WorldWideScience

Sample records for core benchmark analyses

  1. BN-600 hybrid core benchmark analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.I.; Stanculescu, A.; Finck, P.; Hill, R.N.; Grimm, K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Benchmark analyses for the hybrid BN-600 reactor that contains three uranium enrichment zones and one plutonium zone in the core, have been performed within the frame of an IAEA sponsored Coordinated Research Project. The results for several relevant reactivity parameters obtained by the participants with their own state-of-the-art basic data and codes, were compared in terms of calculational uncertainty, and their effects on the ULOF transient behavior of the hybrid BN-600 core were evaluated. The comparison of the diffusion and transport results obtained for the homogeneous representation generally shows good agreement for most parameters between the RZ and HEX-Z models. The burnup effect and the heterogeneity effect on most reactivity parameters also show good agreement for the HEX-Z diffusion and transport theory results. A large difference noticed for the sodium and steel density coefficients is mainly due to differences in the spatial coefficient predictions for non fuelled regions. The burnup reactivity loss was evaluated to be 0.025 (4.3 $) within ∼ 5.0% standard deviation. The heterogeneity effect on most reactivity coefficients was estimated to be small. The heterogeneity treatment reduced the control rod worth by 2.3%. The heterogeneity effect on the k-eff and control rod worth appeared to differ strongly depending on the heterogeneity treatment method. A substantial spread noticed for several reactivity coefficients did not give a significant impact on the transient behavior prediction. This result is attributable to compensating effects between several reactivity effects and the specific design of the partially MOX fuelled hybrid core. (author)

  2. RB reactor benchmark cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1998-01-01

    A selected set of the RB reactor benchmark cores is presented in this paper. The first results of validation of the well-known Monte Carlo MCNP TM code and adjoining neutron cross section libraries are given. They confirm the idea for the proposal of the new U-D 2 O criticality benchmark system and support the intention to include this system in the next edition of the recent OECD/NEA Project: International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Experiment, in near future. (author)

  3. Core Benchmarks Descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Actual regulations while designing of new fuel cycles for nuclear power installations comprise a calculational justification to be performed by certified computer codes. It guarantees that obtained calculational results will be within the limits of declared uncertainties that are indicated in a certificate issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russian Federation (GAN) and concerning a corresponding computer code. A formal justification of declared uncertainties is the comparison of calculational results obtained by a commercial code with the results of experiments or of calculational tests that are calculated with an uncertainty defined by certified precision codes of MCU type or of other one. The actual level of international cooperation provides an enlarging of the bank of experimental and calculational benchmarks acceptable for a certification of commercial codes that are being used for a design of fuel loadings with MOX fuel. In particular, the work is practically finished on the forming of calculational benchmarks list for a certification of code TVS-M as applied to MOX fuel assembly calculations. The results on these activities are presented

  4. Prismatic Core Coupled Transient Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortensi, J.; Pope, M.A.; Strydom, G.; Sen, R.S.; DeHart, M.D.; Gougar, H.D.; Ellis, C.; Baxter, A.; Seker, V.; Downar, T.J.; Vierow, K.; Ivanov, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  5. Vver-1000 Mox core computational benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Science Committee has established an Expert Group that deals with the status and trends of reactor physics, fuel performance and fuel cycle issues related to disposing of weapons-grade plutonium in mixed-oxide fuel. The objectives of the group are to provide NEA member countries with up-to-date information on, and to develop consensus regarding, core and fuel cycle issues associated with burning weapons-grade plutonium in thermal water reactors (PWR, BWR, VVER-1000, CANDU) and fast reactors (BN-600). These issues concern core physics, fuel performance and reliability, and the capability and flexibility of thermal water reactors and fast reactors to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium in standard fuel cycles. The activities of the NEA Expert Group on Reactor-based Plutonium Disposition are carried out in close co-operation (jointly, in most cases) with the NEA Working Party on Scientific Issues in Reactor Systems (WPRS). A prominent part of these activities include benchmark studies. At the time of preparation of this report, the following benchmarks were completed or in progress: VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); VVER-1000 LEU and MOX Benchmark (completed); KRITZ-2 Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); Hollow and Solid MOX Fuel Behaviour Benchmark (completed); PRIMO MOX Fuel Performance Benchmark (ongoing); VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled Reactor Dosimetry Calculation (ongoing); VVER-1000 In-core Self-powered Neutron Detector Calculational Benchmark (started); MOX Fuel Rod Behaviour in Fast Power Pulse Conditions (started); Benchmark on the VENUS Plutonium Recycling Experiments Configuration 7 (started). This report describes the detailed results of the benchmark investigating the physics of a whole VVER-1000 reactor core using two-thirds low-enriched uranium (LEU) and one-third MOX fuel. It contributes to the computer code certification process and to the

  6. Results of LWR core transient benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnemann, H.; Bauer, H.; Galati, A.; Martinelli, R.

    1993-10-01

    LWR core transient (LWRCT) benchmarks, based on well defined problems with a complete set of input data, are used to assess the discrepancies between three-dimensional space-time kinetics codes in transient calculations. The PWR problem chosen is the ejection of a control assembly from an initially critical core at hot zero power or at full power, each for three different geometrical configurations. The set of problems offers a variety of reactivity excursions which efficiently test the coupled neutronic/thermal - hydraulic models of the codes. The 63 sets of submitted solutions are analyzed by comparison with a nodal reference solution defined by using a finer spatial and temporal resolution than in standard calculations. The BWR problems considered are reactivity excursions caused by cold water injection and pressurization events. In the present paper, only the cold water injection event is discussed and evaluated in some detail. Lacking a reference solution the evaluation of the 8 sets of BWR contributions relies on a synthetic comparative discussion. The results of this first phase of LWRCT benchmark calculations are quite satisfactory, though there remain some unresolved issues. It is therefore concluded that even more challenging problems can be successfully tackled in a suggested second test phase. (authors). 46 figs., 21 tabs., 3 refs

  7. A 3D stylized half-core CANDU benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pounders, Justin M.; Rahnema, Farzad; Serghiuta, Dumitru; Tholammakkil, John

    2011-01-01

    A 3D stylized half-core Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor benchmark problem is presented. The benchmark problem is comprised of a heterogeneous lattice of 37-element natural uranium fuel bundles, heavy water moderated, heavy water cooled, with adjuster rods included as reactivity control devices. Furthermore, a 2-group macroscopic cross section library has been developed for the problem to increase the utility of this benchmark for full-core deterministic transport methods development. Monte Carlo results are presented for the benchmark problem in cooled, checkerboard void, and full coolant void configurations.

  8. Recriticality analyses for CAPRA cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Thiem, D.

    1995-01-01

    The first scoping calculation performed show that the energetics levels from recriticalities in CAPRA cores are in the same range as in conventional cores. However, considerable uncertainties exist and further analyses are necessary. Additional investigations are performed for the separation scenarios of fuel/steel/inert and matrix material as a large influence of these processes on possible ramp rates and kinetics parameters was detected in the calculations. (orig./HP)

  9. Recriticality analyses for CAPRA cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschek, W.; Thiem, D.

    1995-08-01

    The first scoping calculation performed show that the energetics levels from recriticalities in CAPRA cores are in the same range as in conventional cores. However, considerable uncertainties exist and further analyses are necessary. Additional investigations are performed for the separation scenarios of fuel/steel/inert and matrix material as a large influence of these processes on possible ramp rates and kinetics parameters was detected in the calculations. (orig./HP)

  10. In-core fuel management benchmarks for PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    Under its in-core fuel management activities, the IAEA set up two co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on complete in-core fuel management code packages. At a consultant meeting in November 1988 the outline of the CRP on in-core fuel management benchmars for PHWRs was prepared, three benchmarks were specified and the corresponding parameters were defined. At the first research co-ordination meeting in December 1990, seven more benchmarks were specified. The objective of this TECDOC is to provide reference cases for the verification of code packages used for reactor physics and fuel management of PHWRs. 91 refs, figs, tabs

  11. Multi-Core Processor Memory Contention Benchmark Analysis Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tyler; McGalliard, James

    2009-01-01

    Multi-core processors dominate current mainframe, server, and high performance computing (HPC) systems. This paper provides synthetic kernel and natural benchmark results from an HPC system at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that illustrate the performance impacts of multi-core (dual- and quad-core) vs. single core processor systems. Analysis of processor design, application source code, and synthetic and natural test results all indicate that multi-core processors can suffer from significant memory subsystem contention compared to similar single-core processors.

  12. Analysis of a multigroup stylized CANDU half-core benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pounders, Justin M.; Rahnema, Farzad; Serghiuta, Dumitru

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper provides a benchmark that is a stylized model problem in more than two energy groups that is realistic with respect to the underlying physics. → An 8-group cross section library is provided to augment a previously published 2-group 3D stylized half-core CANDU benchmark problem. → Reference eigenvalues and selected pin and bundle fission rates are included. → 2-, 4- and 47-group Monte Carlo solutions are compared to analyze homogenization-free transport approximations that result from energy condensation. - Abstract: An 8-group cross section library is provided to augment a previously published 2-group 3D stylized half-core Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor benchmark problem. Reference eigenvalues and selected pin and bundle fission rates are also included. This benchmark is intended to provide computational reactor physicists and methods developers with a stylized model problem in more than two energy groups that is realistic with respect to the underlying physics. In addition to transport theory code verification, the 8-group energy structure provides reactor physicist with an ideal problem for examining cross section homogenization and collapsing effects in a full-core environment. To this end, additional 2-, 4- and 47-group full-core Monte Carlo benchmark solutions are compared to analyze homogenization-free transport approximations incurred as a result of energy group condensation.

  13. Overview of cooperative international piping benchmark analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an effort initiated in 1976 by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to evaluate detailed and simplified inelastic analysis methods for piping systems with particular emphasis on piping bends. The procedure was to collect from participating member IAEA countries descriptions of tests and test results for piping systems or bends (with emphasis on high temperature inelastic tests), to compile, evaluate, and issue a selected number of these problems for analysis, and to compile and make a preliminary evaluation of the analyses results. Of the problem descriptions submitted three were selected to be used: a 90 0 -elbow at 600 0 C with an in-plane transverse force; a 90 0 -elbow with an in-plane moment; and a 180 0 -elbow at room temperature with a reversed, cyclic, in-plane transverse force. A variety of both detailed and simplified analysis solutions were obtained. A brief comparative assessment of the analyses is contained in this paper. 15 figures

  14. Track 3: growth of nuclear technology and research numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-I. 5. Analyses of the OECD MSLB Benchmark with the Codes DYN3D and DYN3D/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.

    2001-01-01

    The code DYN3D coupled with ATHLET was used for the analysis of the OECD Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark, which is based on real plant design and operational data of the TMI-1 pressurized water reactor (PWR). Like the codes RELAP or TRAC,ATHLET is a thermal-hydraulic system code with point or one-dimensional neutron kinetic models. ATHLET, developed by the Gesellschaft for Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, is widely used in Germany for safety analyses of nuclear power plants. DYN3D consists of three-dimensional nodal kinetic models and a thermal-hydraulic part with parallel coolant channels of the reactor core. DYN3D was coupled with ATHLET for analyzing more complex transients with interactions between coolant flow conditions and core behavior. It can be applied to the whole spectrum of operational transients and accidents, from small and intermediate leaks to large breaks of coolant loops or steam lines at PWRs and boiling water reactors. The so-called external coupling is used for the benchmark, where the thermal hydraulics is split into two parts: DYN3D describes the thermal hydraulics of the core, while ATHLET models the coolant system. Three exercises of the benchmark were simulated: Exercise 1: point kinetics plant simulation (ATHLET) Exercise 2: coupled three-dimensional neutronics/core thermal-hydraulics evaluation of the core response for given core thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions (DYN3D) Exercise 3: best-estimate coupled core-plant transient analysis (DYN3D/ATHLET). Considering the best-estimate cases (scenarios 1 of exercises 2 and 3), the reactor does not reach criticality after the reactor trip. Defining more serious tests for the codes, the efficiency of the control rods was decreased (scenarios 2 of exercises 2 and 3) to obtain recriticality during the transient. Besides the standard simulation given by the specification, modifications are introduced for sensitivity studies. The results presented here show (a) the influence of a reduced

  15. Monte Carlo benchmark calculations for 400MWTH PBMR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. Y.; Noh, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    A large interest in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) has been initiated in connection with hydrogen production in recent years. In this study, as a part of work for establishing Monte Carlo computation system for HTGR core analysis, some benchmark calculations for pebble-type HTGR were carried out using MCNP5 code. The core of the 400MW t h Pebble-bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) was selected as a benchmark model. Recently, the IAEA CRP5 neutronics and thermal-hydraulics benchmark problem was proposed for the testing of existing methods for HTGRs to analyze the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic behavior for the design and safety evaluations of the PBMR. This study deals with the neutronic benchmark problems, for fresh fuel and cold conditions (Case F-1), and first core loading with given number densities (Case F-2), proposed for PBMR. After the detailed MCNP modeling of the whole facility, benchmark calculations were performed. Spherical fuel region of a fuel pebble is divided into cubic lattice element in order to model a fuel pebble which contains, on average, 15000 CFPs (Coated Fuel Particles). Each element contains one CFP at its center. In this study, the side length of each cubic lattice element to have the same amount of fuel was calculated to be 0.1635 cm. The remaining volume of each lattice element was filled with graphite. All of different 5 concentric shells of CFP were modeled. The PBMR annular core consists of approximately 452000 pebbles in the benchmark problems. In Case F-1 where the core was filled with only fresh fuel pebble, a BCC(body-centered-cubic) lattice model was employed in order to achieve the random packing core with the packing fraction of 0.61. The BCC lattice was also employed with the size of the moderator pebble increased in a manner that reproduces the specified F/M ratio of 1:2 while preserving the packing fraction of 0.61 in Case F-2. The calculations were pursued with ENDF/B-VI cross-section library and used sab2002 S(α,

  16. Proposal of a benchmark for core burnup calculations for a VVER-1000 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loetsch, T.; Khalimonchuk, V.; Kuchin, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of a project supported by the German BMU the code DYN3D should be further validated and verified. During the work a lack of a benchmark on core burnup calculations for VVER-1000 reactors was noticed. Such a benchmark is useful for validating and verifying the whole package of codes and data libraries for reactor physics calculations including fuel assembly modelling, fuel assembly data preparation, few group data parametrisation and reactor core modelling. The benchmark proposed specifies the core loading patterns of burnup cycles for a VVER-1000 reactor core as well as a set of operational data such as load follow, boron concentration in the coolant, cycle length, measured reactivity coefficients and power density distributions. The reactor core characteristics chosen for comparison and the first results obtained during the work with the reactor physics code DYN3D are presented. This work presents the continuation of efforts of the projects mentioned to estimate the accuracy of calculated characteristics of VVER-1000 reactor cores. In addition, the codes used for reactor physics calculations of safety related reactor core characteristics should be validated and verified for the cases in which they are to be used. This is significant for safety related evaluations and assessments carried out in the framework of licensing and supervision procedures in the field of reactor physics. (authors)

  17. Benchmarking von Krankenhausinformationssystemen – eine vergleichende Analyse deutschsprachiger Benchmarkingcluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn, Franziska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is a method of strategic information management used by many hospitals today. During the last years, several benchmarking clusters have been established within the German-speaking countries. They support hospitals in comparing and positioning their information system’s and information management’s costs, performance and efficiency against other hospitals. In order to differentiate between these benchmarking clusters and to provide decision support in selecting an appropriate benchmarking cluster, a classification scheme is developed. The classification scheme observes both general conditions and examined contents of the benchmarking clusters. It is applied to seven benchmarking clusters which have been active in the German-speaking countries within the last years. Currently, performance benchmarking is the most frequent benchmarking type, whereas the observed benchmarking clusters differ in the number of benchmarking partners and their cooperation forms. The benchmarking clusters also deal with different benchmarking subjects. Assessing costs and quality application systems, physical data processing systems, organizational structures of information management and IT services processes are the most frequent benchmarking subjects. There is still potential for further activities within the benchmarking clusters to measure strategic and tactical information management, IT governance and quality of data and data-processing processes. Based on the classification scheme and the comparison of the benchmarking clusters, we derive general recommendations for benchmarking of hospital information systems.

  18. Preliminary analysis of the proposed BN-600 benchmark core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research is actively involved in the design of Fast Power Reactors in India. The core physics calculations are performed by the computer codes that are developed in-house or by the codes obtained from other laboratories and suitably modified to meet the computational requirements. The basic philosophy of the core physics calculations is to use the diffusion theory codes with the 25 group nuclear cross sections. The parameters that are very sensitive is the core leakage, like the power distribution at the core blanket interface etc. are calculated using transport theory codes under the DSN approximations. All these codes use the finite difference approximation as the method to treat the spatial variation of the neutron flux. Criticality problems having geometries that are irregular to be represented by the conventional codes are solved using Monte Carlo methods. These codes and methods have been validated by the analysis of various critical assemblies and calculational benchmarks. Reactor core design procedure at IGCAR consists of: two and three dimensional diffusion theory calculations (codes ALCIALMI and 3DB); auxiliary calculations, (neutron balance, power distributions, etc. are done by codes that are developed in-house); transport theory corrections from two dimensional transport calculations (DOT); irregular geometry treated by Monte Carlo method (KENO); cross section data library used CV2M (25 group)

  19. Analysis on First Criticality Benchmark Calculation of HTR-10 Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuhair; Ferhat-Aziz; As-Natio-Lasman

    2000-01-01

    HTR-10 is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas cooled pebble bed reactor with an average helium outlet temperature of 700 o C and thermal power of 10 MW. The first criticality benchmark problem of HTR-10 in this paper includes the loading number calculation of nuclear fuel in the form of UO 2 ball with U-235 enrichment of 17% for the first criticality under the helium atmosphere and core temperature of 20 o C, and the effective multiplication factor (k eff ) calculation of full core (5 m 3 ) under the helium atmosphere and various core temperatures. The group constants of fuel mixture, moderator and reflector materials were generated with WlMS/D4 using spherical model and 4 neutron energy group. The critical core height of 150.1 cm obtained from CITATION in 2-D R-Z reactor geometry exists in the calculation range of INET China, JAERI Japan and BATAN Indonesia, and OKBM Russia. The k eff calculation result of full core at various temperatures shows that the HTR-10 has negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. (author)

  20. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Meylianti S., Brigita

    1999-01-01

    Benchmarking has different meaning to different people. There are five types of benchmarking, namely internal benchmarking, competitive benchmarking, industry / functional benchmarking, process / generic benchmarking and collaborative benchmarking. Each type of benchmarking has its own advantages as well as disadvantages. Therefore it is important to know what kind of benchmarking is suitable to a specific application. This paper will discuss those five types of benchmarking in detail, includ...

  1. Reactor physics tests and benchmark analyses of STACY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Umano, Takuya

    1996-01-01

    The Static Experiment Critical Facility, STACY in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, NUCEF is a solution type critical facility to accumulate fundamental criticality data on uranyl nitrate solution, plutonium nitrate solution and their mixture. A series of critical experiments have been performed for 10 wt% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using a cylindrical core tank. In these experiments, systematic data of the critical height, differential reactivity of the fuel solution, kinetic parameter and reactor power were measured with changing the uranium concentration of the fuel solution from 313 gU/l to 225 gU/l. Critical data through the first series of experiments for the basic core are reported in this paper for evaluating the accuracy of the criticality safety calculation codes. Benchmark calculations of the neutron multiplication factor k eff for the critical condition were made using a neutron transport code TWOTRAN in the SRAC system and a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP 4A with a Japanese evaluated nuclear data library, JENDL 3.2. (J.P.N.)

  2. Benchmarking NWP Kernels on Multi- and Many-core Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakes, J.; Vachharajani, M.

    2008-12-01

    Increased computing power for weather, climate, and atmospheric science has provided direct benefits for defense, agriculture, the economy, the environment, and public welfare and convenience. Today, very large clusters with many thousands of processors are allowing scientists to move forward with simulations of unprecedented size. But time-critical applications such as real-time forecasting or climate prediction need strong scaling: faster nodes and processors, not more of them. Moreover, the need for good cost- performance has never been greater, both in terms of performance per watt and per dollar. For these reasons, the new generations of multi- and many-core processors being mass produced for commercial IT and "graphical computing" (video games) are being scrutinized for their ability to exploit the abundant fine- grain parallelism in atmospheric models. We present results of our work to date identifying key computational kernels within the dynamics and physics of a large community NWP model, the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. We benchmark and optimize these kernels on several different multi- and many-core processors. The goals are to (1) characterize and model performance of the kernels in terms of computational intensity, data parallelism, memory bandwidth pressure, memory footprint, etc. (2) enumerate and classify effective strategies for coding and optimizing for these new processors, (3) assess difficulties and opportunities for tool or higher-level language support, and (4) establish a continuing set of kernel benchmarks that can be used to measure and compare effectiveness of current and future designs of multi- and many-core processors for weather and climate applications.

  3. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abanades, Alberto; Aliberti, Gerardo; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto; Bornos, Victor; Kiyavitskaya, Anna; Carta, Mario; Janczyszyn, Jerzy; Maiorino, Jose; Pyeon, Cheolho; Stanculescu, Alexander; Titarenko, Yury; Westmeier, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    In December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has started a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department, is to increase the capability of interested Member States in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative sub-critical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a sub-critical core and an external neutron source (e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)). The objective of these experimental programs is to validate computational methods, obtain high energy nuclear data, characterize the performance of sub-critical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for sub-criticality monitoring. The paper summarizes preliminary results obtained to-date for some of the CRP benchmarks. (authors)

  4. Benchmark for Neutronic Analysis of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor Cores with Various Fuel Types and Core Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauff, N.E.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Buiron, L.; Rimpault, G.; Brun, E.; Lee, Y.K.; Pataki, I.; Kereszturi, A.; Tota, A.; Parisi, C.; Fridman, E.; Guilliard, N.; Kugo, T.; Sugino, K.; Uematsu, M.M.; Ponomarev, A.; Messaoudi, N.; Lin Tan, R.; Kozlowski, T.; Bernnat, W.; Blanchet, D.; Brun, E.; Buiron, L.; Fridman, E.; Guilliard, N.; Kereszturi, A.; Kim, T.K.; Kozlowski, T.; Kugo, T.; Lee, Y.K.; Lin Tan, R.; Messaoudi, N.; Parisi, C.; Pataki, I.; Ponomarev, A.; Rimpault, G.; Stauff, N.E.; Sugino, K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Tota, A.; Uematsu, M.M.; Monti, S.; Yamaji, A.; Nakahara, Y.; Gulliford, J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the foremost Generation IV International Forum (GIF) objectives is to design nuclear reactor cores that can passively avoid damage of the reactor when control rods fail to scram in response to postulated accident initiators (e.g. inadvertent reactivity insertion or loss of coolant flow). The analysis of such unprotected transients depends primarily on the physical properties of the fuel and the reactivity feedback coefficients of the core. Within the activities of the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS), the Sodium Fast Reactor core Feed-back and Transient response (SFR-FT) Task Force was proposed to evaluate core performance characteristics of several Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) concepts. A set of four numerical benchmark cases was initially developed with different core sizes and fuel types in order to perform neutronic characterisation, evaluation of the feedback coefficients and transient calculations. Two 'large' SFR core designs were proposed by CEA: those generate 3 600 MW(th) and employ oxide and carbide fuel technologies. Two 'medium' SFR core designs proposed by ANL complete the set. These medium SFR cores generate 1 000 MW(th) and employ oxide and metallic fuel technologies. The present report summarises the results obtained by the WPRS for the neutronic characterisation benchmark exercise proposed. The benchmark definition is detailed in Chapter 2. Eleven institutions contributed to this benchmark: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives (CEA of Cadarache), Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives (CEA of Saclay), Centre for Energy Research (CER-EK), Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT

  5. CFD-calculations to a core catcher benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.G.

    1999-04-01

    There are numerous experiments for the exploration of the corium spreading behaviour, but comparable data have not been available up to now in the field of the long term behaviour of a corium expanded in a core catcher. The difficulty consists in the experimental simulation of the decay heat that can be neglected for the short-run course of events like relocation and spreading, which must, however, be considered during investigation of the long time behaviour. Therefore the German GRS, defined together with Battelle Ingenieurtechnik a benchmark problem in order to determine particular problems and differences of CFD codes simulating an expanded corium and from this, requirements for a reasonable measurement of experiments, that will be performed later. First the finite-volume-codes Comet 1.023, CFX 4.2 and CFX-TASCflow were used. To be able to make comparisons to a finite-element-code, now calculations are performed at the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf with the code ANSYS/FLOTRAN. For the benchmark calculations of stage 1 a pure and liquid melt with internal heat sources was assumed uniformly distributed over the area of the planned core catcher of a EPR plant. Using the Standard-k-ε-turbulence model and assuming an initial state of a motionless superheated melt several large convection rolls will establish within the melt pool. The temperatures at the surface do not sink to a solidification level due to the enhanced convection heat transfer. The temperature gradients at the surface are relatively flat while there are steep gradients at the ground where the no slip condition is applied. But even at the ground no solidification temperatures are observed. Although the problem in the ANSYS-calculations is handled two-dimensional and not three-dimensional like in the finite-volume-codes, there are no fundamental deviations to the results of the other codes. (orig.)

  6. IAEA coordinated research project on 'analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait-Abderrahim, H.; Stanculescu, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides the general background and the main specifications of the benchmark exercises performed within the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Dept., is to contribute to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e. heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. (authors)

  7. Benchmarking multi-dimensional large strain consolidation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priestley, D.; Fredlund, M.D.; Van Zyl, D.

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing the consolidation of tailings slurries and dredged fills requires a more extensive formulation than is used for common (small strain) consolidation problems. Large strain consolidation theories have traditionally been limited to 1-D formulations. SoilVision Systems has developed the capacity to analyze large strain consolidation problems in 2 and 3-D. The benchmarking of such formulations is not a trivial task. This paper presents several examples of modeling large strain consolidation in the beta versions of the new software. These examples were taken from the literature and were used to benchmark the large strain formulation used by the new software. The benchmarks reported here are: a comparison to the consolidation software application CONDES0, Townsend's Scenario B and a multi-dimensional analysis of long-term column tests performed on oil sands tailings. All three of these benchmarks were attained using the SVOffice suite. (author)

  8. WWER in-core fuel management benchmark definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolov, T.; Alekova, G.; Prodanova, R.; Petrova, T.; Ivanov, K.

    1994-01-01

    Two benchmark problems for WWER-440, including design parameters, operating conditions and measured quantities are discussed in this paper. Some benchmark results for infinitive multiplication factor -K eff , natural boron concentration - C β and relative power distribution - K q obtained by use of the code package are represented. (authors). 5 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Evaluation of the computer code system RADHEAT-V4 by analysing benchmark problems on radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1990-11-01

    A computer code system RADHEAT-V4 has been developed for safety evaluation on radiation shielding of nuclear fuel facilities. To evaluate the performance of the code system, 18 benchmark problem were selected and analysed. Evaluated radiations are neutron and gamma-ray. Benchmark problems consist of penetration, streaming and skyshine. The computed results show more accurate than those by the Sn codes ANISN and DOT3.5 or the Monte Carlo code MORSE. Big core memory and many times I/O are, however, required for RADHEAT-V4. (author)

  10. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  11. Benchmark exercises on PWR level-1 PSA (step 3). Analyses of accident sequence and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Yuji; Takahashi, Hideaki.

    1996-01-01

    The results of level 1 PSA generate fluctuations due to the assumptions based on several engineering judgements set in the stages of PSA analysis. On the purpose of the investigation of uncertainties due to assumptions, three kinds of a standard problem, what we call benchmark exercise have been set. In this report, sensitivity studies (benchmark exercise) of sequence analyses are treated and conclusions are mentioned. The treatment of inter-system dependency would generate uncertainly of PSA. In addition, as a conclusion of the PSA benchmark exercise, several findings in the sequence analysis together with previous benchmark analyses in earlier INSS Journals are treated. (author)

  12. Experimental benchmark for piping system dynamic response analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, G.A.; Mallett, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The scope and status of a piping system dynamics test program are described. A 0.20-m nominal diameter test piping specimen is designed to be representative of main heat transport system piping of LMFBR plants. Attention is given to representing piping restraints. Applied loadings consider component-induced vibration as well as seismic excitation. The principal objective of the program is to provide a benchmark for verification of piping design methods by correlation of predicted and measured responses. Pre-test analysis results and correlation methods are discussed. 3 refs

  13. Experimental benchmark for piping system dynamic-response analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of a piping system dynamics test program. A 0.20 m(8 in.) nominal diameter test piping specimen is designed to be representative of main heat transport system piping of LMFBR plants. Particular attention is given to representing piping restraints. Applied loadings consider component-induced vibration as well as seismic excitation. The principal objective of the program is to provide a benchmark for verification of piping design methods by correlation of predicted and measured responses. Pre-test analysis results and correlation methods are discussed

  14. Solution of the 'MIDICORE' WWER-1000 core periphery power distribution benchmark by KARATE and MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temesvari, E.; Hegyi, G.; Hordosy, G.; Maraczy, C.

    2011-01-01

    The 'MIDICORE' WWER-1000 core periphery power distribution benchmark was proposed by Mr. Mikolas on the twentieth Symposium of AER in Finland in 2010. This MIDICORE benchmark is a two-dimensional calculation benchmark based on the WWER-1000 reactor core cold state geometry with taking into account the geometry of explicit radial reflector. The main task of the benchmark is to test the pin by pin power distribution in selected fuel assemblies at the periphery of the WWER-1000 core. In this paper we present our results (k eff , integral fission power) calculated by MCNP and the KARATE code system in KFKI-AEKI and the comparison to the preliminary reference Monte Carlo calculation results made by NRI, Rez. (Authors)

  15. HEP specific benchmarks of virtual machines on multi-core CPU architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alef, M; Gable, I

    2010-01-01

    Virtualization technologies such as Xen can be used in order to satisfy the disparate and often incompatible system requirements of different user groups in shared-use computing facilities. This capability is particularly important for HEP applications, which often have restrictive requirements. The use of virtualization adds flexibility, however, it is essential that the virtualization technology place little overhead on the HEP application. We present an evaluation of the practicality of running HEP applications in multiple Virtual Machines (VMs) on a single multi-core Linux system. We use the benchmark suite used by the HEPiX CPU Benchmarking Working Group to give a quantitative evaluation relevant to the HEP community. Benchmarks are packaged inside VMs and then the VMs are booted onto a single multi-core system. Benchmarks are then simultaneously executed on each VM to simulate highly loaded VMs running HEP applications. These techniques are applied to a variety of multi-core CPU architectures and VM configurations.

  16. An analytical model for the study of a small LFR core dynamics: development and benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortot, S.; Cammi, A.; Lorenzi, S.; Moisseytsev, A.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical model for the study of a small Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) control-oriented dynamics has been developed aimed at providing a useful, very flexible and straightforward, though accurate, tool allowing relatively quick transient design-basis and stability analyses. A simplified lumped-parameter approach has been adopted to couple neutronics and thermal-hydraulics: the point-kinetics approximation has been employed and an average-temperature heat-exchange model has been implemented. The reactor transient responses following postulated accident initiators such as Unprotected Control Rod Withdrawal (UTOP), Loss of Heat Sink (ULOHS) and Loss of Flow (ULOF) have been studied for a MOX and a metal-fuelled core at the Beginning of Cycle (BoC) and End of Cycle (EoC) configurations. A benchmark analysis has been then performed by means of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System, in which a core model based on three representative channels has been built with the purpose of providing verification for the analytical outcomes and indicating how the latter relate to more realistic one-dimensional calculations. As a general result, responses concerning the main core characteristics (namely, power, reactivity, etc.) have turned out to be mutually consistent in terms of both steady-state absolute figures and transient developments, showing discrepancies of the order of only some percents, thus confirming a very satisfactory agreement. (author)

  17. Analysis of the European results on the HTTR's core physics benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, X.; Damian, F.; Ohlig, U.A.; Brockmann, H.J.; Haas, J.B.M. de; Wallerboss, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Within the frame of the European contract HTR-N1 calculations are performed on the benchmark problems of the HTTR's start-up core physics experiments initially proposed by the IAEA in a Co-ordinated Research Programme. Three European partners, the FZJ in Germany, NRG and IRI in the Netherlands, and CEA in France, have joined this work package with the aim to validate their calculational methods. Pre-test and post-test calculational results, obtained by the partners, are compared with each other and with the experiment. Parts of the discrepancies between experiment and pre-test predictions are analysed and tackled by different treatments. In the case of the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4, used by CEA, the discrepancy between measurement and calculation at the first criticality is reduced to Δk/k∼0.85%, when considering the revised data of the HTTR benchmark. In the case of the diffusion codes, this discrepancy is reduced to: Δk/k∼0.8% (FZJ) and 2.7 or 1.8% (CEA). (author)

  18. Integral Full Core Multi-Physics PWR Benchmark with Measured Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord; Kumar, Shikhar; Rathbun, Miriam; Liang, Jingang

    2018-04-11

    In recent years, the importance of modeling and simulation has been highlighted extensively in the DOE research portfolio with concrete examples in nuclear engineering with the CASL and NEAMS programs. These research efforts and similar efforts worldwide aim at the development of high-fidelity multi-physics analysis tools for the simulation of current and next-generation nuclear power reactors. Like all analysis tools, verification and validation is essential to guarantee proper functioning of the software and methods employed. The current approach relies mainly on the validation of single physic phenomena (e.g. critical experiment, flow loops, etc.) and there is a lack of relevant multiphysics benchmark measurements that are necessary to validate high-fidelity methods being developed today. This work introduces a new multi-cycle full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) depletion benchmark based on two operational cycles of a commercial nuclear power plant that provides a detailed description of fuel assemblies, burnable absorbers, in-core fission detectors, core loading and re-loading patterns. This benchmark enables analysts to develop extremely detailed reactor core models that can be used for testing and validation of coupled neutron transport, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel isotopic depletion. The benchmark also provides measured reactor data for Hot Zero Power (HZP) physics tests, boron letdown curves, and three-dimensional in-core flux maps from 58 instrumented assemblies. The benchmark description is now available online and has been used by many groups. However, much work remains to be done on the quantification of uncertainties and modeling sensitivities. This work aims to address these deficiencies and make this benchmark a true non-proprietary international benchmark for the validation of high-fidelity tools. This report details the BEAVRS uncertainty quantification for the first two cycle of operations and serves as the final report of the project.

  19. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, Alberto [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Aliberti, Gerardo; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [ANL, Argonne (United States); Bornos, Victor; Kiyavitskaya, Anna [Joint Institute of Power Eng. and Nucl. Research ' Sosny' , Minsk (Belarus); Carta, Mario [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy); Janczyszyn, Jerzy [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Maiorino, Jose [IPEN, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pyeon, Cheolho [Kyoto University (Japan); Stanculescu, Alexander [IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Titarenko, Yury [ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation); Westmeier, Wolfram [Wolfram Westmeier GmbH, Ebsdorfergrund (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has started a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department, is to increase the capability of interested Member States in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative sub-critical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a sub-critical core and an external neutron source (e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)). The objective of these experimental programs is to validate computational methods, obtain high energy nuclear data, characterize the performance of sub-critical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for sub-criticality monitoring. The paper summarizes preliminary results obtained to-date for some of the CRP benchmarks. (authors)

  20. Analysis of Homogeneous BFS-73-1 MA Benchmark Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong Il; Yoo, Jae Woon; Song, Hoon; Jang, Jin Wook; Kim, Yeong Il

    2007-06-15

    Analysis of BFS-73-1 critical assembly for MA transmutation has been carried out by using K-CORE system mainly, DIF3D code. All of measured data are compared with the results of analysis and sensitiveness of calculation conditions, for example, number of neutron energy groups, mesh size used, and analysis method, are assessed. Effective multiplication factor was in good agreement within experimental uncertainty in both transport and diffusion calculations. Fission rate distribution of U-235 and U-238 is also fairly good agreed with experimental results within maximum 5% in core region. But large discrepancy was seen in blanket region and it tends to increase as the location closes to core boundary. Largest error of relative reaction rate ratio was seen in Am-243 fission and U-238 capture. For the case of Am-243, the error lay on appropriate range considering the measurement uncertainty of that as 4.6%. Sample reactivity worths for scattering dominant isotope was greatly differ from the experimental results, which can be explained in terms of sample heterogeneity effect, sample self shielding and finally resonance bilinear correction effect. These effects will be evaluated as future study. C/E of effective delayed neutron fraction is within 4%, which is within the measurement uncertainty.

  1. Analysis of Homogeneous BFS-73-1 MA Benchmark Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Il; Yoo, Jae Woon; Song, Hoon; Jang, Jin Wook; Kim, Yeong Il

    2007-06-01

    Analysis of BFS-73-1 critical assembly for MA transmutation has been carried out by using K-CORE system mainly, DIF3D code. All of measured data are compared with the results of analysis and sensitiveness of calculation conditions, for example, number of neutron energy groups, mesh size used, and analysis method, are assessed. Effective multiplication factor was in good agreement within experimental uncertainty in both transport and diffusion calculations. Fission rate distribution of U-235 and U-238 is also fairly good agreed with experimental results within maximum 5% in core region. But large discrepancy was seen in blanket region and it tends to increase as the location closes to core boundary. Largest error of relative reaction rate ratio was seen in Am-243 fission and U-238 capture. For the case of Am-243, the error lay on appropriate range considering the measurement uncertainty of that as 4.6%. Sample reactivity worths for scattering dominant isotope was greatly differ from the experimental results, which can be explained in terms of sample heterogeneity effect, sample self shielding and finally resonance bilinear correction effect. These effects will be evaluated as future study. C/E of effective delayed neutron fraction is within 4%, which is within the measurement uncertainty

  2. ZZ-PBMR-400, OECD/NEA PBMR Coupled Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics Transient Benchmark - The PBMR-400 Core Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Description of benchmark: This international benchmark, concerns Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transients based on the PBMR-400 MW design. The deterministic neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and transient analysis tools and methods available to design and analyse PBMRs lag, in many cases, behind the state of the art compared to other reactor technologies. This has motivated the testing of existing methods for HTGRs but also the development of more accurate and efficient tools to analyse the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic behaviour for the design and safety evaluations of the PBMR. In addition to the development of new methods, this includes defining appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The scope of the benchmark is to establish well-defined problems, based on a common given set of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events through a set of multi-dimensional computational test problems. The benchmark exercise has the following objectives: - Establish a standard benchmark for coupled codes (neutronics/thermal-hydraulics) for PBMR design; - Code-to-code comparison using a common cross section library ; - Obtain a detailed understanding of the events and the processes; - Benefit from different approaches, understanding limitations and approximations. Major Design and Operating Characteristics of the PBMR (PBMR Characteristic and Value): Installed thermal capacity: 400 MW(t); Installed electric capacity: 165 MW(e); Load following capability: 100-40-100%; Availability: ≥ 95%; Core configuration: Vertical with fixed centre graphite reflector; Fuel: TRISO ceramic coated U-235 in graphite spheres; Primary coolant: Helium; Primary coolant pressure: 9 MPa; Moderator: Graphite; Core outlet temperature: 900 C.; Core inlet temperature: 500 C.; Cycle type: Direct; Number of circuits: 1; Cycle

  3. VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmark: Results of ORNL Calculations Using HELIOS-1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, RJ

    2001-02-02

    The Task Force on Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition, now an Expert Group, was set up through the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency to facilitate technical assessments of burning weapons-grade plutonium mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in U.S. pressurized-water reactors and Russian VVER nuclear reactors. More than ten countries participated to advance the work of the Task Force in a major initiative, which was a blind benchmark study to compare code benchmark calculations against experimental data for the VENUS-2 MOX core at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HELIOS-1.4 code was used to perform a comprehensive study of pin-cell and core calculations for the VENUS-2 benchmark.

  4. Calculations with ANSYS/FLOTRAN to a core catcher benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    There are numerous experiments for the exploration of the corium spreading behaviour, but comparable data have not been available up to now in the field of the long-term behaviour of a corium expanded in a core catcher. For the calculations a pure liquid oxidic melt with a homogeneous internal heat source was assumed. The melt was distributed uniformly over the spreading area of the EPR core catcher. All codes applied the well known k-ε-turbulence-model to simulate the turbulent flow regime of this melt configuration. While the FVM-code calculations were performed with three dimensional models using a simple symmetry, the problem was modelled two-dimensionally with ANSYS due to limited CPU performance. In addition, the 2D results of ANSYS should allow a comparison for the planned second stage of the calculations. In this second stage, the behaviour of a segregated metal oxide melt should be examined. However, first estimates and pre-calculations showed that a 3D simulation of the problem is not possible with any of the codes due to lacking computer performance. (orig.)

  5. TCA UO2/MOX core analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Yoshihisa; Noda, Hideyuki

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the adequacy of nuclear data, the TCA UO 2 and MOX core experiments were analyzed with MVP using the libraries based on ENDF/B-VI Mod.3 and JENDL-3.2. The ENDF/B-VI data underpredict k eff values. The replacement of 238 U data with the JENDL-3.2 data and the adjustment of 235 ν-value raise the k eff values by 0.3% for UO 2 cores, but still underpredict k eff values. On the other hand, the nuclear data of JENDL-3.2 for H, O, Al, 238 U and 235 U of ENDF/B-VI whose 235 ν-value in thermal energy region is adjusted to the average value of JENDL-3.2 give a good prediction of k eff . (author)

  6. Advanced core-analyses for subsurface characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, R.

    2017-12-01

    The heterogeneity of geological formations varies over a wide range of length scales and represents a major challenge for predicting the movement of fluids in the subsurface. Although they are inherently limited in the accessible length-scale, laboratory measurements on reservoir core samples still represent the only way to make direct observations on key transport properties. Yet, properties derived on these samples are of limited use and should be regarded as sample-specific (or `pseudos'), if the presence of sub-core scale heterogeneities is not accounted for in data processing and interpretation. The advent of imaging technology has significantly reshaped the landscape of so-called Special Core Analysis (SCAL) by providing unprecedented insight on rock structure and processes down to the scale of a single pore throat (i.e. the scale at which all reservoir processes operate). Accordingly, improved laboratory workflows are needed that make use of such wealth of information by e.g., referring to the internal structure of the sample and in-situ observations, to obtain accurate parameterisation of both rock- and flow-properties that can be used to populate numerical models. We report here on the development of such workflow for the study of solute mixing and dispersion during single- and multi-phase flows in heterogeneous porous systems through a unique combination of two complementary imaging techniques, namely X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The experimental protocol is applied to both synthetic and natural porous media, and it integrates (i) macroscopic observations (tracer effluent curves), (ii) sub-core scale parameterisation of rock heterogeneities (e.g., porosity, permeability and capillary pressure), and direct 3D observation of (iii) fluid saturation distribution and (iv) the dynamic spreading of the solute plumes. Suitable mathematical models are applied to reproduce experimental observations, including both 1D and 3D

  7. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Beretta Sergio; Dossi Andrea; Grove Hugh

    2000-01-01

    Due to their particular nature, the benchmarking methodologies tend to exceed the boundaries of management techniques, and to enter the territories of managerial culture. A culture that is also destined to break into the accounting area not only strongly supporting the possibility of fixing targets, and measuring and comparing the performance (an aspect that is already innovative and that is worthy of attention), but also questioning one of the principles (or taboos) of the accounting or...

  8. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ludewig, H.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Schmidt, E.; Todosow, M.; Parma, E.J.; Ball, R.M.; Hoovler, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Benchmark analyses have been performed of Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) critical experiments (CX) using the MCNP radiation transport code. The experiments have been conducted at the Sandia National Laboratory reactor facility in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. The test reactor is a nineteen element water moderated and reflected thermal system. A series of integral experiments have been carried out to test the capabilities of the radiation transport codes to predict the performance of PBR systems. MCNP was selected as the preferred radiation analysis tool for the benchmark experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculational results indicate close agreement. This paper describes the analyses of benchmark experiments designed to quantify the accuracy of the MCNP radiation transport code for predicting the performance characteristics of PBR reactors

  9. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcow, Elizabeth C.; Cerbone, Ralph J.; Ludewig, Hans; Mughabghab, Said F.; Schmidt, Eldon; Todosow, Michael; Parma, Edward J.; Ball, Russell M.; Hoovler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    Benchmark analyses have been performed of Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) critical experiments (CX) using the MCNP radiation transport code. The experiments have been conducted at the Sandia National Laboratory reactor facility in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. The test reactor is a nineteen element water moderated and reflected thermal system. A series of integral experiments have been carried out to test the capabilities of the radiation transport codes to predict the performance of PBR systems. MCNP was selected as the preferred radiation analysis tool for the benchmark experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculational results indicate close agreement. This paper describes the analyses of benchmark experiments designed to quantify the accuracy of the MCNP radiation transport code for predicting the performance characteristics of PBR reactors.

  10. VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmark: Results of ORNL Calculations Using HELIOS-1.4 - Revised Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, RJ

    2001-06-01

    The Task Force on Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition (TFRPD) was formed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) to study reactor physics, fuel performance, and fuel cycle issues related to the disposition of weapons-grade (WG) plutonium as mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. To advance the goals of the TFRPD, 10 countries and 12 institutions participated in a major TFRPD activity: a blind benchmark study to compare code calculations to experimental data for the VENUS-2 MOX core at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HELIOS-1.4 code system was used to perform the comprehensive study of pin-cell and MOX core calculations for the VENUS-2 MOX core benchmark study.

  11. A benchmarking tool to evaluate computer tomography perfusion infarct core predictions against a DWI standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Carlo W; Christensen, Søren; Campbell, Bruce Cv; Mishra, Nishant K; Mlynash, Michael; Levi, Christopher; Straka, Matus; Wintermark, Max; Bammer, Roland; Albers, Gregory W; Parsons, Mark W; Lansberg, Maarten G

    2016-10-01

    Differences in research methodology have hampered the optimization of Computer Tomography Perfusion (CTP) for identification of the ischemic core. We aim to optimize CTP core identification using a novel benchmarking tool. The benchmarking tool consists of an imaging library and a statistical analysis algorithm to evaluate the performance of CTP. The tool was used to optimize and evaluate an in-house developed CTP-software algorithm. Imaging data of 103 acute stroke patients were included in the benchmarking tool. Median time from stroke onset to CT was 185 min (IQR 180-238), and the median time between completion of CT and start of MRI was 36 min (IQR 25-79). Volumetric accuracy of the CTP-ROIs was optimal at an rCBF threshold of benchmarking tool can play an important role in optimizing CTP software as it provides investigators with a novel method to directly compare the performance of alternative CTP software packages. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Utilizing benchmark data from the ANL-ZPR diagnostic cores program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    The support of the criticality safety community is allowing the production of benchmark descriptions of several assemblies from the ZPR Diagnostic Cores Program. The assemblies have high sensitivities to nuclear data for a few isotopes. This can highlight limitations in nuclear data for selected nuclides or in standard methods used to treat these data. The present work extends the use of the simplified model of the U9 benchmark assembly beyond the validation of k eff . Further simplifications have been made to produce a data testing benchmark in the style of the standard CSEWG benchmark specifications. Calculations for this data testing benchmark are compared to results obtained with more detailed models and methods to determine their biases. These biases or corrections factors can then be applied in the use of the less refined methods and models. Data testing results using Versions IV, V, and VI of the ENDF/B nuclear data are presented for k eff , f 28 /f 25 , c 28 /f 25 , and β eff . These limited results demonstrate the importance of studying other integral parameters in addition to k eff in trying to improve nuclear data and methods and the importance of accounting for methods and/or modeling biases when using data testing results to infer the quality of the nuclear data files

  13. Benchmark calculations on nuclear characteristics of JRR-4 HEU core by SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arigane, Kenji

    1987-04-01

    The reduced enrichment program for the JRR-4 has been progressing based on JAERI's RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) program. The SRAC (JAERI Thermal Reactor Standard Code System for Reactor Design and Analysis) is used for the neutronic design of the JRR-4 LEU Core. This report describes the benchmark calculations on the neutronic characteristics of the JRR-4 HEU Core in order to validate the calculation method. The benchmark calculations were performed on the various kind of neutronic characteristics such as excess reactivity, criticality, control rod worth, thermal neutron flux distribution, void coefficient, temperature coefficient, mass coefficient, kinetic parameters and poisoning effect by Xe-135 build up. As the result, it was confirmed that these calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with the measured values. Therefore, the calculational method by the SRAC was validated. (author)

  14. Defining core elements and outstanding practice in Nutritional Science through collaborative benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samman, Samir; McCarthur, Jennifer O; Peat, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Benchmarking has been adopted by educational institutions as a potentially sensitive tool for improving learning and teaching. To date there has been limited application of benchmarking methodology in the Discipline of Nutritional Science. The aim of this survey was to define core elements and outstanding practice in Nutritional Science through collaborative benchmarking. Questionnaires that aimed to establish proposed core elements for Nutritional Science, and inquired about definitions of " good" and " outstanding" practice were posted to named representatives at eight Australian universities. Seven respondents identified core elements that included knowledge of nutrient metabolism and requirement, food production and processing, modern biomedical techniques that could be applied to understanding nutrition, and social and environmental issues as related to Nutritional Science. Four of the eight institutions who agreed to participate in the present survey identified the integration of teaching with research as an indicator of outstanding practice. Nutritional Science is a rapidly evolving discipline. Further and more comprehensive surveys are required to consolidate and update the definition of the discipline, and to identify the optimal way of teaching it. Global ideas and specific regional requirements also need to be considered.

