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Sample records for cord seed fibrils

  1. Effect of Stirring and Seeding on Whey Protein Fibril Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of stirring and seeding on the formation of fibrils in whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied. More fibrils of a similar length are formed when WPI is stirred during heating at pH 2 and 80 C compared to samples that were heated at rest. Addition of seeds did not show an

  2. Preparation of Amyloid Fibrils Seeded from Brain and Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpelz, Kathryn P; Lu, Jun-Xia; Tycko, Robert; Meredith, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Seeding of amyloid fibrils into fresh solutions of the same peptide or protein in disaggregated form leads to the formation of replicate fibrils, with close structural similarity or identity to the original fibrillar seeds. Here we describe procedures for isolating fibrils composed mainly of β-amyloid (Aβ) from human brain and from leptomeninges, a source of cerebral blood vessels, for investigating Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We also describe methods for seeding isotopically labeled, disaggregated Aβ peptide solutions for study using solid-state NMR and other techniques. These methods should be applicable to other types of amyloid fibrils, to Aβ fibrils from mice or other species, tissues other than brain, and to some non-fibrillar aggregates. These procedures allow for the examination of authentic amyloid fibrils and other protein aggregates from biological tissues without the need for labeling the tissue.

  3. Polymorphism of amyloid-like fibrils can be defined by the concentration of seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Sneideris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prions are infectious proteins where the same protein may express distinct strains. The strains are enciphered by different misfolded conformations. Strain-like phenomena have also been reported in a number of other amyloid-forming proteins. One of the features of amyloid strains is the ability to self-propagate, maintaining a constant set of physical properties despite being propagated under conditions different from those that allowed initial formation of the strain. Here we report a cross-seeding experiment using strains formed under different conditions. Using high concentrations of seeds results in rapid elongation and new fibrils preserve the properties of the seeding fibrils. At low seed concentrations, secondary nucleation plays the major role and new fibrils gain properties predicted by the environment rather than the structure of the seeds. Our findings could explain conformational switching between amyloid strains observed in a wide variety of in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  4. Data for ion and seed dependent fibril assembly of a spidroin core domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Humenik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This data article includes size exclusion chromatography data of soluble eADF4(C16, an engineered spider silk variant based on the core domain sequence of the natural dragline silk protein ADF4 of Araneus diadematus, in combination with light scattering; the protein is monomeric before assembly. The assembled mature fibrils were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Sonicated fibrils were used as seeds to by-pass the nucleation lag phase in eADF4(C16 assembly. We also provide data on the sedimentation kinetics of spider silk in the presence of different NaCl concentrations revealing very slow protein aggregation in comparison to the fast assembly triggered by phosphate ions published previously [1]. Experiments in the Data article represent supporting material for our work published recently [1], which described the assembly mechanism of recombinant eADF4(C16 fibrils.

  5. Longitudinal study of experimental induction of AA amyloidosis in mice seeded with homologous and heterologous AA fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Naeem; Murakami, Tomoaki; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-09-01

    To investigate pathogenesis and kinetics of experimentally induced murine AA amyloidosis seeded with homologous (murine) and heterologous (bovine) AA fibrils. Experimental AA amyloidosis was induced by administration of inflammatory stimulus and preformed AA fibrils to a total of 111 female C57/Black mice. In this longitudinal study, heterologous (bovine) as well as homologous (murine) AA fibrils were injected intraperitoneally to mice in various combinations. Re-stimulation was done at 120 or 300 days post first inoculation. To analyze the intensity of amyloid depositions in mice organs, immunohistochemical techniques and image J software were used. Assessment of cytokines level in sera was done using a Mouse Th1/Th2/Th17 Cytokine CBA Kit. Incidence and severity of AA amyloidosis were quite low in mice inoculated with heterologous bovine AA fibrils than homologous murine one. Homologous AA fibrils administration at first and second inoculation caused maximum amount of amyloid depositions and severe systemic form of amyloidosis. Increase in the level of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was observed after first inoculation, while second inoculation caused a further increase in the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. AA amyloidosis can be induced by heterologous as well as homologous AA fibrils. Severity of AA amyloidosis induced with homologous AA fibrils is higher compared to heterologous AA fibrils.

  6. Rapid biomimetic mineralization of collagen fibrils and combining with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for bone defects healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Bihua; Luo, Xueshi; Li, Zhiwen [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhuang, Caiping [Department of Anesthesiology, Huizhou Central People' s Hospital, Huizhou 516001 (China); Li, Lihua, E-mail: tlihuali@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Lu, Lu; Ding, Shan; Tian, Jinhuan [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhou, Changren, E-mail: tcrz9@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Collagen biomineralization is regulated by complicated interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. Here, the use of sodium tripolyphosphate to simulate the templating functional motif of the C-terminal fragment of non-collagenous proteins is reported, and a low molecular weight polyacrylic acid served as a sequestration agent to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate into nanoprecursors. Self-assembled collagen fibrils served as a fixed template for achieving rapid biomimetic mineralization in vitro. Results demonstrated that, during the mineralization process, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite mineral with collagen fibrils formed and did so via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallization approach in the presence of these dual biomimetic functional analogues. In vitro human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) culture found that the mineralized scaffolds have a better cytocompatibility in terms of cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteoblasts. A rabbit femoral condyle defect model was established to confirm the ability of the n-HA/collagen scaffolds to facilitate bone regeneration and repair. The images of gross anatomy, MRI, CT and histomorphology taken 6 and 12 weeks after surgery showed that the biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds with hUCMSCs can promote the healing speed of bone defects in vivo, and both of the scaffolds groups performing better than the bone defect control group. As new bone tissue formed, the scaffolds degraded and were gradually absorbed. All these results demonstrated that both of the scaffolds and cells have better histocompatibility. - Highlights: • A rapid and facile biomimetic mineralization approach is proposed. • Intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen fibrils was achieved. • HA/COL scaffolds promote hUCMSCs adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. • Feasibility of h

  7. Rapid biomimetic mineralization of collagen fibrils and combining with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for bone defects healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Bihua; Luo, Xueshi; Li, Zhiwen; Zhuang, Caiping; Li, Lihua; Lu, Lu; Ding, Shan; Tian, Jinhuan; Zhou, Changren

    2016-01-01

    Collagen biomineralization is regulated by complicated interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. Here, the use of sodium tripolyphosphate to simulate the templating functional motif of the C-terminal fragment of non-collagenous proteins is reported, and a low molecular weight polyacrylic acid served as a sequestration agent to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate into nanoprecursors. Self-assembled collagen fibrils served as a fixed template for achieving rapid biomimetic mineralization in vitro. Results demonstrated that, during the mineralization process, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite mineral with collagen fibrils formed and did so via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallization approach in the presence of these dual biomimetic functional analogues. In vitro human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) culture found that the mineralized scaffolds have a better cytocompatibility in terms of cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteoblasts. A rabbit femoral condyle defect model was established to confirm the ability of the n-HA/collagen scaffolds to facilitate bone regeneration and repair. The images of gross anatomy, MRI, CT and histomorphology taken 6 and 12 weeks after surgery showed that the biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds with hUCMSCs can promote the healing speed of bone defects in vivo, and both of the scaffolds groups performing better than the bone defect control group. As new bone tissue formed, the scaffolds degraded and were gradually absorbed. All these results demonstrated that both of the scaffolds and cells have better histocompatibility. - Highlights: • A rapid and facile biomimetic mineralization approach is proposed. • Intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen fibrils was achieved. • HA/COL scaffolds promote hUCMSCs adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. • Feasibility of h

  8. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: osteogenesis in vivo as seed cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yinze; Ma, Qingjun; Cui, Fuzhai; Zhong, Yanfeng

    2009-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal seed cells for bone tissue engineering. However, intrinsic deficiencies exist for the autologous transplantation strategy of constructing artificial bone with MSCs derived from bone marrow of patients. In this study, MSCs-like cells were isolated from human umbilical cords and were expanded in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that cells from the fourth passage were positive for CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, and CD105 whereas they were negative for CD14, CD34, CD45, and CD117. Furthermore, these cells expressed HLA-A, B, C (MHC-I), but not HLA-DP, DQ, DR (MHC-II), or costimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86. Following incubation in specific inductive media for 3 weeks, cultured cells were shown to possess potential to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic lineages in vitro. The umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) were loaded with a biomimetic artificial bone scaffold material before being implanted subcutaneously in the back of Balb/c nude mice for four to twelve weeks. Our results revealed that UC-MSCs loaded with the scaffold displayed capacity of osteogenic differentiation leading to osteogenesis with human origin in vivo. As a readily available source of seed cells for bone tissue engineering, UC-MSCs should have broad application prospects.

  9. Spinal cord injury is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Cheng; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Huang, Bor-Ren; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in substantial sensorimotor and autonomic dysfunctions and an adverse prognosis. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic SCI. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to investigate the association between atrial fibrillation (AF) and SCI. Using the National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 41,691 patients without a history of AF who were newly hospitalized for SCI between 2000 and 2011. The comparison group included 166,724 patients without AF or SCI who were matched to the SCI group according to age, sex, and index year at a ratio of 4:1. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011, and the cumulative incidence of AF was calculated. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curve analysis were used to compare differences in the cumulative incidence of AF between the 2 groups. During the mean follow-up periods of 5.69 years for the SCI group and 6.17 years for the non-SCI group, the overall incidence rates were 2.70 and 1.99 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively (crude hazard ratio 1.36; 95% confidence interval 1.24-1.48). After adjusting for age, sex, and all comorbidities, the risk of AF remained significantly higher in the SCI group than in the non-SCI group (adjusted hazard ratio 1.28; 95% confidence interval 1.17-1.40). SCI is associated with an increased risk of AF in a long-term follow-up period. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PrP aggregation can be seeded by pre-formed recombinant PrP amyloid fibrils without the replication of infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Rona M; King, Declan; Jeffrey, Martin; McGovern, Gillian; Agarwal, Sonya; Gill, Andrew C; Piccardo, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian prions are unusual infectious agents, as they are thought to consist solely of aggregates of misfolded prion protein (PrP). Generation of synthetic prions, composed of recombinant PrP (recPrP) refolded into fibrils, has been utilised to address whether PrP aggregates are, indeed, infectious prions. In several reports, neurological disease similar to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) has been described following inoculation and passage of various forms of fibrils in transgenic mice and hamsters. However, in studies described here, we show that inoculation of recPrP fibrils does not cause TSE disease, but, instead, seeds the formation of PrP amyloid plaques in PrP-P101L knock-in transgenic mice (101LL). Importantly, both WT-recPrP fibrils and 101L-recPrP fibrils can seed plaque formation, indicating that the fibrillar conformation, and not the primary sequence of PrP in the inoculum, is important in initiating seeding. No replication of infectious prions or TSE disease was observed following both primary inoculation and subsequent subpassage. These data, therefore, argue against recPrP fibrils being infectious prions and, instead, indicate that these pre-formed seeds are acting to accelerate the formation of PrP amyloid plaques in 101LL Tg mice. In addition, these data reproduce a phenotype which was previously observed in 101LL mice following inoculation with brain extract containing in vivo-generated PrP amyloid fibrils, which has not been shown for other synthetic prion models. These data are reminiscent of the "prion-like" spread of aggregated forms of the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ), α-synuclein and tau observed following inoculation of transgenic mice with pre-formed seeds of each misfolded protein. Hence, even when the protein is PrP, misfolding and aggregation do not reproduce the full clinicopathological phenotype of disease. The initiation and spread of protein aggregation in transgenic mouse lines following inoculation with pre

  11. Effect of Fenugreek Seed Extract (Trigonella Foenum-graecum on Brachial Region of the Spinal Cord of an 18-Day Old Rat Offspring with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Khaksar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Diabetes can affect the spinal cord, an important part of the central nervous system. Fenugreek seed has been suggested to have potential antidiabetic effects. This study was conducted to assess the effects of Fenugreek seed extract (trigonella foenum-graecum on fetal spinal cord structure, specifically in the brachial enlargement cord in an 18-day old fetus of diabetic mothers treated with extracts in comparison with the control groups' mothers. Methods: In the present cross-sectional study, sixteen healthy female rats were randomly divided into four equal groups: Healthy control, Diabetes control, Fenugreek control, Fenugreek treatment. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotcin (50 mg/kg. All four groups became pregnant by natural mating. After formation of the nervous system, two fetuses from each group were expelled by cesarean after performing anesthesia on the animals on 18th day of pregnancy furthermore their brachial enlargement spinal cord samples were taken. Finally, the tissue sections were prepared by routine procedures and diverse histological parameters were examined. The collected data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: results showed that fetal body weight on the diabetic control group was significantly higher compared to the other groups (P≤ 0/05. Moreover, significant reductions in the transvers and vertical diameters in central channel of the spinal cord and as well in the number of neurons of the spinal cord gray matter in the diabetic control groups in comparison with the other groups were observed (P≤0/05. Conclusion: The hyperglycemic effect of maternal diabetes during fetal period causes abnormalities, especially in the brachial enlargement of spinal cord, including changes in the spinal cord and neurons number in the gray matter. Disorders occurring in the prenatal remains and may perhaps cause lack of ability to perform certain physical activities. Key words

  12. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan-alginate scaffolds for seeding human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Sneha G; Pawar, S H

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan and alginate are two natural and accessible polymers that are known to be biocompatible, biodegradable and possesses good antimicrobial activity. When combined, they exhibit desirable characteristics and can be created into a scaffold for cell culture. In this study interaction of chitosan-alginate scaffolds with mesenchymal stem cells are studied. Mesenchymal stem cells were derived from human umbilical cord tissues, characterized by flow cytometry and other growth parameters studied as well. Proliferation and viability of cultured cells were studied by MTT Assay and Trypan Blue dye exclusion assay. Besides chitosan-alginate scaffold was prepared by freeze-drying method and characterized by FTIR, SEM and Rheological properties. The obtained 3D porous structure allowed very efficient seeding of hUMSCs that are able to inhabit the whole volume of the scaffold, showing good adhesion and proliferation. These materials showed desirable rheological properties for facile injection as tissue scaffolds. The results of this study demonstrated that chitosan-alginate scaffold may be promising biomaterial in the field of tissue engineering, which is currently under a great deal of examination for the development and/or restoration of tissue and organs. It combines the stem cell therapy and biomaterials.

