DST 102-AZ core sample consisted of two segments. The core samples were transported to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), where the waste was extruded from its sampler and extensively characterized. A characterization plan was followed that simulated the processing of the NCAW samples through retrieval, pretreatment and vitrification process steps. Physical, rheological, chemical and radiochemical properties were measured throughout the process steps. The characterization of the first core sample from DST 101-AZ was completed, and the results are provided in this report. The results for the other core characterizations will be reported in future reports. 3 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs

  6. Experimental Investigation of Crack Extension Patterns in Hydraulic Fracturing with Shale, Sandstone and Granite Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is an important method of reservoir stimulation in the exploitation of geothermal resources, and conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources. In this article, hydraulic fracturing experiments with shale, sandstone cores (from southern Sichuan Basin, and granite cores (from Inner Mongolia were conducted to investigate the different hydraulic fracture extension patterns in these three reservoir rocks. The different reactions between reservoir lithology and pump pressure can be reflected by the pump pressure monitoring curves of hydraulic fracture experiments. An X-ray computer tomography (CT scanner was employed to obtain the spatial distribution of hydraulic fractures in fractured shale, sandstone, and granite cores. From the microscopic and macroscopic observation of hydraulic fractures, different extension patterns of the hydraulic fracture can be analyzed. In fractured sandstone, symmetrical hydraulic fracture morphology could be formed, while some micro cracks were also induced near the injection hole. Although the macroscopic cracks in fractured granite cores are barely observed by naked eye, the results of X-ray CT scanning obviously show the morphology of hydraulic fractures. It is indicated that the typical bedding planes well developed in shale formation play an important role in the propagation of hydraulic fractures in shale cores. The results also demonstrated that heterogeneity influenced the pathway of the hydraulic fracture in granite cores.

  7. The Effect of Core Stability Training on Functional Movement Patterns in Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherian, Sajad; Ghasempoor, Khodayar; Rahnama, Nader; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2018-02-06

    Pre-participation examinations are the standard approach for assessing poor movement quality that would increase musculoskeletal injury risk. However, little is known about how core stability influences functional movement patterns. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 8-week core stability program on functional movement patterns in collegiate athletes. The secondary purpose was to determine if the core stability training program would be more effective in those with worse movement quality (i.e. ≤14 baseline FMS score). Quasi-experimental design. Athletic Training Facility. One-hundred collegiate athletes. Functional movement patterns included the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), Lateral step down (LSD) and Y balance test (YBT) and were assessed before and after the 8-week program. Participants were placed into 1 of the 2 groups: intervention and control. The intervention group was required to complete a core stability training program that met 3 times per week for 8-week. Significant group x time interactions demonstrated improvements in FMS, LSD and YBT scores in the experimental group relative to the control group (pcore stability training program enhances functional movement patterns and dynamic postural control in collegiate athletes. The benefits are more pronounced in collegiate athletes with poor movement quality.

  8. Using an ontology pattern stack to engineer a core ontology of Accounting Information Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blums, Ivar; Weigand, Hans

    Although the field of Accounting Information Systems (AIS) has a long tradition, there is still a lack of a widely adopted conceptualization. In this paper, The UFO ontology patterns are regarded for application by analogy and extension in the engineering of a core ontology for AIS. The new IASB

  9. Analysis of fuel management pattern of research reactor core of the MTR type design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lily Suparlina; Tukiran Surbakti

    2014-01-01

    Research reactor core design needs neutronics parameter calculation use computer codes. Research reactor MTR type is very interested because can be used as research and also a radioisotope production. The research reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 years old. Therefore, it is needed to design a new research reactor as a compact core. Recent research reactor core is not enough to meet criteria acceptance in the UCD which already determined namely thermal neutron flux in the core is 1.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s. so that it is necessary to be redesign the alternative core design. The new research reactor design is a MTR type with 5x5 configuration core, uses U9Mo-Al fuel, 70 cm of high and uses two certainly fuel management pattern. The aim of this research is to achieve neutron flux in the core to meet the criteria acceptance in the UCD. Calculation is done by using WIMSD-B, Batan-FUEL and Batan-3DIFF codes. The neutronic parameters to be achieved by this calculation are the power level of 50 MW thermal and core cycle of 20 days. The neutronics parameter calculation is done for new U-9Mo-Al fuel with variation of densities.The result of calculation showed that the fresh core with 5x5 configuration, 360 gram, 390 gram and 450 gram of fuel loadings have meet safety margin and acceptance criteria in the UCD at the thermal neutron flux is more then 1.0 x 10 15 n/cm 2 s. But for equilibrium core is only the 450 gram of loading meet the acceptance criteria. (author)

  10. On Input Vector Representation for the SVR model of Reactor Core Loading Pattern Critical Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.

    2008-01-01

    Determination and optimization of reactor core loading pattern is an important factor in nuclear power plant operation. The goal is to minimize the amount of enriched uranium (fresh fuel) and burnable absorbers placed in the core, while maintaining nuclear power plant operational and safety characteristics. The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. Recently, we proposed a new method for fast loading pattern evaluation based on general robust regression model relying on the state of the art research in the field of machine learning. We employed Support Vector Regression (SVR) technique. SVR is a supervised learning method in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The preliminary tests revealed a good potential of the SVR method application for fast and accurate reactor core loading pattern evaluation. However, some aspects of model development are still unresolved. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to conduct additional tests and analyses required for full clarification of the SVR applicability for loading pattern evaluation. We focused our attention on the parameters defining input vector, primarily its structure and complexity, and parameters defining kernel functions. All the tests were conducted on the NPP Krsko reactor core, using MCRAC code for the calculation of reactor core loading pattern critical parameters. The tested input vector structures did not influence the accuracy of the models suggesting that the initially tested input vector, consisted of the number of IFBAs and the k-inf at the beginning of the cycle, is adequate. The influence of kernel function specific parameters (σ for RBF kernel

  11. Using tree core samples to monitor natural attenuation and plume distribution after a PCE spill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten; Burken, J.; Machackova, J.

    2008-01-01

    The potential of using tree core samples to detect and monitor natural attenuation of perchloroethene (PCE) in groundwater was investigated at a PCE-contaminated site. In the area of the known plume with PCE concentrations between 0.004 and >40 mg/L, cores were collected from tree trunks at a hei...... at a height of about 1 m above ground surface. Tree sampling of the site was completed in under six hours. Chlorinated ethenes were analyzed by headspace GC/MS. PCE (0.001 to 7 mg/kg) and natural attenuation products, TCE (...

  12. Benthic foraminiferal census data from Mobile Bay, Alabama--counts of surface samples and box cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richwine, Kathryn A.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken in order to understand recent environmental change in Mobile Bay, Alabama. For this study a series of surface sediment and box core samples was collected. The surface benthic foraminiferal data provide the modern baseline conditions of the bay and can be used as a reference for changing paleoenvironmental parameters recorded in the box cores. The 14 sampling locations were chosen in the bay to cover the wide diversity of fluvial and marine-influenced environments on both sides of the shipping channel.

  13. Two-dimensional T2 distribution mapping in rock core plugs with optimal k-space sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-07-01

    Spin-echo single point imaging has been employed for 1D T(2) distribution mapping, but a simple extension to 2D is challenging since the time increase is n fold, where n is the number of pixels in the second dimension. Nevertheless 2D T(2) mapping in fluid saturated rock core plugs is highly desirable because the bedding plane structure in rocks often results in different pore properties within the sample. The acquisition time can be improved by undersampling k-space. The cylindrical shape of rock core plugs yields well defined intensity distributions in k-space that may be efficiently determined by new k-space sampling patterns that are developed in this work. These patterns acquire 22.2% and 11.7% of the k-space data points. Companion density images may be employed, in a keyhole imaging sense, to improve image quality. T(2) weighted images are fit to extract T(2) distributions, pixel by pixel, employing an inverse Laplace transform. Images reconstructed with compressed sensing, with similar acceleration factors, are also presented. The results show that restricted k-space sampling, in this application, provides high quality results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Drilling induced damage of core samples. Evidences from laboratory testing and numerical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanaro, Flavio

    2008-01-01

    Extensive sample testing in uniaxial and Brazilian test conditions were carried out for the Shobasama and MIU Research Laboratory Site (Gifu Pref., Japan). The compressive and tensile strength of the samples was observed to be negatively correlated to the in-situ stress components. Such correlation was interpreted as stress-release induced sample damage. Similar stress conditions were then numerically simulated by means of the BEM-DDM code FRACOD 2D in plane strain conditions. This method allows for explicitly consider the influence of newly initiated or propagating fractures on the stress field and deformation of the core during drilling process. The models show that already at moderate stress levels some fracturing of the core during drilling might occur leading to reduced laboratory strength of the samples. Sample damage maps were produced independently from the laboratory test results and from the numerical models and show good agreement with each other. (author)

  15. Baseline Design Compliance Matrix for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LECHELT, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the design compliance matrix (DCM) is to provide a single-source document of all design requirements associated with the fifteen subsystems that make up the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) system. It is intended to be the baseline requirement document for the RMCS system and to be used in governing all future design and design verification activities associated with it. This document is the DCM for the RMCS system used on Hanford single-shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This includes the Exhauster System, Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks, Universal Sampling System, Diesel Generator System, Distribution Trailer, X-Ray Cart System, Breathing Air Compressor, Nitrogen Supply Trailer, Casks and Cask Truck, Service Trailer, Core Sampling Riser Equipment, Core Sampling Support Trucks, Foot Clamp, Ramps and Platforms and Purged Camera System. Excluded items are tools such as light plants and light stands. Other items such as the breather inlet filter are covered by a different design baseline. In this case, the inlet breather filter is covered by the Tank Farms Design Compliance Matrix

  16. Comparison of tree coring and soil gas sampling for screening of contaminated sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Stalder, Marcel; Riis, Charlotte

    and then identify high risk areas. The uptake of BTEX into trees varies to a greater extent with the tree species and the site conditions than chlorinated solvents, which lead to greater uncertainty. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the methods supplement each other. Based on results......Site characterization is often time consuming and a financial burden for the site owners, which raises a demand for rapid and inexpensive (pre)screening methods. Phytoscreening by tree coring has shown to be a useful tool to detect subsurface contamination, especially of chlorinated solvents...... suitable as initial screening methods for site characterization. The aim of this study is to compare tree coring and soil gas sampling to evaluate to which extent tree coring may supplement or substitute soil gas sampling as a site contaminant screening tool. And where both methods are feasible, evaluate...

  17. Freeze core sampling to validate time-lapse resistivity monitoring of the hyporheic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran, Laura; Hughes, Brian; Nyquist, Jonathan; Ryan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A freeze core sampler was used to characterize hyporheic zone storage during a stream tracer test. The pore water from the frozen core showed tracer lingered in the hyporheic zone after the tracer had returned to background concentration in collocated well samples. These results confirmed evidence of lingering subsurface tracer seen in time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs. The pore water exhibited brine exclusion (ion concentrations in ice lower than source water) in a sediment matrix, despite the fast freezing time. Although freeze core sampling provided qualitative evidence of lingering tracer, it proved difficult to quantify tracer concentration because the amount of brine exclusion during freezing could not be accurately determined. Nonetheless, the additional evidence for lingering tracer supports using time-lapse resistivity to detect regions of low fluid mobility within the hyporheic zone that can act as chemically reactive zones of importance in stream health. © 2012, The Author(s). GroundWater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  18. Diagnose Test-Taker's Profile in Terms of Core Profile Patterns: Principal Component (PC) vs. Profile Analysis via MDS (PAMS) Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kang; Davison, Mark L.

    A study was conducted to examine how principal components analysis (PCA) and Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) can be used to diagnose individuals observed score profiles in terms of core profile patterns identified by each method. The standardization sample from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition…

  19. Decontamination and concrete core sampling by teleoperated robot at Fukushima Daiichi reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masaru; Onitsuka, Hironori; Shimonabe, Noriaki; Fujita, Jun; Matsumura, Takumi; Okumura, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    For decommissioning of Fukushima daiichi nuclear power station, reduction of the dose equivalent rates inside the reactor buildings is an important issue. Concrete core sampling from the buildings to investigate the contamination is necessary for study about effective decontamination. However, dose rate inside the reactor buildings is very high. For example, dose rate of 1st floor on the Unit 1 is 1.2 - 1820 [mSv / h], the Unit 2 is 2.5 - 220 [mSv / h] and Unit 3 is 2.2 - 4780 [mSv / h]. So it is difficult for workers to work long hours. Therefore, a teleoperated robot, named 'MHI-MEISTeR (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries - Maintenance Equipment Integrated System of Telecontrol Robot)', has been developed to conduct operations like concrete core samples from the reactor buildings. Actually, some concrete core samples from Fukushima daiichi were taken by MHI-MEISTeR. In addition, MHI-MEISTeR is designed as a versatile robot, and so it can conduct suction / blast decontamination works as well as concrete core sampling. The above operations were performed by MHI-MEISTeR in Fukushima daiichi nuclear power station. (author)

  20. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through June 1999. A decontamination factor for the RMCS exhauster filter housing is calculated based on operation data

  1. Operability test report for rotary mode core sampling system number 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the successful completion of operability testing for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system number-sign 3. The Report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-174), exception resolutions, data sheets, and a test report summary

  2. Design/Operations review of core sampling trucks and associated equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, H.P.

    1996-01-01

    A systematic review of the design and operations of the core sampling trucks was commissioned by Characterization Equipment Engineering of the Westinghouse Hanford Company in October 1995. The review team reviewed the design documents, specifications, operating procedure, training manuals and safety analysis reports. The review process, findings and corrective actions are summarized in this supporting document

  3. Structural evaluation for the core sampling trucks, RMCS operations, 200 Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This report evaluates the structural adequacy and the integrity of the existing core sampling trucks to withstand impact should the trucks drop off the ramp, either onto the soft ground or onto a non-yielding surface due to operational error, wind, or earthquake. The report also addresses if the allowable tank dome load will be exceeded by the addition of the impact load

  4. A contact method of determination of thermophysical properties of rocks from core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavril'ev, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The zone of the action of thermal disturbances around a circular heat source on the surface of a semi-infinite body is estimated with the aim of using contact methods of determination of thermophysical properties of materials from core samples

  5. Environmental gamma-ray measurements using in situ and core sampling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Kerr, G.D.; Perdue, P.T.; Abdullah, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Dose rates from natural radionuclides and 137 Cs in soils of the Oak Ridge area have been determined from in situ and core sample measurements. In situ γ-ray measurements were made with a transportable spectrometer. A tape of spectral data and a soil core sample from each site were returned to ORNL for further analysis. Information on soil composition, density and moisture content and on the distribution of cesium in the soil was obtained from the core samples. In situ spectra were analyzed by a computer program which identified and assigned energies to peaks, integrated the areas under the peaks, and calculated radionuclide concentrations based on a uniform distribution in the soil. The assumption of a uniform distribution was adequate only for natural radionuclides, but simple corrections can be made to the computer calculations for man-made radionuclides distributed on the surface or exponentially in the soil. For 137 Cs a correction was used based on an exponential function fitted to the distribution measured in core samples. At typical sites in Oak Ridge, the dose rate determined from these measurements was about 5 μrad/hr. (author)

  6. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-01-01

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples

  7. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  8. Tank 241-SX-105 rotary mode core sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1998-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for rotary mode core samples from tank 241-SX-105 (SX-105). It is written in accordance with Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995) and Memorandum of Understanding for the Organic Complexant Safety Issue Data Requirements (Schreiber 1997a). Vapor screening issues apply as well, but are outside the scope of this SAP. A physical profile prediction based on waste fill history and previous sampling information is provided in Appendix A. Prior to core sampling, the dome space (below the riser) shall be measured for the presence of flammable gases. The measurement shall be taken from within the dome space and the data reported as a percentage of the lower flammability limit (LFL). The results shall be transmitted to the tank coordinator within ten working days of the sampling event (Schreiber 1997b). If the results are above 25 percent of the LFL when analyzing by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or gas-specific monitoring gauges or above 10% of the LFL when analyzing with a combustible gas meter, the necessity for recurring sampling for flammable gas concentration and the frequency of such sampling will be determined by the Flammable Gas Safety Project. Any additional vapor sampling is not within the scope of this SAP

  9. Generalized perturbation theory error control within PWR core-loading pattern optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbriani, J.S.; Turinsky, P.J.; Kropaczek, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The fuel management optimization code FORMOSA-P has been developed to determine the family of near-optimum loading patterns for PWR reactors. The code couples the optimization technique of simulated annealing (SA) with a generalized perturbation theory (GPT) model for evaluating core physics characteristics. To ensure the accuracy of the GPT predictions, as well as to maximize the efficient of the SA search, a GPT error control method has been developed

  10. Thermal modeling of core sampling in flammable gas waste tanks. Part 2: Rotary-mode sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Poston, D.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Witwer, K.S.

    1997-01-01

    The radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks at Hanford site includes mixtures of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite with organic compounds. The waste can produce undesired violent exothermic reactions when heated locally during the rotary-mode sampling. Experiments are performed varying the downward force at a maximum rotational speed of 55 rpm and minimum nitrogen purge flow of 30 scfm. The rotary drill bit teeth-face temperatures are measured. The waste is simulated with a low thermal conductivity hard material, pumice blocks. A torque meter is used to determine the energy provided to the drill string. The exhaust air-chip temperature as well as drill string and drill bit temperatures and other key operating parameters were recorded. A two-dimensional thermal model is developed. The safe operating conditions were determined for normal operating conditions. A downward force of 750 at 55 rpm and 30 scfm nitrogen purge flow was found to yield acceptable substrate temperatures. The model predicted experimental results reasonably well. Therefore, it could be used to simulate abnormal conditions to develop procedures for safe operations

  11. Safety analysis for push-mode and rotary-mode core sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliken, N.J.; Geschke, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    This safety analysis analyzes using the push-mode core sampling truck in the push-mode and the rotary-mode core sampling trucks in both the push- and rotary-modes to retrieve core samples that, once taken and analyzed, will yield waste characterization data for the hazardous waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Operation of the core sampling trucks in both the push- and rotary-modes was reviewed to determine whether the release of radioactive materials could occur during operation. It was concluded that there are three credible scenarios: a sample spill outside of the tank, a steam release event, and an unfiltered release to the environment during continuous exhauster operation. The probability of a sample spill was found to be 10 -4 /event, the probability of a steam release event was determined to fall in the unlikely range (10 -2 /event to 10 -4 /event), and the probability of an unfiltered release was calculated to be 5 x 10 -3 /year. Typically, events with probabilities of 10 -6 /event or less are not considered to be risk significant, and the consequences usually are not analyzed. The three accident scenarios were analyzed to calculate the dose consequences. It was determined that the steam release event is the bounding accident. The onsite and offsite dose consequences for this event are calculated to be 0.24 Sv (24 rem) and 3.2 x 10 -4 Sv (32 mrem), respectively. These consequences are below the risk acceptance guidelines for an unlikely event, as established in WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual. With the design features and the use of the controls presented in Section 8.0, this operation represents a minimal risk

  12. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: wakana@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  13. Tank 241-SY-101 push mode core sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONNER, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for push mode core samples from tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). It is written in accordance with Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue (Bauer 1998), Low Activity Waste Feed Data Quality Objectives (Wiemers and Miller 1997 and DOE 1998), Data Quality Objectives for TWRS Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (Certa 1998), and the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995). The Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis document (Brown et al. 1998) indicates that these issues apply to tank SY-101 for this sampling event. Brown et al. also identifies high-level waste, regulatory, pretreatment and disposal issues as applicable issues for this tank. However, these issues will not be addressed via this sampling event

  14. Crosshole investigations - physical properties of core samples from boreholes F1 and F2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, K.A.; Carlsten, S.; Olsson, O.

    1987-06-01

    The geology and physical properties have been studied of roughly 100 core samples from the boreholes F1 and F2 drilled at the Crosshole site, located at the 360 m level in the Stripa mine. The granitic rock has been divided into two classes: Fracture zones (also called major units) and a rock mass which is relatively undeformed. Samples from the major units have lower resistivity, higher porosity and dielectric constant than the samples from the less deformed rock mass. The electrical properties of the core samples have been measured over a frequency interval ranging from 1 Hz to 70 MHz. The conductivity of the samples increases with frequency, approximately with the frequency raised to the power 0.38. The dielectric constant decreases with frequency but is essentially constant above 3 MHz. These results show that the Hanai-Bruggeman equation can be used to describe the electrical bulk properties of the Stripa granite. The electrical conductivity of the samples is well correlated to the water content of the samples. The granite has a small contents of electrically conductive minerals which could influence the electrical bulk properties. (orig.)

  15. Maternal genealogical patterns of chicken breeds sampled in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyimo, C M; Weigend, A; Msoffe, P L; Hocking, P M; Simianer, H; Weigend, S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the maternal genealogical pattern of chicken breeds sampled in Europe. Sequence polymorphisms of 1256 chickens of the hypervariable region (D-loop) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were used. Median-joining networks were constructed to establish evolutionary relationships among mtDNA haplotypes of chickens, which included a wide range of breeds with different origin and history. Chicken breeds which have had their roots in Europe for more than 3000 years were categorized by their founding regions, encompassing Mediterranean type, East European type and Northwest European type. Breeds which were introduced to Europe from Asia since the mid-19th century were classified as Asian type, and breeds based on crossbreeding between Asian breeds and European breeds were classified as Intermediate type. The last group, Game birds, included fighting birds from Asia. The classification of mtDNA haplotypes was based on Liu et al.'s (2006) nomenclature. Haplogroup E was the predominant clade among the European chicken breeds. The results showed, on average, the highest number of haplotypes, highest haplotype diversity, and highest nucleotide diversity for Asian type breeds, followed by Intermediate type chickens. East European and Northwest European breeds had lower haplotype and nucleotide diversity compared to Mediterranean, Intermediate, Game and Asian type breeds. Results of our study support earlier findings that chicken breeds sampled in Europe have their roots in the Indian subcontinent and East Asia. This is consistent with historical and archaeological evidence of chicken migration routes to Europe. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  16. Engineering task plan for the development, fabrication and installation of rotary mode core sample truck bellows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Rotary Mode Core Sampling Trucks (RMSCTs) currently use a multi-sectioned bellows between the grapple box and the quill rod to compensate for drill head motion and to provide a path for purge gas. The current bellows, which is detailed on drawing H-2-690059, is expensive to procure, has a lengthy procurement cycle, and is prone to failure. Therefore, a task has been identified to design, fabricate, and install a replacement bellows. This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) is the management plan document for accomplishing the identified tasks. Any changes in scope of the ETP shall require formal direction by the Characterization Engineering manager. This document shall also be considered the work planning document for developmental control per Development Control Requirements (HNF 1999a). This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) is the management plan document for accomplishing the design, fabrication, and installation of a replacement bellows assembly for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling Trucks 3 and 4 (RMCST)

  17. HYACE - a novel autoclave coring equipment for systematic offshore gashydrate sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, H.; Hohnberg, H.J.; Reinelt, R. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Schiffs- und Meerestechnik, Fachgebiet Maritime Technik

    1997-12-31

    HYACE, the acronym for hydrate autoclave coring equipment system, is a research and development project sponsored by the European Union`s Marine Science and Technology Programme MAST. The project was to have started in the fourth quarter of 1997 and is to last 30 months. The main activities of the project will be in the development and prototype testing of an innovative down-hole controlled autoclave coring system. This system will be designed to sample marine sediments at extended down-hole conditions maintaining as many parameters constant as possible. In general terms, the main aim of the project is to contribute to systematic ground truthing of a necessarily ephemeral phenomenon of growing global significance: sampling and analysis of gas hydrates in their natural environment. (MSK)

  18. Tank 241-AY-101 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AY-101. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the characteristics of the contents of 241-AY-101 required to satisfy ''Data Quality Objectives For RPP Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T Is An Appropriate Feed Source For High-Level Waste Feed Batch X(HLW DQO)' (Nguyen 1999a), ''Data Quality Objectives For TWRS Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T Is An Appropriate Feed Source For Low-Activity Waste Feed Butch X (LAW DQO) (Nguyen 1999b)'', ''Low Activity Waste and High-Level Waste Feed Data Quality Objectives (L and H DQO)'' (Patello et al. 1999), and ''Characterization Data Needs for Development, Design, and Operation of Retrieval Equipment Developed through the Data Quality Objective Process (Equipment DQO)'' (Bloom 1996). Special instructions regarding support to the LAW and HLW DQOs are provided by Baldwin (1999). Push mode core samples will be obtained from risers 15G and 150 to provide sufficient material for the chemical analyses and tests required to satisfy these data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory will extrude core samples; composite the liquids and solids; perform chemical analyses on composite and segment samples; archive half-segment samples; and provide sub-samples to the Process Chemistry Laboratory. The Process Chemistry Laboratory will prepare test plans and perform process tests to evaluate the behavior of the 241-AY-101 waste undergoing the retrieval and treatment scenarios defined in the applicable DQOs. Requirements for analyses of samples originating in the process tests will be documented in the corresponding test plans and are not within the scope of this SAP

  19. Operability test report for core sample truck number one flammable gas modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report primarily consists of the original test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to Core Sample Truck No. One. Included are exceptions, resolutions, comments, and test results. This report consists of the original, completed, test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to the Push Mode Core Sample Truck No. 1. Prior to the Acceptance/Operability test the truck No. 1 operations procedure (TO-080-503) was revised to be more consistent with the other core sample truck procedures and to include operational steps/instructions for the SR weather cover pressurization system. A draft copy of the operations procedure was used to perform the Operability Test Procedure (OTP). A Document Acceptance Review Form is included with this report (last page) indicating the draft status of the operations procedure during the OTP. During the OTP 11 test exceptions were encountered. Of these exceptions four were determined to affect Acceptance Criteria as listed in the OTP, Section 4.7 ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

  20. Tank 241-AY-101 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AY-101. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the characteristics of the contents of 241-AY-101 required to satisfy Data Quality Objectives For RPP Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T Is An Appropriate Feed Source For High-Level Waste Feed Batch X(HLW DQO) (Nguyen 1999a), Data Quality Objectives For TWRS Privatization Phase I : Confirm Tank T Is An Appropriate Feed Source For Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (LAW DQO) (Nguyen 1999b), Low Activity Waste and High-Level Waste Feed Data Quality Objectives (L and H DQO) (Patello et al. 1999), and Characterization Data Needs for Development, Design, and Operation of Retrieval Equipment Developed through the Data Quality Objective Process (Equipment DQO) (Bloom 1996). Special instructions regarding support to the LAW and HLW DQOs are provided by Baldwin (1999). Push mode core samples will be obtained from risers 15G and 150 to provide sufficient material for the chemical analyses and tests required to satisfy these data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory will extrude core samples; composite the liquids and solids; perform chemical analyses on composite and segment samples; archive half-segment samples; and provide subsamples to the Process Chemistry Laboratory. The Process Chemistry Laboratory will prepare test plans and perform process tests to evaluate the behavior of the 241-AY-101 waste undergoing the retrieval and treatment scenarios defined in the applicable DQOs. Requirements for analyses of samples originating in the process tests will be documented in the corresponding test plans and are not within the scope of this SAP

  1. High-level core sample x-ray imaging at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.R.; Keye, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Waste tank sampling of radioactive high-level waste is required for continued operations, waste characterization, and site safety. Hanford Site Tank farms consist of 28 double-shell and 149 single-shell underground storage tanks. The single shell tanks are out-of-service and no longer receive liquid waste. Core samples of salt cake and sludge waste are remotely obtained using truck-mounted, core drill platforms. Samples are recovered from tanks through a 2.25 inch (in.) drill pipe in 26-in. steel tubes, 1.5 in. diameter. Drilling parameters vary with different waste types. Because sample recovery has been marginal and inadequate at times, a system was needed to provide drill truck operators with real-time feedback about the physical conditions of the sample and the percent recovery, prior to making nuclear assay measurements and characterizations at the analytical laboratory. Westinghouse hanford Company conducted proof-of -principal radiographic testing to verify the feasibility of a proposed imaging system

  2. Radiation pattern of open ended waveguide in air core surrounded by annular plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.R.; Verma, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation pattern of open ended waveguide excited in circular symmetric mode (TM 01 ) in an air core having central conductor and surrounded by an annular plasma column is studied. The field distribution at the open end of the waveguide is considered to be equivalent to the vector sum of magnetic current rings of various radii, ranging from the outer radius of the inner conductor to the inner radius of the outer conductor of the waveguide at the open end. The radiation field is obtained as a vector sum of field components due to individual rings of current. Such a configuration gives rise to multiple narrow radiation beams away from the critical angle. (author)

  3. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Data interpretation report for tank 241-T-107 core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, L.M.; Valenzuela, B.D.

    1994-08-01

    Between November 1992 and March 1993, three core samples were obtained from tank 241-T-107. Analyses were performed on these core samples to support the Ferrocyanide Safety Program and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1994) Milestone M-10-00. This document summarizes and evaluates those analytical results that are pertinent to the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue. This document compares the analytical results with the data requirements for ferrocyanide tanks as documented in Data Requirements of the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue Developed Through the Data Quality Objectives Process (Meacham et al. 1994) and provides an assessment of the safety condition of the tank. Analytes not listed in the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document (Meacham et al. 1994) or not pertinent to the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue are not discussed in this report. Complete documentation of the analytical results can be found in the data package for the tank 241-T-107 cores (Svancara and Pool 1993). A more complete evaluation of the analytical results and an estimate of the tank inventory will be provided in a forthcoming tank characterization report for tank 241-T-107

  4. Investigation of porosity and pore structure adjacent to fractures by PMMA method. Samples taken from drill cores at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Ikonen, J.; Kauppi, L.; Lindberg, A.

    2010-10-01

    The porosity, pore structure and micro fracturing of 18 rock cores from drill holes OLKR4, OL-KR11, OL-KR13, OL-KR14, OL-KR15, OL-KR20 and OL-KR25. The porosity was investigated by the C-14-PMMA autoradiographic method. The main focus was to analyse the changes in porosity and mineralogy adjacent to the typical fractures in the bedrock of Olkiluoto as a mean of porosity profiles. The method makes it possible to study the spatial distribution of the pore space in rock, and the heterogeneity of rock matrices is revealed at the sub micrometre to the centimetre scale. Subsequent autoradiography and digital image analysis make it possible to analyse features limited in size by the range of C-14 beta radiation. The description of the method was given in Posiva working report 2009-03. The samples for this work were chosen in April 2008. The C-14-PMMA method involves the impregnation of centimetre-scale rock cores with C-14 labelled methylmethacrylate (C-14-MMA) in a vacuum, irradiation polymerisation, autoradiography and optical densitometry using digital image-processing techniques. Impregnation with C-14-MMA, a labelled low-molecular-weight and lowviscosity monomer which wets the silicate surfaces well and which can be fixed by polymerisation provides information about the accessible pore space in crystalline rock that cannot be obtained using other methods. The microscopy analyses for mineral identification were done for every PMMA impregnated sample in Geological Survey of Finland. The total porosities of the studied rock cores varied between 0.1 % and 8 %. However, spatially the porosities of 30 - 40 % were determined for the minerals that were strongly altered. The porosity changes were observed adjacent to the fracture surfaces forming from a few to several millimetres porous zones. The heterogeneity of the porosity patterns adjacent to the fracture surfaces was abundant due to mineral alteration. (orig.)

  5. Tank 241-AZ-102 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AZ-102. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the characteristics of the contents of 241-AZ-102 required to satisfy the Data Quality Objectives For TWRS Privatization Phase I : Confirm Tank TIS An Appropriate Feed Source For High-Level Waste Feed Batch X(HLW DQO) (Nguyen 1999a), Data Quality Objectives For TWRS Privatization Phase 1: Confirm Tank TIS An Appropriate Feed Source For Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (LAW DQO) (Nguyen 1999b), Low Activity Waste and High Level Waste Feed Data Quality Objectives (L and H DQO) (Patello et al. 1999) and Characterization Data Needs for Development, Design, and Operation of Retrieval Equipment Developed through the Data Quality Objective Process (Equipment DQO) (Bloom 1996). The Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis document (Brown et al. 1998) indicates that these issues, except the Equipment DQO apply to tank 241-AZ-102 for this sampling event. The Equipment DQO is applied for shear strength measurements of the solids segments only. Poppiti (1999) requires additional americium-241 analyses of the sludge segments. Brown et al. (1998) also identify safety screening, regulatory issues and provision of samples to the Privatization Contractor(s) as applicable issues for this tank. However, these issues will not be addressed via this sampling event. Reynolds et al. (1999) concluded that information from previous sampling events was sufficient to satisfy the safety screening requirements for tank 241-AZ-102. Push mode core samples will be obtained from risers 15C and 24A to provide sufficient material for the chemical analyses and tests required to satisfy these data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory will extrude core samples, composite the liquids and solids, perform chemical analyses

  6. An automated optimization of core fuel loading pattern for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Renji

    1988-11-01

    An optimum method was adopted to search for an optimum fuel loading pattern in pressurized water reactors. A radial power peak factor was chosen as the objective function of the optimum loading. The direct search method with shuffling rules is used to find optimum solution. The search for an optimum loading pattern with the smallest radial power peak by exchanging fuel assemblies was made. The search process is divided into two steps. In the first step fresh fuels or high reactivity fuels are arranged which are placed in core interior to have a reasonable fuel loading pattern. To further reduce the radial power peak factor, the second step will be necessary to rearrange the exposed lower reactivity fuel around the assemblies which has the radial power peak. In optimum process 1.5 group coarse mesh diffusion theory or two group nodal Green function diffusion theory is utilized to calculate the two dimensional power distribution after each shuffle. Also, above two methods are combinatively utilized to calculate the state quantity. It is not only true to save CPU time, but also can obtian exact results. Besides above function, the code MSOFEL is used to search critical boron concentration and to predict burn-up. The code has been written with FORTRAN-4. The optimum loading pattern was chosen for OCONEE and QINSHAN nuclear power plants as reference examples. The validity and feasibility of MSOFEL was demonstrated

  7. A Case Study of German Language Core Journals for Characterizing Citation Patterns in the Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Shan Chi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Publication practices in the social sciences are characterized by the use of heterogeneous publication channels and a stronger national focus (Nederhof, 2006; Hicks & Wang, 2011. At the same time the use of bibliometric indicators in research evaluation promotes journal articles in international peer reviewed journals as the main style of publishing research results. The question emerges to which extent this changes publication practices in these disciplines. In our contribution we address this question and present results of a case study which investigates publication and referencing patterns of core German language journals in sociology and political science. Based on an explorative analysis of reference lists we describe patterns and changes of the parameters of the knowledge base of these journals. The analysis of the results in this study shows that with a total of 67% in the sociology and 76% in the political science the core German journals predominantly refer to non-journal publications. Besides, the share of non-source publications basically remains constant in the time period 2000-2009, and the share of references to source journals is the same in both disciplines. The difference between sociology and political science is: publications in the German language sociology journals have more references to monographs (46% than publications in the German language political science journals (38%, but these political science journals reference to other non-source publications (38% much more than sociology (21%.

  8. A method for combined Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic analysis of <10 mg dust samples: implication for ice core science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Gabor; Wegner, Wencke; Klötzli, Urs

    2017-04-01

    Aeolian mineral dust particles below the size of 10-20 μm often experience longer distance transport in the atmosphere, and thus Aeolian dust is considered an important tracer of large-scale atmospheric circulation. Since ice core dust is purely Aeolian in origin, discrimination of its potential source region(s) can contribute to a better understanding of past dust activity and climatic/environmental causes. Furthermore, ice core dust source information provides critical experimental constraints for model simulations of past atmospheric circulation patterns [1,2]. However, to identify dust sources in past dust archives such as ice cores, the mineralogy and geochemistry of the wind-blown dust material must be characterized. While the amount of dust in marine cores or common terrestrial archives is sufficient for different types of analyses and even for multiple repeat measurements, dust content in ice cores is usually extremely low even for the peak dusty periods such as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (5-8 mg dust/kg ice; [3]). Since the most powerful dust fingerprinting methods, such as REE composition and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic analyses are destructive there is a clear need to establish sequential separation techniques of Sr, Nd, Pb and other REEs to get the most information out of small (5-10 mg) dust samples recovered from ice cores. Although Hf isotopes have recently been added as a robust tool of aerosol/dust source discrimination (e.g. [4,5,6,7]), precise Hf isotopic measurements of small (reliable 176Hf/177Hf (and also 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd) ratios. Along with the standards 50, 10 and 5 mg aliquots of the fine (affected by acid treatment and these signatures are extremely stable both within run (0.000008 variability for the three aliquots, i.e. 0.15 ɛNd unit) and between runs of different laboratories (0.00006, ca 1 ɛNd unit). Hf isotopic compositions varied within 1 (NUS) and 5 ɛHf units (BEI) between the three aliquots, but the BEI sample always gave more

  9. The use of gamma ray computed tomography to investigate soil compaction due to core sampling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Correchel, Vladia; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus; Brasil, Rene P. Camponez do

    2004-01-01

    Compaction processes can influence soil physical properties such as soil density, porosity, pore size distribution, and processes like soil water and nutrient movements, root system distribution, and others. Soil porosity modification has important consequences like alterations in results of soil water retention curves. These alterations may cause differences in soil water storage calculations and matrix potential values, which are utilized in irrigation management systems. Because of this, soil-sampling techniques should avoid alterations of sample structure. In this work soil sample compaction caused by core sampling devices was investigated using the gamma ray computed tomography technique. A first generation tomograph with fixed source-detector arrangement and translation/rotational movements of the sample was utilized to obtain the images. The radioactive source is 241 Am, with an activity of 3.7 GBq, and the detector consists of a 3 in. x 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Soil samples were taken from an experimental field utilizing cylinders 4.0 cm high and 2.6 cm in diameter. Based on image analyses it was possible to detect compacted regions in all samples next to the cylinder wall due to the sampling system. Tomographic unit profiles of the sample permitted to identify higher values of soil density for deeper regions of the sample, and it was possible to determine the average densities and thickness of these layers. Tomographic analyses showed to be a very useful tool for soil compaction characterization and presented many advantages in relation to traditional methods. (author)

  10. The Regional Patterns of Chemical Composition in the Otolith Core of Larval Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M. Y.; Geffen, A. J.; Nash, R. D. M.; Clemmesen, C.

    2012-04-01

    The elemental composition of fish otoliths can record the environmental information because once a trace element is deposited in the otolith; it presents a permanent record of the environmental conditions experienced by the fish at a particular time. The elemental signature of the otolith nucleus, the area lying within the first annual growth ring, is likely to be characteristic of the nursery areas of the species, and could be used as biological tracer for tracking origin and dispersal. However, ocean acidification may alter otolith growth and element incorporation, and it is important to establish baseline information about the sources of variation - both biotic and abiotic. The objectives of this study, as part of the wider CalMarO network, is to examine the regional differences in the otolith cores of selected fish species, contrast these differences with those measured between these same species in areas where their larvae co-exist and to find out the maternal effect to the chemical composition during the first forming of otoliths. The laboratory and field experiments were included to produce otolith material reflecting the maternal and regional patterns. Otolith composition was measured using laser-ablation ICPMS. For clarifying the regional patterns, juveniles from six locations and seven spawning groups along the west of the British Isles and larvae from the North Sea were sampled to distinguish the origin of spawning herring. There are three main nursery-ground groups, the Irish Sea, Scottish sea lochs and the Minch, contributing to the spawning herring in the west of the British Isles according to the otolith elemental composition data. However, the spawning origin of the North Sea herring larvae was still unclear. The otolith concentrations of Li, Na, Mg, Mn, Cu, Ru and Sr were significantly different among nursery-ground populations. Together with length-at-age data, at least two nursery-ground groups contributed to each spawning population. The

  11. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from undisturbed soil cores sampled along a natural clay gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    correlated to the accumulated outflow and was described as a diffusion controlled process, using ¾(accumulated outflow). The mass of leached particles was positively correlated to the clay content as well as to water-dispersible colloids. Particulate phosphorus (P) was linearly correlated to concentration......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  12. Ecological risk evaluation of sediment core samples, Lake Tortum (Erzurum, NE Turkey using environmental indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Kaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the vertical distribution of heavy metals in a 72 cm-long core sample from Lake Tortum in order to shed light on the implications of potential ecological risks. Analysis was based on the use of environmental indices such as the Integrated Pollution Load Index (PLI and Potential Ecological Risk Index (PER. Results reveal that, except for Pb, Mn and Hg, the lowest concentrations of heavy metals occur at a core depth of between 2 cm and 20 cm for Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe, As, Cd, Cr and Al. The highest concentration was found at sampling intervals of 36 cm and 50 cm, with the exception of Pb, Mn, Hg and Ni. The PLI values from bottom to top are less than 1 while the level with the nearest value to the background value lies at a depth between 24 cm and 26 cm. The PER index results suggest a low ecological risk level for Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Mn, Fe, As, Cr, and Al; however, Cd and Hg constitute an ecological threat to the lake ecosystem.

  13. Engineering task plan for rotary mode core sampling exhausters CAM high radiation interlock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system is primarily made up of the Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) and the RMCS Exhausters. During RMCS operations an Exhauster is connected to a tank riser and withdraws gases from the tank dome vapor space at approximately 200 Standard Cubic Feet per Minute (SCFM). The gases are passed through two High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters before passing out the exhaust stack to the atmosphere. A Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) monitors the exhaust gases in the exhaust stack for beta particle and gamma radiation. The CAM has a high radiation alarm output and a detector fail alarm output. The CAM alarms are currently connected to the data logger only. The CAM alarms require operator response per procedure LMHC 1998 but no automatic functions are initiated by the CAM alarms. Currently, there are three events that can cause an automatic shut down of the Exhauster. These are, Low Tank Pressure, Highnow Stack Flow and High HEPA Filter Differential Pressure (DP)

  14. Characterization of tuyere-level core-drill coke samples from blast furnace operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Dong; N. Paterson; S.G. Kazarian; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-12-15

    A suite of tuyere-level coke samples have been withdrawn from a working blast furnace during coal injection, using the core-drilling technique. The samples have been characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-RS), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) extracts of the cokes sampled from the 'bosh', the rear of the 'bird's nest', and the 'dead man' zones were found by SEC to contain heavy soot-like materials (ca. 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} apparent mass units). In contrast, NMP extracts of cokes taken from the raceway and the front of the 'bird's nest' only contained a small amount of material of relatively lower apparent molecular mass (up to ca. 10{sup 5} u). Since the feed coke contained no materials extractable by the present method, the soot-like materials are thought to have formed during the reactions of volatile matter released from the injectant coal, probably via dehydrogenation and repolymerization of the tars. The Raman spectra of the NMP-extracted core-drilled coke samples showed variations reflecting their temperature histories. Area ratios of D-band to G-band decreased as the exposure temperature increased, while intensity ratios of D to G band and those of 2D to G bands increased with temperature. The graphitic (G), defect (D), and random (R) fractions of the carbon structure of the cokes were also derived from the Raman spectra. The R fractions decreased with increasing temperature, whereas G fractions increased, while the D fractions showed a more complex variation with temperature. These data appear to give clues regarding the graphitization mechanism of tuyere-level cokes in the blast furnace. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. XPS and EPXMA investigation and chemical speciation of aerosol samples formed in LWR core melting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Jenett, H.; Kaufmann, R.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1985-09-01

    Aerosol samples consisting of fission products and elements of light water reactor structural materials were collected during simulating in a laboratory scale the heat-up phase of a core melt accident. The aerosol particles were formed in a steam atmosphere at temperatures between 1200 and 1900 0 C of the melting charge. The investigation of the samples by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) permitted the chemical speciation of the detected aerosol constituents silver, cadmium, indium, tellurium, iodine, and cesium. A comparison of the elemental analysis results obtained from XPS with those achieved from electron probe X-ray micro analysis (EPXMA) revealed that aerosol particle surface and aerosol particle bulk are principally composed of the same elements and that these compositions vary with release temperature. In addition, quantitative differences between the composition of surface and bulk have only been observed for those aerosol samples which were collected at higher melting charge temperatures. In order to obtain direct information on chemical species below the surface selected samples were argon ion bombarded. Changes in composition and chemistry were monitored by XPS, and the results were interpreted in light of the effects, which were observed when appropriate standard samples were sputtered. (orig.) [de

  16. Optimization of fuel core loading pattern design in a VVER nuclear power reactors using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babazadeh, Davood; Boroushaki, Mehrdad; Lucas, Caro

    2009-01-01

    The two main goals in core fuel loading pattern design optimization are maximizing the core effective multiplication factor (K eff ) in order to extract the maximum energy, and keeping the local power peaking factor (P q ) lower than a predetermined value to maintain fuel integrity. In this research, a new strategy based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm has been developed to optimize the fuel core loading pattern in a typical VVER. The PSO algorithm presents a simple social model by inspiration from bird collective behavior in finding food. A modified version of PSO algorithm for discrete variables has been developed and implemented successfully for the multi-objective optimization of fuel loading pattern design with constraints of keeping P q lower than a predetermined value and maximizing K eff . This strategy has been accomplished using WIMSD and CITATION calculation codes. Simulation results show that this algorithm can help in the acquisition of a new pattern without contravention of the constraints.

  17. Fault rocks from the SAFOD core samples : implications for weakening at shallow depths along the San Andreas Fault, California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holdsworth, R.E.; van Diggelen, E.W.E.; Spiers, C.J.; Bresser, J.H.P. de; Walker, R.J.; Bown, L.

    2011-01-01

    The drilling of a deep borehole across the actively creeping Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ), California, and collection of core materials permit direct geological study of fault zone processes at 2–3 km depth. The three drill cores sample both host and fault rocks and pass

  18. Geochemical porosity values obtained in core samples from different clay-rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Argillaceous formations of low permeability are considered in many countries as potential host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes (HLRW). In order to determine their suitability for waste disposal, evaluations of the hydro-geochemistry and transport mechanisms from such geologic formations to the biosphere must be undertaken. One of the key questions about radionuclide diffusion and retention is to know the chemistry and chemical reactions and sorption processes that will occur in the rock and their effects on radionuclide mobility. In this context, the knowledge of the pore water chemistry is essential for performance assessment purposes. This information allows to establish a reliable model for the main water-rock interactions, which control the physico-chemical parameters and the chemistry of the major elements of the system. An important issue in order to model the pore water chemistry in clayey media is to determine the respective volume accessible to cations and anions, i.e, the amount of water actually available for chemical reactions/solute transport. This amount is usually referred as accessible porosity or geochemical porosity. By using the anion inventories, i.e. the anion content obtained from aqueous leaching, and assuming that all Cl - , Br - and SO4 2- leached in the aqueous extracts originates from pore water, the concentration of a conservative ion can be converted into the real pore water concentration if the accessible porosity is known. In this work, the accessible porosity or geochemical porosity has been determined in core samples belonging to four different formations: Boom Clay from Hades URL (Belgium, BE), Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (Switzerland, CH), and Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Bure URL (France, FR). The geochemical or chloride porosity was defined as the ratio between the pore water volume containing Cl-bearing pore water and the total volume of a sample

  19. Neutron activation analysis of core and drill cutting samples from geothermal well drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of sandstones and shales were analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis for a total of 30 elements. Three irradiation and five counting periods were employed. Solutions and National Bureau of Standards Reference Materials were used for comparison. The samples were obtained from drill cuttings (with a few core samples) from drillings in the Salton Sea geothermal field of California. These determinations form part of a major study to establish elemental variation as a function of mineral variation as depth and temperature in the well vary. The overall goal is to examine mineral alteration and/or element migration under typical geothermal conditions. The techniques involve typical compromises between maximizing precision for individual element determinations and the amount of time and effort that can be expended, as it is desired to examine large numbers of samples. With the limitations imposed by the reactor flux available at the U.C.Irvine TRIGA reactor, the detectors available, and time factors, most precisions are acceptable for geological comparison purposes. Some additional measurements were made by delayed-neutron counting methods to compare with uranium determinations made by conventional instrumental neutron activation analysis methods. (author)

  20. Chemical and X-ray diffraction analysis on selected samples from the TMI-2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleykamp, H.; Pejsa, R.

    1991-05-01

    Selected samples from different positions of the damaged TMI-2 reactor core were investigated by X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. The measurements yield the following resolidified phases after cooling: Cd and In depleted Ag absorber material, intermetallic Zr-steel compounds, fully oxidized Zircaloy, UO 2 -ZrO 2 solid solutions and their decomposed phases, and Fe-Al-Cr-Zr spinels. The composition of the phases and their lattice parameters as well as the eutectic and monotectic character can serve as indicators of local temperatures of the core. The reaction sequences are estimated from the heterogeneous equilibria of these phases. The main conclusions are: (1) Liquefaction onset is locally possible by Inconel-Zircaloy and steel-Zircaloy reactions of spacers and absorber guide tubes at 930deg C. However, increased rates of dissolution occur above 1200deg C. (2) UO 2 dissolution in the Inconel-steel-Zircaloy melt starts at 1300deg C with increased rates above 1900deg C. (3) Fuel temperatures in the core centre are increased above 2550deg C, liquid (U,Zr)O 2 is generated. (4) Square UO 2 particles are reprecipitated from the Incoloy-steel-Zircaloy-UO 2 melt during cooling, the remaining metallic melt is oxygen poor; two types of intermetallic phases are formed. (5) Oxidized Fe and Zr and Al 2 O 3 from burnable absorber react to spinels which form a low melting eutectic with the fuel at 1500deg C. The spinel acts as lubricant for fuel transport to the lower reactor plenum above 1500deg C. (6) Ruthenium (Ru-106) is dissolved in the steel phase, antimony (Sb-125) in the α-Ag absorber during liquefaction. (7) Oxidation of the Zircaloy-steel phases takes place mainly in the reflood stage 3 of the accident scenario. (orig.) [de

  1. System design specification for rotary mode core sample trucks No. 2, 3, and 4 programmable logic controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, J.L.; Akers, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The system this document describes controls several functions of the Core Sample Truck(s) used to obtain nuclear waste samples from various underground storage tanks at Hanford. The system will monitor the sampling process and provide alarms and other feedback to insure the sampling process is performed within the prescribed operating envelope. The intended audience for this document is anyone associated with rotary or push mode core sampling. This document describes the Alarm and Control logic installed on Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) number-sign 2, 3, and 4. It is intended to define the particular requirements of the RMCST alarm and control operation (not defined elsewhere) sufficiently for detailed design to implement on a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)

  2. Incidence of sleep pattern disturbance (SPD) in a hemodialysis sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangio, D; Locking-Cusolito, H

    1999-01-01

    Personal experience suggests that sleep pattern disturbance (SPD) is a serious problem for the patients we serve. The purpose of this study was to identify the scope of sleep problems among all willing patients in a medium-sized hemodialysis unit in a university teaching centre. This descriptive study examined SPD through the use of a sleep diary that subjects were asked to complete each morning for a week. Subjects were asked to describe sleep latency, sleep quantity, number of arousals, whether they awoke feeling rested, factors that interfered with sleep the night before, and sleep inducers employed the night before. They were also asked to record their dialysis schedule. Each subject's chart was reviewed with respect to medications and evidence of other medical problems that interfered with sleep. Findings were benchmarked with results from the literature. Information regarding facilitators and barriers to sleep has provided some basis for an interdisciplinary plan of care to address this distressing problem.