  15. Calculational benchmark comparisons for a low sodium void worth actinide burner core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Kawashima, M.; Arie, K.; Suzuki, M.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, a number of low void worth core designs with non-conventional core geometries have been proposed. Since these designs lack a good experimental and computational database, benchmark calculations are useful for the identification of possible biases in performance characteristics predictions. In this paper, a simplified benchmark model of a metal fueled, low void worth actinide burner design is detailed; and two independent neutronic performance evaluations are compared. Calculated performance characteristics are evaluated for three spatially uniform compositions (fresh uranium/plutonium, batch-averaged uranium/transuranic, and batch-averaged uranium/transuranic with fission products) and a regional depleted distribution obtained from a benchmark depletion calculation. For each core composition, the flooded and voided multiplication factor, power peaking factor, sodium void worth (and its components), flooded Doppler coefficient and control rod worth predictions are compared. In addition, the burnup swing, average discharge burnup, peak linear power, and fresh fuel enrichment are calculated for the depletion case. In general, remarkably good agreement is observed between the evaluations. The most significant difference is predicted performance characteristics is a 0.3--0.5% Δk/(kk) bias in the sodium void worth. Significant differences in the transmutation rate of higher actinides are also observed; however, these differences do not cause discrepancies in the performing predictions

  16. Benchmark calculation for water reflected STACY cores containing low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takemi

    2001-01-01

    In order to validate the availability of criticality calculation codes and related nuclear data library, a series of fundamental benchmark experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been performed with a Static Experiment Criticality Facility, STACY in JAERI. The basic core composed of a single tank with water reflector was used for accumulating the systematic data with well-known experimental uncertainties. This paper presents the outline of the core configurations of STACY, the standard calculation model, and calculation results with a Monte Carlo code and JENDL 3.2 nuclear data library. (author)

  17. A Benchmark Study of a Seismic Analysis Program for a Single Column of a HTGR Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A seismic analysis program, SAPCOR (Seismic Analysis of Prismatic HTGR Core), was developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The program is used for the evaluation of deformed shapes and forces on the graphite blocks which using point-mass rigid bodies with Kelvin-Voigt impact models. In the previous studies, the program was verified using theoretical solutions and benchmark problems. To validate the program for more complicated problems, a free vibration analysis of a single column of a HTGR core was selected and the calculation results of the SAPCOR and a commercial FEM code, Abaqus, were compared in this study.

  18. Coupled fast-thermal core 'HERBE', as the benchmark experiment at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    2003-10-01

    Validation of the well-known Monte Carlo code MCNP TM against measured criticality data for the coupled fast-thermal HERBE. System at the RB research reactor is shown in this paper. Experimental data are obtained for regular HERBE core and for the cases of controlled flooding of the neutron converter zone by heavy water. Earlier calculations of these criticality parameters, done by combination of transport and diffusion codes using 2D geometry model are also compared to new calculations carried out by the MCNP code in 3D geometry, applying new detailed 3D model of the HEU fuel slug, developed recently. Satisfactory agreements in comparison of the HERBE criticality calculation results with experimental data, in spite complex heterogeneous composition of the HERBE core, are obtained and confirmed that HERBE core could be used as a criticality benchmark for coupled fast-thermal core. (author)

  19. Benchmarking Benchmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Blitz (David)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBenchmarking benchmarks is a bundle of six studies that are inspired by the prevalence of benchmarking in academic finance research as well as in investment practice. Three studies examine if current benchmark asset pricing models adequately describe the cross-section of stock returns.

  20. Power-Energy Simulation for Multi-Core Processors in Bench-marking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Abou-Of

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At Microarchitectural level, multi-core processor, as a complex System on Chip, has sophisticated on-chip components including cores, shared caches, interconnects and system controllers such as memory and ethernet controllers. At technological level, architects should consider the device types forecast in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS. Energy simulation enables architects to study two important metrics simultaneously. Timing is a key element of the CPU performance that imposes constraints on the CPU target clock frequency. Power and the resulting heat impose more severe design constraints, such as core clustering, while semiconductor industry is providing more transistors in the die area in pace with Moore’s law. Energy simulators provide a solution for such serious challenge. Energy is modelled either by combining performance benchmarking tool with a power simulator or by an integrated framework of both performance simulator and power profiling system. This article presents and asses trade-offs between different architectures using four cores battery-powered mobile systems by running a custom-made and a standard benchmark tools. The experimental results assure the Energy/ Frequency convexity rule over a range of frequency settings on different number of enabled cores. The reported results show that increasing the number of cores has a great effect on increasing the power consumption. However, a minimum energy dissipation will occur at a lower frequency which reduces the power consumption. Despite that, increasing the number of cores will also increase the effective cores value which will reflect a better processor performance.

  1. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Integral reactors are developed for the applications such as sea water desalination, heat energy for various industries, and power sources for large container ships. In order to enhance the inherent and passive safety features, low power density concept is chosen for the integral reactor SMART. Moreover, ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation concepts are reviewed for better plant economy and simple design of reactor system. Especially, boron-free operation concept brings about large difference in core configurations and reactivity controls from those of the existing large size commercial nuclear power plants and also causes many differences in the safety aspects. The ultimate objectives of this study include detailed core design of a integral reactor, development of the core design system and technology, and finally acquisition of the system design certificate. The goal of the first stage is the conceptual core design, that is, to establish the design bases and requirements suitable for the boron-free concept, to develop a core loading pattern, to analyze the nuclear, thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the core and to perform the core shielding design. Interface data for safety and performance analyses including fuel design data are produced for the relevant design analysis groups. Nuclear, thermal and hydraulic, shielding design and analysis code systems necessary for the core conceptual design are established through modification of the existing design tools and newly developed methodology and code modules. Core safety and performance can be improved by the technology development such as boron-free core optimization, advaned core monitoring and operational aid system. Feasiblity study on the improvement of the core protection and monitoring system will also contribute toward core safety and performance. Both the conceptual core design study and the related technology will provide concrete basis for the next design phase. This study will also

  2. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Integral reactors are developed for the applications such as sea water desalination, heat energy for various industries, and power sources for large container ships. In order to enhance the inherent and passive safety features, low power density concept is chosen for the integral reactor SMART. Moreover, ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation concepts are reviewed for better plant economy and simple design of reactor system. Especially, boron-free operation concept brings about large difference in core configurations and reactivity controls from those of the existing large size commercial nuclear power plants and also causes many differences in the safety aspects. The ultimate objectives of this study include detailed core design of a integral reactor, development of the core design system and technology, and finally acquisition of the system design certificate. The goal of the first stage is the conceptual core design, that is, to establish the design bases and requirements suitable for the boron-free concept, to develop a core loading pattern, to analyze the nuclear, thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the core and to perform the core shielding design. Interface data for safety and performance analyses including fuel design data are produced for the relevant design analysis groups. Nuclear, thermal and hydraulic, shielding design and analysis code systems necessary for the core conceptual design are established through modification of the existing design tools and newly developed methodology and code modules. Core safety and performance can be improved by the technology development such as boron-free core optimization, advaned core monitoring and operational aid system. Feasiblity study on the improvement of the core protection and monitoring system will also contribute toward core safety and performance. Both the conceptual core design study and the related technology will provide concrete basis for the next design phase. This study will also

  3. Benchmark analyses for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyasu, E-mail: mochizki@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Muranaka, Kohmei; Asai, Takayuki [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Rooijen, W.F.G. van, E-mail: rooijen@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The IAEA EBR-II benchmarks SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R are analyzed with a 1D system code. • The calculated result of SHRT-17 corresponds well to the measured results. • For SHRT-45R ERANOS is used for various core parameters and reactivity coefficients. • SHRT-45R peak temperature is overestimated with the ERANOS feedback coefficients. • The peak temperature is well predicted when the feedback coefficient is reduced. - Abstract: Benchmark problems of several experiments in EBR-II, proposed by ANL and coordinated by the IAEA, are analyzed using the plant system code NETFLOW++ and the neutronics code ERANOS. The SHRT-17 test conducted as a loss-of-flow test is calculated using only the NETFLOW++ code because it is a purely thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data were made available to the benchmark participants after the results of the blind benchmark calculations were submitted. Our work shows that major parameters of the plant are predicted with good accuracy. The SHRT-45R test, an unprotected loss of flow test is calculated using the NETFLOW++ code with the aid of delayed neutron data and reactivity coefficients calculated by the ERANOS code. These parameters are used in the NETFLOW++ code to perform a semi-coupled analysis of the neutronics – thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data are compared with our calculated results. In our work, the peak temperature is underestimated, indicating that the reactivity feedback coefficients are too strong. When the reactivity feedback coefficient for thermal expansion is adjusted, good agreement is obtained in general for the calculated plant parameters, with a few exceptions.

  4. A benchmark for coupled thermohydraulics system/three-dimensional neutron kinetics core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1999-01-01

    During the last years 3D neutron kinetics core models have been coupled to advanced thermohydraulics system codes. These coupled codes can be used for the analysis of the whole reactor system. Although the stand-alone versions of the 3D neutron kinetics core models and of the thermohydraulics system codes generally have a good verification and validation basis, there is a need for additional validation work. This especially concerns the interaction between the reactor core and the other components of a nuclear power plant (NPP). In the framework of the international 'Atomic Energy Research' (AER) association on VVER Reactor Physics and Reactor Safety, a benchmark for these code systems was defined. (orig.)

  5. Criticality safety benchmark experiment on 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using a 28-cm-thickness slab core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    The second series of critical experiments with 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using 28-cm-thick slab core have been performed with the Static Experiment Critical Facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Systematic critical data were obtained by changing the uranium concentration of the fuel solution from 464 to 300 gU/l under various reflector conditions. In this paper, the thirteen critical configurations for water-reflected cores and unreflected cores are identified and evaluated. The effects of uncertainties in the experimental data on k eff are quantified by sensitivity studies. Benchmark model specifications that are necessary to construct a calculational model are given. The uncertainties of k eff 's included in the benchmark model specifications are approximately 0.1%Δk eff . The thirteen critical configurations are judged to be acceptable benchmark data. Using the benchmark model specifications, sample calculation results are provided with several sets of standard codes and cross section data. (author)

  6. NODAL3 Sensitivity Analysis for NEACRP 3D LWR Core Transient Benchmark (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surian Pinem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of sensitivity analysis of the multidimension, multigroup neutron diffusion NODAL3 code for the NEACRP 3D LWR core transient benchmarks (PWR. The code input parameters covered in the sensitivity analysis are the radial and axial node sizes (the number of radial node per fuel assembly and the number of axial layers, heat conduction node size in the fuel pellet and cladding, and the maximum time step. The output parameters considered in this analysis followed the above-mentioned core transient benchmarks, that is, power peak, time of power peak, power, averaged Doppler temperature, maximum fuel centerline temperature, and coolant outlet temperature at the end of simulation (5 s. The sensitivity analysis results showed that the radial node size and maximum time step give a significant effect on the transient parameters, especially the time of power peak, for the HZP and HFP conditions. The number of ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding gives negligible effect on the transient solutions. For productive work of the PWR transient analysis, based on the present sensitivity analysis results, we recommend NODAL3 users to use 2×2 radial nodes per assembly, 1×18 axial layers per assembly, the maximum time step of 10 ms, and 9 and 1 ring divisions for fuel pellet and cladding, respectively.

  7. Radiocarbon analyses along the EDML ice core in Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wal, R.S.W.; Meijer, H.A.J.; van Rooij, M.; van der Veen, C.

    2007-01-01

    Samples, 17 in total, from the EDML core drilled at Kohnen station Antarctica are analysed for 14CO and 14CO2 with a dry-extraction technique in combination with accelerator mass spectrometry. Results of the in situ produced 14CO fraction show a very low concentration of in situ produced 14CO.

  8. Radiocarbon analyses along the EDML ice core in Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Wal, R. S. W.; Meijer, H. A. J.; De Rooij, M.; Van der Veen, C.

    Samples, 17 in total, from the EDML core drilled at Kohnen station Antarctica are analysed for (CO)-C-14 and (CO2)-C-14 with a dry-extraction technique in combination with accelerator mass spectrometry. Results of the in situ produced (CO)-C-14 fraction show a very low concentration of in situ

  9. Verification of MVP-II and SRAC2006 code to the core physics vera benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jati Susilo

    2014-01-01

    In this research, verification calculation for VERA core physics benchmark on the Zero Power Physical Test (ZPPT) of the nuclear reactor Watts Bar 1. The reactor is a 1000 MWe class of PWR designed by. Westinghouse, arranged from 193 unit of 17 x 17 fuel assembly consisting 3 type enrichment of UO2 that are 2.1wt%, 2.619wt% and 3.1wt%. Core power factor distribution and k-eff calculation has been done for the first cycle operation of the core at beginning of cycle (BOC) and hot zero power (HZP). In this calculation, MVP-II and CITATION module of SRAC2006 computer code has been used with ENDF/B-VII.0. cross section data library. Calculation result showed that differences value of k-eff for the core at controlled and uncontrolled condition between reference with MVP-II (-0,07% and -0,014%) and SRAC2006 (0,92% and 0,99%) are very small or below 1%. Differences value of radial power peaking factor at controlled and uncontrolled of the core between reference value with MVP-II are 0,38% and 1,53%, even though with SRAC2006 are 1,13% and -2,45%. It can be said that the calculation result by both computer code showing suitability with reference value. In order to determinate of criticality of the core, the calculation result using MVP-II code is more conservative compare with SRAC2006 code. (author)

  10. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Kim, K. Y.

    2002-03-01

    In general, small and medium-sized integral reactors adopt new technology such as passive and inherent safety concepts to minimize the necessity of power source and operator actions, and to provide the automatic measures to cope with any accidents. Specifically, such reactors are often designed with a lower core power density and with soluble boron free concept for system simplification. Those reactors require ultra long cycle operation for higher economical efficiency. This cycle length requirement is one of the important factors in the design of burnable absorbers as well as assurance of shutdown margin. Hence, both computer code system and design methodology based on the today's design technology for the current commercial reactor cores require intensive improvement for the small and medium-sized soluble boron free reactors. New database is also required for the development of this type of reactor core. Under these technical requirements, conceptual design of small integral reactor SMART has been performed since July 1997, and recently completed under the long term nuclear R and D program. Thus, the final objectives of this work is design and development of an integral reactor core and development of necessary indigenous design technology. To reach the goal of the 2nd stage R and D program for basic design of SMART, design bases and requirements adequate for ultra long cycle and soluble boron free concept are established. These bases and requirements are satisfied by the core loading pattern. Based on the core loading pattern, nuclear, and thermal and hydraulic characteristics are analyzed. Also included are fuel performance analysis and development of a core protection and monitoring system that is adequate for the soluble boron free core of an integral reactor. Core shielding design analysis is accomplished, too. Moreover, full scope interface data are produced for reactor safety and performance analyses and other design activities. Nuclear, thermal and

  11. Adaption of the PARCS Code for Core Design Audit Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyong Chol; Lee, Young Jin; Uhm, Jae Beop; Kim, Hyunjik [Nuclear Safety Evaluation, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hun Young; Ahn, Seunghoon; Woo, Swengwoong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The eigenvalue calculation also includes quasi-static core depletion analyses. PARCS has implemented variety of features and has been qualified as a regulatory audit code in conjunction with other NRC thermal-hydraulic codes such as TRACE or RELAP5. In this study, as an adaptation effort for audit applications, PARCS is applied for an audit analysis of a reload core design. The lattice physics code HELIOS is used for cross section generation. PARCS-HELIOS code system has been established as a core analysis tool. Calculation results have been compared on a wide spectrum of calculations such as power distribution, critical soluble boron concentration, and rod worth. A reasonable agreement between the audit calculation and the reference results has been found.

  12. Research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project on analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Technical Meeting hosted at the Belarus National Academy of Sciences in Minsk by the Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research 'SOSNY' from 5-9 December 2005 was the kick-off Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)'. The CRP had received proposals for research agreements and contracts from scientists representing the following 25 institutions: Centro Atomico Bariloche, SCK CEN Mol, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Sao Paulo, Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research SOSNY Minsk, China Institute of Atomic Energy, CEA Cadarache, CNRS Paris, FZ Rossendorf, FZ Karlsruhe, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) Petten, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AGH-University of Science and Technology Krakow, Institute of Atomic Energy Otwock/Swierk, ITEP Moscow, MEPHI Moscow, Kurchatov Institute, JINR Dubna, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CIEMAT Madrid, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute and Technology', and Argonne National Laboratory). These institutions represent 18 IAEA Member States (i.e., Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, USA), and one International Organization (JINR Dubna). The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP

  13. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  14. Comparison of the results of the fifth dynamic AER benchmark-a benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three-dimensional hexagonal kinetic core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1998-01-01

    The fifth dynamic benchmark was defined at seventh AER-Symposium, held in Hoernitz, Germany in 1997. It is the first benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three-dimensional hexagonal neutron kinetic core models. In this benchmark the interaction between the components of a WWER-440 NPP with the reactor core has been investigated. The initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one control rod group stucking. This break causes an overcooling of the primary circuit. During this overcooling the scram reactivity is compensated and the scrammed reactor becomes re critical. The calculation was continued until the highly-borated water from the high pressure injection system terminated the power excursion. Each participant used own best-estimate nuclear cross section data. Only the initial subcriticality at the beginning of the transient was given. Solutions were received from Kurchatov Institute Russia with the code BIPR8/ATHLET, VTT Energy Finland with HEXTRAN/SMABRE, NRI Rez Czech Republic with DYN3/ATHLET, KFKI Budapest Hungary with KIKO3D/ATHLET and from FZR Germany with the code DYN3D/ATHLET.In this paper the results are compared. Beside the comparison of global results, the behaviour of several thermohydraulic and neutron kinetic parameters is presented to discuss the revealed differences between the solutions.(Authors)

  15. Solution of the 6th dynamic AER benchmark using the coupled core DYN3D/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, A.; Kliem, S.

    2001-01-01

    The 6 th dynamic benchmark is a logical continuation of the work to validate systematically coupled neutron kinetics/thermohydraulics code systems for the estimation of the transient behaviour of WWER type nuclear power plant which was started in the 5 th dynamic benchmark. This benchmark concerns a double ended break of the main steam line (asymmetrical MSLB) in a WWER plant. The core is at the end of first cycle in full power conditions. The asymmetric leak causes a different depressurization of all steam generators. New features in comparison to the 5 th dynamic benchmark were included: asymmetric operation of the feed water system, consideration of incomplete coolant mixing in the reactor vessel, and the definition of a fixed isothermal recriticality temperature for normalising the nuclear data (Authors)

  16. Selection and benchmarking of computer codes for research reactor core conversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Emin [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Jones, Barclay G [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of IL at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1983-09-01

    A group of computer codes have been selected and obtained from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank in France for the core conversion study of highly enriched research reactors. ANISN, WIMSD-4, MC{sup 2}, COBRA-3M, FEVER, THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR were selected for the study. For the final work THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR have been selected and used. A one dimensional thermal hydraulics code also has been used to calculate temperature distributions in the core. THERMOS and CINDER have been modified to serve the purpose. Minor modifications have been made to GAM-2 and EXTERMINATOR to improve their utilization. All of the codes have been debugged on both CDC and IBM computers at the University of IL. IAEA 10 MW Benchmark problem has been solved. Results of this work has been compared with the IAEA contributor's results. Agreement is very good for highly enriched fuel (HEU). Deviations from IAEA contributor's mean value for low enriched fuel (LEU) exist but they are small enough in general. Deviation of k{sub eff} is about 0.5% for both enrichments at the beginning of life (BOL) and at the end of life (EOL). Flux ratios deviate only about 1.5% from IAEA contributor's mean value. (author)

  17. 3-D core modelling of RIA transient: the TMI-1 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraresi, P.; Studer, E.; Avvakumov, A.; Malofeev, V.; Diamond, D.; Bromley, B.

    2001-01-01

    The increase of fuel burn up in core management poses actually the problem of the evaluation of the deposited energy during Reactivity Insertion Accidents (RIA). In order to precisely evaluate this energy, 3-D approaches are used more and more frequently in core calculations. This 'best-estimate' approach requires the evaluation of code uncertainties. To contribute to this evaluation, a code benchmark has been launched. A 3-D modelling for the TMI-1 central Ejected Rod Accident with zero and intermediate initial powers was carried out with three different methods of calculation for an inserted reactivity respectively fixed at 1.2 $ and 1.26 $. The studies implemented by the neutronics codes PARCS (BNL) and CRONOS (IPSN/CEA) describe an homogeneous assembly, whereas the BARS (KI) code allows a pin-by-pin representation (CRONOS has both possibilities). All the calculations are consistent, the variation in figures resulting mainly from the method used to build cross sections and reflectors constants. The maximum rise in enthalpy for the intermediate initial power (33 % P N ) calculation is, for this academic calculation, about 30 cal/g. This work will be completed in a next step by an evaluation of the uncertainty induced by the uncertainty on model parameters, and a sensitivity study of the key parameters for a peripheral Rod Ejection Accident. (authors)

  18. 3-D core modelling of RIA transient: the TMI-1 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraresi, P. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Studer, E. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Avvakumov, A.; Malofeev, V. [Nuclear Safety Institute of Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Diamond, D.; Bromley, B. [Nuclear Energy and Infrastructure Systems Div., Brookhaven National Lab., BNL, Upton, NY (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The increase of fuel burn up in core management poses actually the problem of the evaluation of the deposited energy during Reactivity Insertion Accidents (RIA). In order to precisely evaluate this energy, 3-D approaches are used more and more frequently in core calculations. This 'best-estimate' approach requires the evaluation of code uncertainties. To contribute to this evaluation, a code benchmark has been launched. A 3-D modelling for the TMI-1 central Ejected Rod Accident with zero and intermediate initial powers was carried out with three different methods of calculation for an inserted reactivity respectively fixed at 1.2 $ and 1.26 $. The studies implemented by the neutronics codes PARCS (BNL) and CRONOS (IPSN/CEA) describe an homogeneous assembly, whereas the BARS (KI) code allows a pin-by-pin representation (CRONOS has both possibilities). All the calculations are consistent, the variation in figures resulting mainly from the method used to build cross sections and reflectors constants. The maximum rise in enthalpy for the intermediate initial power (33 % P{sub N}) calculation is, for this academic calculation, about 30 cal/g. This work will be completed in a next step by an evaluation of the uncertainty induced by the uncertainty on model parameters, and a sensitivity study of the key parameters for a peripheral Rod Ejection Accident. (authors)

  19. Selection and benchmarking of computer codes for research reactor core conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Emin; Jones, Barclay G.

    1983-01-01

    A group of computer codes have been selected and obtained from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank in France for the core conversion study of highly enriched research reactors. ANISN, WIMSD-4, MC 2 , COBRA-3M, FEVER, THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR were selected for the study. For the final work THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR have been selected and used. A one dimensional thermal hydraulics code also has been used to calculate temperature distributions in the core. THERMOS and CINDER have been modified to serve the purpose. Minor modifications have been made to GAM-2 and EXTERMINATOR to improve their utilization. All of the codes have been debugged on both CDC and IBM computers at the University of IL. IAEA 10 MW Benchmark problem has been solved. Results of this work has been compared with the IAEA contributor's results. Agreement is very good for highly enriched fuel (HEU). Deviations from IAEA contributor's mean value for low enriched fuel (LEU) exist but they are small enough in general. Deviation of k eff is about 0.5% for both enrichments at the beginning of life (BOL) and at the end of life (EOL). Flux ratios deviate only about 1.5% from IAEA contributor's mean value. (author)

  20. Selection and benchmarking of computer codes for research reactor core conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, E.; Jones, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    A group of computer codes have been selected and obtained from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank in France for the core conversion study of highly enriched research reactors. ANISN, WIMSD-4, MC 2 , COBRA-3M, FEVER, THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR were selected for the study. For the final work THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR have been selected and used. A one dimensional thermal hydraulics code also has been used to calculate temperature distributions in the core. THERMOS and CINDER have been modified to serve the purpose. Minor modifications have been made to GAM-2 and EXTERMINATOR to improve their utilization. All of the codes have been debugged on both CDC and IBM computers at the University of Illinois. IAEA 10 MW Benchmark problem has been solved. Results of this work has been compared with the IAEA contributor's results. Agreement is very good for highly enriched fuel (HEU). Deviations from IAEA contributor's mean value for low enriched fuel (LEU) exist but they are small enough in general

  1. Joint European contribution to phase 5 of the BN600 hybrid reactor benchmark core analysis (European ERANOS formulaire for fast reactor core analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpault, G.

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid UOX/MOX fueled core of the BN-600 reactor was endorsed as an international benchmark. BFS-2 critical facility was designed for full size simulation of core and shielding of large fast reactors (up tp 3000 MWe). Wide experimental programme including measurements of criticality, fission rates, rod worths, and SVRE was established. Four BFS-62 critical assemblies have been designed to study changes in BN-600 reactor physics-when moving to a hybrid MOX core. BFS-62-3A assembly is a full scale model of the BN-600 reactor hybrid core. it consists of three regions of UO 2 fuel, axial and radial fertile blankets, MOX fuel added in a ring between MC and OC zones, 120 deg sector of stainless steel reflector included within radial blanket. Joint European contribution to the Phase 5 benchmark analysis was performed by Serco Assurance Winfrith (UK) and CEA Cadarache (France). Analysis was carried out using Version 1.2 of the ERANOS code; and data system for advanced and fast reactor core applications. Nuclear data is based on the JEF2.2 nuclear data evaluation (including sodium). Results for Phase 5 of the BN-600 benchmark have been determined for criticality and SVRE in both diffusion and transport theory. Full details of the results are presented in a paper posted on the IAEA Business Collaborator website nad a brief summary is provided in this paper

  2. An analysis of the CSNI/GREST core concrete interaction chemical thermodynamic benchmark exercise using the MPEC2 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Ken; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Uchida, Masaaki; Soda, Kunihisa

    1989-01-01

    Fission product (EP) release during a core concrete interaction (CCI) is an important factor of the uncertainty associated with a source term estimation for an LWR severe accident. An analysis was made on the CCI Chemical Thermodynamic Benchmark Exercise organized by OECD/NEA/CSNI Group of Experts on Source Terms (GREST) for investigating the uncertainty in thermodynamic modeling for CCI. The benchmark exercise was to calculate the equilibrium FP vapor pressure for given system of temperature, pressure, and debris composition. The benchmark consisted of two parts, A and B. Part A was a simplified problem intended to test the numerical techniques. In part B, the participants were requested to use their own best estimate thermodynamic data base to examine the variability of the results due to the difference in thermodynamic data base. JAERI participated in this benchmark exercise with use of the MPEC2 code. Chemical thermodynamic data base needed for analysis of Part B was taken from the VENESA code. This report describes the computer code used, inputs to the code, and results from the calculation by JAERI. The present calculation indicates that the FP vapor pressure depends strongly on temperature and Oxygen potential in core debris and the pattern of dependency may be different for different FP elements. (author)

  3. Benchmarking and qualification of the nufreq-npw code for best estimate prediction of multi-channel core stability margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.; McFarlane, A.F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The work described in this paper is focused on the development, verification and benchmarking of the NUFREQ-NPW code at Westinghouse, USA for best estimate prediction of multi-channel core stability margins in US BWRs. Various models incorporated into NUFREQ-NPW are systematically compared against the Westinghouse channel stability analysis code MAZDA, which the Mathematical Model was developed in an entirely different manner. The NUFREQ-NPW code is extensively benchmarked against experimental stability data with and without nuclear reactivity feedback. Detailed comparisons are next performed against nuclear-coupled core stability data. A physically based algorithm is developed to correct for the effect of flow development on subcooled boiling. Use of this algorithm (to be described in the full paper) captures the peak magnitude as well as the resonance frequency with good accuracy

  4. Stylized whole-core benchmark of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hon, Ryan; Kooreman, Gabriel; Rahnema, Farzad; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A stylized benchmark specification of the I2S-LWR core. • A library of cross sections were generated in both 8 and 47 groups. • Monte Carlo solutions generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. • Cross sections and pin fission densities provided in journal’s repository. - Abstract: The Integral, Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I 2 S-LWR) is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept under development by a multi-institutional team led by Georgia Tech. The core is similar in size to small 2-loop PWRs while having the power level of current large reactors (∼1000 MWe) but using uranium silicide fuel and advanced stainless steel cladding. A stylized benchmark specification of the I 2 S-LWR core has been developed in order to test whole-core neutronics codes and methods. For simplification the core was split into 57 distinct material regions for cross section generation. Cross sections were generated using the lattice physics code HELIOS version 1.10 in both 8 and 47 groups. Monte Carlo solutions, including eigenvalue and pin fission densities, were generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. Due to space limitations in this paper, the full cross section library and normalized pin fission density results are provided in the journal’s electronic repository.

  5. Benchmark analyses for EFF-1, -3 and FENDL-1, -2 beryllium data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Wu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The present article is part of the summary report on the Consultants' Meeting on the transport sublibrary of the Fusion Evaluated Data Library version 2.0. It reports on the comparison between beryllium benchmark experiments and Monte Carlo calculations, using different versions of the FENDL and EFF libraries

  6. PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC 3-D PWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains the results of PANTHER calculations for the ``NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power``. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.).

  7. Final PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC3-DPWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    This report contains the final results of PANTHER calculations for the 'NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power'. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.)

  8. PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC 3-D PWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains the results of PANTHER calculations for the ''NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power''. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.)

  9. Final PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC3-DPWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    This report contains the final results of PANTHER calculations for the `NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power`. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.).

  10. The Late Pliocene Eltanin Impact - Documentation From Sediment Core Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersonde, R.; Kuhn, G.; Kyte, F. T.; Flores, J.; Becquey, S.

    2002-12-01

    The expeditions ANT-XII/4 (1995) and ANT-XVIII/5a (2001) of the RV POLARSTERN collected extensive bathymetric and seismic data sets as well as sediment cores from an area in the Bellingshausen Sea (eastern Pacific Southern Ocean) that allow the first comprehensive geoscientific documentation of an asteroid impact into a deep ocean (~ 5 km) basin, named the Eltanin impact. Impact deposits have now been recovered from a total of more than 20 sediment cores collected in an area covering about 80,000 km2. Combined biomagnetostratigraphic dating places the impact event into the earliest Matuyama Chron, a period of enhanced climate variability. Sediment texture analyses and studies of sediment composition including grain size and microfossil distribution reveal the pattern of impact-related sediment disturbance and the sedimentary processes immediately following the impact event. The pattern is complicated by the San Martin Seamounts (~57.5 S, 91 W), a large topographic elevation that rises up to 3000 m above the surrounding abyssal plain in the area affected by the Eltanin impact. The impact ripped up sediments as old as Eocene and probably Paleocene that have been redeposited in a chaotic assemblage. This is followed by a sequence sedimented from a turbulent flow at the sea floor, overprinted by fall-out of airborne meteoritic ejecta that settled trough the water column. Grain size distribution reveals the timing and interaction of the different sedimentary processes. The gathered estimate of ejecta mass deposited over the studied area, composed of shock-melted asteroidal matrial and unmelted meteorites including fragments up to 2.5 cm in diameter, point to an Eltanin asteroid larger than the 1 km in diameter size originally suggested as a minimum based on the ANT-XII/4 results. This places the energy released by the impact at the threshold of those considered to cause environmental disturbance at a global scale and it makes the impact a likely transport mechanism

  11. Validation of full core geometry model of the NODAL3 code in the PWR transient Benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-M Sembiring; S-Pinem; P-H Liem

    2015-01-01

    The coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (T/H) code, NODAL3 code, has been validated in some PWR static benchmark and the NEACRP PWR transient benchmark cases. However, the NODAL3 code have not yet validated in the transient benchmark cases of a control rod assembly (CR) ejection at peripheral core using a full core geometry model, the C1 and C2 cases. By this research work, the accuracy of the NODAL3 code for one CR ejection or the unsymmetrical group of CRs ejection case can be validated. The calculations by the NODAL3 code have been carried out by the adiabatic method (AM) and the improved quasistatic method (IQS). All calculated transient parameters by the NODAL3 code were compared with the reference results by the PANTHER code. The maximum relative difference of 16 % occurs in the calculated time of power maximum parameter by using the IQS method, while the relative difference of the AM method is 4 % for C2 case. All calculation results by the NODAL3 code shows there is no systematic difference, it means the neutronic and T/H modules are adopted in the code are considered correct. Therefore, all calculation results by using the NODAL3 code are very good agreement with the reference results. (author)

  12. BN-600 MOX Core Benchmark Analysis. Results from Phases 4 and 6 of a Coordinated Research Project on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    For those Member States that have or have had significant fast reactor development programmes, it is of utmost importance that they have validated up to date codes and methods for fast reactor physics analysis in support of R and D and core design activities in the area of actinide utilization and incineration. In particular, some Member States have recently focused on fast reactor systems for minor actinide transmutation and on cores optimized for consuming rather than breeding plutonium; the physics of the breeder reactor cycle having already been widely investigated. Plutonium burning systems may have an important role in managing plutonium stocks until the time when major programmes of self-sufficient fast breeder reactors are established. For assessing the safety of these systems, it is important to determine the prediction accuracy of transient simulations and their associated reactivity coefficients. In response to Member States' expressed interest, the IAEA sponsored a coordinated research project (CRP) on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects. The CRP started in November 1999 and, at the first meeting, the members of the CRP endorsed a benchmark on the BN-600 hybrid core for consideration in its first studies. Benchmark analyses of the BN-600 hybrid core were performed during the first three phases of the CRP, investigating different nuclear data and levels of approximation in the calculation of safety related reactivity effects and their influence on uncertainties in transient analysis prediction. In an additional phase of the benchmark studies, experimental data were used for the verification and validation of nuclear data libraries and methods in support of the previous three phases. The results of phases 1, 2, 3 and 5 of the CRP are reported in IAEA-TECDOC-1623, BN-600 Hybrid Core Benchmark Analyses, Results from a Coordinated Research Project on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the

  13. VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagor Malem Sembiring

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS. The coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (T/H code, NODAL3 code, has been validated in some PWR static benchmark and the NEACRP PWR transient benchmark cases. However, the NODAL3 code have not yet validated in the transient benchmark cases of a control rod assembly (CR ejection at peripheral core using a full core geometry model, the C1 and C2 cases.  By this research work, the accuracy of the NODAL3 code for one CR ejection or the unsymmetrical group of CRs ejection case can be validated. The calculations by the NODAL3 code have been carried out by the adiabatic method (AM and the improved quasistatic method (IQS. All calculated transient parameters by the NODAL3 code were compared with the reference results by the PANTHER code. The maximum relative difference of 16% occurs in the calculated time of power maximum parameter by using the IQS method, while the relative difference of the AM method is 4% for C2 case.  All calculation results by the NODAL3 code shows there is no systematic difference, it means the neutronic and T/H modules are adopted in the code are considered correct. Therefore, all calculation results by using the NODAL3 code are very good agreement with the reference results. Keywords: nodal method, coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code, PWR, transient case, control rod ejection.   ABSTRAK VALIDASI MODEL GEOMETRI TERAS PENUH PAKET PROGRAM NODAL3 DALAM PROBLEM BENCHMARK GAYUT WAKTU PWR. Paket program kopel neutronik dan termohidraulika (T/H, NODAL3, telah divalidasi dengan beberapa kasus benchmark statis PWR dan kasus benchmark gayut waktu PWR NEACRP.  Akan tetapi, paket program NODAL3 belum divalidasi dalam kasus benchmark gayut waktu akibat penarikan sebuah perangkat batang kendali (CR di tepi teras menggunakan model geometri teras penuh, yaitu kasus C1 dan C2. Dengan penelitian ini, akurasi paket program

  14. Posture Control—Human-Inspired Approaches for Humanoid Robot Benchmarking: Conceptualizing Tests, Protocols and Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mergner

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Posture control is indispensable for both humans and humanoid robots, which becomes especially evident when performing sensorimotor tasks such as moving on compliant terrain or interacting with the environment. Posture control is therefore targeted in recent proposals of robot benchmarking in order to advance their development. This Methods article suggests corresponding robot tests of standing balance, drawing inspirations from the human sensorimotor system and presenting examples from robot experiments. To account for a considerable technical and algorithmic diversity among robots, we focus in our tests on basic posture control mechanisms, which provide humans with an impressive postural versatility and robustness. Specifically, we focus on the mechanically challenging balancing of the whole body above the feet in the sagittal plane around the ankle joints in concert with the upper body balancing around the hip joints. The suggested tests target three key issues of human balancing, which appear equally relevant for humanoid bipeds: (1 four basic physical disturbances (support surface (SS tilt and translation, field and contact forces may affect the balancing in any given degree of freedom (DoF. Targeting these disturbances allows us to abstract from the manifold of possible behavioral tasks. (2 Posture control interacts in a conflict-free way with the control of voluntary movements for undisturbed movement execution, both with “reactive” balancing of external disturbances and “proactive” balancing of self-produced disturbances from the voluntary movements. Our proposals therefore target both types of disturbances and their superposition. (3 Relevant for both versatility and robustness of the control, linkages between the posture control mechanisms across DoFs provide their functional cooperation and coordination at will and on functional demands. The suggested tests therefore include ankle-hip coordination. Suggested benchmarking

  15. Core story creation: analysing narratives to construct stories for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Julia; Jarvis, Joy; Thomas, Rebecca

    2018-03-16

    Educational research uses narrative enquiry to gain and interpret people's experiences. Narrative analysis is used to organise and make sense of acquired narrative. 'Core story creation' is a way of managing raw data obtained from narrative interviews to construct stories for learning. To explain how core story creation can be used to construct stories from raw narratives obtained by interviewing parents about their neonatal experiences and then use these stories to educate learners. Core story creation involves reconfiguration of raw narratives. Reconfiguration includes listening to and rereading transcribed narratives, identifying elements of 'emplotment' and reordering these to form a constructed story. Thematic analysis is then performed on the story to draw out learning themes informed by the participants. Core story creation using emplotment is a strategy of narrative reconfiguration that produces stories which can be used to develop resources relating to person-centred education about the patient experience. Stories constructed from raw narratives in the context of constructivism can provide a medium or an 'end product' for use in learning resource development. This can then contribute to educating students or health professionals about patients' experiences. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  16. Analysing Student Performance Using Sparse Data of Core Bachelor Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Mirka; Karkkainen, Tommi

    2015-01-01

    Curricula for Computer Science (CS) degrees are characterized by the strong occupational orientation of the discipline. In the BSc degree structure, with clearly separate CS core studies, the learning skills for these and other required courses may vary a lot, which is shown in students' overall performance. To analyze this situation, we apply…

  17. Radiochemical analyses of surface water from U.S. Geological Survey hydrologic bench-mark stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzer, V.J.; Saindon, L.G.

    1972-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's program for collecting and analyzing surface-water samples for radiochemical constituents at hydrologic bench-mark stations is described. Analytical methods used during the study are described briefly and data obtained from 55 of the network stations in the United States during the period from 1967 to 1971 are given in tabular form.Concentration values are reported for dissolved uranium, radium, gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity. Values are also given for suspended gross alpha radioactivity in terms of natural uranium. Suspended gross beta radioactivity is expressed both as the equilibrium mixture of strontium-90/yttrium-90 and as cesium-137.Other physical parameters reported which describe the samples include the concentrations of dissolved and suspended solids, the water temperature and stream discharge at the time of the sample collection.

  18. MC21/CTF and VERA multiphysics solutions to VERA core physics benchmark progression problems 6 and 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kelly, III

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MC21, was coupled to the CTF subchannel thermal-hydraulics code using a combination of Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL tools and in-house Python scripts. An MC21/CTF solution for VERA Core Physics Benchmark Progression Problem 6 demonstrated good agreement with MC21/COBRA-IE and VERA solutions. The MC21/CTF solution for VERA Core Physics Benchmark Progression Problem 7, Watts Bar Unit 1 at beginning of cycle hot full power equilibrium xenon conditions, is the first published coupled Monte Carlo neutronics/subchannel T-H solution for this problem. MC21/CTF predicted a critical boron concentration of 854.5 ppm, yielding a critical eigenvalue of 0.99994 ± 6.8E-6 (95% confidence interval. Excellent agreement with a VERA solution of Problem 7 was also demonstrated for integral and local power and temperature parameters.

  19. Finite element program ARKAS: verification for IAEA benchmark problem analysis on core-wide mechanical analysis of LMFBR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Tsuboi, Y.

    1990-01-01

    ''ARKAS'' code verification, with the problems set in the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the inter-comparison between liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) Core Mechanics Codes, is discussed. The CRP was co-ordinated by the IWGFR around problems set by Dr. R.G. Anderson (UKAEA) and arose from the IWGFR specialists' meeting on The Predictions and Experience of Core Distortion Behaviour (ref. 2). The problems for the verification (''code against code'') and validation (''code against experiment'') were set and calculated by eleven core mechanics codes from nine countries. All the problems have been completed and were solved with the core structural mechanics code ARKAS. Predictions by ARKAS agreed very well with other solutions for the well-defined verification problems. For the validation problems based on Japanese ex-reactor 2-D thermo-elastic experiments, the agreements between measured and calculated values were fairly good. This paper briefly describes the numerical model of the ARKAS code, and discusses some typical results. (author)

  20. Application of the SPH method in nodal diffusion analyses of SFR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Evgeny; Fridman, Emil [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Reactor Safety; Mikityuk, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The current study investigated the potential of the SPH method, applied to correct the few-group XS produced by Serpent, to further improve the accuracy of the nodal diffusion solutions. The procedure for the generation of SPH-corrected few-group XS is presented in the paper. The performance of the SPH method was tested on a large oxide SFR core from the OECD/NEA SFR benchmark. The reference SFR core was modeled with the DYN3D and PARCS nodal diffusion codes using the SPH-corrected few-group XS generated by Serpent. The nodal diffusion results obtained with and without SPH correction were compared to the reference full-core Serpent MC solution. It was demonstrated that the application of the SPH method improves the accuracy of the nodal diffusion solutions, particularly for the rodded core state.

  1. MC21 Monte Carlo analysis of the Hoogenboom-Martin full-core PWR benchmark problem - 301

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.J.; Sutton, Th.M.; Trumbull, T.H.; Dobreff, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    At the 2009 American Nuclear Society Mathematics and Computation conference, Hoogenboom and Martin proposed a full-core PWR model to monitor the improvement of Monte Carlo codes to compute detailed power density distributions. This paper describes the application of the MC21 Monte Carlo code to the analysis of this benchmark model. With the MC21 code, we obtained detailed power distributions over the entire core. The model consisted of 214 assemblies, each made up of a 17x17 array of pins. Each pin was subdivided into 100 axial nodes, thus resulting in over seven million tally regions. Various cases were run to assess the statistical convergence of the model. This included runs of 10 billion and 40 billion neutron histories, as well as ten independent runs of 4 billion neutron histories each. The 40 billion neutron-history calculation resulted in 43% of all regions having a 95% confidence level of 2% or less implying a relative standard deviation of 1%. Furthermore, 99.7% of regions having a relative power density of 1.0 or greater have a similar confidence level. We present timing results that assess the MC21 performance relative to the number of tallies requested. Source convergence was monitored by analyzing plots of the Shannon entropy and eigenvalue versus active cycle. We also obtained an estimate of the dominance ratio. Additionally, we performed an analysis of the error in an attempt to ascertain the validity of the confidence intervals predicted by MC21. Finally, we look forward to the prospect of full core 3-D Monte Carlo depletion by scoping out the required problem size. This study provides an initial data point for the Hoogenboom-Martin benchmark model using a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  2. Benchmarking Data Analysis and Machine Learning Applications on the Intel KNL Many-Core Processor

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Chansup; Kepner, Jeremy; Arcand, William; Bestor, David; Bergeron, Bill; Gadepally, Vijay; Houle, Michael; Hubbell, Matthew; Jones, Michael; Klein, Anna; Michaleas, Peter; Milechin, Lauren; Mullen, Julie; Prout, Andrew; Rosa, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Knights Landing (KNL) is the code name for the second-generation Intel Xeon Phi product family. KNL has generated significant interest in the data analysis and machine learning communities because its new many-core architecture targets both of these workloads. The KNL many-core vector processor design enables it to exploit much higher levels of parallelism. At the Lincoln Laboratory Supercomputing Center (LLSC), the majority of users are running data analysis applications such as MATLAB and O...

  3. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for space nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ludewig, H.

    1993-01-01

    The particle-bed reactor (PBR) system is being developed for use in the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program. This reactor system is characterized by a highly heterogeneous, compact configuration with many streaming pathways. The neutronics analyses performed for this system must be able to accurately predict reactor criticality, kinetics parameters, material worths at various temperatures, feedback coefficients, and detailed fission power and heating distributions. The latter includes coupled axial, radial, and azimuthal profiles. These responses constitute critical inputs and interfaces with the thermal-hydraulics design and safety analyses of the system

  4. European benchmark on the ASTRID-like low-void-effect core characterization: neutronic parameters and safety coefficients - 15361

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortot, S.; Mikityuk, K.; Panadero, A.L.; Pelloni, S.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Lopez, D.; Fridman, E.; Cruzado, I.G.; Herranz, N.G.; Ponomarev, A.; Sciora, P.; Vasile, A.; Seubert, A.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.

    2015-01-01

    A neutronic benchmark was launched with the participation of 8 European institutions using 10 codes and 4 data libraries, in order to study the main characteristics of a low-void-effect sodium-cooled fast spectrum core similar to the one of ASTRID at End-Of-Cycle conditions. The first results of this exercise are presented in this paper. As a major outcome of the study, the negative reactivity effect ensuing from the total voiding of the core was unanimously confirmed. Moreover, the code-to-code comparison allowed identifying a number of issues that require further clarifications and improvements. Some of them are mentioned here. The power generation in the non-fuel regions of the core was calculated by only 2 codes and the resulting result discrepancies reach 100%. Unexpected large discrepancies (up to 100 pcm) were observed in the Doppler constants predictions. The deviation of the Doppler effect's temperature dependence from a logarithmic law is also worth additional analysis. A discrepancy between nuclear data libraries (particularly between JEFF 3.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0) was observed in particular for the prediction of the CR worth

  5. Benchmarking and Accreditation Goals Support the Value of an Undergraduate Business Law Core Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine Neylon; Powers, Richard E.; Wesner, Thomas L.

    2018-01-01

    This article provides information about the value of a core course in business law and why it remains essential to business education. It goes on to identify highly ranked undergraduate business programs that require one or more business law courses. Using "Business Week" and "US News and World Report" to identify top…

  6. The code DYN3DR for steady-state and transient analyses of light water reactor cores with Cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.

    1995-11-01

    The code DYN3D/M2 was developed for 3-dimensional steady-state and transient analyses of reactor cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The neutron kinetics of the new version DYN3DR is based on a nodal method for the solution of the 3-dimensional 2-group neutron diffusion equation for Cartesian geometry. The thermal-hydraulic model FLOCAL simulating the two phase flow of coolant and the fuel rod behaviour is used in the two versions. The fundamentals for the solution of the neutron diffusion equations in DYN3DR are described. The 3-dimensional NEACRP benchmarks for rod ejections in LWR with quadratic fuel assemblies were calculated and the results were compared with the published solutions. The developed algorithm for neutron kinetics are suitable for using parallel processing. The behaviour of speed-up versus the number of processors is demonstrated for calculations of a static neutron flux distribution using a workstation with 4 processors. (orig.) [de

  7. Two-dimensional full-core transport theory Benchmarks for the WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, P.T.

    2002-01-01

    Several two-dimensional full-core real geometry many-group steady-state problems for the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors have been solved by the MARIKO code, based on the method of characteristics. The reference transport theory solutions include assembly-wise and pin-wise power distributions. Homogenized two-group diffusion parameters and discontinuity factors have been calculated by MARIKO for each assembly type both for the whole assembly and for each cell in the smallest sector of symmetry, using the B1 method for calculation of the critical spectrum. Accurate albedo-type boundary conditions have been calculated by MARIKO for the core-reflector and core-absorber boundaries, both for each outer assembly face and for each outer cell face. Comparison with the reference solutions of the two-group nodal diffusion code SPPS-1.6 and the few-group fine-mesh diffusion codes HEX2DA and HEX2DB are presented (Authors)

  8. Development of the evaluation methods in reactor safety analyses and core characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    In order to support the safety reviews by NRA on reactor safety design including the phenomena with multiple failures, the computer codes are developed and the safety evaluations with analyses are performed in the areas of thermal hydraulics and core characteristics evaluation. In the code preparation of safety analyses, the TRACE and RELAP5 code were prepared to conduct the safety analyses of LOCA and beyond design basis accidents with multiple failures. In the core physics code preparation, the functions of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis were incorporated in the lattice physics code CASMO-4. The verification of improved CASMO-4 /SIMULATE-3 was continued by using core physics data. (author)

  9. Bench top and portable mineral analysers, borehole core analysers and in situ borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howarth, W.J.; Watt, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    Bench top and portable mineral analysers are usually based on balanced filter techniques using scintillation detectors or on low resolution proportional detectors. The application of radioisotope x-ray techniques to in situ borehole logging is increasing, and is particularly suited for logging for tin and higher atomic number elements

  10. Development and application of neutron transport methods and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations. Technical report; Entwicklung und Einsatz von Neutronentransportmethoden und Unsicherheitsanalysen fuer Reaktorkernberechnungen. Technischer Bericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwermann, W.; Aures, A.; Bernnat, W.; and others

    2013-06-15

    This report documents the status of the research and development goals reached within the reactor safety research project RS1503 ''Development and Application of Neutron Transport Methods and Uncertainty Analyses for Reactor Core Calculations'' as of the 1{sup st} quarter of 2013. The superordinate goal of the project is the development, validation, and application of neutron transport methods and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations. These calculation methods will mainly be applied to problems related to the core behaviour of light water reactors and innovative reactor concepts. The contributions of this project towards achieving this goal are the further development, validation, and application of deterministic and stochastic calculation programmes and of methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, as well as the assessment of artificial neutral networks, for providing a complete nuclear calculation chain. This comprises processing nuclear basis data, creating multi-group data for diffusion and transport codes, obtaining reference solutions for stationary states with Monte Carlo codes, performing coupled 3D full core analyses in diffusion approximation and with other deterministic and also Monte Carlo transport codes, and implementing uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with the aim of propagating uncertainties through the whole calculation chain from fuel assembly, spectral and depletion calculations to coupled transient analyses. This calculation chain shall be applicable to light water reactors and also to innovative reactor concepts, and therefore has to be extensively validated with the help of benchmarks and critical experiments.