  13. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eissner, Guenther; Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (registered) (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  14. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eissner, Guenther [Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich, E-mail: Guenther.Eissner@med.uni-muenchen.d [Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (registered) (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  15. seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    peptidohydrolase (8.0%) from mung bean seedlings. (Baumgartner and Chrispeels, 1977), EP-HG (4.5%) from horse gram seedlings ( Rajeswari, 1997), acidic protease (15%) from germinating winged-bean seeds. (Usha and Singh, 1996) and EP-1 (1.6%) from barley seedlings and GA3-induced cysteine protease (3.38%).

  16. Atrial fibrillation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Mean blood pressures were 126.03± ... optimal. Keywords: Atrial fibrillation, thrombosis, CHADS2 Score, stroke risk, hypertensive heart disease, ... general population and the average age group ... Appendix 1) to stratify the stroke risk and we.

  17. Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... of your body's cells and organs. Read More "Atrial Fibrillation" Articles Atrial Fibrillation / Who Is at Risk for ...

  18. HPMA-RGD Hydrogels Seeded with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Functional Outcome in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejčl, Aleš; Šedý, Jiří; Kapcalová, Miroslava; Arboleda Toro, David; Amemori, Takashi; Lesný, Petr; Likavčanová, Katarína; Krumbholcová, Eva; Přádný, Martin; Michálek, Jiří; Burian, M.; Hájek, M.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 10 (2010), s. 1535-1546 ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD309/08/H079; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; EC FP6 project RESCUE(XE) LSHB-CT-2005-518233 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : magnetic-resonance tracking * spinal cord injury * stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.791, year: 2010

  19. Atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Nielsen, Morten W; Haunsø, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. A number of studies have demonstrated that AF, and in particular lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. Monogenic mutations in lone and familial AF, although rare, have been recognized...

  20. [Atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinar, J; Vítovec, J

    2003-09-01

    Atrial fibrilation is the most frequent arrhythmia, the occurrence increasing with age and associated diseases. The incidence at the age below 60 years is markedly lower than one per cent, whereas in persons above 80 years of age it exceeds six per cent. The occurrence in patients with heart failure is from 10% (NYHA II) up to 50% (NYHA IV). Atrial fibrillation is classified into that observed for the first time and permanent, respectively, while transient forms include paroxyzmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. The diagnosis is based on ECG recording, while echocardiography is most significant. The therapy includes two basic questions--anticoagulant or anti-aggregation treatment and the control of rhythm or frequency. The anticoagulant therapy should be introduced in all patients, where contraindications are not present, being necessary before every cardioversion, provided atrial fibrillation lasts more than two days. In patients without any heart disease and with a physiological echocardiogram it is possible to administer only anti-aggregation treatment. Cardioversion (the control of rhythm) is recommended to all symptomatic patients, in other cases and especially in older persons the control of frequency is safer and of more advantage. Electrical cardioversion is more effective that a pharmacological treatment, the sinus rhythm is preferably controlled by dofetilid, ibutilid, propafenon and amiodaron. For the control of heart rate beta-blockers, diltiazem, verapamil and digitalis are recommended.

  1. Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Treatment for atrial fibrillation depends on how often you have symptoms, how ...

  2. Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Sherer, Jason A; Ko, Darae

    2017-01-01

    The past 3 decades have been characterized by an exponential growth in knowledge and advances in the clinical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). It is now known that AF genesis requires a vulnerable atrial substrate and that the formation and composition of this substrate may vary depending...... on comorbid conditions, genetics, sex, and other factors. Population-based studies have identified numerous factors that modify the atrial substrate and increase AF susceptibility. To date, genetic studies have reported 17 independent signals for AF at 14 genomic regions. Studies have established...

  3. Fixed cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; DiChiro, G.; DeSouza, B.; McCullough, D.C.; McVeigh, E.; Hefffez, D.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the spinal cord was examined with MR phase imaging in healthy subjects and in cases involving cord tethering and compression. Asymptomatic patients with a low conus medullaris demonstrated normal cord motion. Clinical improvement was associated with improved cord motion after surgical untethering, provided permanent neurologic damage had not occurred. Decreased and unchanged cord motion was associated with unchanged neurologic deficits. In cases of normal cord motion and possible retethering versus syringomyelia, clinical improvement occurred after shunting only. MR imaging of pulsatile cord motion can be clinically useful in the evaluation of diseases restricting motion of the neuraxis

  4. Atrial fibrillation or flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000184.htm Atrial fibrillation or flutter To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Atrial fibrillation or flutter is a common type of abnormal ...

  5. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000237.htm Atrial fibrillation - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... have been in the hospital because you have atrial fibrillation . This condition occurs when your heart beats faster ...

  6. Atrial Fibrillation - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Atrial Fibrillation URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Atrial Fibrillation - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  7. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... has two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  8. AUTOLOGOUS Marrow-Derived Stem Cell-Seeded Gene-Supplemented Collagen Scaffolds for Spinal Cord Regeneration as a Treatment for Paralysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spector, Myron

    2006-01-01

    .... Moreover, the authors will be investigating the effects of incorporating genes from nerve growth factors into the collagen scaffolds and seeding the scaffolds with marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells...

  9. Atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Casper N

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication after myocardial infarction (MI) and new-onset AF has been demonstrated to be associated with adverse outcome and a large excess risk of death in both MI and aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Prevention of new-onset AF is therefore a potential therapeutic target in AS and MI patients. Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent AF. Accordingly, statins are recommended as a class IIa recommendation for prevention of new-onset AF after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, this preventive effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with AS or a large scale first-time MI patient sample and data in patients not undergoing invasive cardiac interventions are limited. This PhD thesis was conducted at the Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, with the aim to investigate the three aforementioned questions and to add to the existing evidence of AF prevention with statins. This was done using three different settings: 1) a randomized patients sample of 1,873 from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 2) a register patient sample of 97,499 with first-time MI, and 3) all published studies until beginning of June 2011 examining statin treatment on new-onset and recurrent AF in patients not undergoing cardiac surgery. This thesis revealed that statins did not lower the incidence or the time to new-onset AF in patients with asymptomatic AS. However, statin treatment showed an independently preventive effect on new-onset AF, including type-dependent effect and a trend to dosage-dependent effect. In addition, this thesis showed that good compliance to statin treatment was important to prevent new-onset AF. Finally, the meta-analysis in this PhD thesis showed a preventive effect in the observational studies although this effect was absent in the randomized controlled trials. Based on this PhD thesis

  10. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  11. The changing face of glucagon fibrillation: Structural polymorphism and conformational imprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.; Dikov, D.; Flink, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    concentration) appear less thermostable than those formed under more challenging conditions (high temperatures, low glucagon or low salt concentrations). Properties of preformed fibrils used for seeding are inherited in a prion-like manner. Thus, we conclude that the structure of fibrils formed by glucagon...

  12. Effect of environmental factors on the kinetics of insulin fibril formation: elucidation of the molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L; Khurana, R; Coats, A; Frokjaer, S; Brange, J; Vyas, S; Uversky, V N; Fink, A L

    2001-05-22

    In the search for the molecular mechanism of insulin fibrillation, the kinetics of insulin fibril formation were studied under different conditions using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T (ThT). The effect of insulin concentration, agitation, pH, ionic strength, anions, seeding, and addition of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), urea, TMAO, sucrose, and ThT on the kinetics of fibrillation was investigated. The kinetics of the fibrillation process could be described by the lag time for formation of stable nuclei (nucleation) and the apparent rate constant for the growth of fibrils (elongation). The addition of seeds eliminated the lag phase. An increase in insulin concentration resulted in shorter lag times and faster growth of fibrils. Shorter lag times and faster growth of fibrils were seen at acidic pH versus neutral pH, whereas an increase in ionic strength resulted in shorter lag times and slower growth of fibrils. There was no clear correlation between the rate of fibril elongation and ionic strength. Agitation during fibril formation attenuated the effects of insulin concentration and ionic strength on both lag times and fibril growth. The addition of ANS increased the lag time and decreased the apparent growth rate for insulin fibril formation. The ANS-induced inhibition appears to reflect the formation of amorphous aggregates. The denaturant, urea, decreased the lag time, whereas the stabilizers, trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate (TMAO) and sucrose, increased the lag times. The results indicated that both nucleation and fibril growth were controlled by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. A kinetic model, involving the association of monomeric partially folded intermediates, whose concentration is stimulated by the air-water interface, leading to formation of the critical nucleus and thence fibrils, is proposed.

  13. The Japanese Mutant Aβ (ΔE22-Aβ1–39) Forms Fibrils Instantaneously, with Low-Thioflavin T Fluorescence: Seeding of Wild-Type Aβ1-40 into Atypical Fibrils by ΔE22-Aβ1-39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloe, Adam L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Sachleben, Joseph R.; Tycko, Robert; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    The ΔE693 (Japanese) mutation of the β-amyloid precursor protein leads to production of ΔE22-Aβ peptides such as ΔE22-Aβ1–39. Despite reports that these peptides do not form fibrils, here we show that, on the contrary, the peptide forms fibrils essentially instantaneously. The fibrils are typical amyloid fibrils in all respects except that they cause only low levels of thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, which, however, develops with no lag phase. The fibrils bind ThT, but with a lower affinity and a smaller number of binding sites than wild-type (WT) Aβ1–40. Fluorescence depolarization confirms extremely rapid aggregation of ΔE22-Aβ1–39. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) indicates very low concentrations of soluble monomer and oligomer, but only in the presence of some organic solvent, e.g., 2% (v/v) DMSO. The critical concentration is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower for ΔE22-Aβ1–39 than for WTAβ1–40. Several lines of evidence point to an altered structure for ΔE22-Aβ1–39 compared to that of WT Aβ1–40 fibrils. In addition to differences in ThT binding and fluorescence, PITHIRDS-CT solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of ΔE22-Aβ1–39 are not compatible with the parallel in-register β-sheet generally observed for WT Aβ1–40 fibrils. X-ray fibril diffraction showed different D spacings: 4.7 and 10.4 Å for WT Aβ1–40 and 4.7 and 9.6 Å for ΔE22-Aβ1–39. Equimolar mixtures of ΔE22-Aβ1–39 and WT Aβ1–40 also produced fibrils extremely rapidly, and by the criteria of ThT fluorescence and electron microscopic appearance, they were the same as fibrils made from pure ΔE22-Aβ1–39. X-ray diffraction of fibrils formed from 1:1 molar mixtures of ΔE22-Aβ1–39 and WT Aβ1–40 showed the same D spacings as fibrils of the pure mutant peptide, not the wild-type peptide. These findings are consistent with extremely rapid nucleation by ΔE22-Aβ1–39, followed by fibril extension by WT Aβ1–40, and

  14. Autologous Marrow-Derived Stem Cell-Seeded Gene-Supplemented Collagen Scaffolds for Spinal Cord Regeneration as a Treatment for Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    seeded scaffolds Chondrocytes were isolated by enzymatic digestion of articular cartilage from the knee (stifle) joint of an adult dog. The cartilage...lyophilized and enzymatically digested using proteinase K (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapo- lis, IN) for DNA and GAG biochemical analyses. DNA analysis The DNA...Gelatin nanoencapsulation of protein/ peptide drugs using an emulsifier-free emulsion method. J Microencapsul 1998;15:163–172. 17. Truong-Le VL, August JT

  15. How curcumin affords effective protection against amyloid fibrillation in insulin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim Habibi, Azadeh; Ghasemi, Atiyeh Ghasemi

    2013-01-01

    Since the formation of amyloid structures from proteins was recognized in numerous diseases, many efforts have been devoted to the task of finding effective anti-amyloidogenic compounds. In a number of these investigations, the existence of “generic” compounds is implicitly acknowledged. Curcumin...... been shown effectively influenced by micro molar concentrations of curcumin. Under amyloidogenic conditions (pH 2.5 and 37°C), the compound was observed to inhibit fibril formation of insulin in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, addition of curcumin to the protein incubated in such conditions...... at different time points resulted in reduced amounts of final fibrils. Disaggregation of pre-formed fibrils was also observed upon addition of curcumin, as well as reduction in final fibril amounts after seeding. Overall, this compound appears to be able to interact with native, intermediate and fibrillar...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  2. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Cardiovascular Conditions What Is Atrial Fibrillation? Your heart has a natural pacemaker, called the “sinus node,” that makes electrical signals. These signals cause the heart to contract and pump ...