  3. Bayesian methods for the combination of core sampling data with historical models for tank characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, J.C.; Remund, K.M.; Chen, G.; Simpson, B.C.; Brown, T.M.

    1995-07-01

    A wide variety of information is available on the contents of the nuclear waste tanks at the Hanford site. This report describes an attempt to combine several sources of information using a Bayesian statistical approach. This methodology allows the combination of multiple disparate information sources. After each source of information is summarized in terms of a probability distribution function (pdf), Bayes' theorem is applied to combine them. This approach has been applied to characterizing tanks B-110, B-111, and B-201. These tanks were chosen for their simple waste matrices: B-110 and B-111 contain mostly 2C waste, and B-201 contains mostly 224 waste. Additionally,, the results of this analysis axe used to make predictions for tank T-111 (which contains both 2C and 224 waste). These predictions are compared to the estimates based on core samples from tank T-111

  4. Towards an integrated petrophysical tool for multiphase flow properties of core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the first use of an Integrated Petrophysical Tool (IPT) on reservoir rock samples. The IPT simultaneously measures the following petrophysical properties: (1) Complete capillary pressure cycle: primary drainage, spontaneous and forced imbibitions, secondary drainage (the cycle leads to the wettability of the core by using the USBM index); End-points and parts of the relative permeability curves; Formation factor and resistivity index. The IPT is based on the steady-state injection of one fluid through the sample placed in a Hassler cell. The experiment leading to the whole Pc cycle on two reservoir sandstones consists of about 30 steps at various oil or water flow rates. It takes about four weeks and is operated at room conditions. Relative permeabilities are in line with standard steady-state measurements. Capillary pressures are in accordance with standard centrifuge measurements. There is no comparison for the resistivity index, but the results are in agreement with literature data. However, the accurate determination of saturation remains the main difficulty and some improvements are proposed. In conclusion, the Integrated Petrophysical Tool is as accurate as standard methods and has the advantage of providing the various parameters on the same sample and during a single experiment. The FIT is easy to use and can be automated. In addition, it can be operated in reservoir conditions.

  5. ANALYSIS OF TANK 28F SALTCAKE CORE SAMPLES FTF-456 - 467

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C; Daniel McCabe, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Ralph Nichols, R

    2007-02-28

    Twelve LM-75 core samplers from Tank 28F sampling were received by SRNL for saltcake characterization. Of these, nine samplers contained mixtures of free liquid and saltcake, two contained only liquid, and one was empty. The saltcake contents generally appeared wet. A summary of the major tasks performed in this work are as follows: (1) Individual saltcake segments were extruded from the samplers and separated into saltcake and free liquid portions. (2) Free liquids were analyzed to estimate the amount of traced drill-string fluid contained in the samples. (3) The saltcake from each individual segment was homogenized, followed by analysis in duplicate. The analysis used more cost-effective and bounding radiochemical analyses rather than using the full Saltstone WAC suite. (4) A composite was created using an approximately equal percentage of each segment's saltcake contents. Supernatant liquid formed upon creation of the composite was decanted prior to use of the composite, but the composite was not drained. (5) A dissolution test was performed on the sample by contacting the composite with water at a 4:1 mass ratio of water to salt. The resulting soluble and insoluble fractions were analyzed. Analysis focused on a large subset of the Saltstone WAC constituents.

  6. SEDRIO/INCORE, an automatic optimal loading pattern search system for PWR NPP reload core using an expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Chunyu; Zhang Zongyao

    2003-01-01

    The expert knowledge library for Daya Bay and Qinshan phase II NPP has been established based on expert knowledge, and the reload core loading pattern heuristic search is performed. The in-core fuel management code system INCORE that has been used in engineering design is employed for neutron calculation, and loading pattern is evaluated by using of cycle length and core radial power peaking factor. The developed system SEDRIO/INCORE has been applied in cycle 4 for unit 2 of Daya Bay NPP and cycle 4 for Phase II in Qinshan NPP. The application demonstrated that the loading patterns obtained by SEDRIO/INCORE system are much better than reference ones from the view of the radial power peak and the cycle length

  7. Gamma ray spectrometry results from core samples collected for RESUME 95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Allyson, J.D.; Toivonen, H.; Honkamaa, T.

    1997-01-01

    Field sampling of an airfield at Vesivehmaa, near Vaeaeksy, Finland (Area I) was carried out between 26-29 May 1995, to establish the radionuclide deposition and inventory of Chernobyl derived 137 Cs, and natural radionuclides. The objective was to establish a common calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometers, for Exercise RESUME 95 conducted in August 1995. The report presents the sampling details, handling and treatment. The analyses are discussed with particular emphasis given to 137 Ca, 134 Cs, 40 K, 214 Bi and 208 radionuclides, and the quantification of their respective deposition and inventories. The results have been used to estimate the effective concentrations of nuclides at the calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometry, and the depth distribution. For 137 Cs the weighted mean activity per unit area takes on values of 50.7±5.2 kBq m -2 at 1 m ground clearance, 51.1±6.9 kBq m -2 at 50 m height and 47.9±8.5 kBq m -2 at 100 m. The similarity of these values confirms the suitability of the Vesivehmaa site for comparison of in-situ and airborne results despite variations of a factor of two between results from individual cores. The mean α/ρ value for 137 Cs in Area I is 0.77±0.10 cm 2 g -1 (relaxation mass per unit area, β 1.31±0.15 gcm -2 ). Additional soil sampling across parts of Area II (a 6x3 km area selected for mapping Chernobyl deposition) was carried out. The mean level of 137 Cs activity from these samples was 92.4±63 kBq m -2 , a sample taken near Laihansuo showing the largest value obtained at 172 kBq m -2 . (EG)

  8. A Review of Inflammatory Processes of the Breast with a Focus on Diagnosis in Core Biopsy Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M. D’Alfonso

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory and reactive lesions of the breast are relatively uncommon among benign breast lesions and can be the source of an abnormality on imaging. Such lesions can simulate a malignant process, based on both clinical and radiographic findings, and core biopsy is often performed to rule out malignancy. Furthermore, some inflammatory processes can mimic carcinoma or other malignancy microscopically, and vice versa. Diagnostic difficulty may arise due to the small and fragmented sample of a core biopsy. This review will focus on the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of the more commonly encountered inflammatory lesions of the breast that can be characterized in a core biopsy sample. These include fat necrosis, mammary duct ectasia, granulomatous lobular mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, and abscess. The microscopic differential diagnoses for these lesions when seen in a core biopsy sample will be discussed.

  9. A Review of Inflammatory Processes of the Breast with a Focus on Diagnosis in Core Biopsy Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alfonso, Timothy M; Ginter, Paula S; Shin, Sandra J

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory and reactive lesions of the breast are relatively uncommon among benign breast lesions and can be the source of an abnormality on imaging. Such lesions can simulate a malignant process, based on both clinical and radiographic findings, and core biopsy is often performed to rule out malignancy. Furthermore, some inflammatory processes can mimic carcinoma or other malignancy microscopically, and vice versa. Diagnostic difficulty may arise due to the small and fragmented sample of a core biopsy. This review will focus on the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of the more commonly encountered inflammatory lesions of the breast that can be characterized in a core biopsy sample. These include fat necrosis, mammary duct ectasia, granulomatous lobular mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, and abscess. The microscopic differential diagnoses for these lesions when seen in a core biopsy sample will be discussed.

  10. Summary of petrophysical analysis of Olkiluoto. Core samples 1990-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, E.; Oehman, I.; Paulamaeki, S.; Saeaevuori, H.; Vuoriainen, S.; Aaltonen, I.

    2009-04-01

    Posiva prepares for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repository at Olkiluoto, Eurajoki. This is in accordance of the application filed in 1999, the Decision in Principle of the State Council in 2000, and ratification by the Parliament in 2001.The site characterization has included comprehensive geological, hydrological and geophysical investigations airborne, on ground and in drillholes since 1988. Petrophysical analysis has been carried out to enhance knowledge on physical properties in rock mass. Also the large scale geophysical interpretations will essentially benefit on this knowledge. This report is associated with and covering the 2005-2008 sampling campaign (932 samples), but also pre-existing results (506 samples from 1990 - 2004) are discussed in the report. Data has been acquired from non-broken core samples, and of representative locations of lithological units. Samples have been taken at 10-30 m interval from all core sections. Selecting the samples and analysis has been carried out for different purposes during campaigns. Altogether there are 1438 samples from drillholes OL-KR1 - OL-KR39 and ONK-PH01-PH07. Petrophysical measurements included density, susceptibility and remanence (partly oriented), resistivity, IP value (frequency effect), P-wave velocity and porosity. Sample data was analyzed for distributions and mutual relations. Petrophysical signatures of different parameters were assessed by lithology. Mineral composition and texture will affect to petrophysical results. Deformation and alteration cause an overprint to lithology specific values. In petrophysical sense, granite pegmatite is distinguished from all other rock types. It is of rather high resistivity and P-wave velocity, and low density and susceptibility. Other distinct lithological unit is mafic gneisses. They are described by high density and Pwave velocity, and also increased susceptibility, IP value and resistivity. The tonaliticgranodioritic- granitic gneiss

  11. A New Method of Stress Measurement Based upon Elastic Deformation of Core Sample with Stress Relief by Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T.; Funato, A.; Tamagawa, T.; Tezuka, K.; Yabe, Y.; Abe, S.; Ishida, A.; Ogasawara, H.

    2017-12-01

    When rock is cored at depth by drilling, anisotropic expansion occurs with the relief of anisotropic rock stresses, resulting in a sinusoidal variation of core diameter with a period of 180 deg. in the core roll angle. The circumferential variation of core diameter is given theoretically as a function of rock stresses. These new findings can lead various ideas to estimate the rock stress from circumferential variation of core diameter measured after the core retrieving. In the simplest case when a single core sample is only available, the difference between the maximum and minimum components of rock stress in a plane perpendicular to the drilled hole can be estimated from the maximum and minimum core diameters (see the detail in, Funato and Ito, IJRMMS, 2017). The advantages of this method include, (i) much easier measurement operation than those in other in-situ or in-lab estimation methods, and (ii) applicability in high stress environment where stress measurements need pressure for packers or pumping system for the hydro-fracturing methods higher than their tolerance levels. We have successfully tested the method at deep seismogenic zones in South African gold mines, and we are going to apply it to boreholes collared at 3 km depth and intersecting a M5.5 rupture plane several hundred meters below the mine workings in the ICDP project of "Drilling into Seismogenic zones of M2.0 - M5.5 earthquakes in deep South African gold mines" (DSeis) (e.g., http://www.icdp-online.org/projects/world/africa/orkney-s-africa/details/). If several core samples with different orientation are available, all of three principal components of 3D rock stress can be estimated. To realize this, we should have several boreholes drilled in different directions in a rock mass where the stress field is considered to be uniform. It is commonly carried out to dill boreholes in different directions from a mine gallery. Even in a deep borehole drilled vertically from the ground surface, the

  12. Ecological patterns, diversity and core taxa of microbial communities in groundwater-fed rapid gravity filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    the second most and most abundant fraction in PFs (27±23%) and AFs (45.2±23%), respectively, and were far more abundant than typical proteobacterial ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, suggesting a physiology beyond nitrite oxidation for Nitrospira. Within the core taxa, sequences closely related to types...... with ability to oxidize ammonium, nitrite, iron, manganese and methane as primary growth substrate were identified and dominated in both PFs (73.6±6%) and AFs (61.4±21%), suggesting their functional importance. Surprisingly, operational taxonomic unit richness correlated strongly and positively with sampling...... location in the drinking water treatment plant (from PFs to AFs), and a weaker negative correlation held for evenness. Significant spatial heterogeneity in microbial community composition was detected in both PFs and AFs, and was higher in the AFs. This is the first comprehensive documentation of microbial...

  13. Low-energy absorption and luminescence of higher plant photosystem II core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Joseph L.; Smith, Paul J.; Pace, Ron J.; Krausz, Elmars

    2007-01-01

    The charge-separating state of PSII has been recently assigned as a homogeneously broadened band peaking at 705 nm. The possibility of observing emission due to luminescence from the charge-separating state was investigated. Emission from the charge-separating state is predicted to be both broad and substantially Stokes shifted. Our PSII cores show an easily observable and broad emission peaking near 735 nm when excited at 707 nm and beyond for temperatures below 100 K as well as the well-known F685 and F695 nm emission when excited at 633 nm. However, the 735 nm emission bears a close correspondence to that previously reported for the light harvesting pigment of photosystem I (PSI), LHCI-730, and we attribute our observed emission to a minor contamination of our sample with this protein. High sensitivity circular dichroism (CD) spectra establish that LHCI and/or PSI contamination of our samples does not contribute significantly to the absorption seen in the 700-730 nm region. Furthermore, systematic illumination-induced absorption changes seen in this region are shown to quantitatively track with charge separation and the subsequent secondary acceptor plastoquinone (Q A ) acceptor anion formation. These results confirm that absorption in the 700-730 nm region is associated with the reaction centre of active PSII

  14. Gamma ray spectrometry results from core samples collected for RESUME 95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Allyson, J.D. [SURRC, East Kilbride, Scotland (United Kingdom); Toivonen, H.; Honkamaa, T. [STUK, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Field sampling of an airfield at Vesivehmaa, near Vaeaeksy, Finland (Area I) was carried out between 26-29 May 1995, to establish the radionuclide deposition and inventory of Chernobyl derived {sup 137}Cs, and natural radionuclides. The objective was to establish a common calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometers, for Exercise RESUME 95 conducted in August 1995. The report presents the sampling details, handling and treatment. The analyses are discussed with particular emphasis given to {sup 137}Ca, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208} radionuclides, and the quantification of their respective deposition and inventories. The results have been used to estimate the effective concentrations of nuclides at the calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometry, and the depth distribution. For {sup 137}Cs the weighted mean activity per unit area takes on values of 50.7{+-}5.2 kBq m{sup -2} at 1 m ground clearance, 51.1{+-}6.9 kBq m{sup -2} at 50 m height and 47.9{+-}8.5 kBq m{sup -2} at 100 m. The similarity of these values confirms the suitability of the Vesivehmaa site for comparison of in-situ and airborne results despite variations of a factor of two between results from individual cores. The mean {alpha}/{rho} value for {sup 137}Cs in Area I is 0.77{+-}0.10 cm{sup 2}g{sup -1} (relaxation mass per unit area, {beta} 1.31{+-}0.15 gcm{sup -2}). Additional soil sampling across parts of Area II (a 6x3 km area selected for mapping Chernobyl deposition) was carried out. The mean level of {sup 137}Cs activity from these samples was 92.4{+-}63 kBq m{sup -2}, a sample taken near Laihansuo showing the largest value obtained at 172 kBq m{sup -2}. (EG). 17 refs.

  15. Gamma ray spectrometry results from core samples collected for RESUME 95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, D C.W.; Allyson, J D [SURRC, East Kilbride, Scotland (United Kingdom); Toivonen, H; Honkamaa, T [STUK, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Field sampling of an airfield at Vesivehmaa, near Vaeaeksy, Finland (Area I) was carried out between 26-29 May 1995, to establish the radionuclide deposition and inventory of Chernobyl derived {sup 137}Cs, and natural radionuclides. The objective was to establish a common calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometers, for Exercise RESUME 95 conducted in August 1995. The report presents the sampling details, handling and treatment. The analyses are discussed with particular emphasis given to {sup 137}Ca, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208} radionuclides, and the quantification of their respective deposition and inventories. The results have been used to estimate the effective concentrations of nuclides at the calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometry, and the depth distribution. For {sup 137}Cs the weighted mean activity per unit area takes on values of 50.7{+-}5.2 kBq m{sup -2} at 1 m ground clearance, 51.1{+-}6.9 kBq m{sup -2} at 50 m height and 47.9{+-}8.5 kBq m{sup -2} at 100 m. The similarity of these values confirms the suitability of the Vesivehmaa site for comparison of in-situ and airborne results despite variations of a factor of two between results from individual cores. The mean {alpha}/{rho} value for {sup 137}Cs in Area I is 0.77{+-}0.10 cm{sup 2}g{sup -1} (relaxation mass per unit area, {beta} 1.31{+-}0.15 gcm{sup -2}). Additional soil sampling across parts of Area II (a 6x3 km area selected for mapping Chernobyl deposition) was carried out. The mean level of {sup 137}Cs activity from these samples was 92.4{+-}63 kBq m{sup -2}, a sample taken near Laihansuo showing the largest value obtained at 172 kBq m{sup -2}. (EG). 17 refs.

  16. Unusual polarity-dependent patterns in a bent-core nematic liquid crystal under low-frequency ac field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ying; Zhou, Meng-jie; Xu, Ming-Ya; Salamon, Péter; Éber, Nándor; Buka, Ágnes

    2015-04-01

    Electric-field-induced patterns of diverse morphology have been observed over a wide frequency range in a recently synthesized bent-core nematic (BCN) liquid crystal. At low frequencies (up to ∼25 Hz), the BCN exhibited unusual polarity-dependent patterns. When the amplitude of the ac field was enhanced, these two time-asymmetrical patterns turned into time-symmetrical prewavylike stripes. At ac frequencies in the middle-frequency range (∼50-3000 Hz), zigzag patterns were detected whose obliqueness varied with the frequency. Finally, if the frequency was increased above 3 kHz, the zigzag pattern was replaced by another, prewavylike pattern, whose threshold voltage depended on the frequency; however, the wave vector did not. For a more complete characterization, material parameters such as elastic constants, dielectric permittivities, and the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility were also determined.

  17. A latency analysis for M2M and OG-like traffic patterns in different HSPA core network configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Popović

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an analysis intended to reveal possible impacts of core network features on latency for modelled M2M and Online Gaming traffic. Simulations were performed in a live 3G/HSPA network. Test traffic simulating multiplayer real-time games and M2M applications was generated on 10 mobile phones in parallel, sending data to a remote server. APNs with different combinations of hardware and features (proxy server, different GGSNs and firewalls, usage of Service Awareness feature were chosen. The traffic was recorded on the Gn interface in the mobile core. The goal of experiments was to evaluate any eventually significant variation of average recorded RTTs in the core part of mobile network that would clearly indicate either the impact of used APN on delay for a specific traffic pattern, or selectivity of the APN towards different traffic patterns.

  18. Using forbidden ordinal patterns to detect determinism in irregularly sampled time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, C W; Chobot, J M; Niskala, B J; Needhammer, C J

    2016-02-01

    It is known that when symbolizing a time series into ordinal patterns using the Bandt-Pompe (BP) methodology, there will be ordinal patterns called forbidden patterns that do not occur in a deterministic series. The existence of forbidden patterns can be used to identify deterministic dynamics. In this paper, the ability to use forbidden patterns to detect determinism in irregularly sampled time series is tested on data generated from a continuous model system. The study is done in three parts. First, the effects of sampling time on the number of forbidden patterns are studied on regularly sampled time series. The next two parts focus on two types of irregular-sampling, missing data and timing jitter. It is shown that forbidden patterns can be used to detect determinism in irregularly sampled time series for low degrees of sampling irregularity (as defined in the paper). In addition, comments are made about the appropriateness of using the BP methodology to symbolize irregularly sampled time series.

  19. Engineering task plan for upgrades to the leveling jacks on core sample trucks number 3 and 4; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOSTELNIK, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    Characterizing the waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site is accomplished by obtaining a representative core sample for analysis. Core sampling is one of the numerous techniques that have been developed for use given the environmental and field conditions at the Hanford Site. Core sampling is currently accomplished using either Push Mode Core Sample Truck No.1 or; Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks No.2, 3 or 4. Past analysis (WHC 1994) has indicated that the Core Sample Truck (CST) leveling jacks are structurally inadequate when lateral loads are applied. WHC 1994 identifies many areas where failure could occur. All these failures are based on exceeding the allowable stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) code. The mode of failure is for the outrigger attachments to the truck frame to fail resulting in dropping of the CST and possible overturning (Ref. Ziada and Hundal, 1996). Out of level deployment of the truck can exceed the code allowable stresses in the structure. Calculations have been performed to establish limits for maintaining the truck level when lifting. The calculations and the associated limits are included in appendix A. The need for future operations of the CSTS is limited. Sampling is expected to be complete in FY-2001. Since there is limited time at risk for continued use of the CSTS with the leveling controls without correcting the structural problems, there are several design changes that could give incremental improvements to the operational safety of the CSTS with limited impact on available operating time. The improvements focus on making the truck easier to control during lifting and leveling. Not all of the tasks identified in this ETP need to be performed. Each task alone can improve the safety. This engineering task plan is the management plan document for implementing the necessary additional structural analysis. Any additional changes to meet requirements of standing orders shall require a

  20. Testing to expand the rotary-mode core sampling system operating envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witwer, K.S.

    1998-01-01

    Rotary sampling using the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System (RMCSS) is constrained by what is referred to as the ''Operating Envelope''. The Operating Envelop defines the maximum downward force, maximum rotational speed and minimum purge gas flow allowed during operation of the RMCSS. The original values of 1170 lb. down force, 55 RPM rotational speed, and 30 SCFM nitrogen purge gas were determined during original envelope testing. This envelope was determined by observing the temperature rise on the bitface while drilling into waste simulants. The maximum temperature in single-shell tanks (SSTS) is considered to be approximately 9O C and the critical drill bit temperature, which is the temperature at which an exothermic reaction could be initiated in the tank waste, was previously determined to be 150 C. Thus, the drill bit temperature increase was limited to 60 C. Thermal properties of these simulants approximated typical properties of waste tank saltcake. Later, more detailed envelope testing which used a pumice block simulant, showed a notably higher temperature rise while drilling. This pumice material, which simulated a ''worst case'' foreign object embedded in the waste, has lower thermal conductivity and lower thermal diffusivity than earlier simulants. These properties caused a slower heat transfer in the pumice than in the previous simulants and consequently a higher temperature rise. The maximum downward force was subsequently reduced to 750 lb (at a maximum 55 RPM and minimum 30 SCFM purge gas flow) which was the maximum value at which the drill bit could be operated and still remain below the 60 C temperature rise

  1. Test Plan for Rotary Mode Core Sample Truck Grapple Hoist Level Wind System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-12-09

    A Grapple Hoist Assembly is currently used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling Trucks (RMCSTs) to actuate the sampler and retrieve the pintle rod during sampling operations. The hoist assembly includes a driven drum approximately two inches wide and six inches in diameter that rotates to pay out or reel in the 5/32-in. cable The current Grapple Hoist Assembly, detailed on drawing H-2-690057, is prone to ''bird nesting'' the cable on the drum. ''Bird nesting'' is a condition in which the cable does not wind onto the drum in a uniformly layered manner, but winds in a random fashion where the cable essentially ''piles up'' inappropriately on the drum and, on some occasions, winds on the drum drive shaft. A system to help control this ''bird nesting'' problem has been designed as an addition to the existing components of the Grapple Hoist Assembly. The new design consists of a mechanism that is timed with, and driven by, the shaft that drives the drum. This mechanism traverses back and forth across the width of the drum to lay the cable on the drum in a uniformly layered manner. This test plan establishes the acceptance criteria, test procedure and test conditions It also describes the test apparatus necessary to verify the adequacy of the level wind system design. The test is defined as qualification testing (LMHC 1999b) and as such will be performed at conditions beyond the parameters that the Grapple Hoist Assembly is allowed to operate by the Safety Equipment List (SEL)(LMHC 1998).

  2. Test Plan for Rotary Mode Core Sample Truck Grapple Hoist Level Wind System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    A Grapple Hoist Assembly is currently used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling Trucks (RMCSTs) to actuate the sampler and retrieve the pintle rod during sampling operations. The hoist assembly includes a driven drum approximately two inches wide and six inches in diameter that rotates to pay out or reel in the 5/32-in. cable. The current Grapple Hoist Assembly, detailed on drawing H-2-690057, is prone to ''bird nesting'' the cable on the drum. ''Bird nesting'' is a condition in which the cable does not wind onto the drum in a uniformly layered manner, but winds in a random fashion where the cable essentially ''piles up'' inappropriately on the drum and, on some occasions, winds on the drum drive shaft. A system to help control this ''bird nesting'' problem has been designed as an addition to the existing components of the Grapple Hoist Assembly. The new design consists of a mechanism that is timed with, and driven by, the shaft that drives the drum. This mechanism traverses back and forth across the width of the drum to lay the cable on the drum in a uniformly layered manner. This test plan establishes the acceptance criteria, test procedure and test conditions. It also describes the test apparatus necessary to verify the adequacy of the level wind system design. The test is defined as qualification testing (LMHC 1999b) and as such will be performed at conditions beyond the parameters that the Grapple Hoist Assembly is allowed to operate by the Safety Equipment List

  3. Test Plan for Rotary Mode Core Sample Truck Grapple Hoist Level Wind System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    A Grapple Hoist Assembly is currently used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling Trucks (RMCSTs) to actuate the sampler and retrieve the pintle rod during sampling operations. The hoist assembly includes a driven drum approximately two inches wide and six inches in diameter that rotates to pay out or reel in the 5/32-in. cable The current Grapple Hoist Assembly, detailed on drawing H-2-690057, is prone to ''bird nesting'' the cable on the drum. ''Bird nesting'' is a condition in which the cable does not wind onto the drum in a uniformly layered manner, but winds in a random fashion where the cable essentially ''piles up'' inappropriately on the drum and, on some occasions, winds on the drum drive shaft. A system to help control this ''bird nesting'' problem has been designed as an addition to the existing components of the Grapple Hoist Assembly. The new design consists of a mechanism that is timed with, and driven by, the shaft that drives the drum. This mechanism traverses back and forth across the width of the drum to lay the cable on the drum in a uniformly layered manner. This test plan establishes the acceptance criteria, test procedure and test conditions It also describes the test apparatus necessary to verify the adequacy of the level wind system design. The test is defined as qualification testing (LMHC 1999b) and as such will be performed at conditions beyond the parameters that the Grapple Hoist Assembly is allowed to operate by the Safety Equipment List (SEL)(LMHC 1998)

  4. Sampling strategy to develop a core collection of Uruguayan maize landraces based on morphological traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malosetti, M.; Abadie, T.

    2001-01-01

    Core collections were suggested to improve germplasm utilization. A core collection is a subset chosen to represent the diversity of a collection with a minimum of redundancies. Because diversity is distributed between and within groups with different degrees of organization, an adequate

  5. Design review report for rotary mode core sample truck (RMCST) modifications for flammable gas tanks, preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the completion of a preliminary design review for the Rotary Mode Core Sample Truck (RMCST) modifications for flammable gas tanks. The RMCST modifications are intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to validate basic design assumptions and concepts to support a path forward leading to a final design. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that the design was acceptable and efforts should continue toward a final design review

  6. Correlation between k-space sampling pattern and MTF in compressed sensing MRSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikal, A A; Wachowicz, K; Fallone, B G

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between the k-space sampling patterns used for compressed sensing MR spectroscopic imaging (CS-MRSI) and the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the metabolite maps. This relationship may allow the desired frequency content of the metabolite maps to be quantitatively tailored when designing an undersampling pattern. Simulations of a phantom were used to calculate the MTF of Nyquist sampled (NS) 32 × 32 MRSI, and four-times undersampled CS-MRSI reconstructions. The dependence of the CS-MTF on the k-space sampling pattern was evaluated for three sets of k-space sampling patterns generated using different probability distribution functions (PDFs). CS-MTFs were also evaluated for three more sets of patterns generated using a modified algorithm where the sampling ratios are constrained to adhere to PDFs. Strong visual correlation as well as high R 2 was found between the MTF of CS-MRSI and the product of the frequency-dependant sampling ratio and the NS 32 × 32 MTF. Also, PDF-constrained sampling patterns led to higher reproducibility of the CS-MTF, and stronger correlations to the above-mentioned product. The relationship established in this work provides the user with a theoretical solution for the MTF of CS MRSI that is both predictable and customizable to the user's needs.

  7. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station] fuel canister and core sample handling equipment used in INEL hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Shurtliff, W.T.; Lynch, R.J.; Croft, K.M.; Whitmill, L.J.; Allen, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the specialized remote handling equipment developed and used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to handle samples obtained from the core of the damaged Unit 2 reactor at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TM-2). Samples of the core were removed, placed in TMI-2 fuel canisters, and transported to the INEL. Those samples will be examined as part of the analysis of the TMI-2 accident. The equipment described herein was designed for removing sample materials from the fuel canisters, assisting with initial examination, and processing samples in preparation for detailed examinations. The more complex equipment used microprocessor remote controls with electric motor drives providing the required force and motion capabilities. The remaining components were unpowered and manipulator assisted

  8. Corrigendum: Information Search in Decisions From Experience: Do Our Patterns of Sampling Foreshadow Our Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Original article: Hills, T. T., & Hertwig, R. (2010). Information search in decisions from experience: Do our patterns of sampling foreshadow our decisions? Psychological Science, 21, 1787-1792. doi:10.1177/0956797610387443.

  9. Eating patterns in a population-based sample of children aged 5 to 7 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micali, Nadia; Simonoff, Emily; Elberling, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    There is still a lack of research on childhood eating patterns and their correlates in relation to psychopathology and parentally perceived impact in general population samples. We aimed to determine which eating patterns were more likely to be identified as problematic by parents, and their impact...... and association with childhood psychopathology (emotional, behavioral, and pervasive developmental disorders) in a general population child cohort....

  10. Eating patterns in a population-based sample of children aged 5 to 7 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micali, Nadia; Simonoff, Emily; Elberling, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    There is still a lack of research on childhood eating patterns and their correlates in relation to psychopathology and parentally perceived impact in general population samples. We aimed to determine which eating patterns were more likely to be identified as problematic by parents, and their impact...

  11. Active AirCore Sampling: Constraining Point Sources of Methane and Other Gases with Fixed Wing Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, J. D.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.; Newberger, T.; Higgs, J. A.; Wolter, S.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate estimates of point source gas emissions are essential for reconciling top-down and bottom-up greenhouse gas measurements, but sampling such sources is challenging. Remote sensing methods are limited by resolution and cloud cover; aircraft methods are limited by air traffic control clearances, and the need to properly determine boundary layer height. A new sampling approach leverages the ability of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to measure all the way to the surface near the source of emissions, improving sample resolution, and reducing the need to characterize a wide downstream swath, or measure to the full height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The "Active-AirCore" sampler, currently under development, will fly on a fixed wing UAS in Class G airspace, spiraling from the surface to 1200 ft AGL around point sources such as leaking oil wells to measure methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. The sampler collects a 100-meter long sample "core" of air in an 1/8" passivated stainless steel tube. This "core" is run on a high-precision instrument shortly after the UAS is recovered. Sample values are mapped to a specific geographic location by cross-referencing GPS and flow/pressure metadata, and fluxes are quantified by applying Gauss's theorem to the data, mapped onto the spatial "cylinder" circumscribed by the UAS. The AirCore-Active builds off the sampling ability and analytical approach of the related AirCore sampler, which profiles the atmosphere passively using a balloon launch platform, but will add an active pumping capability needed for near-surface horizontal sampling applications. Here, we show design elements, laboratory and field test results for methane, describe the overall goals of the mission, and discuss how the platform can be adapted, with minimal effort, to measure other gas species.

  12. Tank Vapor Sampling and Analysis Data Package for Tank 241-Z-361 Sampled 09/22/1999 and 09/27/1999, During Sludge Core Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VISWANATH, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the September 22 and 27, 1999, headspace vapor sampling of Hanford Site Tank 241-2-361 during sludge core removal. The Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) sampling team collected the samples and Waste Management Laboratory (WML) analyzed the samples in accordance with the requirements specified in the 241-2361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan, (SAP), HNF-4371/Rev. 1, (Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Corporation, 1999). Six SUMMA(trademark) canister samples were collected on each day (1 ambient field blank and 5 tank vapor samples collected when each core segment was removed). The samples were radiologically released on September 28 and October 4, 1999, and received at the laboratory on September 29 and October 6, 1999. Target analytes were not detected at concentrations greater than their notification limits as specified in the SAP. Analytical results for the target analytes and tentatively identified compounds (TICs) are presented in Section 2.2.2 starting on page 2B-7. Three compounds identified for analysis in the SAP were analyzed as TICs. The discussion of this modification is presented in Section 2.2.1.2

  13. Thermal property and density measurements of samples taken from drilling cores from potential geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagedrost, J.F.; Capps, W.

    1983-12-01

    Density, steady-state conductivity, enthalpy, specific heat, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity and linear thermal expansion were measured on 59 materials from core drill samples of several geologic media, including rock salt, basalt, and other associated rocks from 7 potential sites for nuclear waste isolation. The measurements were conducted from or near to room temperature up to 500 0 C, or to lower temperatures if limited by specimen cracking or fracturing. Ample documentation establishes the reliability of the property measurement methods and the accuracy of the results. Thermal expansions of salts reached 2.2 to 2.8 percent at 500 0 C. Associated rocks were from 0.6 to 1.6 percent. Basalts were close to 0.3 percent at 500 0 C. Specific heats of salts varied from 0.213 to 0.233 cal g -1 C -1 , and basalts averaged 0.239 cal g -1 C -1 . Thermal conductivities of salts at 50 0 C were from 0.022 to 0.046 wcm -1 C -1 , and at 500 0 C, from 0.012 to 0.027 wcm -1 C -1 . Basalts conductivities ranged from 0.020 to 0.022 wcm -1 C -1 at 100 0 C and 0.016 to 0.018 at 500 0 C. There were no obvious conductivity trends relative to source location. Room temperature densities of salts were from 2.14 to 2.29 gcm -3 , and basalts, from 2.83 to 2.90 gcm -3 . The extreme friability of some materials made specimen fabrication difficult. 21 references, 17 figures, 28 tables

  14. Automatic determination of BWR fuel loading patterns based on K.E. technique with core physics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, T.; Tsuiki, M.; Takeshita, T.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis oof a computerized search method, a prototype for a fuel loading pattern expert system has been developed to support designers in core design for BWRs. The method was implemented by coupling rules and core physics simulators into an inference engine to establish an automated generate-and-test cycle. A search control mechanism, which prunes paths to be searched and selects appropriate rules through the interaction with the user, was also introduced to accomplish an effective search. The constraints in BWR core design are: (1) cycle length more than L, (2) core shutdown margin more than S, and (3) thermal margin more than T. Here L, S, and T are the specified minimum values. In this system, individual rules contain the manipulation to improve the core shutdown margin explicitly. Other items were taken into account only implicitly. Several applications to the test cases were carried out. It was found that the results were comparable with those obtained by human expert engineers. Broad applicability of the present method in the BWR core design domain was proved

  15. Tank 241-AZ-102 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AZ-102

  16. Tank 241-AZ-102 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AZ-102

  17. Design Review Report for formal review of safety class features of exhauster system for rotary mode core sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JANICEK, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    Report documenting Formal Design Review conducted on portable exhausters used to support rotary mode core sampling of Hanford underground radioactive waste tanks with focus on Safety Class design features and control requirements for flammable gas environment operation and air discharge permitting compliance

  18. Design Review Report for formal review of safety class features of exhauster system for rotary mode core sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JANICEK, G.P.

    2000-06-08

    Report documenting Formal Design Review conducted on portable exhausters used to support rotary mode core sampling of Hanford underground radioactive waste tanks with focus on Safety Class design features and control requirements for flammable gas environment operation and air discharge permitting compliance.

  19. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented

  20. Automated CBED processing: Sample thickness estimation based on analysis of zone-axis CBED pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, M., E-mail: klinger@post.cz; Němec, M.; Polívka, L.; Gärtnerová, V.; Jäger, A.

    2015-03-15

    An automated processing of convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns is presented. The proposed methods are used in an automated tool for estimating the thickness of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples by matching an experimental zone-axis CBED pattern with a series of patterns simulated for known thicknesses. The proposed tool detects CBED disks, localizes a pattern in detected disks and unifies the coordinate system of the experimental pattern with the simulated one. The experimental pattern is then compared disk-by-disk with a series of simulated patterns each corresponding to different known thicknesses. The thickness of the most similar simulated pattern is then taken as the thickness estimate. The tool was tested on [0 1 1] Si, [0 1 0] α-Ti and [0 1 1] α-Ti samples prepared using different techniques. Results of the presented approach were compared with thickness estimates based on analysis of CBED patterns in two beam conditions. The mean difference between these two methods was 4.1% for the FIB-prepared silicon samples, 5.2% for the electro-chemically polished titanium and 7.9% for Ar{sup +} ion-polished titanium. The proposed techniques can also be employed in other established CBED analyses. Apart from the thickness estimation, it can potentially be used to quantify lattice deformation, structure factors, symmetry, defects or extinction distance. - Highlights: • Automated TEM sample thickness estimation using zone-axis CBED is presented. • Computer vision and artificial intelligence are employed in CBED processing. • This approach reduces operator effort, analysis time and increases repeatability. • Individual parts can be employed in other analyses of CBED/diffraction pattern.

  1. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to construct rotary mode core-sampling truck and exhauster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    Characterization of wastes in the underground single-shell tanks and double-shell tanks on the Hanford Site is crucial in developing the final disposal options for the waste and closure strategy for the Hanford Site. Additionally, characterization of tank waste is important for the waste tank safety programs. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (also referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00 requires the obtaining and analyzing of at least two samples from each single-shell tank, and Milestone M-10-13 specifically requires the ability to sample hard saltcake. Existing equipment does not allow sampling of all single-shell tanks within established tank safety limits. Consequently, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office has developed a rotary mode core-sampling system that uses nitrogen gas to cool and clear the drill bit. A rotary mode core-sampling truck will be used on approximately 80 single-shell tanks which contain saltcake wastes, and will provide crucial information on the contents of the tanks. This application is a request for approval to construct and operate the rotary mode core-sampling truck and exhauster in the 200 East and 200 West Area Tank Farms of the Hanford Site. This request is being made pursuant to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H

  2. Preliminary stratigraphic and petrologic characterization of core samples from USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, A.C.; Carroll, P.R.

    1981-11-01

    Tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation to determine their potential for long-term storage of radioactive waste. As part of this program, hole USW-G1 was drilled to a depth of 6000 ft below the surface, in the central part of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Petrographic study of the USW-G1 core is presented in this report and shows the tuffs (which generally were variably welded ash flows) are partly recrystallized to a variety of secondary minerals. The important alteration products are zeolites (heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime), smectite clays with minor interstratified illite, albite, micas, potassium feldspar, and various forms of silica. Iijima's zeolite zones I through IV of burial metamorphism can be recognized in the core. Zeolites are first observed at about the 1300-ft depth, and the high-temperature boundary of zeolite stability in this core occurs at about 4350 ft. Analcime persists, either metastably or as a retrograde mineral, deeper in the core. The oxidation state of Fe-Ti oxide minerals, through most of the core, increases as the degree of welding decreases, but towards the bottom of the hole, reducing conditions generally prevail. Four stratigraphic units transected by the core may be potentially favorable sites for a waste repository. These four units, in order of increasing depth in the core, are (1) the lower cooling unit of the Topopah Spring Member, (2) cooling unit II of the Bullfrog Member, (3) the upper part of the Tram tuff, and (4) the Lithic-rich tuff

  3. Preliminary stratigraphic and petrologic characterization of core samples from USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, A.C.; Carroll, P.R. (eds.)

    1981-11-01

    Tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation to determine their potential for long-term storage of radioactive waste. As part of this program, hole USW-G1 was drilled to a depth of 6000 ft below the surface, in the central part of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Petrographic study of the USW-G1 core is presented in this report and shows the tuffs (which generally were variably welded ash flows) are partly recrystallized to a variety of secondary minerals. The important alteration products are zeolites (heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime), smectite clays with minor interstratified illite, albite, micas, potassium feldspar, and various forms of silica. Iijima`s zeolite zones I through IV of burial metamorphism can be recognized in the core. Zeolites are first observed at about the 1300-ft depth, and the high-temperature boundary of zeolite stability in this core occurs at about 4350 ft. Analcime persists, either metastably or as a retrograde mineral, deeper in the core. The oxidation state of Fe-Ti oxide minerals, through most of the core, increases as the degree of welding decreases, but towards the bottom of the hole, reducing conditions generally prevail. Four stratigraphic units transected by the core may be potentially favorable sites for a waste repository. These four units, in order of increasing depth in the core, are (1) the lower cooling unit of the Topopah Spring Member, (2) cooling unit II of the Bullfrog Member, (3) the upper part of the Tram tuff, and (4) the Lithic-rich tuff.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of sediment core samples of Lake Erhai in southern China and a Salt Lake in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shinozuka, Yoshitsugu; Miura, Masahiro; Moriyasu, Yuki

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is in the verification of the hypothesis that the long-lived nuclide ratio of Th/Sc in the deposit sample dug up in the lake with the hinterland of the granite quality is the index of a past change of precipitation and of the event such as earthquakes. As a preceding step the relation between an environmental change and a climate change was studied by the measuring result of the ratio of Th/Sc by the neutron activation analysis about the digging core sample of the Nepalese Katmandu basin (For the past 700,000 years) and the core sample (For 40,000 years and 8,000 years of the past) in Lake Biwa. (H. Katsuta)

  5. The pxarCore Library - Technical Documentation, Reference Manual, and Sample Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon; Perrey, Hanno Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the pxarCore library as of version 2.7, a versatile cross-platform library to program and read out devices featuring PSI46-type readout chips (ROCs) via the PSI digital test beoard (DTB). The design principles and features are presented together with an overview over possible configurations and use cases. The pxarCore library is built as flexible hardware interface and is capable of programming and reading out various combinations of ROCs. Most of the DTB firmware complexity is abstracted to allow users to address the attached devices via a simple yet versatile interface.

  6. Development of the RANCOR Rotary-Percussive Coring System for Mars Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Gale; Indyk, Stephen; Zacny, Kris

    2014-01-01

    A RANCOR drill was designed to fit a Mars Exploration Rover (MER) class vehicle. The low mass of 3 kg was achieved by using the same actuator for three functions: rotation, percussions, and core break-off. Initial testing of the drill exposed an unexpected behavior of an off-the-shelf sprag clutch used to couple and decouple rotary-percussive function from the core break off function. Failure of the sprag was due to the vibration induced during percussive drilling. The sprag clutch would back drive in conditions where it was expected to hold position. Although this did not affect the performance of the drill, it nevertheless reduced the quality of the cores produced. Ultimately, the sprag clutch was replaced with a custom ratchet system that allowed for some angular displacement without advancing in either direction. Replacing the sprag with the ratchet improved the collected core quality. Also, premature failure of a 300-series stainless steel percussion spring was observed. The 300-series percussion spring was ultimately replaced with a music wire spring based on performances of previously designed rotary-percussive drill systems.

  7. Automatic determination of pressurized water reactor core loading patterns which maximize end-of-cycle reactivity within power peaking and burnup constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    An automated procedure for determining the optimal core loading pattern for a pressurized water reactor which maximizes end-of-cycle k/sub eff/ while satisfying constraints on power peaking and discharge burnup has been developed. The optimization algorithm combines a two energy group, two-dimensional coarse-mesh finite difference diffusion theory neutronics model to simulate core conditions, a perturbation theory approach to determine reactivity, flux, power and burnup changes as a function of assembly shuffling, and Monte Carlo integer programming to select the optimal loading pattern solution. The core examined was a typical Cycle 2 reload with no burnable poisons. Results indicate that the core loading pattern that maximizes end-of-cycle k/sub eff/ results in a 5.4% decrease in fuel cycle costs compared with the core loading pattern that minimizes the maximum relative radial power peak

  8. A new CF-IRMS system for quantifying stable isotopes of carbon monoxide from ice cores and small air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new analysis technique for stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from ice core samples. The technique is an online cryogenic vacuum extraction followed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS; it can also be used with small air samples. The CO extraction system includes two multi-loop cryogenic cleanup traps, a chemical oxidant for oxidation to CO2, a cryogenic collection trap, a cryofocusing unit, gas chromatography purification, and subsequent injection into a Finnigan Delta Plus IRMS. Analytical precision of 0.2‰ (±1δ for δ13C and 0.6‰ (±1δ for δ18O can be obtained for 100 mL (STP air samples with CO mixing ratios ranging from 60 ppbv to 140 ppbv (~268–625 pmol CO. Six South Pole ice core samples from depths ranging from 133 m to 177 m were processed for CO isotope analysis after wet extraction. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of stable isotopes of CO in ice core air.

  9. ArF photo resist pattern sample preparation method using FIB without protective coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okushima, Hirohisa; Onozuka, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Yasushi; Yaguchi, Toshie; Umemura, Kaoru; Tamochi, Ryuichiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Hasegawa, Norio; Kawata, Isao; Rijpers, Bart

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method of FIB (FIB: focused ion beam) sample preparation to accurately evaluate critical dimensions and profiles of ArF photo resist patterns without the use of a protective coating on the photo resist. In order to accomplish this, the FIB micro-sampling method that is one of effective FIB milling and fabrication method was employed. First a Si cap is picked up from a silicon wafer and fixed to ArF photo resist patterns to protect against ion beam irradiation. Then, a micro-sample, a piece of Si-capped ArF photo resist, was extracted from the bulk ArF photo resist. In this procedure, this silicon cap always protects ArF photo resist patterns against ion beam irradiation. For the next step, the micro-sample is fixed to a needle stub of the FIB-STEM (STEM: scanning transmission electron microscopy) compatible rotation holder. This sample on the needle stub was rotated 180 degrees and milled from the side of Si substrate. Lastly, the sample is milled to the thickness of 2μm. In this process, the ion beam is irradiating from the silicon substrate side to minimize the ion beam irradiation damages on the ArF photo resist patterns. EDX (EDX: Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) analysis proved that no gallium ions were detected on the surface of the ArF photo resist patterns. The feasibility of high accelerating voltage observation of STEM to observe line edge roughness of a thick sample like 2μm without shrinkage has been demonstrated.

  10. Biostratigraphic analysis of core samples from wells drilled in the Devonian shale interval of the Appalachian and Illinois Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.J.; Zielinski, R.E.

    1978-07-14

    A palynological investigation was performed on 55 samples of core material from four wells drilled in the Devonian Shale interval of the Appalachian and Illinois Basins. Using a combination of spores and acritarchs, it was possible to divide the Middle Devonian from the Upper Devonian and to make subdivisions within the Middle and Upper Devonian. The age of the palynomorphs encountered in this study is Upper Devonian.

  11. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

  12. Synthesis, characterization and nitrite ion sensing performance of reclaimable composite samples through a core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Yuqing, Zhao; Cui, Jiantao; Zheng, Qian; Bo, Wang

    2018-02-01

    The following paper reported and discussed a nitrite ion optical sensing platform based on a core-shell structure, using superamagnetic nanoparticles as the core, a silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as the shell and two rhodamine derivatives as probe, respectively. This superamagnetic core made this sensing platform reclaimable after finishing nitrite ion sensing procedure. This sensing platform was carefully characterized by means of electron microscopy images, porous structure analysis, magnetic response, IR spectra and thermal stability analysis. Detailed analysis suggested that the emission of these composite samples was quenchable by nitrite ion, showing emission turn off effect. A static sensing mechanism based on an additive reaction between chemosensors and nitrite ion was proposed. These composite samples followed Demas quenching equation against different nitrite ion concentrations. Limit of detection value was obtained as low as 0.4 μM. It was found that, after being quenched by nitrite ion, these composite samples could be reclaimed and recovered by sulphamic acid, confirming their recyclability.

  13. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

  14. Nondestructive continuous physical property measurements of core samples recovered from hole B, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirono, Tetsuro; Yeh, En-Chao; Lin, Weiren; Sone, Hiroki; Mishima, Toshiaki; Soh, Wonn; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Aoike, Kan; Ito, Hisao; Kinoshita, Masataka; Murayama, Masafumi; Song, Sheng-Rong; Ma, Kuo-Fong; Hung, Jih-Hao; Wang, Chien-Ying; Tsai, Yi-Ben; Kondo, Tomomi; Nishimura, Masahiro; Moriya, Soichi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Fujiki, Toru; Maeda, Lena; Muraki, Hiroaki; Kuramoto, Toshikatsu; Sugiyama, Kazuhiro; Sugawara, Toshikatsu

    2007-07-01

    The Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project was undertaken in 2002 to investigate the faulting mechanism of the 1999 Mw 7.6 Taiwan Chi-Chi earthquake. Hole B penetrated the Chelungpu fault, and core samples were recovered from between 948.42- and 1352.60-m depth. Three major zones, designated FZB1136 (fault zone at 1136-m depth in hole B), FZB1194, and FZB1243, were recognized in the core samples as active fault zones within the Chelungpu fault. Nondestructive continuous physical property measurements, conducted on all core samples, revealed that the three major fault zones were characterized by low gamma ray attenuation (GRA) densities and high magnetic susceptibilities. Extensive fracturing and cracks within the fault zones and/or loss of atoms with high atomic number, but not a measurement artifact, might have caused the low GRA densities, whereas the high magnetic susceptibility values might have resulted from the formation of magnetic minerals from paramagnetic minerals by frictional heating. Minor fault zones were characterized by low GRA densities and no change in magnetic susceptibility, and the latter may indicate that these minor zones experienced relatively low frictional heating. Magnetic susceptibility in a fault zone may be key to the determination that frictional heating occurred during an earthquake on the fault.