  11. Safety And Transient Analyses For Full Core Conversion Of The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong Ba Vien; Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2011-01-01

    Preparing for full core conversion of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), safety and transient analyses were carried out to confirm about ability to operate safely of proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) working core. The initial LEU core consisting 92 LEU fuel assemblies and 12 Beryllium rods was analyzed under initiating events of uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod, cooling pump failure, earthquake and fuel cladding fail. Working LEU core response were evaluated under these initial events based on RELAP/Mod3.2 computer code and other supported codes like ORIGEN, MCNP and MACCS2. Obtained results showed that safety of the reactor is maintained for all transients/accidents analyzed. (author)

  12. Spectrum integrated (n,He) cross section comparisons and least squares analyses for 6Li and 10B in benchmark fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, R.E.; Oliver, B.M.; Farrar, H. IV.

    1986-06-01

    Spectrum integrated cross sections for 6 Li and 10 B from five benchmark fast reactor neutron fields are compared with calculated values obtained using the ENDF/B-V Cross Section Files. The benchmark fields include the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the 10% Enriched U-235 Critical Assembly (BIG-10) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Sigma-Sigma and Fission Cavity fields of the BR-1 reactor at CEN/SCK, and the Intermediate Energy Standard Neutron Field (ISNF) at the National Bureau of Standards. Results from least square analyses using the FERRET computer code to obtain adjusted cross section values and their uncertainties are presented. Input to these calculations include the above five benchmark data sets. These analyses indicate a need for revision in the ENDF/B-V files for the 10 B and 6 Li cross sections for energies above 50 keV

  13. Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses of a Late Quaternary core in the Zaire (Congo) fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olausson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses have been carried out on samples from a core of the Angola Basin (6 0 50'S, 10 0 45'E, depth 2100 m). The pelagic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber, a species with a shallow water habitat, and two benthic species Uvigerina peregrina and Bulimina aculeata have been analysed. The data are given relative to PDB. (Auth.)

  14. Post test analyses of Revisa benchmark based on a creep test at 1100 Celsius degrees performed on a notched tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Bernard, A.; Bhandari, S.

    2001-01-01

    In the Euratom 4. Framework Program of the European Commission, REVISA Project deals with the Reactor Vessel Integrity under Severe Accidents. One of the tasks consists in the experimental validation of the models developed in the project. To do this, a benchmark was designed where the participants use their models to test the results against an experiment. The experiment called RUPTHER 15 was conducted by the coordinating organisation, CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) in France. It is a 'delayed fracture' test on a notched tube. Thermal loading is an axial gradient with a temperature of about 1130 C in the mid-part. Internal pressure is maintained at 0.8 MPa. This paper presents the results of Finite Element calculations performed by Framatome-ANP using the SYSTUS code. Two types of analyses were made: -) one based on the 'time hardening' Norton-Bailey creep law, -) the other based on the coupled creep/damage Lemaitre-Chaboche model. The purpose of this paper is in particular to show the influence of temperature on the simulation results. At high temperatures of the kind dealt with here, slight errors in the temperature measurements can lead to very large differences in the deformation behaviour. (authors)

  15. KAERI results for BN600 full MOX benchmark (Phase 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kibog Lee

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to report the results of KAERI's calculation for the Phase-4 of BN-600 full MOX fueled core benchmark analyses according to the RCM report of IAEA CRP Action on U pdated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects. T he BN-600 full MOX core model is based on the specification in the document, F ull MOX Model (Phase4. doc ) . This document addresses the calculational methods employed in the benchmark analyses and benchmark results carried out by KAERI

  16. HTR core physics and transient analyses by the Panthermix code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, J.B.M. de; Kuijper, J.C.; Oppe, J. [NRG - Fuels, Actinides and Isotopes group, Petten (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    At NRG Petten, core physics analyses on High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors (HTRs) are mainly performed by means of the PANTHERMIX code system. Since some years NRG is developing the HTR reactor physics code system WIMS/PANTHERMIX, based on the lattice code WIMS (Serco Assurance, UK), the 3-dimensional steady-state and transient core physics code PANTHER (British Energy, UK) and the 2-dimensional R-Z HTR thermal hydraulics code THERMIX-DIREKT (Research Centre FZJ Juelich, Germany). By means of the WIMS code nuclear data are being generated to suit the PANTHER code's neutronics. At NRG the PANTHER code has been interfaced with THERMIX-DIREKT to form PANTHERMIX, to enable core-follow/fuel management and transient analyses in a consistent manner on pebble bed type HTR systems. Also provisions have been made to simulate the flow of pebbles through the core of a pebble bed HTR, according to a given (R-Z) flow pattern. As examples of the versatility of the PANTHERMIX code system, calculations are presented on the PBMR, the South African pebble bed reactor design, to show the transient capabilities, and on a plutonium burning MEDUL-reactor, to demonstrate the core-follow/fuel management capabilities. For the investigated cases a good agreement is observed with the results of other HTR core physics codes.

  17. HTR core physics and transient analyses by the Panthermix code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, J.B.M. de; Kuijper, J.C.; Oppe, J.

    2005-01-01

    At NRG Petten, core physics analyses on High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors (HTRs) are mainly performed by means of the PANTHERMIX code system. Since some years NRG is developing the HTR reactor physics code system WIMS/PANTHERMIX, based on the lattice code WIMS (Serco Assurance, UK), the 3-dimensional steady-state and transient core physics code PANTHER (British Energy, UK) and the 2-dimensional R-Z HTR thermal hydraulics code THERMIX-DIREKT (Research Centre FZJ Juelich, Germany). By means of the WIMS code nuclear data are being generated to suit the PANTHER code's neutronics. At NRG the PANTHER code has been interfaced with THERMIX-DIREKT to form PANTHERMIX, to enable core-follow/fuel management and transient analyses in a consistent manner on pebble bed type HTR systems. Also provisions have been made to simulate the flow of pebbles through the core of a pebble bed HTR, according to a given (R-Z) flow pattern. As examples of the versatility of the PANTHERMIX code system, calculations are presented on the PBMR, the South African pebble bed reactor design, to show the transient capabilities, and on a plutonium burning MEDUL-reactor, to demonstrate the core-follow/fuel management capabilities. For the investigated cases a good agreement is observed with the results of other HTR core physics codes

  18. Nuclear safety analyses and core design calculations to convert the Texas A & M University Nuclear Science Center reactor to low enrichment uranium fuel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, T.A.

    1995-03-02

    This project involved performing the nuclear design and safety analyses needed to modify the license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to allow operation of the Texas A& M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) with a core containing low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. The specific type of LEU fuel to be considered was the TRIGA 20-20 fuel produced by General Atomic. Computer codes for the neutronic analyses were provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the assistance of William Woodruff of ANL in helping the NSCR staff to learn the proper use of the codes is gratefully acknowledged. The codes applied in the LEU analyses were WIMSd4/m, DIF3D, NCTRIGA and PARET. These codes allowed full three dimensional, temperature and burnup dependent calculations modelling the NSCR core to be performed for the first time. In addition, temperature coefficients of reactivity and pulsing calculations were carried out in-house, whereas in the past this modelling had been performed at General Atomic. In order to benchmark the newly acquired codes, modelling of the current NSCR core with highly enriched uranium fuel was also carried out. Calculated results were compared to both earlier licensing calculations and experimental data and the new methods were found to achieve excellent agreement with both. Therefore, even if an LEU core is never loaded at the NSCR, this project has resulted in a significant improvement in the nuclear safety analysis capabilities established and maintained at the NSCR.

  19. NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) Benchmark. Volume II: uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of void distribution and critical power - Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydogan, F.; Hochreiter, L.; Ivanov, K.; Martin, M.; Utsuno, H.; Sartori, E.

    2010-01-01

    experimental cases from the BFBT database for both steady-state void distribution and steady-state critical power uncertainty analyses. In order to study the basic thermal-hydraulics in a single channel, where the concern regarding the cross-flow effect modelling could be removed, an elemental task is proposed, consisting of two sub-tasks that are placed in each phase of the benchmark scope as follows: - Sub-task 1: Void fraction in elemental channel benchmark; - Sub-task 2: Critical power in elemental channel benchmark. The first task can also be utilised as an uncertainty analysis exercise for fine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for which the full bundle sensitivity or uncertainty analysis is more difficult. The task is added to the second volume of the specification as an optional exercise. Chapter 2 of this document provides the definition of UA/SA terms. Chapter 3 provides the selection and characterisation of the input uncertain parameters for the BFBT benchmark and the description of the elemental task. Chapter 4 describes the suggested approach for UA/SA of the BFBT benchmark. Chapter 5 provides the selection of data sets for the uncertainty analysis and the elemental task from the BFBT database. Chapter 6 specifies the requested output for void distribution and critical power uncertainty analyses (Exercises I-4 and II-3) as well as for the elemental task. Chapter 7 provides conclusions. Appendix 1 discusses the UA/SA methods. Appendix 2 presents the Phenomena Identification Ranking Tables (PIRT) developed at PSU for void distribution and critical power predictions in order to assist participants in selecting the most sensitive/uncertain code model parameters

  20. Verification of NUREC Code Transient Calculation Capability Using OECD NEA/US NRC PWR MOX/UO2 Core Transient Benchmark Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Lee, Hyung Chul; Yoo, Jae Woon

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we verified the NUREC code transient calculation capability using OECD NEA/US NRC PWR MOX/UO2 Core Transient Benchmark Problem. The benchmark problem consists of Part 1, a 2-D problem with given T/H conditions, Part 2, a 3-D problem at HFP condition, Part 3, a 3-D problem at HZP condition, and Part 4, a transient state initiated by a control rod ejection at HZP condition in Part 3. In Part 1, the results of NUREC code agreed well with the reference solution obtained from DeCART calculation except for the pin power distributions at the rodded assemblies. In Part 2, the results of NUREC code agreed well with the reference DeCART solutions. In Part 3, some results of NUREC code such as critical boron concentration and core averaged delayed neutron fraction agreed well with the reference PARCS 2G solutions. But the error of the assembly power at the core center was quite large. The pin power errors of NUREC code at the rodded assemblies was much smaller the those of PARCS code. The axial power distribution also agreed well with the reference solution. In Part 4, the results of NUREC code agreed well with those of PARCS 2G code which was taken as the reference solution. From the above results we can conclude that the results of NUREC code for steady states and transient states of the MOX loaded LWR core agree well with those of the other codes

  1. VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark. Phase 1 (V1000CT-1). Vol. 3: summary results of exercise 2 on coupled 3-D kinetics/core thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as current applications. (authors) Recently developed best-estimate computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present volume is a follow-up to the first two volumes. While the first described the specification of the benchmark, the second presented the results of the first exercise that identified the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermal-hydraulic system modelling of the simulated transient caused by the switching on of a main coolant pump when the other three were in operation. Volume 3 summarises the results for Exercise 2 of the benchmark that identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the 3-D neutron kinetics modelling of the simulated transient. These studies are based on an experiment that was conducted by Bulgarian and Russian engineers during the plant-commissioning phase at the VVER-1000 Kozloduy Unit 6. The final volume will soon be published, completing Phase 1 of this study. (authors)

  2. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  3. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2017). Key topic / Enhanced safety and operation excellence. Focus session: Uncertainty analyses in reactor core simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwermann, Winfried [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany). Forschungszentrum

    2017-12-15

    The supplementation of reactor simulations by uncertainty analyses is becoming increasingly important internationally due to the fact that the reliability of simulation calculations can be significantly increased by the quantification of uncertainties in comparison to the use of so-called conservative methods (BEPU- ''Best-Estimate plus Uncertainties''). While systematic uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculations have been performed routinely for a long time, methods for taking into account uncertainties in nuclear data, which are the basis for neutron transport calculations, are under development. The Focus Session Uncertainty Analyses in Reactor Core Simulations was intended to provide an overview of international research and development with respect to supplementing reactor core simulations with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, in research institutes as well as within the nuclear industry. The presented analyses not only focused on light water reactors, but also on advanced reactor systems. Particular emphasis was put on international benchmarks in the field. The session was chaired by Winfried Zwermann (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit).

  4. Array analyses of SmKS waves and the stratification of Earth's outermost core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshima, Satoshi

    2018-03-01

    We perform array analyses of SmKS waves in order to investigate the Vp structure of the Earth's outermost core. For earthquakes recorded by broadband seismometer networks in the world, we measure differential travel times between S3KS and S2KS, between S4KS and S3KS, and between S5KS and S3KS by array techniques. The differential times are well fit by a Vp model of the Earth's outermost core, KHOMC (Kaneshima and Helffrich, 2013). Differential slownesses of S4KS and S2KS relative to S2KS are also measured for the highest quality data. The measured slownesses, with unique sensitivity to the outer core 200-400 km below the CMB, are matched by KHOMC. These observations consolidate the evidence for the presence at the top of the outer core of a layer that has a distinctively steeper Vp gradient than the bulk of the outer core. We invert new SmKS differential time data set by a tau-p method and attempt to refine the Vp profile of KHOMC. The essential features of KHOMC are preserved after the model refinement. However, the newly estimated layer thickness is nearly 450 km, which is thicker than that of KHOMC. The Vp anomalies relative to PREM for the depths 400-800 km below the CMB are less than 0.03 km/s, consistent with the degree of agreement between different Vp models for the depth range.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of multi-core nanoparticles analysed using a generalised numerical inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, P.; Bogart, L. K.; Posth, O.; Szczerba, W.; Rogers, S. E.; Castro, A.; Nilsson, L.; Zeng, L. J.; Sugunan, A.; Sommertune, J.; Fornara, A.; González-Alonso, D.; Barquín, L. Fernández; Johansson, C.

    2017-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of magnetic multi-core particles were determined by numerical inversion of small angle scattering and isothermal magnetisation data. The investigated particles consist of iron oxide nanoparticle cores (9 nm) embedded in poly(styrene) spheres (160 nm). A thorough physical characterisation of the particles included transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Their structure was ultimately disclosed by an indirect Fourier transform of static light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering data of the colloidal dispersion. The extracted pair distance distribution functions clearly indicated that the cores were mostly accumulated in the outer surface layers of the poly(styrene) spheres. To investigate the magnetic properties, the isothermal magnetisation curves of the multi-core particles (immobilised and dispersed in water) were analysed. The study stands out by applying the same numerical approach to extract the apparent moment distributions of the particles as for the indirect Fourier transform. It could be shown that the main peak of the apparent moment distributions correlated to the expected intrinsic moment distribution of the cores. Additional peaks were observed which signaled deviations of the isothermal magnetisation behavior from the non-interacting case, indicating weak dipolar interactions. PMID:28397851

  6. Analyses of the stability and core taxonomic memberships of the human microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Li

    Full Text Available Analyses of the taxonomic diversity associated with the human microbiome continue to be an area of great importance. The study of the nature and extent of the commonly shared taxa ("core", versus those less prevalent, establishes a baseline for comparing healthy and diseased groups by quantifying the variation among people, across body habitats and over time. The National Institutes of Health (NIH sponsored Human Microbiome Project (HMP has provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine and better define what constitutes the taxonomic core within and across body habitats and individuals through pyrosequencing-based profiling of 16S rRNA gene sequences from oral, skin, distal gut (stool, and vaginal body habitats from over 200 healthy individuals. A two-parameter model is introduced to quantitatively identify the core taxonomic members of each body habitat's microbiota across the healthy cohort. Using only cutoffs for taxonomic ubiquity and abundance, core taxonomic members were identified for each of the 18 body habitats and also for the 4 higher-level body regions. Although many microbes were shared at low abundance, they exhibited a relatively continuous spread in both their abundance and ubiquity, as opposed to a more discretized separation. The numbers of core taxa members in the body regions are comparatively small and stable, reflecting the relatively high, but conserved, interpersonal variability within the cohort. Core sizes increased across the body regions in the order of: vagina, skin, stool, and oral cavity. A number of "minor" oral taxonomic core were also identified by their majority presence across the cohort, but with relatively low and stable abundances. A method for quantifying the difference between two cohorts was introduced and applied to samples collected on a second visit, revealing that over time, the oral, skin, and stool body regions tended to be more transient in their taxonomic structure than the vaginal body region.

  7. Development of the computer code system for the analyses of PWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Iwao; Naito, Yoshitaka.

    1992-11-01

    This report is one of the materials for the work titled 'Development of the computer code system for the analyses of PWR core phenomena', which is performed under contracts between Shikoku Electric Power Company and JAERI. In this report, the numerical method adopted in our computer code system are described, that is, 'The basic course and the summary of the analysing method', 'Numerical method for solving the Boltzmann equation', 'Numerical method for solving the thermo-hydraulic equations' and 'Description on the computer code system'. (author)

  8. Core design and fuel rod analyses of a super fast reactor with high power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Haitao; Cao, Liangzhi; Lu, Haoliang; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ishiwatari, Yuki

    2009-01-01

    A Super Fast Reactor is a pressure-vessel type, fast spectrum SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR) that is presently researched in a Japanese project. One of the most important advantages of the Super Fast Reactor is the higher power density compared to the thermal spectrum SCWR, which reduces the capital cost. A preliminary core has an average power density of 158.8W/cc. In this paper, the principle of improving the average power density is studied and the core design is improved. After the sensitivity analyses on the fuel rod configurations, the fuel assembly configurations and the core configurations, an improved core with an average power density of 294.8W/cc is designed by 3-D neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled calculations. This power density is competitive with that of typical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). In order to ensure the fuel rod integrity of this core design, the fuel rod behaviors on the normal operating condition are analyzed using FEMAXI-6 code. The power histories of each fuel rod are taken from the neutronics calculation results in the core design. The cladding surface temperature histories are taken from the thermal-hydraulic calculation results in the core design. Four types of the limiting fuel rods, with the Maximum Cladding Surface Temperature (MCST), Maximum Power Peak(MPP), Maximum Discharge Burnup(MDB) and Different Coolant Flow Pattern (DCFP), are chosen to cover all the fuel rods in the core. The available design range of the fuel rod design parameters, such as initial gas plenum pressure, gas plenum position, gas plenum length, grain size and gap size, are found out in order to satisfy the following design criteria: (1) Maximum fuel centerline temperature should be less than 1900degC. (2) Maximum cladding stress in circumstance direction should be less than 100MPa. (3) Pressure difference on the cladding should be less than 1/3 of buckling collapse pressure. (4) Cumulative damage faction (CDF) of the cladding should be

  9. Transient analyses for a molten salt fast reactor with optimized core geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, R., E-mail: rui.li@kit.edu [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Wang, S.; Rineiski, A.; Zhang, D. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Merle-Lucotte, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie – IN2P3 – CNRS/Grenoble INP/UJF, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • MSFR core is analyzed by fully coupling neutronics and thermal-hydraulics codes. • We investigated four types of transients intensively with the optimized core geometry. • It demonstrates MSFR has a high safety potential. - Abstract: Molten salt reactors (MSRs) have encountered a marked resurgence of interest over the past decades, highlighted by their inclusion as one of the six candidate reactors of the Generation IV advanced nuclear power systems. The present work is carried out in the framework of the European FP-7 project EVOL (Evaluation and Viability Of Liquid fuel fast reactor system). One of the project tasks is to report on safety analyses: calculations of reactor transients using various numerical codes for the molten salt fast reactor (MSFR) under different boundary conditions, assumptions, and for different selected scenarios. Based on the original reference core geometry, an optimized geometry was proposed by Rouch et al. (2014. Ann. Nucl. Energy 64, 449) on thermal-hydraulic design aspects to avoid a recirculation zone near the blanket which accumulates heat and very high temperature exceeding the salt boiling point. Using both fully neutronics thermal-hydraulic coupled codes (SIMMER and COUPLE), we also re-confirm the efforts step by step toward a core geometry without the recirculation zone in particular as concerns the modifications of the core geometrical shape. Different transients namely Unprotected Loss of Heat Sink (ULOHS), Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF), Unprotected Transient Over Power (UTOP), Fuel Salt Over Cooling (FSOC) are intensively investigated and discussed with the optimized core geometry. It is demonstrated that due to inherent negative feedbacks, an MSFR plant has a high safety potential.

  10. Scientific Drilling of Impact Craters - Well Logging and Core Analyses Using Magnetic Methods (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Velasco-Villarreal, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drilling projects of impact structures provide data on the structure and stratigraphy of target, impact and post-impact lithologies, providing insight on the impact dynamics and cratering. Studies have successfully included magnetic well logging and analyses in core and cuttings, directed to characterize the subsurface stratigraphy and structure at depth. There are 170-180 impact craters documented in the terrestrial record, which is a small proportion compared to expectations derived from what is observed on the Moon, Mars and other bodies of the solar system. Knowledge of the internal 3-D deep structure of craters, critical for understanding impacts and crater formation, can best be studied by geophysics and drilling. On Earth, few craters have yet been investigated by drilling. Craters have been drilled as part of industry surveys and/or academic projects, including notably Chicxulub, Sudbury, Ries, Vredefort, Manson and many other craters. As part of the Continental ICDP program, drilling projects have been conducted on the Chicxulub, Bosumtwi, Chesapeake, Ries and El gygytgyn craters. Inclusion of continuous core recovery expanded the range of paleomagnetic and rock magnetic applications, with direct core laboratory measurements, which are part of the tools available in the ocean and continental drilling programs. Drilling studies are here briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the Chicxulub crater formed by an asteroid impact 66 Ma ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. Chicxulub crater has no surface expression, covered by a kilometer of Cenozoic sediments, thus making drilling an essential tool. As part of our studies we have drilled eleven wells with continuous core recovery. Magnetic susceptibility logging, magnetostratigraphic, rock magnetic and fabric studies have been carried out and results used for lateral correlation, dating, formation evaluation, azimuthal core orientation and physical property contrasts. Contributions of magnetic studies on impact

  11. Results of neutron physics analyses of WWER-440 cores with modified reactor protection and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.; Pecka, M.; Rocek, J.; Zalesky, K.

    1993-12-01

    Detailed results are given of neutron physics analyses performed to assess the efficiency and acceptability of modifications of the WWER-440 core protection and control system; the modifications have been proposed with a view to increasing the proportion of mechanical control in the compensation of reactivity effects during reactor unit operation in the variable load mode. The calculations were carried out using the modular MOBY-DICK macrocode system together with the SMV42G36 library of two-group parametrized diffusion constants, containing corrections which allow new-design WWER-440 fuel assemblies to be discriminated. (J.B). 37 tabs., 18 figs., 5 refs

  12. Benchmark Comparison of Dual- and Quad-Core Processor Linux Clusters with Two Global Climate Modeling Workloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGalliard, James

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation details the science and systems environments that NASA High End computing program serves. Included is a discussion of the workload that is involved in the processing for the Global Climate Modeling. The Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) is a system of models integrated using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). The GEOS-5 system was used for the Benchmark tests, and the results of the tests are shown and discussed. Tests were also run for the Cubed Sphere system, results for these test are also shown.

  13. Dynamic benchmarking of simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Paik, C.Y.; Hauser, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Computer simulation of nuclear power plant response can be a full-scope control room simulator, an engineering simulator to represent the general behavior of the plant under normal and abnormal conditions, or the modeling of the plant response to conditions that would eventually lead to core damage. In any of these, the underlying foundation for their use in analysing situations, training of vendor/utility personnel, etc. is how well they represent what has been known from industrial experience, large integral experiments and separate effects tests. Typically, simulation codes are benchmarked with some of these; the level of agreement necessary being dependent upon the ultimate use of the simulation tool. However, these analytical models are computer codes, and as a result, the capabilities are continually enhanced, errors are corrected, new situations are imposed on the code that are outside of the original design basis, etc. Consequently, there is a continual need to assure that the benchmarks with important transients are preserved as the computer code evolves. Retention of this benchmarking capability is essential to develop trust in the computer code. Given the evolving world of computer codes, how is this retention of benchmarking capabilities accomplished? For the MAAP4 codes this capability is accomplished through a 'dynamic benchmarking' feature embedded in the source code. In particular, a set of dynamic benchmarks are included in the source code and these are exercised every time the archive codes are upgraded and distributed to the MAAP users. Three different types of dynamic benchmarks are used: plant transients; large integral experiments; and separate effects tests. Each of these is performed in a different manner. The first is accomplished by developing a parameter file for the plant modeled and an input deck to describe the sequence; i.e. the entire MAAP4 code is exercised. The pertinent plant data is included in the source code and the computer

  14. Comparative Neutronics Analysis of DIMPLE S06 Criticality Benchmark with Contemporary Reactor Core Analysis Computer Code Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonkyeong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-leakage core has been known to be a challenging problem not only for a two-step homogenization approach but also for a direct heterogeneous approach. In this paper the DIMPLE S06 core, which is a small high-leakage core, has been analyzed by a direct heterogeneous modeling approach and by a two-step homogenization modeling approach, using contemporary code systems developed for reactor core analysis. The focus of this work is a comprehensive comparative analysis of the conventional approaches and codes with a small core design, DIMPLE S06 critical experiment. The calculation procedure for the two approaches is explicitly presented in this paper. Comprehensive comparative analysis is performed by neutronics parameters: multiplication factor and assembly power distribution. Comparison of two-group homogenized cross sections from each lattice physics codes shows that the generated transport cross section has significant difference according to the transport approximation to treat anisotropic scattering effect. The necessity of the ADF to correct the discontinuity at the assembly interfaces is clearly presented by the flux distributions and the result of two-step approach. Finally, the two approaches show consistent results for all codes, while the comparison with the reference generated by MCNP shows significant error except for another Monte Carlo code, SERPENT2.

  15. Benchmarking and qualification of the NUFREQ-NPW code for best estimate prediction of multi-channel core stability margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; McFarlane, A.F.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The NUFREQ-NPW code was modified and set up at Westinghouse, USA for mixed fuel type multi-channel core-wide stability analysis. The resulting code, NUFREQ-NPW, allows for variable axial power profiles between channel groups and can handle mixed fuel types. Various models incorporated into NUFREQ-NPW were systematically compared against the Westinghouse channel stability analysis code MAZDA-NF, for which the mathematical model was developed, in an entirely different manner. Excellent agreement was obtained which verified the thermal-hydraulic modeling and coding aspects. Detailed comparisons were also performed against nuclear-coupled reactor core stability data. All thirteen Peach Bottom-2 EOC-2/3 low flow stability tests were simulated. A key aspect for code qualification involved the development of a physically based empirical algorithm to correct for the effect of core inlet flow development on subcooled boiling. Various other modeling assumptions were tested and sensitivity studies performed. Good agreement was obtained between NUFREQ-NPW predictions and data. Moreover, predictions were generally on the conservative side. The results of detailed direct comparisons with experimental data using the NUFREQ-NPW code; have demonstrated that BWR core stability margins are conservatively predicted, and all data trends are captured with good accuracy. The methodology is thus suitable for BWR design and licensing purposes. 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecchia, M.; D' Auria, F. [San Piero A Grado Nuclear Research Group GRNSPG, Univ. of Pisa, via Diotisalvi, 2, 56122 - Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, O. [Nucleo-electrica Argentina Societad Anonima NA-SA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  17. Joint European contribution to phases 1 and 2 of the BN600 hybrid reactor benchmark core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpault, Gerald; Newton, Tim; Smith, Peter

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the ERANOS code developed within the European cooperation on fast reactors. Reference scheme and ERANOS code validation are included. The method for BN-600 reactor core analysis and the results of phases 1 and two are presented. They include effective multiplication factors, fuel Doppler constants; steel Doppler constants; sodium density coefficient; steel density coefficients; fuel density coefficient; absorber density coefficient; axial and radial expansion coefficients; dynamic parameters; power distribution; beta and neutron life time; reaction rate distribution

  18. Benchmarking and qualification of the ppercase nufreq -ppercase npw code for best estimate prediction of multichannel core stability margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; McFarlane, A.F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1994-01-01

    The ppercase nufreq - ppercase np (G.C. Park et al. NUREG/CR-3375, 1983; S.J. Peng et al. NUREG/CR-4116, 1984; S.J. Peng et al. Nucl. Sci. Eng. 88 (1988) 404-411) code was modified and set up at Westinghouse, USA, for mixed fuel type multichannel core-wide stability analysis. The resulting code, ppercase nufreq - ppercase npw , allows for variable axial power profiles between channel groups and can handle mixed fuel types.Various models incorporated into ppercase nurfreq - ppercase npw were systematically compared against the Westinghouse channel stability analysis code ppercase mazda -ppercase nf (R. Taleyarkhan et al. J. Heat Transfer 107 (February 1985) 175-181; NUREG/CR2972, 1983), for which the mathematical model was developed in an entirely different manner. Excellent agreement was obtained which verified the thermal-hydraulic modeling and coding aspects. Detailed comparisons were also performed against nuclear-coupled reactor core stability data. All 13 Peach Bottom-2 EOC-2/3 low flow stability tests (L.A. Carmichael and R.O. Neimi, EPRI NP-564, Project 1020-1, 1978; F.B. Woffinden and R.O. Neimi, EPRI, NP 0972, Project 1020-2, 1981) were simulated. A key aspect for code qualification involved the development of a physically based empirical algorithm to correct for the effect of core inlet flow development on subcooled boiling. Various other modeling assumptions were tested and sensitivity studies performed. Good agreement was obtained between ppercase nufreq-npw predictions and data. ((orig.))

  19. Neutron Fluence, Dosimetry and Damage Response Determination in In-Core/Ex-Core Components of the VENUS CEN/SCK LWR Using 3-D Monte Carlo Simulations: NEA's VENUS-3 Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlado, J. Manuel; Marian, Jaime; Sanz, Jesus Garcia

    2000-01-01

    Validating state-of-the-art methods used to predict fluence exposure to reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) has become an important issue in identifying the sources of uncertainty in the estimated RPV fluence for pressurized water reactors. This is a very important aspect in evaluating irradiation damage leading to the hardening and embrittlement of such structural components. One of the major benchmark experiments carried out to test three-dimensional methodologies is the VENUS-3 Benchmark Experiment in which three-dimensional Monte Carlo and S n codes have proved more efficient than synthesis methods. At the Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (DENIM) at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, a detailed full three-dimensional model of the Venus Critical Facility has been developed making use of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP4B. The problem geometry and source modeling are described, and results, including calculated versus experimental (C/E) ratios as well as additional studies, are presented. Evidence was found that the great majority of C/E values fell within the 10% tolerance and most within 5%. Tolerance limits are discussed on the basis of evaluated data library and fission spectra sensitivity, where a value ranging between 10 to 15% should be accepted. Also, a calculation of the atomic displacement rate has been carried out in various locations throughout the reactor, finding that values of 0.0001 displacements per atom in external components such as the core barrel are representative of this type of reactor during a 30-yr time span

  20. Analysis of an OECD/NEA high-temperature reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosking, J. G.; Newton, T. D.; Koeberl, O.; Morris, P.; Goluoglu, S.; Tombakoglu, T.; Colak, U.; Sartori, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes analyses of the OECD/NEA HTR benchmark organized by the 'Working Party on the Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS)', formerly the 'Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles'. The benchmark was specifically designed to provide inter-comparisons for plutonium and thorium fuels when used in HTR systems. Calculations considering uranium fuel have also been included in the benchmark, in order to identify any increased uncertainties when using plutonium or thorium fuels. The benchmark consists of five phases, which include cell and whole-core calculations. Analysis of the benchmark has been performed by a number of international participants, who have used a range of deterministic and Monte Carlo code schemes. For each of the benchmark phases, neutronics parameters have been evaluated. Comparisons are made between the results of the benchmark participants, as well as comparisons between the predictions of the deterministic calculations and those from detailed Monte Carlo calculations. (authors)

  1. Applying CLSM to increment core surfaces for histometric analyses: A novel advance in quantitative wood anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Liang; Ingo Heinrich; Gerhard Helle; I. Dorado Liñán; T. Heinken

    2013-01-01

    A novel procedure has been developed to conduct cell structure measurements on increment core samples of conifers. The procedure combines readily available hardware and software equipment. The essential part of the procedure is the application of a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) which captures images directly from increment cores surfaced with the advanced WSL core-microtome. Cell wall and lumen are displayed with a strong contrast due to the monochrome black and green nature of th...

  2. An integrated software system for core design and safety analyses: Cascade-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan De Velde, A.; Finnemann, H.; Hahn, T.; Merk, S.

    1999-01-01

    The new Siemens program system CASCADE-3D (Core Analysis and Safety Codes for Advanced Design Evaluation) links some of the most advanced code packages for in-core fuel management and accident analysis: SAV95, PANBOX/COBRA and RELAP5. Consequently by using CASCADE-3D the potential of modern fuel assemblies and in-core fuel management strategies can be much better utilized because safety margins which had been reduced due to conservative methods are now predicted more accurately. By this innovative code system the customers can now take full advantage of the recent progress in fuel assembly design and in-core fuel management. (authors)

  3. Development of a 3-dimensional calculation model of the Danish research reactor DR3 to analyse a proposal to a new core design called ring-core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonboel, E

    1985-07-01

    A 3-dimensional calculation model of the Danish research reactor DR3 has been developed. Demands of a more effective utilization of the reactor and its facilities has required a more detailed calculation tool than applied so far. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the treatment of the coarse control arms. The model has been tested against measurements with satisfying results. Furthermore the model has been used to analyse a proposal to a new core design called ring-core where 4 central fuel elements are replaced by 4 dummy elements to increase the thermal flux in the center of the reactor. (author)

  4. Analyses on the BFS critical experiments. An analysis on the BFS-62-1 and 62-2 cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Kazuteru; Shono, Akira

    2002-04-01

    In order to support the Russian excess weapons plutonium disposition, the international collaboration has been started between Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Russian Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE). In the frame of the collaboration, JNC has carried out analyses on the BFS-62 assemblies that are constructed in the fast reactor critical experimental facility BFS-2 of IPPE. This report summarizes an experimental analysis on the BFS-62-1 and BFS-62-2 cores. The BFS-62-1 core models the present BN-600, and contains the enriched UO 2 fuel surrounded by the UO 2 blanket. The BFS-62-2 core has the same layout as the BFS-62-1 but the blanket region was replaced with stainless steel shied. For core parameter analyses, the 3-D Hexagonal-Z or XYZ geometry model was applied by not only diffusion calculation but also transport calculation. Further in terms of the utilization of the BFS experimental analysis data for the standard data base for FBR core design, consistency evaluation with JUPITER experimental analysis data has been performed using the cross-section adjustment method. As the result of analyses, good agreement was obtained between calculations and experiments for the criticality, the reaction rate ratio and reaction rate distribution in BFS-62-1. In the reaction rate distribution of BFS-62-2 calculation without cross-section adjustment produced big radial dependency of calculation over experiment value (C/E value) in the core region and overestimation in the shield region. Cross-section adjustment technique procedure improved those estimation, however alternation of cross-section of Iron, which was dominant in above improvement, compared to the cross-section error, and further investigation was required. Concerning the control rod worth of BFS-62-1, radial dependency of the C/E value was observed whether cross-section adjustment technique was applied or not, therefore comparison with results of other BFS-62 cores analyses is

  5. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 2. TRAB-3D/SMABRE Calculation of the OECD/ NRC PWR MSLB Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, A.; Haemaelaeinen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.

    2001-01-01

    All three exercises of the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark were calculated at VTT Energy. The SMABRE thermal-hydraulics code was used for the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetics neutronics. The second exercise was calculated with the TRAB-3D three-dimensional reactor dynamics code. The third exercise was calculated with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. Both codes have been developed at VTT Energy. The results of all the exercises agree reasonably well with those of the other participants; thus, instead of reporting the results, this paper concentrates on describing the computational aspects of the calculation with the foregoing codes and on some observations of the sensitivity of the results. In the TRAB-3D neutron kinetics, the two-group diffusion equations are solved in homogenized fuel assembly geometry with an efficient two-level nodal method. The point of the two-level iteration scheme is that only one unknown variable per node, the average neutron flux, is calculated during the inner iteration. The nodal flux shapes and cross sections are recalculated only once in the outer iteration loop. The TRAB-3D core model includes also parallel one-dimensional channel hydraulics with detailed fuel models. Advanced implicit time discretization methods are used in all submodels. SMABRE is a fast-running five-equation model completed by a drift-flux model, with a time discretization based on a non-iterative semi-implicit algorithm. For the third exercise of the benchmark, the TMI-1 models of TRAB-3D and SMABRE were coupled. This was the first time these codes were coupled together. However, similar coupling of the HEXTRAN and SMABRE codes has been shown to be stable and efficient, when used in safety analyses of Finnish and foreign VVER-type reactors. The coupling used between the two codes is called a parallel coupling. SMABRE solves the thermal hydraulics both in the cooling circuit and in the core

  6. EPRI depletion benchmark calculations using PARAGON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucukboyaci, Vefa N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PARAGON depletion calculations are benchmarked against the EPRI reactivity decrement experiments. • Benchmarks cover a wide range of enrichments, burnups, cooling times, and burnable absorbers, and different depletion and storage conditions. • Results from PARAGON-SCALE scheme are more conservative relative to the benchmark data. • ENDF/B-VII based data reduces the excess conservatism and brings the predictions closer to benchmark reactivity decrement values. - Abstract: In order to conservatively apply burnup credit in spent fuel pool criticality analyses, code validation for both fresh and used fuel is required. Fresh fuel validation is typically done by modeling experiments from the “International Handbook.” A depletion validation can determine a bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of the isotopes not found in the fresh fuel critical experiments. Westinghouse’s burnup credit methodology uses PARAGON™ (Westinghouse 2-D lattice physics code) and its 70-group cross-section library, which have been benchmarked, qualified, and licensed both as a standalone transport code and as a nuclear data source for core design simulations. A bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of depletion isotopes, however, are not available for PARAGON. Instead, the 5% decrement approach for depletion uncertainty is used, as set forth in the Kopp memo. Recently, EPRI developed a set of benchmarks based on a large set of power distribution measurements to ascertain reactivity biases. The depletion reactivity has been used to create 11 benchmark cases for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 GWd/MTU and 3 cooling times 100 h, 5 years, and 15 years. These benchmark cases are analyzed with PARAGON and the SCALE package and sensitivity studies are performed using different cross-section libraries based on ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII data to assess that the 5% decrement approach is conservative for determining depletion uncertainty

  7. Analyses and results of the OECD/NEA WPNCS EGUNF benchmark phase II. Technical report; Analysen und Ergebnisse zum OECD/NEA WPNCS EGUNF Benchmark Phase II. Technischer Bericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, Volker; Sommer, Fabian

    2017-05-15

    The report summarizes the performed studies and results in the frame of the phase II benchmarks of the expert group of used nuclear fuel (EGUNF) of the working party of nuclear criticality safety (WPNCS) of the nuclear energy agency (NEA) of the organization for economic co-operation and development (OECD). The studies specified within the benchmarks have been realized to the full extent. The scope of the benchmarks was the comparison of a generic BWR fuel element with gadolinium containing fuel rods with several computer codes and cross section libraries of different international working groups and institutions. The used computational model allows the evaluation of the accuracy of fuel rod and their influence of the inventory calculations and the respective influence on BWR burnout credit calculations.

  8. Preliminary scoping safety analyses of the limiting design basis protected accidents for the Fast Flux Test Facility tritium production core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The SAS4A/SASSYS-l computer code is used to perform a series of analyses for the limiting protected design basis transient events given a representative tritium and medical isotope production core design proposed for the Fast Flux Test Facility. The FFTF tritium and isotope production mission will require a different core loading which features higher enrichment fuel, tritium targets, and medical isotope production assemblies. Changes in several key core parameters, such as the Doppler coefficient and delayed neutron fraction will affect the transient response of the reactor. Both reactivity insertion and reduction of heat removal events were analyzed. The analysis methods and modeling assumptions are described. Results of the analyses and comparison against fuel pin performance criteria are presented to provide quantification that the plant protection system is adequate to maintain the necessary safety margins and assure cladding integrity

  9. Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The IAEA supports Member States in the area of advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA support, and ensures that all technical activities are in line with expressed needs of Member States. Among this broad range, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs), aimed at improving Member State capability in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to perform collaborative research activities was provided by the system startup tests carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the prototype loop type sodium cooled fast reactor Monju, in particular a turbine trip test performed in December 1995. As the JAEA opened the experimental dataset to international collaboration in 2008, the IAEA launched the CRP on Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. The CRP, together with eight institutes from seven States, has contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactors simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on thermal stratification and natural circulation phenomena

  10. JENDL-3.2 performance in analyses of MISTRAL critical experiments for high-moderation MOX cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Naoyuki; Hibi, Koki; Ishii, Kazuya; Ando, Yoshihira; Yamamoto, Toru; Ueji, Masao; Iwata, Yutaka

    2001-01-01

    NUPEC and CEA have launched an extensive experimental program called MISTRAL to study highly moderated MOX cores for the advanced LWRs. The analyses using SRAC system and MVP code with JENDL-3.2 library are in progress on the experiments of the MISTRAL and the former EPICURE programs. Various comparisons have been made between calculation results and measurement values. (author)

  11. A STRONGLY COUPLED REACTOR CORE ISOLATION COOLING SYSTEM MODEL FOR EXTENDED STATION BLACK-OUT ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Laboratory; Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup cooling water to the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. The RCIC system operates independently of AC power, service air, or external cooling water systems. The only required external energy source is from the battery to maintain the logic circuits to control the opening and/or closure of valves in the RCIC systems in order to control the RPV water level by shutting down the RCIC pump to avoid overfilling the RPV and flooding the steam line to the RCIC turbine. It is generally considered in almost all the existing station black-out accidents (SBO) analyses that loss of the DC power would result in overfilling the steam line and allowing liquid water to flow into the RCIC turbine, where it is assumed that the turbine would then be disabled. This behavior, however, was not observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accidents, where the Unit 2 RCIC functioned without DC power for nearly three days. Therefore, more detailed mechanistic models for RCIC system components are needed to understand the extended SBO for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the next generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, we have developed a strongly coupled RCIC system model, which consists of a turbine model, a pump model, a check valve model, a wet well model, and their coupling models. Unlike the traditional SBO simulations where mass flow rates are typically given in the input file through time dependent functions, the real mass flow rates through the turbine and the pump loops in our model are dynamically calculated according to conservation laws and turbine/pump operation curves. A simplified SBO demonstration RELAP-7 model with this RCIC model has been successfully developed. The demonstration model includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety

  12. Library Benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiji Suwarno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The term benchmarking has been encountered in the implementation of total quality (TQM or in Indonesian termed holistic quality management because benchmarking is a tool to look for ideas or learn from the library. Benchmarking is a processof measuring and comparing for continuous business process of systematic and continuous measurement, the process of measuring and comparing for continuous business process of an organization to get information that can help these organization improve their performance efforts.

  13. Numerical investigation on turbulent natural convection in partially connected cylindrical enclosures for analysing SFR safety under core meltdown scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Dijo K.; Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Under the unlikely event of severe core meltdown accident in pool type SFR, the molten core materials may rupture the grid plate which supports the fuel subassemblies and it can get relocated in to the lower pool. These debris may eventually settle on the debris collector (i.e., core catcher) installed above the bottom wall of the lower pool. The bed thus formed generates heat due to radioactive decay which has to be passively removed for maintaining the structural integrity of main vessel. By means of natural convection, the heat generated in the debris bed will be transferred to the top pool where the heat sink (i.e., Decay heat exchanger (DHX)) is installed. Heat transfer to the DHX (which is a part of safety grade decay heat removal system) can take place through the opening created in the grid plate which connects the two liquid pools (i.e., the top pool and the lower pool). Heat transfer can also take place through the lateral wall of the lower cylindrical pool to the side pool and eventually to the top pool, and thus to the DHX. This study numerically investigates the effectiveness of heat transfer between lower pool and top pool during PARR by considering them as partially connected cylindrical enclosures. The governing equations have been numerically solved using finite volume method in cylindrical co-ordinates using SIMPLE algorithm. Turbulence has been modeled using k-ω model and the model is validated against benchmark problems of natural convection found in literature. The effect of parameters such as the heat generation rate in the bed and the size of the grid plate opening are evaluated. Also PAHR in SFR pool is modeled using an axi-symmetric model to fund out the influence of grid plate opening on heat removal from core catcher. The results obtained are useful for improving the cooling capability of in-vessel tray type core catcher for handling the whole core meltdown scenarios in SFR. (author)

  14. Benchmarking and Learning in Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckmaster, Natalie; Mouritsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of learning-oriented benchmarking in public healthcare settings. Benchmarking is a widely adopted yet little explored accounting practice that is part of the paradigm of New Public Management. Extant studies are directed towards mandated coercive benchmarking...... applications. The present study analyses voluntary benchmarking in a public setting that is oriented towards learning. The study contributes by showing how benchmarking can be mobilised for learning and offers evidence of the effects of such benchmarking for performance outcomes. It concludes that benchmarking...... can enable learning in public settings but that this requires actors to invest in ensuring that benchmark data are directed towards improvement....

  15. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  16. RUNE benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo

    This report contains the description of a number of benchmarks with the purpose of evaluating flow models for near-shore wind resource estimation. The benchmarks are designed based on the comprehensive database of observations that the RUNE coastal experiment established from onshore lidar...

  17. Benchmark selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2002-01-01

    Within a production theoretic framework, this paper considers an axiomatic approach to benchmark selection. It is shown that two simple and weak axioms; efficiency and comprehensive monotonicity characterize a natural family of benchmarks which typically becomes unique. Further axioms are added...... in order to obtain a unique selection...

  18. Review of pertinent thermal-hydraulic data for LMFBR core natural circulation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, A.A.; Coffield, R.D. Jr.; Markley, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A literature review and summary of significant data is presented relative to LMFBR core natural convection cooling analysis. First, a brief review of computer codes and respective input data needs is made, significant data areas are then addressed and data for verifying the code calculations are described. Recommendations and conclusions with regard to the data are included

  19. Benchmark Analyses on the Control Rod Withdrawal Tests Performed During the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008–2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The IAEA supports Member State activities in advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. In the broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at improving Member States’ capabilities in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to conduct collaborative research activities was provided by the experimental campaign run by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA, Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives) at the PHÉNIX, a prototype sodium cooled fast reactor. Before the definitive shutdown in 2009, end-of-life tests were conducted to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. Thanks to the CEA opening the experiments to international cooperation, the IAEA decided in 2007 to launch the CRP entitled Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. The CRP, together with institutes from seven States, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this publication is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the control rod withdrawal test performed within the framework of the PHÉNIX end-of-life experimental campaign

  20. Benchmark Analyses on the Natural Circulation Test Performed During the PHENIX End-of-Life Experiments. Final Report of a Co-ordinated Research Project 2008-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports Member State activities in the area of advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a forum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The Agency's activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. Among its broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at the improvement of Member State capabilities in the area of fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to undertake collaborative research was provided by the experimental campaign of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in the prototype sodium fast reactor PHENIX before it was shut down in 2009. The overall purpose of the end of life tests was to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. As the CEA opened the experiments to international cooperation, in 2007 the IAEA launched a CRP on ''Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHENIX End-of-Life Experiments''. The CRP, with the participation of institutes from eight countries, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this report is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the natural circulation test performed in the framework of the PHENIX end of life experimental campaign

  1. Benchmark Analyses on the Control Rod Withdrawal Tests Performed During the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008–2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-06-15

    The IAEA supports Member State activities in advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. In the broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at improving Member States’ capabilities in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to conduct collaborative research activities was provided by the experimental campaign run by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA, Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives) at the PHÉNIX, a prototype sodium cooled fast reactor. Before the definitive shutdown in 2009, end-of-life tests were conducted to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. Thanks to the CEA opening the experiments to international cooperation, the IAEA decided in 2007 to launch the CRP entitled Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. The CRP, together with institutes from seven States, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this publication is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the control rod withdrawal test performed within the framework of the PHÉNIX end-of-life experimental campaign.

  2. Accidents and transients analyses of a super fast reactor with single flow pass core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutanto,; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Safety analysis of a Super FR with single flow pass core is conducted. • Loss of feed water flow leads to a direct effect on the loss of fuel channel flow. • The core pressure is sensitive to LOCA accidents due to the direct effect. • Small LOCA introduces a critical break. • The safety criteria for all selected events are satisfied. - Abstract: The supercritical water cooled fast reactor with single flow pass core has been designed to simplify refueling and the structures of upper and lower mixing plenums. To evaluate the safety performance, safety analysis has been conducted with regard to LOCA and non-LOCA accidents including transient events. Safety analysis results show that the safety criteria are satisfied for all selected events. The total loss of feed water flow is the most important accident which the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) is high due to a direct effect of the accident on the total loss of flow in all fuel assemblies. However, actuation of the ADS can mitigate the accident. Small LOCA also introduces a critical break at 7.8% break which results high MCST at BOC because the scram and ADS are not actuated. Early ADS actuation is effective to mitigate the accident. In large LOCA, 100% break LOCA results a high MCST of flooding phase at BOC due to high power peaking at the bottom part. Use of high injection flow rate by 2 LPCI units is effective to decrease the MCST

  3. WLUP benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA-WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP) is on the end stage. The final library will be released on 2002. It is a result of research and development made by more than ten investigators during 10 years. The organization of benchmarks for testing and choosing the best set of data has been coordinated by the author of this paper. It is presented the organization, name conventions, contents and documentation of WLUP benchmarks, and an updated list of the main parameters for all cases. First, the benchmarks objectives and types are given. Then, comparisons of results from different WIMSD libraries are included. Finally it is described the program QVALUE for analysis and plot of results. Some examples are given. The set of benchmarks implemented on this work is a fundamental tool for testing new multigroup libraries. (author)

  4. Quantitative Analyses of Core Promoters Enable Precise Engineering of Regulated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ede, Christopher; Chen, Ximin; Lin, Meng-Yin; Chen, Yvonne Y.