  3. Toward understanding insulin fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Andersen, L; Laursen, E D; Meyn, G; Rasmussen, E

    1997-05-01

    Formation of insulin fibrils is a physical process by which partially unfolded insulin molecules interact with each other to form linear aggregates. Shielding of hydrophobic domains is the main driving force for this process, but formation of intermolecular beta-sheet may further stabilize the fibrillar structure. Conformational displacement of the B-chain C-terminal with exposure of nonpolar, aliphatic core residues, including A2, A3, B11, and B15, plays a crucial role in the fibrillation process. Recent crystal analyses and molecular modeling studies have suggested that when insulin fibrillates this exposed domain interacts with a hydrophobic surface domain formed by the aliphatic residues A13, B6, B14, B17, and B18, normally buried when three insulin dimers form a hexamer. In rabbit immunization experiments, insulin fibrils did not elicit an increased immune response with respect to formation of IgG insulin antibodies when compared with native insulin. In contrast, the IgE response increased with increasing content of insulin in fibrillar form. Strategies and practical approaches to prevent insulin from forming fibrils are reviewed. Stabilization of the insulin hexameric structure and blockage of hydrophobic interfaces by addition of surfactants are the most effective means of counteracting insulin fibrillation.

  4. Fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution in an interfacial shearing flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaraj, Vignesh; McBride, Samantha; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Although the association of fibril plaques with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is well established, in-depth understanding of the roles played by various physical factors in seeding and growth of fibrils is far from well known. Of the numerous factors affecting this complex phenomenon, the effect of fluid flow and shear at interfaces is paramount as it is ubiquitous and the most varying factor in vivo. Many amyloidogenic proteins have been found to denature upon contact at hydrophobic interfaces due to the self-assembling nature of protein in its monomeric state. Here, fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution is studied in an interfacial shearing flow. The transient surface rheological response of the insulin solution to the flow and its effect on the bulk fibrillization process has been quantified. Minute differences in hydrophobic characteristics between two variants of insulin- Human recombinant and Bovine insulin are found to result in very different responses. Results presented will be in the form of fibrillization assays, images of fibril plaques formed, and changes in surface rheological properties of the insulin solution. The interfacial velocity field, measured from images (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), is compared with computations. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, M; Graffigna, A; Ressia, L; Minzioni, G; Pagani, F; Aiello, M; Gazzoli, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of atrial fibrillation arc multiple reentry circuits spinning around the atrial surface, and these baffle any attempt to direct surgical interruption. The purpose of this article is to report the surgical experience in the treatment of isolated and concomitant atrial fibrillation at the Cardiac Surgical Institute of the University of Pavia. In cases of atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral/valve disease, surgical isolation of the left atrium at the time of mitral valve surgery can prevent atrial fibrillation from involving the right atrium, which can exert its diastolic pump function on the right ventricle. Left atrial isolation was performed on 205 patients at the time of mitral valve surgery. Atrial partitioning ("maze operation") creates straight and blind atrial alleys so that non-recentry circuits can take place. Five patients underwent this procedure. In eight-cases of atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial septal defect, the adult patients with atrial septal defect and chronic or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation underwent surgical isolation of the right atrium associated which surgical correction of the defect, in order to let sinus rhythm govern the left atrium and the ventricles. "Lone" atrial fibrillation occurs in hearts with no detectable organic disease. Bi-atrial isolation with creation of an atrial septal internodal "corridor" was performed on 14 patients. In cases of atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral valve disease, left atrial isolation was performed on 205 patients at the time of mitral valve surgery with an overall sinus rhythm recovery of 44%. In the same period, sinus rhythm was recovered and persisted in only 19% of 252 patients who underwent mitral valve replacement along (P < 0.001). Sinus rhythm was less likely to recover in patients with right atriomegaly requiring tricuspid valve annuloplasty: 59% vs 84% (P < 0.001). Restoration of the right atrial function raised the cardiac index from 2.25 +/- 0.55 1/min per m2

  6. Atrial Fibrillation and Hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprasad N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation occurs in 10 – 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism. Low serum thyrotropin concentration is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid hormone contributes to arrythmogenic activity by altering the electrophysiological characteristics of atrial myocytes by shortening the action potential duration, enhancing automaticity and triggered activity in the pulmonary vein cardio myocytes. Hyperthyroidism results in excess mortality from increased incidence of circulatory diseases and dysrhythmias. Incidence of cerebral embolism is more in hyperthyroid patients with atrial fibrillation, especially in the elderly and anti-coagulation is indicated in them. Treatment of hyperthyroidism results in conversion to sinus rhythm in up to two-third of patients. Beta-blockers reduce left ventricular hypertrophy and atrial and ventricular arrhythmias in patients with hyperthyroidism. Treatment of sub clinical hyperthyroidism is controversial. Optimizing dose of thyroxine treatment in those with replacement therapy and beta-blockers is useful in exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  7. Thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Malvinder S

    2005-01-04

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac complication of hyperthyroidism and occurs in 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism. It is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolism that often involves the central nervous system. Oral anticoagulation is important in the majority of these patients to prevent thromboembolic complications. These patients require adjustment in the dose of various rate-controlling agents because of increased clearance associated with hyperthyroidism and a decrease in warfarin dosage because of increased clearance of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors. The management of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation is summarized in this clinical review.

  8. Cord Blood and Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... donate their baby’s umbilical cord blood to a public cord blood bank. We have more than 249,000 cord blood ... stored as a cord blood unit at a public cord blood bank for future use. It can then be listed ...

  9. Modulation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, G.S.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the results of various surgical procedures for atrial fibrillation which have been performed in the last 2 decades in the Sint Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. In the 1990s the classical Maze III procedure was the main surgical technique for

  10. Screening for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freedman, Ben; Camm, John; Calkins, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 10% of ischemic strokes are associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) first diagnosed at the time of stroke. Detecting asymptomatic AF would provide an opportunity to prevent these strokes by instituting appropriate anticoagulation. The AF-SCREEN international collaboration was formed...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  18. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  19. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  20. Lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B enhances the aggregate forming activity of exogenous α-synuclein fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Atsushi; Taguchi, Katsutoshi; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Tatebe, Harutsugu; Tokuda, Takahiko; Mizuno, Toshiki; Tanaka, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    The formation of intracellular aggregates containing α-synuclein (α-Syn) is one of the key steps in the progression of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Recently, it was reported that pathological α-Syn fibrils can undergo cell-to-cell transmission and form Lewy body-like aggregates. However, little is known about how they form α-Syn aggregates from fibril seeds. Here, we developed an assay to study the process of aggregate formation using fluorescent protein-tagged α-Syn-expressing cells and examined the aggregate forming activity of exogenous α-Syn fibrils. α-Syn fibril-induced formation of intracellular aggregates was suppressed by a cathepsin B specific inhibitor, but not by a cathepsin D inhibitor. α-Syn fibrils pretreated with cathepsin B in vitro enhanced seeding activity in cells. Knockdown of cathepsin B also reduced fibril-induced aggregate formation. Moreover, using LAMP-1 immunocytochemistry and live-cell imaging, we observed that these aggregates initially occurred in the lysosome. They then rapidly grew larger and moved outside the boundary of the lysosome within one day. These results suggest that the lysosomal protease cathepsin B is involved in triggering intracellular aggregate formation by α-Syn fibrils. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Glycosaminoglycans enhance the fibrillation propensity of the ß2-microglobulin cleavage variant--¿K58-ß2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H

    2010-01-01

    when heparan sulfate is present have increased length and diameter, and possess enhanced stability and seeding properties. However, when copper ions are present the fibrils are short, thin and less stable, and form at a slower rate. We suggest that heparan sulfate stabilizes the cleaved monomers...... in the early aggregates, hereby promoting the assembly of these into fibrils, whereas the copper ions appear to have a destabilizing effect on the monomers. This keeps them in a structure forming amorphous aggregates for a longer period of time, leading to the formation of spherical bodies followed...... by the assembly of fibrils. Hence, the in vivo formation of amyloid fibrils in DRA could be initiated by the generation of ¿K58-ß2m which spontaneously aggregate and form fibrils. The fibrillogenesis is enhanced by the involvement of GAGs and/or metal ions, and results in amyloid-like fibrils able to promote...

  2. HYPERTHYROIDISM AND ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Marusenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Review on a problem of the development of atrial fibrillation in patients with thyrotoxicosis is presented. Thyrotoxicosis is one of the most frequent endocrine diseases, conceding only to a diabetes mellitus. The most frequent reasons of hyperthyroidism are Graves’ disease and functional thyroid autonomy. The authors give an analysis of data on the cardiac effects of thyrotoxicosis, features of heart remodeling under the influence of thyroid hyperfunction, prevalence of atrial fibrillation in thyrotoxicosis, depending on age, as well as the possibility of restoring sinus rhythm in the combination of these diseases. Particular attention is paid to the effect on the heart of subclinical thyrotoxicosis, which is defined as a dysfunction of the thyroid gland, characterized by low serum concentration of thyrotropin, normal values of free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is also capable of causing heart remodeling and diastolic dysfunction.Prevalence of thyrotoxicosis in elderly people is higher in areas of iodine deficiency; it is relevant for our country due to the large territory of iodine deficiency. In elderly patients, the cardiac effects of thyrotoxicosis prevail in the clinical picture, that makes it difficult to diagnose endocrine disorders, and correction of thyrotoxicosis is critically important for the successful control of the heart rhythm. The article also discusses the problem of thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy, caused by the toxic effect of excess thyroid hormones: features of this heart disorder, factors affecting its formation, clinical significance and contribution to the development of rhythm disturbances. The greatest significance is the development of atrial fibrillation as a result of thyrotox-icosis in older patients who already have various cardiovascular diseases.Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in thyrotoxicosis. The main cause of arrhythmia in hyperthyroidism is the

  3. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Familial atrial fibrillation Familial atrial fibrillation Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial atrial fibrillation is an inherited abnormality of the heart's normal ...

  4. Torakal Ventral Cord Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Tok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Ventral cord herniation is a rare cause of focal myelopathy due to herniation of the thoracic cord through a dural defect.It is also known by a variety of other terms such as spontaneous thoracic cord herniation or idiopathic spinal cord herniation.The key feature is focal distortion and rotation of the cord with no CSF seen between it and the ventral theca.

  5. (Heckel) seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UTILISATEUR

    Garcinia kola seeds to six different hormonal pre-germination treatments. This consisted of ... Thus, seed dormancy in this case is not a coat- imposed .... development of the cultivation of the species. The cause .... Hormonal regulation of seed ...

  6. Core sequence of PAPf39 amyloid fibrils and mechanism of pH-dependent fibril formation: the role of monomer conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Kinsley C; Makhatadze, George I

    2012-12-21

    PAPf39, a 39-residue peptide fragment from human prostatic acidic phosphatase, has been shown to form amyloid fibrils in semen (SEVI), which increase HIV infectivity by up to 5 orders of magnitude. The sequence of the PAPf39 fibrillar core was identified using hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry and protease protection assays. The central and C-terminal regions are highly protected from HDX and proteolytic cleavage and, thus, are part of the fibrillar core. Conversely, the N-terminal region is unprotected from HDX and proteolytic cleavage, suggesting that it is exposed and not part of the fibrillar core. This finding was tested using two N-terminal truncated variants, PAPf39Δ1-8 and PAPf39Δ1-13. Both variants formed amyloid fibrils at neutral pH. However, these variants showed a markedly different pH dependence of fibril formation versus that of PAPf39. PAPf39 fibrils can form at pH 7.7, but not at pH 5.5 or 2.5, while both N-terminally truncated variants can form fibrils at these pH values. Thus, the N-terminal region is not necessary for fibril formation but modulates the pH dependence of PAPf39 fibril formation. PAPf39Δ1-8 and PAPf39Δ1-13 are capable of seeding PAPf39 fibril formation at neutral pH, suggesting that these variants are structurally compatible with PAPf39, yet no mixed fibril formation occurs between the truncated variants and PAPf39 at low pH. This suggests that pH affects the PAPf39 monomer conformational ensemble, which is supported by far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy. A conceptual model describing the pH dependence of PAPf39 aggregation is proposed and provides potential biological implications.