  15. Data precision of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning of discrete samples with the ITRAX XRF core-scanner exemplified on loess-paleosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profe, Jörn; Ohlendorf, Christian

    2017-04-01

    XRF-scanning is the state-of-the-art technique for geochemical analyses in marine and lacustrine sedimentology for more than a decade. However, little attention has been paid to data precision and technical limitations so far. Using homogenized, dried and powdered samples (certified geochemical reference standards and samples from a lithologically-contrasting loess-paleosol sequence) minimizes many adverse effects that influence the XRF-signal when analyzing wet sediment cores. This allows the investigation of data precision under ideal conditions and documents a new application of the XRF core-scanner technology at the same time. Reliable interpretations of XRF results require data precision evaluation of single elements as a function of X-ray tube, measurement time, sample compaction and quality of peak fitting. Ten-fold measurement of each sample constitutes data precision. Data precision of XRF measurements theoretically obeys Poisson statistics. Fe and Ca exhibit largest deviations from Poisson statistics. The same elements show the least mean relative standard deviations in the range from 0.5% to 1%. This represents the technical limit of data precision achievable by the installed detector. Measurement times ≥ 30 s reveal mean relative standard deviations below 4% for most elements. The quality of peak fitting is only relevant for elements with overlapping fluorescence lines such as Ba, Ti and Mn or for elements with low concentrations such as Y, for example. Differences in sample compaction are marginal and do not change mean relative standard deviation considerably. Data precision is in the range reported for geochemical reference standards measured by conventional techniques. Therefore, XRF scanning of discrete samples provide a cost- and time-efficient alternative to conventional multi-element analyses. As best trade-off between economical operation and data quality, we recommend a measurement time of 30 s resulting in a total scan time of 30 minutes

  16. Automatic determination of pressurized water reactor core loading patterns that maximize beginning-of-cycle reactivity within power-peaking and burnup constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, G.H.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to automatically determine a good estimate of the core loading pattern, which minimizes fuel cycle costs for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Equating fuel cycle cost minimization with core reactivity maximization, the objective is to determine the loading pattern that maximizes core reactivity while satisfying power peaking, discharge burnup, and other constraints. The method utilizes a two-dimensional, coarse-mesh, finite difference scheme to evaluate core reactivity and fluxes for an initial reference loading pattern. First-order perturbation theory is applied to determine the effects of assembly shuffling on reactivity, power distribution, end-of-cycle burnup. Monte Carlo integer programming is then used to determine a near-optimal loading pattern within a range of loading patterns near the reference pattern. The process then repeats with the new loading pattern as the reference loading pattern and terminates when no better loading pattern can be determined. The process was applied with both reactivity maximization and radial power-peaking minimization as objectives. Results on a typical large PWR indicate that the cost of obtaining an 8% improvement in radial power-peaking margin is ≅2% in fuel cycle costs, for the reload core loaded without burnable poisons that was studied

  17. Implementation of Sample Graphic Patterns on Derived Scientific/Technologic Documentary Figures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiang-bao; WANG Xiao-yu; WANG Lei

    2013-01-01

    The presenting work deals with implementation of sample graphic patterns derived from published scientific/technologic documentation figures on numeric simulation of multiphase flow and FEM analysis of thin walled mechanical structures. First, geometric plane patterns in rectangular/circular form were demonstrated in contrast to gradual change style in color and graphic configuration. Next, selected artistic/graphic sample patterns were implemented in logo conceptual design and visual innovation storming. The way in editing the above original figures is 2D symmetry, rectangular array geometrically, and converting them in inverse color in software like PS. The objective of this work is to cultivate, explore and discipline trainees’ visual ability in artistic/aesthetic appreciation, graphic communication and industrial design and application, thus laying ties closely among comprehensive university students from different majors on science, engineering, arts and humanity.

  18. Ice age aerosol content from east Antarctic ice core samples and past wind strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.R.; Briat, M.; Royer, A.

    1981-01-01

    The possible link between the aerosol content from the 905 deep Dome C ice core (East Antartica) which spans some 32,000 yr (Lorius et al. Nature; 280:644 (1979)) and climate, is considered. No evidence of major global or local volcanic activity was found though large marine and continental inputs (respectively 5 and 20 times higher than present) were observed at the end of the last Glacial stage. It is considered that they reflect glacial age climate with stronger atmospheric circulation, enhanced aridity and faster aerosol transport towards the Antarctic continent. (U.K.)

  19. Dietary patterns and depressive mood in a multiethnic representative sample of Texas eighth graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relation between dietary patterns and depressive mood among 8th grade students in Texas. Data were from the 2004–2005 School Physical Activity and Nutrition study, a multistage probability-based sample of Texas 8th graders. Participants (n=8827; 14.7% Afri...

  20. Patterns of Drug Use in a Sample of 200 Young Drug Users in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCambridge, Jim; Strang, John

    2004-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a secondary prevention intervention study was conducted to describe patterns of drug use in a non-treatment sample of young drug users recruited in ten further-education colleges across inner London. Participants were 200 young people who were either weekly cannabis users and/or who had…

  1. Radiation pattern synthesis of planar antennas using the iterative sampling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Coffey, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    A synthesis method is presented for determining an excitation of an arbitrary (but fixed) planar source configuration. The desired radiation pattern is specified over all or part of the visible region. It may have multiple and/or shaped main beams with low sidelobes. The iterative sampling method is used to find an excitation of the source which yields a radiation pattern that approximates the desired pattern to within a specified tolerance. In this paper the method is used to calculate excitations for line sources, linear arrays (equally and unequally spaced), rectangular apertures, rectangular arrays (arbitrary spacing grid), and circular apertures. Examples using these sources to form patterns with shaped main beams, multiple main beams, shaped sidelobe levels, and combinations thereof are given.

  2. Behavioural sampling techniques and activity pattern of Indian Pangolin Manis crassicaudata (Mammalia: Manidae in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Mohapatra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents data on six Indian Pangolins Manis crassicaudata observed in captivity at the Pangolin Conservation Breeding Centre, Nandankanan, Odisha, India over 1377 hours of video recordings for each pangolin between 1500hr and 0800hr on 81 consecutive observational days. Video recordings were made through digital systems assisted by infrared enabled CCTV cameras. The data highlights patterns relate to 12 different behaviour and enclosure utilization. Different interval periods for sampling of instantaneous behaviour from video recordings have been evaluated to develop optimal study methods for the future. The activity budgets of pangolins displayed natural patterns of nocturnal activity with a peak between 20:00-21:00 hr. When out of their burrow, they spent about 59% of the time walking in the enclosure, and 14% of the time feeding. The repeatability of the behaviours has a significant negative correlation with the mean time spent in that behaviour. Focal behavioural samples significantly correlated with instantaneous samples up to 15 minutes interval. The correlation values gradually decreased with the increase in sampling interval. The results indicate that results obtained from focal sampling and instantaneous sampling with relatively shorter intervals (=5 minutes are about equally reliable. The study suggests use of focal sampling, instead of instantaneous sampling to record behaviour relating to social interactions.

  3. Ecological patterns, diversity and core taxa of microbial communities in groundwater-fed rapid gravity filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we document microbial communities in rapid gravity filtration units, specifically serial rapid sand filters (RSFs), termed prefilters (PFs) and after- filters (AFs), fed with anoxic groundwaters low in organic carbon to prepare potable waters. A comprehensive 16S rRNA-based amplicon...... sequencing survey revealed a core RSF microbiome comprising few bacterial taxa (29–30 genera) dominated by Nitrospirae, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria, with a strikingly high abundance (75–87±18%) across five examined waterworks in Denmark. Lineages within the Nitrospira genus consistently comprised...... the second most and most abundant fraction in PFs (27±23%) and AFs (45.2±23%), respectively, and were far more abundant than typical proteobacterial ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, suggesting a physiology beyond nitrite oxidation for Nitrospira. Within the core taxa, sequences closely related to types...

  4. Core regulatory network motif underlies the ocellar complex patterning in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, D.; Lemos, M. C.; Córdoba, A.

    2015-03-01

    During organogenesis, developmental programs governed by Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) define the functionality, size and shape of the different constituents of living organisms. Robustness, thus, is an essential characteristic that GRNs need to fulfill in order to maintain viability and reproducibility in a species. In the present work we analyze the robustness of the patterning for the ocellar complex formation in Drosophila melanogaster fly. We have systematically pruned the GRN that drives the development of this visual system to obtain the minimum pathway able to satisfy this pattern. We found that the mechanism underlying the patterning obeys to the dynamics of a 3-nodes network motif with a double negative feedback loop fed by a morphogenetic gradient that triggers the inhibition in a French flag problem fashion. A Boolean modeling of the GRN confirms robustness in the patterning mechanism showing the same result for different network complexity levels. Interestingly, the network provides a steady state solution in the interocellar part of the patterning and an oscillatory regime in the ocelli. This theoretical result predicts that the ocellar pattern may underlie oscillatory dynamics in its genetic regulation.

  5. Microfracture pattern compared to core-scale fractures in the borehole of Soultz-sous-Forets granite, Rhine graben, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezayes, C.; Villemin, T. [Universite de Savoie (France). Laboratoire de Geodynamique des Chaines Alpines, UPRES-A CNRS 5025; Pecher, A. [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France). Laboratoire de Geodynamique des Chaines Alpines, UPRES-A CNRS 5025

    2000-07-01

    Microfractures appearing in thin section as fluid inclusion trails in quartz crystals were studied in four core samples of Soultz-sous-Forets granite. Their orientations in four series of three mutually perpendicular thin sections were estimated using a previously described apparent dip method and a new method involving measurements of strike and apparent dips. Three samples display three microfracture sets and one sample displays two sets. In all samples, one set is nearly vertical and strikes N-S. In two samples, one and two sets are nearly vertical and strike E-W. In two samples, two sets strike NW-SE: one is vertical, the other dips gently to the NE (or SW). Comparing microfracture and mesofractures sets in the same cores shows that (1) the N-S microfacture set is always dominant at both scales and (2) all other microfracture sets have no mesoscopic counterpart. The N-S microfracture sets could have been created during E-W extension of earliest Cenozoic age (Rhine Graben rifting). Differences between the two scales are explained by a {sigma}{sub 1}/{sigma}{sub 2} switching which occurred at the crystal scale and generated mutually perpendicular cracks.

  6. The Importance of Mars Samples in Constraining the Geological and Geophysical Processes on Mars and the Nature of its Crust, Mantle, and Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    iMOST Team; Herd, C. D. K.; Ammannito, E.; Anand, M.; Debaille, V.; Hallis, L. J.; McCubbin, F. M.; Schmitz, N.; Usui, T.; Weiss, B. P.; Altieri, F.; Amelin, Y.; Beaty, D. W.; Benning, L. G.; Bishop, J. L.; Borg, L. E.; Boucher, D.; Brucato, J. R.; Busemann, H.; Campbell, K. A.; Carrier, B. L.; Czaja, A. D.; Des Marais, D. J.; Dixon, M.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Farmer, J. D.; Fernandez-Remolar, D. C.; Fogarty, J.; Glavin, D. P.; Goreva, Y. S.; Grady, M. M.; Harrington, A. D.; Hausrath, E. M.; Horgan, B.; Humayun, M.; Kleine, T.; Kleinhenz, J.; Mangold, N.; Mackelprang, R.; Mayhew, L. E.; McCoy, J. T.; McLennan, S. M.; McSween, H. Y.; Moser, D. E.; Moynier, F.; Mustard, J. F.; Niles, P. B.; Ori, G. G.; Raulin, F.; Rettberg, P.; Rucker, M. A.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Sephton, M. A.; Shaheen, R.; Shuster, D. L.; Siljestrom, S.; Smith, C. L.; Spry, J. A.; Steele, A.; Swindle, T. D.; ten Kate, I. L.; Tosca, N. J.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.; Wadhwa, M.; Werner, S. C.; Westall, F.; Wheeler, R. M.; Zipfel, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2018-04-01

    We present the main sample types from any potential Mars Sample Return landing site that would be required to constrain the geological and geophysical processes on Mars, including the origin and nature of its crust, mantle, and core.

  7. Patterns of Childhood Abuse and Neglect in a Representative German Population Sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schilling

    Full Text Available Different types of childhood maltreatment, like emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical abuse, physical neglect and sexual abuse are interrelated because of their co-occurrence. Different patterns of childhood abuse and neglect are associated with the degree of severity of mental disorders in adulthood. The purpose of this study was (a to identify different patterns of childhood maltreatment in a representative German community sample, (b to replicate the patterns of childhood neglect and abuse recently found in a clinical German sample, (c to examine whether participants reporting exposure to specific patterns of child maltreatment would report different levels of psychological distress, and (d to compare the results of the typological approach and the results of a cumulative risk model based on our data set.In a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2010, a representative random sample of 2504 German participants aged between 14 and 92 years completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ. General anxiety and depression were assessed by standardized questionnaires (GAD-2, PHQ-2. Cluster analysis was conducted with the CTQ-subscales to identify different patterns of childhood maltreatment.Three different patterns of childhood abuse and neglect could be identified by cluster analysis. Cluster one showed low values on all CTQ-scales. Cluster two showed high values in emotional and physical neglect. Only cluster three showed high values in physical and sexual abuse. The three patterns of childhood maltreatment showed different degrees of depression (PHQ-2 and anxiety (GAD-2. Cluster one showed lowest levels of psychological distress, cluster three showed highest levels of mental distress.The results show that different types of childhood maltreatment are interrelated and can be grouped into specific patterns of childhood abuse and neglect, which are associated with differing severity of psychological distress in adulthood. The results

  8. Patterns of Childhood Abuse and Neglect in a Representative German Population Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Christoph; Weidner, Kerstin; Brähler, Elmar; Glaesmer, Heide; Häuser, Winfried; Pöhlmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Different types of childhood maltreatment, like emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical abuse, physical neglect and sexual abuse are interrelated because of their co-occurrence. Different patterns of childhood abuse and neglect are associated with the degree of severity of mental disorders in adulthood. The purpose of this study was (a) to identify different patterns of childhood maltreatment in a representative German community sample, (b) to replicate the patterns of childhood neglect and abuse recently found in a clinical German sample, (c) to examine whether participants reporting exposure to specific patterns of child maltreatment would report different levels of psychological distress, and (d) to compare the results of the typological approach and the results of a cumulative risk model based on our data set. Methods In a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2010, a representative random sample of 2504 German participants aged between 14 and 92 years completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). General anxiety and depression were assessed by standardized questionnaires (GAD-2, PHQ-2). Cluster analysis was conducted with the CTQ-subscales to identify different patterns of childhood maltreatment. Results Three different patterns of childhood abuse and neglect could be identified by cluster analysis. Cluster one showed low values on all CTQ-scales. Cluster two showed high values in emotional and physical neglect. Only cluster three showed high values in physical and sexual abuse. The three patterns of childhood maltreatment showed different degrees of depression (PHQ-2) and anxiety (GAD-2). Cluster one showed lowest levels of psychological distress, cluster three showed highest levels of mental distress. Conclusion The results show that different types of childhood maltreatment are interrelated and can be grouped into specific patterns of childhood abuse and neglect, which are associated with differing severity of psychological distress in

  9. Tanks 3F and 2F Saltcake Core and Supernate Sample Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARTINO, CHRISTOPHERJ

    2004-01-01

    In support of Low-Curie Salt (LCS) process validation at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) has undertaken a program of tank waste characterization, including salt sampling. As part of this initiative, they sampled the surface of the saltcake in Tank 3F and Tank 2F using approximately 12-inch long sample tubes. A series of three saltcake samples were taken of the upper crust in Tank 3F and a single saltcake sample was taken from the bottom of a liquid-filled well in Tank 2F. In addition to analysis of the solid saltcake samples, the liquid contained in the Tank 3F samples and a separate supernate sample from Tank 2F were studied. The primary objective of the characterization is to gather information that will be useful to the selection and processing of the next waste tanks. Most important is the determination of the 137Cs concentration and liquid retention properties of Tank 3F and Tank 2F saltcake to enable projection of drained, dissolved salt composition. Additional information will aid in refining the waste characterization system (WCS) and could assist the eventual salt treatment or processing

  10. Introducing a rainfall compound distribution model based on weather patterns sub-sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Garavaglia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a probabilistic model for daily rainfall, using sub-sampling based on meteorological circulation. We classified eight typical but contrasted synoptic situations (weather patterns for France and surrounding areas, using a "bottom-up" approach, i.e. from the shape of the rain field to the synoptic situations described by geopotential fields. These weather patterns (WP provide a discriminating variable that is consistent with French climatology, and allows seasonal rainfall records to be split into more homogeneous sub-samples, in term of meteorological genesis.

    First results show how the combination of seasonal and WP sub-sampling strongly influences the identification of the asymptotic behaviour of rainfall probabilistic models. Furthermore, with this level of stratification, an asymptotic exponential behaviour of each sub-sample appears as a reasonable hypothesis. This first part is illustrated with two daily rainfall records from SE of France.

    The distribution of the multi-exponential weather patterns (MEWP is then defined as the composition, for a given season, of all WP sub-sample marginal distributions, weighted by the relative frequency of occurrence of each WP. This model is finally compared to Exponential and Generalized Pareto distributions, showing good features in terms of robustness and accuracy. These final statistical results are computed from a wide dataset of 478 rainfall chronicles spread on the southern half of France. All these data cover the 1953–2005 period.

  11. Final report on the sampling and analysis of sediment cores from the L-Area oil and chemical basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-08-01

    Nine vibracores were collected in the L-Area oil and chemical basin (904-83G) during late March and early April 1985. These cores were collected for analysis of the sludge on the basin floor and the underlying sediment. Several different field and laboratory analyses were performed on each three inch segment of all the cores. These included: (1) Sediment characterization; (2) Percent moisture; (3) Dry weight; (4) Spectral gamma analysis; (5) Gross alpha and beta analysis. Detailed chemical analysis were measured on selected intervals of 2 cores (LBC-5 and 6) for complete chemical characterization of the sediments. This sampling program was conducted to provide information so that a closure plan for the basin could be developed. This report describes the methods employed during the project and provide a hard copy of the analytical results from the sample analyses. Included in the appendices are copies of all field and laboratory notes taken during the project and copies of the gas chromatograms for the petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. All chemical results were also submitted on a 5-inch floppy disk.

  12. Surveillance of a nuclear reactor core by use of a pattern recognition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invernizzi, Michel.

    1982-07-01

    A pattern recognition system is described for the surveillance of a PWR reactor. This report contains four chapters. The first one succinctly deals with statistical pattern recognition principles. In the second chapter we show how a surveillance problem may be treated by pattern recognition and we present methods for surveillances (detection of abnormalities), controls (kind of running recognition) and diagnotics (kind of abnormality recognition). The third chapter shows a surveillance method of a nuclear plant. The signals used are the neutron noise observations made by the ionization chambers inserted in the reactor. Abnormality is defined in opposition with the training set witch is supposed to be an exhaustive summary of normality. In the fourth chapter we propose a scheme for an adaptative recognition and a method based on classes modelisations by hyper-spheres. This method has been tested on simulated training sets in two-dimensional feature spaces. It gives solutions to problems of non-linear separability [fr

  13. Mineralogic and petrologic investigation of post-test core samples from the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Beiriger, J.

    1985-02-01

    We have characterized a suite of samples taken subsequent to the end of the Spent Fuel Test - Climax by petrographic and microanalytical techniques and determined their mineral assemblage, modal properties, and mineral chemistry. The samples were obtained immediately adjacent to the canister borehole at a variety of depths and positions within the canister drift, as well as radially outward from each canister hole. This method of sampling allows variations in post-test mineralogic properties to be evaluated on the basis of (1) depth along a particular canister hole and (2) position within the canister drift, with respect to the heat and radiation sources, and with respect to the pre - test samples. In no case did we find any significant correlation between the mineralogical properties and variables listed above. In short, the Spent Fuel Test - Climax has produced no identifiable mineralogical response in the Climax quartz monzonite. 12 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Associations between Dietary Patterns and Blood Pressure in a Clinical Sample of Overweight Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndanuko, Rhoda N; Tapsell, Linda C; Charlton, Karen E; Neale, Elizabeth P; Batterham, Marijka J

    2017-02-01

    Dietary pattern analysis provides important evidence revealing diet-disease relationships. It may be especially useful in areas less well researched, such as diet and hypertension in clinical populations. The aim of this study was to identify the association between dietary patterns and blood pressure (BP) in a sample of overweight adults volunteering for a clinical trial for weight loss. This cross-sectional analysis used baseline data from the HealthTrack study, a 12-month randomized controlled trial. Dietary intake was evaluated with 4-day food records. Participants were 328 adults recruited from the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia, between May 2014 and April 2015. Resting BP and 24-hour urine sodium and potassium were measured. Dietary patterns were derived by principal component analysis from 21 food groups. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the association between the extracted dietary patterns and BP. The participants' mean age was 43.6±8.0 years, mean body mass index was 32.4±4.2, and mean systolic BP/diastolic BP was 124.9±14.5/73.3±9.9 mm Hg. Six major dietary patterns were identified: "nuts, seeds, fruit, and fish," "milk and meat," "breads, cereals, and snacks," "cereal-based products, fats, and oils," "alcohol, eggs, and legumes," and "savoury sauces, condiments, and meat." The "nuts, seeds, fruit, and fish" dietary pattern was significantly and inversely associated with systolic BP (F [7,320]=15.248; Ppattern rich in nuts, seeds, fruit, and fish was inversely associated with blood pressure in this clinical sample. The findings suggest that current dietary guidelines are relevant to an overweight clinical population and support the value of dietary pattern analysis when exploring the diet-disease relationship. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Classification of the NPP core and fuel assembly states by the pattern recoguition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.A.; Ivanov, E.A.; Kazakov, S.V.; Tolstykh, V.D.

    1981-01-01

    The patern recognition methods used for solving the problems of analysis of radiohazard states of fuel assemblies (FA) and uranium-graphite reactor core as a whole are considered. The problem under consideration is formulated as the problem of studying the deformation of signal space for the system of fuel can tightness control on the background of fuel assembly character space as characteristics, reflecting the FA living conditions in a core power, coolant flow rate, coolant steam content and pipeline length up to the detector of the system of fuel can tightness control are chosen. The analysis of deformation of the fuel can tightness control system signal space is completed by its division into two spaces: the background signal space and the valid signal space. For solving the problem the method of basic components and variational approach have been used. The conclusion is drawn that as the extent of FA failure and valid signals of by-channel system of fuel can tightness control are in one-to-one correspondence it is advantageous to solve the problem of FA state classification in the space of valid signals [ru

  16. The duck hepatitis B virus polymerase and core proteins accumulate in different patterns from their common mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Ermei; Schaller, Heinz; Tavis, John E.

    2003-01-01

    Hepadnaviral reverse transcription occurs in capsids in which the core (C) protein surrounds the reverse transcriptase (P) and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). We analyzed the accumulation patterns of duck hepatitis B virus P, C, and pgRNA in transfected LMH cells, infected primary duck hepatocytes (PDH), and infected duck liver. In all three systems, P accumulated over time in a different pattern compared with C, despite translation of both proteins from the pgRNA. Although the accumulation patterns of the proteins varied between the systems, in each case P became detectable at the same time or earlier than C and the ratio of P relative to C dropped with time. These accumulation patterns were consistent with the translation rates and half-lives of P and C. Comparing the translation rates of P and C with the pgRNA level over time revealed that translation of P and C was negatively regulated in LMH cells. These data provide a framework for comparing replication studies performed in LMH cells, PDHs and ducks

  17. Identification of dietary patterns associated with blood pressure in a sample of overweight Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, S; Charlton, K E; Tapsell, L C; Probst, Y; Ndanuko, R; Batterham, M J

    2016-11-01

    The dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) diet provides strong evidence for an optimal dietary pattern for blood pressure (BP) control; however, investigation at the level of key foods in a dietary pattern is sparse. This study aimed to assess the relationship between dietary patterns driven by key foods with BP in a sample of obese Australian adults. Secondary analysis was conducted on baseline data of 118 participants (45.1±8.4 years, mean BP=124.1±15.8/72.6±9.2 mm Hg) recruited in a weight reduction randomized controlled trial (ACTRN12608000425392). Dietary assessment was by a validated diet history interview. The average of three office BP measurements was taken. Factor analysis extracted dietary patterns and their relation to systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) was analysed using multiple linear regression. Eight dietary patterns were identified based on leading foods: meat and alcohol; seafood; fats; fruits and nuts; legumes; confectionery; sweet foods; and yeast extracts and seasonings. A lower SBP was associated with alignment with the fruit and nuts pattern (β=-4.1 (95% confidence interval -7.5 to -0.7) mm Hg) and with seafood for DBP (β=-2.4 (-4.6 to -0.3) mm Hg). SBP and DBP were higher with yeast extract and seasonings (β=4.3 (1.4-7.3); 2.5 (0.9-4.0) mm Hg, respectively). In obese adults attending for weight loss, dietary patterns that included larger amounts of fruits and nuts and/or seafood were associated with lower BP at baseline, whereas patterns that were characterised by yeast extract and seasonings were associated with higher BP.

  18. Laboratory measurements of the seismic velocities and other petrophysical properties of the Outokumpu deep drill core samples, eastern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbra, Tiiu; Karlqvist, Ronnie; Lassila, Ilkka; Høgström, Edward; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    2011-01-01

    Petrophysical, in particular seismic velocity, measurements of the Outokumpu deep drill core (depth 2.5 km) have been carried out to characterize the geophysical nature of the Paleoproterozoic crustal section of eastern Finland and to find lithological and geophysical interpretations to the distinct crustal reflectors as observed in seismic surveys. The results show that different lithological units can be identified based on the petrophysical data. The density of the samples remained nearly constant throughout the drilled section. Only diopside-tremolite skarns and black schists exhibit higher densities. The samples are dominated by the paramagnetic behaviour with occasional ferromagnetic signature caused by serpentinitic rocks. Large variations in seismic velocities, both at ambient pressure and under in situ crustal conditions are observed. The porosity of the samples, which is extremely low, is either intrinsic by nature or caused by decompaction related to fracturing during the core retrieval. It is noteworthy that these microfractures have dramatically lowered the VP and VS values. From the measured velocities and density data we have calculated the seismic impedances, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratios for the lithological units of the Outokumpu section and from these data the reflection coefficients for the major lithological boundaries, evident in the surveyed section, were determined. The data show that the strong and distinct reflections visible in wide-angle seismic surveys are caused by interfaces between diopside-tremolite skarn and either serpentinites, mica schist or black schist.

  19. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker

    2003-06-01

    In the spring of 2002, the Department of Energy provided an initial 1-year grant to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). The grant covered the one-year operational expenses of a worldclass core and cuttings facility located in Houston, Texas, that BP America donated to the BEG. The DOE investment of $300,000, matched by a $75,000 UT contribution, provided critical first-year funds that were heavily leveraged by the BP gift of $7.0 million in facilities and cash. DOE also provided a one-month extension and grant of $30,000 for the month of May 2003. A 5-year plan to grow a permanent endowment in order to manage the facility in perpetuity is well under way and on schedule. The facility, named the Houston Research Center, represents an ideal model for a strong Federal, university, and private partnership to accomplish a national good. This report summarizes the activities supported by the initial DOE grant during the first 13 months of operation and provides insight into the activities and needs of the facility in the second year of operation.

  20. Per tree estimates with n-tree distance sampling: an application to increment core data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Lynch; Robert F. Wittwer

    2002-01-01

    Per tree estimates using the n trees nearest a point can be obtained by using a ratio of per unit area estimates from n-tree distance sampling. This ratio was used to estimate average age by d.b.h. classes for cottonwood trees (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) on the Cimarron National Grassland. Increment...

  1. Frictional properties of JFAST core samples and implications for slow earthquakes at the Tohoku subduction zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawai, Michiyo; Niemeijer, André R.; Hirose, Takehiro; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Slow earthquakes occur in the shallow (<20 km deep) part of the Tohoku subduction zone. To understand how frictional properties of the plate boundary fault affect the generation of these slow earthquakes, we conducted friction experiments using borehole samples retrieved from the plate boundary

  2. Shifting patterns of ENSO variability from a 492-year South Pacific coral core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangri, N.; Linsley, B. K.; Mucciarone, D.; Dunbar, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Anticipating the impacts of ENSO in a changing climate requires detailed reconstructions of changes in its timing, amplitude, and spatial pattern, as well as attempts to attribute those changes to external forcing or internal variability. A continuous coral δ18O record from American Samoa, in the tropical South Pacific, sheds light on almost five centuries of these changes. We find evidence of internally-driven 50-100 year cycles with broad peaks of high variability punctuated by short transitions of low variability. We see a long, slow trend towards more frequent ENSO events, punctuated by sharp decreases in frequency; the 20th century in particular shows a strong trend towards higher-frequency ENSO. Due to the unique location of American Samoa with respect to ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, we infer changes in the spatial pattern of ENSO. American Samoa currently lies on the ENSO 3.4 nodal line - the boomerang shape that separates waters warmed by El Niño from those that cool. Closer examination reveals that SST around American Samoa displays opposing responses to Eastern and Central Pacific ENSO events. However, this has not always been the case; in the late 19th and early 20th century, SST responded similarly to both flavors of ENSO. We interpret this to mean a geographic narrowing towards the equator of the eastern Pacific El Niño SST anomaly pattern in the first half of the 20th century.

  3. Light-absorbent liquid immersion angled exposure for patterning 3D samples with vertical sidewalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Shinya; Kubo, Hironori; Sasaki, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    To make photolithography patterns on 3D samples, the angled (inclined) exposure technique has been used so far. However, technological issues have emerged in making photolithography patterns on the surface of trench structures. The surface of the trench structures can be covered with a photoresist film by spray-coating but the photoresist film deposited on the sidewalls and bottom of the trench is generally thin. The thin photoresist film deposited inside the trench has been easily overdosed. Moreover, irregular patterns have frequently been formed by the light reflected inside the trench. In this study, we have developed liquid immersion photolithography using a light-absorbent material. The light-reflection inside the trench was suppressed. Various patterns were transferred in the photoresist film deposited on the trench structures which had an aspect ratio of 0.74. Compared to immersion photolithography using pure water under p -polarization light control, the light-absorbent liquid immersion photolithography developed here patterned well the surfaces of the trench sidewalls and bottom. (paper)

  4. Comparison of sample preparation procedures on metal(loid) fractionation patterns in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroukamp, E M; Godeto, T W; Forbes, P B C

    2017-08-13

    The effects of different sample preparation strategies and storage on metal(loid) fractionation trends in plant material is largely underresearched. In this study, a bulk sample of lichen Parmotrema austrosinense (Zahlbr.) Hale was analysed for its total extractable metal(loid) content by ICP-MS, and was determined to be adequately homogenous (sample were prepared utilising a range of sample preservation techniques and subjected to a modified sequential extraction procedure or to total metal extraction. Both experiments were repeated after 1-month storage at 4 °C. Cryogenic freezing gave the best reproducibility for total extractable elemental concentrations between months, indicating this to be the most suitable method of sample preparation in such studies. The combined extraction efficiencies were >82% for As, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn but poor for other elements, where sample preparation strategies 'no sample preparation' and 'dried in a desiccator' had the best extraction recoveries. Cryogenic freezing procedures had a significantly (p sample cleaning and preservation when species fractionation patterns are of interest. This study also shows that the assumption that species stability can be ensured through cryopreservation and freeze drying techniques needs to be revisited.

  5. Optimization of sampling pattern and the design of Fourier ptychographic illuminator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaikai; Dong, Siyuan; Nanda, Pariksheet; Zheng, Guoan

    2015-03-09

    Fourier ptychography (FP) is a recently developed imaging approach that facilitates high-resolution imaging beyond the cutoff frequency of the employed optics. In the original FP approach, a periodic LED array is used for sample illumination, and therefore, the scanning pattern is a uniform grid in the Fourier space. Such a uniform sampling scheme leads to 3 major problems for FP, namely: 1) it requires a large number of raw images, 2) it introduces the raster grid artefacts in the reconstruction process, and 3) it requires a high-dynamic-range detector. Here, we investigate scanning sequences and sampling patterns to optimize the FP approach. For most biological samples, signal energy is concentrated at low-frequency region, and as such, we can perform non-uniform Fourier sampling in FP by considering the signal structure. In contrast, conventional ptychography perform uniform sampling over the entire real space. To implement the non-uniform Fourier sampling scheme in FP, we have designed and built an illuminator using LEDs mounted on a 3D-printed plastic case. The advantages of this illuminator are threefold in that: 1) it reduces the number of image acquisitions by at least 50% (68 raw images versus 137 in the original FP setup), 2) it departs from the translational symmetry of sampling to solve the raster grid artifact problem, and 3) it reduces the dynamic range of the captured images 6 fold. The results reported in this paper significantly shortened acquisition time and improved quality of FP reconstructions. It may provide new insights for developing Fourier ptychographic imaging platforms and find important applications in digital pathology.

  6. Evaluating the Applicability of Data-Driven Dietary Patterns to Independent Samples with a Focus on Measurement Tools for Pattern Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló, Adela; Buijsse, Brian; Martín, Miguel; Ruiz, Amparo; Casas, Ana M; Baena-Cañada, Jose M; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Antolín, Silvia; Ramos, Manuel; Muñoz, Monserrat; Lluch, Ana; de Juan-Ferré, Ana; Jara, Carlos; Lope, Virginia; Jimeno, María A; Arriola-Arellano, Esperanza; Díaz, Elena; Guillem, Vicente; Carrasco, Eva; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2016-12-01

    Diet is a key modifiable risk for many chronic diseases, but it remains unclear whether dietary patterns from one study sample are generalizable to other independent populations. The primary objective of this study was to assess whether data-driven dietary patterns from one study sample are applicable to other populations. The secondary objective was to assess the validity of two criteria of pattern similarity. Six dietary patterns-Western (n=3), Mediterranean, Prudent, and Healthy- from three published studies on breast cancer were reconstructed in a case-control study of 973 breast cancer patients and 973 controls. Three more internal patterns (Western, Prudent, and Mediterranean) were derived from this case-control study's own data. Applicability was assessed by comparing the six reconstructed patterns with the three internal dietary patterns, using the congruence coefficient (CC) between pattern loadings. In cases where any pair met either of two commonly used criteria for declaring patterns similar (CC ≥0.85 or a statistically significant [Pdietary patterns was double-checked by comparing their associations to risk for breast cancer, to assess whether those two criteria of similarity are actually reliable. Five of the six reconstructed dietary patterns showed high congruence (CC >0.9) to their corresponding dietary pattern derived from the case-control study's data. Similar associations with risk for breast cancer were found in all pairs of dietary patterns that had high CC but not in all pairs of dietary patterns with statistically significant correlations. Similar dietary patterns can be found in independent samples. The P value of a correlation coefficient is less reliable than the CC as a criterion for declaring two dietary patterns similar. This study shows that diet scores based on a particular study are generalizable to other populations. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radioactive disequilibria in mineralised drill core samples from the Bjoerklund uranium occurence, northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.A.T.

    1982-12-01

    Forming the basis of a pilot study to investigate the natural mobility of uranium and its daughter products within the geological environment, a series of six samples, chosen from two mineralised fracture zones at depths of 100-130m within a homogeneous leucocratic granite, were examined mineralogically and isotopically to establish the presence or absence of radioactive equilibrium that may indicate recent rock/water interaction processes (i.e. during the last 0.5 m.y.). The results show clear evidence of radioactive disequilibrium, and hence recent rock/water interaction, in four of the six samples. Some is attributable mostly to solution-solid 234 U recoil gain (weakly mineralised zones adjacent to the main mineralisation) and others to solid-solution 234 U recoil loss (moderate to highly mineralised zones). The richer type of impregnation mineralisation indicates apparent radioactive equilibrium. The absence of significant 238 U loss in the samples helps to underline the reducing conditions prevalent within open fracture systems at these depths. This has meant that uraninite, now found in fractured rock at about 100m depth, has been chemically stable in its environment for most, if not all, of its 1750 m.y. existence, including the last 0.5 m.y. when it has been closest to the atmosphere. This could indicate that spent nuclear fuel, which essentially is crystalline UO 2 , and comparable to uraninite once the main fission products have decayed, would also have been stable in this environment for similar periods of time. (Author)

  8. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Chan, K.M.; Sayles, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    Leg 5 samples fall into two categories with respect to interstitial water composition: 1) rapidly deposited terrigenous or appreciably terrigenous deposits, such as in Hole 35 (western Escanaba trough, off Cape Mendocino, California); and, 2) slowly deposited pelagic clays and biogenic muds and oozes. Interstitial waters in the former show modest to slight variations in chloride and sodium, but drastic changes in non-conservative ions such as magnesium and sulfate. The pelagic deposits show only relatively minor changes in both conservative and non-conservative pore fluid constituents. As was pointed out in earlier Leg Reports, it is believed that much of the variation in chloride in pore fluids within individual holes is attributable to the manipulation of samples on board ship and in the laboratory. On the other hand, the scatter in sodium is due in part to analytical error (on the order of 2 to 3 per cent, in terms of a standard deviation), and it probably accounts for most of the discrepancies in total anion and cation balance. All constituents reported here, with the exception of bulk water content, were analyzed on water samples which were sealed in plastic tubes aboard ship and were subsequently opened and divided into weighed aliquots in the laboratory. Analytical methods follow the atomic absorption, wet chemical and emission spectrochemical techniques briefly summarized in previous reports, e.g. Manheim et al., 1969, and Chan and Manheim, 1970. The authors acknowledge assistance from W. Sunda, D. Kerr, C. Lawson and H. Richards, and thank D. Spencer, P. Brewer and E. Degens for allowing the use of equipment and laboratory facilities.

  9. Estimates of the hydrologic impact of drilling water on core samples taken from partially saturated densely welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which drill water might be expected to be imbibed by core samples taken from densely welded tuff. In a related experimental study conducted in G-Tunnel, drill water imbibition by the core samples was observed to be minimal. Calculations were carried out with the TOUGH code with the intent of corroborating the imbibition observations. Due to the absence of hydrologic data pertaining directly to G-Tunnel welded tuff, it was necessary to apply data from a similar formation. Because the moisture retention curve was not available for imbibition conditions, the drainage curve was applied to the model. The poor agreement between the observed and calculated imbibition data is attributed primarily to the inappropriateness of the drainage curve. Also significant is the value of absolute permeability (k) assumed in the model. Provided that the semi-log plot of the drainage and imbibition moisture retention curves are parallel within the saturation range of interest, a simple relationship exists between the moisture retention curve, k, and porosity (/phi/) which are assumed in the model and their actual values. If k and /phi/ are known, we define the hysteresis factor λ to be the ratio of the imbibition and drainage suction pressures for any saturation within the range of interest. If k and /phi/ are unknown, λ also accounts for the uncertainties in their values. Both the experimental and modeling studies show that drill water imbibition by the core has a minimal effect on its saturation state. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  10. The Core Pattern Analysis on Chinese Herbal Medicine for Sjögren's syndrome: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Mao; Chu, Hsueh-Ting; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chen, Fang-Pey; Wang, Shengwen; Wu, Po-Chang; Yen, Hung-Rong; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This large-scale survey aimed to evaluate frequencies and patterns of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) used for Sjögren's syndrome (SS) in Taiwan by analyzing the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) for cases in which CHM was used as an alternative therapy to Western medicine for improving patients' discomforts. We analyzed cases of SS principal diagnosis (ICD-9:710.2) with a catastrophic illness certificate (CIC) in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) outpatient clinics from three cohorts of the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID) in the NHIRD between 2002 and 2011. CHM prescription patterns for SS were evaluated from claimed visitation files and corresponding prescription files. There were 15,914 SS patients with CIC (SS/CIC), and we found only 130 SS/CIC cases visiting TCM clinics in LHID2000, 133 in LHID2005, and 126 in LHID2010. After removing duplicate data, 366 SS/CIC and 4,867 visits were analyzed. The 50–59 year age group showed the highest ratio (29.51%) in both women and men. “Qi-Ju-Di-Huang-Wan” and “Xuan-Shen” (Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl.) was the most commonly used formula and single herb, respectively. “Qi-Ju-Di-Huang-Wan, Gan-Lu-Yin, Xuan-Shen, Mai-Men-Dong (Ophiopogon japonicus (L. f.) Ker-Gawl.), and Sheng-Di-Huang (raw Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch)” were the core pattern prescriptions in treating SS/CIC. PMID:25923413

  11. Alignment of human cardiomyocytes on laser patterned biphasic core/shell nanowire assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Karin; Haidar, Ayman; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Lee, Juseok; Martinez Miró, Marina; Kaan Akkan, Cagri; Cenk Aktas, Oral; Veith, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The management of end stage heart failure patients is only possible by heart transplantation or by the implantation of artificial hearts as a bridge for later transplantation. However, these therapeutic strategies are limited by a lack of donor hearts and by the associated complications, such as coagulation and infection, due to the used artificial mechanical circulatory assist devices. Therefore, new strategies for myocardial regenerative approaches are under extensive research to produce contractile myocardial tissue in the future to replace non-contractile myocardial ischemic and scarred tissue. Different approaches, such as cell transplantation, have been studied intensively. Although successful approaches have been observed, there are still limitations to the application. It is envisaged that myocardial tissue engineering can be used to help replace infarcted non-contractile tissue. The developed tissue should later mimic the aligned fibrillar structure of the extracellular matrix and provide important guidance cues for the survival, function and the needed orientation of cardiomyocytes. Nanostructured surfaces have been tested to provide a guided direction that cells can follow. In the present study, the cellular adhesion/alignment of human cardiomyocytes and the biocompatibility have been investigated after cultivation on different laser-patterned nanowires compared with unmodified nanowires. As a result, the nanostructured surfaces possessed good biocompatibility before and after laser modification. The laser-induced scalability of the pattern enabled the growth and orientation of the adhered myocardial tissue. Such approaches may be used to modify the surface of potential scaffolds to develop myocardial contractile tissue in the future. (paper)

  12. The influence of coring method on the preservation of sedimentary and biogeochemical features when sampling soft-bottom, shallow coastal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogg, Andrew O.M.; Attard, Karl M.; Stahl, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that taking samples of soft marine sediments using surface-based gravity coring equipment causes minimal disruption to their sedimentological, biogeochemical, and biological condition. This assumption was evaluated by examining the potential disturbances caused when...... resuspension or compression during gravity coring. Using SCUBA for shallow-water soft-sediment sampling permits steady and controlled core-tube insertion and extraction, and more measured retrieval of the cores to the surface; this probably accounts for the observed differences. Whereas benthic lander......-based in situ measurement would be the preferred method for analyzing sediment parameters in detail in this type of environment, SCUBA-based sampling offers a more accurate alternative to surface-based gravity coring....

  13. Fuzzy C-Means Clustering Model Data Mining For Recognizing Stock Data Sampling Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Jane Annatje Sumarauw

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Capital market has been beneficial to companies and investor. For investors, the capital market provides two economical advantages, namely deviden and capital gain, and a non-economical one that is a voting .} hare in Shareholders General Meeting. But, it can also penalize the share owners. In order to prevent them from the risk, the investors should predict the prospect of their companies. As a consequence of having an abstract commodity, the share quality will be determined by the validity of their company profile information. Any information of stock value fluctuation from Jakarta Stock Exchange can be a useful consideration and a good measurement for data analysis. In the context of preventing the shareholders from the risk, this research focuses on stock data sample category or stock data sample pattern by using Fuzzy c-Me, MS Clustering Model which providing any useful information jar the investors. lite research analyses stock data such as Individual Index, Volume and Amount on Property and Real Estate Emitter Group at Jakarta Stock Exchange from January 1 till December 31 of 204. 'he mining process follows Cross Industry Standard Process model for Data Mining (CRISP,. DM in the form of circle with these steps: Business Understanding, Data Understanding, Data Preparation, Modelling, Evaluation and Deployment. At this modelling process, the Fuzzy c-Means Clustering Model will be applied. Data Mining Fuzzy c-Means Clustering Model can analyze stock data in a big database with many complex variables especially for finding the data sample pattern, and then building Fuzzy Inference System for stimulating inputs to be outputs that based on Fuzzy Logic by recognising the pattern. Keywords: Data Mining, AUz..:y c-Means Clustering Model, Pattern Recognition

  14. Deep permeability of the San Andreas Fault from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific borehole near Parkfield, California crosses two actively creeping shear zones at a depth of 2.7 km. Core samples retrieved from these active strands consist of a foliated, Mg-clay-rich gouge containing porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock. The adjacent damage zone and country rocks are comprised of variably deformed, fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. We conducted laboratory tests to measure the permeability of representative samples from each structural unit at effective confining pressures, Pe up to the maximum estimated in situ Pe of 120 MPa. Permeability values of intact samples adjacent to the creeping strands ranged from 10−18 to 10−21 m2 at Pe = 10 MPa and decreased with applied confining pressure to 10−20–10−22 m2 at 120 MPa. Values for intact foliated gouge samples (10−21–6 × 10−23 m2 over the same pressure range) were distinctly lower than those for the surrounding rocks due to their fine-grained, clay-rich character. Permeability of both intact and crushed-and-sieved foliated gouge measured during shearing at Pe ≥ 70 MPa ranged from 2 to 4 × 10−22 m2 in the direction perpendicular to shearing and was largely insensitive to shear displacement out to a maximum displacement of 10 mm. The weak, actively-deforming foliated gouge zones have ultra-low permeability, making the active strands of the San Andreas Fault effective barriers to cross-fault fluid flow. The low matrix permeability of the San Andreas Fault creeping zones and adjacent rock combined with observations of abundant fractures in the core over a range of scales suggests that fluid flow outside of the actively-deforming gouge zones is probably fracture dominated.

  15. APPLICATION OF POLYSTYRENE FOAM CORE FUSIBLE PATTERNS IN PRODUCTION OF GAS TURBINES’ CAST PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Shinsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of replacing the LVM dissolves polystyrene molding on models is at the present time, technologically, economically and environmentally promising from the point of view of industrial applications for gas turbine plants in Ukraine. The authors proposed and tested manufacturing process of casting ceramic molds way to remove the polystyrene model of the dissolution of her organic solvents. Kinetic parameters of the process of dissolving and removing patterns of degradation products the polystyrene in the group of solvents depending on the type and amount of polystyrene were identified. The absence of surface defects of castings, reduction of roughness, increased their accuracy class in comparison to accepted technological regulations of the process of production, which reduced the cost of machined parts and increased utilization of expensive heat-resistant alloys were produced.

  16. Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease: Collaboration Patterns and Research Core Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Alejandro; González, Gregorio; Manuel Ramos, Jose

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are important health problems in developing countries. The study aim was to provide a review and content analysis of the scientific literature on rheumatic fever and RHD over a 70-year period. Medline was employed via the online PubMed service of the US National Library of Medicine, to search for all documents containing the MeSH terms 'rheumatic fever' or 'rheumatic heart disease' between January 1945 and December 2013. A total of 18,552 references was retrieved. Between 1945 and 1970 the number of annual publications containing the search terms increased, but decreased between 1971 and 2013. Between 1990 and 2013, national collaboration (co-authorship) was greatly increased, from 8.7% to 41.7% of the total reports. International collaboration also increased, from 2.5% to 14.8% (p = 0.001). The United States was the main collaborating country, sharing ties mainly with India, South Africa and Brazil. A content analysis led to the identification of three prominent core research topics, chief among which were heart diseases (rheumatic fever diseases, mitral valve diseases and endocarditis). Other areas of note included streptococcal infections and rheumatic diseases (which, in addition to rheumatic fever, also highlighted arthritis and juvenile arthritis). Publications on rheumatic fever and RHD had a major impact during the 1960s, but research groups interest has since declined overall, in line with a decreasing interest in these diseases in developed countries. In contrast, national and international collaboration has increased, a phenomenon that should be encouraged for research into these and other diseases that affect developing countries.

  17. Pattern transfer on fused silica samples using sub-aperture reactive ion beam etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miessler, Andre; Arnold, Thomas [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung (IOM), Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In comparison to sole Ar ion beam sputtering Reactive Ion Beam Etching (RIBE) reveals the main advantage of increasing the selectivity for different kind of materials due to chemical contributions during the material removal. Therefore RIBE is qualified to be an excellent candidate for pattern transfer applications. The goal of the present study is to apply a sub-aperture reactive ion beam for pattern transfer on large fused silica samples. Concerning this matter, the etching behavior in the ion beam periphery plays a decisive role. Using a Kaufman-typed ion source with NF{sub 3} as reactive gas, XPS measurements of the modified surface exposes impurities like Ni, Fe and Cr, which belongs to chemically eroded material of the plasma pot and a layer formation of silicon nitride, handicaps the etching process mainly in the beam periphery where the sputtering contribution decrease. These side effects influence the pattern transfer of trench structures, produced in AZ MIR 701 photoresist by lithography on a 2'' fused silica plate, by changing the selectivity due to modified chemical reactions of the resist layer. Concerning this we investigate a RF-Ion source for sub aperture reactive ion beam applications and finally we examine the pattern transfer on large fused silica plates using NF{sub 3}-sub-aperture RIBE.