    2016-01-01

    Inducible transcription systems play a crucial role in a wide array of synthetic biology circuits. However, the majority of inducible promoters are constructed from a limited set of tried-and-true promoter parts, which are susceptible to common shortcomings such as high basal expression levels (i.e., leakiness). To expand the toolbox for regulated mammalian gene expression and facilitate the construction of mammalian genetic circuits with precise functionality, we quantitatively characterized a panel of eight core promoters, including sequences with mammalian, viral, and synthetic origins. We demonstrate that this selection of core promoters can provide a wide range of basal gene expression levels and achieve a gradient of fold-inductions spanning two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, commonly used parts such as minimal CMV and minimal SV40 promoters were shown to achieve robust gene expression upon induction, but also suffer from high levels of leakiness. In contrast, a synthetic promoter, YB_TATA, was shown to combine low basal expression with high transcription rate in the induced state to achieve significantly higher fold-induction ratios compared to all other promoters tested. These behaviors remain consistent when the promoters are coupled to different genetic outputs and different response elements, as well as across different host-cell types and DNA copy numbers. We apply this quantitative understanding of core promoter properties to the successful engineering of human T cells that respond to antigen stimulation via chimeric antigen receptor signaling specifically under hypoxic environments. Results presented in this study can facilitate the design and calibration of future mammalian synthetic biology systems capable of precisely programmed functionality. PMID:26883397

  5. Regional Competitive Intelligence: Benchmarking and Policymaking

    OpenAIRE

    Huggins , Robert

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking exercises have become increasingly popular within the sphere of regional policymaking in recent years. The aim of this paper is to analyse the concept of regional benchmarking and its links with regional policymaking processes. It develops a typology of regional benchmarking exercises and regional benchmarkers, and critically reviews the literature, both academic and policy oriented. It is argued that critics who suggest regional benchmarking is a flawed concept and technique fai...

  6. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari J S Ferreira

    Full Text Available Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  7. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Ari J S

    2014-06-12

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world\\'s oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  8. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Ari J S; Siam, Rania; Setubal, Joã o C; Moustafa, Ahmed; Sayed, Ahmed; Chambergo, Felipe S; Dawe, Adam S; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Sharaf, Hazem; Ouf, Amged; Alam, Intikhab; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M; Lehvä slaiho, Heikki; Ramadan, Eman; Antunes, André ; Stingl, Ulrich; Archer, John A.C.; Jankovic, Boris R; Sogin, Mitchell; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  9. Benchmark analyses for the ITER bulk shield experiment with EFF-3.0, -3.1 and FENDL-1, -2 nuclear cross-section data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Wu, Y.; Hansen, W.; Richter, D.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    1999-01-01

    The present article is part of the summary report on the Consultants' Meeting on the transport sublibrary of the Fusion Evaluated Data Library version 2.0. It reports on the comparison between benchmark experiments on a mock-up of the ITER inboard shield system at FNG, Frascati and Monte Carlo calculations, using different versions of the FENDL and EFF libraries

  10. Submerged terrestrial landscapes in the Baltic Sea: Evidence from multiproxy analyses of sediment cores from Fehmarnbelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enters, Dirk; Wolters, Steffen; Blume, Katharina; Segschneider, Martin; Lücke, Andreas; Theuerkauf, Martin; Hübener, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Five sediment cores were taken from the southern part of the Fehmarn Belt (Baltic Sea) in the context of an environmental impact study for the intended fixed traverse between Germany and Denmark. The lithologies of the 8m long cores reveal dramatic changes in sedimentary environments which reflect the early Holocene history of the southern Baltic Sea. A succession of terrestrial, semiterrestrial and limnic facies from glacial sediments to peat, lacustrine/estuarine deposits and finally marine sediments document the interplay of eustatic sea level rise and isostatic rebound, which finally lead to the establishment of marine conditions during the Littorina transgression. An age control of the observed changes was established by dating over 50 C-14 samples of different fractions. During the Lateglacial minerogenic varves with thicknesses of several centimeters verify the existence of a proglacial lake in the Fehmarnbelt. Peat development started around 11.250 cal. BP and terminated ca. 10.600 cal. BP which is roughly contemporaneous with the end of the Yoldia Phase in the central Baltic Sea. The oldest peat layers consist of undecomposed sedges and reed. Woody remains of willows appear not before 10.700 cal BP and indicate a stagnant or slowly decreasing water table. This semi-terrestrial phase is followed by a shallow inland lake which existed until the Littorina transgression around 8.300 cal. BP. Initially the lacustrine sediments exhibit high C/N ratios, low low δ13Corg values and contain numerous wood fragments as well as other botanical macro remains. This indicates shallow conditions close to the lake shore. Later, the occurrence of planktonic diatom species such as Aulacoseira ambigua suggest greater water depths. We did not find any indications of the often postulated catastrophic outburst of the Ancylus Lake via Fehmarnbelt and the Great Belt into the North Sea. Likewise, XRF scanning does not show conspicuous peaks in Ti or K which would have been

  11. Basic data generation and pressure loss coefficient evaluation for HANARO core thermal-hydraulic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lee, Kye Hong

    1999-06-01

    MATRA-h, a HANARO subchannel analysis computer code, is used to evaluate thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. It's capability includes the assessments of CHF, ONB margin, and fuel temperature. In this report, basic input data and core design parameters required to perform the subchannel analysis with MATRA-h code are collected. These data include the subchannel geometric data, thermal-hydraulic correlations, empirical constants and material properties. The friction and form loss coefficients of the fuel assemblies were determined based on the results of the pressure drop test. At the same time, different form loss coefficients at the end plates and spacers are evaluated for various subchannels. The adequate correlations are applied to the evaluation of the form loss coefficients for various subchannels, which are corrected by measured values in order to have a same pressure drop at each flow channel. These basic input data and design parameters described in this report will be applied usefully to evaluate the thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. (author). 11 refs., 13 tabs., 11 figs

  12. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  13. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  14. Procedures for the external event core damage frequency analyses for NUREG-1150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Lambright, J.A.

    1990-11-01

    This report presents methods which can be used to perform the assessment of risk due to external events at nuclear power plants. These methods were used to perform the external events risk assessments for the Surry and Peach Bottom nuclear power plants as part of the NRC-sponsored NUREG-1150 risk assessments. These methods apply to the full range of hazards such as earthquakes, fires, floods, etc. which are collectively known as external events. The methods described in this report have been developed under NRC sponsorship and represent, in many cases, both advancements and simplifications over techniques that have been used in past years. They also include the most up-to-date data bases on equipment seismic fragilities, fire occurrence frequencies and fire damageability thresholds. The methods described here are based on making full utilization of the power plant systems logic models developed in the internal events analyses. By making full use of the internal events models one obtains an external event analysis that is consistent both in nomenclature and in level of detail with the internal events analyses, and in addition, automatically includes all the appropriate random and tests/maintenance unavailabilities as appropriate. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs

  15. Core Designs and Economic Analyses of Homogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuel in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saglam, Mehmet; Sapyta, Joe J.; Spetz, Stewart W.; Hassler, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop equilibrium fuel cycle designs for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with homogeneously mixed uranium-thorium dioxide (ThO 2 -UO 2 ) fuel and compare those designs with more conventional UO 2 designs.The fuel cycle analyses indicate that ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel cycles are technically feasible in modern PWRs. Both power peaking and soluble boron concentrations tend to be lower than in conventional UO 2 fuel cycles, and the burnable poison requirements are less.However, the additional costs associated with the use of homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in a PWR are significant, and extrapolation of the results gives no indication that further increases in burnup will make thoria-urania fuel economically competitive with the current UO 2 fuel used in light water reactors

  16. Development of the temperature field at the WWER-440 core outlet monitoring system and application of the data analyses methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasova, V.; Georgieva, N.; Haralampieva, Tz.

    2001-01-01

    On-line internal reactor monitoring by 216 thermal couples, located at the reactor core outlet, is carried out during power operation of WWER-440 Units 1 and 2 at Kozloduy NPP. Automatic monitoring of technology process is performed by IB-500MA, which collects and performs initial data processing (discrediting and conversion of analogue signals into digital mode). The paper also presents the results and analyses of power distribution monitoring during the past 21-th and current 22-th fuel cycle at Kozloduy NPP, Unit 1 by using archiving system capacity and related software. The possibility to perform operational assessment and analysis of power distribution in the reactor core in each point of the fuel cycle is checked by comparison of the neutron-physical calculation results with reactor coolant system parameters. Paper shows that the processing and analysis of accumulated significant amount of data in the archive files increases accuracy and reliability of power distribution monitoring in the reactor core in each moment of the fuel cycle of WWER-440 reactors at Kozloduy NPP

  17. IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ''Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated

  18. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC)

  19. HS06 Benchmark for an ARM Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    We benchmarked an ARM cortex-A9 based server system with a four-core CPU running at 1.1 GHz. The system used Ubuntu 12.04 as operating system and the HEPSPEC 2006 (HS06) benchmarking suite was compiled natively with gcc-4.4 on the system. The benchmark was run for various settings of the relevant gcc compiler options. We did not find significant influence from the compiler options on the benchmark result. The final HS06 benchmark result is 10.4.

  20. HS06 benchmark for an ARM server

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We benchmarked an ARM cortex-A9 based server system with a four-core CPU running at 1.1 GHz. The system used Ubuntu 12.04 as operating system and the HEPSPEC 2006 (HS06) benchmarking suite was compiled natively with gcc-4.4 on the system. The benchmark was run for various settings of the relevant gcc compiler options. We did not find significant influence from the compiler options on the benchmark result. The final HS06 benchmark result is 10.4.

  1. Palaeohydrology of the Southwest Yukon Territory, Canada, based on multiproxy analyses of lake sediment cores from a depth transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L.; Abbott, M.B.; Finney, B.P.; Edwards, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Lake-level variations at Marcella Lake, a small, hydrologically closed lake in the southwestern Yukon Territory, document changes in effective moisture since the early Holocene. Former water levels, driven by regional palaeohydrology, were reconstructed by multiproxy analyses of sediment cores from four sites spanning shallow to deep water. Marcella Lake today is thermally stratified, being protected from wind by its position in a depression. It is alkaline and undergoes bio-induced calcification. Relative accumulations of calcium carbonate and organic matter at the sediment-water interface depend on the location of the depositional site relative to the thermocline. We relate lake-level fluctuations to down-core stratigraphic variations in composition, geochemistry, sedimentary structures and to the occurrence of unconformities in four cores based on observations of modern limnology and sedimentation processes. Twenty-four AMS radiocarbon dates on macrofossils and pollen provide the lake-level chronology. Prior to 10 000 cal. BP water levels were low, but then they rose to 3 to 4 m below modern levels. Between 7500 and 5000 cal. BP water levels were 5 to 6 m below modern but rose by 4000 cal. BP. Between 4000 and 2000 cal. BP they were higher than modern. During the last 2000 years, water levels were either near or 1 to 2 m below modern levels. Marcella Lake water-level fluctuations correspond with previously documented palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic changes and provide new, independent effective moisture information. The improved geochronology and quantitative water-level estimates are a framework for more detailed studies in the southwest Yukon. ?? 2005 Edward Arnold (Publishers) Ltd.

  2. 3-D neutron transport benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ikeda, H.

    1991-03-01

    A set of 3-D neutron transport benchmark problems proposed by the Osaka University to NEACRP in 1988 has been calculated by many participants and the corresponding results are summarized in this report. The results of K eff , control rod worth and region-averaged fluxes for the four proposed core models, calculated by using various 3-D transport codes are compared and discussed. The calculational methods used were: Monte Carlo, Discrete Ordinates (Sn), Spherical Harmonics (Pn), Nodal Transport and others. The solutions of the four core models are quite useful as benchmarks for checking the validity of 3-D neutron transport codes

  3. Experimental investigations and seismic analyses for benchmark study of 1000 MW WWER type (water-cooled and moderated reactor) nuclear power plant Kozloduy. Final report 15 June 1993 - 14 June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachansky, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report includes preparation and compilation of all existing studies related to seismic safety assessment of Kozloduy WWER-1000, i.e. Units 5 and 6; description of previous full scale testing of Unit 5; and the results obtained from seismic analyses performed under benchmark experimental studies. The results are concerned with analysis of the geological conditions; analysis of the seismic wave velocities in the soil layers; analysis of the predominant natural periods; dynamic characteristics of the Unit 5; soil-structure interaction and laboratory testing and analysis of the reactor containment tenders

  4. Experimental investigations and seismic analyses for benchmark study of 1000 MW WWER type (water-cooled and moderated reactor) nuclear power plant Kozloduy. Final report 15 June 1993 - 14 June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachansky, S [Building Research Institute (NISI), Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-07-01

    This report includes preparation and compilation of all existing studies related to seismic safety assessment of Kozloduy WWER-1000, i.e. Units 5 and 6; description of previous full scale testing of Unit 5; and the results obtained from seismic analyses performed under benchmark experimental studies. The results are concerned with analysis of the geological conditions; analysis of the seismic wave velocities in the soil layers; analysis of the predominant natural periods; dynamic characteristics of the Unit 5; soil-structure interaction and laboratory testing and analysis of the reactor containment tenders.

  5. 2nd RCM of the CRP on Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The overall objective of the CRP is to improve the Member States’ analytical capabilities in the field of fast reactor in-vessel sodium thermal hydraulics. A necessary condition towards achieving this objective is a wide international validation effort of the data and codes currently employed for the simulation of the various physical effects involved in this field. Therefore, in providing the required wide international basis of interested Member States, each applying different methodologies, the CRP will contribute towards achieving the stated objective with the help of benchmark exercises focusing, in a first stage, on the numerical simulation of temperature stratification of sodium observed in the Monju reactor vessel at a turbine trip test conducted in December 1995 during the original start-up experiments, and with the help of a thorough assessment of the calculation versus measured data comparisons

  6. Benchmarking of FA2D/PARCS Code Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.; Pevec, D.

    2006-01-01

    FA2D/PARCS code package is used at Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER), University of Zagreb, for static and dynamic reactor core analyses. It consists of two codes: FA2D and PARCS. FA2D is a multigroup two dimensional transport theory code for burn-up calculations based on collision probability method, developed at FER. It generates homogenised cross sections both of single pins and entire fuel assemblies. PARCS is an advanced nodal code developed at Purdue University for US NRC and it is based on neutron diffusion theory for three dimensional whole core static and dynamic calculations. It is modified at FER to enable internal 3D depletion calculation and usage of neutron cross section data in a format produced by FA2D and interface codes. The FA2D/PARCS code system has been validated on NPP Krsko operational data (Cycles 1 and 21). As we intend to use this code package for development of IRIS reactor loading patterns the first logical step was to validate the FA2D/PARCS code package on a set of IRIS benchmarks, starting from simple unit fuel cell, via fuel assembly, to full core benchmark. The IRIS 17x17 fuel with erbium burnable absorber was used in last full core benchmark. The results of modelling the IRIS full core benchmark using FA2D/PARCS code package have been compared with reference data showing the adequacy of FA2D/PARCS code package model for IRIS reactor core design.(author)

  7. Benchmark problem suite for reactor physics study of LWR next generation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Ikehara, Tadashi; Ito, Takuya; Saji, Etsuro

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a benchmark problem suite for studying the physics of next-generation fuels of light water reactors. The target discharge burnup of the next-generation fuel was set to 70 GWd/t considering the increasing trend in discharge burnup of light water reactor fuels. The UO 2 and MOX fuels are included in the benchmark specifications. The benchmark problem consists of three different geometries: fuel pin cell, PWR fuel assembly and BWR fuel assembly. In the pin cell problem, detailed nuclear characteristics such as burnup dependence of nuclide-wise reactivity were included in the required calculation results to facilitate the study of reactor physics. In the assembly benchmark problems, important parameters for in-core fuel management such as local peaking factors and reactivity coefficients were included in the required results. The benchmark problems provide comprehensive test problems for next-generation light water reactor fuels with extended high burnup. Furthermore, since the pin cell, the PWR assembly and the BWR assembly problems are independent, analyses of the entire benchmark suite is not necessary: e.g., the set of pin cell and PWR fuel assembly problems will be suitable for those in charge of PWR in-core fuel management, and the set of pin cell and BWR fuel assembly problems for those in charge of BWR in-core fuel management. (author)

  8. Review of the SIMMER-II analyses of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor core-disruptive accident fuel escape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVault, G.P.; Bell, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Early fuel removal from the active core of a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor undergoing a core-disruptive accident may reduce the potential for large energetics resulting from recriticalities. This paper presents a review of analyses with the SIMMER-II computer program of the effectiveness of possible fuel escape paths. Where possible, how SIMMER-II compares with or is validated against experiments that simulated the escape paths also is discussed

  9. RELAP5/MOD3.3 Analyses of Core Heatup Prevention Strategy During Extended Station Blackout in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosek, A.

    2016-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant demonstrated the vulnerability of the plants on the loss of electrical power for several days, so called extended station blackout (SBO). A set of measures have been proposed and implemented in response of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The purpose of the study was to investigate the application of the deterministic safety analysis for core heatup prevention strategy of the extended SBO in pressurized water reactor, lasting 72 h. The prevention strategy selected was water injection into steam generators using turbine driven auxiliary feedwater pump (TD-AFW) or portable water injection pump. Method for assessment of the necessary pump injection flowrate is developed and presented. The necessary injection flowrate to the steam generators is determined from the calculated cumulative water mass injected by the turbine driven auxiliary feedwater pump in the analysed scenarios, when desired normal level is maintained automatically. The developed method allows assessment of the necessary injection flowrates of pump, TD-AFW or portable, for different plant configurations and number of flowrate changes. The RELAP5/MOD3.3 Patch04 computer code and input model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor is used for analyses, assuming different injection start times, flowrates and reactor coolant system losses. Three different reactor coolant system (RCS) coolant loss pathways, with corresponding leakage rate, can be expected in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) during the extended SBO: normal system leakage, reactor coolant pump seal leakage, and RCS coolant loss through letdown relief valve unless automatically isolated or until isolation is procedurally directed. Depressurization of RCS was also considered. In total, six types of RCS coolant loss scenarios were considered. Two cases were defined regarding the operation of the emergency diesel generators. Different delays of the pump

  10. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results.

  11. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results

  12. Development of modern methods with respect to neutron transport and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations. Interim report; Weiterentwicklung moderner Verfahren zu Neutronentransport und Unsicherheitsanalysen fuer Kernberechnungen. Zwischenbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwermann, Winfried; Aures, Alexander; Bostelmann, Friederike; Pasichnyk, Ihor; Perin, Yann; Velkov, Kiril; Zilly, Matias

    2016-12-15

    This report documents the status of the research and development goals reached within the reactor safety research project RS1536 ''Development of modern methods with respect to neutron transport and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations'' as of the 3{sup rd} quarter of 2016. The superordinate goal of the project is the development, validation, and application of neutron transport methods and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations. These calculation methods will mainly be applied to problems related to the core behaviour of light water reactors and innovative reactor concepts, in particular fast reactors cooled by liquid metal. The contributing individual goals are the further optimization and validation of deterministic calculation methods with high spatial and energy resolution, the development of a coupled calculation system using the Monte Carlo method for the neutron transport to describe time-dependent reactor core states, the processing and validation of nuclear data, particularly with regard to covariance data, the development, validation, and application of sampling-based methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, the creation of a platform for performing systematic uncertainty analyses for fast reactor systems, as well as the description of states of severe core damage with the Monte Carlo method. Moreover, work regarding the European NURESAFE project, started in the preceding project RS1503, are being continued and completed.

  13. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify usage of foodservice performance measures, important activities in foodservice benchmarking, and benchmarking attitudes, beliefs, and practices by foodservice directors...

  14. Comparative analysis of a hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in an irradiated LMFBR core using different computer models for a common benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wider, H.U.; Devos, J.; Nguyen, H.; Goethem, G. Van.; Miles, K.J.; Tentner, A.M.; Pizzica, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an international exercise to compare whole-core accident calculations of the initiation phase of an unprotected LOF accident in a large irradiated LMFBR. The results for the accident phase before pin failure are in rather good agreement except for the fuel pin mechanics predictions. There are also some differences in the sodium boiling calculations but the voiding rates which are of key importance are very similar. The post - failure fuel motion and sodium voiding predictions show significant differences. However, the majority of these calculations agree that temporary fuel accumulations occur which increase the power beyond that caused by sodium voiding alone

  15. MOx Depletion Calculation Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Felice, Laurence; Eschbach, Romain; Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Maryam, Seif-Eddine; Hesketh, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS) has been established to study the reactor physics, fuel performance, radiation transport and shielding, and the uncertainties associated with modelling of these phenomena in present and future nuclear power systems. The WPRS has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in these fields. The Expert Group on Reactor Physics and Advanced Nuclear Systems (EGRPANS) was created in 2011 to perform specific tasks associated with reactor physics aspects of present and future nuclear power systems. EGRPANS provides expert advice to the WPRS and the nuclear community on the development needs (data and methods, validation experiments, scenario studies) for different reactor systems and also provides specific technical information regarding: core reactivity characteristics, including fuel depletion effects; core power/flux distributions; Core dynamics and reactivity control. In 2013 EGRPANS published a report that investigated fuel depletion effects in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR). This was entitled 'International Comparison of a Depletion Calculation Benchmark on Fuel Cycle Issues' NEA/NSC/DOC(2013) that documented a benchmark exercise for UO 2 fuel rods. This report documents a complementary benchmark exercise that focused on PuO 2 /UO 2 Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel rods. The results are especially relevant to the back-end of the fuel cycle, including irradiated fuel transport, reprocessing, interim storage and waste repository. Saint-Laurent B1 (SLB1) was the first French reactor to use MOx assemblies. SLB1 is a 900 MWe PWR, with 30% MOx fuel loading. The standard MOx assemblies, used in Saint-Laurent B1 reactor, include three zones with different plutonium enrichments, high Pu content (5.64%) in the center zone, medium Pu content (4.42%) in the intermediate zone and low Pu content (2.91%) in the peripheral zone

  16. Benchmarking and Performance Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, J. Stephen

    This paper defines benchmarking and its relationship to quality management, describes a project which applied the technique in a library context, and explores the relationship between performance measurement and benchmarking. Numerous benchmarking methods contain similar elements: deciding what to benchmark; identifying partners; gathering…

  17. A methodology for evaluating weighting functions using MCNP and its application to PWR ex-core analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchia, Marco; Vasiliev, Alexander; Ferroukhi, Hakim; Pautz, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluation of neutron source importance for a given tally. • Assessment of ex-core detector response plus its uncertainty. • Direct use of neutron track evaluated by a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. - Abstract: The ex-core neutron detectors are commonly used to control reactor power in light water reactors. Therefore, it is relevant to understand the importance of a neutron source to the ex-core detectors response. In mathematical terms, this information is conveniently represented by the so called weighting functions. A new methodology based on the MCNP code for evaluating the weighting functions starting from the neutron history database is presented in this work. A simultaneous evaluation of the weighting functions in a user-given Cartesian coverage mesh is the main advantage of the method. The capability to generate weighting functions simultaneously in both spatial and energy ranges is the innovative part of this work. Then, an interpolation tool complements the methodology, allowing the generation of weighting functions up to the pin-by-pin fuel segment, where a direct evaluation is not possible due to low statistical precision. A comparison to reference results provides a verification of the methodology. Finally, an application to investigate the role of ex-core detectors spatial location and core burnup for a Swiss nuclear power plant is provided.

  18. Angiographic core laboratory reproducibility analyses: implications for planning clinical trials using coronary angiography and left ventriculography end-points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigen, Terje K; Claudio, Cheryl; Abbott, David; Schulzer, Michael; Burton, Jeff; Tymchak, Wayne; Buller, Christopher E; John Mancini, G B

    2008-06-01

    To assess reproducibility of core laboratory performance and impact on sample size calculations. Little information exists about overall reproducibility of core laboratories in contradistinction to performance of individual technicians. Also, qualitative parameters are being adjudicated increasingly as either primary or secondary end-points. The comparative impact of using diverse indexes on sample sizes has not been previously reported. We compared initial and repeat assessments of five quantitative parameters [e.g., minimum lumen diameter (MLD), ejection fraction (EF), etc.] and six qualitative parameters [e.g., TIMI myocardial perfusion grade (TMPG) or thrombus grade (TTG), etc.], as performed by differing technicians and separated by a year or more. Sample sizes were calculated from these results. TMPG and TTG were also adjudicated by a second core laboratory. MLD and EF were the most reproducible, yielding the smallest sample size calculations, whereas percent diameter stenosis and centerline wall motion require substantially larger trials. Of the qualitative parameters, all except TIMI flow grade gave reproducibility characteristics yielding sample sizes of many 100's of patients. Reproducibility of TMPG and TTG was only moderately good both within and between core laboratories, underscoring an intrinsic difficulty in assessing these. Core laboratories can be shown to provide reproducibility performance that is comparable to performance commonly ascribed to individual technicians. The differences in reproducibility yield huge differences in sample size when comparing quantitative and qualitative parameters. TMPG and TTG are intrinsically difficult to assess and conclusions based on these parameters should arise only from very large trials.

  19. A simplified approach to WWER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, P.

    2010-01-01

    The WWER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark was simulated with FLUENT 12 code as a first step of validation of the code for nuclear reactor safety analyses. Results of the benchmark together with comparison of results provided by other participants and results of measurement will be presented in another paper by benchmark organisers. This presentation is therefore focused on our approach to this simulation as illustrated on the case 323-34, which represents a peripheral assembly with five neighbours. All steps of the simulation and some lessons learned are described. Geometry of the computational region supplied as STEP file by organizers of the benchmark was first separated into two parts (inlet part with spacer grid, and the rest of assembly head) in order to keep the size of the computational mesh manageable with regard to the hardware available (HP Z800 workstation with Intel Zeon four-core CPU 3.2 GHz, 32 GB of RAM) and then further modified at places where shape of the geometry would probably lead to highly distorted cells. Both parts of the geometry were connected via boundary profile file generated at cross section, where effect of grid spacers is still felt but the effect of out flow boundary condition used in the computations of the inlet part of geometry is negligible. Computation proceeded in several steps: start with basic mesh, standard k-ε model of turbulence with standard wall functions and first order upwind numerical schemes; after convergence (scaled residuals lower than 10-3) and near-wall meshes local adaptation when needed, realizable k-ε of turbulence was used with second order upwind numerical schemes for momentum and energy equations. During iterations, area-average temperature of thermocouples and area-averaged outlet temperature which are the main figures of merit of the benchmark were also monitored. In this 'blind' phase of the benchmark, effect of spacers was neglected. After results of measurements are available, standard validation

  20. Benchmarking in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In two articles an overview is given of the activities in the Dutch industry and energy sector with respect to benchmarking. In benchmarking operational processes of different competitive businesses are compared to improve your own performance. Benchmark covenants for energy efficiency between the Dutch government and industrial sectors contribute to a growth of the number of benchmark surveys in the energy intensive industry in the Netherlands. However, some doubt the effectiveness of the benchmark studies

  1. Characterization of rapid climate changes through isotope analyses of ice and entrapped air in the NEEM ice core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillevic, Myriam

    Greenland ice core have revealed the occurrence of rapid climatic instabilities during the last glacial period, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, while marine cores from the North Atlantic have evidenced layers of ice rafted debris deposited by icebergs melt, caused by the collapse...... mechanisms at play. Recent analytical developments have made possible to measure new paleoclimate proxies in Greenland ice cores. In this thesis we first contribute to these analytical developments by measuring the new innovative parameter 17O-excess at LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climatet de l......'Environnement, France). At the Centre for Ice and Climate (CIC, Denmark) we contribute to the development of a protocol for absolute referencing of methane gas isotopes, and making full air standard with known concentration and isotopic composition of methane. Then, air (δ15N) and water stable isotope measurements from...

  2. SEDIMENTATION AND DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT BASED ON SEISMIC AND DRILLING CORE ANALYSES IN CIMANUK DELTA INDRAMAYU, WEST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Astawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Core drilling had been carried out in three locations such as in Brondong Village (BH-01, Pasekan Village (BH-02, and Karangsong Village (BH-03. Those three cores are similar in lithology consist of clay. They are correlated based on fragment content, such as fine sand lenses, mollusk shells, rock and carbonate materials which discovered from different depths. Single side band of shallow seismic reflection recorded paleochannels in E sequence at the north and the west of investigated area. It’s predicted the north paleo channels were part of Lawas River or Tegar River, while the west paleo channels were part of Rambatan Lama River. Microfauna content of all those three cores indicated that from the depth of 0.00 meter down to 25,00 meters are Holocene/Recent, from 25,00 meters to the bottom are Pleistocene which were deposited in the bay to middle neritic environment.

  3. Separative analyses of a chromatographic column packed with a core-shell adsorbent for lithium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Sugura, K.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-6 is used as a blanket material for sufficient tritium production in DT fueled fusion reactors. A core-shell type adsorbent was proposed for lithium isotope separation by chromatography. The mass transfer model in a chromatographic column consisted of 4 steps, such as convection and dispersion in the column, transfer through liquid films, intra-particle diffusion and and adsorption or desorption at the local adsorption sites. A model was developed and concentration profiles and time variation in the column were numerically simulated. It became clear that core-shell type adsorbents with thin porous shell were saturated rapidly relatively to fully porous one and established a sharp edge of adsorption band. This is very important feature because lithium isotope separation requires long-distance development of adsorption band. The values of HETP (Height Equivalent of a Theoretical Plate) for core-shell adsorbent packed column were estimated by statistical moments of the step response curve. The value of HETP decreased with the thickness of the porous shell. A core-shell type adsorbent is, then, useful for lithium isotope separation. (authors)

  4. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 5. TMI-1 Benchmark Performed by Different Coupled Three-Dimensional Neutronics Thermal- Hydraulic Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.; Spadoni, A.; Gago, J.L.; Grgic, D.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of a double-ended main-steam-line-break (MSLB) accident assumed to have occurred in the Babcock and Wilcox Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 1 nuclear power plant (NPP) has been carried out at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione of the University of Pisa, Italy. The research has been carried out in cooperation with the University of Zagreb, Croatia, and with partial financial support from the European Union through a grant to one of the authors. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations-Nuclear Science Committee PWR MSLB Benchmark. Different code versions have been adopted in the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are described in this paper: 1. RELAP5/mod 3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics PARCS code; 2. RELAP5/mod 3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics QUABBOX code; 3. RELAP5/3D code coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics NESTLE code. Boundary and initial conditions of the system, including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by The Pennsylvania State University in cooperation with GPU Nuclear (the utility, owner of TMI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main challenge for the calculation was the prediction of the return to power (RTP) following the inlet of cold water into the core and one 'stuck-withdrawn' control rod. Non-realistic assumptions were proposed to augment the core power peak following scram. Zero-dimensional neutronics codes were capable of detecting the RTP after scram. However, the application of 3-D neutronics codes to the same scenario allowed the calculation of a similar value for overall core power peak but showed power increase occurrence in about one-tenth of the core volume. The results achieved in phase 1 of

  5. Geochemistry of mercury and other constituents in subsurface sediment—Analyses from 2011 and 2012 coring campaigns, Cache Creek Settling Basin, Yolo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Michelle R.; Alpers, Charles N.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Agee, Jennifer L.; Sneed, Michelle; Morita, Andrew Y.; Salas, Antonia

    2017-10-31

    Cache Creek Settling Basin was constructed in 1937 to trap sediment from Cache Creek before delivery to the Yolo Bypass, a flood conveyance for the Sacramento River system that is tributary to the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. Sediment management options being considered by stakeholders in the Cache Creek Settling Basin include sediment excavation; however, that could expose sediments containing elevated mercury concentrations from historical mercury mining in the watershed. In cooperation with the California Department of Water Resources, the U.S. Geological Survey undertook sediment coring campaigns in 2011–12 (1) to describe lateral and vertical distributions of mercury concentrations in deposits of sediment in the Cache Creek Settling Basin and (2) to improve constraint of estimates of the rate of sediment deposition in the basin.Sediment cores were collected in the Cache Creek Settling Basin, Yolo County, California, during October 2011 at 10 locations and during August 2012 at 5 other locations. Total core depths ranged from approximately 4.6 to 13.7 meters (15 to 45 feet), with penetration to about 9.1 meters (30 feet) at most locations. Unsplit cores were logged for two geophysical parameters (gamma bulk density and magnetic susceptibility); then, selected cores were split lengthwise. One half of each core was then photographed and archived, and the other half was subsampled. Initial subsamples from the cores (20-centimeter composite samples from five predetermined depths in each profile) were analyzed for total mercury, methylmercury, total reduced sulfur, iron speciation, organic content (as the percentage of weight loss on ignition), and grain-size distribution. Detailed follow-up subsampling (3-centimeter intervals) was done at six locations along an east-west transect in the southern part of the Cache Creek Settling Basin and at one location in the northern part of the basin for analyses of total mercury; organic content; and cesium-137, which was

  6. The validation benchmark analyses for CMS data

    CERN Document Server

    Holub, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this report is to summarize my work at CERN during this summer. My first task was to transport code and dataset files from CERN Open Data Portal to Github that will be more convenient for users. The second part of my work was to copy environment from CERN Open Data Virtual Machine and apply it in the analysis environment SWAN. The last task was to rescale X-axis of the histogram.

  7. SEA LEVEL AND PALAEOCLIMATIC CHANGES IN THE SOUTH AND MIDDLE CASPIAN SEA REGION SINCE THE LATEGLACIAL FROM PALYNOLOGICAL ANALYSES OF MARINE SEDIMENT CORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Leroy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of pollen, spores, non-pollen palynomorphs and dinocyst analyses made in the last two decades is proposed here. Building on spare palynological analyses before 1990, a series of new projects have allowed taking cores in the deeper parts of the Caspian Sea, hence providing access to low-stand sediment. However, still nowadays no complete record exists for the Holocene. The first steps towards quantification of the palynological spectra have been taken. Some of the most urgent problems to solve are the uncertainties related to radiocarbon dating, which are especially acute in the Caspian Sea.

  8. AER benchmark specification sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the VVER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D CFD modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the 23rd cycle of the Paks NPP's Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (authors)

  9. AER Benchmark Specification Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the WWER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational fluid dynamics codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the twenty third cycle of the Paks NPPs Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (Authors)

  10. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in the...

  11. Mutational analyses of the core domain of Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Viruses integrase: critical residues for concerted integration and multimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, Karen; Faure, Claudine; Violot, Sebastien; Gouet, Patrice; Verdier, Gerard; Ronfort, Corinne

    2004-01-01

    During replicative cycle of retroviruses, the reverse-transcribed viral DNA is integrated into the cell DNA by the viral integrase (IN) enzyme. The central core domain of IN contains the catalytic site of the enzyme and is involved in binding viral ends and cell DNA as well as dimerization. We previously performed single amino acid substitutions in the core domain of an Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Virus (ALSV) IN [Arch. Virol. 147 (2002) 1761]. Here, we modeled the resulting IN mutants and analyzed the ability of these mutants to mediate concerted DNA integration in an in vitro assay, and to form dimers by protein-protein cross-linking and size exclusion chromatography. The N197C mutation resulted in the inability of the mutant to perform concerted integration that was concomitant with a loss of IN dimerization. Surprisingly, mutations Q102G and A106V at the dimer interface resulted in mutants with higher efficiencies than the wild-type IN in performing two-ended concerted integration of viral DNA ends. The G139D and A195V mutants had a trend to perform one-ended DNA integration of viral ends instead of two-ended integration. More drastically, the I88L and L135G mutants preferentially mediated nonconcerted DNA integration although the proteins form dimers. Therefore, these mutations may alter the formation of IN complexes of higher molecular size than a dimer that would be required for concerted integration. This study points to the important role of core domain residues in the concerted integration of viral DNA ends as well as in the oligomerization of the enzyme

  12. Experience of RIA safety analyses performance for NPP Temelin core arranged with TVSA-T fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, S.A.; Lizorkin, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    The contents of the presentation are as follows: 1. Definition of categories for initiating events; 2. Acceptance criteria for safety assessment; 3. Main aspects of safety assessment methodology; 4. Main stages of calculation analysis; 5. Interface with other parts of the core design; 6. Codes used for calculation; 6.1 Main performances of code package TIGR-1; 6.2 Main performances of code BIPR-7A; 7. TIGR-1 accounting of design margins in calculation of fuel rod powers; 8. Peculiar features of Instrumentation and Control System for Temelin NPP; 9. Calculations; 10. Checklist of margin data important for reload safety assessment. (P.A.)

  13. Benchmarking Linked Open Data Management Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Angles Rojas (Renzo); M.-D. Pham (Minh-Duc); P.A. Boncz (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractWith inherent support for storing and analysing highly interconnected data, graph and RDF databases appear as natural solutions for developing Linked Open Data applications. However, current benchmarks for these database technologies do not fully attain the desirable characteristics

  14. Common Nearest Neighbor Clustering—A Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lemke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cluster analyses are often conducted with the goal to characterize an underlying probability density, for which the data-point density serves as an estimate for this probability density. We here test and benchmark the common nearest neighbor (CNN cluster algorithm. This algorithm assigns a spherical neighborhood R to each data point and estimates the data-point density between two data points as the number of data points N in the overlapping region of their neighborhoods (step 1. The main principle in the CNN cluster algorithm is cluster growing. This grows the clusters by sequentially adding data points and thereby effectively positions the border of the clusters along an iso-surface of the underlying probability density. This yields a strict partitioning with outliers, for which the cluster represents peaks in the underlying probability density—termed core sets (step 2. The removal of the outliers on the basis of a threshold criterion is optional (step 3. The benchmark datasets address a series of typical challenges, including datasets with a very high dimensional state space and datasets in which the cluster centroids are aligned along an underlying structure (Birch sets. The performance of the CNN algorithm is evaluated with respect to these challenges. The results indicate that the CNN cluster algorithm can be useful in a wide range of settings. Cluster algorithms are particularly important for the analysis of molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We demonstrate how the CNN cluster results can be used as a discretization of the molecular state space for the construction of a core-set model of the MD improving the accuracy compared to conventional full-partitioning models. The software for the CNN clustering is available on GitHub.

  15. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson…

  16. Interpretation of Actinide-Distribution Data Obtained from Non-Destructive and Destructive Post-Test Analyses of an Intact-Core Column of Culebra Dolomite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUCERO, DANIEL A.; PERKINS, W. GEORGE

    1999-01-01

    The US DOE, with technical assistance from Sandia National Laboratories, has successfully received EPA certification and opened the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a nuclear waste disposal facility located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. Performance assessment analyses indicate that human intrusions by inadvertent, intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for releases of radionuclides from the disposal system. In modeling long-term brine releases, subsequent to a drilling event, potential migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado formation were analyzed. Major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer overlying the WIPP site. In order to help quantify parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been earned out using intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the WIPP site. This paper deals primarily with results of analyses for 241 Pu and 241 Am distributions developed during transport experiments in one of these cores. Transport experiments were done using a synthetic brine that simulates Culebra brine at the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft--AIS). Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for intact-core columns were obtained via experiments using the conservative tracer 22 Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers 232 U and 239 Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of the species. Elution experiments with tracers 241 Pu and 241 Am were attempted, but no elution of either species has been observed to date, including experiments of many months' duration. In order to quantify retardation of the non-eluted species 241 Pu and 241 Am after a period of brine flow, non-destructive and

  17. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, based on modelling analyses. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, on the basis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massara, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Since the very first hours after the accident at Fukushima-Daiichi, numerical simulations by means of severe accident codes have been carried out, aiming at highlighting the key physical phenomena allowing a correct understanding of the sequence of events, and - on a long enough timeline - improving models and methods, in order to reduce the discrepancy between calculated and measured data. A last long-term objective is to support the future decommissioning phase. The presentation summarises some of the available elements on the role of the fuel/cladding-water interaction, which became available only through modelling because of the absence of measured data directly related to the cladding-steam interaction. This presentation also aims at drawing some conclusions on the status of the modelling capabilities of current tools, particularly for the purpose of the foreseen application to ATF fuels: - analyses with MELCOR, MAAP, THALES2 and RELAP5 are presented; - input data are taken from BWR Mark-I Fukushima-Daiichi Units 1, 2 and 3, completed with operational data published by TEPCO. In the case of missing or incomplete data or hypotheses, these are adjusted to reduce the calculation/measurement discrepancy. The behaviour of the accident is well understood on a qualitative level (major trends on RPV pressure and water level, dry-wet and PCV pressure are well represented), allowing a certain level of confidence in the results of the analysis of the zirconium-steam reaction - which is accessible only through numerical simulations. These show an extremely fast sequence of events (here for Unit 1): - the top of fuel is uncovered in 3 hours (after the tsunami); - the steam line breaks at 6.5 hours. Vessel dries at 10 hours, with a heat-up rate in a first moment driven by the decay heat only (∼7 K/min) and afterwards by the chemical heat from Zr-oxidation (over 30 K/min), associated with massive hydrogen production. It appears that the level of uncertainty increases with

  18. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  19. Benchmarking in Identifying Priority Directions of Development of Telecommunication Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharchenko Lolita A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses evolution of development and possibilities of application of benchmarking in the telecommunication sphere. It studies essence of benchmarking on the basis of generalisation of approaches of different scientists to definition of this notion. In order to improve activity of telecommunication operators, the article identifies the benchmarking technology and main factors, that determine success of the operator in the modern market economy, and the mechanism of benchmarking and component stages of carrying out benchmarking by a telecommunication operator. It analyses the telecommunication market and identifies dynamics of its development and tendencies of change of the composition of telecommunication operators and providers. Having generalised the existing experience of benchmarking application, the article identifies main types of benchmarking of telecommunication operators by the following features: by the level of conduct of (branch, inter-branch and international benchmarking; by relation to participation in the conduct (competitive and joint; and with respect to the enterprise environment (internal and external.

  20. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for Stable, Comparative Analyses of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Human Disease Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Alison J; Bray, James E; Jolley, Keith A; McCarthy, Noel D; Maiden, Martin C J

    2017-07-01

    Human campylobacteriosis, caused by Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli , remains a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in many countries, but the epidemiology of campylobacteriosis outbreaks remains poorly defined, largely due to limitations in the resolution and comparability of isolate characterization methods. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data enable the improvement of sequence-based typing approaches, such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST), by substantially increasing the number of loci examined. A core genome MLST (cgMLST) scheme defines a comprehensive set of those loci present in most members of a bacterial group, balancing very high resolution with comparability across the diversity of the group. Here we propose a set of 1,343 loci as a human campylobacteriosis cgMLST scheme (v1.0), the allelic profiles of which can be assigned to core genome sequence types. The 1,343 loci chosen were a subset of the 1,643 loci identified in the reannotation of the genome sequence of C. jejuni isolate NCTC 11168, chosen as being present in >95% of draft genomes of 2,472 representative United Kingdom campylobacteriosis isolates, comprising 2,207 (89.3%) C. jejuni isolates and 265 (10.7%) C. coli isolates. Validation of the cgMLST scheme was undertaken with 1,478 further high-quality draft genomes, containing 150 or fewer contiguous sequences, from disease isolate collections: 99.5% of these isolates contained ≥95% of the 1,343 cgMLST loci. In addition to the rapid and effective high-resolution analysis of large numbers of diverse isolates, the cgMLST scheme enabled the efficient identification of very closely related isolates from a well-defined single-source campylobacteriosis outbreak. Copyright © 2017 Cody et al.

  1. Benchmarking semantic web technology

    CERN Document Server

    García-Castro, R

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses the problem of benchmarking Semantic Web Technologies; first, from a methodological point of view, proposing a general methodology to follow in benchmarking activities over Semantic Web Technologies and, second, from a practical point of view, presenting two international benchmarking activities that involved benchmarking the interoperability of Semantic Web technologies using RDF(S) as the interchange language in one activity and OWL in the other.The book presents in detail how the different resources needed for these interoperability benchmarking activities were defined:

  2. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The present work is the results of JNC, Japan, for the Phase 4 of the BN-600 core benchmark problem (Hex-Z fully MOX fuelled core model) organized by IAEA. The benchmark specification is based on 1) the RCM report of IAEA CRP on 'Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of LMFR Reactivity Effects, Action 3.12' (Calculations for BN-600 fully fuelled MOX core for subsequent transient analyses). JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library was used for calculating 70 group ABBN-type group constants. Cell models for fuel assembly and control rod calculations were applied: homogeneous and heterogeneous (cylindrical supercell) model. Basic diffusion calculation was three-dimensional Hex-Z model, 18 group (Citation code). Transport calculations were 18 group, three-dimensional (NSHEC code) based on Sn-transport nodal method developed at JNC. The generated thermal power per fission was based on Sher's data corrected on the basis of ENDF/B-IV data library. Calculation results are presented in Tables for intercomparison

  3. Benchmarking in University Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kuźmicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of global competition and rising challenges that higher education institutions (HEIs meet, it is imperative to increase innovativeness and efficiency of their management. Benchmarking can be the appropriate tool to search for a point of reference necessary to assess institution’s competitive position and learn from the best in order to improve. The primary purpose of the paper is to present in-depth analysis of benchmarking application in HEIs worldwide. The study involves indicating premises of using benchmarking in HEIs. It also contains detailed examination of types, approaches and scope of benchmarking initiatives. The thorough insight of benchmarking applications enabled developing classification of benchmarking undertakings in HEIs. The paper includes review of the most recent benchmarking projects and relating them to the classification according to the elaborated criteria (geographical range, scope, type of data, subject, support and continuity. The presented examples were chosen in order to exemplify different approaches to benchmarking in higher education setting. The study was performed on the basis of the published reports from benchmarking projects, scientific literature and the experience of the author from the active participation in benchmarking projects. The paper concludes with recommendations for university managers undertaking benchmarking, derived on the basis of the conducted analysis.

  4. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the 235 U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of k eff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of k eff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

  5. Evaluation of nuclear characteristics of minor actinide loaded core. Analyses of BFS-69 and BFS-66-2 critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazama, Taira; Sato, Wakaei

    2010-09-01

    Collaboration with Russian Institute of Physics and Power Engineering named 'Investigation of neutronic-physical characteristics and their change when introducing large quantity of neptunium (Np) at different BFS critical assemblies' has been accomplished. This is the second report of the collaboration to describe experimental information and analysis results on BFS-69 and BFS-66-2 critical experiments. In the experiments, various nuclear characteristics were measured in 2 kinds of cores with/without Np loading of about 8 kg. JAEA's standard analysis results were presented with four kinds of nuclear data (JENDL-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL/AC-2008, and ENDF/BVII). Analytical results show: 1) An overestimation trend has been observed in BFS-69 criticality results, especially with JENDL-3.3 and JENDL/AC-2008. The difference from ENDF/B-II having better results mainly lies in the average cosine of the scattering angle around 1 MeV. 2) A small discrepancy exists in BFS-69 Na void reactivity results with the three JENDL nuclear data. The difference from ENDF/B-II mainly lies in scattering cross sections of sodium around 1 MeV and fission cross section of 239 Pu around 1 keV. 3) The analysis results simulate measured Np effects on nuclear characteristics within experimental errors. (author)

  6. Numerical analyses of an ex-core fuel incident: Results of the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Z., E-mail: hozer@aeki.kfki.h [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Aszodi, A. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Barnak, M. [IVS, Trnava (Slovakia); Boros, I. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Fogel, M. [VUJE, Trnava (Slovakia); Guillard, V. [IRSN, Cadarache (France); Gyori, Cs. [ITU, EU, Karlsruhe (Germany); Hegyi, G. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Horvath, G.L. [VEIKI, Budapest (Hungary); Nagy, I. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Junninen, P. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kobzar, V. [KI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Legradi, G. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Molnar, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Pietarinen, K. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Perneczky, L. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Makihara, Y. [ATMEA, Paris (France); Matejovic, P. [IVS, Trnava (Slovakia); Perez-Fero, E.; Slonszki, E. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2010-03-15

    The OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was developed to support the understanding of fuel behaviour in accident conditions on the basis of analyses of the Paks-2 incident. Numerical simulation of the most relevant aspects of the event and comparison of the calculation results with the available data from the incident was carried out between 2006 and 2007. A database was compiled to provide input for the code calculations. The activities covered the following three areas: (a) Thermal hydraulic calculations described the cooling conditions possibly established during the incident. (b) Simulation of fuel behaviour described the oxidation and degradation mechanisms of the fuel assemblies. (c) The release of fission products from the failed fuel rods was estimated and compared to available measured data. The applied used codes captured the most important events of the Paks-2 incident and the calculated results improved the understanding of the causes and mechanisms of fuel failure. The numerical analyses showed that the by-pass flow leading to insufficient cooling amounted to 75-90% of the inlet flow rate, the maximum temperature in the tank was between 1200 and 1400 deg. C, the degree of zirconium oxidation reached 4-12% and the mass of produced hydrogen was between 3 and 13 kg.

  7. A simplified 2D HTTR benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Rahnema, F.; Pounders, J. M.; Zhang, D.; Ougouag, A.