  7. [Atrial fibrillation in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquizan, Caroline

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrilation (AF) is frequent and a strong risk factor for ischemic stroke in elderly. Ischemic stroke in patients with AF are more severe. Vitamine K antagonist therapy is highly effective for stroke prevention but is associated with hemorrhagic risk. The new oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitor [dabigatran], and direct factor Xa inhibitors [rivaroxaban and apixaban]) have all shown non inferiority or superiority, with better safety, considering the risk of intracranial haemorrhage. On this basis, it is justified to give them in priority in the vast majority of patients with AF, the choice of the drug and the dose is individual.

  8. Self-Assembled Matrix by Umbilical Cord Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagio Saitta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Corneal integrity is critical for vision. Corneal wounds frequently heal with scarring that impairs vision. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (cord stem cells have been investigated for tissue engineering and therapy due to their availability and differentiation potential. In this study, we used cord stem cells in a 3-dimensional (3D stroma-like model to observe extracellular matrix organization, with human corneal fibroblasts acting as a control. For 4 weeks, the cells were stimulated with a stable Vitamin C (VitC derivative ±TGF-b1. After 4 weeks, the mean thickness of the constructs was ~30 mm; however, cord stem cell constructs had 50% less cells per unit volume, indicating the formation of a dense matrix. We found minimal change in decorin and lumican mRNA, and a significant increase in perlecan mRNA in the presence of TGF-b1. Keratocan on the other hand decreased with TGF-b1 in both cell lineages. With both cell types, the constructs possessed aligned collagen fibrils and associated glycosaminoglycans. Fibril diameters did not change with TGF-b1 stimulation or cell lineage; however, highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans associated with the collagen fibrils significantly increased with TGF-b1. Overall, we have shown that cord stem cells can secrete their own extracellular matrix and promote the deposition and sulfation of various proteoglycans. Furthermore, these cells are at least comparable to commonly used corneal fibroblasts and present an alternative for the 3D in vitro tissue engineered model.

  9. End-to-end Structural Restriction of α-Synuclein and Its Influence on Amyloid Fibril Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Chul Suk; Park, Jae Hyung; Choe, Young Jun; Paik, Seung R.

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between molecular freedom of amyloidogenic protein and its self-assembly into amyloid fibrils has been evaluated with α-synuclein, an intrinsically unfolded protein related to Parkinson's disease, by restricting its structural plasticity through an end-to-end disulfide bond formation between two newly introduced cysteine residues on the N- and C-termini. Although the resulting circular form of α-synuclein exhibited an impaired fibrillation propensity, the restriction did not completely block the protein's interactive core since co-incubation with wild-type α-synuclein dramatically facilitated the fibrillation by producing distinctive forms of amyloid fibrils. The suppressed fibrillation propensity was instantly restored as the structural restriction was unleashed with β-mercaptoethanol. Conformational flexibility of the accreting amyloidogenic protein to pre-existing seeds has been demonstrated to be critical for fibrillar extension process by exerting structural adjustment to a complementary structure for the assembly

  10. End-to-end Structural Restriction of α-Synuclein and Its Influence on Amyloid Fibril Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Chul Suk; Park, Jae Hyung; Choe, Young Jun; Paik, Seung R. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Relationship between molecular freedom of amyloidogenic protein and its self-assembly into amyloid fibrils has been evaluated with α-synuclein, an intrinsically unfolded protein related to Parkinson's disease, by restricting its structural plasticity through an end-to-end disulfide bond formation between two newly introduced cysteine residues on the N- and C-termini. Although the resulting circular form of α-synuclein exhibited an impaired fibrillation propensity, the restriction did not completely block the protein's interactive core since co-incubation with wild-type α-synuclein dramatically facilitated the fibrillation by producing distinctive forms of amyloid fibrils. The suppressed fibrillation propensity was instantly restored as the structural restriction was unleashed with β-mercaptoethanol. Conformational flexibility of the accreting amyloidogenic protein to pre-existing seeds has been demonstrated to be critical for fibrillar extension process by exerting structural adjustment to a complementary structure for the assembly.

  11. The changing face of glucagon fibrillation: Structural polymorphism and conformational imprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.; Dikov, D.; Flink, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    is not the result of the global energy minimization, but rather kinetically controlled by solvent conditions and seed-imprinting. Fibrillar polymorphism, which is being reported for an increasing number of proteins, probably reflects that fibrils have not been under evolutionary constraints to retain a single...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  14. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  2. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord over time and may be exacerbated during sports or pregnancy, or may be due to narrowing of the ... cord over time and may be exacerbated during sports or pregnancy, or may be due to narrowing of the ...

  3. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ... a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? ...

  6. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Roberto A.; Rosa, Ronaldo F.; Santos, Silvio CM

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses atrial fibrillation according to the guidelines of Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias and the Brazilian Cardiogeriatrics Guidelines. We stress the thromboembolic burden of atrial fibrillation and discuss how to prevent it as well as the best way to conduct cases of atrial fibrillatios in the elderly, reverting the arrhythmia to sinus rhythm, or the option of heart rate control. The new methods to treat atrial fibrillation, such as radiofrequency ablation, new oral direct thrombin inhibitors and Xa factor inhibitors, as well as new antiarrhythmic drugs, are depicted. PMID:22916053

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  12. Pharmacological Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sugi, MD PhD

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological treatment for atrial fibrillation has a variety of purposes, such as pharmacological defibrillation, maintenance of sinus rhythm, heart rate control to prevent congestive heart failure and prevention of both cerebral infarction and atrial remodeling. Sodium channel blockers are superior to potassium channel blockers for atrial defibrillation, while both sodium and potassium channel blockers are effective in the maintenance of sinus rhythm. In general, digitalis or Ca antagonists are used to control heart rate during atrial fibrillation to prevent congestive heart failure, while amiodarone or bepridil also reduce heart rates during atrial fibrillation. Anticoagulant therapy with warfarin is recommended to prevent cerebral infarction and angiotensin converting enzyme antagonists or angiotensin II receptor blockers are also used to prevent atrial remodeling. One should select appropriate drugs for treatment of atrial fibrillation according to the patient's condition.

  13. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  14. Atrial fibrillation and hyperthyroidism: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vivek; Taha, Wael; Kundumadam, Shanker; Khan, Mazhar

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia worldwide with increasing frequency noted with age. Hyperthyroidism is a well-known cause of atrial fibrillation with a 16%-60% prevalence of atrial fibrillation in patients with known hyperthyroidism Ross et al. (2016). While hyperthyroidism as a causative factor of atrial fibrillation is well established, this literature review aims to answer several questions on this topic including: 1. The relationship of atrial fibrillation to hyperthyroidism 2. Atrial fibrillation as a predictor of hyperthyroidism 3. The pathophysiology of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation 4. Subclinical hyperthyroidism and the relationship with atrial fibrillation 5. Cardioversion and Catheter ablation of hyperthyroid patients with atrial fibrillation 6. Thrombotic risk of hyperthyroid patients with atrial fibrillation 7. Management of Thyrotoxic Atrial fibrillation 8. Pharmacological rhythm control in patients with hyperthyroidism and atrial fibrillation 9. Treatment of Hyperthyroidism to prevent atrial fibrillation 10. Clinical Implications of Hyperthyroidism and Atrial Fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Albumin fibrillization induces apoptosis via integrin/FAK/Akt pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous proteins can be converted to amyloid-like fibrils to increase cytotoxicity and induce apoptosis, but the methods generally require a high concentration of protein, vigorous shaking, or fibril seed. As well, the detailed mechanism of the cytotoxic effects is not well characterized. In this study, we have developed a novel process to convert native proteins into the fibrillar form. We used globular bovine serum albumin (BSA as a model protein to verify the properties of the fibrillar protein, investigated its cellular effects and studied the signaling cascade induced by the fibrillar protein. Results We induced BSA, a non-cytotoxic globular protein, to become fibril by a novel process involving Superdex-200 column chromatography in the presence of anionic or zwittergenic detergent(s. The column pore size was more important than column matrix composite in fibril formation. The fibrillar BSA induced apoptosis in BHK-21 cell as well as breast cancer cell line T47D. Pre-treating cells with anti-integrin antibodies blocked the apoptotic effect. Fibrillar BSA, but not globular BSA, bound to integrin, dephosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK, Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β. Conclusion We report on a novel process for converting globular proteins into fibrillar form to cause apoptosis by modulating the integrin/FAK/Akt/GSK-3β/caspase-3 signaling pathway. Our findings may be useful for understanding the pathogenesis of amyloid-like fibrils and applicable for the development of better therapeutic agents that target the underlying mechanism(s of the etiologic agents.

  16. Thermal Stimulation Alters Cervical Spinal Cord Functional Connectivity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kenneth A; Sentis, Amy I; Bernadel-Huey, Olivia N; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Parrish, Todd B; Mackey, Sean

    2018-01-15

    The spinal cord has an active role in the modulation and transmission of the neural signals traveling between the body and the brain. Recent advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made the in vivo examination of spinal cord function in humans now possible. This technology has been recently extended to the investigation of resting state functional networks in the spinal cord, leading to the identification of distinct patterns of spinal cord functional connectivity. In this study, we expand on the previous work and further investigate resting state cervical spinal cord functional connectivity in healthy participants (n = 15) using high resolution imaging coupled with both seed-based functional connectivity analyses and graph theory-based metrics. Within spinal cord segment functional connectivity was present between the left and right ventral horns (bilateral motor network), left and right dorsal horns (bilateral sensory network), and the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns (unilateral sensory-motor network). Functional connectivity between the spinal cord segments was less apparent with the connectivity centered at the region of interest and spanning spinal cord functional network was demonstrated to be state-dependent as thermal stimulation of the right ventrolateral forearm resulted in significant disruption of the bilateral sensory network, increased network global efficiency, and decreased network modularity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Atrial fibrillation associated with chocolate intake abuse and chronic salbutamol inhalation abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; Rocca, Roberto La

    2010-11-19

    The use of substances as the substrate for atrial fibrillation is not frequently recognized. Chocolate is derived from the roasted seeds of the plant theobroma cacao and its components are the methylxanthine alkaloids theobromine and caffeine. Caffeine is a methylxanthine whose primary biological effect is the competitive antagonism of the adenosine receptor. Normal consumption of caffeine was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter. Sympathomimetic effects, due to circulating catecholamines cause the cardiac manifestations of caffeine overdose toxicity, produce tachyarrhythmias such as supraventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation.The commonly used doses of inhaled or nebulized salbutamol induced no acute myocardial ischaemia, arrhythmias or changes in heart rate variability in patients with coronary artery disease and clinically stable asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Two-week salbutamol treatment shifts the cardiovascular autonomic regulation to a new level characterized by greater sympathetic responsiveness and slight beta2-receptor tolerance. We present a case of atrial fibrillation associated with chocolate intake abuse in a 19-year-old Italian woman with chronic salbutamol inhalation abuse. This case focuses attention on chocolate intake abuse associated with chronic salbutamol abuse as the substrate for atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Glucagon Amyloid-like Fibril Morphology Is Selected via Morphology-Dependent Growth Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.B.; Otzen, D.; Christiansen, Gunna

    2007-01-01

    Protein Structure and Biophysics, Novo Nordisk A/S, Novo Nordisk Park, DK-2760 Malov, Denmark, Centre for Insoluble Protein Structures (inSPIN), Department of Life Sciences, Aalborg University, Sohngaardsholmsvej 49, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark, and Institute of Medical Microbiology and Immunology...... twisted fibril seeds cannot grow at high concentrations. We conclude that there exists a morphology-dependent mechanism for inhibition of glucagon fibril growth. Light scattering experiments indicate that glucagon is mainly monomeric below 1 mg/mL and increasingly trimeric above this concentration. We...

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Sally L; Waddington, Lynne J; Goldie, Kenneth N

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy of negatively stained and cryo-prepared specimens allows amyloid fibrils to be visualised at high resolution in a dried or a hydrated state, and is an essential method for characterising the morphology of fibrils and pre-fibrillar species. We outline the key steps involved in the preparation and observation of samples using negative staining and cryo-electron preservation. We also discuss methods to measure fibril characteristics, such as fibril width, from electron micrographs.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... Your email address * This iframe contains the logic required to ...

  1. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G. Andrade, MD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1 the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2 selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3 predictors of efficacy, 4 advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5 strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy.

  2. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability......, and hospitalizations. During the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association (AFNET/EHRA) consensus conference, we identified the following opportunities to personalize management of AF in a better manner with a view to improve outcomes by integrating atrial morphology and damage...

  3. Seed quality in informal seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: informal seed systems, seed recycling, seed quality, germination, seed pathology, seed health, seed-borne diseases, mycotoxigenic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides, mycotoxins, Vigna unguiculata, Zea mays, Nigeria.

    Seed is a crucial input for agricultural production.