  18. Preliminary biological sampling of GT3 and BT1 cores and the microbial community dynamics of existing subsurface wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, E. A.; Stamps, B. W.; Rempfert, K. R.; Ellison, E. T.; Nothaft, D. B.; Boyd, E. S.; Templeton, A. S.; Spear, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface microbial life is poorly understood but potentially very important to the search for life on other planets as well as increasing our understanding of Earth's geobiological processes. Fluids and rocks of actively serpentinizing subsurface environments are a recent target of biological study due to their apparent ubiquity across the solar system. Areas of serpentinization can contain high concentrations of molecular hydrogen, H2, that can serve as the dominant fuel source for subsurface microbiota. Working with the Oman Drilling Project, DNA and RNA were extracted from fluids of seven alkaline wells and two rock cores from drill sites GT3 and BT1 within the Samail ophiolite. DNA and cDNA (produced via reverse transcription from the recovered RNA) were sequenced using universal primers to identify microbial life across all three domains. Alkaline subsurface fluids support a microbial community that changes with pH and host-rock type. In peridotite with pH values of >11, wells NSHQ 14 and WAB 71 have high relative abundances of Meiothermus, Methanobacterium, the family Nitrospiraceae, and multiple types of the class Dehalococcoidia. While also hosted in peridotite but at pH 8.5, wells WAB 104 and 105 have a distinct, more diverse microbial community. This increased variance in community make-up is seen in wells that sit near/at the contact of gabbro and peridotite formations as well. Core results indicate both sampled rock types host a very low biomass environment subject to multiple sources of contamination during the drilling process. Suggestions for contaminant reduction, such as having core handlers wear nitrile gloves and flame-sterilizing the outer surfaces of core rounds for biological sampling, would have minimal impact to overall ODP coreflow and maximize the ability to better understand in situ microbiota in this low-biomass serpentinizing subsurface environment. While DNA extraction was successful with gram amounts of crushed rock, much can be

  19. Toxic air pollutants notice of construction for rotary mode core sampling systems three and four and modification system two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyekman, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) approved the construction and operation of Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) System Two on November 22, 1993 (NOC-93-04). This approval supported the characterization of waste in the single-shell tanks (SSTS) and double-shell tanks (DSTS) on the Hanford Site. The waste tank characterization sampling and analysis effort is vital to the safe operations of the Hanford Site tank farms, and the timely collection of the information necessary to support retrieval, pretreatment, disposal planning, and final closure strategy. This is based on the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-05 Implementation Plan (DOE-RL-94-001), US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) proposed the expedited construction and operation of two additional RMCS systems to support characterization of waste stored in SSTs and DSTS. RMCS currently is scheduled for approximately 50 (active or passively ventilated) of the 149 SSTs in the 200 East and 200 West Areas. If necessary, the RMCS will be used to sample other tanks currently not scheduled, subject to the requirements of this document and any applicable Ecology approval order. The typical components of the RMCS systems are shown in Figure 1. It should be noted that the Flammable Gas Detector cart is not being used during RMCS at this time. RMCS is scheduled for approximately 40 tanks that are not actively ventilated. These tanks operate at atmospheric pressure with passive (breather) high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The RMCS system uses nitrogen gas to cool and purge the drill bit assembly. Without the use of a portable ventilation system, the additional gas from RMCS might unsafely pressurize tanks that are not actively ventilated. The RMCS system also will generate aerosols and dust in the tank vapor head space. HEPA filters will be required on the portable exhauster during rotary mode core drilling to control radionuclide

  20. Student Wellbeing at a University in Post-Apartheid South Africa: A Comparison with a British University Sample Using the GP-CORE Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Charles; Campbell, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This article provides GP-CORE norms for a South African university sample, which are compared to published data obtained from a United Kingdom university sample. The measure appears to be both reliable and valid for this multilingual and multicultural South African sample. The profiles of the psychological distress reported by white South African…

  1. Concentration of Antifouling Biocides and Metals in Sediment Core Samples in the Northern Part of Hiroshima Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Tsunemasa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Ot alternative antifoulants in sediment is the focus of this research. Much research had been done on surface sediment, but in this report, the accumulation in the sediment core was studied. The Ot alternative antifoulants, Diuron, Sea-Nine211, and Irgarol 1051, and the latter’s degradation product, M1, were investigated in five samples from the northern part of Hiroshima Bay. Ot compounds (tributyltin (TBT and triphenyltin (TPT were also investigated for comparison. In addition, metal (Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn levels and chronology were measured to better understand what happens after accumulation on the sea floor. It was discovered that Ot alternative antifoulant accumulation characteristics in sediment were like Ot compounds, with the concentration in the sediment core being much higher than surface sediment. The concentration in sediment seems to have been affected by the regulation of Ot compounds in 1990, due to the concentration of Ot alternative antifoulants and Ot compounds at the survey point in front of the dock, showing an increase from almost the same layer after the regulation.

  2. [New theory of holistic integrative physiology and medicine. III: New insight of neurohumoral mechanism and pattern of control and regulation for core axe of respiration, circulation and metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xing-guo

    2015-07-01

    Systemic mechanism of neurohumoral control and regulation for human is limited. We used the new theory of holistic integrative physiology and medicine to approach the mechanism and pattern of neurohumoral control and regulation for life. As the core of human life, there are two core axes of functions. The first one is the common goal of respiration and circulation to transport oxygen and carbon dioxide for cells, and the second one is the goal of gastrointestinal tract and circulation to transport energy material and metabolic product for cells. These two core axes maintain the metabolism. The neurohumoral regulation is holistically integrated and unified for all functions in human body. We simplified explain the mechanism of neurohumoral control and regulation life (respiration and circulation) as the example pattern of sound system. Based upon integrated regulation of life, we described the neurohumoral pattern to control respiration and circulation.

  3. Replicability of time-varying connectivity patterns in large resting state fMRI samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrol, Anees; Damaraju, Eswar; Miller, Robyn L; Stephen, Julia M; Claus, Eric D; Mayer, Andrew R; Calhoun, Vince D

    2017-12-01

    The past few years have seen an emergence of approaches that leverage temporal changes in whole-brain patterns of functional connectivity (the chronnectome). In this chronnectome study, we investigate the replicability of the human brain's inter-regional coupling dynamics during rest by evaluating two different dynamic functional network connectivity (dFNC) analysis frameworks using 7 500 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets. To quantify the extent to which the emergent functional connectivity (FC) patterns are reproducible, we characterize the temporal dynamics by deriving several summary measures across multiple large, independent age-matched samples. Reproducibility was demonstrated through the existence of basic connectivity patterns (FC states) amidst an ensemble of inter-regional connections. Furthermore, application of the methods to conservatively configured (statistically stationary, linear and Gaussian) surrogate datasets revealed that some of the studied state summary measures were indeed statistically significant and also suggested that this class of null model did not explain the fMRI data fully. This extensive testing of reproducibility of similarity statistics also suggests that the estimated FC states are robust against variation in data quality, analysis, grouping, and decomposition methods. We conclude that future investigations probing the functional and neurophysiological relevance of time-varying connectivity assume critical importance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of different palatal rugae patterns in a sample Lucknow population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Asdullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Palatoscopy is the study of palatal rugae pattern and it can be used to establish the identity of a person. The rugae are unique internal structures protected by the lips, buccal pad of fat and teeth that resist decomposition, thus serving an important role in forensic identification. The appearance of palatal rugae is constant, as they do not demonstrate changes after the completion of growth of the individual, thus increasing its utility as a personal identification tool. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of different palatal rugae patterns in a sample of Lucknow, India population. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 100 healthy (50 males and 50 females subjects of age between 18 and 40 years, who were randomly selected. In this study we used the classification of rugae patterns suggested by Kapali et al. (straight, curved, wavy andcircular, and Thomas and Kotze (unification and nonspecific. Results: The mean rugae number in females was slightly more than males. The most prevalent forms in both genders were curved type followed by wavy, straight and diverging types. Straight and curved forms were significantly more in numbers in females than males. Conclusion: This is a preliminary study on a localized Indian population. Scope still exists for further studies to determine gender as well as personal identification. We believe that rugae can be used as a reliable guide in forensic identification.

  5. Pattern transfer on large samples using a sub-aperture reactive ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miessler, Andre; Mill, Agnes; Gerlach, Juergen W.; Arnold, Thomas [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung (IOM), Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In comparison to sole Ar ion beam sputtering Reactive Ion Beam Etching (RIBE) reveals the main advantage of increasing the selectivity for different kind of materials due to chemical contributions during the material removal. Therefore RIBE is qualified to be an excellent candidate for pattern transfer applications. The goal of the present study is to apply a sub-aperture reactive ion beam for pattern transfer on large fused silica samples. Concerning this matter, the etching behavior in the ion beam periphery plays a decisive role. Using CF{sub 4} as reactive gas, XPS measurements of the modified surface exposes impurities like Ni, Fe and Cr, which belongs to chemically eroded material of the plasma pot as well as an accumulation of carbon (up to 40 atomic percent) in the beam periphery, respectively. The substitution of CF{sub 4} by NF{sub 3} as reactive gas reveals a lot of benefits: more stable ion beam conditions in combination with a reduction of the beam size down to a diameter of 5 mm and a reduced amount of the Ni, Fe and Cr contaminations. However, a layer formation of silicon nitride handicaps the chemical contribution of the etching process. These negative side effects influence the transfer of trench structures on quartz by changing the selectivity due to altered chemical reaction of the modified resist layer. Concerning this we investigate the pattern transfer on large fused silica plates using NF{sub 3}-sub-aperture RIBE.

  6. Sample preparation for total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis using resist pattern technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, K.; Yomogita, N.; Konyuba, Y.

    2018-06-01

    A circular resist pattern layer with a diameter of 9 mm was prepared on a glass substrate (26 mm × 76 mm; 1.5 mm thick) for total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis. The parallel cross pattern was designed with a wall thickness of 10 μm, an interval of 20 μm, and a height of 1.4 or 0.8 μm. This additional resist layer did not significantly increase background intensity on the XRF peaks in TXRF spectra. Dotted residue was obtained from a standard solution (10 μL) containing Ti, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Ga, each at a final concentration of 10 ppm, on a normal glass substrate with a silicone coating layer. The height of the residue was more than 100 μm, where self-absorption in the large residue affected TXRF quantification (intensity relative standard deviation (RSD): 12-20%). In contrast, from a droplet composed of a small volume of solution dropped and cast on the resist pattern structure, the obtained residue was not completely film but a film-like residue with a thickness less than 1 μm, where self-absorption was not a serious problem. In the end, this sample preparation was demonstrated to improve TXRF quantification (intensity RSD: 2-4%).

  7. Stage-specific sampling by pattern recognition receptors during Candida albicans phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid E M Heinsbroek

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a medically important pathogen, and recognition by innate immune cells is critical for its clearance. Although a number of pattern recognition receptors have been shown to be involved in recognition and phagocytosis of this fungus, the relative role of these receptors has not been formally examined. In this paper, we have investigated the contribution of the mannose receptor, Dectin-1, and complement receptor 3; and we have demonstrated that Dectin-1 is the main non-opsonic receptor involved in fungal uptake. However, both Dectin-1 and complement receptor 3 were found to accumulate at the site of uptake, while mannose receptor accumulated on C. albicans phagosomes at later stages. These results suggest a potential role for MR in phagosome sampling; and, accordingly, MR deficiency led to a reduction in TNF-alpha and MCP-1 production in response to C. albicans uptake. Our data suggest that pattern recognition receptors sample the fungal phagosome in a sequential fashion.

  8. Pattern of somatostatin receptors expression in normal and bladder cancer tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavitakis, Markos; Msaouel, Pavlos; Michalopoulos, Vassilis; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Known risks factors for bladder cancer progression and recurrence are limited regarding their prognostic ability. Therefore identification of molecular determinants of disease progression could provide with more specific prognostic information and could be translated into new approaches for biomarker development. In the present study we evaluated, the expression patterns of somatostatin receptors 1-5 (SSTRs) in normal and tumor bladder tissues. The expression of SSTR1-5 was characterized in 45 normal and bladder cancer tissue samples using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SSTR1 was expressed in 24 samples, SSTR2 in 15, SSTR3 in 23, SSTR4 in 16 and SSTR5 in all but one sample. Bladder cancer tissue samples expressed lower levels of SSTR3. Co-expression of SSTRs was associated with superficial disease. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that there is expression of SSTR in normal and bladder cancer urothelium. Further studies are required to evaluate the prognostic and therapeutic significance of these findings. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Re-heating Tissue Samples to Core Body Temperature on High-Velocity Ballistic Projectile-tissue Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Henneberg, Maciej; Wachsberger, Christian; Maiden, Nicholas; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2017-11-01

    Damage produced by high-speed projectiles on organic tissue will depend on the physical properties of the tissues. Conditioning organic tissue samples to human core body temperature (37°C) prior to conducting ballistic experiments enables their behavior to closely mimic that of living tissues. To minimize autolytic changes after death, the tissues are refrigerated soon after their removal from the body and re-heated to 37°C prior to testing. This research investigates whether heating 50-mm-cube samples of porcine liver, kidney, and heart to 37°C for varying durations (maximum 7 h) can affect the penetration response of a high-speed, steel sphere projectile. Longer conditioning times for heart and liver resulted in a slight loss of velocity/energy of the projectile, but the reverse effect occurred for the kidney. Possible reasons for these trends include autolytic changes causing softening (heart and liver) and dehydration causing an increase in density (kidney). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. Recovery of MARICO-2 sample part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashida, Takashi; Ito, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    At Joyo reactor MK-III core in May 2007, due to the design deficiencies of the disconnect mechanism of the holding part and the sample part of the experimental apparatus with instrumentation lines (MARICO-2), a disconnect failure incident occurred in the sample part after irradiation test. The deformation of the sample part due to this failure incurred its interference with the lower surface of reactor core upper structure and the holddown axis body. By this, the operating range of the rotary plug was restricted, leading to the partial inhibition of the fuel exchange function that precluded the access to 1/4 of the assemblies of the reactor core. In face of restoration work, the preparation for restoration such the exchange of upper core structure, and the recovery of MARICO-2 sample part are under way. The following items are introduced here: (1) summary of restoration work and overall process of restoration work, (2) recovery operation of MARICO-2 sample part, (3) exchange of the upper core structure that was conducted this year, and (4) results of recovery of MARIKO-2 sample part. (A.O.)

  11. Revised South China Sea spreading history based on macrostructure analysis of IODP Expedition 349 core samples and geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z.; Ding, W.; Zhao, X.; Qiu, N.; Lin, J.; Li, C.

    2017-12-01

    In Internaltional Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 349, four sites were drilled and cored successfully in the South China Sea (SCS). Three of them are close to the central spreading ridge (Sites U1431, U1433 and U1434), and one (Site U1435) is located on an outer rise,,providingsignificant information on the spreading history of the SCS.In order to constrain the spreading historymore accurately with the core results, we analyzed the identifiable macrostructures (over 300 fractures, veins and slickensides)from all the consolidated samples of these four drill sites. Then we made a retrograde reconstruction of the SCS spreading history with the constraints of the estimated fractures and veins, post-spreading volcanism,seismic interpretation, as well as free-air gravity and magnetic anomaly and topography analysis. Our study indicates that the spreading of the SCS experienced at least one ridge jump event and two events of ridge orientation and spreading direction adjustment, which mademagnetic anomaly orientation, ridge positionand facture zone directionskeep changing in the South China Sea. During the last spreading stage, the spreading direction was north-southward but lasted for a very short time period. The oceanic crust is wider in the eastern SCS and tapers out toward west.Due to the subductionof SCS beneath the Philippine Sea plate, the seafloor began to develop new fractures:the NWW-to EW-trending R' shear faults and the NE-trending P faultsbecame dominant faults and controlled the eruption of post-drift volcanism.

  12. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Appendix C: Samples of Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This document presents writing samples that have been annotated to illustrate the criteria required to meet the Common Core State Standards for particular types of writing--argument, informative/explanatory text, and narrative--in a given grade. Each of the samples exhibits at least the level of quality required to meet the Writing standards for…

  13. Introducing etch kernels for efficient pattern sampling and etch bias prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbuch, François; Lutich, Andrey; Schatz, Jirka

    2018-01-01

    Successful patterning requires good control of the photolithography and etch processes. While compact litho models, mainly based on rigorous physics, can predict very well the contours printed in photoresist, pure empirical etch models are less accurate and more unstable. Compact etch models are based on geometrical kernels to compute the litho-etch biases that measure the distance between litho and etch contours. The definition of the kernels, as well as the choice of calibration patterns, is critical to get a robust etch model. This work proposes to define a set of independent and anisotropic etch kernels-"internal, external, curvature, Gaussian, z_profile"-designed to represent the finest details of the resist geometry to characterize precisely the etch bias at any point along a resist contour. By evaluating the etch kernels on various structures, it is possible to map their etch signatures in a multidimensional space and analyze them to find an optimal sampling of structures. The etch kernels evaluated on these structures were combined with experimental etch bias derived from scanning electron microscope contours to train artificial neural networks to predict etch bias. The method applied to contact and line/space layers shows an improvement in etch model prediction accuracy over standard etch model. This work emphasizes the importance of the etch kernel definition to characterize and predict complex etch effects.

  14. THE CORES OF THE Fe Kα LINES IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: AN EXTENDED CHANDRA HIGH ENERGY GRATING SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, X. W.; Wang, J. X.; Yaqoob, T.

    2010-01-01

    We extend the study of the core of the Fe Kα emission line at ∼6.4 keV in Seyfert galaxies reported by Yaqoob and Padmanabhan using a larger sample observed by the Chandra high-energy grating (HEG). The sample consists of 82 observations of 36 unique sources with z H 23 cm -2 ) Seyfert galaxies to date. From an empirical and uniform analysis, we present measurements of the Fe Kα line centroid energy, flux, equivalent width (EW), and intrinsic width (FWHM). The Fe Kα line is detected in 33 sources, and its centroid energy is constrained in 32 sources. In 27 sources, the statistical quality of the data is good enough to yield measurements of the FWHM. We find that the distribution in the line centroid energy is strongly peaked around the value for neutral Fe, with over 80% of the observations giving values in the range 6.38-6.43 keV. Including statistical errors, 30 out of 32 sources (∼94%) have a line centroid energy in the range 6.35-6.47 keV. The mean EW, among the observations in which a non-zero lower limit could be measured, was 53 ± 3 eV. The mean FWHM from the subsample of 27 sources was 2060 ± 230 km s -1 . The mean EW and FWHM are somewhat higher when multiple observations for a given source are averaged. From a comparison with the Hβ optical emission-line widths (or, for one source, Brα), we find that there is no universal location of the Fe Kα line-emitting region relative to the optical broad-line region (BLR). In general, a given source may have contributions to the Fe Kα line flux from parsec-scale distances from the putative black hole, down to matter a factor ∼2 closer to the black hole than the BLR. We confirm the presence of the X-ray Baldwin effect, an anti-correlation between the Fe Kα line EW and X-ray continuum luminosity. The HEG data have enabled isolation of this effect to the narrow core of the Fe Kα line.

  15. The spatial and temporal patterns of odors sampled by lobsters and crabs in a turbulent plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidenbach, Matthew A; Koehl, M A R

    2011-09-15

    Odors are dispersed across aquatic habitats by turbulent water flow as filamentous, intermittent plumes. Many crustaceans sniff (take discrete samples of ambient water and the odors it carries) by flicking their olfactory antennules. We used planar laser-induced fluorescence to investigate how flicking antennules of different morphologies (long antennules of spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus; short antennules of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus) sample fluctuating odor signals at different positions in a turbulent odor plume in a flume to determine whether the patterns of concentrations captured can provide information about an animal's position relative to the odor source. Lobster antennules intercept odors during a greater percentage of flicks and encounter higher peak concentrations than do crab antennules, but because crabs flick at higher frequency, the duration of odor-free gaps between encountered odor pulses is similar. For flicking antennules there were longer time gaps between odor encounters as the downstream distance to the odor source decreases, but shorter gaps along the plume centerline than near the edge. In contrast to the case for antennule flicking, almost all odor-free gaps were <500 ms at all positions in the plume if concentration was measured continuously at the same height as the antennules. Variance in concentration is lower and mean concentration is greater near the substratum, where leg chemosensors continuously sample the plume, than in the water where antennules sniff. Concentrations sampled by legs increase as an animal nears an odor source, but decrease for antennules. Both legs and antennules encounter higher concentrations near the centerline than at the edge of the plume.

  16. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Rare Earth Elements Pattern in Weathered Japanese Soil Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Hosoda, M.; Takahashi, H.; Sorimachi, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Tokonami, S.; Uchida, S.

    2011-01-01

    From the viewpoint of radiation protection, determination of natural radionuclides e.g. thorium and uranium in soil samples are important. Accurate methods for determination of Th and U is gaining importance. The geochemical behavior of Th, U and rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively close to one another while compared to other elements in geological environment. Radioactive elements like 232 Th and 238 U along with their decay products (e.g. 226 Ra) are present in most of the environmental matrices and can be transferred to living bodies by different pathways that can lead to sources of exposure of man. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor these natural radionuclides in weathered soil samples to assess the possible hazards. The activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 228 Th, and 40 K in soils have been measured using a g γ-ray spectroscopy system with high purity germanium detector. The thorium, uranium and REEs were determined from the same sample using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Granitic rocks contain higher amounts of Th, U and light REEs compared to other igneous rocks such as basalt and andesites. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the interaction between REEs and nature of soils, as soils are complex heterogeneous mixture of organic and inorganic solids, water and gases. In this paper, we have discussed about distribution pattern of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 238 U along with REEs in soil samples of weathered acid rock (granite and ryolite) collected from two prefectures in Japan: 1. Gifu and 2. Okinawa. (author)

  17. Preparation and characterisation of core-shell CNTs@MIPs nanocomposites and selective removal of estrone from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruixia; Su, Xiaoqian; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-01-15

    This paper reports the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for advanced removal of estrone. CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites with a well-defined core-shell structure were obtained using a semi-covalent imprinting strategy, which employed a thermally reversible covalent bond at the surface of silica-coated CNTs for a large-scale production. The morphology and structure of the products were characterised by transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adsorption properties were demonstrated by equilibrium rebinding experiments and Scatchard analysis. The results demonstrate that the imprinted nanocomposites possess favourable selectivity, high capacity and fast kinetics for template molecule uptake, yielding an adsorption capacity of 113.5 μmol/g. The synthetic process is quite simple, and the different batches of synthesized CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites showed good reproducibility in template binding. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water using the CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites was demonstrated using water samples spiked with estrone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-04-15

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ``beyond extremely unlikely`` frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  19. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ''beyond extremely unlikely'' frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  20. Capillary ion chromatography with on-column focusing for ultra-trace analysis of methanesulfonate and inorganic anions in limited volume Antarctic ice core samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Estrella Sanz; Poynter, Sam; Curran, Mark; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2015-08-28

    Preservation of ionic species within Antarctic ice yields a unique proxy record of the Earth's climate history. Studies have been focused until now on two proxies: the ionic components of sea salt aerosol and methanesulfonic acid. Measurement of the all of the major ionic species in ice core samples is typically carried out by ion chromatography. Former methods, whilst providing suitable detection limits, have been based upon off-column preconcentration techniques, requiring larger sample volumes, with potential for sample contamination and/or carryover. Here, a new capillary ion chromatography based analytical method has been developed for quantitative analysis of limited volume Antarctic ice core samples. The developed analytical protocol applies capillary ion chromatography (with suppressed conductivity detection) and direct on-column sample injection and focusing, thus eliminating the requirement for off-column sample preconcentration. This limits the total sample volume needed to 300μL per analysis, allowing for triplicate sample analysis with Application to composite ice-core samples is demonstrated, with coupling of the capillary ion chromatograph to high resolution mass spectrometry used to confirm the presence and purity of the observed methanesulfonate peak. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The WAIS Melt Monitor: An automated ice core melting system for meltwater sample handling and the collection of high resolution microparticle size distribution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, D. J.; Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate data are often extracted from ice cores by careful geochemical analysis of meltwater samples. The analysis of the microparticles found in ice cores can also yield unique clues about atmospheric dust loading and transport, dust provenance and past environmental conditions. Determination of microparticle concentration, size distribution and chemical makeup as a function of depth is especially difficult because the particle size measurement either consumes or contaminates the meltwater, preventing further geochemical analysis. Here we describe a microcontroller-based ice core melting system which allows the collection of separate microparticle and chemistry samples from the same depth intervals in the ice core, while logging and accurately depth-tagging real-time electrical conductivity and particle size distribution data. This system was designed specifically to support microparticle analysis of the WAIS Divide WDC06A deep ice core, but many of the subsystems are applicable to more general ice core melting operations. Major system components include: a rotary encoder to measure ice core melt displacement with 0.1 millimeter accuracy, a meltwater tracking system to assign core depths to conductivity, particle and sample vial data, an optical debubbler level control system to protect the Abakus laser particle counter from damage due to air bubbles, a Rabbit 3700 microcontroller which communicates with a host PC, collects encoder and optical sensor data and autonomously operates Gilson peristaltic pumps and fraction collectors to provide automatic sample handling, melt monitor control software operating on a standard PC allowing the user to control and view the status of the system, data logging software operating on the same PC to collect data from the melting, electrical conductivity and microparticle measurement systems. Because microparticle samples can easily be contaminated, we use optical air bubble sensors and high resolution ice core density

  2. Stress and strain patterns, kinematics and deformation mechanisms in a basement-cored anticline: Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrouch, Khalid; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Callot, Jean-Paul

    2010-02-01

    In order to characterize and compare the stress-strain record prior to, during, and just after folding at the macroscopic and the microscopic scales and to provide insights into stress levels sustained by folded rocks, we investigate the relationship between the stress-strain distribution in folded strata derived from fractures, striated microfaults, and calcite twins and the development of the Laramide, basement-cored Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming. Tectonic data were mainly collected in Lower Carboniferous to Permian carbonates and sandstones. In both rock matrix and veins, calcite twins recorded three different tectonic stages: the first stage is a pre-Laramide (Sevier) layer-parallel shortening (LPS) parallel to fold axis, the second one is a Laramide LPS perpendicular to the fold axis, and the third stage corresponds to Laramide late fold tightening with compression also perpendicular to the fold axis. Stress and strain orientations and regimes at the microscale agree with the polyphase stress evolution revealed by populations of fractures and striated microfaults, testifying for the homogeneity of stress record at different scales through time. Calcite twin analysis additionally reveals significant variations of differential stress magnitudes between fold limbs. Our results especially point to an increase of differential stress magnitudes related to Laramide LPS from the backlimb to the forelimb of the fold possibly in relation with motion of an underlying basement thrust fault that likely induced stress concentrations at its upper tip. This result is confirmed by a simple numerical model. Beyond regional implications, this study highlights the potential of calcite twin analyses to yield a representative quantitative picture of stress and strain patterns related to folding.

  3. Gene expression patterns in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded core biopsies predict docetaxel chemosensitivity in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jenny C; Makris, Andreas; Gutierrez, M Carolina; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Hackett, James R; Jeong, Jennie; Liu, Mei-Lan; Baker, Joffre; Clark-Langone, Kim; Baehner, Frederick L; Sexton, Krsytal; Mohsin, Syed; Gray, Tara; Alvarez, Laura; Chamness, Gary C; Osborne, C Kent; Shak, Steven

    2008-03-01

    Previously, we had identified gene expression patterns that predicted response to neoadjuvant docetaxel. Other studies have validated that a high Recurrence Score (RS) by the 21-gene RT-PCR assay is predictive of worse prognosis but better response to chemotherapy. We investigated whether tumor expression of these 21 genes and other candidate genes can predict response to docetaxel. Core biopsies from 97 patients were obtained before treatment with neoadjuvant docetaxel (4 cycles, 100 mg/m2 q3 weeks). Three 10-microm FFPE sections were submitted for quantitative RT-PCR assays of 192 genes that were selected from our previous work and the literature. Of the 97 patients, 81 (84%) had sufficient invasive cancer, 80 (82%) had sufficient RNA for QRTPCR assay, and 72 (74%) had clinical response data. Mean age was 48.5 years, and the median tumor size was 6 cm. Clinical complete responses (CR) were observed in 12 (17%), partial responses in 41 (57%), stable disease in 17 (24%), and progressive disease in 2 patients (3%). A significant relationship (P<0.05) between gene expression and CR was observed for 14 genes, including CYBA. CR was associated with lower expression of the ER gene group and higher expression of the proliferation gene group from the 21 gene assay. Of note, CR was more likely with a high RS (P=0.008). We have established molecular profiles of sensitivity to docetaxel. RT-PCR technology provides a potential platform for a predictive test of docetaxel chemosensitivity using small amounts of routinely processed material.

  4. Associations between lifestyle patterns and body mass index in a sample of Greek children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontogianni, Meropi D; Farmaki, Anastasia-Eleni; Vidra, Nikoletta; Sofrona, Stavroula; Magkanari, Flora; Yannakoulia, Mary

    BACKGROUND: Although eating and physical activity behaviors have been previously individually investigated with regard to overweight in children, multidimensional lifestyle patterns, based on these behaviors, have not been explored. OBJECTIVE: To assess lifestyle patterns in relation to body mass

  5. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design (XIII). Analysis of small sample reactivity experiments at ZPPR-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Wakaei; Fukushima, Manabu; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2000-09-01

    A comprehensive study to evaluate and accumulate the abundant results of fast reactor physics is now in progress at O-arai Engineering Center to improve analytical methods and prediction accuracy of nuclear design for large fast breeder cores such as future commercial FBRs. The present report summarizes the analytical results of sample reactivity experiments at ZPPR-9 core, which has not been evaluated by the latest analytical method yet. The intention of the work is to extend and further generalize the standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. The analytical results of the sample reactivity experiments (samples: PU-30, U-6, DU-6, SS-1 and B-1) at ZPPR-9 core in JUPITER series, with the latest nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 and the analytical method which was established by the JUPITER analysis, can be concluded as follows: The region-averaged final C/E values generally agreed with unity within 5% differences at the inner core region. However, the C/E values of every sample showed the radial space-dependency increasing from center to core edge, especially the discrepancy of B-1 was the largest by 10%. Next, the influence of the present analytical results for the ZPPR-9 sample reactivity to the cross-section adjustment was evaluated. The reference case was a unified cross-section set ADJ98 based on the recent JUPITER analysis. As a conclusion, the present analytical results have sufficient physical consistency with other JUPITER data, and possess qualification as a part of the standard data base for FBR nuclear design. (author)

  6. Filter Bank Regularized Common Spatial Pattern Ensemble for Small Sample Motor Imagery Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Hoon; Lee, David; Lee, Sang-Goog

    2018-02-01

    For the last few years, many feature extraction methods have been proposed based on biological signals. Among these, the brain signals have the advantage that they can be obtained, even by people with peripheral nervous system damage. Motor imagery electroencephalograms (EEG) are inexpensive to measure, offer a high temporal resolution, and are intuitive. Therefore, these have received a significant amount of attention in various fields, including signal processing, cognitive science, and medicine. The common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm is a useful method for feature extraction from motor imagery EEG. However, performance degradation occurs in a small-sample setting (SSS), because the CSP depends on sample-based covariance. Since the active frequency range is different for each subject, it is also inconvenient to set the frequency range to be different every time. In this paper, we propose the feature extraction method based on a filter bank to solve these problems. The proposed method consists of five steps. First, motor imagery EEG is divided by a using filter bank. Second, the regularized CSP (R-CSP) is applied to the divided EEG. Third, we select the features according to mutual information based on the individual feature algorithm. Fourth, parameter sets are selected for the ensemble. Finally, we classify using ensemble based on features. The brain-computer interface competition III data set IVa is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The proposed method improves the mean classification accuracy by 12.34%, 11.57%, 9%, 4.95%, and 4.47% compared with CSP, SR-CSP, R-CSP, filter bank CSP (FBCSP), and SR-FBCSP. Compared with the filter bank R-CSP ( , ), which is a parameter selection version of the proposed method, the classification accuracy is improved by 3.49%. In particular, the proposed method shows a large improvement in performance in the SSS.

  7. Dispersion patterns and sampling plans for Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sétamou, Mamoudou; Flores, Daniel; French, J Victor; Hall, David G

    2008-08-01

    The abundance and spatial dispersion of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) were studied in 34 grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macfad.) and six sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] orchards from March to August 2006 when the pest is more abundant in southern Texas. Although flush shoot infestation levels did not vary with host plant species, densities of D. citri eggs, nymphs, and adults were significantly higher on sweet orange than on grapefruit. D. citri immatures also were found in significantly higher numbers in the southeastern quadrant of trees than other parts of the canopy. The spatial distribution of D. citri nymphs and adults was analyzed using Iowa's patchiness regression and Taylor's power law. Taylor's power law fitted the data better than Iowa's model. Based on both regression models, the field dispersion patterns of D. citri nymphs and adults were aggregated among flush shoots in individual trees as indicated by the regression slopes that were significantly >1. For the average density of each life stage obtained during our surveys, the minimum number of flush shoots per tree needed to estimate D. citri densities varied from eight for eggs to four flush shoots for adults. Projections indicated that a sampling plan consisting of 10 trees and eight flush shoots per tree would provide density estimates of the three developmental stages of D. citri acceptable enough for population studies and management decisions. A presence-absence sampling plan with a fixed precision level was developed and can be used to provide a quick estimation of D. citri populations in citrus orchards.

  8. Influence of fuel assembly loading pattern and fuel burnups upon leakage neutron flux spectra from light water reactor core (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Kensuke; Okumura, Keisuke; Kosako, Kazuaki; Torii, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    At the decommissioning of light water reactors (LWRs), it is important to evaluate an amount of radioactivity in the ex-core structures such as a reactor containment vessel, radiation shieldings, and so on. It is thought that the leakage neutron spectra in these radioactivation regions, which strongly affect the induced radioactivity, would be changed by different reactor core configurations such as fuel assembly loading pattern and fuel burnups. This study was intended to evaluate these effects. For this purpose, firstly, partial neutron currents on the core surfaces were calculated for some core configurations. Then, the leakage neutron flux spectra in major radioactivation regions were calculated based on the provided currents. Finally, influence of the core configurations upon the neutron flux spectra was evaluated. As a result, it has been found that the influence is small on the spectrum shapes of neutron fluxes. However, it is necessary to pay attention to the facts that intensities of the leakage neutron fluxes are changed by the configurations and that intensities and spectrum shapes of the leakage neutron fluxes are changed depending on the angular direction around the core. (author)

  9. Differences in Movement Pattern and Detectability between Males and Females Influence How Common Sampling Methods Estimate Sex Ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fabrício Mota Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Sampling the biodiversity is an essential step for conservation, and understanding the efficiency of sampling methods allows us to estimate the quality of our biodiversity data. Sex ratio is an important population characteristic, but until now, no study has evaluated how efficient are the sampling methods commonly used in biodiversity surveys in estimating the sex ratio of populations. We used a virtual ecologist approach to investigate whether active and passive capture methods are able to accurately sample a population's sex ratio and whether differences in movement pattern and detectability between males and females produce biased estimates of sex-ratios when using these methods. Our simulation allowed the recognition of individuals, similar to mark-recapture studies. We found that differences in both movement patterns and detectability between males and females produce biased estimates of sex ratios. However, increasing the sampling effort or the number of sampling days improves the ability of passive or active capture methods to properly sample sex ratio. Thus, prior knowledge regarding movement patterns and detectability for species is important information to guide field studies aiming to understand sex ratio related patterns.

  10. Differences in Movement Pattern and Detectability between Males and Females Influence How Common Sampling Methods Estimate Sex Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Fabrício Mota; Coelho, Marco Túlio Pacheco

    2016-01-01

    Sampling the biodiversity is an essential step for conservation, and understanding the efficiency of sampling methods allows us to estimate the quality of our biodiversity data. Sex ratio is an important population characteristic, but until now, no study has evaluated how efficient are the sampling methods commonly used in biodiversity surveys in estimating the sex ratio of populations. We used a virtual ecologist approach to investigate whether active and passive capture methods are able to accurately sample a population's sex ratio and whether differences in movement pattern and detectability between males and females produce biased estimates of sex-ratios when using these methods. Our simulation allowed the recognition of individuals, similar to mark-recapture studies. We found that differences in both movement patterns and detectability between males and females produce biased estimates of sex ratios. However, increasing the sampling effort or the number of sampling days improves the ability of passive or active capture methods to properly sample sex ratio. Thus, prior knowledge regarding movement patterns and detectability for species is important information to guide field studies aiming to understand sex ratio related patterns.

  11. Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS) and its application to analysis of Delta O-17(CO2) from small air samples collected with an AirCore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrozek, Dorota Janina; van der Veen, Carina; Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Rockmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present the set-up and a scientific application of the Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS), a device to collect and to store the vertical profile of air collected with an AirCore (Karion et al., 2010) in numerous sub-samples for later analysis in the laboratory. The SAS described here is a 20m

  12. AirCore-HR: a high-resolution column sampling to enhance the vertical description of CH4 and CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Membrive

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An original and innovative sampling system called AirCore was presented by NOAA in 2010 (Karion et al., 2010. It consists of a long (>  100 m and narrow (<  1 cm stainless steel tube that can retain a profile of atmospheric air. The captured air sample has then to be analyzed with a gas analyzer for trace mole fraction. In this study, we introduce a new AirCore aiming to improve resolution along the vertical with the objectives to (i better capture the vertical distribution of CO2 and CH4, (ii provide a tool to compare AirCores and validate the estimated vertical resolution achieved by AirCores. This (high-resolution AirCore-HR consists of a 300 m tube, combining 200 m of 0.125 in. (3.175 mm tube and a 100 m of 0.25 in. (6.35 mm tube. This new configuration allows us to achieve a vertical resolution of 300 m up to 15 km and better than 500 m up to 22 km (if analysis of the retained sample is performed within 3 h. The AirCore-HR was flown for the first time during the annual StratoScience campaign from CNES in August 2014 from Timmins (Ontario, Canada. High-resolution vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 up to 25 km were successfully retrieved. These profiles revealed well-defined transport structures in the troposphere (also seen in CAMS-ECMWF high-resolution forecasts of CO2 and CH4 profiles and captured the decrease of CO2 and CH4 in the stratosphere. The multi-instrument gondola also carried two other low-resolution AirCore-GUF that allowed us to perform direct comparisons and study the underlying processing method used to convert the sample of air to greenhouse gases vertical profiles. In particular, degrading the AirCore-HR derived profiles to the low resolution of AirCore-GUF yields an excellent match between both sets of CH4 profiles and shows a good consistency in terms of vertical structures. This fully validates the theoretical vertical resolution achievable by AirCores. Concerning CO2 although a

  13. Prescribing Patterns in a Psychiatrically Referred Sample of Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekunov, Julia; Wozniak, Janet; Conroy, Kristina; Pinsky, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, Maura; de Leon, Melissa F; Belser, Abigail; Biederman, Joseph; Joshi, Gagan

    The aim of this study was to examine the pattern of psychopharmacologic interventions in a psychiatrically referred sample of youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This retrospective chart review aimed at collecting demographic and clinical information, including data on DSM-IV-TR criteria-based psychiatric disorders and related current medication treatment and response. Data were collected in December 2011. Clinicians identified the target disorder for each medication and any adverse events. Level of psychopathology and therapeutic response was assessed by the clinician-rated Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI). Psychiatrically referred youth with ASD (n = 54) suffered from multiple psychopathologies (mean = 2.3) and had a marked level of morbidity (range of baseline CGI-Severity of Illness mean scores, 4.3-5.6). The most prevalent psychopathology was ADHD (83%), anxiety disorders (67%), bipolar spectrum disorder (43%), and mood disorder not otherwise specified (44%). The majority (80%) of the subjects received combination therapy (mean ± SD number of psychotropic medications = 3 ± 1.5). Forty percent of the participants responded on all treatment target symptoms (CGI-Improvement scale score ≤ 2), and an additional 10% experienced response versus nonresponse on a relatively greater number of target symptoms. Half of the subjects reported an adverse event, most commonly weight gain (28%) and sedation (12%), both from antipsychotic medication use. Psychiatrically referred youth with ASD suffer from multiple highly impairing psychiatric disorders that require combination pharmacotherapy. These findings highlight the need for further research to guide clinical decision-making and treatment. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. Attempt of groundwater dating using the drilled rock core. 1. Development of the rock sampling method for measurement of noble gases dissolved in interstitial water in rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahara, Yasunori

    2002-01-01

    Groundwater dating in low permeable rock is very difficult and impracticable, because we take a very long time to collect groundwater sample in a borehole and have to invest much fund in production of the in-situ groundwater sampler and in operation of it. If we can directly measure noble gases dissolved in interstitial groundwater in rock core, we have a big merit to estimate groundwater resident time easy. In this study, we designed and produced a high vacuum container to let dissolved noble gases diffuse until reaching in equilibrium, and we made a handling manual of the rock core into the container and a procedure to vacuum out air from the sealed container. We compared data sets of noble gas concentration obtained from rock cores and groundwater sample collected from boreholes in-situ. The measured rocks are pumice-tuff rock, mud rock and hornfels, which have their permeabilities of 10 -6 cm/s, 10 -9 cm/s and 10 -11 cm/s, respectively. Consequently, we evaluated the rock core method is better than the in-situ groundwater sampling method for low permeable rock. (author)

  15. Accounting for sampling patterns reverses the relative importance of trade and climate for the global sharing of exotic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofaer, Helen R.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2017-01-01

    AimThe distributions of exotic species reflect patterns of human-mediated dispersal, species climatic tolerances and a suite of other biotic and abiotic factors. The relative importance of each of these factors will shape how the spread of exotic species is affected by ongoing economic globalization and climate change. However, patterns of trade may be correlated with variation in scientific sampling effort globally, potentially confounding studies that do not account for sampling patterns.LocationGlobal.Time periodMuseum records, generally from the 1800s up to 2015.Major taxa studiedPlant species exotic to the United States.MethodsWe used data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) to summarize the number of plant species with exotic occurrences in the United States that also occur in each other country world-wide. We assessed the relative importance of trade and climatic similarity for explaining variation in the number of shared species while evaluating several methods to account for variation in sampling effort among countries.ResultsAccounting for variation in sampling effort reversed the relative importance of trade and climate for explaining numbers of shared species. Trade was strongly correlated with numbers of shared U.S. exotic plants between the United States and other countries before, but not after, accounting for sampling variation among countries. Conversely, accounting for sampling effort strengthened the relationship between climatic similarity and species sharing. Using the number of records as a measure of sampling effort provided a straightforward approach for the analysis of occurrence data, whereas species richness estimators and rarefaction were less effective at removing sampling bias.Main conclusionsOur work provides support for broad-scale climatic limitation on the distributions of exotic species, illustrates the need to account for variation in sampling effort in large biodiversity databases, and highlights the

  16. Determination of three-dimensional stress orientations in the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling (WFSD) hole-1: A preliminary result by anelastic strain recovery measurements of core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Lin, W.; Wang, L.; Tang, Z.; Sun, D.; Gao, L.; Wang, W.

    2010-12-01

    A great and destructive earthquake (Ms 8.0; Mw 7.9), Wunchuan earthquake struck on the Longmen Shan foreland trust zone in Sichuan province, China on 12 May 2008 (Xu et al., 2008; Episodes, Vol.31, pp.291-301). As a rapid response scientific drilling project, Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling (WFSD) started on 6 November 2008 shorter than a half of year from the date of earthquake main shock. The first pilot borehole (hole-1) has been drilled to the target depth (measured depth 1201 m MD, vertical depth 1179 m) at Hongkou, Dujianyan, Sichuan and passed through the main fault of the earthquake around 589 m MD. We are trying to determine three dimensional in-situ stress states in the WFSD boreholes by a core-based method, anelastic strain recovery (ASR) method (Lin et al., 2006; Tectonophysics, Vol4.26, pp.221-238). This method has been applied in several scientific drilling projects (TCDP: Lin et al., 2007; TAO, Vol.18, pp.379-393; NanTtoSEIZE: Byrne et al., 2009; GRL, Vol.36, L23310). These applications confirm the validity of using the ASR technique in determining in situ stresses by using drilled cores. We collected total 15 core samples in a depth range from 340 m MD to 1180 m MD, approximately for ASR measurements. Anelastic normal strains, measured every ten minutes in nine directions, including six independent directions, were used to calculate the anelastic strain tensors. The data of the ASR tests conducted at hole-1 is still undergoing analysis. As a tentative perspective, more than 10 core samples showed coherent strain recovery over one - two weeks. However, 2 or 3 core samples cannot be re-orientated to the global system. It means that we cannot rink the stress orientation determined by the core samples to geological structure. Unfortunately, a few core samples showed irregular strain recovery and were not analyzed further. The preliminary results of ASR tests at hole-1 show the stress orientations and stress regime changes a lot with the

  17. Optical method for the characterization of laterally patterned samples in integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Humphrey J [Barrington, RI

    2009-03-17

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample having a structure disposed on or within the sample, comprising the steps of applying a first pulse of light to a surface of the sample for creating a propagating strain pulse in the sample, applying a second pulse of light to the surface so that the second pulse of light interacts with the propagating strain pulse in the sample, sensing from a reflection of the second pulse a change in optical response of the sample, and relating a time of occurrence of the change in optical response to at least one dimension of the structure.

  18. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  19. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  20. Sampling and analysis plan for the gunite and associated tanks interim remedial action, wall coring and scraping at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan documents the procedures for collecting and analyzing wall core and wall scraping samples from the Gunite and Associated Tanks. These activities are being conducted to support the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act at the gunite and associated tanks interim remedial action at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The sampling and analysis activities will be performed in concert with sludge retrieval and sluicing of the tanks. Wall scraping and/or wall core samples will be collected from each quadrant in each tank by using a scraping sampler and/or a coring drill deployed by the Houdini robot vehicle. Each sample will be labeled, transported to the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory, and analyzed for physical and radiological characteristics, including total activity, gross alpha, gross beta, radioactive strontium and cesium, and other alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides. The data quality objectives process, based on US Environmental Protection Agency guidance, was applied to identify the objectives of this sampling and analysis. The results of the analysis will be used to (1) validate predictions of a strontium concrete diffusion model, (2) estimate the amount of radioactivity remaining in the tank shells, (3) provide information to correlate with measurements taken by the Gunite Tank Isotope Mapping Probe and the Characterization End Effector, and (4) estimate the performance of the wall cleaning system. This revision eliminates wall-scraping samples from all tanks, except Tank W-3. The Tank W-3 experience indicated that the wall scrapper does not collect sufficient material for analysis

  1. Results of submerged sediment core sampling and analysis on Par Pond, Pond C, and L Lake: July 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.W. II; Martin, F.D.; Friday, G.P.

    1996-06-01

    Sediment cores from shallow and deep water locations in Par Pond, Pond C, and L Lake were collected and analyzed in 1995 for radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. This core analysis was conducted to develop a defensible characterization of contaminants found in the sediments of Par Pond, Pond C, and L Lake. Mercury was the only nonradiological constituent with a nonestimated quantity that was detected above the U.S Environmental Protection Agency Region IV potential contaminants of concern screening criteria. It was detected at a depth of 0.3--0.6 meters (1.0--2.0 feet) at one location in L Lake. Cesium-137, promethium-146, plutonium-238, and zirconium-95 had significantly higher concentrations in Par Pond sediments than in sediments from the reference sites. Cobalt-60, cesium-137, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and strontium-90 had significantly higher concentrations in L-Lake sediments than sediments from the reference sites

  2. The Mediating Role of Maximizer Decision Makin g Approach in Core Self - Evaluations and Entrepreneurial Persona lity Relationship: Konya Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Arslan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A lot of effort has been put to increase the number of entrepreneurs, the engines of the countries’ economic progress, and to promote entrepreneurship. In this regard, within the recent years in particular, studies, based on psychology and personality relationship are done to understand the entrepreneurial personality. To contribute to this topic and after searching the relevant literature, variables that might predict entrepreneurship have been incorporated into the model. It has been argued that one ofhese theories, core self-evaluations, may determine the entrepreneurial personality by enhancing their self-perceptions and awareness regarding their skills to utilize the opportunities. Moreover, it has also been investigated if the maximizer decision- making, one of the cognitive psychology theories, play a role as a mediator. Core self-evaluations account for 72% of the variance on entrepreneurship; but when maximizer decision-making is added, the amount of variance decreased to 65%. It may assumed to be an important result that entrepreneurial personality and maximizer decision-making cannot co-exist when the negative but statistical significant relationship between maximizer decision-making and core self-evaluations are considered

  3. Engineering task plan for the development, fabrication and installation of rotary mode core sample truck grapple hoist box level wind system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan is to design, generate fabrication drawings, fabricate, test, and install the grapple hoist level wind system for Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) 3 and 4. Deliverables will include generating fabrication drawings, fabrication of one level wind system, updating fabrication drawings as required, and installation of level wind systems on RMCST 3 or 4. The installation of the level wind systems will be done during a preventive maintenance outage

  4. Transactional Patterns of Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Mother-Child Mutual Negativity in an Adoption Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roben, Caroline K. P.; Moore, Ginger A.; Cole, Pamela M.; Molenaar, Peter; Leve, Leslie D.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2015-01-01

    Transactional models of analysis can examine both moment-to-moment interactions within a dyad and dyadic patterns of influence across time. This study used data from a prospective adoption study to test a transactional model of parental depressive symptoms and mutual negativity between mother and child over time, utilizing contingency analysis of…

  5. Nutritional pattern and its relationship with lipids level in a sample of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess the nutritional pattern of Cameroonian diabetics and its relationship to lipid profile. Methodology: The nutritional status and nutrient intake of type 2 diabetes patients in Cameroon was determined using seven days food diaries. Results: The median daily energy intake of these patients was found to be ...