    2009-01-01

    To access the accuracy of diffusion or transport methods for reactor calculations, it is desirable to create heterogeneous benchmark problems that are typical of relevant whole core configurations. In this paper we have created a numerical benchmark problem in 2D configuration typical of a high temperature gas cooled prismatic core. This problem was derived from the HTTR start-up experiment. For code-to-code verification, complex details of geometry and material specification of the physical experiments are not necessary. To this end, the benchmark problem presented here is derived by simplifications that remove the unnecessary details while retaining the heterogeneity and major physics properties from the neutronics viewpoint. Also included here is a six-group material (macroscopic) cross section library for the benchmark problem. This library was generated using the lattice depletion code HELIOS. Using this library, benchmark quality Monte Carlo solutions are provided for three different configurations (all-rods-in, partially-controlled and all-rods-out). The reference solutions include the core eigenvalue, block (assembly) averaged fuel pin fission density distributions, and absorption rate in absorbers (burnable poison and control rods). (authors)

  8. Calculation of Single Cell and Fuel Assembly IRIS Benchmarks Using WIMSD5B and GNOMER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevec, D.; Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2002-01-01

    IRIS reactor (an acronym for International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, small to medium power (100-335 MWe/module) reactor, which addresses the requirements defined by the United States Department of Energy for Generation IV nuclear energy systems, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics, and waste reduction. An international consortium led by Westinghouse/BNFL was created for development of IRIS reactor; it includes universities, institutes, commercial companies, and utilities. Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb joined the consortium in year 2001, with the aim to take part in IRIS neutronics design and safety analyses of IRIS transients. A set of neutronic benchmarks for IRIS reactor was defined with the objective to compare results of all participants with exactly the same assumptions. In this paper a calculation of Benchmark 44 for IRIS reactor is described. Benchmark 44 is defined as a core depletion benchmark problem for specified IRIS reactor operating conditions (e.g., temperatures, moderator density) without feedback. Enriched boron, inhomogeneously distributed in axial direction, is used as an integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). The aim of this benchmark was to enable a more direct comparison of results of different code systems. Calculations of Benchmark 44 were performed using the modified CORD-2 code package. The CORD-2 code package consists of WIMSD and GNOMER codes. WIMSD is a well-known lattice spectrum calculation code. GNOMER solves the neutron diffusion equation in three-dimensional Cartesian geometry by the Green's function nodal method. The following parameters were obtained in Benchmark 44 analysis: effective multiplication factor as a function of burnup, nuclear peaking factor as a function of burnup, axial offset as a function of burnup, core-average axial power profile, core radial power profile, axial power profile for selected

  9. HTR core physics analysis at NRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Haas, J.B.M. de; Oppe, J.

    2002-01-01

    Since a number of years NRG is developing the HTR reactor physics code system PANTHERMIX. In PANTHERMIX the 3-D steady-state and transient core physics code PANTHER has been interfaced with the HTR thermal hydraulics code THERMIX to enable core follow and transient analyses on both pebble bed and block type HTR systems. Recently the capabilities of PANTHERMIX have been extended with the possibility to simulate the flow of pebbles through the core cavity and the (re)loading of pebbles on top of the core.The PANTHERMIX code system is being applied for the benchmark exercises for the Chinese HTR-10 and Japanese HTTR first criticality, calculating the critical loading, control rod worth and the isothermal temperature coefficients at zero power conditions. Also core physics calculations have been performed on an early version the South African PBMR design. The reactor physics properties of the reactor at equilibrium core loading have been studied as well as a selected run-in scenario, starting form fresh fuel. The recently developed reload option of PANTHERMIX was used extensively in these analyses. The examples shown demonstrate the capabilities of PANTHERMIX for performing steady-state and transient HTR core physics analyses. However, additional validation, especially for transient analyses, remains desirable. (author)

  10. Multifarious Physics Analyses of the Core Plasma Properties in a Helical DEMO Reactor FFHR-d1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, J.; Satake, S.; Goto, T.; Seki, R.; Nunami, M.; Funaba, H.; Yamada, I.; Suzuki, C.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Yamada, H.; Sagara, A., E-mail: miyazawa@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Yokoyama, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Masaoka, Y.; Murakami, S. [Departement Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Theoretical analyses on the MHD equilibrium, the neoclassical transport, and the alpha particle transport, etc., are being carried out for a helical fusion DEMO reactor named FFHR- d1, using radial profiles extrapolated from LHD. FFHR-d1 is a heliotron type DEMO reactor of which the conceptual design activity has been launched since 2010. It is possible to sustain the burning plasma without auxiliary heating (i.e., self-ignition) in FFHR-d1, since there is no need of plasma current drive in heliotron plasmas. The device size is 4 times enlarged from LHD, i.e., the major radius of helical coil center is 15.6 m, the magnetic field strength at the helical coil center is 4.7 T, and the fusion output is {approx} 3 GW. One of the distinguished subjects in FFHR-d1 compared with the former FFHR design series is the robust similarity with LHD. The arrangement of superconducting magnet coils in FFHR-d1 is similar to that of LHD, except a pair of planar poloidal coils omitted to maximize the maintenance ports. This makes reasonable to assume a similar MHD equilibrium as observed in LHD for FFHR-d1, as long as the beta profiles in these two are similar. In FFHR-d1, radial profiles of density and temperature are determined by multiplying proper enhancement factors on those obtained in LHD, according to the DPE (Direct Profile Extrapolation) method. The enhancement factors are calculated consistently with the gyro-Bohm model. Therefore, the global confinement properties as expressed in ISS95 or ISS04 are kept in FFHR-d1. A large Shafranov shift is foreseen in FFHR-d1 due to its high-beta property. This leads to deterioration in the neoclassical transport and alpha particle confinement. Effectiveness of plasma position control and/or magnetic configuration optimization has been examined to solve this problem and to check the validity of extrapolated profiles. According to these analyses, it is concluded that the self-ignition condition can be achieved in FFHR-d1 by

  11. Benchmark calculations of power distribution within assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavarec, C.; Perron, J.F.; Verwaerde, D.; West, J.P.

    1994-09-01

    The main objective of this Benchmark is to compare different techniques for fine flux prediction based upon coarse mesh diffusion or transport calculations. We proposed 5 ''core'' configurations including different assembly types (17 x 17 pins, ''uranium'', ''absorber'' or ''MOX'' assemblies), with different boundary conditions. The specification required results in terms of reactivity, pin by pin fluxes and production rate distributions. The proposal for these Benchmark calculations was made by J.C. LEFEBVRE, J. MONDOT, J.P. WEST and the specification (with nuclear data, assembly types, core configurations for 2D geometry and results presentation) was distributed to correspondents of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 11 countries and 19 companies answered the exercise proposed by this Benchmark. Heterogeneous calculations and homogeneous calculations were made. Various methods were used to produce the results: diffusion (finite differences, nodal...), transport (P ij , S n , Monte Carlo). This report presents an analysis and intercomparisons of all the results received

  12. Mining microsatellites in the peach genome: development of new long-core SSR markers for genetic analyses in five Prunus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Maria Teresa; Micali, Sabrina; Giovinazzi, Jessica; Scalabrin, Simone; Verde, Ignazio; Cipriani, Guido

    2015-01-01

    A wide inventory of molecular markers is nowadays available for individual fingerprinting. Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play a relevant role due to their relatively ease of use, their abundance in the plant genomes, and their co-dominant nature, together with the availability of primer sequences in many important agricultural crops. Microsatellites with long-core motifs are more easily scored and were adopted long ago in human genetics but they were developed only in few crops, and Prunus species are not among them. In the present work the peach whole-genome sequence was used to select 216 SSRs containing long-core motifs with tri-, tetra- and penta-nucleotide repeats. Microsatellite primer pairs were designed and tested for polymorphism in the five diploid Prunus species of economic relevance (almond, apricot, Japanese plum, peach and sweet cherry). A set of 26 microsatellite markers covering all the eight chromosomes, was also selected and used in the molecular characterization, population genetics and structure analyses of a representative sample of the five diploid Prunus species, assessing their transportability and effectiveness. The combined probability of identity between two random individuals for the whole set of 26 SSRs was quite low, ranging from 2.30 × 10(-7) in peach to 9.48 × 10(-10) in almond, confirming the usefulness of the proposed set for fingerprinting analyses in Prunus species.

  13. MCNP neutron benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Whalen, D.J.; Cardon, D.A.; Uhle, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Over 50 neutron benchmark calculations have recently been completed as part of an ongoing program to validate the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The new and significant aspects of this work are as follows: These calculations are the first attempt at a validation program for MCNP and the first official benchmarking of version 4 of the code. We believe the chosen set of benchmarks is a comprehensive set that may be useful for benchmarking other radiation transport codes and data libraries. These calculations provide insight into how well neutron transport calculations can be expected to model a wide variety of problems

  14. First measurements on the core and edge isotope composition using the JET isotope separator neutral particle analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettella, D; Murari, A; Stamp, M; Testa, D

    2003-01-01

    Direct measurements of tokamak plasmas isotope composition are in general quite difficult and have therefore been very seldom performed. On the other hand, the importance of this measurement is going to increase, as future experiments will be progressively focused on plasmas approaching reactor conditions. In this paper, we report for the first time encouraging experimental evidence supporting a new method to determine the radial profile of the density ratio n H /(n H + n D ), based on neutral particle analyser (NPA) measurements. The measurements have been performed in JET with the ISotope SEParator (ISEP), a NPA device specifically developed to measure the energy spectra of the three hydrogen isotopes with very high accuracy and low cross-talk. The data presented here have been collected in two different experimental conditions. In the first case, the density ratio has been kept constant during the discharge. The isotope ratio derived from the ISEP has been compared with the results of visible spectroscopy at the edge and with the isotope composition derived from an Alfven eigenmodes active diagnostic (AEAD) system at about half the minor radius for the discharges reported in this paper. A preliminary evaluation of the additional heating effects on the measurements has also been carried out. In the second set of experiments, the isotope composition of deuterium plasmas has been abruptly changed with suitable short blips of hydrogen, in order to assess the capability of the method to study the transport of the hydrogen isotope species. Future developments of the methodology and its applications to the evaluation of hydrogen transport coefficients are also briefly discussed. The results obtained so far motivate further development of the technique, which constitutes one of the few candidate diagnostic approaches viable for ITER

  15. Numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/ plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/ U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-II. 3. Analysis of the OECD TMI-1 Main-Steam- Line-Break Benchmark Accident Using the Coupled RELAP5/PANTHER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneidesch, C.R.; Guisset, J.P.; Zhang, J.; Bryce, P.; Parkes, M.

    2001-01-01

    The RELAP5 best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code has been coupled with the PANTHER three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics code via the TALINK dynamic data exchange control and processing tool. The coupled RELAP5/PANTHER code package is being qualified and will be used at British Energy (BE) and Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE), independently, to analyze pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients where strong core-system interactions occur. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency PWR Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark problem was performed to demonstrate the capability of the coupled code package to simulate such transients, and this paper reports the BE and TEE contributions. In the first exercise, a point-kinetics (PK) calculation is performed using the RELAP5 code. Two solutions have been derived for the PK case. The first corresponds to scenario, 1 where calculations are carried out using the original (BE) rod worth and where no significant return to power (RTP) occurs. The second corresponds to scenario 2 with arbitrarily reduced rod worth in order to obtain RTP (and was not part of the 'official' results). The results, as illustrated in Fig. 1, show that the thermalhydraulic system response and rod worth are essential in determining the core response. The second exercise consists of a 3-D neutron kinetics transient calculation driven by best-estimate time-dependent core inlet conditions on a 18 T and H zones basis derived from TRAC-PF1/MOD2 (PSU), again analyzing two scenarios of different rod worths. Two sets of PANTHER solutions were submitted for exercise 2. The first solution uses a spatial discretization of one node per assembly and 24 core axial layers for both flux and T and H mesh. The second is characterized by spatial refinement (2 x 2 nodes per assembly, 48 core layers for flux, and T and H calculation), time refinement (half-size time steps), and an increased radial discretization for solution

  16. Benchmarking ENDF/B-VII.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marck, Steven C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The new major release VII.0 of the ENDF/B nuclear data library has been tested extensively using benchmark calculations. These were based upon MCNP-4C3 continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutronics simulations, together with nuclear data processed using the code NJOY. Three types of benchmarks were used, viz., criticality safety benchmarks (fusion) shielding benchmarks, and reference systems for which the effective delayed neutron fraction is reported. For criticality safety, more than 700 benchmarks from the International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were used. Benchmarks from all categories were used, ranging from low-enriched uranium, compound fuel, thermal spectrum ones (LEU-COMP-THERM), to mixed uranium-plutonium, metallic fuel, fast spectrum ones (MIX-MET-FAST). For fusion shielding many benchmarks were based on IAEA specifications for the Oktavian experiments (for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, LiF, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, W, Zr), Fusion Neutronics Source in Japan (for Be, C, N, O, Fe, Pb), and Pulsed Sphere experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (for 6 Li, 7 Li, Be, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Ti, Fe, Pb, D 2 O, H 2 O, concrete, polyethylene and teflon). For testing delayed neutron data more than thirty measurements in widely varying systems were used. Among these were measurements in the Tank Critical Assembly (TCA in Japan) and IPEN/MB-01 (Brazil), both with a thermal spectrum, and two cores in Masurca (France) and three cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA, Japan), all with fast spectra. In criticality safety, many benchmarks were chosen from the category with a thermal spectrum, low-enriched uranium, compound fuel (LEU-COMP-THERM), because this is typical of most current-day reactors, and because these benchmarks were previously underpredicted by as much as 0.5% by most nuclear data libraries (such as ENDF/B-VI.8, JEFF-3.0). The calculated results presented here show that this underprediction is no longer there for ENDF/B-VII.0. The average over 257

  17. The core regulatory network of the abscisic acid pathway in banana: genome-wide identification and expression analyses during development, ripening, and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Yan, Yan; Shi, Haitao; Liu, Juhua; Miao, Hongxia; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Ding, XuPo; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiashui; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2017-08-29

    Abscisic acid (ABA) signaling plays a crucial role in developmental and environmental adaptation processes of plants. However, the PYL-PP2C-SnRK2 families that function as the core components of ABA signaling are not well understood in banana. In the present study, 24 PYL, 87 PP2C, and 11 SnRK2 genes were identified from banana, which was further supported by evolutionary relationships, conserved motif and gene structure analyses. The comprehensive transcriptomic analyses showed that banana PYL-PP2C-SnRK2 genes are involved in tissue development, fruit development and ripening, and response to abiotic stress in two cultivated varieties. Moreover, comparative expression analyses of PYL-PP2C-SnRK2 genes between BaXi Jiao (BX) and Fen Jiao (FJ) revealed that PYL-PP2C-SnRK2-mediated ABA signaling might positively regulate banana fruit ripening and tolerance to cold, salt, and osmotic stresses. Finally, interaction networks and co-expression assays demonstrated that the core components of ABA signaling were more active in FJ than in BX in response to abiotic stress, further supporting the crucial role of the genes in tolerance to abiotic stress in banana. This study provides new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of PYL-PP2C-SnRK2 genes, improves the understanding of PYL-PP2C-SnRK2-mediated ABA signaling in the regulation of fruit development, ripening, and response to abiotic stress, and identifies some candidate genes for genetic improvement of banana.

  18. OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark: Simulation by POLCA-T Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, Dobromir

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse transient code POLCA-T brings together the system thermal-hydraulics plant models and three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics core models. Participation in the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip (TT) Benchmark is a part of our efforts toward the code's validation. The paper describes the objectives for TT analyses and gives a brief overview of the developed plant system input deck and 3-D core model.The results of exercise 1, system model without netronics, are presented. Sensitivity studies performed cover the maximal time step, turbine stop valve position and mass flow, feedwater temperature, and steam bypass mass flow. Results of exercise 2, 3-D core neutronic and thermal-hydraulic model with boundary conditions, are also presented. Sensitivity studies include the core inlet temperature, cladding properties, and direct heating to core coolant and bypass.The entire plant model was validated in the framework of the benchmark's phase 3. Sensitivity studies include the effect of SCRAM initialization and carry-under. The results obtained - transient fission power and its initial axial distribution and steam dome, core exit, lower and upper plenum, main steam line, and turbine inlet pressures - showed good agreement with measured data. Thus, the POLCA-T code capabilities for correct simulation of pressurizing transients with very fast power were proved

  19. EBR-II Reactor Physics Benchmark Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Chad L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Lum, Edward S [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Stewart, Ryan [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Byambadorj, Bilguun [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Beaulieu, Quinton [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2017-12-28

    This report provides a reactor physics benchmark evaluation with associated uncertainty quantification for the critical configuration of the April 1986 Experimental Breeder Reactor II Run 138B core configuration.

  20. Benchmark of the CASMO-3G/MICROBURN-B codes for Commonwealth Edison boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, J.K.; Pallotta, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Commonwealth Edison Company has performed an extensive benchmark against measured data from three boiling water reactors using the Studsvik lattice physics code CASMO-3G and the Siemens Nuclear Power three-dimensional simulator code MICROBURN-B. The measured data of interest for this benchmark are the hot and cold reactivity, and the core power distributions as measured by the traversing incore probe system and gamma scan data for fuel pins and assemblies. A total of nineteen unit-cycles were evaluated. The database included fuel product lines manufactured by General Electric and Siemens Nuclear Power, wit assemblies containing 7 x 7 to 9 x 9 pin configurations, several water rod designs, various enrichments and gadolina loadings, and axially varying lattice designs throughout the enriched portion of the bundle. The results of the benchmark present evidence that the CASMO-3G/MICROBURN-B code package can adequately model the range of fuel and core types in the benchmark, and the codes are acceptable for performing neutronic analyses of Commonwealth Edison's boiling water reactors

  1. Benchmarking af kommunernes sagsbehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    Fra 2007 skal Ankestyrelsen gennemføre benchmarking af kommuernes sagsbehandlingskvalitet. Formålet med benchmarkingen er at udvikle praksisundersøgelsernes design med henblik på en bedre opfølgning og at forbedre kommunernes sagsbehandling. Dette arbejdspapir diskuterer metoder for benchmarking...

  2. Internet based benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the design of interactive, internet based benchmarking using parametric (statistical) as well as nonparametric (DEA) models. The user receives benchmarks and improvement potentials. The user is also given the possibility to search different efficiency frontiers and hereby to explore...

  3. The Drill Down Benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); T. Rühl (Tim); F. Kwakkel

    1998-01-01

    textabstractData Mining places specific requirements on DBMS query performance that cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using existing OLAP benchmarks. The DD Benchmark - defined here - provides a practical case and yardstick to explore how well a DBMS is able to support Data Mining applications. It

  4. Benchmarking Tool Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Health Libraries Association.

    Nine Canadian health libraries participated in a pilot test of the Benchmarking Tool Kit between January and April, 1998. Although the Tool Kit was designed specifically for health libraries, the content and approach are useful to other types of libraries as well. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to…

  5. How Activists Use Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Wigan, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Non-governmental organisations use benchmarks as a form of symbolic violence to place political pressure on firms, states, and international organisations. The development of benchmarks requires three elements: (1) salience, that the community of concern is aware of the issue and views...... are put to the test. The first is a reformist benchmarking cycle where organisations defer to experts to create a benchmark that conforms with the broader system of politico-economic norms. The second is a revolutionary benchmarking cycle driven by expert-activists that seek to contest strong vested...... interests and challenge established politico-economic norms. Differentiating these cycles provides insights into how activists work through organisations and with expert networks, as well as how campaigns on complex economic issues can be mounted and sustained....

  6. EGS4 benchmark program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasu, Y.; Hirayama, H.; Namito, Y.; Yashiro, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes EGS4 Benchmark Suite which consists of three programs called UCSAMPL4, UCSAMPL4I and XYZDOS. This paper also evaluates optimization methods of recent RISC/UNIX systems, such as IBM, HP, DEC, Hitachi and Fujitsu, for the benchmark suite. When particular compiler option and math library were included in the evaluation process, system performed significantly better. Observed performance of some of the RISC/UNIX systems were beyond some so-called Mainframes of IBM, Hitachi or Fujitsu. The computer performance of EGS4 Code System on an HP9000/735 (99MHz) was defined to be the unit of EGS4 Unit. The EGS4 Benchmark Suite also run on various PCs such as Pentiums, i486 and DEC alpha and so forth. The performance of recent fast PCs reaches that of recent RISC/UNIX systems. The benchmark programs have been evaluated with correlation of industry benchmark programs, namely, SPECmark. (author)

  7. The development of code benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has undertaken a code benchmarking effort to define a series of cask-like problems having both numerical solutions and experimental data. The development of the benchmarks includes: (1) model problem definition, (2) code intercomparison, and (3) experimental verification. The first two steps are complete and a series of experiments are planned. The experiments will examine the elastic/plastic behavior of cylinders for both the end and side impacts resulting from a nine meter drop. The cylinders will be made from stainless steel and aluminum to give a range of plastic deformations. This paper presents the results of analyses simulating the model's behavior using materials properties for stainless steel and aluminum

  8. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  9. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  10. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  11. Calculation of the 5th AER dynamic benchmark with APROS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.; Kontio, H.

    1998-01-01

    The model used for calculation of the 5th AER dynamic benchmark with APROS code is presented. In the calculation of the 5th AER dynamic benchmark the three-dimensional neutronics model of APROS was used. The core was divided axially into 20 nodes according to the specifications of the benchmark and each six identical fuel assemblies were placed into one one-dimensional thermal hydraulic channel. The five-equation thermal hydraulic model was used in the benchmark. The plant process and automation was described with a generic VVER-440 plant model created by IVO PE. (author)

  12. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Lozano, Luis; Acosta-Cruz, Erika; Borland, Stéphanie; Drogue, Benoît; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Rouy, Zoé; Barbe, Valérie; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; González, Victor; Mavingui, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510). The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis), and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron) are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation. PMID:24705077

  13. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor González

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510. The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis, and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation.

  14. Full sphere hydrodynamic and dynamo benchmarks

    KAUST Repository

    Marti, P.

    2014-01-26

    Convection in planetary cores can generate fluid flow and magnetic fields, and a number of sophisticated codes exist to simulate the dynamic behaviour of such systems. We report on the first community activity to compare numerical results of computer codes designed to calculate fluid flow within a whole sphere. The flows are incompressible and rapidly rotating and the forcing of the flow is either due to thermal convection or due to moving boundaries. All problems defined have solutions that alloweasy comparison, since they are either steady, slowly drifting or perfectly periodic. The first two benchmarks are defined based on uniform internal heating within the sphere under the Boussinesq approximation with boundary conditions that are uniform in temperature and stress-free for the flow. Benchmark 1 is purely hydrodynamic, and has a drifting solution. Benchmark 2 is a magnetohydrodynamic benchmark that can generate oscillatory, purely periodic, flows and magnetic fields. In contrast, Benchmark 3 is a hydrodynamic rotating bubble benchmark using no slip boundary conditions that has a stationary solution. Results from a variety of types of code are reported, including codes that are fully spectral (based on spherical harmonic expansions in angular coordinates and polynomial expansions in radius), mixed spectral and finite difference, finite volume, finite element and also a mixed Fourier-finite element code. There is good agreement between codes. It is found that in Benchmarks 1 and 2, the approximation of a whole sphere problem by a domain that is a spherical shell (a sphere possessing an inner core) does not represent an adequate approximation to the system, since the results differ from whole sphere results. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society.

  15. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Artjom; Riazanov, Alexandre; Hindle, Matthew M; Baker, Christopher Jo

    2014-02-25

    Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption.

  16. Pool critical assembly pressure vessel facility benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1997-07-01

    This pool critical assembly (PCA) pressure vessel wall facility benchmark (PCA benchmark) is described and analyzed in this report. Analysis of the PCA benchmark can be used for partial fulfillment of the requirements for the qualification of the methodology for pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations, as required by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guide DG-1053. Section 1 of this report describes the PCA benchmark and provides all data necessary for the benchmark analysis. The measured quantities, to be compared with the calculated values, are the equivalent fission fluxes. In Section 2 the analysis of the PCA benchmark is described. Calculations with the computer code DORT, based on the discrete-ordinates method, were performed for three ENDF/B-VI-based multigroup libraries: BUGLE-93, SAILOR-95, and BUGLE-96. An excellent agreement of the calculated (C) and measures (M) equivalent fission fluxes was obtained. The arithmetic average C/M for all the dosimeters (total of 31) was 0.93 ± 0.03 and 0.92 ± 0.03 for the SAILOR-95 and BUGLE-96 libraries, respectively. The average C/M ratio, obtained with the BUGLE-93 library, for the 28 measurements was 0.93 ± 0.03 (the neptunium measurements in the water and air regions were overpredicted and excluded from the average). No systematic decrease in the C/M ratios with increasing distance from the core was observed for any of the libraries used

  17. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  18. DORT-TD/THERMIX solutions for the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Pautz, Andreas; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2008-01-01

    In new reactor designs that are still under review such as the PBMR, not much experimental data exists to benchmark newly developed computer codes against. Such a situation requires that nuclear engineers and designers of this novel reactor design must resort to the validation of a newly developed code through a code-to-code benchmarking exercise because there are validated codes that are currently in use to analyze this reactor design, albeit very few of them. There are numerous HTR core physics benchmarks that are currently being pursued by different organizations, for different purposes. One such benchmark exercise is the PBMR-400 MW OECD/NEA/NSC coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark. In this paper, a newly developed coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics code system, DORT-TD/THERMIX with both transport and diffusion theory options, is used to simulate the transient scenarios in the above-mentioned benchmark problem. Steady-state calculations results are compared with selected participants' results as well as transient models in which the diffusion and transport theory solutions of the same code system are directly compared. Several sensitivity studies are also shown in order to determine how much the change in certain parameters influences the overall behaviour of a given transient. It is shown in this paper that DORT-TD/THERMIX is a versatile tool which can be deployed for design and safety analyses of high temperature reactors of pebble-bed type. (authors)

  19. Benchmark tests for fast and thermal reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yuji

    1984-01-01

    Integral tests of JENDL-2 library for fast and thermal reactor applications are reviewed including relevant analyses of JUPITER experiments. Criticality and core center characteristics were tested with one-dimensional models for a total of 27 fast critical assemblies. More sofisticated problems such as reaction rate distributions, control rod worths and sodium void reactivities were tested using two-dimensional models for MOZART and ZPPR-3 assemblies. Main observations from the fast core benchmark tests are as follows. 1) The criticality is well predicted; the average C/E value is 0.999+-0.008 for uranium cores and 0.997+-0.005 for plutonium cores. 2) The calculation underpredicts the reaction rate ratio 239 Pusub(fis)/ 235 Usub(fis) by 3% and overpredicts 238 Usub(cap)/ 239 Pusub(fis) by 6%. The results are consistent with those of JUPITER analyses. 3) The reaction rate distributions in the cores of prototype size are well predicted within +-3%. In larger JUPITER cores, however, the C/E value increases with the radial distance from the core center up to 6% at the outer core edge. 4) The prediction of control rod worths is satisfactory; C/E values are within the range from 0.92 to 0.97 with no apparent dependence on 10 B enrichment and the number of control rods inserted. Spatial dependence of C/E is also observed in the JUPITER cores. 5) The sodium void reactivity is overpredicted by 30% to 50% to the positive side. 1) The criticality is well predicted, as is the same in the fast core tests; the average C/E is 0.997+-0.003. 2) The calculation overpredicts 238 Usub(fis)/ 235 Usub(fis) by 3% to 6%, which shows the same tendency as in the small and medium size fast assemblies. The 238 Usub(cap)/ 235 Usub(fis) ratio is well predicted in the thermal cores. The calculated reaction rate ratios of 232 Th deviate from the measurements by 10% to 15%. (author)

  20. Benchmarking and the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, M; Nadin, L

    2001-01-01

    This article describes how benchmarking can be used to assess laboratory performance. Two benchmarking schemes are reviewed, the Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report and the College of American Pathologists' Q-Probes scheme. The Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report is undertaken by staff based in the clinical management unit, Keele University with appropriate input from the professional organisations within pathology. Five annual reports have now been completed. Each report is a detailed analysis of 10 areas of laboratory performance. In this review, particular attention is focused on the areas of quality, productivity, variation in clinical practice, skill mix, and working hours. The Q-Probes scheme is part of the College of American Pathologists programme in studies of quality assurance. The Q-Probes scheme and its applicability to pathology in the UK is illustrated by reviewing two recent Q-Probe studies: routine outpatient test turnaround time and outpatient test order accuracy. The Q-Probes scheme is somewhat limited by the small number of UK laboratories that have participated. In conclusion, as a result of the government's policy in the UK, benchmarking is here to stay. Benchmarking schemes described in this article are one way in which pathologists can demonstrate that they are providing a cost effective and high quality service. Key Words: benchmarking • pathology PMID:11477112

  1. Benchmark tests of JENDL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Hasegawa, Akira; Takano, Hideki; Kamei, Takanobu; Hojuyama, Takeshi; Sasaki, Makoto; Seki, Yuji; Zukeran, Atsushi; Otake, Iwao.

    1982-02-01

    Various benchmark tests were made on JENDL-1. At the first stage, various core center characteristics were tested for many critical assemblies with one-dimensional model. At the second stage, applicability of JENDL-1 was further tested to more sophisticated problems for MOZART and ZPPR-3 assemblies with two-dimensional model. It was proved that JENDL-1 predicted various quantities of fast reactors satisfactorily as a whole. However, the following problems were pointed out: 1) There exists discrepancy of 0.9% in the k sub(eff)-values between the Pu- and U-cores. 2) The fission rate ratio of 239 Pu to 235 U is underestimated by 3%. 3) The Doppler reactivity coefficients are overestimated by about 10%. 4) The control rod worths are underestimated by 4%. 5) The fission rates of 235 U and 239 Pu are underestimated considerably in the outer core and radial blanket regions. 6) The negative sodium void reactivities are overestimated, when the sodium is removed from the outer core. As a whole, most of problems of JENDL-1 seem to be related with the neutron leakage and the neutron spectrum. It was found through the further study that most of these problems came from too small diffusion coefficients and too large elastic removal cross sections above 100 keV, which might be probably caused by overestimation of the total and elastic scattering cross sections for structural materials in the unresolved resonance region up to several MeV. (author)

  2. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  3. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  4. Reactor fuel depletion benchmark of TINDER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.J.; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Hecht, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A reactor burnup benchmark of TINDER, coupling MCNP6 to CINDER2008, was performed. • TINDER is a poor candidate for fuel depletion calculations using its current libraries. • Data library modification is necessary if fuel depletion is desired from TINDER. - Abstract: Accurate burnup calculations are key to proper nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle modeling, and disposal estimations. The TINDER code, originally designed for activation analyses, has been modified to handle full burnup calculations, including the widely used predictor–corrector feature. In order to properly characterize the performance of TINDER for this application, a benchmark calculation was performed. Although the results followed the trends of past benchmarked codes for a UO 2 PWR fuel sample from the Takahama-3 reactor, there were obvious deficiencies in the final result, likely in the nuclear data library that was used. Isotopic comparisons versus experiment and past code benchmarks are given, as well as hypothesized areas of deficiency and future work

  5. An improved benchmark model for the Big Ten critical assembly - 021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    A new benchmark specification is developed for the BIG TEN uranium critical assembly. The assembly has a fast spectrum, and its core contains approximately 10 wt.% enriched uranium. Detailed specifications for the benchmark are provided, and results from the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code using a variety of nuclear-data libraries are given for this benchmark and two others. (authors)

  6. Possibilities of instrumental neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses of sedimentary-magmatic metamorphosed rocks from deep borehole drill cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, A.L.; Drynkin, V.I.; Lejpunskaya, D.I.

    1977-01-01

    The possibilities for instrumental neutron-activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses of rocks of metamorphized sedimentary magmatic complexes have been studied with the aid of deep-hole core. The principal characteristics of the conditions of irradiation and of sample measurement ensuring the determination of the content of 26 elements are presented. The use of X-ray fluorescence analysis enables one to determine additionally the content of stron-tium and niobium. Standard specimens of the composition of rocks and complex reference compounds based on phenol formaldehyde resins are used as metrolo.o.ical auxiliaries in the calibration system and in evaluating the correctness of the techniques of instrumental neutron activation and fluorescence analysis. The ranges of the contents to be determined, the sensitivity and relative standard deviation are given. The contribution from the nonuniformity of the specimens to the summary error of element determination is estimated. It is shown that the accuracy and error of analyses are within the allowable range

  7. Benchmarking Severe Accident Computer Codes for Heavy Water Reactor Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    Requests for severe accident investigations and assurance of mitigation measures have increased for operating nuclear power plants and the design of advanced nuclear power plants. Severe accident analysis investigations necessitate the analysis of the very complex physical phenomena that occur sequentially during various stages of accident progression. Computer codes are essential tools for understanding how the reactor and its containment might respond under severe accident conditions. The IAEA organizes coordinated research projects (CRPs) to facilitate technology development through international collaboration among Member States. The CRP on Benchmarking Severe Accident Computer Codes for HWR Applications was planned on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for HWRs (the TWG-HWR). This publication summarizes the results from the CRP participants. The CRP promoted international collaboration among Member States to improve the phenomenological understanding of severe core damage accidents and the capability to analyse them. The CRP scope included the identification and selection of a severe accident sequence, selection of appropriate geometrical and boundary conditions, conduct of benchmark analyses, comparison of the results of all code outputs, evaluation of the capabilities of computer codes to predict important severe accident phenomena, and the proposal of necessary code improvements and/or new experiments to reduce uncertainties. Seven institutes from five countries with HWRs participated in this CRP

  8. MCNP simulation of the TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, R.; Glumac, B.; Maucec, M.

    1996-01-01

    The complete 3D MCNP model of the TRIGA Mark II reactor is presented. It enables precise calculations of some quantities of interest in a steady-state mode of operation. Calculational results are compared to the experimental results gathered during reactor reconstruction in 1992. Since the operating conditions were well defined at that time, the experimental results can be used as a benchmark. It may be noted that this benchmark is one of very few high enrichment benchmarks available. In our simulations experimental conditions were thoroughly simulated: fuel elements and control rods were precisely modeled as well as entire core configuration and the vicinity of the core. ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-V libraries were used. Partial results of benchmark calculations are presented. Excellent agreement of core criticality, excess reactivity and control rod worths can be observed. (author)

  9. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  10. Benchmarking Swiss electricity grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walti, N.O.; Weber, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This extensive article describes a pilot benchmarking project initiated by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises that assessed 37 Swiss utilities. The data collected from these utilities on a voluntary basis included data on technical infrastructure, investments and operating costs. These various factors are listed and discussed in detail. The assessment methods and rating mechanisms that provided the benchmarks are discussed and the results of the pilot study are presented that are to form the basis of benchmarking procedures for the grid regulation authorities under the planned Switzerland's electricity market law. Examples of the practical use of the benchmarking methods are given and cost-efficiency questions still open in the area of investment and operating costs are listed. Prefaces by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy complete the article

  11. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    . The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  12. Financial Integrity Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of Jackson, Mississippi — This data compiles standard financial integrity benchmarks that allow the City to measure its financial standing. It measure the City's debt ratio and bond ratings....

  13. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    .... The design of this study included two parts: (1) eleven expert panelists involved in a Delphi technique to identify and rate importance of foodservice performance measures and rate the importance of benchmarking activities, and (2...

  14. MFTF TOTAL benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, J.H.

    1979-06-01

    A benchmark of the TOTAL data base management system as applied to the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) data base was implemented and run in February and March of 1979. The benchmark was run on an Interdata 8/32 and involved the following tasks: (1) data base design, (2) data base generation, (3) data base load, and (4) develop and implement programs to simulate MFTF usage of the data base

  15. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author)

  16. Shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Masayoshi; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1978-09-01

    Shielding benchmark problems were prepared by the Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Comittee on Shielding Design of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and compiled by the Shielding Laboratory of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Twenty-one kinds of shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm and the accuracy of computer codes based on the discrete ordinates method and the Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in the codes. (author)

  17. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  18. Development of concept and neutronic calculation method for large LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Ikegami, T.; Sanda, T.; Kaneto, K.; Kawashima, M.; Kaise, Y.; Shirakawa, M.; Hibi, K.

    1991-01-01

    Presented in this paper is the state of the art of reactor physics R and Ds for the development of concept and neutronic calculation method for large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) core. Physics characteristics of concepts for mixed oxide (MOX) fueled large FBR core were investigated by a series of benchmark critical experiments. Next, an adequacy and accuracy of the current neutronic calculation method was assessed by the experiments analyses, and then neutronic prediction accuracies by the method were evaluated for physics characteristics of the large core. Concerns on core development were discussed in terms of neutronics. (author)

  19. Benchmarking electricity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, K. [Department of Justice and Attorney-General, QLD (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Benchmarking has been described as a method of continuous improvement that involves an ongoing and systematic evaluation and incorporation of external products, services and processes recognised as representing best practice. It is a management tool similar to total quality management (TQM) and business process re-engineering (BPR), and is best used as part of a total package. This paper discusses benchmarking models and approaches and suggests a few key performance indicators that could be applied to benchmarking electricity distribution utilities. Some recent benchmarking studies are used as examples and briefly discussed. It is concluded that benchmarking is a strong tool to be added to the range of techniques that can be used by electricity distribution utilities and other organizations in search of continuous improvement, and that there is now a high level of interest in Australia. Benchmarking represents an opportunity for organizations to approach learning from others in a disciplined and highly productive way, which will complement the other micro-economic reforms being implemented in Australia. (author). 26 refs.

  20. Improving accuracy and precision of ice core δD(CH4 analyses using methane pre-pyrolysis and hydrogen post-pyrolysis trapping and subsequent chromatographic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bock

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Firn and polar ice cores offer the only direct palaeoatmospheric archive. Analyses of past greenhouse gas concentrations and their isotopic compositions in air bubbles in the ice can help to constrain changes in global biogeochemical cycles in the past. For the analysis of the hydrogen isotopic composition of methane (δD(CH4 or δ2H(CH4 0.5 to 1.5 kg of ice was hitherto used. Here we present a method to improve precision and reduce the sample amount for δD(CH4 measurements in (ice core air. Pre-concentrated methane is focused in front of a high temperature oven (pre-pyrolysis trapping, and molecular hydrogen formed by pyrolysis is trapped afterwards (post-pyrolysis trapping, both on a carbon-PLOT capillary at −196 °C. Argon, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, unpyrolysed methane and krypton are trapped together with H2 and must be separated using a second short, cooled chromatographic column to ensure accurate results. Pre- and post-pyrolysis trapping largely removes the isotopic fractionation induced during chromatographic separation and results in a narrow peak in the mass spectrometer. Air standards can be measured with a precision better than 1‰. For polar ice samples from glacial periods, we estimate a precision of 2.3‰ for 350 g of ice (or roughly 30 mL – at standard temperature and pressure (STP – of air with 350 ppb of methane. This corresponds to recent tropospheric air samples (about 1900 ppb CH4 of about 6 mL (STP or about 500 pmol of pure CH4.

  1. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts as well as for current applications. Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for coupling core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present report is the second in a series of four and summarises the results of the first benchmark exercise, which identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermalhydraulic system modelling of the transient, with specified core average axial power distribution and fission power time transient history. The transient addressed is a turbine trip in a boiling water reactor, involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4) make the present benchmark particularly valuable. (author)

  2. Validation and applicability of the 3D core kinetics and thermal hydraulics coupled code SPARKLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Manabu; Maruyama, Manabu; Ogawa, Junto; Otake, Yukihiko; Miyake, Shuhei; Tabuse, Shigehiko; Tanaka, Hirohisa

    2009-01-01

    The SPARKLE code is a coupled code system based on three individual codes whose physical models have already been verified and validated. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) confirmed the coupling calculation, including data transfer and the total reactor coolant system (RCS) behavior of the SPARKLE code. The confirmation uses the OECD/NEA MSLB benchmark problem, which is based on Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) nuclear power plant data. This benchmark problem has been used to verify coupled codes developed and used by many organizations. Objectives of the benchmark program are as follows. Phase 1 is to compare the results of the system transient code using point kinetics. Phase 2 is to compare the results of the coupled three-dimensional (3D) core kinetics code and 3D core thermal-hydraulics (T/H) code, and Phase 3 is to compare the results of the combined coupled system transient code, 3D core kinetics code, and 3D core T/H code as a total validation of the coupled calculation. The calculation results of the SPARKLE code indicate good agreement with other benchmark participants' results. Therefore, the SPARKLE code is validated through these benchmark problems. In anticipation of applying the SPARKLE code to licensing analyses, MHI and Japanese PWR utilities have established a safety analysis method regarding the calculation conditions such as power distributions, reactivity coefficients, and event-specific features. (author)

  3. Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

    2007-10-30

    Critical data science applications requiring frequent access to storage perform poorly on today's computing architectures. This project addresses efficient computation of data-intensive problems in national security and basic science by exploring, advancing, and applying a new form of computing called storage-intensive supercomputing (SISC). Our goal is to enable applications that simply cannot run on current systems, and, for a broad range of data-intensive problems, to deliver an order of magnitude improvement in price/performance over today's data-intensive architectures. This technical report documents much of the work done under LDRD 07-ERD-063 Storage Intensive Supercomputing during the period 05/07-09/07. The following chapters describe: (1) a new file I/O monitoring tool iotrace developed to capture the dynamic I/O profiles of Linux processes; (2) an out-of-core graph benchmark for level-set expansion of scale-free graphs; (3) an entity extraction benchmark consisting of a pipeline of eight components; and (4) an image resampling benchmark drawn from the SWarp program in the LSST data processing pipeline. The performance of the graph and entity extraction benchmarks was measured in three different scenarios: data sets residing on the NFS file server and accessed over the network; data sets stored on local disk; and data sets stored on the Fusion I/O parallel NAND Flash array. The image resampling benchmark compared performance of software-only to GPU-accelerated. In addition to the work reported here, an additional text processing application was developed that used an FPGA to accelerate n-gram profiling for language classification. The n-gram application will be presented at SC07 at the High Performance Reconfigurable Computing Technologies and Applications Workshop. The graph and entity extraction benchmarks were run on a Supermicro server housing the NAND Flash 40GB parallel disk array, the Fusion-io. The Fusion system specs are as follows

  4. In-core fuel management code package validation for BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The main goal of the present CRP (Coordinated Research Programme) was to develop benchmarks which are appropriate to check and improve the fuel management computer code packages and their procedures. Therefore, benchmark specifications were established which included a set of realistic data for running in-core fuel management codes. Secondly, the results of measurements and/or operating data were also provided to verify and compare with these parameters as calculated by the in-core fuel management codes or code packages. For the BWR it was established that the Mexican Laguna Verde 1 BWR would serve as the model for providing data on the benchmark specifications. It was decided to provide results for the first 2 cycles of Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde reactor. The analyses of the above benchmarks are performed in two stages. In the first stage, the lattice parameters are generated as a function of burnup at different voids and with and without control rod. These lattice parameters form the input for 3-dimensional diffusion theory codes for over-all reactor analysis. The lattice calculations were performed using different methods, such as, Monte Carlo, 2-D integral transport theory methods. Supercell Model and transport-diffusion model with proper correction for burnable absorber. Thus the variety of results should provide adequate information for any institute or organization to develop competence to analyze In-core fuel management codes. 15 refs, figs and tabs

  5. The KMAT: Benchmarking Knowledge Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Martha

    Provides an overview of knowledge management and benchmarking, including the benefits and methods of benchmarking (e.g., competitive, cooperative, collaborative, and internal benchmarking). Arthur Andersen's KMAT (Knowledge Management Assessment Tool) is described. The KMAT is a collaborative benchmarking tool, designed to help organizations make…

  6. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity growth. Throughout

  7. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity

  8. A framework for benchmarking land models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Q. Luo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1 targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2 a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3 metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4 model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1 a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2 a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties

  9. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Ghasemi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance incompanies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, ithas rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan’s Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aimsto share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how the projectsystematic implementation led to succes.

  10. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    OpenAIRE

    Sasan Ghasemi; Mohammad Nazemi; Mehran Nejati

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance in companies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, it has rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan's Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aims to share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how th...

  11. Deviating From the Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; Carneiro, Anabela

    This paper studies three related questions: To what extent otherwise similar startups employ different quantities and qualities of human capital at the moment of entry? How persistent are initial human capital choices over time? And how does deviating from human capital benchmarks influence firm......, founders human capital, and the ownership structure of startups (solo entrepreneurs versus entrepreneurial teams). We then study the survival implications of exogenous deviations from these benchmarks, based on spline models for survival data. Our results indicate that (especially negative) deviations from...... the benchmark can be substantial, are persistent over time, and hinder the survival of firms. The implications may, however, vary according to the sector and the ownership structure at entry. Given the stickiness of initial choices, wrong human capital decisions at entry turn out to be a close to irreversible...

  12. Determination of Benchmarks Stability within Ahmadu Bello ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heights of six geodetic benchmarks over a total distance of 8.6km at the Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria, Nigeria were recomputed and analysed using least squares adjustment technique. The network computations were tied to two fix primary reference pillars situated outside the campus. The two-tail Chi-square ...

  13. Benchmark test of JENDL-3T and -3T/Rev.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki; Kaneko, Kunio.

    1989-10-01

    The fast reactor 70-group constant set JFS-3-J3T has been generated by using the JENDL-3T nuclear data. One-dimensional 21-benchmark cores and the ZPPR-9 core were analysed with the JFS-3-J3T set. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The values of keff are underestimated by 0.6% for Pu-fueled cores and overestimated by 2% for U-fueled cores. (2) The central reaction rate ratio 239 σ f φ/ 235 σ f φ is in a good agreement with the experimental value, though 238 σ c φ/ 239 σ f φ and 238 σ f φ/ 235 σ f φ are overestimated. (3) Doppler and Na-void reactivities are in a good agreement with the measured data. (4) The prediction accuracy of radial reaction rate distributions are improved in the comparison of the results obtained with the JENDL-2 data. Furthermore, the benchmark test of JENDL-3T/Rev. 1 which was revised from JENDL-3T for several important nuclides has been again performed. It was shown that JENDL-3T/Rev. 1 would predict nuclear characteristics more satisfactorily than JENDL-3T. (author)

  14. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as for current nuclear applications Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for the purpose. The present volume describes the specification of such a benchmark. The transient addressed is a turbine trip (TT) in a BWR involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the plant make the present benchmark very valuable. The data used are from events at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4). (authors)

  15. HPCG Benchmark Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Luszczek, Piotr [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The High Performance Conjugate Gradient (HPCG) benchmark [cite SNL, UTK reports] is a tool for ranking computer systems based on a simple additive Schwarz, symmetric Gauss-Seidel preconditioned conjugate gradient solver. HPCG is similar to the High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] in its purpose, but HPCG is intended to better represent how today’s applications perform. In this paper we describe the technical details of HPCG: how it is designed and implemented, what code transformations are permitted and how to interpret and report results.

  16. Benchmarking for Best Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Zairi, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    Benchmarking for Best Practice uses up-to-the-minute case-studies of individual companies and industry-wide quality schemes to show how and why implementation has succeeded. For any practitioner wanting to establish best practice in a wide variety of business areas, this book makes essential reading. .It is also an ideal textbook on the applications of TQM since it describes concepts, covers definitions and illustrates the applications with first-hand examples. Professor Mohamed Zairi is an international expert and leading figure in the field of benchmarking. His pioneering work in this area l

  17. Benchmarking Danish Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Bentzen, Eric; Aagaard Andreassen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    compatible survey. The International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) doesbring up the question of supply chain management, but unfortunately, we did not have access to thedatabase. Data from the members of the SCOR-model, in the form of benchmarked performance data,may exist, but are nonetheless...... not public. The survey is a cooperative project "Benchmarking DanishIndustries" with CIP/Aalborg University, the Danish Technological University, the DanishTechnological Institute and Copenhagen Business School as consortia partners. The project has beenfunded by the Danish Agency for Trade and Industry...

  18. [Do you mean benchmarking?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, F; Solignac, S; Marty, J

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of benchmarking is to settle improvement processes by comparing the activities to quality standards. The proposed methodology is illustrated by benchmark business cases performed inside medical plants on some items like nosocomial diseases or organization of surgery facilities. Moreover, the authors have built a specific graphic tool, enhanced with balance score numbers and mappings, so that the comparison between different anesthesia-reanimation services, which are willing to start an improvement program, is easy and relevant. This ready-made application is even more accurate as far as detailed tariffs of activities are implemented.

  19. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark. Volume II: Summary Results of Exercise 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Olson, Andy M.

    2005-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) completed under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship a PWR main steam line break (MSLB) benchmark against coupled system three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic codes. Another OECD/NRC coupled-code benchmark was recently completed for a BWR turbine trip (TT) transient and is the object of the present report. Turbine trip transients in a BWR are pressurisation events in which the coupling between core space-dependent neutronic phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. The data made available from actual experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 plant make the present benchmark particularly valuable. While defining and coordinating the BWR TT benchmark, a systematic approach and level methodology not only allowed for a consistent and comprehensive validation process, but also contributed to the study of key parameters of pressurisation transients. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises, two initial states and five transient scenarios. The BWR TT Benchmark will be published in four volumes as NEA reports. CD-ROMs will also be prepared and will include the four reports and the transient boundary conditions, decay heat values as a function of time, cross-section libraries and supplementary tables and graphs not published in the paper version. BWR TT Benchmark - Volume I: Final Specifications was issued in 2001 [NEA/NSC/DOC(2001)]. The benchmark team [Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in co-operation with Exelon Nuclear and the NEA] has been responsible for coordinating benchmark activities, answering participant questions and assisting them in developing their models, as well as analysing submitted solutions and providing reports summarising the results for each phase. The benchmark team has also been involved in the technical aspects of the benchmark, including sensitivity studies for the different exercises. Volume II summarises the results for Exercise 1 of the

  20. Yucatan Subsurface Stratigraphy from Geophysical Data, Well Logs and Core Analyses in the Chicxulub Impact Crater and Implications for Target Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, I.; Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Camargo, A. Z.; Perez-Cruz, G.