  4. A beta2-microglobulin cleavage variant fibrillates at near-physiological pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) deposits as amyloid in dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), predominantly in joints. The molecular mechanisms underlying the amyloidogenicity of beta2m are still largely unknown. In vitro, acidic conditions, pH ... several days. Here, we show that amyloid fibrils are generated in less than an hour when a cleavage variant of beta2m--found in the circulation of many dialysis patients--is exposed to pH levels (pH 6.6) occurring in joints during inflammation. Aggregation and fibrillation, including seeding effects...... with intact, native beta2m were studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry, capillary electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. We conclude that a biologically relevant variant of beta2m is amyloidogenic at slightly acidic pH. Also, only a very small amount of preformed fibrils...

  5. Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora C Botwinick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying (DGE are common after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Our aim was to investigate a potential relationship between atrial fibrillation and DGE, which we defined as failure to tolerate a regular diet by the 7(th postoperative day. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 249 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy at our institution between 2000 and 2009. Data was analyzed with Fisher exact test for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney U or unpaired T-test for continuous variables. RESULTS: Approximately 5% of the 249 patients included in the analysis experienced at least one episode of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Median age of patients with atrial fibrillation was 74 years, compared with 66 years in patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0005. Patients with atrial fibrillation were more likely to have a history of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03. 92% of the patients with atrial fibrillation suffered from DGE, compared to 46% of patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0007. This association held true when controlling for age. CONCLUSION: Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation are more likely to experience delayed gastric emptying. Interventions to manage delayed gastric function might be prudent in patients at high risk for postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  6. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweers, K K M; Bennink, M L; Subramaniam, V

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils. (topical review)

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  11. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanaroff, Alexander C; Steffel, Jan; Alexander, John H

    2018-01-01

    of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Observational studies employing RWD are useful for describing how oral anticoagulants are used in clinical practice, but generally cannot be used to make claims regarding comparative treatment effects. Questions regarding treatment effect generally are best answered...

  12. Risk Factors for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. Krijthe (Bouwe)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by rapid disorganized atrial electrical activity resulting in absence of atrial contractions. It is diagnosed on the basis of typical findings on an electrocardiogram (ECG). The characteristic ECG findings are

  13. Genetic basis of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Campuzano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and remains as one of main challenges in current clinical practice. The disease may be induced secondary to other diseases such as hypertension, valvular heart disease, and heart failure, conferring an increased risk of stroke and sudden death. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that genetic factors play an important role and up to 30% of clinically diagnosed patients may have a family history of atrial fibrillation. To date, several rare variants have been identified in a wide range of genes associated with ionic channels, calcium handling protein, fibrosis, conduction and inflammation. Important advances in clinical, genetic and molecular basis have been performed over the last decade, improving diagnosis and treatment. However, the genetics of atrial fibrillation is complex and pathophysiological data remains still unraveling. A better understanding of the genetic basis will induce accurate risk stratification and personalized clinical treatment. In this review, we have focused on current genetics basis of atrial fibrillation.

  14. Signal analysis of ventricular fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbschleb, J.N.; Heethaar, R.M.; Tweel, L.H. van der; Zimmerman, A.N.E.; Meijler, F.L.

    Signal analysis of electro(cardio)grams during ventricular fibrillation (VF) in dogs and human patients indicates more organization and regularity than the official WHO definition suggests. The majority of the signal is characterized by a power spectrum with narrow, equidistant peaks. In a further

  15. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouza, Maksim, E-mail: mkouza@chem.uw.edu.pl; Kolinski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszaw (Poland); Co, Nguyen Truong [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of HCM City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Phuong H. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan, E-mail: masli@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  16. seed oils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    processes, production of biodiesel, as lubricant and in deep-frying purposes. They could ... for its juice, nectars and fruit while its seeds are ... Malaysia. The fine seed powder was stored in a plastic container inside a refrigerator at between 4 o.

  17. seed flour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... and with a nice taste, used for cooking or as lamp oil. The fatty acid ... Pra seeds were obtained from a local market in Nakhon Si Thammarat. Page 2. Table 1. Proximate composition of pra seed flour. Constituent. Percentage ...

  18. Robotic seeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Fountas, Spyros; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural robotics has received attention for approximately 20 years, but today there are only a few examples of the application of robots in agricultural practice. The lack of uptake may be (at least partly) because in many cases there is either no compelling economic benefit......, or there is a benefit but it is not recognized. The aim of this chapter is to quantify the economic benefits from the application of agricultural robots under a specific condition where such a benefit is assumed to exist, namely the case of early seeding and re-seeding in sugar beet. With some predefined assumptions...... with regard to speed, capacity and seed mapping, we found that among these two technical systems both early seeding with a small robot and re-seeding using a robot for a smaller part of the field appear to be financially viable solutions in sugar beet production....

  19. Heterogeneous Seeding of a Prion Structure by a Generic Amyloid Form of the Fungal Prion-forming Domain HET-s(218-289)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, William; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kijac, Aleksandra; Wemmer, David E.; Stubbs, Gerald [UCB; (Vanderbilt); (LBNL)

    2013-11-13

    The fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289) forms infectious amyloid fibrils at physiological pH that were shown by solid-state NMR to be assemblies of a two-rung β-solenoid structure. Under acidic conditions, HET-s(218–289) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils that have very low infectivity in vivo, but structural information about these fibrils has been very limited. We show by x-ray fiber diffraction that the HET-s(218–289) fibrils formed under acidic conditions have a stacked β-sheet architecture commonly found in short amyloidogenic peptides and denatured protein aggregates. At physiological pH, stacked β-sheet fibrils nucleate the formation of the infectious β-solenoid prions in a process of heterogeneous seeding, but do so with kinetic profiles distinct from those of spontaneous or homogeneous (seeded with infectious β-solenoid fibrils) fibrillization. Several serial passages of stacked β-sheet-seeded solutions lead to fibrillization kinetics similar to homogeneously seeded solutions. Our results directly show that structural mutation can occur between substantially different amyloid architectures, lending credence to the suggestion that the processes of strain adaptation and crossing species barriers are facilitated by structural mutation.

  20. Seed regulations and local seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwaars, N.

    2000-01-01

    Seed regulations have been introduced in most countries based on the development of formal seed production. Concerns about seed quality and about the varietal identity of the seeds have commonly led to seed laws. However, formal regulations are often inappropriate for informal seed systems, which

  1. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Risk of atrial fibrillation in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L; Schjerning, Anne-Marie; Lindhardt, Tommi B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Diabetes has been associated with atrial fibrillation but the current evidence is conflicting. In particular knowledge regarding young diabetes patients and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation is sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients...... with diabetes compared to the background population in Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through Danish nationwide registries we included persons above 18 years of age and without prior atrial fibrillation and/or diabetes from 1996 to 2012. The study cohort was divided into a background population without diabetes...... and a diabetes group. The absolute risk of developing atrial fibrillation was calculated and Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and comorbidities were used to calculate incidence rate ratios of atrial fibrillation. The total study cohort included 5,081,087 persons, 4,827,713 (95%) in the background...

  3. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.

    2006-01-01

    in collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...... produced in the presence of perlecan. Interestingly, the enhancement of collagen fibril formation is independent on the core protein and is mimicked by chondroitin sulfate E but neither by chondroitin sulfate D nor dextran sulfate. Furthermore, perlecan chondroitin sulfate contains the 4,6-disulfated...... disaccharides typical for chondroitin sulfate E. Indeed, purified glycosaminoglycans from perlecan-enriched fractions of cartilage extracts contain elevated levels of 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate disaccharides and enhance collagen fibril formation. The effect on collagen assembly is proportional...

  4. [Panic disorder and atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olazabal Eizaguirre, N; Chavez, R; González-Torres, M A; Gaviria, M

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the relationship between atrial fibrillation and panic disorder. There are often doubts on the differential diagnosis in emergency services and general medical settings. Panic disorder prevalence rates have been found to be high in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. Various studies have observed that patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders frequently have higher cardiovascular disease rates compared to the general population. Usually, patients suffering from panic disorder exhibit somatic complaints suggesting coronary disease, such as chest pain or palpitations. The aim is to make the correct diagnosis and treatment for these different illnesses, and to decrease the costs due to misdiagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ...

  13. Parachute Cord Tension Sensor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To design and fabricate a light weight (few oz), very small (~2 inch length) parachute cord tension sensor demonstrator device.A major challenge for the CPAS (The...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ... Experiences By Topic Resources Blog Peer Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of Use Site Map ...

  4. Cord-Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord blood mainly because of the promise that stem cell research holds for the future. Most of us would have little use for stem cells now, but research into using them to treat diseases is ongoing — ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow ... recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  9. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  10. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  11. The role of protonation in protein fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Martin D; Westh, Peter; Otzen, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins fibrillate at low pH despite a high population of charged side chains. Therefore exchange of protons between the fibrillating peptide and its surroundings may play an important role in fibrillation. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry to measure exchange of protons between...... buffer and the peptide hormone glucagon during fibrillation. Glucagon absorbs or releases protons to an extent which allows it to attain a net charge of zero in the fibrillar state, both at acidic and basic pH. Similar results are obtained for lysozyme. This suggests that side chain pKa values change...

  12. Stop-and-go kinetics in amyloid fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Fonslet, Jesper; Andersen, Christian Beyschau

    2010-01-01

    Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow in an intermi......Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow...

  13. Opposed Effects of Dityrosine Formation in Soluble and Aggregated α-Synuclein on Fibril Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wördehoff, Michael M; Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Groß, Luca; Gremer, Lothar; Stoldt, Matthias; Buell, Alexander K; Willbold, Dieter; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2017-10-13

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. It is characterized by aggregation of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn) in Lewy bodies, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased oxidative stress in the substantia nigra. Oxidative stress leads to several modifications of biomolecules including dityrosine (DiY) crosslinking in proteins, which has recently been detected in α-syn in Lewy bodies from Parkinson's disease patients. Here we report that α-syn is highly susceptible to ultraviolet-induced DiY formation. We investigated DiY formation of α-syn and nine tyrosine-to-alanine mutants and monitored its effect on α-syn fibril formation in vitro. Ultraviolet irradiation of intrinsically disordered α-syn generates DiY-modified monomers and dimers, which inhibit fibril formation of unmodified α-syn by interfering with fibril elongation. The inhibition depends on both the DiY group and its integration into α-syn. When preformed α-syn fibrils are crosslinked by DiY formation, they gain increased resistance to denaturation. DiY-stabilized α-syn fibrils retain their high seeding efficiency even after being exposed to denaturant concentrations that completely depolymerize non-crosslinked seeds. Oxidative stress-associated DiY crosslinking of α-syn therefore entails two opposing effects: (i) inhibition of aggregation by DiY-modified monomers and dimers, and (ii) stabilization of fibrillar aggregates against potential degradation mechanisms, which can lead to promotion of aggregation, especially in the presence of secondary nucleation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Aspects epidemiologiques et etiologiques de la fibrillation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion : La fibrillation auriculaire est fréquente chez l'adulte noir togolais. Ses étiologies sont dominées par l'hypertension artérielle et les cardiomyopathies dilatées. complications and stoke. Aim: Our aim was to study epidemiologic and etiologic aspects of atrial fibrillation in black togolese in hospital circle. Material ...

  15. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene; Hassenkam, Tue; P, Hansen

    2010-01-01

    Whole tendon and fibril bundles display viscoelastic behavior, but to the best of our knowledge this property has not been directly measured in single human tendon fibrils. In the present work an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach was used for tensile testing of two human patellar tendon fibr...

  16. Fibril assembly in whey protein mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to study fibril assembly in mixtures of whey proteins. The effect of the composition of the protein mixture on the structures and the resulting phase behaviour was investigated. The current work has shown that beta-lactoglobulin is responsible for the fibril assembly

  17. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Umbilical cord abnormalities Umbilical cord abnormalities Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. ... blood supply) to the baby. The two arteries transport waste from the baby to the placenta (where ...

  18. Cetirizine-Induced atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altuğ Osken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common observed arrhythmia in clinical practice. In the literature, AF events associated with drug induction are available. Cetirizine is a second-generation histamine antagonist used in the treatment of allergies, angioedema, and urticaria. We wish to present an atypical case who took cetirizine medication for relieving symptoms of upper tract respiratory system infection, experienced rapid ventricular response AF and treated successfully. To best of our knowledge, this is the first case of cetirizine-induced AF.

  19. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  20. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  1. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  2. seed oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wara

    Neem seed oil from the neem tree (Azadiracta indica) finds wide usage one of which is its utilization for cosmetics particularly .... obtained which is higher than that of olive oil 17. mgKOH/g (Davine ... The skin tolerance of shea fat employed as ...