  6. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  7. A core invasiveness gene signature reflects epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but not metastatic potential in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Marsan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metastases remain the primary cause of cancer-related death. The acquisition of invasive tumour cell behaviour is thought to be a cornerstone of the metastatic cascade. Therefore, gene signatures related to invasiveness could aid in stratifying patients according to their prognostic profile. In the present study we aimed at identifying an invasiveness gene signature and investigated its biological relevance in breast cancer. METHODS & RESULTS: We collected a set of published gene signatures related to cell motility and invasion. Using this collection, we identified 16 genes that were represented at a higher frequency than observed by coincidence, hereafter named the core invasiveness gene signature. Principal component analysis showed that these overrepresented genes were able to segregate invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines, outperforming sets of 16 randomly selected genes (all P<0.001. When applied onto additional data sets, the expression of the core invasiveness gene signature was significantly elevated in cell lines forced to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The link between core invasiveness gene expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was also confirmed in a dataset consisting of 2420 human breast cancer samples. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CIG expression is not associated with a shorter distant metastasis free survival interval (HR = 0.956, 95%C.I. = 0.896-1.019, P = 0.186. DISCUSSION: These data demonstrate that we have identified a set of core invasiveness genes, the expression of which is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines and in human tissue samples. Despite the connection between epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive tumour cell behaviour, we were unable to demonstrate a link between the core invasiveness gene signature and enhanced metastatic potential.

  8. Histological Pattern Of Endometrial Samples In Postmenopausal Women With Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeba, Farhat; Shaista; Khan, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the most common clinical problems in gynaecological practice and is an indicator of various underlying disorders. An endometrial biopsy should be done in all women over 35 years with AUB to rule out endometrial cancer or pre-malignant lesion and to initiate treatment. However, wide range of histological patterns on endometrial biopsy offer a diagnostic challenge to practicing pathologists. The objective of this study was to determine histological patterns of endometrium in postmenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Benazir Bhutto Shaheed women and children teaching hospital, Abbottabad from 15/11/2014 to 14/05/2015. This study involved 110 postmenopausal women presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding. A written informed consent was obtained from every patient. The mean age of the patients was 61.60±6.17 years and the mean duration of AUB was 5.20±2.80 years. Most of the patients were para 6 (28.2%) and para 5 (28.2%) followed by para 4 (18.2%) and para 3 (17.3%) while only 8.2% were para 1. The most common histological pattern observed was complex hyperplasia without atypia (30.9%) followed by atrophic endometrium (24.5%), simple hyperplasia (23.6%), malignancy (12.7%), complex hyperplasia with atypia (4.5%) and benign endometrial polyp (3.6%). When stratified the data, there was no significant difference of histological patterns across various age groups (p=.673), duration of AUB (p=.064) and parity (p=.242). The most common histological pattern observed in postmenopausal women with AUB was complex hyperplasia without atypia (30.9%) followed by atrophic endometrium (24.5%), simple hyperplasia (23.6%), malignancy (12.7%), complex hyperplasia with atypia (4.5%) and benign endometrial polyp (3.6%).

  9. Metapopulation theory identifies biogeographical patterns among core and satellite marine bacteria scaling from tens to thousands of kilometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindh, Markus V.; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Ekstam, Börje

    2017-01-01

    Metapopulation theory developed in terrestrial ecology provides applicable frameworks for interpreting the role of local and regional processes in shaping species distribution patterns. Yet, empirical testing of metapopulation models on microbial communities is essentially lacking. We determined ...

  10. Recurrent daily rainfall patterns over South Africa and associated dynamics during the core of the austral summer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cretat, J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available field instead of atmospheric processes and dynamics. An original agglomerative hierarchical clustering approach is used to classify daily rainfall patterns recorded at 5352 stations from DJF 1971 to DJF 1999. Five clusters are retained for analysis...

  11. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part: 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark)] Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    The present report documents the efforts to develop an impedance method for determining the distribution of the water saturation in a chalk core sample. Measurement of this distribution during a displacement process will make it possible to make numerical simulations of the process which may in turn reveal important rock parameters. The impedance method is one among other methods to determine saturation profiles in a research programme on rock parameters with participants from Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, and Danmarks og Groenlands Geologiske Undersoegelse, GEUS. The other methods investigated are nmr-scanning and {gamma}-logging. (au)

  12. Motivation patterns of a sample of African workers employed at a colliery in Mpumalanga

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Phil. (Labour Law and Employment Relations) The purpose of this study is to determine the work motivation pattern of African workers and the factors that motivate them In the workplace. The research was carried out within the framework of the Herzberg Motivation-Hygiene Theory. The research was conducted within the coal mining industry. The data was collected by means ofa TIMS Attitude Survey questionnaire and review of secondary data relevant to the research. The research results indica...

  13. Mono-, di- and trimethylated homologues of isoprenoid tetraether lipid cores in archaea and environmental samples: mass spectrometric identification and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappy, Chris; Barillà, Daniela; Chong, James; Hodgson, Dominic; Morgan, Hugh; Suleman, Muhammad; Tan, Christine; Yao, Peng; Keely, Brendan

    2015-12-01

    Higher homologues of widely reported C(86) isoprenoid diglycerol tetraether lipid cores, containing 0-6 cyclopentyl rings, have been identified in (hyper)thermophilic archaea, representing up to 21% of total tetraether lipids in the cells. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirms that the additional carbon atoms in the C(87-88) homologues are located in the etherified chains. Structures identified include dialkyl and monoalkyl ('H-shaped') tetraethers containing C(40-42) or C(81-82) hydrocarbons, respectively, many representing novel compounds. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of hydrocarbons released from the lipid cores by ether cleavage suggests that the C(40) chains are biphytanes and the C(41) chains 13-methylbiphytanes. Multiple isomers, having different chain combinations, were recognised among the dialkyl lipids. Methylated tetraethers are produced by Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in varying proportions depending on growth conditions, suggesting that methylation may be an adaptive mechanism to regulate cellular function. The detection of methylated lipids in Pyrobaculum sp. AQ1.S2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius represents the first reported occurrences in Crenarchaeota. Soils and aquatic sediments from geographically distinct mesotemperate environments that were screened for homologues contained monomethylated tetraethers, with di- and trimethylated structures being detected occasionally. The structural diversity and range of occurrences of the C(87-89) tetraethers highlight their potential as complementary biomarkers for archaea in natural environments. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Histological pattern of endometrial samples in post-menopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeba, F.; Shaista, A.; Khan, B.

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the most common clinical problems in gynaecological practice and is an indicator of various underlying disorders. An endometrial biopsy should be done in all women over 35 years with AUB to rule out endometrial cancer or pre-malignant lesion and to initiate treatment. However, wide range of histological patterns on endometrial biopsy offer a diagnostic challenge to practicing pathologists. The objective of this study was to determine histological patterns of endometrium in postmenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Benazir Bhutto Shaheed women and children teaching hospital, Abbottabad from 15/11/2014 to 14/05/2015. This study involved 110 postmenopausal women presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding. A written informed consent was obtained from every patient. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.60+-6.17 years and the mean duration of AUB was 5.20+-2.80 years. Most of the patients were para 6 (28.2 percent) and para 5 (28.2 percent) followed by para 4 (18.2 percent) and para 3 (17.3 percent) while only 8.2 percent were para 1. The most common histological pattern observed was complex hyperplasia without atypia (30.9 percent) followed by atrophic endometrium (24.5 percent), simple hyperplasia (23.6 percent), malignancy (12.7 percent), complex hyperplasia with atypia (4.5 percent) and benign endometrial polyp (3.6 percent). When stratified the data, there was no significant difference of histological patterns across various age groups (p=.673), duration of AUB (p=.064) and parity (p=.242). Conclusion: The most common histological pattern observed in postmenopausal women with AUB was complex hyperplasia without atypia (30.9 percent) followed by atrophic endometrium (24.5 percent), simple hyperplasia (23.6 percent), malignancy (12.7 percent), complex hyperplasia with atypia (4.5 percent) and benign endometrial polyp

  15. Fast neutron (14 MeV) attenuation analysis in saturated core samples and its application in well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin Attarzadeh; Mohammad Kamal Ghassem Al Askari; Tagy Bayat

    2009-01-01

    To introduce the application of nuclear logging, it is appropriate to provide a motivation for the use of nuclear measurement techniques in well logging. Importance aspects of the geological sciences are for instance grain and porosity structure and porosity volume of the rocks, as well as the transport properties of a fluid in the porous media. Nuclear measurements are, as a rule non-intrusive. Namely, a measurement does not destroy the sample, and it does not interfere with the process to be measured. Also, non- intrusive measurements are often much faster than the radiation methods, and can also be applied in field measurements. A common type of nuclear measurement employs neutron irradiation. It is powerful technique for geophysical analysis. In this research we illustrate the detail of this technique and it's applications to well logging and oil industry. Experiments have been performed to investigate the possibilities of using neutron attenuation measurements to determine water and oil content of rock sample. A beam of 14 MeV neutrons produced by a 150 KV neutron generator was attenuated by different samples and subsequently detected with plastic scintillators NE102 (Fast counter). Each sample was saturated with water and oil. The difference in neutron attenuation between dry and wet samples was compared with the fluid content determined by mass balance of the sample. In this experiment we were able to determine 3% of humidity in standard sample model (SiO 2 ) and estimate porosity in geological samples when saturated with different fluids. (Author)

  16. Detection of sunn pest-damaged wheat samples using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy based on pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basati, Zahra; Jamshidi, Bahareh; Rasekh, Mansour; Abbaspour-Gilandeh, Yousef

    2018-05-30

    The presence of sunn pest-damaged grains in wheat mass reduces the quality of flour and bread produced from it. Therefore, it is essential to assess the quality of the samples in collecting and storage centers of wheat and flour mills. In this research, the capability of visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy combined with pattern recognition methods was investigated for discrimination of wheat samples with different percentages of sunn pest-damaged. To this end, various samples belonging to five classes (healthy and 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% unhealthy) were analyzed using Vis/NIR spectroscopy (wavelength range of 350-1000 nm) based on both supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition methods. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) as the unsupervised techniques and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) as supervised methods were used. The results showed that Vis/NIR spectra of healthy samples were correctly clustered using both PCA and HCA. Due to the high overlapping between the four unhealthy classes (5%, 10%, 15% and 20%), it was not possible to discriminate all the unhealthy samples in individual classes. However, when considering only the two main categories of healthy and unhealthy, an acceptable degree of separation between the classes can be obtained after classification with supervised pattern recognition methods of SIMCA and PLS-DA. SIMCA based on PCA modeling correctly classified samples in two classes of healthy and unhealthy with classification accuracy of 100%. Moreover, the power of the wavelengths of 839 nm, 918 nm and 995 nm were more than other wavelengths to discriminate two classes of healthy and unhealthy. It was also concluded that PLS-DA provides excellent classification results of healthy and unhealthy samples (R 2  = 0.973 and RMSECV = 0.057). Therefore, Vis/NIR spectroscopy based on pattern recognition techniques

  17. Assessment of the Bacteriological Quality of Food Samples May Offer Clues the Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foodborne illnesses continue to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; however, the burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to culture-confirmed the bacterial profile and their antibiotic resistant pattern in Food and Drug Laboratory, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 22 bacteria including of Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp and E. coli were presumptive isolated from the traditional ice cream, cream pastries, sausage, and salami by the Official Food Microbiology Laboratory, Deputy of Food and Drug Administration, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran, and sent to the Research Center Laboratory, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, to confirm the bacterial spp by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. These isolates were also checked for their antimicrobial resistance pattern according to CLSI guideline. Results: The highest rate of contamination was with Klebsiella spp 09 (40.9%, followed by S. aureus 07 (31.8%, E. coli 06 (27.27%, as reported by the Official Food Microbiology Laboratory of Alborz University of Medical Sciences. Gel electrophoresis of the isolates shows the 600bp bp and 80 bp gene among S. aureus and E. coli respectively. The antibiotic resistant pattern in case of Klensiella spp showed that 6 (66.6% Klensiella spp were resistant to Penicillin and Cotrimoxazole. Similarly, penicillin and amoxicillin were found the highest resistant antibiotic against 83.3% E. coli, however, ceftriaxone showed the highest sensitivity against 100% E. coli isolates. Conclusions: In conclusion, Klebsiella spp, S. aureus and E. coli are contaminants of food specimens obtained from food industries in Karaj, Iran; they constitute a serious health risk for human population. Moreover, the principal purpose of this study is to increase awareness of the antibiotic resistance of

  18. Colorization-Based RGB-White Color Interpolation using Color Filter Array with Randomly Sampled Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Paul; Lee, Sukho; Kang, Moon Gi

    2017-06-28

    Recently, several RGB-White (RGBW) color filter arrays (CFAs) have been proposed, which have extra white (W) pixels in the filter array that are highly sensitive. Due to the high sensitivity, the W pixels have better SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) characteristics than other color pixels in the filter array, especially, in low light conditions. However, most of the RGBW CFAs are designed so that the acquired RGBW pattern image can be converted into the conventional Bayer pattern image, which is then again converted into the final color image by using conventional demosaicing methods, i.e., color interpolation techniques. In this paper, we propose a new RGBW color filter array based on a totally different color interpolation technique, the colorization algorithm. The colorization algorithm was initially proposed for colorizing a gray image into a color image using a small number of color seeds. Here, we adopt this algorithm as a color interpolation technique, so that the RGBW color filter array can be designed with a very large number of W pixels to make the most of the highly sensitive characteristics of the W channel. The resulting RGBW color filter array has a pattern with a large proportion of W pixels, while the small-numbered RGB pixels are randomly distributed over the array. The colorization algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct the colors from such a small number of RGB values. Due to the large proportion of W pixels, the reconstructed color image has a high SNR value, especially higher than those of conventional CFAs in low light condition. Experimental results show that many important information which are not perceived in color images reconstructed with conventional CFAs are perceived in the images reconstructed with the proposed method.

  19. Analysis of spatial patterns informs community assembly and sampling requirements for Collembola in forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirilgen, Tara; Juceviča, Edite; Melecis, Viesturs; Querner, Pascal; Bolger, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The relative importance of niche separation, non-equilibrial and neutral models of community assembly has been a theme in community ecology for many decades with none appearing to be applicable under all circumstances. In this study, Collembola species abundances were recorded over eleven consecutive years in a spatially explicit grid and used to examine (i) whether observed beta diversity differed from that expected under conditions of neutrality, (ii) whether sampling points differed in their relative contributions to overall beta diversity, and (iii) the number of samples required to provide comparable estimates of species richness across three forest sites. Neutrality could not be rejected for 26 of the forest by year combinations. However, there is a trend toward greater structure in the oldest forest, where beta diversity was greater than predicted by neutrality on five of the eleven sampling dates. The lack of difference in individual- and sample-based rarefaction curves also suggests randomness in the system at this particular scale of investigation. It seems that Collembola communities are not spatially aggregated and assembly is driven primarily by neutral processes particularly in the younger two sites. Whether this finding is due to small sample size or unaccounted for environmental variables cannot be determined. Variability between dates and sites illustrates the potential of drawing incorrect conclusions if data are collected at a single site and a single point in time.

  20. Dietary patterns, nutrition knowledge and lifestyle: associations with blood pressure in a sample of Australian adults (the Food BP study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalesi, S; Sharma, S; Irwin, C; Sun, J

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the association between dietary patterns, nutrition knowledge and lifestyle with blood pressure (BP) in a sample of Australian adults. Adults with normal and high BP were included in a cross-sectional study. Dietary intake data was collected using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Nutrition knowledge and lifestyle surveys were included in the questionnaire. Dietary patterns were extracted using factor analysis followed by cluster analysis. Associations were analysed using logistic regression. Four hundred and seven participants were included. Three dietary patterns were identified: Western; Snack and alcohol; and Balanced. Participants with high BP had a higher intake of Western and a lower intake of Balanced dietary pattern. A significant and higher frequency of discretionary foods and oils consumption, as well as lower nutrition knowledge score and activity frequency, were observed in the high BP group. Regression analysis indicated that the intake of Western and Snack and alcohol dietary patterns increases the likelihood of having high BP by 2.40 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28-4.49) and 2.76 (95% CI: 1.52-5.00), respectively, when nutrition knowledge and lifestyle were controlled for as moderator variables. The likelihood of high BP was not associated with nutrition knowledge, but increased with physical inactivity. This study indicates that poor dietary patterns and inactivity are associated with increases in the likelihood of high BP, and the association is not influenced by nutrition knowledge. These findings indicate the importance of developing public health strategies with an emphasis on improving the dietary patterns of individuals to prevent and control high BP in Australian adults.

  1. Study on a pattern classification method of soil quality based on simplified learning sample dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiahua; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the massive soil information in current soil quality grade evaluation, this paper constructed an intelligent classification approach of soil quality grade depending on classical sampling techniques and disordered multiclassification Logistic regression model. As a case study to determine the learning sample capacity under certain confidence level and estimation accuracy, and use c-means algorithm to automatically extract the simplified learning sample dataset from the cultivated soil quality grade evaluation database for the study area, Long chuan county in Guangdong province, a disordered Logistic classifier model was then built and the calculation analysis steps of soil quality grade intelligent classification were given. The result indicated that the soil quality grade can be effectively learned and predicted by the extracted simplified dataset through this method, which changed the traditional method for soil quality grade evaluation. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  2. Patterns of volcanism, weathering, and climate history from high-resolution geochemistry of the BINGO core, Mono Lake, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, S. R.; Starratt, S.; Hemming, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Mono Lake, California is a closed-basin lake on the east side of the Sierra Nevada, and inflow from snowmelt dominates the modern hydrology. Changes in wetness during the last glacial period (>12,000 years ago) and over the last 2,000 years have been extensively described, but are poorly known for the intervening period. We have recovered a 6.25 m-long core from ~3 m of water in the western embayment of Mono Lake, which is shown by initial radiocarbon dates to cover at least the last 10,000 years. The sediments of the core are variable, ranging from black to gray silts near the base, laminated olive-green silt through the center, to layers of peach-colored carbonate nodules interbedded with gray and olive silts and pea-green organic ooze. Volcanic tephras from Bodie and Adobe Hills to the north, east, and south. The rhyolitic tephras of the Mono-Inyo Craters are much lower in TiO2 than the bedrock (10,000 calibrated years before present (cal yr BP) higher in the core, and significant disruption of the fine layers, this interval likely indicates a relatively deep lake persisting into the early Holocene, after the initial dramatic regression from late Pleistocene levels. The finely laminated olive-green silt of the period ~10,700 to ~7500 cal yr BP is very homogenous chemically, probably indicating a stable, stratified lake and a relatively wet climate. This section merits mm-scale scanning and petrographic examination in the future. The upper boundary of the laminated section shows rising Ca/K and decreasing Ti and Si/K, marking the appearance of authigenic carbonate layers. After ~7500 cal yr BP, the sediment in BINGO becomes highly variable, with increased occurrence of tephra layers and carbonate, indicating a lower and more variable lake level. A short interval of olive-green, laminated fine sand/silt just above a radiocarbon date of 3870 ± 360 cal yr BP may record the Dechambeau Ranch highstand of Stine (1990; PPP v. 78 pp 333-381), and is marked by a distinct

  3. Influences of sampling effort on detected patterns and structuring processes of a Neotropical plant-hummingbird network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Maruyama, Pietro K; Debastiani, Vanderlei J; Duarte, L da S; Dalsgaard, Bo; Sazima, Marlies

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all empirical ecological interaction networks to some extent suffer from undersampling. However, how limitations imposed by sampling incompleteness affect our understanding of ecological networks is still poorly explored, which may hinder further advances in the field. Here, we use a plant-hummingbird network with unprecedented sampling effort (2716 h of focal observations) from the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil, to investigate how sampling effort affects the description of network structure (i.e. widely used network metrics) and the relative importance of distinct processes (i.e. species abundances vs. traits) in determining the frequency of pairwise interactions. By dividing the network into time slices representing a gradient of sampling effort, we show that quantitative metrics, such as interaction evenness, specialization (H2 '), weighted nestedness (wNODF) and modularity (Q; QuanBiMo algorithm) were less biased by sampling incompleteness than binary metrics. Furthermore, the significance of some network metrics changed along the sampling effort gradient. Nevertheless, the higher importance of traits in structuring the network was apparent even with small sampling effort. Our results (i) warn against using very poorly sampled networks as this may bias our understanding of networks, both their patterns and structuring processes, (ii) encourage the use of quantitative metrics little influenced by sampling when performing spatio-temporal comparisons and (iii) indicate that in networks strongly constrained by species traits, such as plant-hummingbird networks, even small sampling is sufficient to detect their relative importance for the frequencies of interactions. Finally, we argue that similar effects of sampling are expected for other highly specialized subnetworks. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  4. Genotypic characterization, invasion index and antimicrobial resistance pattern in Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Sadeghi Kalani

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Since MLVA is a high-throughput screening method that is fairly inexpensive, easy to accomplish, rapid, and trustworthy, it is well suited to interlaboratory comparisons during epidemiological investigations. Also further studies of larger samples from a variety of sources such as food and animal specimens recommended comparing by MLVA method.

  5. Molecular biogeography of tribe Thermopsideae (Leguminosae): A Madrean-Tethyan disjunction pattern with an African origin of core genistoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Huang; Stewart C. Sanderson; Ping Yan; Yu-H Wu; Bo-Rong Pan

    2015-01-01

    Thermopsideae has 45 species and exhibits a series of interesting biogeographical distribution patterns, such as Madrean-Tethyan disjunction and EastAsia-North America disjunction,with a center of endemism in the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau (QTP) and Central Asia. Phylogenetic analysis in this paper employed maximum likelihood using ITS, rps16, psbA-trnH, and trnL-F...

  6. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  7. Simulation of range imaging-based estimation of respiratory lung motion. Influence of noise, signal dimensionality and sampling patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, M; Werner, R; Blendowski, M; Ortmüller, J; Handels, H

    2014-01-01

    A major problem associated with the irradiation of thoracic and abdominal tumors is respiratory motion. In clinical practice, motion compensation approaches are frequently steered by low-dimensional breathing signals (e.g., spirometry) and patient-specific correspondence models, which are used to estimate the sought internal motion given a signal measurement. Recently, the use of multidimensional signals derived from range images of the moving skin surface has been proposed to better account for complex motion patterns. In this work, a simulation study is carried out to investigate the motion estimation accuracy of such multidimensional signals and the influence of noise, the signal dimensionality, and different sampling patterns (points, lines, regions). A diffeomorphic correspondence modeling framework is employed to relate multidimensional breathing signals derived from simulated range images to internal motion patterns represented by diffeomorphic non-linear transformations. Furthermore, an automatic approach for the selection of optimal signal combinations/patterns within this framework is presented. This simulation study focuses on lung motion estimation and is based on 28 4D CT data sets. The results show that the use of multidimensional signals instead of one-dimensional signals significantly improves the motion estimation accuracy, which is, however, highly affected by noise. Only small differences exist between different multidimensional sampling patterns (lines and regions). Automatically determined optimal combinations of points and lines do not lead to accuracy improvements compared to results obtained by using all points or lines. Our results show the potential of multidimensional breathing signals derived from range images for the model-based estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy.

  8. BWRVIP-123, Revision 1NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project Removal and Analysis of Material Samples from Core Shroud and Top Guide at Susquehanna Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, D.; Haertel, T.; Lindberg, J.; Oliver, B.; Greenwood, L.

    2005-01-01

    Fast and thermal fluence were determined by a laboratory analysis of the samples. Fluence in the upper regions of the shroud (between the H1 and H2 welds) was substantially lower than that in the belt line region (near the H4 weld). Fluence in the top guide was significantly higher than fluence on the core shroud. As expected, helium concentrations were highest in regions where fluence was highest. Estimates of the initial boron concentration were similar to measurements made on materials removed from other reactors. A technical justification evaluated the acceptability of the sampling process with respect to structural consequences of material removal and to increased cracking susceptibility due to the as-left condition. It was determined that the sampling process was acceptable on both counts

  9. Multivariate data analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis protein patterns from few samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristina Nedenskov; Jessen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Bo

    2008-01-01

    One application of 2D gel electrophoresis is to reveal differences in protein pattern between two or more groups of individuals, attributable to their group membership. Multivariate data analytical methods are useful in pinpointing the spots relevant for discrimination by focusing not only...... on single spot differences, but on the covariance structure between proteins. However, their outcome is dependent on data scaling, and they may fail in producing valid multivariate models due to the much higher number of "irrelevant" spots present in the gels. The case where only few gels are available...... and where the aim is to find as many as possible of the group-dependent proteins seems particularly difficult to handle. The present paper investigates such a case regarding the effect of scaling and of prefiltering by univariate nonparametric statistics on the selection of spots. Besides, a modified...

  10. Physical Activity Patterns During Pregnancy in a Sample of Portuguese Women: A Longitudinal Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paula Clara; Abreu, Sandra; Moreira, Carla; Santos, Rute; Ferreira, Margarida; Alves, Odete; Moreira, Pedro; Mota, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) patterns during pregnancy have not been explored in depth and most previous studies lack assessment of variables such as type, frequency, duration and intensity of activity. This study had two goals: 1) to analyze PA patterns during pregnancy according to weekly time spent on different types of activity; and 2) to determine women's perception about health care providers regarding PA advisement during pregnancy. A longitudinal prospective study was carried out with a 118-pregnant women cohort. Participants were evaluated during all trimesters. Self-reported questionnaires were used to collect personal and obstetric data. Type, duration and frequency of PA were evaluated using the pregnancy physical activity questionnaire (PPAQ) and intensity levels were calculated. Repeated measure analysis of variance was performed to determine differences between trimesters, and Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed when appropriate. A decrease in values of self-reported PA (MET.h.wk(-1)) was found from the first to the second and the first to the third trimester of pregnancy, respectively; total (270.91 vs 220.54 vs 210.35; P pregnancy. Women spent most of their weekly time during the entire pregnancy on household and caregiving activities, occupational activities and leisure, except sport activities. Swimming was the most reported organized PA, reaching its highest proportion (12.7%) in the second trimester. Prenatal exercise classes were reported by 39.8% of women during the 3rd trimester. Pregnant women reported that PA was recommended by health professionals: 53.9% in the 1st trimester, 70.4% in the 2nd trimester and 56.8% in the 3rd trimester. Self-reported PA decreased, especially from the first to the second trimester, in total, light and moderate intensity. Women spent most of their weekly time on domestic, occupational and leisure activities, except sport activities. There are some health care providers that do not recommend physical activity

  11. A Descriptive Study of Pediatric Injury Patterns from the National Automotive Sampling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, C; Jolly, BT

    1998-01-01

    This study describes information from the National Automotive Sampling System for injury mechanisms in the pediatric age group (age 0–16). The total number of pediatric cases in the NASS database for this three year sampling period is 2141(weighted 591,084). No restraint use was identified in 23–43% of the children. For age < 1yr, 60% of patients suffer a facial injury. Head injuries make up only 10% of the total injuries, but are severe. For those age 1–4 yrs abdominal injuries and lower extremity injuries begin to appear. For those age 5–10 yrs, the predominant change over younger occupants is the proportion of spinal injuries. By age 11–16, injuries to the spine, upper extremities, and lower extremities outnumber injuries to the face and head. However, in this population, the greatest proportions of AIS 3–5 injuries still occur to the head and abdomen.

  12. Cannabis and Opium Abuse Patterns and Their Associated Complications in a Sample of Young Iranians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, Mohammad Ali; Asgary, Sedigheh; Shahrokhi, Shahnaz; Naderi, Gholam Ali; Shariatirad, Schwann

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of drug abuse has been reported to be up to 17.0% in Iran. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of two frequently abused substances--cannabis and opium--in samples of the young population in Isfahan, Iran. In a survey done from January 2005 to December 2006, 537 individuals aged 13-20 years were recruited using a…

  13. Monitoring an electric cable core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Marris, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method of, and apparatus for, continuously monitoring an advancing core having a continuous covering comprises directing X-ray radiation laterally towards the advancing covered core; continuously forming an X-ray image pattern of the advancing covered core and translating the image pattern into a visible image pattern; continuously transforming the visible pattern into a digital bit pattern; and processing the digital bit pattern using a microprocessor with interfacing electronics to provide an image profile of the advancing covered core and/or to provide analogue and/or digital signals indicative of the overall diameter and eccentricity of the covered core and of the thickness of the covering. (author)

  14. Comparison of Mother, Father, and Teacher Reports of ADHD Core Symptoms in a Sample of Child Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollie, Henrik; Larsson, Bo; Mørch, Willy-Tore

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the significance of adding father ratings to mother and teacher ratings in the assessment of ADHD symptoms in children. Method: The ADHD Rating Scale-IV, the Child Behavior Checklist, and the Teacher Report Form were filled out by all three informants for a sample of 48 clinically referred children (79% boys) aged 6 to 15 (M…

  15. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part 1: Development of prototype measurement cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark); Lauersen, S. [DTU, Lab. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    To make reservoir simulations it is necessary to know such parameter functions as the capillary pressure curve, relative permeabilities etc. These are difficult to measure in chalk by means of traditional techniques because of the low permeability. In the present approach a displacement process is studied in detail and computer simulation with reservoir simulators can be used to determine parameter functions. To do this, however, it is necessary to know the developments of saturation profiles during the experiment. Different methods are tested in the programme. NMR-scanning and {gamma}-logging are methods where straight rays penetrate the sample and are partly absorbed. In electric current imaging an electric field is induced in the sample and detected at the surface. There are several benefits of this method compared with the others: There are no special safety requirements in contrast to work with radiation; No expensive and limited available equipment is needed unlike NMR; There are no intrinsic procedures slowing the method. There are, however, also drawbacks: Making measurements on a core sample implies the application of a large number of minute electrodes. To do this an implementation has to be derived from scratch; The inverse problem, i.e. the determination of the field inside the sample from surface measurements, is more difficult than the inverse problem of straight ray absorption. In the present report the development of an experimental technique is described. In part II of the report the interpretation of the experimental results will be discussed. (EG) 21 refs.

  16. Sex-Specific Sociodemographic Correlates of Dietary Patterns in a Large Sample of French Elderly Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina A. Andreeva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional analysis provides up-to-date information about dietary patterns (DP and their sociodemographic correlates in European elderly individuals. We studied 6686 enrollees aged 65+ (55% women in the ongoing French population-based NutriNet-Santé e-cohort. Diet was assessed via three 24 h records. The sex-specific correlates of factor analysis derived DP were identified with multivariable linear regression. Using 22 pre-defined food groups, three DP were extracted. The “healthy” DP (fruit, vegetables, grains, nuts, fish was positively associated with education, living alone, and being a former smoker (women, and negatively associated with being overweight, current smoker (men, age 75+ years, having hypertension, and obesity (women. The “western” DP (meat, appetizers, cheese, alcohol was positively associated with BMI (men and being a former/current smoker; it was negatively associated with age 75+ years (women and living alone. The “traditional” DP (bread, potatoes, milk, vegetables, butter, stock was positively associated with age and negatively associated with being a former/current smoker, education (men, and residing in an urban/semi-urban area. The findings support the diversity of DP among the elderly, highlighting sex-specific differences. The “healthy” DP explained the largest amount of variance in intake. Future studies could replicate the models in longitudinal and international contexts.

  17. The Effect of Temperature and Injection Rate during Water Flooding Using Carbonate Core Samples: An Experimental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Ahmadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In many reservoirs, after water flooding, a large volume of oil is still left behind. Hot water injection is the most basic type of thermal recovery which increase recovery by improved sweep efficiency and thermal expansion of crude.In the present work, the effects of injection rate and the temperature of the injected water were surveyed by using core flooding apparatus. Water flooding was performed at different rates (0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 cc/min and temperatures (20 and 90 °C, and the reservoir temperature was about 63 °C. Oil recovery during hot water injection was more than water injection. Moreover, it was concluded that at injection rates of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 cc/min breakthrough time in hot water injection occurred 10 min later in comparison to water injection. The results showed that higher oil recovery and longer breakthrough time were obtained as a result of reducing injection rate. In the first 50 minutes, the oil recovery at injection rates of 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 cc/min was 27.5, 34, and 46% respectively. It was found that at the beginning of injection, thermal and non-thermal injection recovery factors are approximately equal. Moreover, according to the results, recovery factor at the lowest rate in hot water (T=90 °C and q=0.2 cc/min is the best condition to obtain the highest recovery.

  18. Dutch Dyslexia in Adulthood: Core Features and Variety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekebrede, Judith; van der Leij, Aryan; Plakas, Anna; Share, David; Morfidi, Eleni

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the phonological core deficit hypothesis among Dutch dyslexic adults and also evaluated the pattern of individual differences among dyslexics predicted by the phonological-core variable-orthographic differences (PCVOD) model (van der Leij & Morfidi, 2006) in a sample of 57 control adults and 56 dyslexic adults. It was…

  19. Potential bacterial core species associated with digital dermatitis in cattle herds identified by molecular profiling of interdigital skin samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Strube, Mikael Lenz; Isbrand, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    of different molecular methods. Deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene variable regions V1–V2 showed that Treponema, Mycoplasma, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas were the genera best differentiating the DD samples from the controls. Additional deep sequencing analysis of the most abundant genus, Treponema...... in the epidermal lesions and were present in only a subset of samples. RT-qPCR analysis showed that treponemes were also actively expressing a panel of virulence factors at the site of infection. Our results further support the hypothesis that species belonging to the genus Treponema are major pathogens of DD...... and also provide sufficient clues to motivate additional research into the role of M. fermentans, F. necrophorum and P. levii in the etiology of DD....

  20. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  1. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  2. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions

  3. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions

  4. Attachment Patterns and Complex Trauma in a Sample of Adults Diagnosed with Gender Dysphoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Giovanardi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated attachment representations and complex trauma in a sample of gender dysphoric adults. Although it has been proven that the psychological wellbeing of gender diverse persons is largely mediated by family acceptance and support, research on their relationships with parental figures is scarce. A total of 95 adults took part in the study. The attachment distribution was as follows: 27% secure, 27% insecure and 46% disorganized. Regarding early traumas, 56% experienced four or more traumatic forms. Further, gender dysphoric adults showed significantly higher levels of attachment disorganization and polyvictimisation, relative to controls. Comparisons of subgroups, defined by natal gender, showed that trans women, compared to control males, had more involving and physically and psychologically abusive fathers, and were more often separated from their mothers; trans men, relative to female controls, had more involving mothers and were more frequently separated from and neglected by their fathers. The research has several implications for treatment, clinical health psychology, family support and education.

  5. Oskarshamn site investigation. Hydrogeochemical monitoring programme for core and percussion drilled boreholes 2009. Summary of ground water chemistry results from spring and autumn sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regander, Claes; Bergman, Bo (Sweco Environment AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    This report summarises the results obtained in 2009 from the hydrogeochemical monitoring programme for core and percussion drilled boreholes. During 2009 groundwater sampling has been performed in monitored (permanently installed) boreholes in two sampling periods, spring (May-June), and autumn (October-November). Both in spring and autumn groundwater sampling was carried out in the following 12 sections; HLX28:2, HLX35:2, HLX37:1, HLX39:1, KLX08:4, KLX10:2, KLX10:5, KLX12A:2, KLX15A:3, KLX15A:6, KLX18A:3, KLX19A:3. The programme started in 2005 and since then water sampling has been performed twice every year. The objective of the hydrogeochemical monitoring programme is to determine the groundwater composition in selected sections chosen for this purpose. In 2009 the sampling of core drilled borehole sections has been conducted in time series, where each borehole section has been sampled at seven occasions. Percussion drilled borehole sections has been sampled at three occasions. The final sample in each section was taken when the electric conductivity had reached a stable level. Obtained results from the activities presented here include groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 5 including options and SKB chemistry reduced class 5. SKB chemistry reduced class 5 includes analysis of pH, electric conductivity, alkalinity, density, drill water (uranine), major cations (Chapter 5.4), F-, Br-, Cl-, SO{sub 4}2-, Fe(II)/Fe(tot), HS-, DOC, TOC and the isotopes delta2H, delta18O and 3H. Options for SKB chemistry class 5 include even lanthanoids and other trace elements, As, In, I, environmental metals, NH{sub 4}+, nutrient salts and the isotopes delta34S, delta37Cl, 87Sr/86Sr, 10B/11B, delta13C, 226Ra, 222Rn, 238U, 234U, 230Th and 232Th. All data from the activity are stored in the SICADA database

  6. Sensitivity of hepatitis C virus core antigen and antibody combination assays in a global panel of window period samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperche, Syria; Nubling, C. Micha; Stramer, Susan L.; Brojer, Ewa; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi; Kalibatas, Vytenis; El Elkyabi, Magdy; Moftah, Faten; Girault, Annie; van Drimmelen, Harry; Busch, Michael P.; Lelie, Nico

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen and antibody combination assays have been launched as a cost-effective alternative to nucleic acid testing (NAT) for reducing the antibody-negative window period (WP). Later, a HCV antigen chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) became available. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A panel composed of 337 HCV NAT–yield samples that were characterized for viral load (VL) and genotype was used to compare the sensitivity of two combination enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (Monolisa, Bio-Rad; and Murex, formerly Abbott) and a HCV antigen CLIA (Abbott). Analytic sensitivity was compared with HCV RNA detection using Ultrio (Grifols) by testing serial dilutions of 10 genotype (gt)1 to gt4 samples. RESULTS HCV antigen CLIA detected 92.4% of samples, whereas Monolisa and Murex detected 38.3 and 47.5%, respectively. In the HCV RNA VL range of 105 to 107 IU/mL, Monolisa and Murex detected 38% to 56% of gt1, 85% to 78% of gt2, and 21% to 37% of gt3. The overall geometric mean 50% limit of detection (range) of Ultrio on gt1 to gt4 dilution series was 3.5 (1.2–7.7) copies/mL, compared to 3.3 × 106 (4.4 × 105-2.7 × 107), 3.4 × 106 (2.2 × 105–4.2 × 107), and 2728 (415–7243) copies/mL for Monolisa, Murex, and HCV antigen CLIA, respectively. CONCLUSION Analytical sensitivity of NAT was on average 1 million- and 780-fold higher than combination assays and HCV antigen CLIA, respectively. Relative sensitivities of combination assays differed for genotypes with Murex being more sensitive for gt1 and gt3 and Monolisa more sensitive for gt2. Although being less sensitive than NAT, combination assays could be considered in resource-limited settings since they detect 38% to 47% of seronegative WP donations. PMID:26013970

  7. Mineralogic and petrologic investigation of pre-test core samples from the spent fuel test-climax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Qualheim, B.J.

    1983-12-01

    Pre-test samples obtained from just inside the perimeter of the canister emplacement holes of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax have been characterized by petrographic and microanalytical techniques. The primary quartz monzonite has undergone various degrees of hydrothermal alteration as a result of natural processes. Alteration is most apparent on primary plagioclase and biotite. The most common secondary phases on plagioclase are muscovite and calcite, while the most common secondary phases on biotite are epidote and chlorite. The major alteration zones encountered are localized along filled fractures, i.e. veins. The thickness and mineralogy of the alteration zones can be correlated with the vein mineralogy, becoming wider and more complex mineralogically when the veins contain calcite. 7 references, 10 figures, 4 tables

  8. Major- and trace elements in grain size fractions of the Apollo-17 core of the drilled sample 74001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraehenbuehl, U.; Gunten, H.R. von; Jost, D.; Meyer, G.; Wegmueller, F.

    1980-01-01

    Two layers of a drill sample were examined, one from a depth of 38 cm and the other from 58 cm depth. Neutron activation analysis was used for one group of elements, and radiochemical analysis for another. Over a range of grain size from 36 to 450 μm, the trace elements U, Co, and La were found to uniformly distributed, as was iron. The top layer consistently showed a 5-8% higher content. The volatile trace elements Ge and Cd were found to be enriched in the smaller grain sizes. This contradicts previous assumptions of an enrichment of the more volatile elements in top layers owing to more rapid cooling of volcanic eruptions. (R.S.)

  9. Sr-Nd-Hf Isotopic Analysis of <10 mg Dust Samples: Implications for Ice Core Dust Source Fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ujvari, Gabor; Wegner, Wencke; Klötzli, Urs

    2018-01-01

    Combined Sr‐Nd‐Hf isotopic data of two reference materials (AGV‐1/BCR2) and 50, 10, and 5 mg aliquots of carbonate‐free fine grain (isotopic...... compositions (ICs) demonstrate that robust isotopic ratios can be obtained from 5 to 10 mg size rock samples using the ion exchange/mass spectrometry techniques applied. While 87Sr/86Sr ratios of dust aluminosilicate fractions are affected by even small changes in pretreatments, Nd isotopic ratios are found...... to be insensitive to acid leaching, grain‐size or weathering effects. However, the Nd isotopic tracer is sometimes inconclusive in dust source fingerprinting (BEI and NUS both close to ɛNd(0) –10). Hafnium isotopic values (

  10. Dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E Whitney; Lipton, Richard B; Peterlin, B Lee; Raynor, Hollie A; Thomas, J Graham; O'Leary, Kevin C; Pavlovic, Jelena; Wing, Rena R; Bond, Dale S

    2015-04-01

    The role of diet in migraine is not well understood. We sought to characterize usual dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine. We also examined whether the relationship between migraine and diet differs by weight status. In this analysis, women with migraine or severe headache status was determined by questionnaire for 3069 women, ages 20-50 years, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, 1999-2004. Women who experienced severe headaches or migraines were classified as migraine for the purposes of this analysis. Dietary intake patterns (micro- and macronutrient intake and eating frequency) and diet quality, measured by the Healthy Eating Index, 2005, were determined using one 24-hour dietary recall. Dietary intake patterns did not significantly differ between women with and without migraine. Normal weight women with migraine had significantly lower diet quality (Healthy Eating Index, 2005 total scores) than women without migraine (52.5 ± 0.9 vs. 45.9 ± 1.0; P quality differs by migraine status in normal weight women. Prospective analyses are needed to establish how diet relates to migraine onset, characteristics, and clinical features in individuals of varying weight status. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  11. University of TX Bureau of Economic Geology's Core Research Centers: The Time is Right for Registering Physical Samples and Assigning IGSN's - Workflows, Stumbling Blocks, and Successes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, A.; DeJarnett, B. B.

    2016-12-01

    The University Of Texas Bureau Of Economic Geology (BEG) serves as the geological survey for Texas and operates three geological sample repositories that house well over 2 million boxes of geological samples (cores and cuttings) and an abundant amount of geoscience data (geophysical logs, thin sections, geochemical analyses, etc.). Material is accessible and searchable online, and it is publically available to the geological community for research and education. Patrons access information about our collection by using our online core and log database (SQL format). BEG is currently undertaking a large project to: 1) improve the internal accuracy of metadata associated with the collection; 2) enhance the capabilities of the database for both BEG curators and researchers as well as our external patrons; and 3) ensure easy and efficient navigation for patrons through our online portal. As BEG undertakes this project, BEG is in the early stages of planning to export the metadata for its collection into SESAR (System for Earth Sample Registration) and have IGSN's (International GeoSample Numbers) assigned to its samples. Education regarding the value of IGSN's and an external registry (SESAR) has been crucial to receiving management support for the project because the concept and potential benefits of registering samples in a registry outside of the institution were not well-known prior to this project. Potential benefits such as increases in discoverability, repository recognition in publications, and interoperability were presented. The project was well-received by management, and BEG fully supports the effort to register our physical samples with SESAR. Since BEG is only in the initial phase of this project, any stumbling blocks, workflow issues, successes/failures, etc. can only be predicted at this point, but by mid-December, BEG expects to have several concrete issues to present in the session. Currently, our most pressing issue involves establishing the most

  12. Drilling, Coring and Sampling Using Piezoelectric Actuated Mechanisms: From the USDC to a Piezo-Rotary-Hammer Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2012-01-01

    NASA exploration missions are increasingly including sampling tasks but with the growth in engineering experience (particularly, Phoenix Scout and MSL) it is now very much recognized that planetary drilling poses many challenges. The difficulties grow significantly with the hardness of sampled material, the depth of drilling and the harshness of the environmental conditions. To address the requirements for samplers that could be operated at the conditions of the various bodies in the solar system, a number of piezoelectric actuated drills and corers were developed by the Advanced Technologies Group of JPL. The basic configuration that was conceived in 1998 is known as the Ultrasonic/Sonic Driller/Corer (USDC), and it operates as a percussive mechanism. This drill requires as low preload as 10N (important for operation at low gravity) allowing to operate with as low-mass device as 400g, use an average power as low as 2- 3W and drill rocks as hard as basalt. A key feature of this drilling mechanism is the use of a free-mass to convert the ultrasonic vibrations generated by piezoelectric stack to sonic impacts on the bit. Using the versatile capabilities f the USDC led to the development of many configurations and device sizes. Significant improvement of the penetration rate was achieved by augmenting the hammering action by rotation and use of a fluted bit to remove cuttings. To reach meters deep in ice a wireline drill was developed called the Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher and it was demonstrated in 2005 to penetrate about 2-m deep at Antarctica. Jointly with Honeybee Robotics, this mechanism is currently being modified to incorporate rotation and inchworm operation forming Auto-Gopher to reach meters deep in rocks. To take advantage of the ability of piezoelectric actuators to operate over a wide temperatures range, piezoelectric actuated drills were developed and demonstrated to operate at as cold as -200oC and as hot as 500oC. In this paper, the developed mechanisms

  13. Comparison of mother, father, and teacher reports of ADHD core symptoms in a sample of child psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollie, Henrik; Larsson, Bo; Mørch, Willy-Tore

    2013-11-01

    To explore the significance of adding father ratings to mother and teacher ratings in the assessment of ADHD symptoms in children. The ADHD Rating Scale-IV, the Child Behavior Checklist, and the Teacher Report Form were filled out by all three informants for a sample of 48 clinically referred children (79% boys) aged 6 to 15 (M = 10.1) years. Correspondence between father and teacher reports on ADHD-specific symptoms (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = .38) exceeded that between mothers and teachers (ICC = .23). Fathers rated their children as having fewer problems than did mothers and teachers on Total scale scores and the Inattention subscale of the ADHD Rating Scale-IV. Mother ratings were more sensitive to an ADHD diagnosis, whereas father ratings better predicted an ADHD diagnosis requiring the two-setting criterion. The choice of parent informant and informant combination had a considerable impact on parent-teacher concordance and estimates of ADHD symptoms and subtypes in the child.

  14. High-precision dual-inlet IRMS measurements of the stable isotopes of CO2 and the N2O / CO2 ratio from polar ice core samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Bauska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An important constraint on mechanisms of past carbon cycle variability is provided by the stable isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric carbon dioxide (δ13C-CO2 trapped in polar ice cores, but obtaining very precise measurements has proven to be a significant analytical challenge. Here we describe a new technique to determine the δ13C of CO2 at very high precision, as well as measuring the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios. In this method, ancient air is extracted from relatively large ice samples (~400 g with a dry-extraction "ice grater" device. The liberated air is cryogenically purified to a CO2 and N2O mixture and analyzed with a microvolume-equipped dual-inlet IRMS (Thermo MAT 253. The reproducibility of the method, based on replicate analysis of ice core samples, is 0.02‰ for δ13C-CO2 and 2 ppm and 4 ppb for the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios, respectively (1σ pooled standard deviation. Our experiments show that minimizing water vapor pressure in the extraction vessel by housing the grating apparatus in a ultralow-temperature freezer (−60 °C improves the precision and decreases the experimental blank of the method to −0.07 ± 0.04‰. We describe techniques for accurate calibration of small samples and the application of a mass-spectrometric method based on source fragmentation for reconstructing the N2O history of the atmosphere. The oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 is also investigated, confirming previous observations of oxygen exchange between gaseous CO2 and solid H2O within the ice archive. These data offer a possible constraint on oxygen isotopic fractionation during H2O and CO2 exchange below the H2O bulk melting temperature.

  15. Foam patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  16. A performance comparison of sampling methods in the assessment of species composition patterns and environment–vegetation relationships in species-rich grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Swacha; Zoltán Botta-Dukát; Zygmunt Kącki; Daniel Pruchniewicz; Ludwik Żołnierz

    2017-01-01

    The influence that different sampling methods have on the results and the interpretation of vegetation analysis has been much debated, but little is yet known about how the spatial arrangement of samples affect patterns of species composition and environment–vegetation relationships within the same vegetation type. We compared three data sets of the same sample size obtained by three standard sampling methods: preferential, random, and systematic. These different sampling methods were applied...