    2011-12-01

    Asymmetries in the geophysical signature of Chicxulub crater are being evaluated to investigate on effects of impact angle and trajectory and pre-existing target structural controls for final crater form. Early studies interpreted asymmetries in the gravity anomaly in the offshore sector to propose oblique either northwest- and northeast-directed trajectories. An oblique impact was correlated to the global ejecta distribution and enhanced environmental disturbance. In contrast, recent studies using marine seismic data and computer modeling have shown that crater asymmetries correlate with pre-existing undulations of the Cretaceous continental shelf, suggesting a structural control of target heterogeneities. Documentation of Yucatan subsurface stratigraphy has been limited by lack of outcrops of pre-Paleogene rocks. The extensive cover of platform carbonate rocks has not been affected by faulting or deformation and with no rivers cutting the carbonates, information comes mainly from the drilling programs and geophysical surveys. Here we revisit the subsurface stratigraphy in the crater area from the well log data and cores retrieved in the drilling projects and marine seismic reflection profiles. Other source of information being exploited comes from the impact breccias, which contain a sampling of disrupted target sequences, including crystalline basement and Mesozoic sediments. We analyze gravity and seismic data from the various exploration surveys, including multiple Pemex profiles in the platform and the Chicxulub experiments. Analyses of well log data and seismic profiles identify contacts for Lower Cretaceous, Cretaceous/Jurassic and K/Pg boundaries. Results show that the Cretaceous continental shelf was shallower on the south and southwest than on the east, with emerged areas in Quintana Roo and Belize. Mesozoic and upper Paleozoic sediments show variable thickness, possibly reflecting the crystalline basement regional structure. Paleozoic and Precambrian

  1. Benchmarking and Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TANTAU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the chosen topic is explained by the meaning of the firm efficiency concept - the firm efficiency means the revealed performance (how well the firm performs in the actual market environment given the basic characteristics of the firms and their markets that are expected to drive their profitability (firm size, market power etc.. This complex and relative performance could be due to such things as product innovation, management quality, work organization, some other factors can be a cause even if they are not directly observed by the researcher. The critical need for the management individuals/group to continuously improve their firm/company’s efficiency and effectiveness, the need for the managers to know which are the success factors and the competitiveness determinants determine consequently, what performance measures are most critical in determining their firm’s overall success. Benchmarking, when done properly, can accurately identify both successful companies and the underlying reasons for their success. Innovation and benchmarking firm level performance are critical interdependent activities. Firm level variables, used to infer performance, are often interdependent due to operational reasons. Hence, the managers need to take the dependencies among these variables into account when forecasting and benchmarking performance. This paper studies firm level performance using financial ratio and other type of profitability measures. It uses econometric models to describe and then propose a method to forecast and benchmark performance.

  2. Surveys and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Surveys and benchmarks continue to grow in importance for community colleges in response to several factors. One is the press for accountability, that is, for colleges to report the outcomes of their programs and services to demonstrate their quality and prudent use of resources, primarily to external constituents and governing boards at the state…

  3. 2nd RCM of the CRP on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and Technical Meeting on Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel Utilization in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R&D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP’s overall objective is to make contributions towards the realization of a transmutation demonstration facility

  4. Benchmarking i den offentlige sektor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Dietrichson, Lars; Sandalgaard, Niels

    2008-01-01

    I artiklen vil vi kort diskutere behovet for benchmarking i fraværet af traditionelle markedsmekanismer. Herefter vil vi nærmere redegøre for, hvad benchmarking er med udgangspunkt i fire forskellige anvendelser af benchmarking. Regulering af forsyningsvirksomheder vil blive behandlet, hvorefter...

  5. Simplified two and three dimensional HTTR benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhan; Rahnema, Farzad; Zhang Dingkang; Pounders, Justin M.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the accuracy of diffusion or transport methods for reactor calculations, it is desirable to create heterogeneous benchmark problems that are typical of whole core configurations. In this paper we have created two and three dimensional numerical benchmark problems typical of high temperature gas cooled prismatic cores. Additionally, a single cell and single block benchmark problems are also included. These problems were derived from the HTTR start-up experiment. Since the primary utility of the benchmark problems is in code-to-code verification, minor details regarding geometry and material specification of the original experiment have been simplified while retaining the heterogeneity and the major physics properties of the core from a neutronics viewpoint. A six-group material (macroscopic) cross section library has been generated for the benchmark problems using the lattice depletion code HELIOS. Using this library, Monte Carlo solutions are presented for three configurations (all-rods-in, partially-controlled and all-rods-out) for both the 2D and 3D problems. These solutions include the core eigenvalues, the block (assembly) averaged fission densities, local peaking factors, the absorption densities in the burnable poison and control rods, and pin fission density distribution for selected blocks. Also included are the solutions for the single cell and single block problems.

  6. Cloud benchmarking for performance

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Blesson; Akgun, Ozgur; Miguel, Ian; Thai, Long; Barker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 20/09/2014 How can applications be deployed on the cloud to achieve maximum performance? This question has become significant and challenging with the availability of a wide variety of Virtual Machines (VMs) with different performance capabilities in the cloud. The above question is addressed by proposing a six step benchmarking methodology in which a user provides a set of four weights that indicate how important each of the following groups: memory, processor, computa...

  7. ZZ ECN-BUBEBO, ECN-Petten Burnup Benchmark Book, Inventories, Afterheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, Jan Leen

    1999-01-01

    Description of program or function: Contains experimental benchmarks which can be used for the validation of burnup code systems and accompanied data libraries. Although the benchmarks presented here are thoroughly described in literature, it is in many cases not straightforward to retrieve unambiguously the correct input data and corresponding results from the benchmark Descriptions. Furthermore, results which can easily be measured, are sometimes difficult to calculate because of conversions to be made. Therefore, emphasis has been put to clarify the input of the benchmarks and to present the benchmark results in such a way that they can easily be calculated and compared. For more thorough Descriptions of the benchmarks themselves, the literature referred to here should be consulted. This benchmark book is divided in 11 chapters/files containing the following in text and tabular form: chapter 1: Introduction; chapter 2: Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Phase 1-B; chapter 3: Yankee-Rowe Core V Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 4: H.B. Robinson Unit 2 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 5: Turkey Point Unit 3 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 6: Turkey Point Unit 3 Afterheat Power Study; chapter 7: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of U-235; chapter 8: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of Pu-239; chapter 9: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-233; chapter 10: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-235; chapter 11: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of Pu-239

  8. Experiment and analyses on intentional secondary-side depressurization during PWR small break LOCA. Effects of depressurization rate and break area on core liquid level behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaka, Hideaki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kukita, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the secondary-side depressurization rate and break area on the core liquid level behavior during a PWR small-break LOCA were studied using experimental data from the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and by using analysis results obtained with a JAERI modified version of RELAP5/MOD3 code. The LSTF is a 1/ 48 volumetrically scaled full-height integral model of a Westinghouse-type PWR. The code reproduced the thermal-hydraulic responses, observed in the experiment, for important parameters such as the primary and secondary side pressures and core liquid level behavior. The sensitivity of the core minimum liquid level to the depressurization rate and break area was studied by using the code assessed above. It was found that the core liquid level took a local minimum value for a given break area as a function of secondary side depressurization rate. Further efforts are, however, needed to quantitatively define the maximum core temperature as a function of break area and depressurization rate. (author)

  9. Development of common user data model for APOLLO3 and MARBLE and application to benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji

    2009-07-01

    A Common User Data Model, CUDM, has been developed for the purpose of benchmark calculations between APOLLO3 and MARBLE code systems. The current version of CUDM was designed for core calculation benchmark problems with 3-dimensional Cartesian, 3-D XYZ, geometry. CUDM is able to manage all input/output data such as 3-D XYZ geometry, effective macroscopic cross section, effective multiplication factor and neutron flux. In addition, visualization tools for geometry and neutron flux were included. CUDM was designed by the object-oriented technique and implemented using Python programming language. Based on the CUDM, a prototype system for a benchmark calculation, CUDM-benchmark, was also developed. The CUDM-benchmark supports input/output data conversion for IDT solver in APOLLO3, and TRITAC and SNT solvers in MARBLE. In order to evaluate pertinence of CUDM, the CUDM-benchmark was applied to benchmark problems proposed by T. Takeda, G. Chiba and I. Zmijarevic. It was verified that the CUDM-benchmark successfully reproduced the results calculated with reference input data files, and provided consistent results among all the solvers by using one common input data defined by CUDM. In addition, a detailed benchmark calculation for Chiba benchmark was performed by using the CUDM-benchmark. Chiba benchmark is a neutron transport benchmark problem for fast criticality assembly without homogenization. This benchmark problem consists of 4 core configurations which have different sodium void regions, and each core configuration is defined by more than 5,000 fuel/material cells. In this application, it was found that the results by IDT and SNT solvers agreed well with the reference results by Monte-Carlo code. In addition, model effects such as quadrature set effect, S n order effect and mesh size effect were systematically evaluated and summarized in this report. (author)

  10. Benchmarking reference services: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J G; Buchanan, H S

    1995-01-01

    Benchmarking is based on the common sense idea that someone else, either inside or outside of libraries, has found a better way of doing certain things and that your own library's performance can be improved by finding out how others do things and adopting the best practices you find. Benchmarking is one of the tools used for achieving continuous improvement in Total Quality Management (TQM) programs. Although benchmarking can be done on an informal basis, TQM puts considerable emphasis on formal data collection and performance measurement. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to evaluate process performance. This article introduces the general concept of benchmarking, linking it whenever possible to reference services in health sciences libraries. Data collection instruments that have potential application in benchmarking studies are discussed and the need to develop common measurement tools to facilitate benchmarking is emphasized.

  11. Advances in methods of commercial FBR core characteristics analyses. Investigations of a treatment of the double-heterogeneity and a method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugino, Kazuteru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Iwai, Takehiko

    1998-07-01

    A standard data base for FBR core nuclear design is under development in order to improve the accuracy of FBR design calculation. As a part of the development, we investigated an improved treatment of double-heterogeneity and a method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections in a commercial reactor geometry, for the betterment of the analytical accuracy of commercial FBR core characteristics. As an improvement in the treatment of double-heterogeneity, we derived a new method (the direct method) and compared both this and conventional methods with continuous energy Monte-Carlo calculations. In addition, we investigated the applicability of the reaction rate ratio preservation method as a advanced method to calculate homogenized control rod cross sections. The present studies gave the following information: (1) An improved treatment of double-heterogeneity: for criticality the conventional method showed good agreement with Monte-Carlo result within one sigma standard deviation; the direct method was consistent with conventional one. Preliminary evaluation of effects in core characteristics other than criticality showed that the effect of sodium void reactivity (coolant reactivity) due to the double-heterogeneity was large. (2) An advanced method to calculate homogenize control rod cross sections: for control rod worths the reaction rate ratio preservation method agreed with those produced by the calculations with the control rod heterogeneity included in the core geometry; in Monju control rod worth analysis, the present method overestimated control rod worths by 1 to 2% compared with the conventional method, but these differences were caused by more accurate model in the present method and it is considered that this method is more reliable than the conventional one. These two methods investigated in this study can be directly applied to core characteristics other than criticality or control rod worth. Thus it is concluded that these methods will

  12. Benchmark for evaluation and validation of reactor simulations (BEAVRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horelik, N.; Herman, B.; Forget, B.; Smith, K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Advances in parallel computing have made possible the development of high-fidelity tools for the design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores, and such tools require extensive verification and validation. This paper introduces BEAVRS, a new multi-cycle full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) depletion benchmark based on two operational cycles of a commercial nuclear power plant that provides a detailed description of fuel assemblies, burnable absorbers, in-core fission detectors, core loading patterns, and numerous in-vessel components. This benchmark enables analysts to develop extremely detailed reactor core models that can be used for testing and validation of coupled neutron transport, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel isotopic depletion. The benchmark also provides measured reactor data for Hot Zero Power (HZP) physics tests, boron letdown curves, and three-dimensional in-core flux maps from fifty-eight instrumented assemblies. Initial comparisons between calculations performed with MIT's OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code and measured cycle 1 HZP test data are presented, and these results display an average deviation of approximately 100 pcm for the various critical configurations and control rod worth measurements. Computed HZP radial fission detector flux maps also agree reasonably well with the available measured data. All results indicate that this benchmark will be extremely useful in validation of coupled-physics codes and uncertainty quantification of in-core physics computational predictions. The detailed BEAVRS specification and its associated data package is hosted online at the MIT Computational Reactor Physics Group web site (http://crpg.mit.edu/), where future revisions and refinements to the benchmark specification will be made publicly available. (authors)

  13. Present Status and Extensions of the Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard; Petrovic, Bojan; Martin, William R.

    2014-06-01

    The NEA Monte Carlo Performance benchmark started in 2011 aiming to monitor over the years the abilities to perform a full-size Monte Carlo reactor core calculation with a detailed power production for each fuel pin with axial distribution. This paper gives an overview of the contributed results thus far. It shows that reaching a statistical accuracy of 1 % for most of the small fuel zones requires about 100 billion neutron histories. The efficiency of parallel execution of Monte Carlo codes on a large number of processor cores shows clear limitations for computer clusters with common type computer nodes. However, using true supercomputers the speedup of parallel calculations is increasing up to large numbers of processor cores. More experience is needed from calculations on true supercomputers using large numbers of processors in order to predict if the requested calculations can be done in a short time. As the specifications of the reactor geometry for this benchmark test are well suited for further investigations of full-core Monte Carlo calculations and a need is felt for testing other issues than its computational performance, proposals are presented for extending the benchmark to a suite of benchmark problems for evaluating fission source convergence for a system with a high dominance ratio, for coupling with thermal-hydraulics calculations to evaluate the use of different temperatures and coolant densities and to study the correctness and effectiveness of burnup calculations. Moreover, other contemporary proposals for a full-core calculation with realistic geometry and material composition will be discussed.

  14. Analysis and sensitivity studies with CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D of the NEACRP PWR rod ejection benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferroukhi, H.; Coddington, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    The OECD/NEA PWR rod ejection benchmark has been analysed using the 3-D nodal spatial-kinetic codes CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D. The following results were obtained. A) The agreement in 3-D solution between CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D was found to be very good both during steady-state and transient conditions. In particular at HZP (hot zero power), an excellent agreement in the initial steady-state 3-D power distribution and with regard to the core power excursion during the super-prompt critical phase of the transient (i.e. when the negative reactivity feedback is still very weak) was found. This illustrates the consistency in the neutronic solution between both codes. B) At both HZP and FP (full power) conditions, the CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D results lie well within the range of the previous benchmark solutions. In particular at HZP, both codes predict a power excursion and an increase in maximum pellet temperature that are among the closest results to those obtained with the benchmark reference solution. It must here be emphasised that these analyses are by no means a validation of the codes. However, the good agreement of both CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D with other 3-D solutions provides confidence in the ability of these codes to analyse LWR (light water reactor) core transients. In addition, it was found appropriate to perform, for this well-defined international benchmark problem, some sensitivity studies in order to assess the impact of modelling options on the CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D results. (authors)

  15. Analysis and sensitivity studies with CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D of the NEACRP PWR rod ejection benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferroukhi, H.; Coddington, P.

    2001-01-01

    The OECD/NEA PWR rod ejection benchmark has been analysed using the 3-D nodal spatial-kinetic codes CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D. The following results were obtained. A) The agreement in 3-D solution between CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D was found to be very good both during steady-state and transient conditions. In particular at HZP (hot zero power), an excellent agreement in the initial steady-state 3-D power distribution and with regard to the core power excursion during the super-prompt critical phase of the transient (i.e. when the negative reactivity feedback is still very weak) was found. This illustrates the consistency in the neutronic solution between both codes. B) At both HZP and FP (full power) conditions, the CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D results lie well within the range of the previous benchmark solutions. In particular at HZP, both codes predict a power excursion and an increase in maximum pellet temperature that are among the closest results to those obtained with the benchmark reference solution. It must here be emphasised that these analyses are by no means a validation of the codes. However, the good agreement of both CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D with other 3-D solutions provides confidence in the ability of these codes to analyse LWR (light water reactor) core transients. In addition, it was found appropriate to perform, for this well-defined international benchmark problem, some sensitivity studies in order to assess the impact of modelling options on the CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D results. (authors)

  16. Analysis of structural heterogeneities on drilled cores: a reservoir modeling oriented methodology; Analyse des heterogeneites structurales sur carottes: une methodologie axee vers la modelisation des reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes, P.; Petit, J.P. [Montpellier-2 Univ., Lab. de Geophysique, Tectonique et Sedimentologie, UMR CNRS 5573, 34 (France); Guy, L. [ELF Aquitaine Production, 64 - Pau (France); Thiry-Bastien, Ph. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 (France)

    1999-07-01

    The characterization of structural heterogeneities of reservoirs is of prime importance for hydrocarbons recovery. A methodology is presented which allows to compare the dynamic behaviour of fractured reservoirs and the observation of microstructures on drilled cores or surface reservoir analogues. (J.S.)

  17. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care we...... document pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for assessment and benchmarking the clinical management of HIV-patients in any setting worldwide....

  18. Benchmarking Cloud Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of cloud computing, many cloud storage systems like Dropbox, Google Drive and Mega have been built to provide decentralized and reliable file storage. It is thus of prime importance to know their features, performance, and the best way to make use of them. In this context, we introduce BenchCloud, a tool designed as part of this thesis to conveniently and efficiently benchmark any cloud storage system. First, we provide a study of six commonly-used cloud storage systems to ident...

  19. The COST Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Tiesyte, Dalia; Tradisauskas, Nerius

    2006-01-01

    An infrastructure is emerging that enables the positioning of populations of on-line, mobile service users. In step with this, research in the management of moving objects has attracted substantial attention. In particular, quite a few proposals now exist for the indexing of moving objects...... takes into account that the available positions of the moving objects are inaccurate, an aspect largely ignored in previous indexing research. The concepts of data and query enlargement are introduced for addressing inaccuracy. As proof of concepts of the benchmark, the paper covers the application...

  20. Benchmarking of nuclear economics tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Megan; Korinny, Andriy; Shropshire, David; Sadhankar, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • INPRO and GIF economic tools exhibited good alignment in total capital cost estimation. • Subtle discrepancies in the cost result from differences in financing and the fuel cycle assumptions. • A common set of assumptions was found to reduce the discrepancies to 1% or less. • Opportunities for harmonisation of economic tools exists. - Abstract: Benchmarking of the economics methodologies developed by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and the International Atomic Energy Agency’s International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), was performed for three Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The Economic Modeling Working Group of GIF developed an Excel based spreadsheet package, G4ECONS (Generation 4 Excel-based Calculation Of Nuclear Systems), to calculate the total capital investment cost (TCIC) and the levelised unit energy cost (LUEC). G4ECONS is sufficiently generic in the sense that it can accept the types of projected input, performance and cost data that are expected to become available for Generation IV systems through various development phases and that it can model both open and closed fuel cycles. The Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) Economic Support Tool (NEST) was developed to enable an economic analysis using the INPRO methodology to easily calculate outputs including the TCIC, LUEC and other financial figures of merit including internal rate of return, return of investment and net present value. NEST is also Excel based and can be used to evaluate nuclear reactor systems using the open fuel cycle, MOX (mixed oxide) fuel recycling and closed cycles. A Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor system with an open fuel cycle and two Fast Reactor systems, one with a break-even fuel cycle and another with a burner fuel cycle, were selected for the benchmarking exercise. Published data on capital and operating costs were used for economics analyses using G4ECONS and NEST tools. Both G4ECONS and

  1. Hospital benchmarking: are U.S. eye hospitals ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korne, Dirk F; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Sol, Kees J C A; Betz, Robert; Thomas, Richard C; Schein, Oliver D; Klazinga, Niek S

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking is increasingly considered a useful management instrument to improve quality in health care, but little is known about its applicability in hospital settings. The aims of this study were to assess the applicability of a benchmarking project in U.S. eye hospitals and compare the results with an international initiative. We evaluated multiple cases by applying an evaluation frame abstracted from the literature to five U.S. eye hospitals that used a set of 10 indicators for efficiency benchmarking. Qualitative analysis entailed 46 semistructured face-to-face interviews with stakeholders, document analyses, and questionnaires. The case studies only partially met the conditions of the evaluation frame. Although learning and quality improvement were stated as overall purposes, the benchmarking initiative was at first focused on efficiency only. No ophthalmic outcomes were included, and clinicians were skeptical about their reporting relevance and disclosure. However, in contrast with earlier findings in international eye hospitals, all U.S. hospitals worked with internal indicators that were integrated in their performance management systems and supported benchmarking. Benchmarking can support performance management in individual hospitals. Having a certain number of comparable institutes provide similar services in a noncompetitive milieu seems to lay fertile ground for benchmarking. International benchmarking is useful only when these conditions are not met nationally. Although the literature focuses on static conditions for effective benchmarking, our case studies show that it is a highly iterative and learning process. The journey of benchmarking seems to be more important than the destination. Improving patient value (health outcomes per unit of cost) requires, however, an integrative perspective where clinicians and administrators closely cooperate on both quality and efficiency issues. If these worlds do not share such a relationship, the added

  2. How to Advance TPC Benchmarks with Dependability Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Raquel; Poess, Meikel; Nambiar, Raghunath; Patil, Indira; Vieira, Marco

    Transactional systems are the core of the information systems of most organizations. Although there is general acknowledgement that failures in these systems often entail significant impact both on the proceeds and reputation of companies, the benchmarks developed and managed by the Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) still maintain their focus on reporting bare performance. Each TPC benchmark has to pass a list of dependability-related tests (to verify ACID properties), but not all benchmarks require measuring their performances. While TPC-E measures the recovery time of some system failures, TPC-H and TPC-C only require functional correctness of such recovery. Consequently, systems used in TPC benchmarks are tuned mostly for performance. In this paper we argue that nowadays systems should be tuned for a more comprehensive suite of dependability tests, and that a dependability metric should be part of TPC benchmark publications. The paper discusses WHY and HOW this can be achieved. Two approaches are introduced and discussed: augmenting each TPC benchmark in a customized way, by extending each specification individually; and pursuing a more unified approach, defining a generic specification that could be adjoined to any TPC benchmark.

  3. Thermal reactor benchmark tests on JENDL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki; Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Yamane, Tsuyoshi; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Ishiguro, Yukio; Ido, Masaru.

    1983-11-01

    A group constant library for the thermal reactor standard nuclear design code system SRAC was produced by using the evaluated nuclear data JENDL-2. Furthermore, the group constants for 235 U were calculated also from ENDF/B-V. Thermal reactor benchmark calculations were performed using the produced group constant library. The selected benchmark cores are two water-moderated lattices (TRX-1 and 2), two heavy water-moderated cores (DCA and ETA-1), two graphite-moderated cores (SHE-8 and 13) and eight critical experiments for critical safety. The effective multiplication factors and lattice cell parameters were calculated and compared with the experimental values. The results are summarized as follows. (1) Effective multiplication factors: The results by JENDL-2 are considerably improved in comparison with ones by ENDF/B-IV. The best agreement is obtained by using JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-V (only 235 U) data. (2) Lattice cell parameters: For the rho 28 (the ratio of epithermal to thermal 238 U captures) and C* (the ratio of 238 U captures to 235 U fissions), the values calculated by JENDL-2 are in good agreement with the experimental values. The rho 28 (the ratio of 238 U to 235 U fissions) are overestimated as found also for the fast reactor benchmarks. The rho 02 (the ratio of epithermal to thermal 232 Th captures) calculated by JENDL-2 or ENDF/B-IV are considerably underestimated. The functions of the SRAC system have been continued to be extended according to the needs of its users. A brief description will be given, in Appendix B, to the extended parts of the SRAC system together with the input specification. (author)

  4. Benchmarking multimedia performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Ahmad; Sudharsanan, Subramania I.

    1998-03-01

    With the introduction of faster processors and special instruction sets tailored to multimedia, a number of exciting applications are now feasible on the desktops. Among these is the DVD playback consisting, among other things, of MPEG-2 video and Dolby digital audio or MPEG-2 audio. Other multimedia applications such as video conferencing and speech recognition are also becoming popular on computer systems. In view of this tremendous interest in multimedia, a group of major computer companies have formed, Multimedia Benchmarks Committee as part of Standard Performance Evaluation Corp. to address the performance issues of multimedia applications. The approach is multi-tiered with three tiers of fidelity from minimal to full compliant. In each case the fidelity of the bitstream reconstruction as well as quality of the video or audio output are measured and the system is classified accordingly. At the next step the performance of the system is measured. In many multimedia applications such as the DVD playback the application needs to be run at a specific rate. In this case the measurement of the excess processing power, makes all the difference. All these make a system level, application based, multimedia benchmark very challenging. Several ideas and methodologies for each aspect of the problems will be presented and analyzed.

  5. A benchmarking study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Groessing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A benchmark study for permeability measurement is presented. In the past studies of other research groups which focused on the reproducibility of 1D-permeability measurements showed high standard deviations of the gained permeability values (25%, even though a defined test rig with required specifications was used. Within this study, the reproducibility of capacitive in-plane permeability testing system measurements was benchmarked by comparing results of two research sites using this technology. The reproducibility was compared by using a glass fibre woven textile and carbon fibre non crimped fabric (NCF. These two material types were taken into consideration due to the different electrical properties of glass and carbon with respect to dielectric capacitive sensors of the permeability measurement systems. In order to determine the unsaturated permeability characteristics as function of fibre volume content the measurements were executed at three different fibre volume contents including five repetitions. It was found that the stability and reproducibility of the presentedin-plane permeability measurement system is very good in the case of the glass fibre woven textiles. This is true for the comparison of the repetition measurements as well as for the comparison between the two different permeameters. These positive results were confirmed by a comparison to permeability values of the same textile gained with an older generation permeameter applying the same measurement technology. Also it was shown, that a correct determination of the grammage and the material density are crucial for correct correlation of measured permeability values and fibre volume contents.

  6. Benchmarking Using Basic DBMS Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain; Ghazal, Ahmad

    The TPC-H benchmark proved to be successful in the decision support area. Many commercial database vendors and their related hardware vendors used these benchmarks to show the superiority and competitive edge of their products. However, over time, the TPC-H became less representative of industry trends as vendors keep tuning their database to this benchmark-specific workload. In this paper, we present XMarq, a simple benchmark framework that can be used to compare various software/hardware combinations. Our benchmark model is currently composed of 25 queries that measure the performance of basic operations such as scans, aggregations, joins and index access. This benchmark model is based on the TPC-H data model due to its maturity and well-understood data generation capability. We also propose metrics to evaluate single-system performance and compare two systems. Finally we illustrate the effectiveness of this model by showing experimental results comparing two systems under different conditions.

  7. Benchmarking & European Sustainable Transport Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    , Benchmarking is one of the management tools that have recently been introduced in the transport sector. It is rapidly being applied to a wide range of transport operations, services and policies. This paper is a contribution to the discussion of the role of benchmarking in the future efforts to...... contribution to the discussions within the Eusponsored BEST Thematic Network (Benchmarking European Sustainable Transport) which ran from 2000 to 2003....

  8. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Plaček Michal; Ochrana František; Půček Milan

    2015-01-01

    The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Base...

  9. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  10. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S. Ducatman MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center ® (FPSC databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above. The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative

  11. Status on benchmark testing of CENDL-3

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Ping

    2002-01-01

    CENDL-3, the newest version of China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library has been finished, and distributed for some benchmarks analysis recently. The processing was carried out using the NJOY nuclear data processing code system. The calculations and analysis of benchmarks were done with Monte Carlo code MCNP and reactor lattice code WIMSD5A. The calculated results were compared with the experimental results based on ENDF/B6. In most thermal and fast uranium criticality benchmarks, the calculated k sub e sub f sub f values with CENDL-3 were in good agreements with experimental results. In the plutonium fast cores, the k sub e sub f sub f values were improved significantly with CENDL-3. This is duo to reevaluation of the fission spectrum and elastic angular distributions of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 0 Pu. CENDL-3 underestimated the k sub e sub f sub f values compared with other evaluated data libraries for most spherical or cylindrical assemblies of plutonium or uranium with beryllium

  12. Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  13. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  14. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  15. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. SSI and structural benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes, currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to cut-off depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils. Further, the paper presents some key aspects of the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop (NUREG/CP-0054) which was held in Bethesda, MD on June 1, 1986. Finally, recent efforts related to the task on the structural benchmarks are described

  17. Benchmarking the Multidimensional Stellar Implicit Code MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffrey, T.; Pratt, J.; Viallet, M.; Baraffe, I.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Geroux, C.; Constantino, T.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of a numerical benchmark study for the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) based on widely applicable two- and three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics problems relevant to stellar interiors. MUSIC is an implicit large eddy simulation code that uses implicit time integration, implemented as a Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. A physics based preconditioning technique which can be adjusted to target varying physics is used to improve the performance of the solver. The problems used for this benchmark study include the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and the decay of the Taylor-Green vortex. Additionally we show a test of hydrostatic equilibrium, in a stellar environment which is dominated by radiative effects. In this setting the flexibility of the preconditioning technique is demonstrated. This work aims to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic test problems typically used during development of numerical methods and the complex flows of stellar interiors. A series of multidimensional tests were performed and analysed. Each of these test cases was analysed with a simple, scalar diagnostic, with the aim of enabling direct code comparisons. As the tests performed do not have analytic solutions, we verify MUSIC by comparing it to established codes including ATHENA and the PENCIL code. MUSIC is able to both reproduce behaviour from established and widely-used codes as well as results expected from theoretical predictions. This benchmarking study concludes a series of papers describing the development of the MUSIC code and provides confidence in future applications.

  18. Review for session K - benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight of the papers to be considered in Session K are directly concerned, at least in part, with the Pool Critical Assembly (P.C.A.) benchmark at Oak Ridge. The remaining seven papers in this session, the subject of this review, are concerned with a variety of topics related to the general theme of Benchmarks and will be considered individually

  19. Internal Benchmarking for Institutional Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    Internal benchmarking is an established practice in business and industry for identifying best in-house practices and disseminating the knowledge about those practices to other groups in the organization. Internal benchmarking can be done with structures, processes, outcomes, or even individuals. In colleges or universities with multicampuses or a…

  20. Entropy-based benchmarking methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temurshoev, Umed

    2012-01-01

    We argue that benchmarking sign-volatile series should be based on the principle of movement and sign preservation, which states that a bench-marked series should reproduce the movement and signs in the original series. We show that the widely used variants of Denton (1971) method and the growth

  1. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J; Batstone, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to p...

  2. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  3. Benchmark for Strategic Performance Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Annette

    1997-01-01

    Explains benchmarking, a total quality management tool used to measure and compare the work processes in a library with those in other libraries to increase library performance. Topics include the main groups of upper management, clients, and staff; critical success factors for each group; and benefits of benchmarking. (Author/LRW)

  4. Benchmarking: A Process for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Thomas M.

    One problem with the outcome-based measures used in higher education is that they measure quantity but not quality. Benchmarking, or the use of some external standard of quality to measure tasks, processes, and outputs, is partially solving that difficulty. Benchmarking allows for the establishment of a systematic process to indicate if outputs…

  5. Benchmark job – Watch out!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    On 12 December 2016, in Echo No. 259, we already discussed at length the MERIT and benchmark jobs. Still, we find that a couple of issues warrant further discussion. Benchmark job – administrative decision on 1 July 2017 On 12 January 2017, the HR Department informed all staff members of a change to the effective date of the administrative decision regarding benchmark jobs. The benchmark job title of each staff member will be confirmed on 1 July 2017, instead of 1 May 2017 as originally announced in HR’s letter on 18 August 2016. Postponing the administrative decision by two months will leave a little more time to address the issues related to incorrect placement in a benchmark job. Benchmark job – discuss with your supervisor, at the latest during the MERIT interview In order to rectify an incorrect placement in a benchmark job, it is essential that the supervisor and the supervisee go over the assigned benchmark job together. In most cases, this placement has been done autom...

  6. Benchmark calculations for VENUS-2 MOX -fueled reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Kung; Kim, Hong Chul; Shin, Chang Ho; Han, Chi Young; Na, Byung Chan

    2004-01-01

    As a part of a Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Project, it was pursued the benchmark for dosimetry calculation of the VENUS-2 MOX-fueled reactor. In this benchmark, the goal is to test the current state-of-the-art computational methods of calculating neutron flux to reactor components against the measured data of the VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled critical experiments. The measured data to be used for this benchmark are the equivalent fission fluxes which are the reaction rates divided by the U 235 fission spectrum averaged cross-section of the corresponding dosimeter. The present benchmark is, therefore, defined to calculate reaction rates and corresponding equivalent fission fluxes measured on the core-mid plane at specific positions outside the core of the VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled reactor. This is a follow-up exercise to the previously completed UO 2 -fuelled VENUS-1 two-dimensional and VENUS-3 three-dimensional exercises. The use of MOX fuel in LWRs presents different neutron characteristics and this is the main interest of the current benchmark compared to the previous ones

  7. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark with APROS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska Eija Karita; Kontio Harii

    1998-01-01

    The band-out presents the model used for calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark with APROS code. In the calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark the three-dimensional neutronics model of APROS was used. The core was divided axially into 20 nodes according to the specifications of the benchmark and each six identical fuel assemblies were placed into one one-dimensional thermal hydraulic channel. The five-equation thermal hydraulic model was used in the benchmark. The plant process and automation was described with a generic WWER-440 plant model created by IVO Power Engineering Ltd. - Finland. (Author)

  9. Human factors reliability benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poucet, A.

    1989-08-01

    The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has organised a Human Factors Reliability Benchmark Exercise (HF-RBE) with the aim of assessing the state of the art in human reliability modelling and assessment. Fifteen teams from eleven countries, representing industry, utilities, licensing organisations and research institutes, participated in the HF-RBE. The HF-RBE was organised around two study cases: (1) analysis of routine functional Test and Maintenance (TPM) procedures: with the aim of assessing the probability of test induced failures, the probability of failures to remain unrevealed and the potential to initiate transients because of errors performed in the test; (2) analysis of human actions during an operational transient: with the aim of assessing the probability that the operators will correctly diagnose the malfunctions and take proper corrective action. This report summarises the contributions received from the participants and analyses these contributions on a comparative basis. The aim of this analysis was to compare the procedures, modelling techniques and quantification methods used, to obtain insight in the causes and magnitude of the variability observed in the results, to try to identify preferred human reliability assessment approaches and to get an understanding of the current state of the art in the field identifying the limitations that are still inherent to the different approaches

  10. Benchmarking school nursing practice: the North West Regional Benchmarking Group

    OpenAIRE

    Littler, Nadine; Mullen, Margaret; Beckett, Helen; Freshney, Alice; Pinder, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    It is essential that the quality of care is reviewed regularly through robust processes such as benchmarking to ensure all outcomes and resources are evidence-based so that children and young people’s needs are met effectively. This article provides an example of the use of benchmarking in school nursing practice. Benchmarking has been defined as a process for finding, adapting and applying best practices (Camp, 1994). This concept was first adopted in the 1970s ‘from industry where it was us...

  11. CEA-IPSN Participation in the MSLB Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, E.; Raimond, E.; Caruge, D.

    2001-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) Benchmark allows the comparison of state-of-the-art and best-estimate models used to compute reactivity accidents. The three exercises of the MSLB benchmark are defined with the aim of analyzing the space and time effects in the core and their modeling with computational tools. Point kinetics (exercise 1) simulation results in a return to power (RTP) after scram, whereas 3-D kinetics (exercises 2 and 3) does not display any RTP. The objective is to understand the reasons for the conservative solution of point kinetics and to assess the benefits of best-estimate models. First, the core vessel mixing model is analyzed; second, sensitivity studies on point kinetics are compared to 3-D kinetics; third, the core thermal hydraulics model and coupling with neutronics is presented; finally, RTP and a suitable model for MSLB are discussed

  12. Steady- and transient-state analyses of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel loaded reactor core via two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel-loaded core is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model. • The model is compared to harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models. • The three thermal analysis models show ∼100 pcm differences in the k eff eigenvalue. • The three thermal analysis models show more than 70 K differences in the maximum temperature. • There occur more than 3 times differences in the maximum power for a control rod ejection accident. - Abstract: Fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel, a type of accident-tolerant fuel (ATF), consists of TRISO particles randomly dispersed in a SiC matrix. In this study, for a thermal analysis of the FCM fuel with such a high heterogeneity, a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model was applied by the authors. This model provides separate temperatures for the fuel-kernels and the SiC matrix. It also provides more realistic temperature profiles than those of harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models, which are used for thermal analysis of a fuel element in VHTRs having a composition similar to the FCM fuel, because such models are unable to provide the fuel-kernel and graphite matrix temperatures separately. In this study, coupled with a neutron diffusion model, a FCM fuel-loaded reactor core is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model at steady- and transient-states. The results are compared to those from harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models, i.e., we compare k eff eigenvalues, power distributions, and temperature profiles in the hottest single-channel at steady-state. At transient-state, we compare total powers, reactivity, and maximum temperatures in the hottest single-channel obtained by the different thermal analysis models. The different thermal analysis models and the availability of fuel-kernel temperatures in the two-temperature homogenized thermal

  13. Stationary PWR-calculations by means of LWRSIM at the NEACRP 3D-LWRCT benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Wetering, T.F.H.

    1993-01-01

    Within the framework of participation in an international benchmark, calculations were executed by means of an adjusted version of the computer code Light Water Reactor SIMulation (LWRSIM) for three-dimensional reactor core calculations of pressurized water reactors. The 3-D LWR Core Transient Benchmark was set up aimed at the comparison of 3-D computer codes for transient calculations in LWRs. Participation in the benchmark provided more insight in the accuracy of the code when applied for other pressurized water reactors than applied for the nuclear power plant Borssele in the Netherlands, for which the code has been developed and used originally

  14. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  15. Virtual machine performance benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steve G; French, Todd

    2011-10-01

    The attractions of virtual computing are many: reduced costs, reduced resources and simplified maintenance. Any one of these would be compelling for a medical imaging professional attempting to support a complex practice on limited resources in an era of ever tightened reimbursement. In particular, the ability to run multiple operating systems optimized for different tasks (computational image processing on Linux versus office tasks on Microsoft operating systems) on a single physical machine is compelling. However, there are also potential drawbacks. High performance requirements need to be carefully considered if they are to be executed in an environment where the running software has to execute through multiple layers of device drivers before reaching the real disk or network interface. Our lab has attempted to gain insight into the impact of virtualization on performance by benchmarking the following metrics on both physical and virtual platforms: local memory and disk bandwidth, network bandwidth, and integer and floating point performance. The virtual performance metrics are compared to baseline performance on "bare metal." The results are complex, and indeed somewhat surprising.

  16. Benchmarking biofuels; Biobrandstoffen benchmarken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croezen, H.; Kampman, B.; Bergsma, G.

    2012-03-15

    A sustainability benchmark for transport biofuels has been developed and used to evaluate the various biofuels currently on the market. For comparison, electric vehicles, hydrogen vehicles and petrol/diesel vehicles were also included. A range of studies as well as growing insight are making it ever clearer that biomass-based transport fuels may have just as big a carbon footprint as fossil fuels like petrol or diesel, or even bigger. At the request of Greenpeace Netherlands, CE Delft has brought together current understanding on the sustainability of fossil fuels, biofuels and electric vehicles, with particular focus on the performance of the respective energy carriers on three sustainability criteria, with the first weighing the heaviest: (1) Greenhouse gas emissions; (2) Land use; and (3) Nutrient consumption [Dutch] Greenpeace Nederland heeft CE Delft gevraagd een duurzaamheidsmeetlat voor biobrandstoffen voor transport te ontwerpen en hierop de verschillende biobrandstoffen te scoren. Voor een vergelijk zijn ook elektrisch rijden, rijden op waterstof en rijden op benzine of diesel opgenomen. Door onderzoek en voortschrijdend inzicht blijkt steeds vaker dat transportbrandstoffen op basis van biomassa soms net zoveel of zelfs meer broeikasgassen veroorzaken dan fossiele brandstoffen als benzine en diesel. CE Delft heeft voor Greenpeace Nederland op een rijtje gezet wat de huidige inzichten zijn over de duurzaamheid van fossiele brandstoffen, biobrandstoffen en elektrisch rijden. Daarbij is gekeken naar de effecten van de brandstoffen op drie duurzaamheidscriteria, waarbij broeikasgasemissies het zwaarst wegen: (1) Broeikasgasemissies; (2) Landgebruik; en (3) Nutriëntengebruik.

  17. Burn-up TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persic, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zagar, T.

    1998-01-01

    Different reactor codes are used for calculations of reactor parameters. The accuracy of the programs is tested through comparison of the calculated values with the experimental results. Well-defined and accurately measured benchmarks are required. The experimental results of reactivity measurements, fuel element reactivity worth distribution and fuel-up measurements are presented in this paper. The experiments were performed with partly burnt reactor core. The experimental conditions were well defined, so that the results can be used as a burn-up benchmark test case for a TRIGA Mark II reactor calculations.(author)

  18. Benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosso, John A; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Nappi, Jean; Gubbins, Paul O; Ross, Leigh Ann

    2010-10-11

    Benchmarking in academic pharmacy, and recommendations for the potential uses of benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments are discussed in this paper. Benchmarking is the process by which practices, procedures, and performance metrics are compared to an established standard or best practice. Many businesses and industries use benchmarking to compare processes and outcomes, and ultimately plan for improvement. Institutions of higher learning have embraced benchmarking practices to facilitate measuring the quality of their educational and research programs. Benchmarking is used internally as well to justify the allocation of institutional resources or to mediate among competing demands for additional program staff or space. Surveying all chairs of academic pharmacy departments to explore benchmarking issues such as department size and composition, as well as faculty teaching, scholarly, and service productivity, could provide valuable information. To date, attempts to gather this data have had limited success. We believe this information is potentially important, urge that efforts to gather it should be continued, and offer suggestions to achieve full participation.

  19. The EORTC Core Quality of Life questionnaire (QLQ-C30): validity and reliability when analysed with patients treated with palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasa, S.; Aaronson, N.

    1995-01-01

    The EORTC Core Quality of Life questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) is designed to measure cancer patients' physical, psychological and social functions. The questionnaire is composed of multi-item scales and single items. 247 patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 before palliative radiotherapy and 181 after palliative radiotherapy. The questionnaire was well accepted with a high completion rate in the present patient population consisting of advanced cancer patients with short life expectancy. In addition, the questionnaire was found to be useful to detect the effect of palliative radiotherapy over time. The scale reliability was excellent for all scales except the role functioning scale. Excellent criterion validity was found for the emotional functioning scale where it was correlated with GHQ-20. Performance of the questionnaire was improved after the second evaluation as compared with the first. The present study shows that the EORTC-QLQ-C30 is found to be practical and valid in measuring quality of life in patients with advanced disease. (author)

  20. Nitrogen isotope and trace metal analyses from the Mingolsheim core (Germany): Evidence for redox variations across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Tracy M.; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Field, M. Paul; Rosenthal, Yair; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2008-06-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) boundary was one of the largest but least understood mass extinction events in the Phanerozoic. We measured bulk organic nitrogen and carbon isotopes and trace metal concentrations from a core near Mingolsheim (Germany) to infer paleoenvironmental conditions associated with this event. Poorly fossiliferous claystones across the boundary have relatively low δ15N values and low concentrations of redox-sensitive elements, characteristic of an oxic environment with significant terrestrial input. The Early Jurassic features enrichment in δ15N coincident with high redox-sensitive element concentrations, indicating an increase in water column denitrification and decreased oxygen concentrations. These redox state variations are concordant with shifts in abundance and species composition in terrestrial and marine microflora. We propose that the mass extinction at the T-J boundary was caused by a series of events resulting in a long period of stratification, deep-water hypoxia, and denitrification in this region of the Tethys Ocean basin.

  1. WIPP Benchmark calculations with the large strain SPECTROM codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, G.D.; DeVries, K.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides calculational results from the updated Lagrangian structural finite-element programs SPECTROM-32 and SPECTROM-333 for the purpose of qualifying these codes to perform analyses of structural situations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Results are presented for the Second WIPP Benchmark (Benchmark II) Problems and for a simplified heated room problem used in a parallel design calculation study. The Benchmark II problems consist of an isothermal room problem and a heated room problem. The stratigraphy involves 27 distinct geologic layers including ten clay seams of which four are modeled as frictionless sliding interfaces. The analyses of the Benchmark II problems consider a 10-year simulation period. The evaluation of nine structural codes used in the Benchmark II problems shows that inclusion of finite-strain effects is not as significant as observed for the simplified heated room problem, and a variety of finite-strain and small-strain formulations produced similar results. The simplified heated room problem provides stratigraphic complexity equivalent to the Benchmark II problems but neglects sliding along the clay seams. The simplified heated problem does, however, provide a calculational check case where the small strain-formulation produced room closures about 20 percent greater than those obtained using finite-strain formulations. A discussion is given of each of the solved problems, and the computational results are compared with available published results. In general, the results of the two SPECTROM large strain codes compare favorably with results from other codes used to solve the problems

  2. Issues in Benchmark Metric Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain

    It is true that a metric can influence a benchmark but will esoteric metrics create more problems than they will solve? We answer this question affirmatively by examining the case of the TPC-D metric which used the much debated geometric mean for the single-stream test. We will show how a simple choice influenced the benchmark and its conduct and, to some extent, DBMS development. After examining other alternatives our conclusion is that the “real” measure for a decision-support benchmark is the arithmetic mean.

  3. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the

  4. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results

  5. JENDL-4.0 benchmarking for fission reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go; Okumura, Keisuke; Sugino, Kazuteru; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Okajima, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Benchmark testing for the newly developed Japanese evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 is carried out by using a huge amount of integral data. Benchmark calculations are performed with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code and with the deterministic procedure, which has been developed for fast reactor analyses in Japan. Through the present benchmark testing using a wide range of benchmark data, significant improvement in the performance of JENDL-4.0 for fission reactor applications is clearly demonstrated in comparison with the former library JENDL-3.3. Much more accurate and reliable prediction for neutronic parameters for both thermal and fast reactors becomes possible by using the library JENDL-4.0. (author)

  6. A Global Vision over Benchmarking Process: Benchmarking Based Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Sitnikov, Catalina; Giurca Vasilescu, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking uses the knowledge and the experience of others to improve the enterprise. Starting from the analysis of the performance and underlying the strengths and weaknesses of the enterprise it should be assessed what must be done in order to improve its activity. Using benchmarking techniques, an enterprise looks at how processes in the value chain are performed. The approach based on the vision “from the whole towards the parts” (a fragmented image of the enterprise’s value chain) redu...

  7. Pericles and Attila results for the C5G7 MOX benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Recently the Nuclear Energy Agency has published a new benchmark entitled, 'C5G7 MOX Benchmark.' This benchmark is to test the ability of current transport codes to treat reactor core problems without spatial homogenization. The benchmark includes both a two- and three-dimensional problem. We have calculated results for these benchmark problems with our Pericles and Attila codes. Pericles is a one-,two-, and three-dimensional unstructured grid discrete-ordinates code and was used for the twodimensional benchmark problem. Attila is a three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete-ordinate code and was used for the three-dimensional problem. Both codes use discontinuous finite element spatial differencing. Both codes use diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) for accelerating the inner iterations.

  8. POLCA-T simulation of OECD/NRC BWR turbine trip benchmark exercise 3 best estimate scenario TT2 test and four extreme scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, D.

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse transient code POLCA-T brings together the system thermal-hydraulics plant models and the 3D neutron kinetics core model. Code validation plan includes the calculations of Peach Bottom end of cycle 2 turbine trip transients and low-flow stability tests. The paper describes the objectives, method, and results of analyses performed in the final phase of OECD/NRC Peach Bottom 2 Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark. Brief overview of the code features, the method of simulation, the developed 3D core model and system input deck for Peach Bottom 2 are given. The paper presents the results of benchmark exercise 3 best estimate scenario: coupled 3D core neutron kinetics with system thermal-hydraulics analyses. Performed sensitivity studies cover the SCRAM initiation, carry-under, and decay power. Obtained results including total power, steam dome, core exit, lower and upper plenum, main steam line and turbine inlet pressures showed good agreement with measured plant data Thus the POLCA-T code capabilities for correct simulation of turbine trip transients were proved The performed calculations and obtained results for extreme cases demonstrate the POLCA-T code wide range capabilities to simulate transients when scram, steam bypass, and safety and relief valves are not activated. The code is able to handle such transients even when the reactor power and pressure reach values higher than 600 % of rated power, and 10.8 MPa. (authors)

  9. Geologic field notes and geochemical analyses of outcrop and drill core from Mesoproterozoic rocks and iron-oxide deposits and prospects of southeast Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Warren C.; Granitto, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources/Missouri Geological Survey, undertook a study from 1988 to 1994 on the iron-oxide deposits and their host Mesoproterozoic igneous rocks in southeastern Missouri. The project resulted in an improvement of our understanding of the geologic setting, mode of formation, and the composition of many of the known deposits and prospects and the associated rocks of the St. Francois terrane in Missouri. The goal for this earlier work was to allow the comparison of Missouri iron-oxide deposits in context with other iron oxide-copper ± uranium (IOCG) types of mineral deposits observed globally. The raw geochemical analyses were released originally through the USGS National Geochemical Database (NGDB, http://mrdata.usgs.gov). The data presented herein offers all of the field notes, locations, rock descriptions, and geochemical analyses in a coherent package to facilitate new research efforts in IOCG deposit types. The data are provided in both Microsoft Excel (Version Office 2010) spreadsheet format (*.xlsx) and MS-DOS text formats (*.txt) for ease of use by numerous computer programs.

  10. Bioelectrochemical Systems Workshop:Standardized Analyses, Design Benchmarks, and Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    measured are the measured anode and cathode potentials and Ean and Ecat are the calculated potentials based on the Nernst equation . These calculated...transport (ET), and pH gradient (EΔpH). The overpotentials can be calculated from Equations 1 and 2 (see attachment), where Ean,measured and Ecat...catalytic current (icat) and the limiting current (iL) is described by Equation 3 (see attachment), where n is the number of electrons involved in the

  11. Adverse Outcome Pathway Network Analyses: Techniques and benchmarking the AOPwiki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: As the community of toxicological researchers, risk assessors, and risk managers adopt the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) paradigm for organizing toxicological knowledge, the number and diversity of adverse outcome pathways and AOP networks are continuing to grow. This ...

  12. Performance Targets and External Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ivar; Hansen, Allan; Vámosi, Tamás S.

    Research on relative performance measures, transfer pricing, beyond budgeting initiatives, target costing, piece rates systems and value based management has for decades underlined the importance of external benchmarking in performance management. Research conceptualises external benchmarking...... as a market mechanism that can be brought inside the firm to provide incentives for continuous improvement and the development of competitive advances. However, whereas extant research primarily has focused on the importance and effects of using external benchmarks, less attention has been directed towards...... the conditions upon which the market mechanism is performing within organizations. This paper aims to contribute to research by providing more insight to the conditions for the use of external benchmarking as an element in performance management in organizations. Our study explores a particular type of external...