  3. Atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Once considered as nothing more than a nuisance after cardiac surgery, the importance of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF has been realized in the last decade, primarily because of the morbidity associated with the condition. Numerous causative factors have been described without any single factor being singled out as the cause of this complication. POAF has been associated with stroke, renal failure and congestive heart failure, although it is difficult to state whether POAF is directly responsible for these complications. Guidelines have been formulated for prevention of POAF. However, very few cardiothoracic centers follow any form of protocol to prevent POAF. Routine use of prophylaxis would subject all patients to the side effects of anti-arrhythmic drugs, while only a minority of the patients do actually develop this problem postoperatively. Withdrawal of beta blockers in the postoperative period has been implicated as one of the major causes of POAF. Amiodarone, calcium channel blockers and a variety of other pharmacological agents have been used for the prevention of POAF. Atrial pacing is a non-pharmacological measure which has gained popularity in the prevention of POAF. There is considerable controversy regarding whether rate control is superior to rhythm control in the treatment of established atrial fibrillation (AF. Amiodarone plays a central role in both rate control and rhythm control in postoperative AF. Newer drugs like dronedarone and ranazoline are likely to come into the market in the coming years.

  4. A β2-microglobulin cleavage variant fibrillates at near-physiological pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlin, Dorthe B.; Johnsen, Christina K.; Nissen, Mogens H.; Heegaard, Niels H.H.

    2009-01-01

    β 2 -microglobulin (β 2 m) deposits as amyloid in dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), predominantly in joints. The molecular mechanisms underlying the amyloidogenicity of β 2 m are still largely unknown. In vitro, acidic conditions, pH 2 m within several days. Here, we show that amyloid fibrils are generated in less than an hour when a cleavage variant of β 2 m-found in the circulation of many dialysis patients-is exposed to pH levels (pH 6.6) occurring in joints during inflammation. Aggregation and fibrillation, including seeding effects with intact, native β 2 m were studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry, capillary electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. We conclude that a biologically relevant variant of β 2 m is amyloidogenic at slightly acidic pH. Also, only a very small amount of preformed fibrils of this variant is required to induce fibrillation of native β 2 m. This may explain the apparent lack of detectable amounts of the variant β 2 m in extracts of amyloid from DRA patients.

  5. Fixed cord in spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Wang, H.; Francomano, C.; Hurko, O.; Carson, B.; Heffez, D.S.; DiChiro, G.; Bryan, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates patients with cervical spinal canal compromise due to congenital anomalies (achondroplasia, Chiari malformation) and degenerative diseases using MR cord motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow studies. Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the cervical cord was determined by means of cardiac-gated velocity phase contrast methods, including cine. Pathology included dwarfism (n = 15), Chiari malformation (n = 10), spondylosis (n = 10), and acute cord compression (n = 9). Symptomatic cases of congenital cervical stenosis had decreased cord motion, although CSF flow was not always significantly compromised. Postoperative cases demonstrated good cord and CSF motion, unless compression or obstruction was present

  6. The C-terminus hot spot region helps in the fibril formation of bacteriophage-associated hyaluronate lyase (HylP2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Harish; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2015-09-23

    The bacteriophage encoded hyaluronate lyases (HylP and HylP2) degrade hyaluronan and other glycosaminoglycans. HylP2 forms a functional fibril under acidic conditions in which its N-terminus is proposed to form the fibrillar core, leading to nucleation and acceleration of fibril formation. Here we report the presence of a hot spot region (A144GVVVY149) towards the carboxy terminus of HylP2, essential for the acceleration of fibril formation. The 'hot spot' is observed to be inherently mutated for valines (A178AMVMY183) in case of HylP. The N- terminal swapped chimeras between these phage HLs ((N)HylP2(C)HylP and (N)HylP(C)HylP2) or HylP did not form fibrils at acidic pH. However, seeding of prefibrils of HylP2 recompensed nucleation and led to fibrillation in (N)HylP(C)HylP2. The V147A mutation in the 'hot spot' region abolished fibril formation in HylP2. The M179V and M181V double mutations in the 'hot spot' region of HylP led to fibrillation with the seeding of prefibrils. It appears that fibrillation in HylP2 even though is initiated by the N-terminus, is accelerated by the conserved 'hot spot' region in the C-terminus. A collagenous (Gly-X-Y)10 motif in the N-terminus and a mutated 'hot spot' region in the C-terminus of HylP affect fibrillar nucleation and acceleration respectively.

  7. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  8. Vocal Cord Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral infections. Some viral infections, such as Lyme disease, Epstein-Barr and herpes, can cause inflammation and damage directly to the nerves in the larynx. Neurological conditions. If you have certain ... disease, you may experience vocal cord paralysis. Risk factors ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite David, ... injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  14. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  15. Sucrose modulates insulin amyloid-like fibril formation: effect on the aggregation mechanism and fibril morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marasini, Carlotta; Foderà, Vito; Vestergaard, Bente

    2017-01-01

    the protein self-assembly pathways. Using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and transmission electron microscopy, we study the kinetics of formation and structural properties of human insulin fibrils in the presence of sucrose. The presence of sucrose results...... in a delay of the onset of fibrillation. Moreover, it leads to a dramatic change in both the morphology and overall amount of fibrils. Our results emphasize that the detailed composition of protein surroundings likely influences not only the fibrillation kinetics but also the balance between different...

  16. Electroversion in treatment of arrhythmia in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Peng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】We report electroversion in treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF and atrioventricular nodal reentry ta-chycardia (AVNRT in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cervical spinal cord injury. At first, the pa-tient sustained respiratory failure and weak cough reflex, thereafter repeated bronchoscopy was used to aspirate the sputum as well as control the pneumonia, which resulted in arrhythmia (AF and AVNRT. Two doses of intravenous amiodarone failed to correct the arrhythmia. After restora-tion of sinus rhythm by electroversion, he was successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation and discharged from the intensive care unit without recurrent arrhythmia. Key words: Arrhythmia, cardiac; Atrial fibrillation; Electric countershock; Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome; Spinal cord injuries

  17. Psychosomatic correlations in atrial fibrillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ernstovich Medvedev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atrial fibrillations (AF and comorbid mental disorders were examined. Two patient groups differing in the structure of psychosomatic ratios were identified. Group 1 comprised patients with AF and signs of reactivity lability that manifested itself as psychopathological reactions to the primary manifestations of AF; Group 2 included those who had developed mental disorders mainly in end-stage cardiovascular disease (predominantly a permanent form of AF in the presence of such events as chronic heart failure (CHF. The results of the study suggest that the patients with AF have frequently anxiety and hypochondriacal disorders, which agrees with the data available in the literature. In addition, end-stage AF is marked by depressive syndromes caused by the severe course of cardiovascular diseases resulting in CHF.

  18. Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen, B; Viskin, S

    1993-06-01

    Important data have recently been added to our understanding of sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurring in the absence of demonstrable heart disease. Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia (VT) is usually of monomorphic configuration and can be classified according to its site of origin as either right monomorphic (70% of all idiopathic VTs) or left monomorphic VT. Several physiopathological types of monomorphic VT can be presently individualized, according to their mode of presentation, their relationship to adrenergic stress, or their response to various drugs. The long-term prognosis is usually good. Idiopathic polymorphic VT is a much rarer type of arrhythmia with a less favorable prognosis. Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation may represent an underestimated cause of sudden cardiac death in ostensibly healty patients. A high incidence of inducibility of sustained polymorphic VT with programmed ventricular stimulation has been found by our group, but not by others. Long-term prognosis on Class IA antiarrhythmic medications that are highly effective at electrophysiologic study appears excellent.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsett, Mark; Hamilton, Douglas; Lemery, Jay; Polk, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible scenario of an astronaut having Atrial Fibrillation during a Mars Mission. In the case review the presentation asks several questions about the alternatives for treatment, medications and the ramifications of the decisions.

  20. [Relations between FANS, PPI and atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Fabrizio; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2013-05-01

    Recent evidence supports the existence of an association between the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of atrial fibrillation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory disorders, and chronic inflammation is a well-known risk factor for the development of myocardial fibrosis. The latter accounts for atrial inhomogeneities of conduction, thus triggering and perpetuating atrial fibrillation. Atrial inflammatory remodeling may therefore be responsible for the higher incidence of atrial fibrillation among patients assuming steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of an underlying inflammatory disorders. Alternative theories contemplate gastroesophageal reflux, which is extremely common during the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and may trigger atrial fibrillation, as mediating the above-mentioned association.

  1. Salbutamol Abuse is Associated with Ventricular Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin UYSAL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Salbutamol-induced cardiac complications are well-established. Herein, we describe a case of a 24-year female who was admitted to the emergency department because of a suicide attempt with salbutamol (76 mg. Salbutamol abuse induced the development of supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Regular sinus rhythm was restored with defibrillation. The hypokalemic patient who stayed in the intensive care unit was discharged after 48 hours of hospitalization. Key words: Salbutamol, suicide, ventricular fibrillation

  2. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. How Glycosaminoglycans Promote Fibrillation of Salmon Calcitonin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmos, Kirsten Gade; Bjerring, Morten; Jessen, Christian Moestrup; Nielsen, Erik Holm Toustrup; Poulsen, Ebbe T.; Christiansen, Gunna; Vosegaard, Thomas; Skrydstrup, Troels; Enghild, Jan J.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bind all known amyloid plaques and help store protein hormones in (acidic) granular vesicles, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these important effects are unclear. Here we investigate GAG interactions with the peptide hormone salmon calcitonin (sCT). GAGs induce fast sCT fibrillation at acidic pH and only bind monomeric sCT at acidic pH, inducing sCT helicity. Increasing GAG sulfation expands the pH range for binding. Heparin, the most highly sulfated GAG, binds sCT in the pH interval 3–7. Small angle x-ray scattering indicates that sCT monomers densely decorate and pack single heparin chains, possibly via hydrophobic patches on helical sCT. sCT fibrillates without GAGs, but heparin binding accelerates the process by decreasing the otherwise long fibrillation lag times at low pH and accelerates fibril growth rates at neutral pH. sCT·heparin complexes form β-sheet-rich heparin-covered fibrils. Solid-state NMR reveals that heparin does not alter the sCT fibrillary core around Lys11 but makes changes to Val8 on the exterior side of the β-strand, possibly through contacts to Lys18. Thus GAGs significantly modulate sCT fibrillation in a pH-dependent manner by interacting with both monomeric and aggregated sCT. PMID:27281819

  4. Collagen Fibrils: Nature's Highly Tunable Nonlinear Springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Orestis G; Desissaire, Sylvia; Thurner, Philipp J

    2018-03-21

    Tissue hydration is well known to influence tissue mechanics and can be tuned via osmotic pressure. Collagen fibrils are nature's nanoscale building blocks to achieve biomechanical function in a broad range of biological tissues and across many species. Intrafibrillar covalent cross-links have long been thought to play a pivotal role in collagen fibril elasticity, but predominantly at large, far from physiological, strains. Performing nanotensile experiments of collagen fibrils at varying hydration levels by adjusting osmotic pressure in situ during atomic force microscopy experiments, we show the power the intrafibrillar noncovalent interactions have for defining collagen fibril tensile elasticity at low fibril strains. Nanomechanical tensile tests reveal that osmotic pressure increases collagen fibril stiffness up to 24-fold in transverse (nanoindentation) and up to 6-fold in the longitudinal direction (tension), compared to physiological saline in a reversible fashion. We attribute the stiffening to the density and strength of weak intermolecular forces tuned by hydration and hence collagen packing density. This reversible mechanism may be employed by cells to alter their mechanical microenvironment in a reversible manner. The mechanism could also be translated to tissue engineering approaches for customizing scaffold mechanics in spatially resolved fashion, and it may help explain local mechanical changes during development of diseases and inflammation.

  5. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, D., E-mail: denis.michel@live.fr [Universite de Rennes1-IRSET, Campus de Beaulieu Bat. 13, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-01-21

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation, and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers, and the accumulation of complexes in vivo by rescue from degradation. Overlooked aspects of these processes are also pointed: the exponential distribution of fibril lengths can be recovered using various models because it is attributable to randomness only. It is also suggested that the same term “critical concentration” is used for different things, involved in either nucleation or elongation.

  6. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  7. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  8. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  9. On the role of fibril mechanics in the work of separation of fibrillating interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, B.G.; Sluis, van der O.; Schreurs, P.J.G.; Geers, M.G.D.; Neggers, J.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    High values for the work of separation have been reported in peel tests on fibrillating interfacial systems. The exact origin of these high values is not properly understood, since it remains unclear which dissipative mechanisms related to fibrillation cause a significant increase in the work of

  10. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  11. Organic leek seed production - securing seed quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Lise Christina; Boelt, Birte

    2011-01-01

    To maintain integrity in organic farming, availability of organically produced GM-free seed of varieties adapted to organic production systems is of vital impor-tance. Despite recent achievements, organic seed supply for a number of vegetable species is insufficient. Still, in many countries...... seeds. Tunnel production is a means of securing seed of high genetic purity and quality, and organic leek (Allium porrum L.) seed production was tested in tunnels in Denmark. The present trial focused on steckling size and in all years large stecklings had a positive effect on both seed yield...