  17. Patterns of drug dependence in a Queensland (Australia) sample of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Andrew; Kemp, Robert; Ward, James; Henderson, Suzanna; Williams, Sidney; Dev, Abhilash; Najman, Jake M

    2016-09-01

    Despite over-representation of Indigenous Australians in sentinel studies of injecting drug use, little is known about relevant patterns of drug use and dependence. This study compares drug dependence and possible contributing factors in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians who inject drugs. Respondent-driven sampling was used in major cities and 'peer recruitment' in regional towns of Queensland to obtain a community sample of Indigenous (n = 282) and non-Indigenous (n = 267) injectors. Data are cross sectional. Multinomial models were developed for each group to examine types of dependence on injected drugs (no dependence, methamphetamine-dependent only, opioid-dependent only, dependent on methamphetamine and opioids). Around one-fifth of Indigenous and non-Indigenous injectors were dependent on both methamphetamine and opioids in the previous 12 months. Psychological distress was associated with dual dependence on these drugs for Indigenous [adjusted relative risk (ARR) 4.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.08-11.34] and non-Indigenous (ARR 4.14, 95% CI 1.59-10.78) participants. Unemployment (ARR 8.98, 95% CI 2.25-35.82) and repeated (> once) incarceration as an adult (ARR 3.78, 95% CI 1.43-9.97) were associated with dual dependence for Indigenous participants only. Indigenous participants had high rates of alcohol dependence, except for those dependent on opioids only. The drug dependence patterns of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who inject drugs were similar, including the proportions dependent on both methamphetamine and opioids. However, for Indigenous injectors, there was a stronger association between drug dependence and contextual factors such as unemployment and incarceration. Expansion of treatment options and community-level programs may be required. [Smirnov A, Kemp R, Ward J, Henderson S, Williams S, Dev A, Najman J M. Patterns of drug dependence in a Queensland (Australia) sample of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who

  18. Gender differences in substance use patterns and disorders among an Iranian patient sample receiving methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Amir; Motmaen, Maryam; Abdi, Iraj; Rasouli-Azad, Morad

    2017-09-01

    The current prevalence rate of substance abuse and dependence, represents an increasing trend of substance abuse and dependence among women, and the results of epidemiology studies indicate that substance use patterns are different between men and women. This study aimed to determine gender differences in substance use patterns and disorders among the patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment. This cross-sectional study was conducted throughout a specified time bracket ranging from September 2012 through March 2013 in Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) clinics of Mashhad, Iran. In this study, 140 men and 120 women were selected from among the patients referring to MMT clinics in Mashhad through purposeful sampling method. The sample units were assessed using a demographic information questionnaire and Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (SCID). The data were then analyzed by Chi Square test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Independent-samples t-test. SPSS software 16 was used to conduct statistical analyses with P values less than 0.05 regarded as significant. The results showed that men and women are significantly different from each other in terms of marital status (p=0.001), education (p=0.001), income (p=0.001), history of injection (p=0.002), imprisonment (p=0.001), and substance use abstention (p=0.023). It was also revealed that methamphetamine dependence (p=0.017) and simultaneous use of multiple substances (p=0.001) in the past 12 months were diagnosed, to a larger extent, in male participants than those in female participants. In addition, the diagnoses of nicotine dependence (p=0.001), cannabis abuse (p=0.001), heroin dependence (p=0.001), and substance abuse and alcohol dependence (p=0.001) during a lifetime were more frequently existing in males than those in females. There are gender differences in substance use patterns and disorders that appear to be caused by the degree of access to

  19. 3-Way pattern-recognition of PAHs from Galicia (NW Spain) seawater samples after the Prestige's wreck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueiro-Noche, G.; Andrade, J.M.; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S.; Lopez-Mahia, P.; Prada-Rodriguez, D.

    2010-01-01

    In November 2002 the oil tanker 'Prestige' released 65 000 tons of a heavy fuel oil throughout the Galician coastline (NW Spain), causing extensive damage to marine life, natural resources and economic activities at Northern Portugal, Spain and SW France. To evaluate the impact of the oil spill on the aquatic system, 30 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including alkylated derivatives, were analyzed in seawater on five different sampling campaigns from 2002 to 2004. Sampling was made along the Galician continental shelf. In each station three samples were collected at three different depths (surface, mid-depth and bottom). Four different approaches for 3-way analyses (Catenated-PCA, Matrix-Augmented Principal Components Analysis, Parallel Factor Analysis and Procrustes rotation) have been used to asses the major sources of PAHs into the seawater. They revealed two main pollution patterns: one related to oil spillages and discharge of petroleum products, and another more associated with a diffuse anthropogenic origin. - Oil- and anthropogenic-related sources of PAHs were found in a survey program in Galicia after the Prestige wreck, the latter being more relevant as time went by.

  20. Elastic anisotropy of core samples from the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP): direct 3-D measurements and weak anisotropy approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Laurent; David, Christian; Špaček, Petr; Wong, Teng-Fong; Fortin, Jérôme; Song, Sheng Rong

    2012-01-01

    The study of seismic anisotropy has become a powerful tool to decipher rock physics attributes in reservoirs or in complex tectonic settings. We compare direct 3-D measurements of P-wave velocity in 132 different directions on spherical rock samples to the prediction of the approximate model proposed by Louis et al. based on a tensorial approach. The data set includes measurements on dry spheres under confining pressure ranging from 5 to 200 MPa for three sandstones retrieved at a depth of 850, 1365 and 1394 metres in TCDP hole A (Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project). As long as the P-wave velocity anisotropy is weak, we show that the predictions of the approximate model are in good agreement with the measurements. As the tensorial method is designed to work with cylindrical samples cored in three orthogonal directions, a significant gain both in the number of measurements involved and in sample preparation is achieved compared to measurements on spheres. We analysed the pressure dependence of the velocity field and show that as the confining pressure is raised the velocity increases, the anisotropy decreases but remains significant even at high pressure, and the shape of the ellipsoid representing the velocity (or elastic) fabric evolves from elongated to planar. These observations can be accounted for by considering the existence of both isotropic and anisotropic crack distributions and their evolution with applied pressure.

  1. Classification of chilli sauces: Multivariate pattern recognition using selected GCMS retention time peaks of chilli sauces samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Kah Hin; Sharifuddin Mohd Zain; Mohd Radzi Abas

    2008-01-01

    As a preliminary work on the possibility of separating classes of chili sauces based on taste or customer preferences, organic compounds from different kinds of chili sauces of various brands were separated and analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC/ MS). It was found that these organic compounds do form a basis for separation of different types of sauces. The similarity and dissimilarity of chromatograms due to the organic composition of the chili sauces were explored by multivariate pattern recognition techniques based on cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Both CA and PCA results exhibit four linearly separable classes, namely general sauces, hot sauces, sauces with benzoic acid and sauces with garlic. It was concluded that by using chosen retention peaks in the chromatograms of various sauce samples as multivariate features, CA and PCA can be successfully used to reveal the natural clusters existing in chili sauces according to their organic composition. (author)

  2. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns of Bacterial Isolates from Pus Samples in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Punjab, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rugira Trojan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibilities patterns of bacterial isolates from pus samples collected from patients in a tertiary care hospital of Punjab, India. E. coli was the most prevalent pathogen (51.2% followed by Staphylococcus aureus (21%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.6%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.8%, Citrobacter spp. (3.5%, Acinetobacter baumannii (2.3%, Proteus mirabilis (2.3%, and Streptococcus spp. (2.3%. E. coli, K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii, and Citrobacter isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics including higher generation cephalosporins. S. aureus and Streptococcus isolates were sensitive to cloxacillin and vancomycin. However, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis, and Streptococcus isolates were found to be less resistant to the spectrum of antibiotics tested. Overall, our findings indicate the prevalence of resistance to different classes of antibiotics in bacterial isolates from pus infections and hence highlight the need for effective surveillance, regulator reporting, and antibiogram-guided antibiotic prescription.

  3. Identification of heparin samples that contain impurities or contaminants by chemometric pattern recognition analysis of proton NMR spectral data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Qingda [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Snowdon, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States); University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Health Informatics, School of Health Related Professions, Newark, NJ (United States); Keire, David A.; Buhse, Lucinda F.; Trehy, Michael L. [Food and Drug Administration, CDER, Division of Pharmaceutical Analysis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Wood, Richard D. [Snowdon, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States); Mital, Dinesh P.; Haque, Syed; Srinivasan, Shankar [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Health Informatics, School of Health Related Professions, Newark, NJ (United States); Moore, Christine M.V.; Nasr, Moheb; Al-Hakim, Ali [Food and Drug Administration, CDER, Office of New Drug Quality Assessment, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Welsh, William J. [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Chemometric analysis of a set of one-dimensional (1D) {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data for heparin sodium active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) samples was employed to distinguish USP-grade heparin samples from those containing oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) contaminant and/or unacceptable levels of dermatan sulfate (DS) impurity. Three chemometric pattern recognition approaches were implemented: classification and regression tree (CART), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM). Heparin sodium samples from various manufacturers were analyzed in 2008 and 2009 by 1D {sup 1}H NMR, strong anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and percent galactosamine in total hexosamine tests. Based on these data, the samples were divided into three groups: Heparin, DS {<=} 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; DS, DS > 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; and OSCS, OSCS > 0% with any content of DS. Three data sets corresponding to different chemical shift regions (1.95-2.20, 3.10-5.70, and 1.95-5.70 ppm) were evaluated. While all three chemometric approaches were able to effectively model the data in the 1.95-2.20 ppm region, SVM was found to substantially outperform CART and ANN for data in the 3.10-5.70 ppm region in terms of classification success rate. A 100% prediction rate was frequently achieved for discrimination between heparin and OSCS samples. The majority of classification errors between heparin and DS involved cases where the DS content was close to the 1.0% DS borderline between the two classes. When these borderline samples were removed, nearly perfect classification results were attained. Satisfactory results were achieved when the resulting models were challenged by test samples containing blends of heparin APIs spiked with non-, partially, or fully oversulfated chondroitin sulfate A, heparan sulfate, or DS at the 1.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% (w/w) levels. This study demonstrated that the combination of 1D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy

  4. Genotyping-by-sequencing for Populus population genomics: an assessment of genome sampling patterns and filtering approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P Schilling

    Full Text Available Continuing advances in nucleotide sequencing technology are inspiring a suite of genomic approaches in studies of natural populations. Researchers are faced with data management and analytical scales that are increasing by orders of magnitude. With such dramatic advances comes a need to understand biases and error rates, which can be propagated and magnified in large-scale data acquisition and processing. Here we assess genomic sampling biases and the effects of various population-level data filtering strategies in a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS protocol. We focus on data from two species of Populus, because this genus has a relatively small genome and is emerging as a target for population genomic studies. We estimate the proportions and patterns of genomic sampling by examining the Populus trichocarpa genome (Nisqually-1, and demonstrate a pronounced bias towards coding regions when using the methylation-sensitive ApeKI restriction enzyme in this species. Using population-level data from a closely related species (P. tremuloides, we also investigate various approaches for filtering GBS data to retain high-depth, informative SNPs that can be used for population genetic analyses. We find a data filter that includes the designation of ambiguous alleles resulted in metrics of population structure and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium that were most consistent with previous studies of the same populations based on other genetic markers. Analyses of the filtered data (27,910 SNPs also resulted in patterns of heterozygosity and population structure similar to a previous study using microsatellites. Our application demonstrates that technically and analytically simple approaches can readily be developed for population genomics of natural populations.

  5. Detecting oscillatory patterns and time lags from proxy records with non-uniform sampling: Some pitfalls and possible solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Reik

    2013-04-01

    Time series analysis offers a rich toolbox for deciphering information from high-resolution geological and geomorphological archives and linking the thus obtained results to distinct climate and environmental processes. Specifically, on various time-scales from inter-annual to multi-millenial, underlying driving forces exhibit more or less periodic oscillations, the detection of which in proxy records often allows linking them to specific mechanisms by which the corresponding drivers may have affected the archive under study. A persistent problem in geomorphology is that available records do not present a clear signal of the variability of environmental conditions, but exhibit considerable uncertainties of both the measured proxy variables and the associated age model. Particularly, time-scale uncertainty as well as the heterogeneity of sampling in the time domain are source of severe conceptual problems that may lead to false conclusions about the presence or absence of oscillatory patterns and their mutual phasing in different archives. In my presentation, I will discuss how one can cope with non-uniformly sampled proxy records to detect and quantify oscillatory patterns in one or more data sets. For this purpose, correlation analysis is reformulated using kernel estimates which are found superior to classical estimators based on interpolation or Fourier transform techniques. In order to characterize non-stationary or noisy periodicities and their relative phasing between different records, an extension of continuous wavelet transform is utilized. The performance of both methods is illustrated for different case studies. An extension to explicitly considering time-scale uncertainties by means of Bayesian techniques is briefly outlined.

  6. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  7. Summary of micrographic analysis of selected core samples from Well ER-20-6n number 1 in support of matrix diffusion testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-20-6number s ign1 was cored to determine fracture and lithologic properties proximal to the BULLION test cavity. Selected samples from ER-20-6number s ign1 were subjected to matrix and/or fracture diffusion experiments to assess solute movement in this environment. Micrographic analysis of these samples suggests that the similarity in bulk chemical composition results in very similar mineral assemblages forming along natural fractures. These samples are all part of the mafic-poor Calico Hills Formation and exhibit fracture-coating mineral assemblages dominated by mixed illite/smectite clay and illite, with local opaline silica (2,236 and 2, 812 feet), and zeolite (at 2,236 feet). Based on this small sample population, the magnitude to which secondary phases have formed on fracture surfaces bears an apparently inverse relationship to the competency of the host lithology, reflected by variations in the degree of fracturing and the development of secondary phases on fracture surfaces. In the flow breccia at 2,851 feet, thinly developed, localized coatings are developed along persistent open fracture apertures in this competent rock type. Fractures in the devitrified lava from 2,812 feet are irregular, and locally blocked by secondary mineral phases. Natural fractures on the zeolitized tuff from 2,236 feet are discontinuous and irregular and typically obstructed with secondary mineral phases. There are also a second set of clean fractures in the 2,236 foot sample which lack secondary mineral phases and are interpreted to have been induced by the BULLION test. Based on these results, it is expected that matrix diffusion will be enhanced in samples where potentially transmissive fractures exhibit the greatest degree of obstruction (2,236>2,812=2,835>2,851). It is unclear what influence the induced fractures observed at 2,236 feet may have on diffusion given the lack of knowledge on their extent. It is assumed that the bulk matrix diffusion characteristics of the

  8. The influence of sampling unit size and spatial arrangement patterns on neighborhood-based spatial structure analyses of forest stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Zhang, G.; Hui, G.; Li, Y.; Hu, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of study: Neighborhood-based stand spatial structure parameters can quantify and characterize forest spatial structure effectively. How these neighborhood-based structure parameters are influenced by the selection of different numbers of nearest-neighbor trees is unclear, and there is some disagreement in the literature regarding the appropriate number of nearest-neighbor trees to sample around reference trees. Understanding how to efficiently characterize forest structure is critical for forest management. Area of study: Multi-species uneven-aged forests of Northern China. Material and methods: We simulated stands with different spatial structural characteristics and systematically compared their structure parameters when two to eight neighboring trees were selected. Main results: Results showed that values of uniform angle index calculated in the same stand were different with different sizes of structure unit. When tree species and sizes were completely randomly interspersed, different numbers of neighbors had little influence on mingling and dominance indices. Changes of mingling or dominance indices caused by different numbers of neighbors occurred when the tree species or size classes were not randomly interspersed and their changing characteristics can be detected according to the spatial arrangement patterns of tree species and sizes. Research highlights: The number of neighboring trees selected for analyzing stand spatial structure parameters should be fixed. We proposed that the four-tree structure unit is the best compromise between sampling accuracy and costs for practical forest management. (Author)

  9. Histologic Subtype in Core Lung Biopsies of Early-Stage Lung Adenocarcinoma is a Prognostic Factor for Treatment Response and Failure Patterns After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeman, Jonathan E.; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Montecalvo, Joseph [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hsu, Meier; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Reibnitz, Donata von; Panchoo, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Adusumilli, Prasad S. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Travis, William [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for early-stage lung cancer. The histologic subtype of surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma is recognized as a prognostic factor, with the presence of solid or micropapillary patterns predicting poor outcomes. We describe the outcomes after SBRT for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma stratified by histologic subtype. Methods and Materials: We identified 119 consecutive patients (124 lesions) with stage I to IIA lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone definitive SBRT at our institution from August 2008 to August 2015 and had undergone core biopsy. Histologic subtyping was performed according to the 2015 World Health Organization classification. Of the 124 tumors, 37 (30%) were a high-risk subtype, defined as containing a component of solid and/or micropapillary pattern. The cumulative incidences of local, nodal, regional, and distant failure were compared between the high-risk and non–high-risk adenocarcinoma subtypes using Gray's test, and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated from propensity score–weighted Cox regression models. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 17 months and for surviving patients was 21 months. The 1-year cumulative incidence of and adjusted HR for local, nodal, regional, and distant failure in high-risk versus non–high-risk lesions was 7.3% versus 2.7% (HR 16.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5-81.4), 14.8% versus 2.6% (HR 3.8; 95% CI 0.95-15.0), 4.0% versus 1.2% (HR 20.9; 95% CI 2.3-192.3), and 22.7% versus 3.6% (HR 6.9; 95% CI 2.2-21.1), respectively. No significant difference was seen with regard to overall survival. Conclusions: The outcomes after SBRT for early-stage adenocarcinoma of the lung correlate highly with histologic subtype, with micropapillary and solid tumors portending significantly higher rates of locoregional and metastatic progression. In this context, the histologic subtype

  10. The Brief Core Schema Scales (BCSS): psychometric properties and associations with paranoia and grandiosity in non-clinical and psychosis samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, David; Freeman, Daniel; Smith, Ben; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Bebbington, Paul; Bashforth, Hannah; Coker, Sian; Hodgekins, Joanne; Gracie, Alison; Dunn, Graham; Garety, Philippa

    2006-06-01

    Traditional instruments that measure self-esteem may not relate directly to the schema construct as outlined in recent cognitive models. The Brief Core Schema Scales (BCSS) aim to provide a theoretically coherent self-report assessment of schemata concerning self and others in psychosis. The scales assess four dimensions of self and other evaluation: negative-self, positive-self, negative-other, positive-other. We analysed the psychometric properties of the BCSS using a sample of 754 students recruited by email and 252 people with psychosis recruited as part of a trial of cognitive therapy. We report the internal consistency, stability and the factor structure of the scale, and the association of the BCSS with measures of self-esteem and with symptoms of paranoia and grandiosity. The BCSS have good psychometric properties and have more independence from mood than the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Schedule. People with chronic psychosis reported extreme negative evaluations of both self and others on these scales, but their levels of self-esteem and positive evaluations of self and others were similar to the student sample. Extreme negative evaluations of self and others appear to be characteristic of the appraisals of people with chronic psychosis, and are associated with symptoms of grandiosity and paranoia in the non-clinical population. The BCSS may provide a more useful measure of schemata about self and others than traditional measures of self-esteem.

  11. Core-shell Fe3O4 polydopamine nanoparticles as sorbent for magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction of copper from food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Emre; Tokalıoğlu, Şerife; Patat, Şaban

    2018-10-15

    In the present study, core-shell Fe 3 O 4 polydopamine nanoparticles were synthesized and used for the first time as an adsorbent for the vortex assisted magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction of copper from food samples. After elution, copper in the solutions was determined by FAAS. The adsorbent was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, and zeta potential measurements. Various parameters affecting the magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction were evaluated. The optimum pH and magnetic adsorbent amount were found to be 5 and 40 mg, respectively. Elution was made by 3 mL of 2 mol L -1 HNO 3 .The major advantage of the method is the fast equilibration during adsorption without the need for vortexing or shaking. The preconcentration factor and detection limit of the method were found to be 150 and 0.22 mg L -1 , respectively. The precision (as RSD%) and adsorption capacity of the method were 3.7% and 28 mg g -1 , respectively. The method was successfully verified by analyzing four certified reference materials (SPS-WW1 Batch 114 Wastewater, TMDA-53.3 Lake water, BCR-482 Lichen and 1573a Tomato Leaves) and by addition/recovery tests of copper standard solution in organic baby food, muesli, macaroni, honey, and milk samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Characterizing spatial patterns of NO(x), SO2 and O3 in Pearl River Delta by passive sampling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Shao, Min; Wang, Chen; Wang, Bo-Guang; Lu, Si-Hua; Zhong, Liu-Ju

    2011-02-01

    Concentrations of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were measured by passive sampling within 200km x 200km grid in Pearl River Delta (PRD). Sampling period was two weeks in November, 2009. Spatial distributions of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were obtained by Kriging interpolation method. The results were compared with emission inventories and modeling results. The transportations of O3 were evaluated by using backward trajectories of air parcels. During the sampling period, the mean concentrations of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were 75.9 microg/m3, 37.3 microg/m3 and 36.2 microg/m3, respectively. And the highest concentrations of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were 195.7 microg/m3, 95.9 microg/m3 and 81.8 microg/m3. Comparing with routine measurements from the regional monitoring network in PRD, the results by passive method were 18.6%, 33.5% and 37.5% lower for NO(x), SO2 and O3, respectively. The spatial patterns demonstrated that higher NO(x) concentrations often appeared in cities such as Guangzhou, Foshan and Shenzhen. SO2 concentrations were higher in west and lower in east. High SO2 concentrations are mainly from emission of power plants and industrial sources. Concentrations of O3 showed the highest levels in the south of PRD. Backward trajectory analysis for higher ozone areas indicated that 53% of the air masses were from the region with high concentration of NO(x). The horizontal transportation caused higher ozone in the south while lower in north in PRD.

  13. Sampling in the Snow: High School Winter Field Experiences Provide Relevant, Real World Connections Between Scientific Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, E. W.; Burakowski, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the northern United States, the months surrounding the winter solstice are times of increased darkness, low temperatures, and frozen landscapes. It's a time when many high school science educators, who otherwise would venture outside with their classes, hunker down and are wary of the outdoors. However, a plethora of learning opportunities lies just beyond the classroom. Working collaboratively, a high school science teacher and a snow scientist have developed multiple activities to engage students in the scientific process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting the winter world using snow data to (1) learn about the insulative properties of snow, and (2) to learn about the role of snow cover on winter climate through its reflective properties while participating in a volunteer network that collects snow depth, albedo (reflectivity), and density data. These outdoor field-based snow investigations incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and disciplinary core ideas, including ESS2.C: The roles of water in Earth's surface processes and ESS2.D: Weather and Climate. Additionally, the lesson plans presented address Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics, including the creation and analysis of bar graphs and time series plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.A.1) and xy scatter plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.B.6). High school students participating in the 2013/2014 snow sampling season described their outdoor learning experience as "authentic" and "hands-on" as compared to traditional class indoors. They emphasized that learning outdoors was essential to their understanding of underlying content and concepts because they "learn through actual experience."

  14. Mesures de contraintes in-situ. Méthode de relaxation des carottes Measuring in-Situ Stresses. Relaxation Method with Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perreau P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, on se propose de présenter les premiers résultats de l'étude de la méthode d'évaluation des contraintes par mesure de déformations différées d'une carotte après son extraction. Le travail correspondant a été réalisé dans le cadre du projet ARTEP Fracturation hydraulique . Les principes de cette méthode et les quelques éléments d'interprétation récemment publiés dans la littérature sont exposés dans un premier temps. Les résultats de deux campagnes de mesures sur deux puits de la SNEA-P (Soudron, novembre 1985 et Lanot, juillet 1986 sont ensuite présentés. Ces essais ont mis en évidence que les déformations différées d'une carotte dues au relachement des contraintes sont effectivement mesurables. Cependant, une interprétation quantitative de ces mesures nécessite une amélioration des conditions expérimentales (stabilisation thermique, stabilisation de l'état de saturation. This article describes the first results of research on a method of evaluating stresses by measuring the differred deformations of a core sample after it has been extracted. The corresponding research was done within the framework of an ARTEP project on Hydraulic Fracturing . The principles of this method and several interpretation aspects published recently in the literature are described in the first part. Then the results of two measurement campaigns using two SNEA-P wells (Soudron in November 1985 and Lanot in July 1986 are described. These tests revealed that the differed deformations of a core sample due to the relaxing of stresses can effectively be measured. However, a quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires an improvement to be made in the experimental conditions (thermal stabilization, stabilization of the state of saturation.

  15. Evaluation of Total Nitrite Pattern Visualization as an Improved Method for Gunshot Residue Detection and its Application to Casework Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jason; Upton, Colin; Springer, Elyah

    2018-04-23

    Visualization of nitrite residues is essential in gunshot distance determination. Current protocols for the detection of nitrites include, among other tests, the Modified Griess Test (MGT). This method is limited as nitrite residues are unstable in the environment and limited to partially burned gunpowder. Previous research demonstrated the ability of alkaline hydrolysis to convert nitrates to nitrites, allowing visualization of unburned gunpowder particles using the MGT. This is referred to as Total Nitrite Pattern Visualization (TNV). TNV techniques were modified and a study conducted to streamline the procedure outlined in the literature to maximize the efficacy of the TNV in casework, while reducing the required time from 1 h to 5 min, and enhancing effectiveness on blood-soiled samples. The TNV method was found to provide significant improvement in the ability to detect significant nitrite residues, without sacrificing efficiency, that would allow for the determination of the muzzle-to-target distance. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Mandibulary dental arch form differences between level four polynomial method and pentamorphic pattern for normal occlusion sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yuliana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of an orthodontic treatment is to achieve aesthetic, dental health and the surrounding tissues, occlusal functional relationship, and stability. The success of an orthodontic treatment is influenced by many factors, such as diagnosis and treatment plan. In order to do a diagnosis and a treatment plan, medical record, clinical examination, radiographic examination, extra oral and intra oral photos, as well as study model analysis are needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in dental arch form between level four polynomial and pentamorphic arch form and to determine which one is best suitable for normal occlusion sample. This analytic comparative study was conducted at Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran on 13 models by comparing the dental arch form using the level four polynomial method based on mathematical calculations, the pattern of the pentamorphic arch and mandibular normal occlusion as a control. The results obtained were tested using statistical analysis T student test. The results indicate a significant difference both in the form of level four polynomial method and pentamorphic arch form when compared with mandibular normal occlusion dental arch form. Level four polynomial fits better, compare to pentamorphic arch form.

  17. Geochemistry of core samples of the Tiva Canyon Tuff from drill hole UE-25 NRG number-sign 3, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, Z.E.; Futa, K.

    1996-01-01

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff of Miocene age is composed of crystal-poor, high-silica rhyolite overlain by a crystal-rich zone that is gradational in composition from high-silica rhyolite to quartz latite. Each of these zones is divided into subzones that have distinctive physical, mineralogical, and geochemical features.Accurate identification of these subzones and their contacts is essential for detailed mapping and correlation both at the surface and in the subsurface in drill holes and in the exploratory studies facility (ESF). This report presents analyses of potassium (K), calcium (Ca), titanium (Ti), rubidium (Rb), strontium (Sr), yttrium (Y), zirconium (Zr), niobium (Nb), barium (Ba), lanthanum (La), and cerium (Ce) in core samples of the Tiva Canyon Tuff from drill hole UE-25 NRG number-sign 3. The concentrations of most of these elements are remarkably constant throughout the high-silica rhyolite, but at its upper contact with the crystal-rich zone, Ti, Zr, Ba, Ca, Sr, La, Ce, and K begin to increase progressively through the crystal-rich zone. In contrast, Rb and Nb decrease, and Y remains essentially constant. Initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios are relatively uniform in the high-silica rhyolite with a mean value of 0.7117, whereas initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios decrease upward in the quartz latite to values as low as 0.7090

  18. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography separations of pharmaceutical samples using dual Fused-Core columns in the 2nd dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Anthony J; Ma, Lianjia

    2009-02-27

    This paper focuses on the application of RPLC x RPLC to pharmaceutical analysis and addresses the specific problem of separating co-eluting impurities/degradation products that maybe "hidden" within the peak envelope of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and thus may escape detection by conventional methods. A comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatograph (LC x LC) was constructed from commercially available HPLC equipment. This system utilizes two independently configurable 2nd dimension binary pumping systems to deliver independent flow rates, gradient profiles and mobile phase compositions to dual Fused-Core secondary columns. Very fast gradient separations (30s total cycle time) were achieved at ambient temperature without excessive backpressure and without compromising optimal 1st dimension sampling rates. The operation of the interface is demonstrated for the analysis of a 1mg/ml standard mixture containing 0.05% of a minor component. The practicality of using RPLC x RPLC for the analysis of actual co-eluting pharmaceutical degradation products, by exploiting pH-induced changes in selectivity, is also demonstrated using a three component mixture. This mixture (an API, an oxidation product of the API at 1.0%, w/w, and a photo degradant of the API at 0.5%, w/w) was used to assess the stability indicating nature of an established LC method for analysis of the API.

  19. Development of a versatile sample preparation method and its application for rare-earth pattern and Nd isotope ratio analysis in nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajko, J.

    2015-01-01

    An improved sample preparation procedure for trace-levels of lanthanides in uranium-bearing samples was developed. The method involves a simple co-precipitation using Fe(III) carrier in ammonium carbonate medium to remove the uranium matrix. The procedure is an effective initial pre-concentration step for the subsequent extraction chromatographic separations. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by the measurement of REE pattern and 143 Nd/ 144 Nd isotope ratio in uranium ore concentrate samples. (author)

  20. Combined geophysical surveys and coring data to investigate the pattern of the Watukosek fault system around the Lusi eruption site, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husein, Alwi; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Mauri, Guillaume; Kemna, Andreas; Hadi, Soffian; Santosa, Bagus

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption is located in the Sidoarjo area, Indonesia and is continuously erupting hot mud since its birth in May 2006. The Watukosek fault system originates from the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex extending towards the NE of Java. After the 27-06-2006 M 6.3 earthquake this fault system was reactivated and hosted numerous hot mud eruptions in the Sidoarjo area. Until now, no targeted investigations have been conducted to understand the geometry of the faults system crossing the Lusi eruption site. A comprehensive combined electrical resistivity and self-potential (SP) survey was performed in the 7 km2 area inside the Lusi embankment that had been built to contain the erupted mud and to prevent flooding of the surrounding roads and settlements. The goal of the geophysical survey is to map the near-surface occurrence of the Watukosek fault system upon which Lusi resides, delineate its spatial pattern, and monitor its development. We completed six lines of resistivity measurements using Wenner configuration and SP measurements using roll-along technique. Three subparallel lines were located to the north and to the south of the main crater. Each line was approximately W-E oriented extending for ~1.26 km. The surveyed regions consist of mud breccia (containing clayey-silty-sandy mixture with clast up to ~10 cm in size). The geophysical data have been complemented with a N-S oriented profile consisting of 6 cores (~30m long) drilled in the dry area inside the Lusi embankment. The resistivity data were inverted into 2-D resistivity images with a maximum penetration depth of almost 200 m. These images consistently reveal a region of about 300 m in width (between 30-90 m depth) characterized by anomalous resistivities, which are lower than the values observed in the surrounding area. The results of the SP data correspond well with the resistivity profiles in the anomalous parts, which suggests that their origin is related to fluid flow paths in the

  1. Preparation of magnetic core mesoporous shell microspheres with C18-modified interior pore-walls for fast extraction and analysis of phthalates in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongbo; Huang, Danni; Fu, Chinfai; Wei, Biwen; Yu, Wenjia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2011-09-16

    In this study, core-shell magnetic mesoporous microspheres with C18-functionalized interior pore-walls were synthesized through coating Fe(3)O(4) microspheres with a mesoporous inorganic-organic hybrid layer with a n-octadecyltriethoxysilane (C18TES) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the silica source and cetyltrimethylammonia bromide (CTAB) as a template. The obtained C18-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres possess numerous C18 groups anchored in the interior pore-walls, large surface area (274.7 m(2)/g, high magnetization (40.8 emu/g) and superparamagnetism, uniform mesopores (4.1 nm), which makes them ideal absorbents for simple, fast, and efficient extraction and enrichment of hydrophobic organic compounds in water samples. Several kinds of phthalates were used as the model hydrophobic organic compounds to systematically evaluate the performance of the C18-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres in extracting hydrophobic molecules by using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Various parameters, including eluting solvent, the amounts of absorbents, extraction time and elution time were optimized. Hydrophobic extraction was performed in the interior pore of magnetic mesoporous microspheres, and the materials had the anti-interference ability to macromolecular proteins, which was also investigated in the work. Under the optimized conditions, C18-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) microspheres were successfully used to analyze the real water samples. The results indicated that this novel method was fast, convenient and efficient for the target compounds and could avoid being interfered by macromolecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Major ions in spitsbergen snow samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semb, A.; Braekkan, R.; Joranger, E.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical analysis of Spitsbergen snow cores sampled in spring 1983, reveals a spatial pattern consistent with orographic deposition of major anthropogenic pollutants with air movements from southeast towards northwest. The highest concentrations of pollutant species were found at an altitude of 700 metres above sea level, and are higher than for any other recorded snow samples from the Arctic

  3. Effect of core body temperature, time of day, and climate conditions on behavioral patterns of lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J D; Hall, L W; Collier, R J; Smith, J F

    2015-01-01

    Cattle show several responses to heat load, including spending more time standing. Little is known about what benefit this may provide for the animals. Data from 3 separate cooling management trials were analyzed to investigate the relationship between behavioral patterns in lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress and their body temperature. Cows (n=157) were each fitted with a leg data logger that measured position and an intravaginal data logger that measures core body temperature (CBT). Ambient conditions were also collected. All data were standardized to 5-min intervals, and information was divided into several categories: when standing and lying bouts were initiated and the continuance of each bout (7,963 lying and 6,276 standing bouts). In one location, cows were continuously subjected to heat-stress levels according to temperature-humidity index (THI) range (THI≥72). The THI range for the other 2 locations was below and above a heat-stress threshold of 72 THI. Overall and regardless of period of day, cows stood up at greater CBT compared with continuing to stand or switching to a lying position. In contrast, cows lay down at lower CBT compared with continuing to lie or switching to a standing position, and lying bouts lasted longer when cows had lower CBT. Standing bouts also lasted longer when cattle had greater CBT, and they were less likely to lie down (less than 50% of lying bouts initiated) when their body temperature was over 38.8°C. Also, cow standing behavior was affected once THI reached 68. Increasing CBT decreased lying duration and increased standing duration. A CBT of 38.93°C marked a 50% likelihood a cow would be standing. This is the first physiological evidence that standing may help cool cows and provides insight into a communally observed behavioral response to heat. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Heterogeneity of PTEN and ERG expression in prostate cancer on core needle biopsies: implications for cancer risk stratification and biomarker sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajal B; Bentley, James; Jeffery, Zach; DeMarzo, Angelo M

    2015-05-01

    ERG and PTEN biomarkers are increasingly being analyzed on prostate core biopsies (NBXs); ERG as a marker of clonality and number of separately arising tumor foci and PTEN for prognostic information. Yet, in patients with multiple biopsy cores positive for cancer (PCa), there is no standardized approach for interrogation of these biomarkers in terms of the number of positive cores to evaluate. A total of 194 NBX cases containing more than one positive core with cancer were evaluated for ERG overexpression and PTEN loss by immunostaining (immunohistochemistry) of all positive cores. ERG overexpression or PTEN loss in at least one cancer core was present in 111 (57%) and 69 (36%) cases respectively. ERG overexpression was significantly associated with PTEN loss (P < .0001), and PTEN loss was associated with a high Gleason score (P < .0001). Inter- and intra-tumor core staining heterogeneity for ERG overexpression occurred in 42% and 5% cases and for PTEN loss both intra- and inter-tumor core heterogeneity was 68%. PTEN staining was highly discordant between PCa sites regardless of laterality. When the Gleason score was non-uniform across PCa sites, the combination of cores showing the highest Gleason score and largest tumor volume provided the best representation of ERG overexpression (92%) and PTEN loss (98%). When grades were uniform across cancer sites, the highest tumor volume core was generally representative of ERG overexpression (90%) but was less representative for PTEN loss (76%). Our results suggest that knowledge of this heterogeneity is critical for developing optimal yet cost-effective strategies to identify these underlying molecular abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Environmental Streptococci Recovered from Bovine Milk Samples in the Maritime Provinces of Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Cameron

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens is important for guiding antimicrobial treatment decisions and for the detection of emerging resistance. Environmental streptococci are ubiquitous in the farm environment and are a frequent cause of mastitis in dairy cows. The aim of the study was to determine patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility among species of environmental streptococci isolated from dairy cows in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. The collection consisted of 192 isolates identified in milk samples collected from 177 cows originating from 18 dairy herds. Results were aggregated into: 1 Streptococcus uberis (n = 70, 2 Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n = 28, 3 other Streptococci spp. (n = 35, 4, Lactococcus spp. (n = 32, and 5 Enterococcus spp. (n = 27. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined using the Sensititre microdilution system and mastitis plate format. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to analyze the data, with antimicrobial susceptibility as the outcome. The proportion of susceptible Streptococcus uberis ranged from 23% (for penicillin to 99% (for penicillin/novobiocin, with a median of 82%. All Streptococcus dysgalactiae were susceptible to all antimicrobials except for penicillin (93% susceptible and tetracycline (18% susceptible. The range of susceptibility for other Streptococcus spp. was 43% (for tetracycline to 100%, with a median percent susceptibility of 92%. Lactococcus spp. isolates displayed percent susceptibilities ranging from 0% (for penicillin to 97% (for erythromycin, median 75%. For the antimicrobials tested, the MIC were higher for Enterococcus spp. than for the other species. According to the multilevel models, there was a significant interaction between antimicrobial and bacterial species, indicating that susceptibility against a particular antimicrobial varied among the species of environmental streptococci and vice versa. Generally

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of 22/25-gauge core needle in endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Kang, Hyun; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Geun Joo; Choi, Jung Sik

    2016-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core needle aspiration with that of standard fine-needle aspiration by systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies using 22/25-gauge core needles, irrespective of comparison with standard fine needles, were comprehensively reviewed. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and summary receiver operating characteristic curves for the diagnosis of malignancy were used to estimate the overall diagnostic efficiency. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the core needle for the diagnosis of malignancy were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 0.90), 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1), and 167.37 (95% CI, 65.77 to 425.91), respectively. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the standard needle were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.88), 1 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1), and 130.14 (95% CI, 34.00 to 495.35), respectively. The area under the curve of core and standard needle in the diagnosis of malignancy was 0.974 and 0.955, respectively. The core and standard needle were comparable in terms of pancreatic malignancy diagnosis. There was no significant difference in procurement of optimal histologic cores between core and standard needles (risk ratio [RR], 0.545; 95% CI, 0.187 to 1.589). The number of needle passes for diagnosis was significantly lower with the core needle (standardized mean difference, -0.72; 95% CI, -1.02 to -0.41). There were no significant differences in overall complications (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.34 to 4.62) and technical failure (RR, 5.07; 95% CI, 0.68 to 37.64). Core and standard needles were comparable in terms of diagnostic accuracy, technical performance, and safety profile.

  7. Fragmentation patterns in the diatom genus Rouxia and their potential for identifying latent depositional hiatuses in the early Pliocene diatomite of the ANDRILL AND-1B core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konfirst, M. A.; Scherer, R. P.; Winter, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Warnock, J.; Kuhn, G.; Niessen, F.; Helling, D.; Magens, D.

    2009-04-01

    Diatom genera have traditionally been split into two primary groupings based upon the symmetry of the siliceous frustule. Diatoms symmetric about a point are classified as centrics, while those symmetric about a line are classified as pennates. This fundamental difference in shape has consequences for preservation in ice proximal settings, where an overriding ice sheet can create shearing in the upper meters of the sediment column. This leads to preferential breakage in pennate forms, and results in a higher ratio of undamaged centric to pennate frustules (Scherer et al., 2004). Similarly, an ice sheet grounded over highly porous diatomite results in significant diatom fragmentation resulting from normal load compaction. The diatom genus Rouxia is a pennate form with a relatively wide raphe, making it particularly susceptible to breakage during ice advance and retreat, and offering the opportunity to evaluate ice advance stages in sedimentary units where glacial erosion may have removed upper depositional units. In the ANDRILL AND-1B core, a long interval of nearly pure diatomite was recovered from 382.98-459.24 mbsf. Construction of an age model during this interval has relied primarily on age ranges provided by presence or absence of key diatom species. However, questions still remain as to the continuity of deposition. In this study, samples were collected at an average of 50-cm spacing for the length of the long diatom unit as well as for 20 meters of the silica-rich diamictite unit directly overlaying the diatomite. Fragments of specimens from the genus Rouxia were counted and classified into categories based on the size of the fragment in relation to total frustule length. These data were then used to develop a quantitative index, which was examined for changes in fragmentation through time. Preliminary data are presented that indicate increased fragmentation at the top of the section under study, which we interpret to indicate evidence for increased glacial

  8. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  9. A SELDI mass spectrometry study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: sample preparation, reproducibility, and differential protein expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Sausan; Broadwater, Laurie; Li, Shuo; Freeman, Ernest J; McDonough, Jennifer; Gregory, Roger B

    2013-05-01

    Da) levels were lower in EAE samples with advanced disease relative to controls, while an MBP fragment (12. 4kDa), likely due to calpain digestion, was increased in EAE relative to controls. The appearance of MBP in mitochondrially enriched fractions is due to tissue freezing and storage, as MBP was not found associated with mitochondria obtained from fresh tissue. SELDI mass spectrometry can be employed to explore the proteome of a complex tissue (brain) and obtain protein profiles of differentially expressed proteins from protein fractions. Appropriate homogenization protocols and protein fractionation using anion exchange beads can be employed to reduce sample complexity without introducing significant additional variation into the SELDI mass spectra beyond that inherent in the SELDI- MS method itself. SELDI-MS coupled with principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis provides protein patterns that can clearly distinguish the disease state from controls. However, identification of individual differentially expressed proteins requires a separate purification of the proteins of interest by polyacrylamide electrophoresis prior to trypsin digestion and peptide mass fingerprint analysis, and unambiguous identification of differentially expressed proteins can be difficult if protein bands consist of several proteins with similar molecular weights.

  10. An automated setup to measure paleoatmospheric δ13C-CH4, δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O in one ice core sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperlich, P.; Buizert, C.; Jenk, T.M.; Sapart, C.J.; Prokopiou, M.; Röckmann, T.; Blunier, T.

    2013-01-01

    Air bubbles in ice core samples represent the only opportunity to study the isotopic variability of paleoatmospheric CH4 and N2O. The highest possible precision in isotope measurements is required to maximize the resolving power for CH4 and N2O sink and source reconstructions. We present a new setup

  11. Transactional relationships and sex with a woman in prostitution: prevalence and patterns in a representative sample of South African men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewkes, Rachel; Morrell, Robert; Sikweyiya, Yandisa; Dunkle, Kristin; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2012-05-02

    Sex motivated by economic exchange is a public health concern as a driver of the Sub-Saharan African HIV epidemic. We describe patterns of engagement in transactional sexual relationships and sex with women in prostitution of South African men, and suggest interpretations that advance our understanding of the phenomenon. Cross-sectional study with a randomly-selected sample of 1645 sexually active men aged 18-49 years who completed interviews in a household study and were asked whether they had had sex with a woman in prostitution, or had had a relationship or sex they took to be motivated by the expectation of material gain (transactional sex). 18% of men had ever had sex with a woman in prostitution, 66% at least one type of transactional sexual relationship, only 30% of men had done neither. Most men had had a transactional relationship/sex with a main partner (58% of all men), 42% with a concurrent partner (or makhwapheni) and 44% with a once off partner, and there was almost no difference in reports of what was provided to women of different partner types. The majority of men distinguished the two types of sexual relationships and even among men who had once-off transactional sex and gave cash (n = 314), few (34%) reported that they had had sex with a 'prostitute'. Transactional sex was more common among men aged 25-34 years, less educated men and low income earners rather than those with none or higher income. Having had sex with a woman in prostitution varied little between social and demographic categories, but was less common among the unwaged or very low earners. The notion of 'transactional sex' developed through research with women does not translate easily to men. Many perceive expectations that they fulfil a provider role, with quid pro quo entitlement to sex. Men distinguished these circumstances of sex from having sex with a woman in prostitution. Whilst there may be similarities, when viewed relationally, these are quite distinct practices

  12. Transactional relationships and sex with a woman in prostitution: prevalence and patterns in a representative sample of South African men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Sex motivated by economic exchange is a public health concern as a driver of the Sub-Saharan African HIV epidemic. We describe patterns of engagement in transactional sexual relationships and sex with women in prostitution of South African men, and suggest interpretations that advance our understanding of the phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional study with a randomly-selected sample of 1645 sexually active men aged 18–49 years who completed interviews in a household study and were asked whether they had had sex with a woman in prostitution, or had had a relationship or sex they took to be motivated by the expectation of material gain (transactional sex). Results 18% of men had ever had sex with a woman in prostitution, 66% at least one type of transactional sexual relationship, only 30% of men had done neither. Most men had had a transactional relationship/sex with a main partner (58% of all men), 42% with a concurrent partner (or makhwapheni) and 44% with a once off partner, and there was almost no difference in reports of what was provided to women of different partner types. The majority of men distinguished the two types of sexual relationships and even among men who had once-off transactional sex and gave cash (n = 314), few (34%) reported that they had had sex with a ‘prostitute’. Transactional sex was more common among men aged 25–34 years, less educated men and low income earners rather than those with none or higher income. Having had sex with a woman in prostitution varied little between social and demographic categories, but was less common among the unwaged or very low earners. Conclusions The notion of ‘transactional sex’ developed through research with women does not translate easily to men. Many perceive expectations that they fulfil a provider role, with quid pro quo entitlement to sex. Men distinguished these circumstances of sex from having sex with a woman in prostitution. Whilst there may be similarities, when

  13. Reaction of Topopah Spring tuff with J-13 water at 1500C: samples from drill cores USW G-1, USW GU-3, USW G-4, and UE-25h No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversby, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Samples of Topopah Spring tuff selected from vertical drill holes USW G-1, GU-3, and G-4, and from the horizontal air-drilled hole at Fran Ridge were reacted with J-13 water at 150 0 C. The primary purpose of these experiments was to compare the resulting solution chemistries to estimate the degree of homogeneity that might be expected in thermally affected ground water in a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The second purpose was to relate data obtained from welded devitrified Topopah Spring tuff collected from the potential repository depth to that previously obtained using outcrop samples. The results show very similar aqueous phase chemistries for all samples after reaction for times up to 70 days. The largest difference in final solution concentrations was for silica in one of the samples from Fran Ridge. All vertical drill core samples gave results for silica that were in agreement to within +-6 ppM and indicated solubility controlled by cristobalite. The results for reaction at 150 0 C are in agreement with those obtained in previous experiments using surface outcrop samples from Fran Ridge. The major difference between the drill core results and the outcrop samples is found in the data for room-temperature rinse solutions. The outcrop samples show relatively large amounts of soluble salts that can be easily removed at room temperature. The data for room-temperature rinsing of drill core samples show no significant quantities of readily soluble salts. This result is particularly significant for the samples from the air-drilled hole at Fran Ridge, since drilling fluid that might have removed soluble salts was not used in the portion of the hole from which the samples were obtained. This result strongly suggests that the presence of soluble salts is a surface evaporation phenomenon, and that such materials are unlikely to be present at the depth of the repository

  14. Pattern analysis of total item score and item response of the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6 in a nationally representative sample of US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Tomitaka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Several recent studies have shown that total scores on depressive symptom measures in a general population approximate an exponential pattern except for the lower end of the distribution. Furthermore, we confirmed that the exponential pattern is present for the individual item responses on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D. To confirm the reproducibility of such findings, we investigated the total score distribution and item responses of the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6 in a nationally representative study. Methods Data were drawn from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS, which comprises four subsamples: (1 a national random digit dialing (RDD sample, (2 oversamples from five metropolitan areas, (3 siblings of individuals from the RDD sample, and (4 a national RDD sample of twin pairs. K6 items are scored using a 5-point scale: “none of the time,” “a little of the time,” “some of the time,” “most of the time,” and “all of the time.” The pattern of total score distribution and item responses were analyzed using graphical analysis and exponential regression model. Results The total score distributions of the four subsamples exhibited an exponential pattern with similar rate parameters. The item responses of the K6 approximated a linear pattern from “a little of the time” to “all of the time” on log-normal scales, while “none of the time” response was not related to this exponential pattern. Discussion The total score distribution and item responses of the K6 showed exponential patterns, consistent with other depressive symptom scales.

  15. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  16. Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Treatability Study, wall coring and scraping in Tanks W-3 and W-4 (North Tank Farm), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This plan documents the procedures for collecting and analyzing wall core and wall scraping samples from Tanks W-3 and W-4 in the North Tank Farm. This is in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Treatability Study of the Gunite and Associated Tanks at ORNL. The sampling and analysis will be in concert with sludge retrieval and sluicing of the tanks. Wall scraping and wall core samples will be collected from each quadrant in each tank by using a scraping sampler and a coring drill deployed by the Houdini robot vehicle. Each sample will be labeled, transported to the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory and analyzed for physical/radiological characteristics, including total activity, gross alpha, gross beta, radioactive Sr + Cs, and other alpha and gamma emitting radionuclides. The Data Quality Objectives process, based on US EPA guidance (EPA QA/G-4, Sept. 1994), was applied to identify the objectives of this sampling and analysis. Results of the analysis will be used to validate predictions of a Sr concrete diffusion model, estimate the amount of radioactivity remaining in the tank shells, provide information to correlate with measurements taken by the Gunite Tank Isotope Mapping Probe and the Characterization End Effector, and estimate the performance of the wall cleaning system

  17. Determining Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene deglaciation of the Baltic Ice Lake through sedimentological core sample analysis of IODP Site M0064

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. L.; Passchier, S.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the deglaciation history of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) within the Baltic Sea's Hanö Bay from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene using samples from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site M0064. The research aims to understand how the speed of deglaciation influences Baltic Ice Lake (BIL) drainage patterns and relative sea level changes on a high-resolution timescale. Glacial history of the SIS has been studied through glacial till analysis, surface exposure dating, and modeling, encompassing its most recent deglaciation 20-14ka BP, and suggests ice retreated from the project site 16.7ka BP. Between 17 and 14ka BP global sea level rose 4 meters per century, accompanied by a dramatic increase in atmospheric carbon. This period of rapid sea level rise and global warming is a valuable analog for understanding the Earth's current and projected climate. This project uses particle size analysis to better understand the late-glacial depositional environment in Hanö Bay, and ICP-OES geochemical analysis for evidence pertaining to changing sediment provenance and bottom water oxygenation in the BIL. Diamicton is present between 47 and 9 mbsf in Hole M0064D. At 8 mbsf, the sediment exhibits a prominent upward transition from well-laminated cm-scale grey to more thinly laminated reddish brown rhythmites. With calculated Al/Ti ratios, we find that there is not much provenance change in the sequence, however we see fluctuations in Mn/Al ratios, implying shifts in sediment color may be chemical, possibly indicating redox changes in the water column during sediment deposition. Although we find that particle size in the varve sequence does not change, this factor may be driving chemical fluctuations in the diamicton. These results increase the understanding of ice retreat, paleocirculation and relative sea level changes in the Baltic Sea at the onset of the last deglaciation.