  13. Benchmarking and Sustainable Transport Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Wyatt, Andrew; Gordon, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    Order to learn from the best. In 2000 the European Commission initiated research to explore benchmarking as a tool to promote policies for ‘sustainable transport’. This paper reports findings and recommendations on how to address this challenge. The findings suggest that benchmarking is a valuable...... tool that may indeed help to move forward the transport policy agenda. However, there are major conditions and limitations. First of all it is not always so straightforward to delimit, measure and compare transport services in order to establish a clear benchmark. Secondly ‘sustainable transport......’ evokes a broad range of concerns that are hard to address fully at the level of specific practices. Thirdly policies are not directly comparable across space and context. For these reasons attempting to benchmark ‘sustainable transport policies’ against one another would be a highly complex task, which...

  14. Present status and benchmark tests of JENDL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The second version of Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL-2) consists of the evaluated data from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV for 176 nuclides including 99 fission product nuclei. Complete reevaluation has been made to heavy actinide, fission product and main structural material nuclides. Benchmark tests have been made on JENDL-2 for fast reactor application. Various characteristics in core center have been tested with one-dimensional model for total of 27 assemblies, and more sophisticated problems have been examined for MOZART and ZPPR-3. Furthermore analyses of JUPITER project give useful information. Satisfactory results have been obtained as a whole. However, the spectrum is a little underestimated above a few hundred keV and below a few keV. The positive sodium void reactivity worth is much overestimated. As to the latter, the sensitivity analysis with the generalized perturbation method suggests that the fission cross section of 239 Pu below a few keV has an important role. (Auth.)

  15. Benchmarking: contexts and details matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Siyuan

    2017-07-05

    Benchmarking is an essential step in the development of computational tools. We take this opportunity to pitch in our opinions on tool benchmarking, in light of two correspondence articles published in Genome Biology.Please see related Li et al. and Newman et al. correspondence articles: www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1256-5 and www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1257-4.

  16. Handbook of critical experiments benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

    1978-03-01

    Data from critical experiments have been collected together for use as benchmarks in evaluating calculational techniques and nuclear data. These benchmarks have been selected from the numerous experiments performed on homogeneous plutonium systems. No attempt has been made to reproduce all of the data that exists. The primary objective in the collection of these data is to present representative experimental data defined in a concise, standardized format that can easily be translated into computer code input

  17. Analysis of Benchmark 2 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacha, F.; Lefievre, B.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.

    1994-01-01

    The code GEANT315 has been compared to different codes in two benchmarks. We analyze its performances through our results, especially in the thick target case. In spite of gaps in nucleus-nucleus interaction theories at intermediate energies, benchmarks allow possible improvements of physical models used in our codes. Thereafter, a scheme of radioactive waste burning system is studied. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  18. Benchmarks for GADRAS performance validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Rhykerd, Charles L. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) was validated by comparing GADRAS model results to experimental measurements for a series of benchmark sources. Sources for the benchmark include a plutonium metal sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, plutonium oxide in cans, a highly enriched uranium sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, a depleted uranium shell and spheres, and a natural uranium sphere. The benchmark experimental data were previously acquired and consist of careful collection of background and calibration source spectra along with the source spectra. The calibration data were fit with GADRAS to determine response functions for the detector in each experiment. A one-dimensional model (pie chart) was constructed for each source based on the dimensions of the benchmark source. The GADRAS code made a forward calculation from each model to predict the radiation spectrum for the detector used in the benchmark experiment. The comparisons between the GADRAS calculation and the experimental measurements are excellent, validating that GADRAS can correctly predict the radiation spectra for these well-defined benchmark sources.

  19. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaček Michal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Based on an analysis of the current situation and existing needs in the Czech Republic, as well as on a comparison with international experience, recommendations for public policy are made, which lie in the design of a model of a collaborative benchmarking for Czech economics and management in higher-education programs. Because the fully complex model cannot be implemented immediately – which is also confirmed by structured interviews with academics who have practical experience with benchmarking –, the final model is designed as a multi-stage model. This approach helps eliminate major barriers to the implementation of benchmarking.

  20. Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Gartung, P.; Jones, C. D.

    2017-10-01

    In 2012 CMS evaluated which underlying concurrency technology would be the best to use for its multi-threaded framework. The available technologies were evaluated on the high throughput computing systems dominating the resources in use at that time. A skeleton framework benchmarking suite that emulates the tasks performed within a CMSSW application was used to select Intel’s Thread Building Block library, based on the measured overheads in both memory and CPU on the different technologies benchmarked. In 2016 CMS will get access to high performance computing resources that use new many core architectures; machines such as Cori Phase 1&2, Theta, Mira. Because of this we have revived the 2012 benchmark to test it’s performance and conclusions on these new architectures. This talk will discuss the results of this exercise.

  1. A Benchmark for Virtual Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Automatically animating and placing the virtual camera in a dynamic environment is a challenging task. The camera is expected to maximise and maintain a set of properties — i.e. visual composition — while smoothly moving through the environment and avoiding obstacles. A large number of different....... For this reason, in this paper, we propose a benchmark for the problem of virtual camera control and we analyse a number of different problems in different virtual environments. Each of these scenarios is described through a set of complexity measures and, as a result of this analysis, a subset of scenarios...

  2. Present status and extensions of the Monte Carlo performance benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Petrovic, B.; Martin, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    The NEA Monte Carlo Performance benchmark started in 2011 aiming to monitor over the years the abilities to perform a full-size Monte Carlo reactor core calculation with a detailed power production for each fuel pin with axial distribution. This paper gives an overview of the contributed results thus far. It shows that reaching a statistical accuracy of 1 % for most of the small fuel zones requires about 100 billion neutron histories. The efficiency of parallel execution of Monte Carlo codes on a large number of processor cores shows clear limitations for computer clusters with common type computer nodes. However, using true supercomputers the speedup of parallel calculations is increasing up to large numbers of processor cores. More experience is needed from calculations on true supercomputers using large numbers of processors in order to predict if the requested calculations can be done in a short time. As the specifications of the reactor geometry for this benchmark test are well suited for further investigations of full-core Monte Carlo calculations and a need is felt for testing other issues than its computational performance, proposals are presented for extending the benchmark to a suite of benchmark problems for evaluating fission source convergence for a system with a high dominance ratio, for coupling with thermal-hydraulics calculations to evaluate the use of different temperatures and coolant densities and to study the correctness and effectiveness of burnup calculations. Moreover, other contemporary proposals for a full-core calculation with realistic geometry and material composition will be discussed. (authors)

  3. International benchmark tests of the FENDL-1 Nuclear Data Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.

    1997-01-01

    An international benchmark validation task has been conducted to validate the fusion evaluated nuclear data library FENDL-1 through data tests against integral 14 MeV neutron experiments. The main objective of this task was to qualify the FENDL-1 working libraries for fusion applications and to elaborate recommendations for further data improvements. Several laboratories and institutions from the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and US have contributed to the benchmark task. A large variety of existing integral 14 MeV benchmark experiments was analysed with the FENDL-1 working libraries for continuous energy Monte Carlo and multigroup discrete ordinate calculations. Results of the benchmark analyses have been collected, discussed and evaluated. The major findings, conclusions and recommendations are presented in this paper. With regard to the data quality, it is summarised that fusion nuclear data have reached a high confidence level with the available FENDL-1 data library. With few exceptions this holds for the materials of highest importance for fusion reactor applications. As a result of the performed benchmark analyses, some existing deficiencies and discrepancies have been identified that are recommended for removal in theforthcoming FENDL-2 data file. (orig.)

  4. An ultra-clean technique for accurately analysing Pb isotopes and heavy metals at high spatial resolution in ice cores with sub-pg g{sup -1} Pb concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burn, Laurie J. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia); Rosman, Kevin J.R. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia)], E-mail: K.Rosman@curtin.edu.au; Candelone, Jean-Pierre [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia); Vallelonga, Paul [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia); Istituto per la Dinamica dei Processi Ambientali (IDPA-CNR), Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Burton, Graeme R. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia); Smith, Andrew M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Morgan, Vin I. [Australian Antarctic Division and Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC, Private Bag 80, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Barbante, Carlo [Istituto per la Dinamica dei Processi Ambientali (IDPA-CNR), Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Hong, Sungmin [Korea Polar Research Institute, Songdo Techno Park, 7-50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Boutron, Claude F. [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement du CNRS, 54, rue Moliere, B.P. 96, 3840.2 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2009-02-23

    Measurements of Pb isotope ratios in ice containing sub-pg g{sup -1} concentrations are easily compromised by contamination, particularly where limited sample is available. Improved techniques are essential if Antarctic ice cores are to be analysed with sufficient spatial resolution to reveal seasonal variations due to climate. This was achieved here by using stainless steel chisels and saws and strict protocols in an ultra-clean cold room to decontaminate and section ice cores. Artificial ice cores, prepared from high purity water were used to develop and refine the procedures and quantify blanks. Ba and In, two other important elements present at pg g{sup -1} and fg g{sup -1} concentrations in Polar ice, were also measured. The final blank amounted to 0.2 {+-} 0.2 pg of Pb with {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios of 1.16 {+-} 0.12 and 2.35 {+-} 0.16, respectively, 1.5 {+-} 0.4 pg of Ba and 0.6 {+-} 2.0 fg of In, most of which probably originates from abrasion of the steel saws by the ice. The procedure was demonstrated on a Holocene Antarctic ice core section and was shown to contribute blanks of only {approx}5%, {approx}14% and {approx}0.8% to monthly resolved samples with respective Pb, Ba and In concentrations of 0.12 pg g{sup -1}, 0.3 pg g{sup -1} and 2.3 fg g{sup -1}. Uncertainties in the Pb isotopic ratio measurements were degraded by only {approx}0.2%.

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-10/TIMP-2 structure and analyses define conserved core interactions and diverse exosite interactions in MMP/TIMP complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotica Batra

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play central roles in vertebrate tissue development, remodeling, and repair. The endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs regulate proteolytic activity by binding tightly to the MMP active site. While each of the four TIMPs can inhibit most MMPs, binding data reveal tremendous heterogeneity in affinities of different TIMP/MMP pairs, and the structural features that differentiate stronger from weaker complexes are poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the comparatively weakly bound human MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison with previously reported structures of MMP-3/TIMP-1, MT1-MMP/TIMP-2, MMP-13/TIMP-2, and MMP-10/TIMP-1 complexes offers insights into the structural basis of binding selectivity. Our analyses identify a group of highly conserved contacts at the heart of MMP/TIMP complexes that define the conserved mechanism of inhibition, as well as a second category of diverse adventitious contacts at the periphery of the interfaces. The AB loop of the TIMP N-terminal domain and the contact loops of the TIMP C-terminal domain form highly variable peripheral contacts that can be considered as separate exosite interactions. In some complexes these exosite contacts are extensive, while in other complexes the AB loop or C-terminal domain contacts are greatly reduced and appear to contribute little to complex stability. Our data suggest that exosite interactions can enhance MMP/TIMP binding, although in the relatively weakly bound MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex they are not well optimized to do so. Formation of highly variable exosite interactions may provide a general mechanism by which TIMPs are fine-tuned for distinct regulatory roles in biology.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase-10/TIMP-2 structure and analyses define conserved core interactions and diverse exosite interactions in MMP/TIMP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Jyotica; Soares, Alexei S; Mehner, Christine; Radisky, Evette S

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play central roles in vertebrate tissue development, remodeling, and repair. The endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) regulate proteolytic activity by binding tightly to the MMP active site. While each of the four TIMPs can inhibit most MMPs, binding data reveal tremendous heterogeneity in affinities of different TIMP/MMP pairs, and the structural features that differentiate stronger from weaker complexes are poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structure of the comparatively weakly bound human MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison with previously reported structures of MMP-3/TIMP-1, MT1-MMP/TIMP-2, MMP-13/TIMP-2, and MMP-10/TIMP-1 complexes offers insights into the structural basis of binding selectivity. Our analyses identify a group of highly conserved contacts at the heart of MMP/TIMP complexes that define the conserved mechanism of inhibition, as well as a second category of diverse adventitious contacts at the periphery of the interfaces. The AB loop of the TIMP N-terminal domain and the contact loops of the TIMP C-terminal domain form highly variable peripheral contacts that can be considered as separate exosite interactions. In some complexes these exosite contacts are extensive, while in other complexes the AB loop or C-terminal domain contacts are greatly reduced and appear to contribute little to complex stability. Our data suggest that exosite interactions can enhance MMP/TIMP binding, although in the relatively weakly bound MMP-10/TIMP-2 complex they are not well optimized to do so. Formation of highly variable exosite interactions may provide a general mechanism by which TIMPs are fine-tuned for distinct regulatory roles in biology.

  7. Qualification of the core model DYN3D coupled with the code ATHLET as an advanced tool for the accident analysis of VVER type reactors. Pt. 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.; Rohde, U.

    2002-10-01

    Benchmark calculations for the validation of the coupled neutron kinetics/thermohydraulic code complex DYN3D-ATHLET are described. Two benchmark problems concerning hypothetical accident scenarios with leaks in the steam system for a VVER-440 type reactor and the TMI-1 PWR have been solved. The first benchmark task has been defined by FZR in the frame of the international association 'Atomic Energy Research' (AER), the second exercise has been organized under the auspices of the OECD. While in the first benchmark the break of the main steam collector in the sub-critical hot zero power state of the reactor was considered, the break of one of the two main steam lines at full reactor power was assumed in the OECD benchmark. Therefore, in this exercise the mixing of the coolant from the intact and the defect loops had to be considered, while in the AER benchmark the steam collector break causes a homogeneous overcooling of the primary circuit. In the AER benchmark, each participant had to use its own macroscopic cross section libraries. In the OECD benchmark, the cross sections were given in the benchmark definition. The main task of both benchmark problems was to analyse the re-criticality of the scrammed reactor due to the overcooling. For both benchmark problems, a good agreement of the DYN3D-ATHLET solution with the results of other codes was achieved. Differences in the time of re-criticality and the height of the power peak between various solutions of the AER benchmark can be explained by the use of different cross section data. Significant differences in the thermohydraulic parameters (coolant temperature, pressure) occurred only at the late stage of the transient during the emergency injection of highly borated water. In the OECD benchmark, a broader scattering of the thermohydraulic results can be observed, while a good agreement between the various 3D reactor core calculations with given thermohydraulic boundary conditions was achieved. Reasons for the

  8. Developing and modeling of the 'Laguna Verde' BWR CRDA benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis-Rodarte, J.; Fu, H.; Ivanov, K.N.; Matsui, Y.; Hotta, A.

    2002-01-01

    Reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) and design basis transients are one of the most important aspects related to nuclear power reactor safety. These events are re-evaluated whenever core alterations (modifications) are made as part of the nuclear safety analysis performed to a new design. These modifications usually include, but are not limited to, power upgrades, longer cycles, new fuel assembly and control rod designs, etc. The results obtained are compared with pre-established bounding analysis values to see if the new core design fulfills the requirements of safety constraints imposed on the design. The control rod drop accident (CRDA) is the design basis transient for the reactivity events of BWR technology. The CRDA is a very localized event depending on the control rod insertion position and the fuel assemblies surrounding the control rod falling from the core. A numerical benchmark was developed based on the CRDA RIA design basis accident to further asses the performance of coupled 3D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulics codes. The CRDA in a BWR is a mostly neutronic driven event. This benchmark is based on a real operating nuclear power plant - unit 1 of the Laguna Verde (LV1) nuclear power plant (NPP). The definition of the benchmark is presented briefly together with the benchmark specifications. Some of the cross-sections were modified in order to make the maximum control rod worth greater than one dollar. The transient is initiated at steady-state by dropping the control rod with maximum worth at full speed. The 'Laguna Verde' (LV1) BWR CRDA transient benchmark is calculated using two coupled codes: TRAC-BF1/NEM and TRAC-BF1/ENTREE. Neutron kinetics and thermal hydraulics models were developed for both codes. Comparison of the obtained results is presented along with some discussion of the sensitivity of results to some modeling assumptions

  9. Benchmarking of SIMULATE-3 on engineering workstations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlson, C.F.; Reed, M.L.; Webb, J.R.; Elzea, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear fuel management department of Arizona Public Service Company (APS) has evaluated various computer platforms for a departmental engineering and business work-station local area network (LAN). Historically, centralized mainframe computer systems have been utilized for engineering calculations. Increasing usage and the resulting longer response times on the company mainframe system and the relative cost differential between a mainframe upgrade and workstation technology justified the examination of current workstations. A primary concern was the time necessary to turn around routine reactor physics reload and analysis calculations. Computers ranging from a Definicon 68020 processing board in an AT compatible personal computer up to an IBM 3090 mainframe were benchmarked. The SIMULATE-3 advanced nodal code was selected for benchmarking based on its extensive use in nuclear fuel management. SIMULATE-3 is used at APS for reload scoping, design verification, core follow, and providing predictions of reactor behavior under nominal conditions and planned reactor maneuvering, such as axial shape control during start-up and shutdown

  10. Benchmarking to improve the quality of cystic fibrosis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    Benchmarking involves the ascertainment of healthcare programs with most favorable outcomes as a means to identify and spread effective strategies for delivery of care. The recent interest in the development of patient registries for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been fueled in part by an interest in using them to facilitate benchmarking. This review summarizes reports of how benchmarking has been operationalized in attempts to improve CF care. Although certain goals of benchmarking can be accomplished with an exclusive focus on registry data analysis, benchmarking programs in Germany and the United States have supplemented these data analyses with exploratory interactions and discussions to better understand successful approaches to care and encourage their spread throughout the care network. Benchmarking allows the discovery and facilitates the spread of effective approaches to care. It provides a pragmatic alternative to traditional research methods such as randomized controlled trials, providing insights into methods that optimize delivery of care and allowing judgments about the relative effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches.

  11. [Benchmarking and other functions of ROM: back to basics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendregt, M

    2015-01-01

    Since 2011 outcome data in the Dutch mental health care have been collected on a national scale. This has led to confusion about the position of benchmarking in the system known as routine outcome monitoring (rom). To provide insight into the various objectives and uses of aggregated outcome data. A qualitative review was performed and the findings were analysed. Benchmarking is a strategy for finding best practices and for improving efficacy and it belongs to the domain of quality management. Benchmarking involves comparing outcome data by means of instrumentation and is relatively tolerant with regard to the validity of the data. Although benchmarking is a function of rom, it must be differentiated form other functions from rom. Clinical management, public accountability, research, payment for performance and information for patients are all functions of rom which require different ways of data feedback and which make different demands on the validity of the underlying data. Benchmarking is often wrongly regarded as being simply a synonym for 'comparing institutions'. It is, however, a method which includes many more factors; it can be used to improve quality and has a more flexible approach to the validity of outcome data and is less concerned than other rom functions about funding and the amount of information given to patients. Benchmarking can make good use of currently available outcome data.

  12. VENUS-2 Benchmark Problem Analysis with HELIOS-1.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Jun; Choe, Jiwon; Lee, Deokjung

    2014-01-01

    Since there are reliable results of benchmark data from the OECD/NEA report of the VENUS-2 MOX benchmark problem, by comparing benchmark results users can identify the credibility of code. In this paper, the solution of the VENUS-2 benchmark problem from HELIOS 1.9 using the ENDF/B-VI library(NJOY91.13) is compared with the result from HELIOS 1.7 with consideration of the MCNP-4B result as reference data. The comparison contains the results of pin cell calculation, assembly calculation, and core calculation. The eigenvalues from those are considered by comparing the results from other codes. In the case of UOX and MOX assemblies, the differences from the MCNP-4B results are about 10 pcm. However, there is some inaccuracy in baffle-reflector condition, and relatively large differences were found in the MOX-reflector assembly and core calculation. Although HELIOS 1.9 utilizes an inflow transport correction, it seems that it has a limited effect on the error in baffle-reflector condition

  13. Gas cooled fast reactor benchmarks for JNC and Cea neutronic tools assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpault, G.; Sugino, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to verify the adequacy of JNC and Cea computational tools for the definition of GCFR (gas cooled fast reactor) core characteristics, GCFR neutronic benchmarks have been performed. The benchmarks have been carried out on two different cores: 1) a conventional Gas-Cooled fast Reactor (EGCR) core with pin-type fuel, and 2) an innovative He-cooled Coated-Particle Fuel (CPF) core. Core characteristics being studied include: -) Criticality (Effective multiplication factor or K-effective), -) Instantaneous breeding gain (BG), -) Core Doppler effect, and -) Coolant depressurization reactivity. K-effective and coolant depressurization reactivity at EOEC (End Of Equilibrium Cycle) state were calculated since these values are the most critical characteristics in the core design. In order to check the influence due to the difference of depletion calculation systems, a simple depletion calculation benchmark was performed. Values such as: -) burnup reactivity loss, -) mass balance of heavy metals and fission products (FP) were calculated. Results of the core design characteristics calculated by both JNC and Cea sides agree quite satisfactorily in terms of core conceptual design study. Potential features for improving the GCFR computational tools have been discovered during the course of this benchmark such as the way to calculate accurately the breeding gain. Different ways to improve the accuracy of the calculations have also been identified. In particular, investigation on nuclear data for steel is important for EGCR and for lumped fission products in both cores. The outcome of this benchmark is already satisfactory and will help to design more precisely GCFR cores. (authors)

  14. TRX and UO2 criticality benchmarks with SAM-CE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.; Troubetzkoy, E.S.; Lichtenstein, H.; Rose, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    A set of thermal reactor benchmark calculations with SAM-CE which have been conducted at both MAGI and at BNL are described. Their purpose was both validation of the SAM-CE reactor eigenvalue capability developed by MAGI and a substantial contribution to the data testing of both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V libraries. This experience also resulted in increased calculational efficiency of the code and an example is given. The benchmark analysis included the TRX-1 infinite cell using both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V cross section sets and calculations using ENDF/B-IV of the TRX-1 full core and TRX-2 cell. BAPL-UO2-1 calculations were conducted for the cell using both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V and for the full core with ENDF/B-V

  15. Benchmarking of human resources management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Akinnusi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of human resource management (HRM which, today, plays a strategic partnership role in management. The focus of the paper is on HRM in the public sector, where much hope rests on HRM as a means of transforming the public service and achieving much needed service delivery. However, a critical evaluation of HRM practices in the public sector reveals that these services leave much to be desired. The paper suggests the adoption of benchmarking as a process to revamp HRM in the public sector so that it is able to deliver on its promises. It describes the nature and process of benchmarking and highlights the inherent difficulties in applying benchmarking in HRM. It concludes with some suggestions for a plan of action. The process of identifying “best” practices in HRM requires the best collaborative efforts of HRM practitioners and academicians. If used creatively, benchmarking has the potential to bring about radical and positive changes in HRM in the public sector. The adoption of the benchmarking process is, in itself, a litmus test of the extent to which HRM in the public sector has grown professionally.

  16. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, U; Alex, J; Batstone, D J; Benedetti, L; Comas, J; Copp, J B; Corominas, L; Flores-Alsina, X; Gernaey, K V; Nopens, I; Pons, M-N; Rodríguez-Roda, I; Rosen, C; Steyer, J-P; Vanrolleghem, P A; Volcke, E I P; Vrecko, D

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, highlighting areas where knowledge may still be deficient and where new opportunities are emerging, and to propose potential avenues for future development and application of the general benchmarking framework and its associated tools. The paper focuses on the topics of temporal and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity.

  17. Assessing reactor physics codes capabilities to simulate fast reactors on the example of the BN-600 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Vladimir [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SES NRS), Moscow (Russian Federation); Bousquet, Jeremy [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    This work aims to assess the capabilities of reactor physics codes (initially validated for thermal reactors) to simulate fast sodium cooled reactors. The BFS-62-3A critical experiment from the BN-600 Hybrid Core Benchmark Analyses was chosen for the investigation. Monte-Carlo codes (KENO from SCALE and SERPENT 2.1.23) and the deterministic diffusion code DYN3D-MG are applied to calculate the neutronic parameters. It was found that the multiplication factor and reactivity effects calculated by KENO and SERPENT using the ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy library are in a good agreement with each other and with the measured benchmark values. Few-groups macroscopic cross sections, required for DYN3D-MG, were prepared in applying different methods implemented in SCALE and SERPENT. The DYN3D-MG results of a simplified benchmark show reasonable agreement with results from Monte-Carlo calculations and measured values. The former results are used to justify DYN3D-MG implementation for sodium cooled fast reactors coupled deterministic analysis.

  18. JENDL-3.3 thermal reactor benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Integral tests of JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library have been carried out by Reactor Integral Test WG of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The most important problem in the thermal reactor benchmark testing was the overestimation of the multiplication factor of the U fueled cores. With several revisions of the data of 235 U and the other nuclides, JENDL-3.3 data library gives a good estimation of multiplication factors both for U and Pu fueled thermal reactors. (author)

  19. JENDL-4.0 benchmarking for effective delayed neutron fraction with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yasunobu

    2013-01-01

    Benchmark calculations with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code have been performed for delayed neutron data of JENDL-4.0. JENDL-4.0 gives good prediction for the effective delayed neutron fraction in the present benchmarks but further detailed analysis is required for some cores. (author)

  20. Benchmark Evaluation of Start-Up and Zero-Power Measurements at the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate six cold-critical and two warm-critical, zero-power measurements of the HTTR. Additional measurements of a fully-loaded subcritical configuration, core excess reactivity, shutdown margins, six isothermal temperature coefficients, and axial reaction-rate distributions were also evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments. Insufficient information is publicly available to develop finely-detailed models of the HTTR as much of the design information is still proprietary. However, the uncertainties in the benchmark models are judged to be of sufficient magnitude to encompass any biases and bias uncertainties incurred through the simplification process used to develop the benchmark models. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the impurity content of the various graphite blocks that comprise the HTTR. Monte Carlo calculations of keff are between approximately 0.9 % and 2.7 % greater than the benchmark values. Reevaluation of the HTTR models as additional information becomes available could improve the quality of this benchmark and possibly reduce the computational biases. High-quality characterization of graphite impurities would significantly improve the quality of the HTTR benchmark assessment. Simulation of the other reactor physics measurements are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

  1. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  2. The fifth AER dynamic benchmark calculation with hextran-smabre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemaelaeinen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.

    1998-01-01

    The first AER benchmark for coupling of the thermohydraulic codes and three-dimensional reactordynamic core models is discussed. HEXTRAN 2.7 is used for the core dynamics and SMABRE 4.6 as a thermohydraulic model for the primary and secondary loops. The plant model for SMABRE is based mainly on two input models, the Loviisa model and standard VVER-440/213 plant model. The primary circuit includes six separate loops, totally 505 nodes and 652 junctions. The reactor pressure vessel is divided into six parallel channels. In HEXTRAN calculation 1/6 symmetry is used in the core. In the calculations nuclear data is based on the ENDF/B-IV library and it has been evaluated with the CASMO-HEX code. The importance of the nuclear data was illustrated by repeating the benchmark calculation with using three different data sets. Optimal extensive data valid from hot to cold conditions were not available for all types of fuel enrichments needed in this benchmark. (author)

  3. Benchmarking of the FENDL-3 Neutron Cross-section Data Starter Library for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Angelone, M. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom, ENEA Fusion Division, Via E. Fermi 27, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Bohm, T. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kondo, K. [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Konno, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Villari, R. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom, ENEA Fusion Division, Via E. Fermi 27, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Walker, B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    This paper summarizes the benchmark analyses performed in a joint effort of ENEA (Italy), JAEA (Japan), KIT (Germany), and the University of Wisconsin (USA) on a computational ITER benchmark and a series of 14 MeV neutron benchmark experiments. The computational benchmark revealed a modest increase of the neutron flux levels in the deep penetration regions and a substantial increase of the gas production in steel components. The comparison to experimental results showed good agreement with no substantial differences between FENDL-3.0 and FENDL-2.1 for most of the responses. In general, FENDL-3 shows an improved performance for fusion neutronics applications.

  4. Strategic behaviour under regulatory benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamasb, T. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Economics; Nillesen, P. [NUON NV (Netherlands); Pollitt, M. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Judge Inst. of Management

    2004-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of electricity distribution networks, some regulators have adopted incentive regulation schemes that rely on performance benchmarking. Although regulation benchmarking can influence the ''regulation game,'' the subject has received limited attention. This paper discusses how strategic behaviour can result in inefficient behaviour by firms. We then use the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method with US utility data to examine implications of illustrative cases of strategic behaviour reported by regulators. The results show that gaming can have significant effects on the measured performance and profitability of firms. (author)

  5. Atomic Energy Research benchmark activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.

    1998-01-01

    The test problems utilized in the validation and verification process of computer programs in Atomic Energie Research are collected into one bunch. This is the first step towards issuing a volume in which tests for VVER are collected, along with reference solutions and a number of solutions. The benchmarks do not include the ZR-6 experiments because they have been published along with a number of comparisons in the Final reports of TIC. The present collection focuses on operational and mathematical benchmarks which cover almost the entire range of reaktor calculation. (Author)

  6. Histograms showing variations in oil yield, water yield, and specific gravity of oil from Fischer assay analyses of oil-shale drill cores and cuttings from the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, John D.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado contains over 1.5 trillion barrels of oil in place, making the basin the largest known oil-shale deposit in the world. Previously published histograms display oil-yield variations with depth and widely correlate rich and lean oil-shale beds and zones throughout the basin. Histograms in this report display oil-yield data plotted alongside either water-yield or oil specific-gravity data. Fischer assay analyses of core and cutting samples collected from exploration drill holes penetrating the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin can aid in determining the origins of those deposits, as well as estimating the amount of organic matter, halite, nahcolite, and water-bearing minerals. This report focuses only on the oil yield plotted against water yield and oil specific gravity.

  7. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, B. J.; Dean, V. F.; Pesic, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimenters or the experimental facility; (3) compile the data into a standardized format; (4) perform calculations of each experiment with standard criticality safety codes, and (5) formally document the work into a single source of verified benchmark critical data. The work of the ICSBEP is documented as an OECD handbook, in 7 volumes, entitled, 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'. This handbook is available on CD-ROM or on the Internet (http://icsbep.inel.gov/icsbep). Over 150 scientists from around the world have combined their efforts to produce this Handbook. The 2000 publication of the handbook will span over 19,000 pages and contain benchmark specifications for approximately 284 evaluations containing 2352 critical configurations. The handbook is currently in use in 45 different countries by criticality safety analysts to perform necessary validation of their calculation techniques and it is expected to be a valuable tool for decades to come. As a result of the efforts of the ICSBEP: (1) a large portion of the tedious, redundant, and very costly research and processing of criticality safety experimental data has been eliminated; (2) the necessary step in criticality safety analyses of validating computer codes with benchmark data is greatly streamlined; (3) gaps in data are being highlighted; (4) lost data are being retrieved; (5) deficiencies and errors in cross section processing codes and neutronic codes are being identified, and (6) over a half-century of valuable criticality safety data are being preserved. (author)

  8. International benchmarking of electricity transmission by regulators: A contrast between theory and practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, Aoife Brophy; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarking of electricity networks has a key role in sharing the benefits of efficiency improvements with consumers and ensuring regulated companies earn a fair return on their investments. This paper analyses and contrasts the theory and practice of international benchmarking of electricity transmission by regulators. We examine the literature relevant to electricity transmission benchmarking and discuss the results of a survey of 25 national electricity regulators. While new panel data techniques aimed at dealing with unobserved heterogeneity and the validity of the comparator group look intellectually promising, our survey suggests that they are in their infancy for regulatory purposes. In electricity transmission, relative to electricity distribution, choosing variables is particularly difficult, because of the large number of potential variables to choose from. Failure to apply benchmarking appropriately may negatively affect investors’ willingness to invest in the future. While few of our surveyed regulators acknowledge that regulatory risk is currently an issue in transmission benchmarking, many more concede it might be. In the meantime new regulatory approaches – such as those based on tendering, negotiated settlements, a wider range of outputs or longer term grid planning – are emerging and will necessarily involve a reduced role for benchmarking. -- Highlights: •We discuss how to benchmark electricity transmission. •We report survey results from 25 national energy regulators. •Electricity transmission benchmarking is more challenging than benchmarking distribution. •Many regulators concede benchmarking may raise capital costs. •Many regulators are considering new regulatory approaches

  9. Benchmark criticality experiments for fast fission configuration with high enriched nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorin, S.N.; Mandzik, S.G.; Polazau, S.A.; Hryharovich, T.K.; Damarad, Y.V.; Palahina, Y.A.

    2014-01-01

    Benchmark criticality experiments of fast heterogeneous configuration with high enriched uranium (HEU) nuclear fuel were performed using the 'Giacint' critical assembly of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research - Sosny (JIPNR-Sosny) of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus. The critical assembly core comprised fuel assemblies without a casing for the 34.8 mm wrench. Fuel assemblies contain 19 fuel rods of two types. The first type is metal uranium fuel rods with 90% enrichment by U-235; the second one is dioxide uranium fuel rods with 36% enrichment by U-235. The total fuel rods length is 620 mm, and the active fuel length is 500 mm. The outer fuel rods diameter is 7 mm, the wall is 0.2 mm thick, and the fuel material diameter is 6.4 mm. The clad material is stainless steel. The side radial reflector: the inner layer of beryllium, and the outer layer of stainless steel. The top and bottom axial reflectors are of stainless steel. The analysis of the experimental results obtained from these benchmark experiments by developing detailed calculation models and performing simulations for the different experiments is presented. The sensitivity of the obtained results for the material specifications and the modeling details were examined. The analyses used the MCNP and MCU computer programs. This paper presents the experimental and analytical results. (authors)

  10. Accelerator driven systems. ADS benchmark calculations. Results of stage 2. Radiotoxic waste transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenreich, W.E.; Gruppelaar, H

    1998-12-01

    This report contains the results of calculations made at ECN-Petten of a benchmark to study the neutronic potential of a modular fast spectrum ADS (Accelerator-Driven System) for radiotoxic waste transmutation. The study is focused on the incineration of TRans-Uranium elements (TRU), Minor Actinides (MA) and Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFP), in this case {sup 99}Tc. The benchmark exercise is made in the framework of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme. A simplified description of an ADS, restricted to the reactor part, with TRU or MA fuel (k{sub eff}=0.96) has been analysed. All spectrum calculations have been performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. The burnup calculations have been performed with the code FISPACT coupled to MCNP-4A by means of our OCTOPUS system. The cross sections are based upon JEF-2.2 for transport calculations and supplemented with EAF-4 data for inventory calculations. The determined quantities are: core dimensions, fuel inventories, system power, sensitivity on external source spectrum and waste transmutation rates. The main conclusions are: The MA-burner requires only a small accelerator current increase during burnup, in contrast to the TRU-burner. The {sup 99} Tc-burner has a large initial loading; a more effective design may be possible. 5 refs.

  11. Accelerator driven systems. ADS benchmark calculations. Results of stage 2. Radiotoxic waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenreich, W.E.; Gruppelaar, H.

    1998-12-01

    This report contains the results of calculations made at ECN-Petten of a benchmark to study the neutronic potential of a modular fast spectrum ADS (Accelerator-Driven System) for radiotoxic waste transmutation. The study is focused on the incineration of TRans-Uranium elements (TRU), Minor Actinides (MA) and Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFP), in this case 99 Tc. The benchmark exercise is made in the framework of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme. A simplified description of an ADS, restricted to the reactor part, with TRU or MA fuel (k eff =0.96) has been analysed. All spectrum calculations have been performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. The burnup calculations have been performed with the code FISPACT coupled to MCNP-4A by means of our OCTOPUS system. The cross sections are based upon JEF-2.2 for transport calculations and supplemented with EAF-4 data for inventory calculations. The determined quantities are: core dimensions, fuel inventories, system power, sensitivity on external source spectrum and waste transmutation rates. The main conclusions are: The MA-burner requires only a small accelerator current increase during burnup, in contrast to the TRU-burner. The 99 Tc-burner has a large initial loading; a more effective design may be possible. 5 refs

  12. Piping benchmark problems for the Westinghouse AP600 Standardized Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1997-01-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for the Westinghouse AP600 Standardized Plant, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the AP600 standard design. It will be required that the combined license licensees demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set

  13. Benchmarked Library Websites Comparative Study

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.; Tyhurst, Janis

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an analysis of services provided by the benchmarked library websites. The exploratory study includes comparison of these websites against a list of criterion and presents a list of services that are most commonly deployed by the selected websites. In addition to that, the investigators proposed a list of services that could be provided via the KAUST library website.

  14. Defining a methodology for benchmarking spectrum unfolding codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Kirmser, P.G.; Miller, W.H.; Hu, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    It has long been recognized that different neutron spectrum unfolding codes will produce significantly different results when unfolding the same measured data. In reviewing the results of such analyses it has been difficult to determine which result if any is the best representation of what was measured by the spectrometer detector. A proposal to develop a benchmarking procedure for spectrum unfolding codes is presented. The objective of the procedure will be to begin to develop a methodology and a set of data with a well established and documented result that could be used to benchmark and standardize the various unfolding methods and codes. It is further recognized that development of such a benchmark must involve a consensus of the technical community interested in neutron spectrum unfolding

  15. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  16. Direct data access protocols benchmarking on DPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furano, Fabrizio; Devresse, Adrien; Keeble, Oliver; Mancinelli, Valentina

    2015-12-01

    The Disk Pool Manager is an example of a multi-protocol, multi-VO system for data access on the Grid that went though a considerable technical evolution in the last years. Among other features, its architecture offers the opportunity of testing its different data access frontends under exactly the same conditions, including hardware and backend software. This characteristic inspired the idea of collecting monitoring information from various testbeds in order to benchmark the behaviour of the HTTP and Xrootd protocols for the use case of data analysis, batch or interactive. A source of information is the set of continuous tests that are run towards the worldwide endpoints belonging to the DPM Collaboration, which accumulated relevant statistics in its first year of activity. On top of that, the DPM releases are based on multiple levels of automated testing that include performance benchmarks of various kinds, executed regularly every day. At the same time, the recent releases of DPM can report monitoring information about any data access protocol to the same monitoring infrastructure that is used to monitor the Xrootd deployments. Our goal is to evaluate under which circumstances the HTTP-based protocols can be good enough for batch or interactive data access. In this contribution we show and discuss the results that our test systems have collected under the circumstances that include ROOT analyses using TTreeCache and stress tests on the metadata performance.

  17. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.

    2003-09-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E, Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC. (orig.)

  18. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Stueben, H.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.; Wittig, H.

    2004-01-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E; Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC

  19. Tourism Destination Benchmarking: Evaluation and Selection of the Benchmarking Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luštický Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourism development has an irreplaceable role in regional policy of almost all countries. This is due to its undeniable benefits for the local population with regards to the economic, social and environmental sphere. Tourist destinations compete for visitors at tourism market and subsequently get into a relatively sharp competitive struggle. The main goal of regional governments and destination management institutions is to succeed in this struggle by increasing the competitiveness of their destination. The quality of strategic planning and final strategies is a key factor of competitiveness. Even though the tourism sector is not the typical field where the benchmarking methods are widely used, such approaches could be successfully applied. The paper focuses on key phases of the benchmarking process which lies in the search for suitable referencing partners. The partners are consequently selected to meet general requirements to ensure the quality if strategies. Following from this, some specific characteristics are developed according to the SMART approach. The paper tests this procedure with an expert evaluation of eight selected regional tourism strategies of regions in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Great Britain. In this way it validates the selected criteria in the frame of the international environment. Hence, it makes it possible to find strengths and weaknesses of selected strategies and at the same time facilitates the discovery of suitable benchmarking partners.

  20. BONFIRE: benchmarking computers and computer networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bouckaert, Stefan; Vanhie-Van Gerwen, Jono; Moerman, Ingrid; Phillips, Stephen; Wilander, Jerker

    2011-01-01

    The benchmarking concept is not new in the field of computing or computer networking. With “benchmarking tools”, one usually refers to a program or set of programs, used to evaluate the performance of a solution under certain reference conditions, relative to the performance of another solution. Since the 1970s, benchmarking techniques have been used to measure the performance of computers and computer networks. Benchmarking of applications and virtual machines in an Infrastructure-as-a-Servi...

  1. Benchmarking clinical photography services in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Giles

    2015-01-01

    Benchmarking is used in services across the National Health Service (NHS) using various benchmarking programs. Clinical photography services do not have a program in place and services have to rely on ad hoc surveys of other services. A trial benchmarking exercise was undertaken with 13 services in NHS Trusts. This highlights valuable data and comparisons that can be used to benchmark and improve services throughout the profession.

  2. Discussion of OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.; Royer, E.; Gillford, J.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for best estimate calculations in nuclear reactor design and safety evaluations has increased in recent years. Uncertainty quantification has been highlighted as part of the best estimate calculations. The modelling aspects of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are to be further developed and validated on scientific grounds in support of their performance and application to multi-physics reactor simulations. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has endorsed the creation of an Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (EGUAM). Within the framework of activities of EGUAM/NSC the OECD/NEA initiated the Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling for Design, Operation, and Safety Analysis of Light Water Reactor (OECD LWR UAM benchmark). The general objective of the benchmark is to propagate the predictive uncertainties of code results through complex coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations. The benchmark is divided into three phases with Phase I highlighting the uncertainty propagation in stand-alone neutronics calculations, while Phase II and III are focused on uncertainty analysis of reactor core and system respectively. This paper discusses the progress made in Phase I calculations, the Specifications for Phase II and the incoming challenges in defining Phase 3 exercises. The challenges of applying uncertainty quantification to complex code systems, in particular the time-dependent coupled physics models are the large computational burden and the utilization of non-linear models (expected due to the physics coupling). (authors)

  3. How Benchmarking and Higher Education Came Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gary D.; Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of benchmarking and how higher education institutions began to use benchmarking for a variety of purposes. Here, benchmarking is defined as a strategic and structured approach whereby an organization compares aspects of its processes and/or outcomes to those of another organization or set of organizations to…

  4. WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark (CB5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper the specification of WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark first phase (depletion calculations), given. The second phase - criticality calculations for the WWER-1000 fuel pin cell, will be given after the evaluation of the results, obtained at the first phase. The proposed benchmark is a continuation of the WWER benchmark activities in this field (Author)

  5. Benchmarking and Learning in Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckmaster, Natalie; Mouritsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of learning-oriented benchmarking in public healthcare settings. Benchmarking is a widely adopted yet little explored accounting practice that is part of the paradigm of New Public Management. Extant studies are directed towards mandated coercive benchmarking...

  6. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  7. Benchmarking Variable Selection in QSAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Martin; Norinder, Ulf; Boyer, Scott; Carlsson, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Variable selection is important in QSAR modeling since it can improve model performance and transparency, as well as reduce the computational cost of model fitting and predictions. Which variable selection methods that perform well in QSAR settings is largely unknown. To address this question we, in a total of 1728 benchmarking experiments, rigorously investigated how eight variable selection methods affect the predictive performance and transparency of random forest models fitted to seven QSAR datasets covering different endpoints, descriptors sets, types of response variables, and number of chemical compounds. The results show that univariate variable selection methods are suboptimal and that the number of variables in the benchmarked datasets can be reduced with about 60 % without significant loss in model performance when using multivariate adaptive regression splines MARS and forward selection. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Reactor based plutonium disposition - physics and fuel behaviour benchmark studies of an OECD/NEA experts group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Hondt, P.; Gehin, J.; Na, B.C.; Sartori, E.; Wiesenack, W.

    2001-01-01

    One of the options envisaged for disposing of weapons grade plutonium, declared surplus for national defence in the Russian Federation and Usa, is to burn it in nuclear power reactors. The scientific/technical know-how accumulated in the use of MOX as a fuel for electricity generation is of great relevance for the plutonium disposition programmes. An Expert Group of the OECD/Nea is carrying out a series of benchmarks with the aim of facilitating the use of this know-how for meeting this objective. This paper describes the background that led to establishing the Expert Group, and the present status of results from these benchmarks. The benchmark studies cover a theoretical reactor physics benchmark on a VVER-1000 core loaded with MOX, two experimental benchmarks on MOX lattices and a benchmark concerned with MOX fuel behaviour for both solid and hollow pellets. First conclusions are outlined as well as future work. (author)

  9. Closed-loop neuromorphic benchmarks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stewart, TC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarks   Terrence C. Stewart 1* , Travis DeWolf 1 , Ashley Kleinhans 2 , Chris Eliasmith 1   1 University of Waterloo, Canada, 2 Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa   Submitted to Journal:   Frontiers in Neuroscience   Specialty... Eliasmith 1 1Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada 2Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems group, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa Correspondence*: Terrence C. Stewart Centre...

  10. Investible benchmarks & hedge fund liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Marc S; McMillan, Ben

    2011-01-01

    A lack of commonly accepted benchmarks for hedge fund performance has permitted hedge fund managers to attribute to skill returns that may actually accrue from market risk factors and illiquidity. Recent innovations in hedge fund replication permits us to estimate the extent of this misattribution. Using an option-based model, we find evidence that the value of liquidity options that investors implicitly grant managers when they invest may account for part or even all hedge fund returns. C...

  11. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models

  12. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models.

  13. Argonne Code Center: Benchmark problem book.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-06-01

    This book is an outgrowth of activities of the Computational Benchmark Problems Committee of the Mathematics and Computation Division of the American Nuclear Society. This is the second supplement of the original benchmark book which was first published in February, 1968 and contained computational benchmark problems in four different areas. Supplement No. 1, which was published in December, 1972, contained corrections to the original benchmark book plus additional problems in three new areas. The current supplement. Supplement No. 2, contains problems in eight additional new areas. The objectives of computational benchmark work and the procedures used by the committee in pursuing the objectives are outlined in the original edition of the benchmark book (ANL-7416, February, 1968). The members of the committee who have made contributions to Supplement No. 2 are listed below followed by the contributors to the earlier editions of the benchmark book.

  14. Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  15. BENCHMARKING ORTEC ISOTOPIC MEASUREMENTS AND CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R; Raymond Sigg, R; Vito Casella, V; Nitin Bhatt, N

    2008-09-29

    This report represents a description of compiled benchmark tests conducted to probe and to demonstrate the extensive utility of the Ortec ISOTOPIC {gamma}-ray analysis computer program. The ISOTOPIC program performs analyses of {gamma}-ray spectra applied to specific acquisition configurations in order to apply finite-geometry correction factors and sample-matrix-container photon absorption correction factors. The analysis program provides an extensive set of preset acquisition configurations to which the user can add relevant parameters in order to build the geometry and absorption correction factors that the program determines from calculus and from nuclear g-ray absorption and scatter data. The Analytical Development Section field nuclear measurement group of the Savannah River National Laboratory uses the Ortec ISOTOPIC analysis program extensively for analyses of solid waste and process holdup applied to passive {gamma}-ray acquisitions. Frequently the results of these {gamma}-ray acquisitions and analyses are to determine compliance with facility criticality safety guidelines. Another use of results is to designate 55-gallon drum solid waste as qualified TRU waste3 or as low-level waste. Other examples of the application of the ISOTOPIC analysis technique to passive {gamma}-ray acquisitions include analyses of standard waste box items and unique solid waste configurations. In many passive {gamma}-ray acquisition circumstances the container and sample have sufficient density that the calculated energy-dependent transmission correction factors have intrinsic uncertainties in the range 15%-100%. This is frequently the case when assaying 55-gallon drums of solid waste with masses of up to 400 kg and when assaying solid waste in extensive unique containers. Often an accurate assay of the transuranic content of these containers is not required, but rather a good defensible designation as >100 nCi/g (TRU waste) or <100 nCi/g (low level solid waste) is required. In

  16. Benchmarking strategies for measuring the quality of healthcare: problems and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovaglio, Pietro Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, increasing attention has been directed toward the problems inherent to measuring the quality of healthcare and implementing benchmarking strategies. Besides offering accreditation and certification processes, recent approaches measure the performance of healthcare institutions in order to evaluate their effectiveness, defined as the capacity to provide treatment that modifies and improves the patient's state of health. This paper, dealing with hospital effectiveness, focuses on research methods for effectiveness analyses within a strategy comparing different healthcare institutions. The paper, after having introduced readers to the principle debates on benchmarking strategies, which depend on the perspective and type of indicators used, focuses on the methodological problems related to performing consistent benchmarking analyses. Particularly, statistical methods suitable for controlling case-mix, analyzing aggregate data, rare events, and continuous outcomes measured with error are examined. Specific challenges of benchmarking strategies, such as the risk of risk adjustment (case-mix fallacy, underreporting, risk of comparing noncomparable hospitals), selection bias, and possible strategies for the development of consistent benchmarking analyses, are discussed. Finally, to demonstrate the feasibility of the illustrated benchmarking strategies, an application focused on determining regional benchmarks for patient satisfaction (using 2009 Lombardy Region Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire) is proposed.

  17. Benchmarking Strategies for Measuring the Quality of Healthcare: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovaglio, Pietro Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, increasing attention has been directed toward the problems inherent to measuring the quality of healthcare and implementing benchmarking strategies. Besides offering accreditation and certification processes, recent approaches measure the performance of healthcare institutions in order to evaluate their effectiveness, defined as the capacity to provide treatment that modifies and improves the patient's state of health. This paper, dealing with hospital effectiveness, focuses on research methods for effectiveness analyses within a strategy comparing different healthcare institutions. The paper, after having introduced readers to the principle debates on benchmarking strategies, which depend on the perspective and type of indicators used, focuses on the methodological problems related to performing consistent benchmarking analyses. Particularly, statistical methods suitable for controlling case-mix, analyzing aggregate data, rare events, and continuous outcomes measured with error are examined. Specific challenges of benchmarking strategies, such as the risk of risk adjustment (case-mix fallacy, underreporting, risk of comparing noncomparable hospitals), selection bias, and possible strategies for the development of consistent benchmarking analyses, are discussed. Finally, to demonstrate the feasibility of the illustrated benchmarking strategies, an application focused on determining regional benchmarks for patient satisfaction (using 2009 Lombardy Region Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire) is proposed. PMID:22666140

  18. Benchmarking Analysis of Institutional University Autonomy in Denmark, Lithuania, Romania, Scotland, and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents a benchmark, comparative analysis of institutional university autonomy in Denmark, Lithuania, Romania, Scotland and Sweden. These countries are partners in a EU TEMPUS funded project 'Enhancing University Autonomy in Moldova' (EUniAM). This benchmark analysis was conducted...... by the EUniAM Lead Task Force team that collected and analysed secondary and primary data in each of these countries and produced four benchmark reports that are part of this book. For each dimension and interface of institutional university autonomy, the members of the Lead Task Force team identified...... respective evaluation criteria and searched for similarities and differences in approaches to higher education sectors and respective autonomy regimes in these countries. The consolidated report that precedes the benchmark reports summarises the process and key findings from the four benchmark reports...