  12. Organic Leek Seed Production - Securing Seed Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, L C; Boelt, B

    2011-01-01

    To maintain integrity in organic farming, availability of organically produced GM-free seed of varieties adapted to organic production systems is of vital impor-tance. Despite recent achievements, organic seed supply for a number of vegetable species is insufficient. Still, in many countries...... seeds. Tunnel production is a means of securing seed of high genetic purity and quality, and organic leek (Allium porrum L.) seed production was tested in tunnels in Denmark. The present trial focused on steckling size and in all years large stecklings had a positive effect on both seed yield...

  13. Persistent atrial fibrillation vs paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: differences in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulescu, Andrei D; Mont, Lluis

    2017-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common human arrhythmia. AF is a progressive disease, initially being nonsustained and induced by trigger activity, and progressing towards persistent AF through alteration of the atrial myocardial substrate. Treatment of AF aims to decrease the risk of stroke and improve the quality of life, by preventing recurrences (rhythm control) or controlling the heart rate during AF (rate control). In the last 20 years, catheter-based and, less frequently, surgical and hybrid ablation techniques have proven more successful compared with drug therapy in achieving rhythm control in patients with AF. However, the efficiency of ablation techniques varies greatly, being highest in paroxysmal and lowest in long-term persistent AF. Areas covered: In this review, we discuss the fundamental differences between paroxysmal and persistent AF and the potential impact of those differences on patient management, emphasizing the available therapeutic strategies to achieve rhythm control. Expert commentary: Treatment to prevent AF recurrences is suboptimal, particularly in patients with persistent AF. Emerging technologies, such as documentation of atrial fibrosis using magnetic resonance imaging and documentation of electrical substrate using advanced electrocardiographic imaging techniques are likely to provide valuable insights about patient-specific tailoring of treatments.

  14. Effect of age on stroke prevention therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation: the atrial fibrillation investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Walraven, Carl; Hart, Robert G; Connolly, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    contains patient level-data from randomized trials of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We used Cox regression models with age as a continuous variable that controlled for sex, year of randomization, and history of cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and congestive heart failure......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke risk increases with age in patients who have nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. It is uncertain whether the efficacy of stroke prevention therapies in atrial fibrillation changes as patients age. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of age...... on the relative efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiplatelet (AP) therapy (including acetylsalicylic acid and triflusal) on ischemic stroke, serious bleeding, and vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: This is an analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Investigators database, which...

  15. The core of Ure2p prion fibrils is formed by the N-terminal segment in a parallel cross-β structure: evidence from solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryndushkin, Dmitry S; Wickner, Reed B; Tycko, Robert

    2011-06-03

    Intracellular fibril formation by Ure2p produces the non-Mendelian genetic element [URE3] in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making Ure2p a prion protein. We show that solid-state NMR spectra of full-length Ure2p fibrils, seeded with infectious prions from a specific [URE3] strain and labeled with uniformly (15)N-(13)C-enriched Ile, include strong, sharp signals from Ile residues in the globular C-terminal domain (CTD) with both helical and nonhelical (13)C chemical shifts. Treatment with proteinase K eliminates these CTD signals, leaving only nonhelical signals from the Gln-rich and Asn-rich N-terminal segment, which are also observed in the solid-state NMR spectra of Ile-labeled fibrils formed by residues 1-89 of Ure2p. Thus, the N-terminal segment, or "prion domain" (PD), forms the fibril core, while CTD units are located outside the core. We additionally show that, after proteinase K treatment, Ile-labeled Ure2p fibrils formed without prion seeding exhibit a broader set of solid-state NMR signals than do prion-seeded fibrils, consistent with the idea that structural variations within the PD core account for prion strains. Measurements of (13)C-(13)C magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among (13)C-labeled Ile carbonyl sites in full-length Ure2p fibrils support an in-register parallel β-sheet structure for the PD core of Ure2p fibrils. Finally, we show that a model in which CTD units are attached rigidly to the parallel β-sheet core is consistent with steric constraints. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Is early cord clamping, delayed cord clamping or cord milking best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Binay; Demirel, Gamze; Ciler Eren, Elif; Erel, Ozcan; Neselioglu, Salim; Karavar, Hande Nur; Gundogdu, Semra; Ulfer, Gozde; Bahadir, Selcen; Tastekin, Ayhan

    2018-04-01

    To compare the antioxidant status of three cord clamping procedures (early clamping, delayed clamping and milking) by analyzing the thiol-disulfide balance. This randomized controlled study enrolled 189 term infants who were divided into three groups according to the cord clamping procedure: early clamping, delayed clamping and milking. Blood samples were collected from the umbilical arteries immediately after clamping, and the thiol/disulfide homeostasis was analyzed. The native and total thiol levels were significantly (p total thiol ratio was significantly (p = .026) lower in the delayed cord clamping and milking groups compared with the early clamping groups. Early cord clamping causes the production of more disulfide bonds and lower thiol levels, indicating that oxidation reactions are increased in the early cord clamping procedure compared with the delayed cord clamping and milking procedures. The oxidant capacity is greater with early cord clamping than with delayed clamping or cord milking. Delayed cord clamping or milking are beneficial in neonatal care, and we suggest that they be performed routinely in all deliveries.

  17. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdovinová, Veronika [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tomašovičová, Natália, E-mail: nhudak@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasyl M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Zentrum fr Material, und Kstenforschung GmbH, Max-Plank-Strae 1, Geesthacht 216502 (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kopčanský, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-06-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  18. Spectral of electrocardiographic RR intervals to indicate atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, Nuryani; Satrio Nugroho, Anto

    2017-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart diseases, which is associated on the risk of death, and thus an early detection of atrial fibrillation is necessary. We have investigated spectral pattern of electrocardiogram in relation to atrial fibrillation. The utilized feature of electrocardiogram is RR interval. RR interval is the time interval between a two-consecutive R peaks. A series of RR intervals in a time segment is converted to a signal with a frequency domain. The frequency components are investigated to find the components which significantly associate to atrial fibrillation. A segment is defined as atrial fibrillation or normal segments by considering a defined number of atrial fibrillation RR in the segment. Using clinical data of 23 patients with atrial fibrillation, we find that the frequency components could be used to indicate atrial fibrillation.

  19. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  20. Treatment Guidelines of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Treatment Guidelines of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF) Updated:Jun 28,2017 What are the treatment guidelines for atrial fibrillation? Medical guidelines are written by ...

  1. Management of atrial fibrillation in the setting of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, HJGM; VandenBerg, MP; VanGelder, IC; VanVeldhuisen, DJ

    Heart failure is often complicated by atrial fibrillation. Once atrial fibrillation has started it further enhances heart failure due to uncontrolled rate with shortened filling time and provocation of tachycardiomyopathy. Absent atrial kick and irregularity of the ventricular rhythm also

  2. Rising rates of hospital admissions for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Jens; Buch, Nina Pernille Gardshodn; Scharling, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia associated with excess morbidity and mortality. We studied temporal changes in hospital admission rates for atrial fibrillation using data from a prospective population-based cohort study spanning 2 decades (the Copenhagen City Heart Study).......Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia associated with excess morbidity and mortality. We studied temporal changes in hospital admission rates for atrial fibrillation using data from a prospective population-based cohort study spanning 2 decades (the Copenhagen City Heart Study)....

  3. Cutting the Cord-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  4. Cutting the Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  5. Vocal cord dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Blakeslee E; Kemp, James S

    2007-06-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction during inspiration has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction, but historical factors and pulmonary function findings may provide adequate clues to the correct diagnosis. Speech therapy, and in some cases psychological counselling, is often beneficial in this disorder. The natural course and prognosis of vocal cord dysfunction are still not well described in adults or children.

  6. Artificial atrial fibrillation in the dog. An artifact?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strackee, J.; Hoelen, A.J.; Zimmerman, A.N.E.; Meijler, F.L.

    R-R interval sequences during artificial atrial fibrillation in dogs were studied in the same way as in patients in a previous study and compared with results obtained in dogs with spontaneous atrial fibrillation. Artificial atrial fibrillation was effected by right atrial stimulation in three

  7. Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that alcohol consumption, both observational (self-reported) and estimated by genetic instruments, is associated with a risk of atrial fibrillation and to determine whether people with high cardiovascular risk are more sensitive towards...... alcohol than people with low risk. METHODS: We used data for a total of 88,782 men and women from the Copenhagen City Heart Study 1991-1994 and 2001-2003 and the Copenhagen General Population Study 2003-2010. Information on incident cases of atrial fibrillation was obtained from a validated nationwide...... register. As a measure of alcohol exposure, both self-reported consumption and genetic variations in alcohol metabolizing genes (ADH1B/ADH1C) were used as instrumental variables. The endpoint was admission to hospital for atrial fibrillation as recorded in a validated hospital register. RESULTS: A total...

  8. The atrial fibrillation ablation pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... was achieved in 40.7% of patients (43.7% in paroxysmal AF; 30.2% in persistent AF; 36.7% in long-lasting persistent AF). A second ablation was required in 18% of the cases and 43.4% were under antiarrhythmic treatment. Thirty-three patients (2.5%) suffered an adverse event, 272 (21%) experienced a left atrial...... tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter ablation of AFib...

  9. Antihypertensive treatment and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Nielsen, Sune F; Benn, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the associations between antihypertensive treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), β-blockers, diuretics, or calcium-antagonists, and risk of atrial fibrillation. We examined these associations using the entire Danish...... population from 1995 through 2010. METHODS AND RESULTS: Excluding medication used in atrial fibrillation, we matched individuals on ACEi monotherapy 1:1 with individuals on β-blocker (n = 48 658), diuretic (n = 69 630), calcium-antagonist (n = 57 646), and ARB monotherapy (n = 20 158). Likewise, individuals...... on ARB monotherapy were matched 1:1 with individuals on β-blocker (n = 20 566), diuretic (n = 20 832), calcium-antagonist (n = 20 232), and ACEi monotherapy (n = 20 158). All were free of atrial fibrillation and of predisposing diseases like heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus...

  10. Digoxin for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J; Nielsen, Emil E; Safi, Sanam

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During recent years, systematic reviews of observational studies have compared digoxin to no digoxin in patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter, and the results of these reviews suggested that digoxin seems to increase the risk of all-cause mortality regardless...... of concomitant heart failure. Our objective was to assess the benefits and harms of digoxin for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter based on randomized clinical trials. METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, SCI-Expanded, BIOSIS for eligible trials comparing digoxin versus placebo......, no intervention, or other medical interventions in patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter in October 2016. Our primary outcomes were all-cause mortality, serious adverse events, and quality of life. Our secondary outcomes were heart failure, stroke, heart rate control, and conversion to sinus rhythm...

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure and chronic atrial fibrillation : Role of duration of at atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, MP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van Gelder, IC; De Kam, PJ; Lie, KI

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants of atrial natriuretic peptide level in patients with congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. In particular, the duration of atrial fibrillation was analyzed because atrial fibrillation per se might have a specific effect on atrial

  12. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  13. Patients with atrial fibrillation and permanent pacemaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Frederik; Ruwald, Martin H; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The management of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) with rate-lowering or anti-arrhythmic drugs has markedly changed over the last decade, but it is unknown how these changes have affected patients with NVAF with a permanent pacemaker (PPM). METHODS: Through Danish......,261. Thus, the proportional amount of NVAF patients with a PPM decreased from 1.3% to 1.1% (p = 0.015). Overall 45.9% had atrial fibrillation (AF) duration less than one year and the proportion declined from 55.5% to 42.4% (p

  14. Atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Gerds, Thomas A.; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Although the relation between stroke risk factors and stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has been extensively examined, only few studies have explored the association of AF and the risk of ischaemic stroke/systemic thromboembolism/transient ischaemic attack (stroke.......5-10.6), and 15.4% (14.5-16.4), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke/TE/TIA risk was particularly increased when prior stroke/TE/TIA was present. Atrial fibrillation is associated with an increase in risk of stroke/TE/TIA in the absence of other risk factors but only a moderate increase in risk when other risk...

  15. Integrating new approaches to atrial fibrillation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotecha, Dipak; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John

    2018-01-01

    There are major challenges ahead for clinicians treating patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The population with AF is expected to expand considerably and yet, apart from anticoagulation, therapies used in AF have not been shown to consistently impact on mortality or reduce adverse...... of the Atrial Fibrillation Network (AFNET) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), held at the European Society of Cardiology Heart House in Sophia Antipolis, France, 17-19 January 2017. Sixty-two global specialists in AF and 13 industry partners met to develop innovative solutions based on new...

  16. Initiation of anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, A.; Staerk, L.; Fosbøl, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing rapidly. We compared characteristics of AF patients initiated on NOACs versus vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Methods: Using Danish nationwide registry data, we...... compared with a VKA [odds ratio (OR) 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28–1.43]. By contrast, patients with a history of myocardial infarction were less likely to be initiated on a NOAC compared with a VKA (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.67–0.77). Conclusions: Atrial fibrillation patients who were initiated...