  18. Substance use, substance use disorders, and comorbidity patterns in a representative sample of incarcerated male Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, Coby; van den Brink, Wim; Wouters, Luuk F. J. M.; Doreleijers, Theo A. H.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of substance use and substance use disorders (SUDs) among incarcerated boys, and comorbidity patterns and the relationship between SUDs and violent offending and criminal recidivism. The presence of SUDs and other psychiatric disorders was

  19. Comparison of Contact Patterns Relevant for Transmission of Respiratory Pathogens in Thailand and the Netherlands Using Respondent-Driven Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Mart L.; van Steenbergen, Jim E.; Buskens, Vincent; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Chanyasanha, Charnchudhi; Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Thorson, Anna E.; Bengtsson, Linus; Lu, Xin; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding infection dynamics of respiratory diseases requires the identification and quantification of behavioural, social and environmental factors that permit the transmission of these infections between humans. Little empirical information is available about contact patterns within real-world social networks, let alone on differences in these contact networks between populations that differ considerably on a socio-cultural level. Here we compared contact network data that were collected in the Netherlands and Thailand using a similar online respondent-driven method. By asking participants to recruit contact persons we studied network links relevant for the transmission of respiratory infections. We studied correlations between recruiter and recruited contacts to investigate mixing patterns in the observed social network components. In both countries, mixing patterns were assortative by demographic variables and random by total numbers of contacts. However, in Thailand participants reported overall more contacts which resulted in higher effective contact rates. Our findings provide new insights on numbers of contacts and mixing patterns in two different populations. These data could be used to improve parameterisation of mathematical models used to design control strategies. Although the spread of infections through populations depends on more factors, found similarities suggest that spread may be similar in the Netherlands and Thailand. PMID:25423343

  20. Three-dimensional fabrication and characterisation of core-shell nano-columns using electron beam patterning of Ge-doped SiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Jinschek, Joerg R.; Ou, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    electron tomography. The results show that transformations in insulators that have been subjected to intense irradiation using charged particles can be studied directly in three dimensions. The fabricated structures include core-shell nano-columns, sputtered regions, voids, and clusters. (C) 2012 American......A focused electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to create arrays of core-shell structures in a specimen of amorphous SiO2 doped with Ge. The same electron microscope is then used to measure the changes that occurred in the specimen in three dimensions using...

  1. Visible-near infrared point spectrometry of drill core samples from Río Tinto, Spain: results from the 2005 Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) drilling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Brown, Adrian J; Stoker, Carol R

    2008-10-01

    Sampling of subsurface rock may be required to detect evidence of past biological activity on Mars. The Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) utilized the Río Tinto region, Spain, as a Mars analog site to test dry drilling technologies specific to Mars that retrieve subsurface rock for biological analysis. This work examines the usefulness of visible-near infrared (VNIR) (450-1000 nm) point spectrometry to characterize ferric iron minerals in core material retrieved during a simulated Mars drilling mission. VNIR spectrometry can indicate the presence of aqueously precipitated ferric iron minerals and, thus, determine whether biological analysis of retrieved rock is warranted. Core spectra obtained during the mission with T1 (893-897 nm) and T2 (644-652 nm) features indicate goethite-dominated samples, while relatively lower wavelength T1 (832-880 nm) features indicate hematite. Hematite/goethite molar ratios varied from 0 to 1.4, and within the 880-898 nm range, T1 features were used to estimate hematite/goethite molar ratios. Post-mission X-ray analysis detected phyllosilicates, which indicates that examining beyond the VNIR (e.g., shortwave infrared, 1000-2500 nm) will enhance the detection of other minerals formed by aqueous processes. Despite the limited spectral range of VNIR point spectrometry utilized in the MARTE Mars drilling simulation project, ferric iron minerals could be identified in retrieved core material, and their distribution served to direct core subsampling for biological analysis.

  2. Nonmelanoma skin cancer visits and procedure patterns in a nationally representative sample: national ambulatory medical care survey 1995-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysong, Ashley; Linos, Eleni; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Arron, Sarah T; Gladstone, Hayes; Tang, Jean Y

    2013-04-01

    The rising incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is well documented, but data are limited on the number of visits and treatment patterns of NMSC in the outpatient setting. To evaluate practice and treatment patterns of NMSC in the United States over the last decade and to characterize differences according to sex, age, race, insurance type, and physician specialty. Adults with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis of NMSC were included in this cross-sectional survey study of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey between 1995 and 2007. Primary outcomes included population-adjusted NMSC visit rates and odds ratios of receiving a procedure for NMSC using logistic regression. Rates of NMSC visits increased between 1995 and 2007. The number of visits was significantly higher in men, particularly those aged 65 and older. Fifty-nine percent of NMSC visits were associated with a procedure, and the individuals associated with that visit were more likely to be male, to be seen by a dermatologist, and to have private-pay insurance. Nonmelanoma skin cancer visit rates increased from 1995 to 2007 and were higher in men than women. Visits to a dermatologist are more likely to be associated with a procedure for NMSC, and there may be discrepancies in treatment patterns based on insurance type and sex. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Determination of the influence of dispersion pattern of pesticide-resistant individuals on the reliability of resistance estimates using different sampling plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R; Worner, S P; Chapman, R B

    2012-10-01

    Pesticide resistance monitoring includes resistance detection and subsequent documentation/ measurement. Resistance detection would require at least one (≥1) resistant individual(s) to be present in a sample to initiate management strategies. Resistance documentation, on the other hand, would attempt to get an estimate of the entire population (≥90%) of the resistant individuals. A computer simulation model was used to compare the efficiency of simple random and systematic sampling plans to detect resistant individuals and to document their frequencies when the resistant individuals were randomly or patchily distributed. A patchy dispersion pattern of resistant individuals influenced the sampling efficiency of systematic sampling plans while the efficiency of random sampling was independent of such patchiness. When resistant individuals were randomly distributed, sample sizes required to detect at least one resistant individual (resistance detection) with a probability of 0.95 were 300 (1%) and 50 (10% and 20%); whereas, when resistant individuals were patchily distributed, using systematic sampling, sample sizes required for such detection were 6000 (1%), 600 (10%) and 300 (20%). Sample sizes of 900 and 400 would be required to detect ≥90% of resistant individuals (resistance documentation) with a probability of 0.95 when resistant individuals were randomly dispersed and present at a frequency of 10% and 20%, respectively; whereas, when resistant individuals were patchily distributed, using systematic sampling, a sample size of 3000 and 1500, respectively, was necessary. Small sample sizes either underestimated or overestimated the resistance frequency. A simple random sampling plan is, therefore, recommended for insecticide resistance detection and subsequent documentation.

  4. A new set-up for simultaneous high-precision measurements of CO2, δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 on small ice core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenk, Theo Manuel; Rubino, Mauro; Etheridge, David; Ciobanu, Viorela Gabriela; Blunier, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Palaeoatmospheric records of carbon dioxide and its stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) obtained from polar ice cores provide important constraints on the natural variability of the carbon cycle. However, the measurements are both analytically challenging and time-consuming; thus only data exist from a limited number of sampling sites and time periods. Additional analytical resources with high analytical precision and throughput are thus desirable to extend the existing datasets. Moreover, consistent measurements derived by independent laboratories and a variety of analytical systems help to further increase confidence in the global CO2 palaeo-reconstructions. Here, we describe our new set-up for simultaneous measurements of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios and atmospheric δ13C and δ18O-CO2 in air extracted from ice core samples. The centrepiece of the system is a newly designed needle cracker for the mechanical release of air entrapped in ice core samples of 8-13 g operated at -45 °C. The small sample size allows for high resolution and replicate sampling schemes. In our method, CO2 is cryogenically and chromatographically separated from the bulk air and its isotopic composition subsequently determined by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). In combination with thermal conductivity measurement of the bulk air, the CO2 mixing ratio is calculated. The analytical precision determined from standard air sample measurements over ice is ±1.9 ppm for CO2 and ±0.09 ‰ for δ13C. In a laboratory intercomparison study with CSIRO (Aspendale, Australia), good agreement between CO2 and δ13C results is found for Law Dome ice core samples. Replicate analysis of these samples resulted in a pooled standard deviation of 2.0 ppm for CO2 and 0.11 ‰ for δ13C. These numbers are good, though they are rather conservative estimates of the overall analytical precision achieved for single ice sample measurements. Facilitated by the small sample requirement

  5. THE GROWTH OF COOL CORES AND EVOLUTION OF COOLING PROPERTIES IN A SAMPLE OF 83 GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0.3 < z < 1.2 SELECTED FROM THE SPT-SZ SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.; Bautz, M. W. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vikhlinin, A.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Haan, T. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Lin, H. W. [Caddo Parish Magnet High School, Shrevport, LA 71101 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bocquet, S.; Desai, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A., E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrosifica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Chile); and others

    2013-09-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare these properties to those for local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner {approx}100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z {approx} 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed ''entropy floor'' at {approx}10 keV cm{sup 2}. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density ({rho}{sub g,0}/{rho}{sub crit}) increasing by an order of magnitude from z {approx} 1 to z {approx} 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, {approx}150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm{sup 2} and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z{sub cool}=1.0{sup +1.0}{sub -0.2}, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. At high redshift (z {approx}> 0.75), galaxy clusters may be classified as ''cooling flows

  6. Quality of Care for Lung Cancer in Taiwan: A Pattern of Care Based on Core Measures in the Taiwan Cancer Database Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ru Chien

    2008-08-01

    Conclusion: It is very likely that significant variation in QOC for lung cancer in Taiwan exists among different types but not locations of hospitals, at least in the diagnostic domain. The introduction of internal benchmarking (TCDB and core measures was associated with some changes, at least in some diagnostic domains, which may lead to improvement in QOC for lung cancer in Taiwan.

  7. Dependence of B1+ and B1- Field Patterns of Surface Coils on the Electrical Properties of the Sample and the MR Operating Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Manushka V; Collins, Christopher M; Sodickson, Daniel K; Brown, Ryan; Wiggins, Graham C; Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    In high field MRI, the spatial distribution of the radiofrequency magnetic ( B 1 ) field is usually affected by the presence of the sample. For hardware design and to aid interpretation of experimental results, it is important both to anticipate and to accurately simulate the behavior of these fields. Fields generated by a radiofrequency surface coil were simulated using dyadic Green's functions, or experimentally measured over a range of frequencies inside an object whose electrical properties were varied to illustrate a variety of transmit [Formula: see text] and receive [Formula: see text] field patterns. In this work, we examine how changes in polarization of the field and interference of propagating waves in an object can affect the B 1 spatial distribution. Results are explained conceptually using Maxwell's equations and intuitive illustrations. We demonstrate that the electrical conductivity alters the spatial distribution of distinct polarized components of the field, causing "twisted" transmit and receive field patterns, and asymmetries between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Additionally, interference patterns due to wavelength effects are observed at high field in samples with high relative permittivity and near-zero conductivity, but are not present in lossy samples due to the attenuation of propagating EM fields. This work provides a conceptual framework for understanding B 1 spatial distributions for surface coils and can provide guidance for RF engineers.

  8. Genetic patterns in forest antelope populations in the Udzungwa Mountains, Tanzania, as inferred from non-invasive sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowkett, Andrew E.; Jones, Trevor; Rovero, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    As for many tropical regions, the evolutionary and demographic status of antelope populations in the Udzungwa Mountains, Tanzania, are poorly resolved. We employed genetic information from 618 faecal samples to assess the status of forest antelope species in terms of their distribution, intraspec...... except the endangered C. spadix. Overall, our results demonstrate the value of non-invasive genetic sampling in studying the distribution and evolution of rarely observed species.......As for many tropical regions, the evolutionary and demographic status of antelope populations in the Udzungwa Mountains, Tanzania, are poorly resolved. We employed genetic information from 618 faecal samples to assess the status of forest antelope species in terms of their distribution......, intraspecific diversity and population subdivision within the Udzungwa landscape. Most species were detected in the majority of forest fragments, except for Philantomba monticola. Phylogenetic analyses were consistent with traditional taxonomy with the exception of Cephalophus harveyi which was paraphyletic...

  9. Video games use patterns and parenteral supervision in a clinical sample of Hispanic adolescents 13-17 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, Linnette; Nazario, Lelis L; Gutiérrez, Roberto; González, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Video games have become a popular entertainment among adolescents. Although some video games are educational, there are others with high content of violence and the potential for other harmful effects. Lack of appropriate supervision of video games use during adolescence, a crucial stage of development, may lead to serious behavioral consequences in some adolescents. There is also concern about time spent playing video games and the subsequent neglect of more developmentally appropriate activities, such as completing academic tasks. Self-administered questionnaires were used to assess video game use patterns and parental supervision among 55 adolescent patients 13-17 years old (mean age 14.4 years; 56.4% males) and their parents. Parental supervision /monitoring of the adolescents video games use was not consistent and gender related differences were found regarding their video game use. Close to one third (32%) of the participants reported video game playing had interfered with their academic performance. Parents who understood video games rating system were more likely to prohibit their use due to rating. These findings underscore the need for clear and consistently enforced rules and monitoring of video games use by adolescents. Parents need to be educated about the relevance of their supervision, video games content and rating system; so they will decrease time playing and exposure to potentially harmful video games. It also supports the relevance of addressing supervision, gender-based parental supervisory styles, and patterns of video games use in the evaluation and treatment of adolescents.

  10. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    formation comprised of coarse, large-grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Risk Factors, Vaccination Patterns, and Vaccine Perceptions among a Sample of Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B.; Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Charyk, Anna; Sutherland, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates, including initiation and completion of the vaccine series, and barriers to vaccination in a sample of male college students. Participants: Male students between the ages of 18 and 25 who reported being currently or previously sexually active (N = 735). Methods: A cross-sectional…

  12. Effects of diurnal emission patterns and sampling frequency on precision of measurement methods for daily ammonia emissions from animal houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estelles, F.; Calvet, S.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia concentrations and airflow rates are the main parameters needed to determine ammonia emissions from animal houses. It is possible to classify their measurement methods into two main groups according to the sampling frequency: semi-continuous and daily average measurements. In the first

  13. Patterns of drug use among a sample of drug users and injecting drug users attending a General Practice in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeshaft Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim This study aimed to examine drug use, drug treatment history and risk behaviour among a sample of Iranian drug users seeking treatment through a general practice clinic in Iran. Methods Review of medical records and an intake questionnaire at a large general practice in Marvdasht, Iran, with a special interest in drug dependence treatment. Records from a random sample of injecting drug users (IDU, non-injecting drug users (DU and non-drug using patients were examined. Results 292 records were reviewed (34% IDU, 31% DU and 35% non-drug users. Eighty-three percent were males; all females were non-drug users. The mean age of the sample was 30 years. Of the IDU sample, 67% reported sharing a needle or syringe, 19% of these had done so in prison. Of those who had ever used drugs, being 'tired' of drug use was the most common reason for seeking help (34%. Mean age of first drug use was 20 years. The first drugs most commonly used were opium (72%, heroin (13% and hashish/ other cannabinoids (13%. Three quarters reported having previously attempted to cease their drug use. IDU were more likely than DU to report having ever been imprisoned (41% vs 7% and 41% to have used drugs in prison. Conclusion This study has shown that there is a need for general practice clinics in Iran to treat drug users including those who inject and that a substantial proportion of those who inject have shared needles and syringes, placing them at risk of BBVI such as HIV and hepatitis C. The expansion of services for drug users in Iran such as needle and syringe programs and pharmacotherapies are likely to be effective in reducing the harms associated with opium use and heroin injection.

  14. Antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli strains isolated from surface water and groundwater samples in a pig production area

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Neto Schneider; André Nadvorny; Verônica Schmidt

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotics, so excessive and indiscriminate in intensive animal production, has triggered an increase in the number of resistant microorganisms which can be transported to aquatic environments. The aim of this study was to determine the profile of the antimicrobial resistance of samples of Escherichia coli isolated from groundwater and surface water in a region of pig breeding. Through the test of antimicrobial susceptibility, we analyzed 205 strains of E. coli. A high rate of res...

  15. Antibiotic resistance patterns of Escherichia coli strains isolated from surface water and groundwater samples in a pig production area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Neto Schneider

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics, so excessive and indiscriminate in intensive animal production, has triggered an increase in the number of resistant microorganisms which can be transported to aquatic environments. The aim of this study was to determine the profile of the antimicrobial resistance of samples of Escherichia coli isolated from groundwater and surface water in a region of pig breeding. Through the test of antimicrobial susceptibility, we analyzed 205 strains of E. coli. A high rate of resistance to cefaclor was observed, both in surface water (51.9% and groundwater (62.9%, while all samples were sensitive to amikacin. The percentages of multi-resistant samples were 25.96% and 26.73% in surface water and groundwater, respectively, while 19.23% and 13.86% were sensitive to all antibiotics tested. It was determined that the rate of multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR was 0.164 for surface water and 0.184 for groundwater. No significant differences were found in the profile of the antimicrobial resistance in strains of E. coli isolated in surface water and groundwater, but the index MAR calculated in certain points of groundwater may offer a potential risk of transmission of resistant genes.

  16. Sample descriptions and geophysical logs for cored well BP-3-USGS, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Alamosa County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Skipp, Gary L.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Davis, Joshua K.; Benson, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The BP-3-USGS well was drilled at the southwestern corner of Great Sand Dunes National Park in the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, 68 feet (ft, 20.7 meters [m]) southwest of the National Park Service’s boundary-piezometer (BP) well 3. BP-3-USGS is located at latitude 37°43ʹ18.06ʺN. and longitude 105°43ʹ39.30ʺW., at an elevation of 7,549 ft (2,301 m). The well was drilled through poorly consolidated sediments to a depth of 326 ft (99.4 m) in September 2009. Water began flowing from the well after penetrating a clay-rich layer that was first intercepted at a depth of 119 ft (36.3 m). The base of this layer, at an elevation of 7,415 ft (2,260 m) above sea level, likely marks the top of a regional confined aquifer recognized throughout much of the San Luis Valley. Approximately 69 ft (21 m) of core was recovered (about 21 percent), almost exclusively from clay-rich zones. Coarser grained fractions were collected from mud extruded from the core barrel or captured from upwelling drilling fluids. Natural gamma-ray, full waveform sonic, density, neutron, resistivity, spontaneous potential, and induction logs were acquired. The well is now plugged and abandoned.

  17. Patterns of Competence and Adjustment Among Adolescents from Authoritative, Authoritarian, Indulgent, and Neglectful Homes: A Replication in a Sample of Serious Juvenile Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence; Blatt-Eisengart, Ilana; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2006-03-01

    The correlates of authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and neglectful parenting were examined within a sample of 1,355 14- to 18-year-olds adjudicated of serious criminal offenses. The sample is composed primarily of poor, ethnic-minority youth living in impoverished urban neighborhoods. As has been found in community samples, juvenile offenders who describe their parents as authoritative are more psychosocially mature, more academically competent, less prone to internalized distress, and less prone to externalizing problems than their peers,whereas those who describe their parents as neglectful are less mature, less competent, and more troubled. Juvenile offenders who characterize their parents as either authoritarian or indulgent typically score somewhere between the two extremes, although those from authoritarian homes are consistently better functioning than those from indulgent homes. These patterns did not vary as a function of adolescents' ethnicity or gender.

  18. Petrogenetic significance of rare earth element patterns of selected samples of Ingaldhal metavolcanics, Karnatak State, India : Consortium studies no. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murali, A V; Pawaskar, P B; Reddy, G R; Sankar Das, M [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Analytical Chemistry Div.; Subbarao, K V [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay, Geology Dept.; Vasudev, V N [Chitradurga Copper Co., Bangalore (India)

    1979-07-01

    Rare earth element contents of metavolcanics of the Ingaldhal area of Chitradurga schist belt in India have been analysed by instrument neutron activation analysis on the coarse fraction (approximately 30 mesh) and radiochemical neutron activation analysis on the fine fraction (-200 mesh). The coarse and fine fractions of the samples were irradiated separately in the CIRUS reactor at a flux of 10/sup 13/n cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ for 24 hours. The counting assembly consisted of a Ge(Li) detector (45 cc; coupled to 1024 channel analyser) and the system resolution was FWHM 2.3 keV at 1332 keV. Results are presented.

  19. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in wild samples of two morphotypes of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gilbert; Smith, Carl; Kenny, John G; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Ritchie, Michael G

    2015-04-01

    Epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation play important biological roles in gene expression regulation and cellular differentiation during development. To examine whether DNA methylation patterns are potentially associated with naturally occurring phenotypic differences, we examined genome-wide DNA methylation within Gasterosteus aculeatus, using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing. First, we identified highly methylated regions of the stickleback genome, finding such regions to be located predominantly within genes, and associated with genes functioning in metabolism and biosynthetic processes, cell adhesion, signaling pathways, and blood vessel development. Next, we identified putative differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the genome between complete and low lateral plate morphs of G. aculeatus. We detected 77 DMRs that were mainly located in intergenic regions. Annotations of genes associated with these DMRs revealed potential functions in a number of known divergent adaptive phenotypes between G. aculeatus ecotypes, including cardiovascular development, growth, and neuromuscular development. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Does Money Matter: Earnings Patterns Among a National Sample of the US State Governmental Public Health Agency Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Brian C; Leider, Jonathon P; Liss-Levinson, Rivka; Sellers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Earnings have been shown to be a critical point in workforce recruitment and retention. However, little is known about how much governmental public health staff are paid across the United States. To characterize earnings among state health agency central office employees. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of state health agency central office employees in late 2014. The sampling approach was stratified by 5 (paired HHS) regions. Balanced repeated replication weights were used to correctly calculate variance estimates, given the complex sampling design. Descriptive and bivariate statistical comparisons were conducted. A linear regression model was used to examine correlates of earnings among full-time employees. A total of 9300 permanently employed, full-time state health agency central office staff who reported earnings information. Earnings are the main outcomes examined in this article. Central office staff earn between $55,000 and $65,000 on average annually. Ascending supervisory status, educational attainment, and tenure are all associated with greater earnings. Those employed in clinical and laboratory positions and public health science positions earn more than their colleagues in administrative positions. Disparities exist between men and women, with men earning more, all else being equal (P earnings levels, including disparities in earnings that persist after accounting for education and experience. Data from the survey can inform strategies to address earnings issues and help reduce disparities.

  1. A study of uranium series disequilibrium in core profiles and mineral separates from the samples of Lac du Bonnet granite from the URL site, Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.; Longworth, G.; Wilkins, M.A.; Hasler, S.E.

    1987-12-01

    Uranium series disequilibrium measurements of actinide activities and activity ratios have been used to study the geochemical history of Lac du Bonnet granite, from the URL site, Pinawa, Canada. Measurements on core profiles between fractured surfaces and the parent rock show that the granite underwent high temperature events several million years ago, followed by more recent low temperature events within the last million years. The main locations for the rock/water interaction and exchange of actinides are the fracture surfaces. The results of similar measurements on separated mineral phases show that the 'soft' minerals such as biotite and feldspar are more vulnerable to weathering than the 'hard' accessory minerals such as zircon. (author)

  2. "Doing Difference" and Fast Food Consumption: Patterns Among a Sample of White and African American Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Jeannette M

    2018-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that frequent consumption of fast food is linked to obesity and that trends in both are disparate across race and sex categories. Contextualizing race- and sex-related factors that structure fast food consumption in emerging adulthood is a much-needed contribution to social research. Specifically, this study uses the "doing difference" framework, to examine the frequency of fast food consumption in a sample of White and African American (18-25 years old). According to the framework, social inequalities are reproduced through dramaturgical performances of race, class, and gender. Results of this suggest that feminine gender orientation and education serve as protective factors, while African American race and male sex serve as risk factors. African American women emerged as especially high risk given their higher prevalence of traditionally masculine traits.

  3. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  4. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  5. Windscale pile core surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.F.; Mathews, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The two Windscale Piles were closed down, defueled as far as possible and mothballed for thirty years following a fire in the core of Pile 1 in 1957 resulting from the spontaneous release of stored Wigner energy in the graphite moderator. Decommissioning of the reactors commenced in 1987 and has reached the stage where the condition of both cores needs to be determined. To this end, non-intrusive and intrusive surveys and sampling of the cores have been planned and partly implemented. The objectives for each Pile differ slightly. The location and quantity of fuel remaining in the damaged core of Pile 1 needed to be established, whereas the removal of all fuel from Pile 2 needed to be confirmed. In Pile 1, the possible existence of a void in the core is to be explored and in Pile 2, the level of Wigner energy remaining required to be quantified. Levels of radioactivity in both cores needed to be measured. The planning of the surveys is described including strategy, design, safety case preparation and the remote handling and viewing equipment required to carry out the inspection, sampling and monitoring work. The results from the completed non-intrusive survey of Pile 2 are summarised. They confirm that the core is empty and the graphite is in good condition. The survey of Pile 1 has just started. (UK)

  6. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  7. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P 15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P 3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe tumors; higher interfraction amplitude variability indicated tumors in contact

  8. Spatial patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes in a cross-sectional sample of pig farms with indoor non-organic production of finishers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkegård, Anna Camilla; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in pig populations is a public health concern. There is a lack of information of spatial distributions of AMR genes in pig populations at large scales. The objective of the study was to describe the spatial pattern of AMR genes in faecal samples from pig farms...... spatial clusters were identified for ermB, ermF, sulII and tet(W). The broad spatial trends in AMR resistance evident in the risk maps were in agreement with the results of the cluster analysis. However, they also showed that there were only small scale spatial differences in the gene levels. We conclude...

  9. Bacteriological Profile and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Bacteria Isolated from Pus/Wound Swab Samples from Children Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salu Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Nepal, little is known about the microbiological profile of wound infections in children and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Total of 450 pus/wound swab samples collected were cultured using standard microbiological techniques and the colonies grown were identified with the help of biochemical tests. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were detected by using cefoxitin disc and confirmed by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of oxacillin. 264 (59% samples were culture positive. The highest incidence of bacterial infections was noted in the age group of less than 1 year (76%. Out of 264 growth positive samples, Gram-positive bacteria were isolated from 162 (61% samples and Gram-negative bacteria were found in 102 (39% samples. Staphylococcus aureus (99% was the predominant Gram-positive bacteria isolated and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (44% was predominant Gram-negative bacteria. About 19% of S. aureus isolates were found to be methicillin-resistant MIC of oxacillin ranging from 4 μg/mL to 128 μg/mL. Among the children of Nepal, those of age less than 1 year were at higher risk of wound infections by bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common bacteria causing wound infections in children.

  10. Hidden cross-correlation patterns in stock markets based on permutation cross-sample entropy and PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aijing; Shang, Pengjian; Zhong, Bo

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we investigate the hidden cross-correlation structures in Chinese stock markets and US stock markets by performing PCSE combined with PCA approach. It is suggested that PCSE can provide a more faithful and more interpretable description of the dynamic mechanism between time series than cross-correlation matrix. We show that this new technique can be adapted to observe stock markets especially during financial crisis. In order to identify and compare the interactions and structures of stock markets during financial crisis, as well as in normal periods, all the samples are divided into four sub-periods. The results imply that the cross-correlations between Chinese group are stronger than the US group in the most sub-periods. In particular, it is likely that the US stock markets are more integrated with each other during global financial crisis than during Asian financial crisis. However, our results illustrate that Chinese stock markets are not immune from the global financial crisis, although less integrated with other markets if they are compared with US stock markets.

  11. Modern sedimentation patterns in Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia, derived from surface sediment and inlet streams samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wennrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake El'gygytgyn/NE Russia holds a continuous 3.58 Ma sediment record, which is regarded as the most long-lasting climate archive of the terrestrial Arctic. Based on multi-proxy geochemical, mineralogical, and granulometric analyses of surface sediment, inlet stream and bedrock samples, supplemented by statistical methods, major processes influencing the modern sedimentation in the lake were investigated. Grain-size parameters and chemical elements linked to the input of feldspars from acidic bedrock indicate a wind-induced two-cell current system as major driver of sediment transport and accumulation processes in Lake El'gygytgyn. The distribution of mafic rock related elements in the sediment on the lake floor can be traced back to the input of weathering products of basaltic rocks in the catchment. Obvious similarities in the spatial variability of manganese and heavy metals indicate sorption or co-precipitation of these elements with Fe and Mn hydroxides and oxides. But the similar distribution of organic matter and clay contents might also point to a fixation to organic components and clay minerals. An enrichment of mercury in the inlet streams might be indicative of neotectonic activity around the lake. The results of this study add to the fundamental knowledge of the modern lake processes of Lake El'gygytgyn and its lake-catchment interactions, and thus, yield crucial insights for the interpretation of paleo-data from this unique archive.

  12. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures

  13. TMI-2 core debris analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.A.; Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    One of the ongoing examination tasks for the damaged TMI-2 reactor is analysis of samples of debris obtained from the debris bed presently at the top of the core. This paper summarizes the results reported in the TMI-2 Core Debris Grab Sample Examination and Analysis Report, which will be available early in 1986. The sampling and analysis procedures are presented, and information is provided on the key results as they relate to the present core condition, peak temperatures during the transient, temperature history, chemical interactions, and core relocation. The results are then summarized

  14. Synthesis of core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres by precipitation polymerization for the inline molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of thiabendazole from citrus fruits and orange juice samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Francisco; Turiel, Esther; Cormack, Peter A G; Martín-Esteban, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres with narrow particle size distributions and core-shell morphology by a two-step precipitation polymerization procedure is described. Polydivinylbenzene (poly DVB-80) core particles were used as seed particles in the production of molecularly imprinted polymer shells by copolymerization of divinylbenzene-80 with methacrylic acid in the presence of thiabendazole (TBZ) and an appropriate porogen. Thereafter, polymer particles were packed into refillable stainless steel HPLC columns used in the development of an inline molecularly imprinted SPE method for the determination of TBZ in citrus fruits and orange juice samples. Under optimized chromatographic conditions, recoveries of TBZ within the range 81.1-106.4%, depending upon the sample, were obtained, with RSDs lower than 10%. This novel method permits the unequivocal determination of TBZ in the samples under study, according to the maximum residue levels allowed within Europe, in less than 20 min and without any need for a clean-up step in the analytical protocol. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Behavioural patterns only predict concurrent BMI status and not BMI trajectories in a sample of youth in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxer, Rachel E; Cooke, Martin; Dubin, Joel A; Brownson, Ross C; Chaurasia, Ashok; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2018-01-01

    Youth are engaging in multiple risky behaviours, increasing their risk of overweight, obesity, and related chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of engaging in unique clusters of unhealthy behaviours on youths' body mass index (BMI) trajectories. This study used a linked-longitudinal sample of Grades 9 and 10 students (13 to 17 years of age) participating in the COMPASS host study. Students reported obesity-related and other risky behaviours at baseline and height and weight (to derive BMI) at baseline (2012/2013) and annually for 2 years post-baseline (2013/14 and 2014/15). Students were grouped into behavioural clusters based on response probabilities. Linear mixed effects models, using BMI as a continuous outcome measure, were used to examine the effect of engaging in clusters of risky behaviours on BMI trajectories. There were significant differences in BMI of the four behavioural clusters at baseline that remained consistent over time. Higher BMI values were found among youth classified at baseline to be Typical High School Athletes (β = 0.232 kg/m2, [confidence interval (CI): 0.03-0.50]), Inactive High Screen-User (β = 0.348 kg/m2, CI: 0.11-0.59) and Moderately Active Substance Users (β = 0.759 kg/m2, CI: 0.36-1.15) compared to students classified as Health Conscious. Despite these baseline differences, BMI appeared to increase across all behavioural clusters annually by the same amount (β = 0.6097 kg/m2, (CI) = 0.57-0.64). Although annual increases in BMI did not differ by behavioural clusters, membership in a particular behavioural cluster was associated with baseline BMI, and these differences remained consistent over time. Results indicate that intervening and modifying unhealthy behaviours earlier might have a greater impact than during adolescence. Health promotion strategies targeting the highest risk youth as they enter secondary school might be promising means to prevent or delay the onset of obesity.

  16. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The text samples presented in this document primarily serve to exemplify the level of complexity and quality that the Standards require all students in a given grade band to engage with. Additionally, they are suggestive of the breadth of texts that students should encounter in the text types required by the Standards. The choices should serve as…

  17. Analytical Results for 35 Mine-Waste Tailings Cores and Six Bed-Sediment Samples, and An Estimate of the Volume of Contaminated Material at Buckeye Meadow on Upper Basin Creek, Northern Jefferson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, David L.; Church, Stan E.; Finney, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acid-generation and toxic-metal solubilization. Flotation-mill tailings in the meadow below the Buckeye mine, hereafter referred to as the Buckeye mill-tailings site, have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of Basin Creek, Montana. Basin Creek is one of three tributaries to the Boulder River in the study area; bed sediments and waters draining from the Buckeye mine have also been implicated. Geochemical analysis of 35 tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples was undertaken to determine the concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb,and Zn present in these materials. These elements are environmentally significant, in that they can be toxic to fish and/or the invertebrate organisms that constitute their food. A suite of one-inch cores of dispersed flotation-mill tailings and underlying premining material was taken from a large, flat area north of Basin Creek near the site of the Buckeye mine. Thirty-five core samples were taken and divided into 204 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) using a mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements listed above are present at moderate to very high concentrations (arsenic to 63,000 ppm, silver to 290 ppm, cadmium to 370 ppm, copper to 4,800 ppm, lead to 93,000 ppm, and zinc to 23,000 ppm). Volume calculations indicate that an estimated 8,400 metric tons of contaminated material are present at the site. Six bed-sediment samples were also subjected to the mixed-acid total digestion, and a warm (50°C) 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leach and analyzed by ICP-AES. Results indicate that bed sediments of Basin Creek are only slightly impacted by past mining above the Buckeye-Enterprise complex, moderately impacted at the upper (eastern

  18. Ground Penetrating Radar, Magnetic and Compositional Analysis of Sediment Cores and Surface Samples: The Relationships Between Lacustrine Sediments and Holocene Lake- Level and Climate Change at Deming Lake, Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R.; Lascu, I.; Plank, C.

    2007-12-01

    Deming Lake is a small (Deming. Cores were sampled continuously at a 1-2 cm resolution and sediment composition (in terms of percent organic matter, carbonate material, and minerogenic residue) was determined via loss on ignition (LOI). Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) were used as proxies of magnetic mineral concentration and grain size. Four lithostratigraphic units were identified and correlated between cores based on these analyses. Changes in GPR facies corroborate the correlation between the two shallow cores. In order to inform our interpretation of down-core variations in magnetic properties and LOI values in terms of variations in lake depth, a suite of over 70 modern sediment samples were collected from the basin and analyzed. LOI compositional variability across the basin was high, with no clear trends related to depth or distance from shore. A sharp decrease in minerogenic content was observed at depths consistent with a predicted wave-base of 0.5 m, but aside from this trend it appears the steep slopes of much of the basin promote gravity driven slumping and mixing of sediments at depth. In the profundal sediments IRM values are routinely 5% higher than in the slope and littoral environments, while ARM/IRM ratios indicate an increase in magnetic grain size with water depth. We infer that an increase in coarse organic material in the shallow-water cores of Deming records a period of aridity (associated with a decrease lake-level less than 2m based on GPR profiles) and/or increased water clarity during the regionally expansive mid-Holocene dry period. We do not see clear evidence of late-Holocene lake level change of a significant magnitude (i.e. >1m). While remanence measurements (especially IRM) often correlate with the LOI residue, interference in the IRM resulting from the dissolution of magnetic minerals casts uncertainty into the reliability of our magnetic measurements as a signal of climate

  19. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  20. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  1. [The new eubacterium Roseomonas baikalica sp. nov. isolated from core samples collected by deep-hole drilling of the bottom of Lake Baĭkal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, I S; Pechurkina, N I; Morozova, O V; Riabchikova, E I; Belikov, S I; Puchkova, L I; Emel'ianova, E K; Torok, T; Repin, V E

    2007-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of samples of sedimentary rocks from various eras of the geological history of the Baikal rift has enabled us to isolate a large number of microorganisms that can be classified into new, previously undescribed species. The present work deals with the identification and study of the morphological, biochemical, and physiological properties of one such strain, Che 82, isolated from sample C-29 of 3.4-3.5 Ma-old sedimentary rocks taken at a drilling depth of 146.74 m. As a result of our investigations, strain Che 82 is described as a new bacterial species, Roseomonas baikalica sp. nov., belonging to the genus Roseomonas within the family Methylobacteriaceae, class Alphaproteobacteria.

  2. Rb-Sr systematics in drill core samples of the Eye-Dashwa Lakes pluton at the whole rock and mineral scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, Z.E.; Futa, K.; Kamineni, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-one whole-rock samples from boreholes ATK-1 and ATK-6 define a precise Rb-Sr isochron with an age of 2637 ± 33 Ma and initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr intercept, IR(Sr), of 0.70144 ± 0.00006. An internal mineral isochron for ATC-1 (991-997) and biotites from ATK-1 (35.63) and ATK-1 (3.84) give younger ages of 2541 ± 14 Ma 2574 ± 25 Ma, and 2534 ± 25 Ma, respectively. Data for samples from fracture zones scatter but correlate around an isochron of 2281 ± 153 Ma. The internal isochron and biotite ages record cooling below about 300 C due to uplift and erosion. The younger age, 2281 ± 153 Ma, records an episode or episodes of brittle failure at relatively high crustal levels. These fractures provided pathways for infiltration of water, which facilitated the mineralogical alteration

  3. Thermal Expansivity Between 150 and 800°C of Hydrothermally Altered Conduit Dyke Samples from USDP-4 Drill Core (Mt Unzen, Shimabara, Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, T. I.; Hess, K. U.; Vasseur, J.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Gilg, H. A.; Nakada, S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2017-12-01

    When hot magma intrudes the crust, the surrounding rocks expand. Similarly, the cooling magma contracts. The expansion and contraction of these multiphase materials is not simple and often requires empirical constraint. Therefore, we constrained the thermal expansivity of Unzen dome and conduit samples using a NETZSCH® DIL 402C. Following experiments, those samples were scanned using a Phoenix v|tome|x m to observe the cracks that may have developed during the heating and cooling. The dome samples do not show petrological or chemical signs of alteration. However, the alteration of the conduit dykes is represented by the occurrence of the main secondary phases such as chlorite, sulfides, carbonates, R1 (Reichweite parameter) illite-smectite, and kaolinite. These alteration products indicate an (I) early weak to moderate argillic magmatic alteration, and a (II) second stage weak to moderate propylitic hydrothermal alteration. The linear thermal expansion coefficient aL of the dome material is K-1 between 150° and 800°C and shows a sharp peak of up to K-1 around the alpha-beta-quartz-transition ( 573°C). In contrast, aL of the hydrothermally altered conduit samples starts to increase around 180° and reaches K-1 at 400°C. We interpret this effect as being due to the water content of the kaolinite and the R1 illite-smectite, which induces larger expansions per degree temperature change. Furthermore, the altered conduit samples show a more pronounced increases of aL between 500 and 650°C of up to peaks at K-1, which is generated by the breakdown of chlorite, iron-rich dolomite solid solutions, calcite, and pyrite. We use a 1D conductive model of heat transfer to explore how the country rock around the Unzen conduit zone would heat up after intrusion. In turn, we convert these temperature profiles to thermal stress profiles, assuming the edifice is largely undeformable. We show that these high linear thermal expansion coefficients of the hydrothermally altered

  4. Diverse patterns of recognition of hepatitis C virus core and nonstructural antigens by antibodies present in Egyptian cancer patients and blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, M. A.; Zekri, A. R.; Goudsmit, J.; Boom, R.; Khaled, H. M.; Mansour, M. T.; de Wolf, F.; el-Din, H. M.; Sol, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Serum samples from 429 cancer patients, 82 unpaid blood donors, and 74 paid blood donors were tested for hepatitis C virus (HCV) markers in two commercially available enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). A total of 229 of 429 (53.4%) cancer patients were positive by the two EIAs. A total of 34 of 156 (21.8%)

  5. An automated GC-C-GC-IRMS setup to measure palaeoatmospheric δ13C-CH4, δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O in one ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sperlich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Air bubbles in ice core samples represent the only opportunity to study the mixing ratio and isotopic variability of palaeoatmospheric CH4 and N2O. The highest possible precision in isotope measurements is required to maximize the resolving power for CH4 and N2O sink and source reconstructions. We present a new setup to measure δ13C-CH4, δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O isotope ratios in one ice core sample and with one single IRMS instrument, with a precision of 0.09, 0.6 and 0.7‰, respectively, as determined on 0.6–1.6 nmol CH4 and 0.25–0.6 nmol N2O. The isotope ratios are referenced to the VPDB scale (δ13C-CH4, the N2-air scale (δ15N-N2O and the VSMOW scale (δ18O-N2O. Ice core samples of 200–500 g are melted while the air is constantly extracted to minimize gas dissolution. A helium carrier gas flow transports the sample through the analytical system. We introduce a new gold catalyst to oxidize CO to CO2 in the air sample. CH4 and N2O are then separated from N2, O2, Ar and CO2 before they get pre-concentrated and separated by gas chromatography. A combustion unit is required for δ13C-CH4 analysis, which is equipped with a constant oxygen supply as well as a post-combustion trap and a post-combustion GC column (GC-C-GC-IRMS. The post-combustion trap and the second GC column in the GC-C-GC-IRMS combination prevent Kr and N2O interferences during the isotopic analysis of CH4-derived CO2. These steps increase the time for δ13C-CH4 measurements, which is used to measure δ15N-N2O and δ18O-N2O first and then δ13C-CH4. The analytical time is adjusted to ensure stable conditions in the ion source before each sample gas enters the IRMS, thereby improving the precision achieved for measurements of CH4 and N2O on the same IRMS. The precision of our measurements is comparable to or better than that of recently published systems. Our setup is calibrated by analysing multiple reference gases that were injected over bubble-free ice samples. We show

  6. Iowa Geologic Sampling Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Point locations of geologic samples/files in the IGS repository. Types of samples include well cuttings, outcrop samples, cores, drillers logs, measured sections,...

  7. Determination of Organophosphorous Pesticides in Environmental Water Samples Using Surface-Engineered C18 Functionalized Silica-Coated Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles-Based Extraction Coupled with GC-MS/MS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Neha; Kumari, Supriya; Nair, Kishore; Alam, Samsul; Raza, Syed K

    2017-05-01

    The present paper depicts a novel method based on magnetic SPE (MSPE) for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) such as phorate, malathion, and chlorpyrifos in environmental water samples. In this study, C18 functionalized silica-coated core-shell iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were used as a surface-engineered magnetic sorbent for the selective extraction of pesticides from aqueous samples, followed by GC-MS and GC-tandem MS analysis for confirmative determination of the analytes. Various important method parameters, including quantity of MNP adsorbent, volume of sample, effective time for extraction, nature of the desorbing solvent, and pH of the aqueous sample, were investigated and optimized to obtain maximum method performance. Under the optimized instrumental analysis conditions, good linearity (r2 value ≥0.994) was achieved at the concentration range of 0.5-500 μg/L. Recoveries were in the range of 79.2-96.3 and 80.4-97.5% in selective-ion monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) modes, respectively, at the spiking concentrations of 1, 5, and 10 μg/L. MRM mode showed better sensitivity, selectivity, and low-level detection (0.5 μg/L) of analytes. The novel MSPE method is a simple, cheap, rapid, and eco-friendly method for the determination of OPs in environmental water samples.

  8. Diurnal changes in core body temperature, day/night locomotor activity patterns, and actigraphy-generated behavioral sleep in aged canines with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M. Zanghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Core body temperature (CBT rhythm, locomotor activity, and actigraphy-sleep were evaluated in geriatric dogs with cognitive dysfunction. Dogs (n=33; 9–16 yrs performed a spatial working memory task and divided into three memory groups: Low, Moderate, and High, with subsequent evaluation of learning and attention. Rectal CBT was recorded 6 times over a 17.5 h period and Actiwatch® activity monitoring system for 5 days while housed indoors with 12 h light/dark schedule. Rhythm of daily activity data was evaluated using the traditional cosinor analysis and generation of non-parametric measures of interdaily stability, intradaily variability, and relative amplitude. CBT differed with time (F (5, 130=11.36, p<0.001, and was the highest at 19:00C. CBT at 19:00 was positively related (p<0.01 to memory (r(31=0.50 and 3-domain cognitive performance index (memory, learning, attention; r(31=0.39. Total daytime or night-time activity did not differ between memory groups, but hourly counts at 8:00 were positively related (p<0.05 to memory (r(31=0.52, learning (r(31=0.36, and 3-domain cognitive performance index (r(31=0.53. There were no significant differences between age or memory groups for any circadian rhythm measures. Daytime naps were inversely related to memory accuracy (r(31=−0.39; p<0.05 and BT at 15:00 (r(30=−0.51; p<0.01. Lower peak BT and increased napping may predict some aspects of cognitive performance of working memory, learning, and/or attention processes in these geriatric dogs, but minimal diurnal rhythm disruption of locomotor activity is observed when these cognitive processes decline.

  9. Temporal lobe sulcal pattern and the bony impressions in the middle cranial fossa: the case of the el Sidrón (Spain) neandertal sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Antonio; Peña-Melián, Angel; García-Tabernero, Antonio; Bastir, Markus; De La Rasilla, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Correspondence between temporal lobe sulcal pattern and bony impressions on the middle cranial fossae (MCF) was analyzed. MCF bone remains (SD-359, SD-315, and SD-1219) from the El Sidrón (Spain) neandertal site are analyzed in this context. Direct comparison of the soft and hard tissues from the same individual was studied by means of: 1) dissection of two human heads; 2) optic (white light) surface scans; 3) computed tomography and magnetic resonance of the same head. The inferior temporal sulcus and gyrus are the features most strongly influencing MCF bone surface. The Superior temporal sulcus and middle temporal and fusiform gyri also leave imprints. Temporal lobe form differs between Homo sapiens and neandertals. A wider and larger post-arcuate fossa (posterior limit of Brodmann area 20 and the anterior portion of area 37) is present in modern humans as compared to neandertals. However other traits of the MCF surface are similar in these two large-brained human groups. A conspicuous variation is appreciated in the more vertical location of the inferior temporal gyrus in H. sapiens. In parallel, structures of the lower surface of the temporal lobe are more sagittally orientated. Grooves accommodating the fusiform and the lower temporal sulci become grossly parallel to the temporal squama. These differences can be understood within the context of a supero-lateral deployment of the lobe in H. sapiens, a pattern previously identified (Bastir et al., Nat Commun 2 (2011) 588-595). Regarding dural sinus pattern, a higher incidence of petrosquamous sinus is detected in neandertal samples. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mental health and patterns of work-related coping behaviour in a German sample of student teachers: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Linda; Unterbrink, Thomas; Pfeifer, Ruth; Wirsching, Michael; Rose, Uwe; Stößel, Ulrich; Nübling, Matthias; Buhl-Grießhaber, Veronika; Frommhold, Markus; Schaarschmidt, Uwe; Bauer, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the mental health of student teachers, to analyse the extent to which they feel prepared for their profession by the university curriculum and to investigate patterns of coping with occupational stress. A sample of 481 German student teachers was investigated using two standardised instruments: GHQ-12 (General Health Questionnaire) and AVEM (Arbeitsbezogenes Verhaltens- und Erlebensmuster), an occupational stress and coping questionnaire describing four patterns of work-related coping behaviour. In addition, we asked how well the student teachers felt that the curriculum prepared them for their profession. Forty-four per cent of the student teachers report impaired mental health in the second teacher training period, indicated by a GHQ value equal to or over the cut-off of four. The AVEM responses revealed more than 40% showing risk patterns (A or B) compared to only 26.3% displaying a healthy coping style (G), while 32.8% demonstrate an unambitious style (S). These GHQ values are inversely correlated with the extent to which student teachers feel prepared for their work by the university curriculum. Our data indicate a problematic stress level for student teachers in the second training phase (high exposure to health risks and unfavourable coping styles). Since teaching is clearly an extremely demanding job, it is vital that teacher training systems contribute towards protecting the health of teachers by focusing on fostering healthy personal attitudes and equipping young teachers with coping styles and skills that will better prepare them for the challenges facing them in their daily work. Self-care health management should also be part of the teacher training curriculum.

  11. The pattern of physical comorbidity and the psychosocial determinants of depression: a prospective cohort study on a representative sample of family practice attendees in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selič, Polona; Svab, Igor; Rifel, Janez; Pavlič, Danica Rotar; Cerne, Anja; King, Michael; Nazareth, Irwin

    2011-09-01

    Objectives This study aims to present the patterns of physical comorbidity in depressed patients and factors strongly associated with depression in a representative sample of Slovenian family practice attendees.Methods Medical data was obtained for 911 general practice attendees. Of them, 221 (24.3%) were diagnosed as depressed. The depressive states of the subjects were evaluated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Physical comorbidity was assessed with a questionnaire covering the most common health problems in the Slovenian adult population. Several psycho-social factors were also analysed.Results Those variables significantly related to ICD depression were included in multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, adjusted by age, gender and education. The calculation included the chi-square, odds ratio (OR) with confidence interval (95% CI) and P-value. A P-value financial situation were strongly associated with depression. The impact of concurrent incontinence and chronic bowel disease was also important, though somewhat weaker.

  12. Validation of the Eating Pattern Inventory for Children in a General Population Sample of 11- to 12-Year-Old Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Anja; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Petersen, Janne

    2017-01-01

    Previous research suggests that the Eating Pattern Inventory for Children (EPI-C) is best conceptualized as comprising four factors: dietary restraint, emotional, external eating and parental pressure to eat. This study aims to examine the psychometric properties of the EPI-C and to test gender......, emotional and external eating, while underweight children reported higher parental pressure to eat. The results support the use of EPI-C for measuring eating behaviors in preadolescence....... and weight group differences. The population-based study sample comprised 1,939 children aged 11 to 12 years from the Copenhagen Child Cohort (CCC2000). Psychometric properties were evaluated using multigroup categorical data in confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and differential item functioning (DIF) tests...