  19. Melcor benchmarking against integral severe fuel damage tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated computer code that models all phases of the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants, and is being developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a program with the NRC to provide independent assessment of MELCOR, and a very important part of this program is to benchmark MELCOR against experimental data from integral severe fuel damage tests and predictions of that data from more mechanistic codes such as SCDAP or SCDAP/RELAP5. Benchmarking analyses with MELCOR have been carried out at BNL for five integral severe fuel damage tests, namely, PBF SFD 1-1, SFD 14, and NRU FLHT-2, analyses, and their role in identifying areas of modeling strengths and weaknesses in MELCOR.

  20. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Sally; Rarick, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking was very interesting and provided a wealth of information (1) We did see potential solutions to some of our "top 10" issues (2) We have an assessment of where NASA stands with relation to other aerospace/defense groups We formed new contacts and potential collaborations (1) Several organizations sent us examples of their templates, processes (2) Many of the organizations were interested in future collaboration: sharing of training, metrics, Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) appraisers, instructors, etc. We received feedback from some of our contractors/ partners (1) Desires to participate in our training; provide feedback on procedures (2) Welcomed opportunity to provide feedback on working with NASA

  1. NEACRP thermal fission product benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.; Taubman, C.J.

    1989-09-01

    The objective of the thermal fission product benchmark was to compare the range of fission product data in use at the present time. A simple homogeneous problem was set with 200 atoms H/1 atom U235, to be burnt up to 1000 days and then decay for 1000 days. The problem was repeated with 200 atoms H/1 atom Pu239, 20 atoms H/1 atom U235 and 20 atoms H/1 atom Pu239. There were ten participants and the submissions received are detailed in this report. (author)

  2. Benchmark neutron porosity log calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Michael, M.; Verghese, K.; Gardner, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations have been made for a benchmark neutron porosity log problem with the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP and the specific purpose Monte Carlo code McDNL. For accuracy and timing comparison purposes the CRAY XMP and MicroVax II computers have been used with these codes. The CRAY has been used for an analog version of the MCNP code while the MicroVax II has been used for the optimized variance reduction versions of both codes. Results indicate that the two codes give the same results within calculated standard deviations. Comparisons are given and discussed for accuracy (precision) and computation times for the two codes

  3. 3-D extension C5G7 MOX benchmark calculation using threedant code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.Ch.; Han, Ch.Y.; Kim, J.K.; Na, B.Ch.

    2005-01-01

    It pursued the benchmark on deterministic 3-D MOX fuel assembly transport calculations without spatial homogenization (C5G7 MOX Benchmark Extension). The goal of this benchmark is to provide a more through test results for the abilities of current available 3-D methods to handle the spatial heterogeneities of reactor core. The benchmark requires solutions in the form of normalized pin powers as well as the eigenvalue for each of the control rod configurations; without rod, with A rods, and with B rods. In this work, the DANTSYS code package was applied to analyze the 3-D Extension C5G7 MOX Benchmark problems. The THREEDANT code within the DANTSYS code package, which solves the 3-D transport equation in x-y-z, and r-z-theta geometries, was employed to perform the benchmark calculations. To analyze the benchmark with the THREEDANT code, proper spatial and angular approximations were made. Several calculations were performed to investigate the effects of the different spatial approximations on the accuracy. The results from these sensitivity studies were analyzed and discussed. From the results, it is found that the 4*4 grid per pin cell is sufficiently refined so that very little benefit is obtained by increasing the mesh size. (authors)

  4. Benchmark Analysis of EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    This publication presents the results and main achievements of an IAEA coordinated research project to verify and validate system and safety codes used in the analyses of liquid metal thermal hydraulics and neutronics phenomena in sodium cooled fast reactors. The publication will be of use to the researchers and professionals currently working on relevant fast reactors programmes. In addition, it is intended to support the training of the next generation of analysts and designers through international benchmark exercises

  5. Experimental Benchmarking of Fire Modeling Simulations. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, Miles; Lopez, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    A series of large-scale fire tests were performed at Sandia National Laboratories to simulate a nuclear waste transport package under severe accident conditions. The test data were used to benchmark and adjust the Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code. CAFE is a computational fluid dynamics fire model that accurately calculates the heat transfer from a large fire to a massive engulfed transport package. CAFE will be used in transport package design studies and risk analyses

  6. Discrepancies in Communication Versus Documentation of Weight-Management Benchmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy B. Turer MD, MHS

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To examine gaps in communication versus documentation of weight-management clinical practices, communication was recorded during primary care visits with 6- to 12-year-old overweight/obese Latino children. Communication/documentation content was coded by 3 reviewers using communication transcripts and health-record documentation. Discrepancies in communication/documentation content codes were resolved through consensus. Bivariate/multivariable analyses examined factors associated with discrepancies in benchmark communication/documentation. Benchmarks were neither communicated nor documented in up to 42% of visits, and communicated but not documented or documented but not communicated in up to 20% of visits. Lowest benchmark performance rates were for laboratory studies (35% and nutrition/weight-management referrals (42%. In multivariable analysis, overweight (vs obesity was associated with 1.6 more discrepancies in communication versus documentation (P = .03. Many weight-management benchmarks are not met, not documented, or performed without being communicated. Enhanced communication with families and documentation in health records may promote lifestyle changes in overweight children and higher quality care for overweight children in primary care.

  7. Reevaluation of the Jezebel Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Every nuclear engineering student is familiar with Jezebel, the homogeneous bare sphere of plutonium first assembled at Los Alamos in 1954-1955. The actual Jezebel assembly was neither homogeneous, nor bare, nor spherical; nor was it singular – there were hundreds of Jezebel configurations assembled. The Jezebel benchmark has been reevaluated for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Logbooks, original drawings, mass accountability statements, internal reports, and published reports have been used to model four actual three-dimensional Jezebel assemblies with high fidelity. Because the documentation available today is often inconsistent, three major assumptions were made regarding plutonium part masses and dimensions. The first was that the assembly masses given in Los Alamos report LA-4208 (1969) were correct, and the second was that the original drawing dimension for the polar height of a certain major part was correct. The third assumption was that a change notice indicated on the original drawing was not actually implemented. This talk will describe these assumptions, the alternatives, and the implications. Since the publication of the 2013 ICSBEP Handbook, the actual masses of the major components have turned up. Our assumption regarding the assembly masses was proven correct, but we had the mass distribution incorrect. Work to incorporate the new information is ongoing, and this talk will describe the latest assessment.

  8. SCWEB, Scientific Workstation Evaluation Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffenetti, R C [Computing Services-Support Services Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    1988-06-16

    1 - Description of program or function: The SCWEB (Scientific Workstation Evaluation Benchmark) software includes 16 programs which are executed in a well-defined scenario to measure the following performance capabilities of a scientific workstation: implementation of FORTRAN77, processor speed, memory management, disk I/O, monitor (or display) output, scheduling of processing (multiprocessing), and scheduling of print tasks (spooling). 2 - Method of solution: The benchmark programs are: DK1, DK2, and DK3, which do Fourier series fitting based on spline techniques; JC1, which checks the FORTRAN function routines which produce numerical results; JD1 and JD2, which solve dense systems of linear equations in double- and single-precision, respectively; JD3 and JD4, which perform matrix multiplication in single- and double-precision, respectively; RB1, RB2, and RB3, which perform substantial amounts of I/O processing on files other than the input and output files; RR1, which does intense single-precision floating-point multiplication in a tight loop, RR2, which initializes a 512x512 integer matrix in a manner which skips around in the address space rather than initializing each consecutive memory cell in turn; RR3, which writes alternating text buffers to the output file; RR4, which evaluates the timer routines and demonstrates that they conform to the specification; and RR5, which determines whether the workstation is capable of executing a 4-megabyte program

  9. Pynamic: the Python Dynamic Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, G L; Ahn, D H; de Supinksi, B R; Gyllenhaal, J C; Miller, P J

    2007-07-10

    Python is widely used in scientific computing to facilitate application development and to support features such as computational steering. Making full use of some of Python's popular features, which improve programmer productivity, leads to applications that access extremely high numbers of dynamically linked libraries (DLLs). As a result, some important Python-based applications severely stress a system's dynamic linking and loading capabilities and also cause significant difficulties for most development environment tools, such as debuggers. Furthermore, using the Python paradigm for large scale MPI-based applications can create significant file IO and further stress tools and operating systems. In this paper, we present Pynamic, the first benchmark program to support configurable emulation of a wide-range of the DLL usage of Python-based applications for large scale systems. Pynamic has already accurately reproduced system software and tool issues encountered by important large Python-based scientific applications on our supercomputers. Pynamic provided insight for our system software and tool vendors, and our application developers, into the impact of several design decisions. As we describe the Pynamic benchmark, we will highlight some of the issues discovered in our large scale system software and tools using Pynamic.

  10. The Isprs Benchmark on Indoor Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshelham, K.; Díaz Vilariño, L.; Peter, M.; Kang, Z.; Acharya, D.

    2017-09-01

    Automated generation of 3D indoor models from point cloud data has been a topic of intensive research in recent years. While results on various datasets have been reported in literature, a comparison of the performance of different methods has not been possible due to the lack of benchmark datasets and a common evaluation framework. The ISPRS benchmark on indoor modelling aims to address this issue by providing a public benchmark dataset and an evaluation framework for performance comparison of indoor modelling methods. In this paper, we present the benchmark dataset comprising several point clouds of indoor environments captured by different sensors. We also discuss the evaluation and comparison of indoor modelling methods based on manually created reference models and appropriate quality evaluation criteria. The benchmark dataset is available for download at: html"target="_blank">http://www2.isprs.org/commissions/comm4/wg5/benchmark-on-indoor-modelling.html.

  11. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is the result of phase 3 BN-600 core benchmark problem, meaning burnup and heterogeneity. Analytical method applied consisted of: JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library, group constants (70 group, ABBN type self shielding transport factors), heterogeneous cell model for fuel and control rod, basic diffusion calculation (CITATION code), transport theory and mesh size correction (NSHEX code based on SN transport nodal method developed by JNC). Burnup and heterogeneity calculation results are presented obtained by applying both diffusion and transport approach for beginning and end of cycle

  12. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark - Steady-state results and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Han, J.; Ivanov, K.; Sartori, E.

    2008-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated. Since only a few pebble-bed HTR experimental facilities or plant data are available the use of code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MW design and a representative set of transient cases is defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well-defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross-sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The OECD benchmark includes steady-state and transients cases. Although the focus of the benchmark is on the modelling of the transient behaviour of the PBMR core, it was also necessary to define some steady-state cases to ensure consistency between the different approaches before results of transient cases could be compared. This paper describes the status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the three steady state exercises defined as a standalone neutronics calculation, a standalone thermal-hydraulic core calculation, and a coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulic simulation. (authors)

  13. Nuclear data uncertainties for local power densities in the Martin-Hoogenboom benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Marck, S.C.; Rochman, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The recently developed method of fast Total Monte Carlo to propagate nuclear data uncertainties was applied to the Martin-Hoogenboom benchmark. This Martin- Hoogenboom benchmark prescribes that one calculates local pin powers (of light water cooled reactor) with a statistical uncertainty lower than 1% everywhere. Here we report, for the first time, an estimate of the nuclear data uncertainties for these local pin powers. For each of the more than 6 million local power tallies, the uncertainty due to nuclear data uncertainties was calculated, based on random variation of data for 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and H in H 2 O thermal scattering. In the center of the core region, the nuclear data uncertainty is 0.9%. Towards the edges of the core, this uncertainty increases to roughly 3%. The nuclear data uncertainties have been shown to be larger than the statistical uncertainties that the benchmark prescribes

  14. Analysis of a molten salt reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Biplab; Bajpai, Anil; Degweker, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses results of our studies of an IAEA molten salt reactor (MSR) benchmark. The benchmark, proposed by Japan, involves burnup calculations of a single lattice cell of a MSR for burning plutonium and other minor actinides. We have analyzed this cell with in-house developed burnup codes BURNTRAN and McBURN. This paper also presents a comparison of the results of our codes and those obtained by the proposers of the benchmark. (author)

  15. Benchmarking i eksternt regnskab og revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Frank; Kiertzner, Lars

    2001-01-01

    løbende i en benchmarking-proces. Dette kapitel vil bredt undersøge, hvor man med nogen ret kan få benchmarking-begrebet knyttet til eksternt regnskab og revision. Afsnit 7.1 beskæftiger sig med det eksterne årsregnskab, mens afsnit 7.2 tager fat i revisionsområdet. Det sidste afsnit i kapitlet opsummerer...... betragtningerne om benchmarking i forbindelse med begge områder....

  16. Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 101 NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database is a collection of experimental and ab initio thermochemical properties for a selected set of molecules. The goals are to provide a benchmark set of molecules for the evaluation of ab initio computational methods and allow the comparison between different ab initio computational methods for the prediction of thermochemical properties.

  17. SARNET2 benchmark on air ingress experiments QUENCH-10, -16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Moguel, Leticia; Bals, Christine; Beuzet, Emilie; Bratfisch, Christian; Coindreau, Olivia; Hózer, Zoltan; Stuckert, Juri; Vasiliev, Alexander; Vryashkova, Petya

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Two similar QUENCH air ingress experiments were analysed with eight different codes. • Eight institutions have participated in the study. • Differences in the code were mostly small to moderate during the pre-oxidation. • Differences in the code were larger during the air phase. • Study has proven that there are physical processes that should be further studied. - Abstract: The QUENCH-10 (Q-10) and QUENCH-16 (Q-16) experiments were chosen as a SARNET2 code benchmark (SARNET2-COOL-D5.4) exercise to assess the status of modelling air ingress sequences and to compare the capabilities of the various codes used for accident analyses, specifically ATHLET-CD (GRS and RUB), ICARE-CATHARE (IRSN), MAAP (EDF), MELCOR (INRNE and PSI), SOCRAT (IBRAE), and RELAP/SCDAPSim (PSI). Both experiments addressed air ingress into an overheated core following earlier partial oxidation in steam. Q-10 was performed with extensive preoxidation, moderate/high air flow rate and high temperatures at onset of reflood (max T pct = 2200 K), while Q-16 was performed with limited preoxidation, low air flow rate and relative low temperatures at reflood initiation (max T pct = 1870 K). Variables relating to the major signatures (thermal response, hydrogen generation, oxide layer development, oxygen and nitrogen consumption and reflood behaviour) were compared globally and/or at selected locations. In each simulation, the same input models and assumptions are used for both experiments, differing only in respect of the boundary conditions. However, some slight idealisations were made to the assumed boundary conditions in order to avoid ambiguities in the code-to-code comparisons; in this way, it was possible to focus more easily on the key phenomena and hence make the results of the exercise more transparent. Remarks are made concerning the capability of physical modelling within the codes, description of the experiment facility and test conduct as specified in the code input

  18. Aerodynamic Benchmarking of the Deepwind Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedona, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic benchmarking for the DeepWind rotor is conducted comparing different rotor geometries and solutions and keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective for the benchmarking is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize the power production and minimize...... the blade solicitation and the cost of energy. Different parameters are considered for the benchmarking study. The DeepWind blade is characterized by a shape similar to the Troposkien geometry but asymmetric between the top and bottom parts: this shape is considered as a fixed parameter in the benchmarking...

  19. HPC Benchmark Suite NMx, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Automation Inc., (IAI) and University of Central Florida (UCF) propose to develop a comprehensive numerical test suite for benchmarking current and...

  20. High Energy Physics (HEP) benchmark program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasu, Yoshiji; Ichii, Shingo; Yashiro, Shigeo; Hirayama, Hideo; Kokufuda, Akihiro; Suzuki, Eishin.

    1993-01-01

    High Energy Physics (HEP) benchmark programs are indispensable tools to select suitable computer for HEP application system. Industry standard benchmark programs can not be used for this kind of particular selection. The CERN and the SSC benchmark suite are famous HEP benchmark programs for this purpose. The CERN suite includes event reconstruction and event generator programs, while the SSC one includes event generators. In this paper, we found that the results from these two suites are not consistent. And, the result from the industry benchmark does not agree with either of these two. Besides, we describe comparison of benchmark results using EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation program with ones from two HEP benchmark suites. Then, we found that the result from EGS4 in not consistent with the two ones. The industry standard of SPECmark values on various computer systems are not consistent with the EGS4 results either. Because of these inconsistencies, we point out the necessity of a standardization of HEP benchmark suites. Also, EGS4 benchmark suite should be developed for users of applications such as medical science, nuclear power plant, nuclear physics and high energy physics. (author)

  1. Establishing benchmarks and metrics for utilization management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Stacy E F

    2014-01-01

    The changing environment of healthcare reimbursement is rapidly leading to a renewed appreciation of the importance of utilization management in the clinical laboratory. The process of benchmarking of laboratory operations is well established for comparing organizational performance to other hospitals (peers) and for trending data over time through internal benchmarks. However, there are relatively few resources available to assist organizations in benchmarking for laboratory utilization management. This article will review the topic of laboratory benchmarking with a focus on the available literature and services to assist in managing physician requests for laboratory testing. © 2013.

  2. Professional Performance and Bureaucratic Benchmarking Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Melanie L.; Mahlendorf, Matthias D.; Schäffer, Utz

    Prior research documents positive effects of benchmarking information provision on performance and attributes this to social comparisons. However, the effects on professional recipients are unclear. Studies of professional control indicate that professional recipients often resist bureaucratic...... controls because of organizational-professional conflicts. We therefore analyze the association between bureaucratic benchmarking information provision and professional performance and suggest that the association is more positive if prior professional performance was low. We test our hypotheses based...... on archival, publicly disclosed, professional performance data for 191 German orthopedics departments, matched with survey data on bureaucratic benchmarking information given to chief orthopedists by the administration. We find a positive association between bureaucratic benchmarking information provision...

  3. Performance Benchmarking of Fast Multipole Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Harthi, Noha A.

    2013-06-01

    The current trends in computer architecture are shifting towards smaller byte/flop ratios, while available parallelism is increasing at all levels of granularity – vector length, core count, and MPI process. Intel’s Xeon Phi coprocessor, NVIDIA’s Kepler GPU, and IBM’s BlueGene/Q all have a Byte/flop ratio close to 0.2, which makes it very difficult for most algorithms to extract a high percentage of the theoretical peak flop/s from these architectures. Popular algorithms in scientific computing such as FFT are continuously evolving to keep up with this trend in hardware. In the meantime it is also necessary to invest in novel algorithms that are more suitable for computer architectures of the future. The fast multipole method (FMM) was originally developed as a fast algorithm for ap- proximating the N-body interactions that appear in astrophysics, molecular dynamics, and vortex based fluid dynamics simulations. The FMM possesses have a unique combination of being an efficient O(N) algorithm, while having an operational intensity that is higher than a matrix-matrix multiplication. In fact, the FMM can reduce the requirement of Byte/flop to around 0.01, which means that it will remain compute bound until 2020 even if the cur- rent trend in microprocessors continues. Despite these advantages, there have not been any benchmarks of FMM codes on modern architectures such as Xeon Phi, Kepler, and Blue- Gene/Q. This study aims to provide a comprehensive benchmark of a state of the art FMM code “exaFMM” on the latest architectures, in hopes of providing a useful reference for deciding when the FMM will become useful as the computational engine in a given application code. It may also serve as a warning to certain problem size domains areas where the FMM will exhibit insignificant performance improvements. Such issues depend strongly on the asymptotic constants rather than the asymptotics themselves, and therefore are strongly implementation and hardware

  4. Benchmark test of evaluated nuclear data files for fast reactor neutronics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go; Hazama, Taira; Iwai, Takehiko; Numata, Kazuyuki

    2007-07-01

    A benchmark test of the latest evaluated nuclear data files, JENDL-3.3, JEFF-3.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0, has been carried out for fast reactor neutronics application. For this benchmark test, experimental data obtained at fast critical assemblies and fast power reactors are utilized. In addition to comparing of numerical solutions with the experimental data, we have extracted several cross sections, in which differences between three nuclear data files affect significantly numerical solutions, by virtue of sensitivity analyses. This benchmark test concludes that ENDF/B-VII.0 predicts well the neutronics characteristics of fast neutron systems rather than the other nuclear data files. (author)

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of OECD Benchmark Tests in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmidt, Rodney C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williamson, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on sensitivity analysis of a fuels performance benchmark problem. The benchmark problem was defined by the Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling working group of the Nuclear Science Committee, part of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD ). The benchmark problem involv ed steady - state behavior of a fuel pin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The problem was created in the BISON Fuels Performance code. Dakota was used to generate and analyze 300 samples of 17 input parameters defining core boundary conditions, manuf acturing tolerances , and fuel properties. There were 24 responses of interest, including fuel centerline temperatures at a variety of locations and burnup levels, fission gas released, axial elongation of the fuel pin, etc. Pearson and Spearman correlatio n coefficients and Sobol' variance - based indices were used to perform the sensitivity analysis. This report summarizes the process and presents results from this study.

  6. Summary of the First Workshop on OECD/NRC boiling water reactor turbine trip benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. This first workshop was focused on technical issues connected with the first draft of

  7. FENDL neutronics benchmark: Specifications for the calculational neutronics and shielding benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    During the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''Improved Evaluations and Integral Data Testing for FENDL'' held in Garching near Munich, Germany in the period 12-16 September 1994, the Working Group II on ''Experimental and Calculational Benchmarks on Fusion Neutronics for ITER'' recommended that a calculational benchmark representative of the ITER design should be developed. This report describes the neutronics and shielding calculational benchmark available for scientists interested in performing analysis for this benchmark. (author)

  8. Beyond-CMOS Device Benchmarking for Boolean and Non-Boolean Logic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Chenyun; Naeemi, Azad

    2017-01-01

    The latest results of benchmarking research are presented for a variety of beyond-CMOS charge- and spin-based devices. In addition to improving the device-level models, several new device proposals and a few majorly modified devices are investigated. Deep pipelining circuits are employed to boost the throughput of low-power devices. Furthermore, the benchmarking methodology is extended to interconnect-centric analyses and non-Boolean logic applications. In contrast to Boolean circuits, non-Bo...

  9. Three-Dimensional (X,Y,Z) Deterministic Analysis of the PCA-Replica Neutron Shielding Benchmark Experiment using the TORT-3.2 Code and Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Pescarini Massimo; Orsi Roberto; Frisoni Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The PCA-Replica 12/13 (H2O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmark experiment was analysed using the ORNL TORT-3.2 3D SN code. PCA-Replica, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes employed in LWR shielding and radiation damage calculations, reproduces a PWR ex-core radial geometry with alternate layers of water and steel including a PWR pressure vessel simulator. Three broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format with ...

  10. Validation of the BUGJEFF311.BOLIB, BUGENDF70.BOLIB and BUGLE-B7 broad-group libraries on the PCA-Replica (H2O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmark experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Pescarini Massimo; Orsi Roberto; Frisoni Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The PCA-Replica 12/13 (H2O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmark experiment was analysed using the TORT-3.2 3D SN code. PCA-Replica reproduces a PWR ex-core radial geometry with alternate layers of water and steel including a pressure vessel simulator. Three broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format with the same energy group structure (47 n + 20 γ) and based on different nuclear data were alternatively used: the ENEA BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and U...

  11. Human factors reliability Benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poucet, A.

    1989-06-01

    The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has organized a Human Factors Reliability Benchmark Exercise (HF-RBE) with the aim of assessing the state of the art in human reliability modelling and assessment. Fifteen teams from eleven countries, representing industry, utilities, licensing organisations and research institutes, participated in the HF-RBE. The HF-RBE was organized around two study cases: (1) analysis of routine functional Test and Maintenance (T and M) procedures: with the aim of assessing the probability of test induced failures, the probability of failures to remain unrevealed and the potential to initiate transients because of errors performed in the test; (2) analysis of human actions during an operational transient: with the aim of assessing the probability that the operators will correctly diagnose the malfunctions and take proper corrective action. This report contains the final summary reports produced by the participants in the exercise

  12. Experimental and computational benchmark tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, D.M.; Briesmeister, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    A program involving principally NIST, LANL, and ORNL has been in progress for about four years now to establish a series of benchmark measurements and calculations related to the moderation and leakage of 252 Cf neutrons from a source surrounded by spherical aqueous moderators of various thicknesses and compositions. The motivation for these studies comes from problems in criticality calculations concerning arrays of multiplying components, where the leakage from one component acts as a source for the other components. This talk compares experimental and calculated values for the fission rates of four nuclides - 235 U, 239 Pu, 238 U, and 237 Np - in the leakage spectrum from moderator spheres of diameters 76.2 mm, 101.6 mm, and 127.0 mm, with either pure water or enriched B-10 solutions as the moderator. Very detailed Monte Carlo calculations were done with the MCNP code, using a open-quotes light waterclose quotes S(α,β) scattering kernel

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL BENCHMARKING FOR LOCAL AUTHORITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela GHEREŞ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to clarify and present the many definitions ofbenchmarking. It also attempts to explain the basic steps of benchmarking, toshow how this tool can be applied by local authorities as well as to discuss itspotential benefits and limitations. It is our strong belief that if cities useindicators and progressively introduce targets to improve management andrelated urban life quality, and to measure progress towards more sustainabledevelopment, we will also create a new type of competition among cities andfoster innovation. This is seen to be important because local authorities’actions play a vital role in responding to the challenges of enhancing thestate of the environment not only in policy-making, but also in the provision ofservices and in the planning process. Local communities therefore need tobe aware of their own sustainability performance levels and should be able toengage in exchange of best practices to respond effectively to the ecoeconomicalchallenges of the century.

  14. Benchmark results in radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.D.M.; Siewert, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    Several aspects of the F N method are reported, and the method is used to solve accurately some benchmark problems in radiative transfer in the field of atmospheric physics. The method was modified to solve cases of pure scattering and an improved process was developed for computing the radiation intensity. An algorithms for computing several quantities used in the F N method was done. An improved scheme to evaluate certain integrals relevant to the method is done, and a two-term recursion relation that has proved useful for the numerical evaluation of matrix elements, basic for the method, is given. The methods used to solve the encountered linear algebric equations are discussed, and the numerical results are evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Solution of the fifth dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem using the coupled code DIN3/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1998-01-01

    The fifth dynamic benchmark is the first benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three dimensional hexagonal neutron kinetic core models. In this benchmark the interaction between the components of a WWER-440 NPP with the reactor core has been investigated. The initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and the shutdown conditions with one control rod group s tucking. This break causes an overcooling of the primary circuit. During this overcooling the scram reactivity is compensated and the scrammed reactor becomes re critical. The calculation was continued until the highly-borated water from the high pressure injection system terminated the power excursion. Several aspects of the very complex and complicated benchmark problem are analyzed in detail. Sensitivity studies with different hydraulic parameters are made. The influence on the course of the transient and on the solution is discussed.(Author)

  16. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarick, Heather L.; Godfrey, Sara H.; Kelly, John C.; Crumbley, Robert T.; Wifl, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    To identify best practices for the improvement of software engineering on projects, NASA's Offices of Chief Engineer (OCE) and Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) formed a team led by Heather Rarick and Sally Godfrey to conduct this benchmarking study. The primary goals of the study are to identify best practices that: Improve the management and technical development of software intensive systems; Have a track record of successful deployment by aerospace industries, universities [including research and development (R&D) laboratories], and defense services, as well as NASA's own component Centers; and Identify candidate solutions for NASA's software issues. Beginning in the late fall of 2010, focus topics were chosen and interview questions were developed, based on the NASA top software challenges. Between February 2011 and November 2011, the Benchmark Team interviewed a total of 18 organizations, consisting of five NASA Centers, five industry organizations, four defense services organizations, and four university or university R and D laboratory organizations. A software assurance representative also participated in each of the interviews to focus on assurance and software safety best practices. Interviewees provided a wealth of information on each topic area that included: software policy, software acquisition, software assurance, testing, training, maintaining rigor in small projects, metrics, and use of the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) framework, as well as a number of special topics that came up in the discussions. NASA's software engineering practices compared favorably with the external organizations in most benchmark areas, but in every topic, there were ways in which NASA could improve its practices. Compared to defense services organizations and some of the industry organizations, one of NASA's notable weaknesses involved communication with contractors regarding its policies and requirements for acquired software. One of NASA's strengths

  17. Development and verification of an efficient spatial neutron kinetics method for reactivity-initiated event analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hideaki; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2001-01-01

    A space/time nodal diffusion code based on the nodal expansion method (NEM), EPISODE, was developed in order to evaluate transient neutron behavior in light water reactor cores. The present code employs the improved quasistatic (IQS) method for spatial neutron kinetics, and neutron flux distribution is numerically obtained by solving the neutron diffusion equation with the nonlinear iteration scheme to achieve fast computation. A predictor-corrector (PC) method developed in the present study enabled to apply a coarse time mesh to the transient spatial neutron calculation than that applicable in the conventional IQS model, which improved computational efficiency further. Its computational advantage was demonstrated by applying to the numerical benchmark problems that simulate reactivity-initiated events, showing reduction of computational times up to a factor of three than the conventional IQS. The thermohydraulics model was also incorporated in EPISODE, and the capability of realistic reactivity event analyses was verified using the SPERT-III/E-Core experimental data. (author)

  18. Nonlinear Resonance Benchmarking Experiment at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, I; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Martini, M; Métral, Elias

    2003-01-01

    As a first step of a space charge - nonlinear resonance benchmarking experiment over a large number of turns, beam loss and emittance evolution were measured over 1 s on a 1.4 GeV kinetic energy flat-bottom in the presence of a single octupole. By lowering the working point towards the resonance a gradual transition from a loss-free core emittance blow-up to a regime dominated by continuous loss was found. Our 3D simulations with analytical space charge show that trapping on the resonance due to synchrotron oscillation causes the observed core emittance growth as well as halo formation, where the latter is explained as the source of the observed loss.

  19. Jendl-3.1 iron validation on the PCA-REPLICA (H2O/Fe) shielding benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescarini, M.; Borgia, M. G.

    1997-03-01

    The PCA-REPLICA (H 2 O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmarks experiment is analysed using the SN 2-D DOT 3.5-E code and the 3-D-equivalent flux synthesis method. This engineering benchmark reproduces the ex-core radial geometry of a PWR, including a mild steel reactor pressure vessel (RPV) simulator, and is designed to test the accuracy of the calculation of the in-vessel neutron exposure parameters. This accuracy is strongly dependent on the quality of the iron neutron cross sections used to describe the nuclear reactions within the RPV simulator. In particular, in this report, the cross sections based on the JENDL-3.1 iron data files are tested, through a comparison of the calculated integral and spectral results with the corresponding experimental data. In addition, the present results are compared, on the same benchmark experiment, with those of a preceding ENEA-Bologna validation of the ENDF/B VI iron cross sections. The integral result comparison indicates that, for all the threshold detectors considered (Rh-103 (n, n') Rh-103m, In-115 (n, n') In-115m and S-32 (n, p) P-32), the JENDL-3.1 natural iron data produce satisfactory results similar to those obtained with the ENDF/B VI iron data. On the contrary, when the JENDL/3.1 Fe-56 data file is used, strongly underestimated results are obtained for the lower energy threshold detectors, Rh-103 and In-115. This fact, in particular, becomes more evident with increasing the neutron penetration depth in the RPV simulator

  20. Shielding benchmark tests of JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hasegawa, Akira; Ueki, Kohtaro; Yamano, Naoki; Sasaki, Kenji; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Morio; Ohtani, Nobuo; Sakurai, Kiyoshi.

    1994-03-01

    The integral test of neutron cross sections for major shielding materials in JENDL-3 has been performed by analyzing various shielding benchmark experiments. For the fission-like neutron source problem, the following experiments are analyzed: (1) ORNL Broomstick experiments for oxygen, iron and sodium, (2) ASPIS deep penetration experiments for iron, (3) ORNL neutron transmission experiments for iron, stainless steel, sodium and graphite, (4) KfK leakage spectrum measurements from iron spheres, (5) RPI angular neutron spectrum measurements in a graphite block. For D-T neutron source problem, the following two experiments are analyzed: (6) LLNL leakage spectrum measurements from spheres of iron and graphite, and (7) JAERI-FNS angular neutron spectrum measurements on beryllium and graphite slabs. Analyses have been performed using the radiation transport codes: ANISN(1D Sn), DIAC(1D Sn), DOT3.5(2D Sn) and MCNP(3D point Monte Carlo). The group cross sections for Sn transport calculations are generated with the code systems PROF-GROUCH-G/B and RADHEAT-V4. The point-wise cross sections for MCNP are produced with NJOY. For comparison, the analyses with JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV have been also carried out. The calculations using JENDL-3 show overall agreement with the experimental data as well as those with ENDF/B-IV. Particularly, JENDL-3 gives better results than JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV for sodium. It has been concluded that JENDL-3 is very applicable for fission and fusion reactor shielding analyses. (author)

  1. The fifth Atomic Energy Research dynamic benchmark calculation with HEXTRAN-SMABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenaelaeinen, Anitta

    1998-01-01

    The fifth Atomic Energy Research dynamic benchmark is the first Atomic Energy Research benchmark for coupling of the thermohydraulic codes and three-dimensional reactor dynamic core models. In VTT HEXTRAN 2.7 is used for the core dynamics and SMABRE 4.6 as a thermohydraulic model for the primary and secondary loops. The plant model for SMABRE is based mainly on two input models. the Loviisa model and standard WWER-440/213 plant model. The primary circuit includes six separate loops, totally 505 nodes and 652 junctions. The reactor pressure vessel is divided into six parallel channels. In HEXTRAN calculation 176 symmetry is used in the core. In the sequence of main steam header break at the hot standby state, the liquid temperature is decreased symmetrically in the core inlet which leads to return to power. In the benchmark, no isolations of the steam generators are assumed and the maximum core power is about 38 % of the nominal power at four minutes after the break opening in the HEXTRAN-SMABRE calculation. Due to boric acid in the high pressure safety injection water, the power finally starts to decrease. The break flow is pure steam in the HEXTRAN-SMABRE calculation during the whole transient even in the swell levels in the steam generators are very high due to flashing. Because of sudden peaks in the preliminary results of the steam generator heat transfer, the SMABRE drift-flux model was modified. The new model is a simplified version of the EPRI correlation based on test data. The modified correlation behaves smoothly. In the calculations nuclear data is based on the ENDF/B-IV library and it has been evaluated with the CASMO-HEX code. The importance of the nuclear data was illustrated by repeating the benchmark calculation with using three different data sets. Optimal extensive data valid from hot to cold conditions were not available for all types of fuel enrichments needed in this benchmark.(Author)

  2. A GFR benchmark comparison of transient analysis codes based on the ETDR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubelis, E.; Coddington, P.; Castelliti, D.; Dor, I.; Fouillet, C.; Geus, E. de; Marshall, T.D.; Van Rooijen, W.; Schikorr, M.; Stainsby, R.

    2007-01-01

    A GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) transient benchmark study was performed to investigate the ability of different code systems to calculate the transition in the core heat removal from the main circuit forced flow to natural circulation cooling using the Decay Heat Removal (DHR) system. This benchmark is based on a main blower failure in the Experimental Technology Demonstration Reactor (ETDR) with reactor scram. The codes taking part into the benchmark are: RELAP5, TRAC/AAA, CATHARE, SIM-ADS, MANTA and SPECTRA. For comparison purposes the benchmark was divided into several stages: the initial steady-state solution, the main blower flow run-down, the opening of the DHR loop and the transition to natural circulation and finally the 'quasi' steady heat removal from the core by the DHR system. The results submitted by the participants showed that all the codes gave consistent results for all four stages of the benchmark. In the steady-state the calculations revealed some differences in the clad and fuel temperatures, the core and main loop pressure drops and in the total Helium mass inventory. Also some disagreements were observed in the Helium and water flow rates in the DHR loop during the final natural circulation stage. Good agreement was observed for the total main blower flow rate and Helium temperature rise in the core, as well as for the Helium inlet temperature into the core. In order to understand the reason for the differences in the initial 'blind' calculations a second round of calculations was performed using a more precise set of boundary conditions

  3. The role of benchmarking for yardstick competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Phil; Jenkins, Cloda; Riechmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    With the increasing interest in yardstick regulation, there is a need to understand the most appropriate method for realigning tariffs at the outset. Benchmarking is the tool used for such realignment and is therefore a necessary first-step in the implementation of yardstick competition. A number of concerns have been raised about the application of benchmarking, making some practitioners reluctant to move towards yardstick based regimes. We assess five of the key concerns often discussed and find that, in general, these are not as great as perceived. The assessment is based on economic principles and experiences with applying benchmarking to regulated sectors, e.g. in the electricity and water industries in the UK, The Netherlands, Austria and Germany in recent years. The aim is to demonstrate that clarity on the role of benchmarking reduces the concern about its application in different regulatory regimes. We find that benchmarking can be used in regulatory settlements, although the range of possible benchmarking approaches that are appropriate will be small for any individual regulatory question. Benchmarking is feasible as total cost measures and environmental factors are better defined in practice than is commonly appreciated and collusion is unlikely to occur in environments with more than 2 or 3 firms (where shareholders have a role in monitoring and rewarding performance). Furthermore, any concern about companies under-recovering costs is a matter to be determined through the regulatory settlement and does not affect the case for using benchmarking as part of that settlement. (author)

  4. Benchmarking set for domestic smart grid management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, M.G.C.; Bakker, Vincent; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a benchmark for domestic smart grid management. It consists of an in-depth description of a domestic smart grid, in which local energy consumers, producers and buffers can be controlled. First, from this description a general benchmark framework is derived, which can be used

  5. Medical school benchmarking - from tools to programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Tim J; Hudson, Judith N; Mccoll, Geoffrey J; Hu, Wendy C Y; Jolly, Brian C; Schuwirth, Lambert W T

    2015-02-01

    Benchmarking among medical schools is essential, but may result in unwanted effects. To apply a conceptual framework to selected benchmarking activities of medical schools. We present an analogy between the effects of assessment on student learning and the effects of benchmarking on medical school educational activities. A framework by which benchmarking can be evaluated was developed and applied to key current benchmarking activities in Australia and New Zealand. The analogy generated a conceptual framework that tested five questions to be considered in relation to benchmarking: what is the purpose? what are the attributes of value? what are the best tools to assess the attributes of value? what happens to the results? and, what is the likely "institutional impact" of the results? If the activities were compared against a blueprint of desirable medical graduate outcomes, notable omissions would emerge. Medical schools should benchmark their performance on a range of educational activities to ensure quality improvement and to assure stakeholders that standards are being met. Although benchmarking potentially has positive benefits, it could also result in perverse incentives with unforeseen and detrimental effects on learning if it is undertaken using only a few selected assessment tools.

  6. Benchmarking in digital circuit design automation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jozwiak, L.; Gawlowski, D.M.; Slusarczyk, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on benchmarking, which is the main experimental approach to the design method and EDA-tool analysis, characterization and evaluation. We discuss the importance and difficulties of benchmarking, as well as the recent research effort related to it. To resolve several serious

  7. Benchmark Two-Good Utility Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jaegher, K.

    Benchmark two-good utility functions involving a good with zero income elasticity and unit income elasticity are well known. This paper derives utility functions for the additional benchmark cases where one good has zero cross-price elasticity, unit own-price elasticity, and zero own price

  8. Repeated Results Analysis for Middleware Regression Benchmarking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulej, Lubomír; Kalibera, T.; Tůma, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 60, - (2005), s. 345-358 ISSN 0166-5316 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/03/0672 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : middleware benchmarking * regression benchmarking * regression testing Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 0.756, year: 2005

  9. Benchmarking the energy efficiency of commercial buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, William; Hui, Y.V.; Lam, Y. Miu

    2006-01-01

    Benchmarking energy-efficiency is an important tool to promote the efficient use of energy in commercial buildings. Benchmarking models are mostly constructed in a simple benchmark table (percentile table) of energy use, which is normalized with floor area and temperature. This paper describes a benchmarking process for energy efficiency by means of multiple regression analysis, where the relationship between energy-use intensities (EUIs) and the explanatory factors (e.g., operating hours) is developed. Using the resulting regression model, these EUIs are then normalized by removing the effect of deviance in the significant explanatory factors. The empirical cumulative distribution of the normalized EUI gives a benchmark table (or percentile table of EUI) for benchmarking an observed EUI. The advantage of this approach is that the benchmark table represents a normalized distribution of EUI, taking into account all the significant explanatory factors that affect energy consumption. An application to supermarkets is presented to illustrate the development and the use of the benchmarking method

  10. Benchmarking, Total Quality Management, and Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of the use of Total Quality Management (TQM) in higher education and academic libraries focuses on the identification, collection, and use of reliable data. Methods for measuring quality, including benchmarking, are described; performance measures are considered; and benchmarking techniques are examined. (11 references) (MES)

  11. A Seafloor Benchmark for 3-dimensional Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an inexpensive, permanent seafloor benchmark to increase the longevity of seafloor geodetic measurements. The benchmark provides a physical tie to the sea floor lasting for decades (perhaps longer) on which geodetic sensors can be repeatedly placed and removed with millimeter resolution. Global coordinates estimated with seafloor geodetic techniques will remain attached to the benchmark allowing for the interchange of sensors as they fail or become obsolete, or for the sensors to be removed and used elsewhere, all the while maintaining a coherent series of positions referenced to the benchmark. The benchmark has been designed to free fall from the sea surface with transponders attached. The transponder can be recalled via an acoustic command sent from the surface to release from the benchmark and freely float to the sea surface for recovery. The duration of the sensor attachment to the benchmark will last from a few days to a few years depending on the specific needs of the experiment. The recovered sensors are then available to be reused at other locations, or again at the same site in the future. Three pins on the sensor frame mate precisely and unambiguously with three grooves on the benchmark. To reoccupy a benchmark a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) uses its manipulator arm to place the sensor pins into the benchmark grooves. In June 2014 we deployed four benchmarks offshore central Oregon. We used the ROV Jason to successfully demonstrate the removal and replacement of packages onto the benchmark. We will show the benchmark design and its operational capabilities. Presently models of megathrust slip within the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) are mostly constrained by the sub-aerial GPS vectors from the Plate Boundary Observatory, a part of Earthscope. More long-lived seafloor geodetic measures are needed to better understand the earthquake and tsunami risk associated with a large rupture of the thrust fault within the Cascadia subduction zone

  12. SP2Bench: A SPARQL Performance Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Hornung, Thomas; Meier, Michael; Pinkel, Christoph; Lausen, Georg

    A meaningful analysis and comparison of both existing storage schemes for RDF data and evaluation approaches for SPARQL queries necessitates a comprehensive and universal benchmark platform. We present SP2Bench, a publicly available, language-specific performance benchmark for the SPARQL query language. SP2Bench is settled in the DBLP scenario and comprises a data generator for creating arbitrarily large DBLP-like documents and a set of carefully designed benchmark queries. The generated documents mirror vital key characteristics and social-world distributions encountered in the original DBLP data set, while the queries implement meaningful requests on top of this data, covering a variety of SPARQL operator constellations and RDF access patterns. In this chapter, we discuss requirements and desiderata for SPARQL benchmarks and present the SP2Bench framework, including its data generator, benchmark queries and performance metrics.

  13. Benchmarking of refinery emissions performance : Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    This study was undertaken to collect emissions performance data for Canadian and comparable American refineries. The objective was to examine parameters that affect refinery air emissions performance and develop methods or correlations to normalize emissions performance. Another objective was to correlate and compare the performance of Canadian refineries to comparable American refineries. For the purpose of this study, benchmarking involved the determination of levels of emission performance that are being achieved for generic groups of facilities. A total of 20 facilities were included in the benchmarking analysis, and 74 American refinery emission correlations were developed. The recommended benchmarks, and the application of those correlations for comparison between Canadian and American refinery performance, were discussed. The benchmarks were: sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, particulate, volatile organic compounds, ammonia and benzene. For each refinery in Canada, benchmark emissions were developed. Several factors can explain differences in Canadian and American refinery emission performance. 4 tabs., 7 figs

  14. Udsættelser af lejere – Udvikling og benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gunvor; Jeppesen, Anders Gade; Kjær, Agnete Aslaug

    I denne rapport undersøges udviklingen i både fogedsager og effektive udsættelser fra 2007-2013. Rapporten indeholder desuden en benchmarking-analyse, der estimerer, om hver enkelt kommune har flere eller færre effektive udsættelser, end hvad man skulle forvente, når der tages højde for bl...... kommuner, der indgår i benchmarking-analysen har desuden flere effektive udsættelser i de almene boliger, end man kunne forvente, når der tages hensyn til kommunernes befolkningsgrundlag, det lokale boligmarked og kommunale forhold som fx størrelsen af kommunen. Rapporten er finansieret af Ministeriet...

  15. ES-RBE Event sequence reliability Benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poucet, A.E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The event Sequence Reliability Benchmark Exercise (ES-RBE) can be considered as a logical extension of the other three Reliability Benchmark Exercices : the RBE on Systems Analysis, the RBE on Common Cause Failures and the RBE on Human Factors. The latter, constituting Activity No. 1, was concluded by the end of 1987. The ES-RBE covered the techniques that are currently used for analysing and quantifying sequences of events starting from an initiating event to various plant damage states, including analysis of various system failures and/or successes, human intervention failure and/or success and dependencies between systems. By this way, one of the scopes of the ES-RBE was to integrate the experiences gained in the previous exercises

  16. OECD/NEA benchmark for time-dependent neutron transport calculations without spatial homogenization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Jason, E-mail: jason.hou@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Boyarinov, Victor F.; Fomichenko, Peter A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A time-dependent homogenization-free neutron transport benchmark was created. • The first phase, known as the kinetics phase, was described in this work. • Preliminary results for selected 2-D transient exercises were presented. - Abstract: A Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) benchmark for the time-dependent neutron transport calculations without spatial homogenization has been established in order to facilitate the development and assessment of numerical methods for solving the space-time neutron kinetics equations. The benchmark has been named the OECD/NEA C5G7-TD benchmark, and later extended with three consecutive phases each corresponding to one modelling stage of the multi-physics transient analysis of the nuclear reactor core. This paper provides a detailed introduction of the benchmark specification of Phase I, known as the “kinetics phase”, including the geometry description, supporting neutron transport data, transient scenarios in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) configurations, as well as the expected output parameters from the participants. Also presented are the preliminary results for the initial state 2-D core and selected transient exercises that have been obtained using the Monte Carlo method and the Surface Harmonic Method (SHM), respectively.

  17. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  18. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  19. Thermal Performance Benchmarking: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuhui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center

    2017-10-19

    In FY16, the thermal performance of the 2014 Honda Accord Hybrid power electronics thermal management systems were benchmarked. Both experiments and numerical simulation were utilized to thoroughly study the thermal resistances and temperature distribution in the power module. Experimental results obtained from the water-ethylene glycol tests provided the junction-to-liquid thermal resistance. The finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were found to yield a good match with experimental results. Both experimental and modeling results demonstrate that the passive stack is the dominant thermal resistance for both the motor and power electronics systems. The 2014 Accord power electronics systems yield steady-state thermal resistance values around 42- 50 mm to the 2nd power K/W, depending on the flow rates. At a typical flow rate of 10 liters per minute, the thermal resistance of the Accord system was found to be about 44 percent lower than that of the 2012 Nissan LEAF system that was benchmarked in FY15. The main reason for the difference is that the Accord power module used a metalized-ceramic substrate and eliminated the thermal interface material layers. FEA models were developed to study the transient performance of 2012 Nissan LEAF, 2014 Accord, and two other systems that feature conventional power module designs. The simulation results indicate that the 2012 LEAF power module has lowest thermal impedance at a time scale less than one second. This is probably due to moving low thermally conductive materials further away from the heat source and enhancing the heat spreading effect from the copper-molybdenum plate close to the insulated gate bipolar transistors. When approaching steady state, the Honda system shows lower thermal impedance. Measurement results of the thermal resistance of the 2015 BMW i3 power electronic system indicate that the i3 insulated gate bipolar transistor module has significantly lower junction

  20. Performance Against WELCOA's Worksite Health Promotion Benchmarks Across Years Among Selected US Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, GracieLee M; Mendenhall, Brandon N; Hunnicutt, David; Picarella, Ryan; Leffelman, Brittanie; Perko, Michael; Bibeau, Daniel L

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the performance of organizations' worksite health promotion (WHP) activities against the benchmarking criteria included in the Well Workplace Checklist (WWC). The Wellness Council of America (WELCOA) developed a tool to assess WHP with its 100-item WWC, which represents WELCOA's 7 performance benchmarks. Workplaces. This study includes a convenience sample of organizations who completed the checklist from 2008 to 2015. The sample size was 4643 entries from US organizations. The WWC includes demographic questions, general questions about WHP programs, and scales to measure the performance against the WELCOA 7 benchmarks. Descriptive analyses of WWC items were completed separately for each year of the study period. The majority of the organizations represented each year were multisite, multishift, medium- to large-sized companies mostly in the services industry. Despite yearly changes in participating organizations, results across the WELCOA 7 benchmark scores were consistent year to year. Across all years, benchmarks that organizations performed the lowest were senior-level support, data collection, and programming; wellness teams and supportive environments were the highest scoring benchmarks. In an era marked with economic swings and health-care reform, it appears that organizations are staying consistent in their performance across these benchmarks. The WWC could be useful for organizations, practitioners, and researchers in assessing the quality of WHP programs.