  13. An Investigation of Antibiotic Resistance Pattern in the Strains of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Isolated From Clinical Samples in Isfahan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Nourbakhsh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Staphylococcus epidermidis is one of the effective factors causing nosocomial infections. This study was performed to investigate the antibiotic resistance pattern in the methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis strains isolated from clinical samples in Isfahan Province. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 150 isolates of S. epidermidis were isolated from detected from the patients hospitalized in hospitals and treatment centers of Isfahan City. The antibiotic resistance pattern was evaluated by disk diffusion method. The presence of the gene encoding antibiotic resistance to methicillin (mec A in the isolates were investigated using PCR method. Data were analyzed with Chi-square and Fisher's exact statistical tests. Results: In this study, most isolates were related to urinary tract infections. The highest resistance was reported to penicillin (98.9%, erythromycin (89.4%, ciprofloxacin (77.7%, clindamycin (65.9%, tetracycline (63.2%, and meticillin (54%. None of the strains showed resistance to vancomycin and linezolid. Molecular studies indicated the presence of mecA gene in 76% of the studied isolates. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, vancomycin and linezolid antibiotics can be the best choice of treatment for infections caused by S. epidermidis. Also, high resistance of S. epidermidis can be a serious warning for increased multiple antibiotic resistance. Molecular studies are indicative of high sensitivity of molecular methods in the investigation of methicillin-resistant isolates.  

  14. Preliminary findings on the association between attachment patterns and levels of growth hormone in a sample of children with non-organic failure to thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojanesi, Marta; Gallo, Mariana; Spaziani, Matteo; Russo, Federica; Valentini, Martina; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Biondi, Massimo; Radicioni, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Deficiency of growth hormone (GH) in absence of pituitary injuries is one of the causes of short stature and of the non organic failure to thrive (NOFTT) condition. Advances in developmental psychology have highlighted the role of emotions and caregiving behaviors in the organization of child’s personality and psychobiology, with the mother-son attachment bond being considered a fundamental developmental experience. The objective of the present preliminary study was to assess whether there are significant correlations between attachment patterns and GH levels in a sample of subjects with NOFTT. Overall, 27 children (mean age 9.49±2.63 years) with NOFTT were enrolled. Perceived attachment security was assessed through the Security Scale (SS) and its subscales focused on maternal and paternal security. Pearson partial correlation was used to test associations between GH levels and SS measures adjusting for confounding factors (i.e. age, gender and body mass index). Across all subjects, GH was significantly positively correlated with general security (r=0.425; p=0.038) and maternal security (r=0.451; p=0.027) and not significantly correlated with paternal security (r=0.237; p=0.264). These findings preliminarily suggest that the association between GH levels and perceived attachment security may play a role in the pathophysiology of NOFTT and add to the accumulating evidence that attachment patterns may be related with specific psychoendocrine underpinnings.

  15. Chemistry of Selected Core Samples, Concentrate, Tailings, and Tailings Pond Waters: Pea Ridge Iron (-Lanthanide-Gold) Deposit, Washington County, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauch, Richard I.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seeger, Cheryl M.; Budahn, James R.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    The Minerals at Risk and for Emerging Technologies Project of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program is examining potential sources of lanthanide elements (rare earth elements) as part of its objective to provide up-to-date geologic information regarding mineral commodities likely to have increased demand in the near term. As part of the examination effort, a short visit was made to the Pea Ridge iron (-lanthanide-gold) deposit, Washington County, Missouri in October 2008. The deposit, currently owned by Wings Enterprises, Inc. of St. Louis, Missouri (Wings), contains concentrations of lanthanides that may be economic as a primary product or as a byproduct of iron ore production. This report tabulates the results of chemical analyses of the Pea Ridge samples and compares rare earth elements contents for world class lanthanide deposits with those of the Pea Ridge deposit. The data presented for the Pea Ridge deposit are preliminary and include some company data that have not been verified by the USGS or by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey (DGLS), Geological Survey Program (MGS). The inclusion of company data is for comparative purposes only and does not imply an endorsement by either the USGS or MGS.

  16. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  17. Complexity of nearshore strontium-to-calcium ratio variability in a core sample of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea obtained in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Christopher D.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don; Morrison, Jennifer M.; Flannery, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Strontium-to-calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) were measured on the skeletal matrix of a core sample from a colony of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea collected in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Strontium and calcium are incorporated into the coral skeleton during the precipitation of aragonite by the coral polyps and their ratio is highly temperature dependent. The robustness of this temperature dependence makes Sr/Ca a reliable proxy for sea surface temperature (SST). Details presented from the St. John S. siderea core indicate that terrestrial inputs of sediment and freshwater can disrupt the chemical balance and subsequently complicate the utility of Sr/Ca in reconstructing historical SST. An approximately 44-year-long record of Sr/Ca shows that an annual SST signal is recorded but with an increasing Sr/Ca trend from 1980 to present, which is likely the result of runoff from the mountainous terrain of St. John. The overwhelming influence of the terrestrial fingerprint on local seawater chemistry makes utilizing Sr/Ca as a SST proxy in nearshore environments very difficult.

  18. Community level patterns in diverse systems: A case study of litter fauna in a Mexican pine-oak forest using higher taxa surrogates and re-sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Claudia E.; Guevara, Roger; Sánchez-Rojas, Gerardo; Téllez, Dianeis; Verdú, José R.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental assessment at the community level in highly diverse ecosystems is limited by taxonomic constraints and statistical methods requiring true replicates. Our objective was to show how diverse systems can be studied at the community level using higher taxa as biodiversity surrogates, and re-sampling methods to allow comparisons. To illustrate this we compared the abundance, richness, evenness and diversity of the litter fauna in a pine-oak forest in central Mexico among seasons, sites and collecting methods. We also assessed changes in the abundance of trophic guilds and evaluated the relationships between community parameters and litter attributes. With the direct search method we observed differences in the rate of taxa accumulation between sites. Bootstrap analysis showed that abundance varied significantly between seasons and sampling methods, but not between sites. In contrast, diversity and evenness were significantly higher at the managed than at the non-managed site. Tree regression models show that abundance varied mainly between seasons, whereas taxa richness was affected by litter attributes (composition and moisture content). The abundance of trophic guilds varied among methods and seasons, but overall we found that parasitoids, predators and detrivores decreased under management. Therefore, although our results suggest that management has positive effects on the richness and diversity of litter fauna, the analysis of trophic guilds revealed a contrasting story. Our results indicate that functional groups and re-sampling methods may be used as tools for describing community patterns in highly diverse systems. Also, the higher taxa surrogacy could be seen as a preliminary approach when it is not possible to identify the specimens at a low taxonomic level in a reasonable period of time and in a context of limited financial resources, but further studies are needed to test whether the results are specific to a system or whether they are general

  19. Minority Stress, Smoking Patterns, and Cessation Attempts: Findings From a Community-Sample of Transgender Women in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarel, Kristi E; Mereish, Ethan H; Manning, David; Iwamoto, Mariko; Operario, Don; Nemoto, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    Research has demonstrated associations between reports of minority stressors and smoking behaviors among lesbian, gay, and bisexual populations; however, little is known about how minority stressors are related to smoking behaviors and cessation attempts among transgender women. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to examine the associations between transgender-based discrimination and smoking patterns among a sample of transgender women; and (2) to identify barriers to smoking cessation in a sample of transgender women with a history of smoking. A community sample of 241 transgender women completed a one-time survey. Binary and multinomial logistic regression models examined associations between minority stressors and (1) smoking behaviors and (2) cessation attempts. Both models adjusted for income, education, race/ethnicity, recent sex work, HIV status, depression, alcohol use, and current hormone use. Overall, 83% of participants indicated that they had smoked a cigarette in the last month. Of these women, 62.3% reported daily smoking and 51.7% reported an unsuccessful quit attempt. Discrimination was positively associated with currently smoking (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01, 1.08). Discrimination was positively associated with unsuccessful cessation (AOR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.18) and never attempting (AOR = 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11) compared to successful cessation. Discrimination was also positively associated with never attempting compared to unsuccessful cessation (AOR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.03). Smoking cessation may be driven by unique transgender-related minority stressors, such as discrimination. Future research is warranted to address unique stigmatizing contexts when understanding and providing tailored intervention addressing smoking among transgender women. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government

  20. Spatiotemporal patterns of plant water isotope values from a continental-scale sample network in Europe as a tool to improve hydroclimate proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. B.; Kahmen, A.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of water available for biosynthetic processes in vascular plants plays an important role in shaping the isotopic composition of organic compounds that these organisms produce, including leaf waxes and cellulose in leaves and tree rings. Characterizing changes in large scale spatial patterns of precipitation, soil water, stem water, and leaf water isotope values over time is therefore useful for evaluating how plants reflect changes in the isotopic composition of these source waters in different environments. This information can, in turn, provide improved calibration targets for understanding the environmental signals that plants preserve. The pathway of water through this continuum can include several isotopic fractionations, but the extent to which the isotopic composition of each of these water pools varies under normal field conditions and over space and time has not been systematically and concurrently evaluated at large spatial scales. Two season-long sampling campaigns were conducted at nineteen sites throughout Europe over the 2014 and 2015 growing seasons to track changes in the isotopic composition of plant-relevant waters. Samples of precipitation, soil water, stem water, and leaf water were collected over more than 200 field days and include more than 500 samples from each water pool. Measurements were used to validate continent-wide gridded estimates of leaf water isotope values derived from a combination of mechanistic and statistical modeling conducted with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity data. Data-model comparison shows good agreement for summer leaf waters, and substantiates the incorporation of modeled leaf waters in evaluating how plants respond to hydroclimate changes at large spatial scales. These results also suggest that modeled leaf water isotope values might be used in future studies in similar ecosystems to improve the coverage density of spatial or temporal data.

  1. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  2. TMI-2 core bore acquisition summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolman, E.L.; Smith, R.P.; Martin, M.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Broughton, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Core bore samples were obtained from the severely damaged TMI-2 core during July and August, 1986. A description of the TMI-2 core bore drilling unit used to obtain samples; a summary and discussion of the data from the ten core bore segments which were obtained; and the initial results of analysis and evaluation of these data are presented in this report. The impact of the major findings relative to our understanding of the accident scenario is also discussed

  3. Consistency of genetic inheritance mode and heritability patterns of triglyceride vs. high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in two Taiwanese family samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chi-Yu

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C is considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Genetic components were important in controlling the variation in western countries. But the mode of inheritance and family aggregation patterns were still unknown among Asian-Pacific countries. This study, based on families recruited from community and hospital, is aimed to investigate the mode of inheritance, heritability and shared environmental factors in controlling TG/HDL-C. Results Two populations, one from community-based families (n = 988, 894 parent-offspring and 453 sibling pairs and the other from hospital-based families (n = 1313, 76 parent-offspring and 52 sibling pairs were sampled. The population in hospital-based families had higher mean age values than community-based families (54.7 vs. 34.0. Logarithmic transformed TG/ HDL-C values, after adjusted by age, gender and body mass index, were for genetic analyses. Significant parent-offspring and sibling correlations were also found in both samples. The parent-offspring correlation coefficient was higher in the hospital-based families than in the community-based families. Genetic heritability was higher in community-based families (0.338 ± 0.114, p = 0.002, but the common shared environmental factor was higher in hospital-based families (0.203 ± 0.042, p Conclusion Variations of TG/HDL-C in the normal ranges were likely to be influenced by multiple factors, including environmental and genetic components. Higher genetic factors were proved in younger community-based families than in older hospital-based families.

  4. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  5. Loading pattern optimization in hexagonal geometry using PANTHER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, G.T.; Knight, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The extension of the loading pattern optimization capability of Nuclear Electric's reactor physics code PANTHER to hexagonal geometry cores is described. The variety of search methods available and the code's performance are illustrated by an example in which three search different methods are used in turn in order to find an optimal reload design for a sample hexagonal geometry problem. (author)

  6. ROSA full-core and DNBR capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; Wakker, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    The latest developments of the ROSA (Reloading Optimization by Simulated Annealing) code system with an emphasis on the first full-core version and the minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) as a new optimization parameter are presented. Designing the core loading pattern of nuclear power plants is becoming a more and more complex task. This task becomes even more complicated if asymmetries in the core loading pattern arise, for instance due to damaged fuel assemblies. For over almost 2 decades ROSA, NRG's (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group) loading pattern optimization code system for PWRs, has proven to be a valuable tool to reactor operators in accomplishing this task. To improve the use of ROSA for designing asymmetric loading patterns, NRG has developed a full-core version of ROSA besides the original quarter-core version which requires rotational symmetry in the computational domain. The extension of ROSA with DNBR as an optimization parameter is part of ROSA's continuous development. (orig.)

  7. Computer-Aided Test Flow in Core-Based Design

    OpenAIRE

    Zivkovic, V.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper copes with the test-pattern generation and fault coverage determination in the core based design. The basic core-test strategy that one has to apply in the core-based design is stated in this work. A Computer-Aided Test (CAT) flow is proposed resulting in accurate fault coverage of embedded cores. The CAT now is applied to a few cores within the Philips Core Test Pilot IC project

  8. Computer-Aided Test Flow in Core-Based Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, V.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper copes with the efficient test-pattern generation in a core-based design. A consistent Computer-Aided Test (CAT) flow is proposed based on the required core-test strategy. It generates a test-pattern set for the embedded cores with high fault coverage and low DfT area overhead. The CAT

  9. Core vocabulary of young children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Stijn R J M; Van Zaalen, Yvonne; Van Balkom, Hans; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a core vocabulary list for young children with intellectual disabilities between 2 and 7 years of age because data from this population are lacking in core vocabulary literature. Children with Down syndrome are considered one of the most valid reference groups for researching developmental patterns in children with intellectual disabilities; therefore, spontaneous language samples of 30 Dutch children with Down syndrome were collected during three different activities with multiple communication partners (free play with parents, lunch- or snack-time at home or at school, and speech therapy sessions). Of these children, 19 used multimodal communication, primarily manual signs and speech. Functional word use in both modalities was transcribed. The 50 most frequently used core words accounted for 67.2% of total word use; 16 words comprised core vocabulary, based on commonality. These data are consistent with similar studies related to the core vocabularies of preschoolers and toddlers with typical development, although the number of nouns present on the core vocabulary list was higher for the children in the present study. This finding can be explained by manual sign use of the children with Down syndrome and is reflective of their expressive vocabulary ages.

  10. Magnetic solid phase extraction using ionic liquid-coated core-shell magnetic nanoparticles followed by high-performance liquid chromatography for determination of Rhodamine B in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jieping; Zhu, Xiashi

    2016-06-01

    Three hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) (1-butyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6), 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazole hexafluoro-phosphate ([HMIM]PF6), and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluorophosphate ([OMIM]PF6)) were used to coat Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) with core-shell structures to prepare magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) agents (Fe3O4@SiO2@IL). A novel method of MSPE coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the separation/analysis of Rhodamine B was then established. The results showed that Rhodamine B was adsorbed rapidly on Fe3O4@SiO2@[OMIM]PF6 and was released using ethanol. Under optimal conditions, the pre-concentration factor for the proposed method was 25. The linear range, limit of detection (LOD), correlation coefficient (R), and relative standard deviation (RSD) were found to be 0.50-150.00 μgL(-1), 0.08 μgL(-1), 0.9999, and 0.51% (n=3, c=10.00 μgL(-1)), respectively. The Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs could be re-used up to 10 times. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Rhodamine B in food samples. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Patterns of lymph node sampling and the impact of lymph node density in favorable histology Wilms tumor: An analysis of the national cancer database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, A F; Carrasco, A; Amini, A; Aldrink, J H; Dasgupta, R; Gow, K W; Glick, R D; Ehrlich, P F; Cost, N G

    2018-04-01

    There is controversy about the role of lymph node (LN) sampling or dissection in the management of favorable histology (FH) Wilms tumor (WT), specifically how it performed and how it may impact survival. The objective of this study was to analyze factors affecting LN sampling patterns and the impact of LN yield and density (number of positive LNs/LNs examined) on overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced-stage favorable histology Wilms tumor (FHWT). The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was queried for patients with FHWT during 2004-2013. Demographic, clinical and OS data were abstracted for those who underwent surgical resection. Poisson regression was performed to analyze how factors influenced LN yield. Patients with positive LNs had LN density calculated and were further analyzed. A total of 2340 patients met criteria, with a median age at diagnosis of 3 years (range 0-78 years). The median number of LNs examined was three (range 0-87). Lymph node yield was affected by age, race, insurance, tumor size, laterality, advanced stage, LN positivity, and institutional volume. A total of 390 (16.6%) patients had LN-positive disease. Median LN density for these LN-positive patients was 0.38 (range 0.02-1) (Summary Figure). Estimated 5-year OS was significantly improved for those with LN density ≤0.38 vs. >0.38 (94% vs. 84.6%, P = 0.012). In this population, on multivariate analysis, age and LN density were significant predictors of OS. It is difficult to compile large numbers of cases in rare diseases like WT, and fortunately a large administrative database such as the NCDB can serve as a great resource. However, administrative data come with inherent limitations such as missing data and inability to account for a variety of factors that may influence LN yield and/or OS (specimen designation, pathologist experience, surgeon experience/volume, institutional Children's Oncology Group (COG) association, etc.). In this specific disease, the American Joint Committee

  12. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  13. Development and application of the capacity to make tests of dynamic displacement in samples of oil well drilling cores; Desarrollo y aplicacion de la capacidad para realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras L, Enrique; Garcia M, Pablo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    In the Laboratory of Deposits of the Gerencia de Geotermia of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) the capacity has been developed to make tests of dynamic oil displacement by means of gas or brine injection in samples of oil well drilling cores. Also the methodologies to interpret the results of these tests in terms of dynamics and the efficiency of the oil recovery in terms of the relative permeability have been developed. These capacities represent a very important contribution towards the improvement of the insufficiency that exists in the country to make the large amount of tests of dynamic displacement that demand the different Actives of PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEP), since they satisfy their necessities of data on which the activities of design and implementation of the most suitable techniques for the hydrocarbon recovery of the oil deposits lean. In the present work these capacities are described and some examples are presented of the results that have been obtained from their application in special studies of drilling cores, which have been recently made in the Laboratory of Deposits of the IIE for diverse Actives of PEP exploitation. [Spanish] En el laboratorio de yacimientos de la Gerencia de Geotermia del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) se ha desarrollado la capacidad de realizar pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico de aceite mediante inyeccion de salmuera o de gases en muestras de nucleos de perforacion de pozos petroleros. Tambien se han desarrollado las metodologias para interpretar los resultados de estas pruebas en terminos de la dinamica y la eficiencia de la recuperacion de aceite y en terminos de la permeabilidades relativas. Estas capacidades representan una contribucion muy importante hacia el mejoramiento de la insuficiencia que existe en el pais para realizar la gran cantidad de pruebas de desplazamiento dinamico que demandan los diferentes activos de explotacion de PEMEX Exploracion y Produccion (PEP), ya

  14. How unusual are the contents of paraphilias? Paraphilia-associated sexual arousal patterns in a community-based sample of men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, Christoph Joseph; Schaefer, Gerard Alfons; Mundt, Ingrid Annette; Roll, Stephanie; Englert, Heike; Willich, Stefan N; Beier, Klaus Michael

    2011-05-01

    This is a report of a cross-sectional study on paraphilia-associated sexual arousal patterns (PASAP) among men in a metropolitan city in Germany, EU. To determine the prevalence of PASAP during sexual fantasies, fantasies accompanying masturbation, and real-life sociosexual behavior. In a cross-sectional study, self-reported sexual history data were collected by questionnaire from 367 volunteers recruited from a community sample of 1,915 men aged 40-79 years. The Derogatis Symptom Checklist-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LSQ; German original, Fragebogen zur Lebenszufriedenheit, [FLZ]) were administered to obtain a general subjective health measure and a measure of general as well as sex life satisfaction. The Questionnaire on Sexual Experiences and Behaviour was administered to comprehensively assess all relevant sexo-medical data. Results.  The percent of men that reported at least one PASAP was 62.4%. In 1.7% of cases, PASAP were reported to have caused distress. The presence of PASAP was associated with a higher likelihood of being single (odds ratio [OR] 2.6; 95%; confidence interval [CI] 1.047-6.640), masturbating at least once per week (OR 4.4; 95%; CI 1.773-10.914), or having a low general subjective health score (OR 11.9; 95%; CI 2.601-54.553). Pedophilic PASAP in sexual fantasies and in real-life sociosexual behavior was reported by 9.5% and 3.8% of participants, respectively. The findings suggest that paraphilia-related experience can not be regarded as unusual from a normative perspective. At the same time, many men experience PASAP without accompanying problem awareness or distress, even when PASAP contents are associated with potentially causing harm to others. In view of the relevance for sex life and relationship satisfaction, presence of PASAP should be assessed in all sexual medicine consultations. Future research should focus on conditions in which PASAP reach clinical significance in the sense of mental disorders.

  15. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical samples at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnessa, Tebelay; Bitew, Adane

    2016-08-09

    Staphylococcus aureus particularly MRSA strains are one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired bacterial infections. They are also becoming increasingly multi-drug resistant and have recently developed resistance to vancomycin, which has been used successfully to treat MRSA for many years. In-vitro determination of drug resistance patterns of S. aureus is critical for the selection of effective drugs for the treatment of staphylococci infections. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains from different clinical specimens from patients referred for routine culture and sensitivity testing. A cross sectional study was conducted among 1360 participants at Yekatit 12 Hospital Medical College in Ethiopia from September 2013 to April 2014. Clinical samples from various anatomical sites of study participants were cultured on blood agar and mannitol salt agar and identified to be S. aureus by using catalase, coagulase and DNAse tests. S. aureus isolates then were screened for MRSA using 30 μg cefoxitin disc and other 11 antimicrobial drugs by disc diffusion procedure, and agar dilution and E tests for vancomycin. All S. aureus isolates examined for beta-lactamase production by employing nitrocefin. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software and logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between dependent and independent variables. Of 1360 clinical specimens analyzed S. aureus was recovered from (194, 14.3 %). Rate of isolation of S. aureus with regard to clinical specimens was the highest in pus (118, 55.4 %).No S. aureus was isolated from CSF and urethral discharge. Out of 194 S. aureus isolates, (34, 17.5 %) were found out to be MRSA and the remaining (160, 82.5 %) were MSSA. Ninety eight (50.5 %) S. aureus were multi drug resistant and the highest isolates were resistant to penicillin (187, 96.4 %) and least resistant for clindamycin (23, 11.9 %) and vancomycin

  16. Amostragem de acessos introduzidos e melhorados para composição de uma coleção núcleo de milho Sampling of introduced and improved access to composition of a core collection of corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Rodrigues Coimbra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Visando a amostragem de acessos para comporem uma coleção núcleo de milho, foram amostrados acessos introduzidos e melhorados da Coleção Ativa de Germoplasma da Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, localizada em Sete Lagoas, MG. A estratégia de amostragem utilizada foi baseada em análise multivariada, sendo adotada intensidade de amostragem de 20%. A estratificação dos acesos introduzidos foi realizada principalmente de acordo com o país de origem, local de avaliação e tipo de grão. Para os acessos melhorados considerou-se principalmente o tipo de grão e a instituição responsável pela realização do melhoramento do acesso. Verificou-se a necessidade de se realizar a caracterização e avaliação de muitos acessos introduzidos e melhorados. Foi possível observar a existência de variabilidade genética entre os acessos introduzidos e melhorados. As características altura de planta e peso de mil grãos foram as que mais contribuíram para a discriminação dos genótipos. A utilização combinada do método de Tocher tendo como medida de dissimilaridade a distância euclidiana invertida e a análise de dispersão gráfica com base nos três primeiros componentes principais foi eficiente. Foi possível a amostragem de acessos para comporem uma coleção núcleo de milho com base em análise multivariada a partir de dados de caracterização e avaliação.Aiming at the selection of accessions to compose a core collection of maize, were sampled access introduced and improved of Active Germplasm Bank at Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, located in Sete Lagoas, MG, Brazil. The sampling strategy was based in multivariate analysis, and adopted a sampling rate of 20% of accesses. Stratification of introduced accessions was in according with the country of origin, place of assessment and type of grain. For improved access was considered mainly the type of grain and the institution responsible for improvement of access. There is a need to perform the

  17. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  18. Patterns of Competence and Adjustment among Adolescents from Authoritative, Authoritarian, Indulgent, and Neglectful Homes: A Replication in a Sample of Serious Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence; Blatt-Eisengart, Ilana; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The correlates of authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and neglectful parenting were examined within a sample of 1,355 14- to 18-year-olds adjudicated of serious criminal offenses. The sample is composed primarily of poor, ethnic-minority youth living in impoverished urban neighborhoods. As has been found in community samples, juvenile…

  19. Web-based Core Design System Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, So Young; Kim, Hyung Jin; Yang, Sung Tae; Hong, Sun Kwan

    2011-01-01

    The selection of a loading pattern is one of core design processes in the operation of a nuclear power plant. A potential new loading pattern is identified by selecting fuels that to not exceed the major limiting factors of the design and that satisfy the core design conditions for employing fuel data from the existing loading pattern of the current operating cycle. The selection of a loading pattern is also related to the cycle plan of an operating nuclear power plant and must meet safety and economic requirements. In selecting an appropriate loading pattern, all aspects, such as input creation, code runs and result processes are processed as text forms manually by a designer, all of which may be subject to human error, such as syntax or running errors. Time-consuming results analysis and decision-making processes are the most significant inefficiencies to avoid. A web-based nuclear plant core design system was developed here to remedy the shortcomings of an existing core design system. The proposed system adopts the general methodology of OPR1000 (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plants) and Westinghouse-type plants. Additionally, it offers a GUI (Graphic User Interface)-based core design environment with a user-friendly interface for operators. It reduces human errors related to design model creation, computation, final reload core model selection, final output confirmation, and result data validation and verification. Most significantly, it reduces the core design time by more than 75% compared to its predecessor

  20. Fracture resistance of upper central incisors restored with different posts and cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rezaei Dastjerdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors restored with different posts and cores. Materials and Methods Forty-eight upper central incisors were randomly divided into four groups: cast post and core (group 1, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC post and composite core (group 2, composite post and core (group 3, and controls (group 4. Mesio-distal and bucco-lingual dimensions at 7 and 14 mm from the apex were compared to ensure standardization among the groups. Twelve teeth were prepared for crown restoration (group 4. Teeth in other groups were endodontically treated, decoronated at 14 mm from the apex, and prepared for posts and cores. Resin-based materials were used for cementation in groups 1 and 2. In group 3, composite was used directly to fill the post space and for core build-up. All samples were restored by standard metal crowns using glass ionomer cement, mounted at 135° vertical angle, subjected to thermomechanical aging, and then fractured using a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. Results Fracture resistance of the groups was as follows: Control (group 4 > cast post and core (group 1 > fiber post and composite core (group 2 > composite post and core (group 3. All samples in groups 2 and 3 fractured in restorable patterns, whereas most (58% in group 1 were non-restorable. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, FRC posts showed acceptable fracture resistance with favorable fracture patterns for reconstruction of upper central incisors.

  1. Pattern theory the stochastic analysis of real-world signals

    CERN Document Server

    Mumford, David

    2010-01-01

    Pattern theory is a distinctive approach to the analysis of all forms of real-world signals. At its core is the design of a large variety of probabilistic models whose samples reproduce the look and feel of the real signals, their patterns, and their variability. Bayesian statistical inference then allows you to apply these models in the analysis of new signals. This book treats the mathematical tools, the models themselves, and the computational algorithms for applying statistics to analyze six representative classes of signals of increasing complexity. The book covers patterns in text, sound

  2. TMI-2 core boring machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, K.M.; Helbert, H.J.; Laney, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    An important and essential aspect of the TMI-2 defueling effort is to determine what occurred in the core region during the accident. Remote cameras and probes only portray a portion of the overall picture. What lies beneath the rubble bed and solidified sublayer is, as yet, unknown. This paper discusses the TMI-2 Core Boring Machine, which has been developed to drill into the damaged core of the TMI-2 reactor and extract stratified samples of the core. This machine, its unique support structure, positioning and leveling systems, and specially designed drill bits, combine to provide a unique mechanical system. In addition, the machine is controlled by a microprocessor; which actually controls the drilling operation, allowing relatively inexperienced operators to drill the core samples. A data acquisition system is data integral with the controlling system and collects data relative to system conditions and monitored parameters during drilling. Data obtained during the actual drilling operations are collected in a data base which will be used for actual mapping of the core region, identifying materials and stratification levels that are present

  3. Dietary Patterns, Nutrition Knowledge, Lifestyle, and Health-Related Quality of Life: Associations with Anti-Hypertension Medication Adherence in a Sample of Australian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalesi, Saman; Irwin, Christopher; Sun, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Poor anti-hypertension medication (AHT) adherence can increase disease costs and adverse outcomes. Hypertensive individuals who have a better nutrition knowledge may lead a healthier lifestyle, have a better health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and greater confidence to change behaviour. On this basis, they may have better treatment adherence. To explore the association between the above-mentioned variables and AHT adherence in a group of Australian adults with high blood pressure (BP) in a cross-sectional clinical and community-based study. Adults with high BP (n = 270) completed a questionnaire including: food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), nutrition knowledge, HRQoL, self-efficacy of diet and exercise, lifestyle and AHT adherence sections. Bivariate analysis and hierarchical logistic regression were used to explore the data. Three dietary patterns were identified from the FFQ, using factor and cluster analyses (Western, Snack and Alcohol, and Balanced). We observed that following a Western dietary pattern, having lower exercise self-efficacy and shorter sleep duration were more dominant in the poor AHT adherence individuals compared to their counterparts. A positive association was observed between self-efficacy and sleep duration with AHT adherence. A Western dietary pattern was prevalent in high BP participants which slightly reduced the likelihood of good adherence. A healthier dietary pattern, better exercise self-efficacy and adequate sleep (more than six hours a night) may increase the likelihood of AHT adherence in individuals with high BP. Interventions focusing on improving these variables are required to confirm the findings of this study.

  4. Core drilling provides information about Santa Fe Group aquifer system beneath Albuquerque's West Mesa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B.D.; Connell, S.D.; Hawley, J.W.; Stone, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Core samples from the upper ???1500 ft of the Santa Fe Group in the Albuquerque West Mesa area provide a first-hand look at the sediments and at subsurface stratigraphic relationships in this important part of the basin-fill aquifer system. Two major hydrostratigraphic subunits consisting of a lower coarse-grained, sandy interval and an overlying fine-grained, interbedded silty sand and clay interval lie beneath the water table at the 98th St core hole. Borehole electrical conductivity measurements reproduce major textural changes observed in the recovered cores and support subsurface correlations of hydrostratigraphic units in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system based on geophysical logs. Comparison of electrical logs from the core hole and from nearby city wells reveals laterally consistent lithostratigraphic patterns over much of the metropolitan area west of the Rio Grande that may be used to delineate structural and related stratigraphic features that have a direct bearing on the availability of ground water.

  5. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  6. Online respondent-driven sampling for studying contact patterns relevant for the spread of close-contact pathogens : A pilot study in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Mart L.; van Steenbergen, Jim E.; Chanyasanha, Charnchudhi; Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Buskens, Vincent; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Sabaiwan, Wasamon; Bengtsson, Linus; Lu, Xin; Thorson, Anna E.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Information on social interactions is needed to understand the spread of airborne infections through a population. Previous studies mostly collected egocentric information of independent respondents with self-reported information about contacts. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a

  7. The NBOMe hallucinogenic drug series: Patterns of use, characteristics of users and self-reported effects in a large international sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Will; Barratt, Monica; Williams, Martin; Horne, Abi; Winstock, Adam

    2014-08-01

    The NBOMe compounds are a novel series of hallucinogenic drugs that are potent agonists of the 5-HT2A receptor, have a short history of human consumption and are available to buy online, in most countries. In this study, we sought to investigate the patterns of use, characteristics of users and self-reported effects. A cross-sectional anonymous online survey exploring the patterns of drug use was conducted in 2012 (n = 22,289), including questions about the use of 25B-NBOMe, 25C-NBOMe, and 25I-NBOMe and comparison drugs. We found that 2.6% of respondents (n = 582) reported having ever tried one of the three NBOMe drugs and that at 2.0%, 25I-NBOMe was the most popular (n = 442). Almost all (93.5%) respondents whose last new drug tried was a NBOMe drug, tried it in 2012, and 81.2% of this group administered the drug orally or sublingually/buccally. Subjective effects were similar to comparison serotonergic hallucinogens, though higher 'negative effects while high' and greater 'value for money' were reported. The most common (41.7%) drug source was via a website. The NBOMe drugs have emerged recently, are frequently bought using the internet and have similar effects to other hallucinogenic drugs; however, they may pose larger risks, due to the limited knowledge about them, their relatively low price and availability via the internet. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Reactor power distribution pattern judging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Tadashi.

    1992-01-01

    The judging device of the present invention comprises a power distribution readout system for intaking a power value from a fuel segment, a neural network having an experience learning function for receiving a power distribution value as an input variant, mapping it into a desirable property and self-organizing the map, and a learning date base storing a plurality of learnt samples. The read power distribution is classified depending on the similarity thereof with any one of representative learnt power distribution, and the corresponding state of the reactor core is outputted as a result of the judgement. When an error is found in the classified judging operation, erroneous cases are additionally learnt by using the experience and learning function, thereby improving the accuracy of the reactor core characteristic estimation operation. Since the device is mainly based on the neural network having a self-learning function and a pattern classification and judging function, a judging device having a human's intuitive pattern recognition performance and a pattern experience and learning performance is obtainable, thereby enabling to judge the state of the reactor core accurately. (N.H.)

  9. Computer-Aided Test Flow in Core-Based Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, V.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper copes with the test-pattern generation and fault coverage determination in the core based design. The basic core-test strategy that one has to apply in the core-based design is stated in this work. A Computer-Aided Test (CAT) flow is proposed resulting in accurate fault coverage of

  10. Differences in the diurnal pattern of soil respiration under adjacent Miscanthus x giganteus and barley crops reveal potential flaws in accepted sampling strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, James; Ineson, Phil

    2017-04-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and contributes ca. 30% of global ecosystem respiration.However, for convenience, measurements used to compare Rs from different land uses, crops or management practices are often made between 09:00 and 16:00, with an implicit assumption that Rs is largely controlled by temperature. Three months' continuous data presented here show distinctly different diurnal patterns of Rs between barley (Hordeum vulgare) and Miscanthus x giganteus (Miscanthus) grown on adjacent fields. Maximum Rs in barley occurred during the afternoon and correlated with soil temperature, whereas Rs peaked in Miscanthus during the night and was significantly correlated with earlier levels of solar radiation, probably due to delays in translocation of recent photosynthate. Since daily mean Rs in Miscanthus coincided with levels 40% greater than the mean in barley, it is vital to select appropriate times to measure Rs if only single daily measurements are to be made.

  11. A Latent Class Analysis of Gambling Activity Patterns in a Canadian University Sample of Emerging Adults: Socio-demographic, Motivational, and Mental Health Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanscartier, Matthew D; Edgerton, Jason D; Roberts, Lance W

    2017-12-02

    This analysis of gambling habits of Canadian university students (ages 18-25) dovetails two recent developments in the field of gambling studies. First, the popularity of latent class analysis to identify heterogeneous classes of gambling patterns in different populations; second, the validation of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire (with financial motives) among university students-specifically to understand both how and why emerging adults gamble. Our results support a four-class model of gambling activity patterns, consisting of female-preponderant casual and chance-based gambling groups, and male-preponderant skill-based and extensive gambling groups. Each class shows a specific combination of motives, underscoring the necessity for nuanced responses to problem gambling among emerging adults. More specifically, gambling for the skill-based group appears primarily to be a source of thrill and a way to cope; for the chance-based group, gambling appears but one symptom of a set of wider issues involving depression, anxiety, substance use, and low self-esteem; while extensive gamblers seem to seek excitement, sociality, and coping, in that order. Only the chance-based group was significantly more likely than casual gamblers to be motivated by financial reasons. Situating our analysis in the literature, we suggest that interventions for the predominantly male subtypes should address gambling directly (e.g. re-focusing excitement seeking into other activities, instilling more productive coping mechanisms) while interventions for predominantly female subtypes should address low self-esteem in conjunction with depression, substance abuse, and problematic levels of gambling. We conclude future research should focus on links between self-esteem, depression, substance abuse, and financial motives for gambling among female emerging adults.

  12. Prehistoric spatial patterning and subsistence studies: Archaeological investigations at Sample Unit U19arP4, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.G.; DuBarton, A.; Edwards, S.; Drollinger, H.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the methods and results of archaeological investigations at Sample Unit U19arP4 on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Eight sites were located there: four lithic artifact scatters (26NY1370, 26NY1372, 26NY3666 and 26NY3667), two temporary camps (26NY3665 and 26NY5418), one artifact locality (26NY5419), and one quarry (26NY3664). One of the lithic scatters, 26NY3667, incorporated a previously recorded rock ring, 26NY1371, that could not be relocated during subsequent investigations. Surface artifacts were collected from all but two of the sites, 26NY1370 and 26NY1372. The data retrieved from these investigations include over one thousand artifacts, such as projectile points, bifaces, debitage, groundstone, and pottery. The temporally diagnostic materials indicate periodic use of Sample Unit U19arP4 from the Middle Archaic to the Shoshonean period

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of Musashi TRIGA mark II reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the TRIGA-II core at the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (Musashi reactor, 100 kW) was performed by the three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP4A). Effective multiplication factors (k eff ) for the several fuel-loading patterns including the initial core criticality experiment, the fuel element and control rod reactivity worth as well as the neutron flux measurements were used in the validation process of the physical model and neutron cross section data from the ENDF/B-V evaluation. The calculated k eff overestimated the experimental data by about 1.0%Δk/k for both the initial core and the several fuel-loading arrangements. The calculated reactivity worths of control rod and fuel element agree well the measured ones within the uncertainties. The comparison of neutron flux distribution was consistent with the experimental ones which were measured by activation methods at the sample irradiation tubes. All in all, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is good, which indicated that the Monte Carlo model is enough to simulate the Musashi TRIGA-II reactor core. (author)

  14. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  15. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Patterns Before and During Pregnancy in a Multi-ethnic Sample of Asian Women in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmapriya, N; Shen, Liang; Soh, Shu-E; Shen, Zhe; Kwek, Kenneth; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang-Mei; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk

    2015-11-01

    To describe physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) patterns before and during pregnancy among Chinese, Malay and Indian women. In addition, to investigate determinants of change in PA and SB during pregnancy. The Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes cohort recruited first trimester pregnant women. PA and SB (sitting time and television time) before and during pregnancy were assessed as a part of an interview questionnaire at weeks 26-28 gestational clinic visit. Total energy expenditure (TEE) on PA and time in SB were calculated. Determinants of change in PA and SB were investigated using multiple logistic regression analysis. PA and SB questions were answered by 94 % (n = 1171) of total recruited subjects. A significant reduction in TEE was observed from before to during pregnancy [median 1746.0-1039.5 metabolic equivalent task (MET) min/week, p women insufficiently active (Women with higher household income, lower level of perceived health, nausea/vomiting during pregnancy and higher level of pre-pregnancy PA were more likely to reduce PA. Women with children were less likely to reduce PA. Women reporting nausea/vomiting and lower level of pre-pregnancy sitting time were more likely to increase sitting time. Participants substantially reduced PA and increased SB by 26-28 weeks of pregnancy. Further research is needed to better understand determinants of change in PA and SB and develop effective health promotion strategies.

  16. Technical note: Differences in the diurnal pattern of soil respiration under adjacent Miscanthus × giganteus and barley crops reveal potential flaws in accepted sampling strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Keane, J.; Ineson, Phil

    2017-03-01

    For convenience, measurements used to compare soil respiration (Rs) from different land uses, crops or management practices are often made between 09:00 and 16:00 UTC, convenience which is justified by an implicit assumption that Rs is largely controlled by temperature. Three months of continuous data presented here show distinctly different diurnal patterns of Rs between barley (Hordeum vulgare) and Miscanthus × giganteus (Miscanthus) grown on adjacent fields. Maximum Rs in barley occurred during the afternoon and correlated with soil temperature, whereas in Miscanthus after an initial early evening decline, Rs increased above the daily average during the night and in July maximum daily rates of Rs were seen at 22:00 and was significantly correlated with earlier levels of solar radiation, probably due to delays in translocation of recent photosynthate. Since the time of the daily mean Rs in Miscanthus occurred when Rs in the barley was 40 % greater than the daily mean, it is vital to select appropriate times to measure Rs especially if only single daily measurements are to be made.

  17. Apparatus for measurement of tree core density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blincow, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus is described for direct measurement of the density of a core sample from a tree. A radiation source and detector with a receptacle for the core therebetween, an integrator unit for the detector output, and an indicating meter driven by the integrator unit are described

  18. Intracommunity relationships, dispersal pattern and paternity success in a wild living community of Bonobos (Pan paniscus) determined from DNA analysis of faecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, U; Hartung, B; Fruth, B; Hohmann, G; Tautz, D

    1999-06-07

    Differences in social relationships among community members are often explained by differences in genetic relationships. The current techniques of DNA analysis allow explicit testing of such a hypothesis. Here, we have analysed the genetic relationships for a community of wild bonobos (Pan paniscus) using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers extracted from faecal samples. Bonobos show an opportunistic and promiscuous mating behaviour, even with mates from outside the community. Nonetheless, we find that most infants were sired by resident males and that two dominant males together attained the highest paternity success. Intriguingly, the latter males are the sons of high-ranking females, suggesting an important influence of mothers on the paternity success of their sons. The molecular data support previous inferences on female dispersal and male philopatry. We find a total of five different mitochondrial haplotypes among 15 adult females, suggesting a frequent migration of females. Moreover, for most adult and subadult males in the group we find a matching mother, while this is not the case for most females, indicating that these leave the community during adolescence. Our study demonstrates that faecal samples can be a useful source for the determination of kinship in a whole community.

  19. Heat transfer through the flat surface of Rutherford superconducting cable samples with novel pattern of electrical insulation immersed in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychalski, M.; Chorowski, M.; Polinski, J.

    2014-05-01

    Future accelerator magnets will be exposed to heat loads that exceed even by an order of magnitude presently observed heat fluxes transferred to superconducting magnet coils. To avoid the resistive transition of the superconducting cables, the efficiency of heat transfer between the magnet structure and the helium must be significantly increased. This can be achieved through the use of novel concepts of the cable’s electrical insulation wrapping, characterized by an enhanced permeability to helium while retaining sufficient electrical resistivity. This paper presents measurement results of the heat transfer through Rutherford NbTi cable samples immersed in a He II bath and subjected to the pressure loads simulating the counteracting of the Lorentz forces observed in powered magnets. The Rutherford cable samples that were tested used different electrical insulation wrapping schemes, including the scheme that is presently used and the proposed scheme for future LHC magnets. A new porous polyimide cable insulation with enhanced helium permeability was proposed in order to improve the evacuation of heat form the NbTi coil to He II bath. These tests were performed in a dedicated Claudet-type cryostat in pressurized He II at 1.9 K and 1 bar.

  20. Understanding core conductor fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D E

    2011-01-01

    ESD Association standard test method ANSI/ESD STM2.1 - Garments (STM2.1), provides electrical resistance test procedures that are applicable for materials and garments that have surface conductive or surface dissipative properties. As has been reported in other papers over the past several years 1 fabrics are now used in many industries for electrostatic control purposes that do not have surface conductive properties and therefore cannot be evaluated using the procedures in STM2.1 2 . A study was conducted to compare surface conductive fabrics with samples of core conductor fibre based fabrics in order to determine differences and similarities with regards to various electrostatic properties. This work will be used to establish a new work item proposal within WG-2, Garments, in the ESD Association Standards Committee in the USA.

  1. Trends in cigarette pricing and purchasing patterns in a sample of US smokers: findings from the ITC US Surveys (2002-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Monica E; Driezen, Pete; Hyland, Andrew; Fong, Geoffrey T; Chaloupka, Frank J; Cummings, K Michael

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines trends in cigarette prices and corresponding purchasing patterns over a 9-year period and explores characteristics associated with the quantity and location of cigarettes purchased by adult smokers in the USA. The data for this paper come from a nationally representative longitudinal survey of 6669 adult smokers (18 years and older) who were recruited and surveyed between 2002 and 2011. Telephone interviews were conducted annually, and smokers were asked a series of questions about the location, quantity (ie, single vs multiple packs or cartons) and price paid for their most recent cigarette purchase. Generalised estimating equations were used to assess trends and model characteristics associated with cigarette purchasing behaviours. Between 2002 and 2011, the reported purchase of cigarette cartons and the use of coupons declined while multipack purchases increased. Compared with those purchasing by single packs, those who purchased by multipacks and cartons saved an average of $0.53 and $1.63, respectively. Purchases in grocery and discount stores declined, while purchases in tobacco only outlets increased slightly. Female, older, white smokers were more likely to purchase cigarettes by the carton or in multipacks and in locations commonly associated with tax avoidance (ie, duty free shops, Indian reservations). As cigarette prices have risen, smokers have begun purchasing via multipacks instead of cartons. As carton sales have declined, purchases from grocery and discount stores have also declined, while an increasing number of smokers report low tax sources as their usual purchase location for cigarettes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Trends in Cigarette Pricing and Purchasing Patterns in a Sample of US Smokers: Findings from the ITC US Surveys (2002-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Monica E.; Driezen, Pete; Hyland, Andrew; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Cummings, K. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper examines trends in cigarette prices and corresponding purchasing patterns over a 9 year period and explores characteristics associated with the quantity and location of cigarettes purchased by adult smokers in the United States. Methods The data for this paper come from a nationally representative longitudinal survey of 6,669 adult smokers (18 years and older) who were recruited and surveyed between 2002 and 2011. Telephone interviews were conducted annually, and smokers were asked a series of questions about the location, quantity (i.e., single vs. multiple packs or cartons), and price paid for their most recent cigarette purchase. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess trends and model characteristics associated with cigarette purchasing behaviors. Results Between 2002 and 2011, the reported purchase of cigarette cartons and the use of coupons declined while multi-pack purchases increased. Compared with those purchasing by single packs, those who purchased by multi-packs and cartons saved an average of $0.53 and $1.63, respectively. Purchases in grocery and discount stores declined, while purchases in tobacco only outlets increased slightly. Female, older, white smokers were more likely to purchase cigarettes by the carton or in multi-packs and in locations commonly associated with tax avoidance (i.e., duty free shops, Indian reservations). Conclusions As cigarette prices have risen, smokers have begun purchasing via multi-packs instead of cartons. As carton sales have declined, purchases from grocery and discount stores have also declined, while an increasing number of smokers report low tax sources as their usual purchase location for cigarettes. PMID:24917617

  3. The origin of endodontic Enterococcus faecalis explored by comparison of virulence factor patterns and antibiotic resistance to that of isolates from stool samples, blood cultures and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidana, R; Rashid, M U; Özenci, V; Weintraub, A; Lund, B

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the origin of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from secondary root canal infections and the possibility for a foodborne transmission by comparing them to strains recovered from food, blood and stool regarding putative virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility profiles, where strains from common origin were hypothesized to harbour similar characteristics. A total of 108 E. faecalis strains recovered in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, were screened using PCR for putative virulence factors esp, cylA, gelE/gelatinase-negative phenotype (ef1841/fsrC), efaA, ace and asa1. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ampicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, gentamicin, vancomycin, ciprofloxacin and linezolid was determined using the agar dilution method. Next to strains from blood, the food isolates presented the highest average number of virulence determinants and were frequently enriched with asa1 coding for aggregation substance. None of the endodontic strains carried cylA, and the gelatinase-negative phenotype caused by a deletion dominated the group. Altogether, the most prevalent genes were gelE, efaA and ace, and a combination of them was equally present in approximately 80% of the strains from food, stool and root canals in comparison with 43.3% of the blood isolates. High-level resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was observed in 30% of the blood isolates, whereas the isolates from other origins, with single exceptions, were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Evidence for a foodborne transmission, explaining the high reported prevalence of E. faecalis in root filled teeth, could not be determined based on the similarities in virulence factor patterns and antibiotic susceptibility. The only linkage between isolates from food and root canals consisted of a shared common combination of the genes gelE, efaA and ace. The high occurrence of putative virulence traits in food isolates questions the safety of E. faecalis in food

  4. SMART core preliminary nuclear design-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Chan; Ji, Seong Kyun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1997-06-01

    Three loading patterns for 330 MWth SMART core are constructed for 25, 33 and 29 CRDMs, and one loading pattern for larger 69-FA core with 45 CRDMs is also constructed for comparison purpose. In this study, the core consists of 57 reduced height Korean Optimized Fuel Assemblies (KOFAs) developed by KAERI. The enrichment of fuel is 4.95 w/o. As a main burnable poison, 35% B-10 enriched B{sub 4}C-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shim is used. To control stuck rod worth, some gadolinia bearing fuel rods are used. The U-235 enrichment of the gadolinia bearing fuel rods is 1.8 w/o as used in KOFA. All patterns return cycle length of about 3 years. Three loading patterns except 25-CRDM pattern satisfy cold shutdown condition of keff {<=} 0.99 without soluble boron. These three patterns also satisfy the refueling condition of keff {<=} 0.95. In addition to the construction of loading pattern, an editing module of MASTER PPI files for rod power history generation is developed and rod power histories are generated for 29-CRDM loading pattern. Preliminary Fq design limit is suggested as 3.71 based on KOFA design experience. (author). 9 tabs., 45 figs., 16 refs.

  5. Early Patterns of Self-Regulation as Risk and Promotive Factors in Development: A Longitudinal Study from Childhood to Adulthood in a High-Risk Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causadias, José M; Salvatore, Jessica E; Sroufe, L Alan

    2012-07-01

    The present study examines two childhood markers of self-re