  17. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  18. Atrial fibrillation and the 4P medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censi, Federica; Cianfrocca, Cinzia; Purificato, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Although the paradigm of the 4P medicine - Predictive, Personalized, Preemptive, and Participatory - has been suggested several years ago, its application to atrial fibrillation is still far away. Given the increasing prevalence and incidence of this pathology it is the time to promote preventive strategies, by identifying the risk factors associated to life style and by incentivizing innovative diagnostic technologies. The promotion of the correct life style and of the use of diagnostic devices based on innovative and reliable technologies, represent a first step towards the full realization of the revolution of 4P medicine in atrial fibrillation.

  19. Atrial fibrillation and the 4P medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Censi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the paradigm of the 4P medicine - Predictive, Personalized, Preemptive, and Participatory - has been suggested several years ago, its application to atrial fibrillation is still far away. Given the increasing prevalence and incidence of this pathology it is the time to promote preventive strategies, by identifying the risk factors associated to life style and by incentivizing innovative diagnostic technologies. The promotion of the correct life style and of the use of diagnostic devices based on innovative and reliable technologies, represent a first step towards the full realization of the revolution of 4P medicine in atrial fibrillation.

  20. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René; Hassenkam, Tue; Hansen, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Whole tendon and fibril bundles display viscoelastic behavior, but to the best of our knowledge this property has not been directly measured in single human tendon fibrils. In the present work an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach was used for tensile testing of two human patellar tendon...... saline, cyclic testing was performed in the pre-yield region at different strain rates, and the elastic response was determined by a stepwise stress relaxation test. The elastic stress-strain response corresponded to a second-order polynomial fit, while the viscous response showed a linear dependence...

  1. New risk factors for atrial fibrillation : causes of 'not-so-lone atrial fibrillation'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonderwoerd, Bas A.; Smit, Marcelle D.; Pen, Lucas; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent arrhythmia in patients with cardiovascular disease. The classical risk factors for developing AF include hypertension, valvular disease, (ischaemic) cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus, and thyroid disease. In some patients with AF, no underlying

  2. Protein Polymerization into Fibrils from the Viewpoint of Nucleation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashchiev, Dimo

    2015-11-17

    The assembly of various proteins into fibrillar aggregates is an important phenomenon with wide implications ranging from human disease to nanoscience. Using general kinetic results of nucleation theory, we analyze the polymerization of protein into linear or helical fibrils in the framework of the Oosawa-Kasai (OK) model. We show that while within the original OK model of linear polymerization the process does not involve nucleation, within a modified OK model it is nucleation-mediated. Expressions are derived for the size of the fibril nucleus, the work for fibril formation, the nucleation barrier, the equilibrium and stationary fibril size distributions, and the stationary fibril nucleation rate. Under otherwise equal conditions, this rate decreases considerably when the short (subnucleus) fibrils lose monomers much more frequently than the long (supernucleus) fibrils, a feature that should be born in mind when designing a strategy for stymying or stimulating fibril nucleation. The obtained dependence of the nucleation rate on the concentration of monomeric protein is convenient for experimental verification and for use in rate equations accounting for nucleation-mediated fibril formation. The analysis and the results obtained for linear fibrils are fully applicable to helical fibrils whose formation is describable by a simplified OK model. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metastable Amyloid Phases and their Conversion to Mature Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschol, Martin; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Schmit, Jeremy

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in both functional biological responses and pathogenic disorders which include Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Amyloid fibril assembly frequently generates compact oligomeric and curvilinear polymeric intermediates which are implicated to be toxic to cells. Yet, the relation between these early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. Our measurements indicate that lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after crossing a salt and protein concentration dependent threshold. These oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. Our experimental transition boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions accounting for salt-modulated charge repulsion. We also report our preliminary findings on the mechanism by which these metastable oligomeric phases are converted into stable amyloid fibrils.

  4. Embolic Risk in Atrial Fibrillation that Arises from Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Elie; Coplan, Neil L.

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac complication of hyperthyroidism, occurs in an estimated 10% to 25% of overtly hyperthyroid patients. The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases with age in the general population and in thyrotoxic patients. Other risk factors for atrial fibrillation in thyrotoxic patients include male sex, ischemic or valvular heart disease, and congestive heart failure. The incidence of arterial embolism or stroke in thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation is less clear. There are many reports of arterial thromboembolism associated with hyperthyroidism, including cases of young adults without coexisting risk factors other than thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation. The use of anticoagulative agents to prevent thromboembolic sequelae of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation is controversial: national organizations provide conflicting recommendations in their practice guidelines. Herein, we review the medical literature and examine the evidence behind the recommendations in order to determine the best approach to thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients who have atrial fibrillation that is associated with hyperthyroidism. PMID:21720457

  5. Spontaneous conversion of first onset atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; Hansen, Sidsel; Nielsen, Tonny

    2011-01-01

    Background  We studied all patients admitted to hospital with first onset atrial fibrillation (AF) to determine the probability of spontaneous conversion to sinus rhythm and to identify factors predictive of such a conversion. Methods and Results  We retrospectively reviewed charts of 438...

  6. Genetic aspects of lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Laura; Nielsen, Jonas B; Olesen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. A subgroup of patients presents with AF without traditional risk factors and is diagnosed before the age of 60 years. Such patients are commonly referred as having "lone AF" and comprise 10-20% of all cases. A number of studies have...

  7. Atrial fibrillation in the Middle East

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Shamkhani, Warkaa; Ayetey, Harold; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the commonest persistent cardiac arrhythmia with an estimated incidence rate of between 1.5-2% and an important cause of strokes. Few epidemiological studies and clinical trials on the management of AF have been conducted outside Europe and North America...

  8. An "account" of digitalis and atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.

    This review deals with the mechanisms by which digitalis exerts its "opium-Iike" action on the ventricular rate in patients with atrial fibrillation. To understand the effect of digitalis on ventricular rate and rhythm, it is essential to learn more about the basic electrophysiologic

  9. SAS-Based Studies of Protein Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marasini, Carlotta; Vestergaard, Bente

    2017-01-01

    Protein fibrillation is associated with a number of fatal amyloid diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). From a structural point of view, the aggregation process starts from an ensemble of native states that convert into transiently formed oligomers, higher order assemblies and pro...... and highlight existing reports, exemplifying the wealth of information that can be derived from the method....

  10. Aggregation and fibrillation of bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, NK; Jespersen, SK; Thomassen, LV

    2007-01-01

    The all-alpha helix multi-domain protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) aggregates at elevated temperatures. Here we show that these thermal aggregates have amyloid properties. They bind the fibril-specific dyes Thioflavin T and Congo Red, show elongated although somewhat worm-like morphology...

  11. Kinetics and mechanical stability of the fibril state control fibril formation time of polypeptide chains: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Li, Mai Suan; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Buhimschi, Irina Alexandra

    2018-06-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite much progress in the understanding of the protein aggregation process, the factors governing fibril formation rates and fibril stability have not been fully understood. Using lattice models, we have shown that the fibril formation time is controlled by the kinetic stability of the fibril state but not by its energy. Having performed all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations with the GROMOS43a1 force field for full-length amyloid beta peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42 and truncated peptides, we demonstrated that kinetic stability can be accessed via mechanical stability in such a way that the higher the mechanical stability or the kinetic stability, the faster the fibril formation. This result opens up a new way for predicting fibril formation rates based on mechanical stability that may be easily estimated by steered molecular dynamics.

  12. Encapsulated sensory corpuscle in the mucosa of human vocal cord: an electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T

    1982-05-01

    Encapsulated sensory corpuscles of the Krause type were found in the mucosa of surgically removed human vocal cords. The corpuscles were ellipsoidal structures of about 30 to 50 micrometers and were located beneath the free edge in the mid-region along the intermembranous part. They contained a number of varicose nerve endings and lamellar cells. The lamellar cells had thin cytoplasmic lamellae which contained numerous cytoplasmic filaments and were interposed between the nerve endings. Attachment devices were frequently noted between the cytoplasmic lamellae and between the lamellae and nerve endings. Half-desmosomes were also noted along the plasma membrane of the lamellar cells. The intercellular space was filled with amorphous electron lucent material and contained a few collagen fibrils. Ladder-like filamentous structures were frequently encountered in the intercellular space. The location of the corpuscles at the free edge of the vocal cords suggests that the endings may receive the bilateral touch of the vibrating part of the cords in order to give sensory information for the control of the movement of the cords in phonation.

  13. Spinal cord: motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Kourosh; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord motor neuron diseases affect lower motor neurons in the ventral horn. This article focuses on the most common spinal cord motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which also affects upper motor neurons. Also discussed are other motor neuron diseases that only affect the lower motor neurons. Despite the identification of several genes associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the pathogenesis of this complex disease remains elusive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Synaptic Plasticity in Cardiac Innervation and Its Potential Role in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse L. Ashton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity is defined as the ability of synapses to change their strength of transmission. Plasticity of synaptic connections in the brain is a major focus of neuroscience research, as it is the primary mechanism underpinning learning and memory. Beyond the brain however, plasticity in peripheral neurons is less well understood, particularly in the neurons innervating the heart. The atria receive rich innervation from the autonomic branch of the peripheral nervous system. Sympathetic neurons are clustered in stellate and cervical ganglia alongside the spinal cord and extend fibers to the heart directly innervating the myocardium. These neurons are major drivers of hyperactive sympathetic activity observed in heart disease, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Both pre- and postsynaptic changes have been observed to occur at synapses formed by sympathetic ganglion neurons, suggesting that plasticity at sympathetic neuro-cardiac synapses is a major contributor to arrhythmias. Less is known about the plasticity in parasympathetic neurons located in clusters on the heart surface. These neuronal clusters, termed ganglionated plexi, or “little brains,” can independently modulate neural control of the heart and stimulation that enhances their excitability can induce arrhythmia such as atrial fibrillation. The ability of these neurons to alter parasympathetic activity suggests that plasticity may indeed occur at the synapses formed on and by ganglionated plexi neurons. Such changes may not only fine-tune autonomic innervation of the heart, but could also be a source of maladaptive plasticity during atrial fibrillation.

  15. Simultaneous isolation of vascular endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells from the human umbilical cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Sachin S; Tiwari, Shubha; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2009-01-01

    The umbilical cord represents the link between mother and fetus during pregnancy. This cord is usually discarded as a biological waste after the child's birth; however, its importance as a "store house" of stem cells has been explored recently. We developed a method of simultaneous isolation of endothelial cells (ECs) from the vein and mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord Wharton's jelly of the same cord. The isolation protocol has been simplified, modified, and improvised with respect to choice of enzyme and enzyme mixture, digestion time, cell yield, cell growth, and culture medium. Isolated human umbilical vascular ECs (hUVECs) were positive for von-Willibrand factor, a classical endothelial marker, and could form capillary-like structures when seeded on Matrigel, thus proving their functionality. The isolated human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) were found positive for CD44, CD90, CD 73, and CD117 and were found negative for CD33, CD34, CD45, and CD105 surface markers; they were also positive for cytoskeleton markers of smooth muscle actin and vimentin. The hUCMSCs showed multilineage differentiation potential and differentiated into adipogenic, chondrogenic, osteogenic, and neuronal lineages under influence of lineage specific differentiation medium. Thus, isolating endothelial cells as well as mesenchymal cells from the same umbilical cord could lead to complete utilization of the available tissue for the tissue engineering and cell therapy.

  16. Modulation of α-synuclein fibrillization by ring-fused 2-pyridones: templation and inhibition involve oligomers with different structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Istvan; Sellstedt, Magnus; Weise, Christoph; Nordvall, Lina-Maria; Krishna Prasad, G; Olofsson, Anders; Larsson, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2013-04-15

    In a recent study we discovered that a ring-fused 2-pyridone compound triggered fibrillization of a key protein in Parkinson's disease, α-synuclein. To reveal how variations in compound structure affect protein aggregation, we now prepared a number of strategic analogs and tested their effects on α-synuclein amyloid fiber formation in vitro. We find that, in contrast to the earlier templating effect, some analogs inhibit α-synuclein fibrillization. For both templating and inhibiting compounds, the key species formed in the reactions are α-synuclein oligomers that contain compound. Despite similar macroscopic appearance, the templating and inhibiting oligomers are distinctly different in secondary structure content. When the inhibitory oligomers are added in seed amounts, they inhibit fresh α-synuclein aggregation reactions. Our study demonstrates that small chemical changes to the same central fragment can result in opposite effects on protein aggregation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinetically controlled thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2005-09-23

    Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter in the temperature range from 10 to 120 degrees C for characterizing the thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils. The thermograms of amyloid fibril solution showed a remarkably large decrease in heat capacity that was essentially released upon the thermal unfolding of the fibrils, in which the magnitude of negative heat capacity change was not explicable in terms of the current accessible surface area model of protein structural thermodynamics. The heat capacity-temperature curve of amyloid fibrils prior to the fibril unfolding exhibited an unusual dependence on the fibril concentration and the heating rate. Particularly, the heat needed to induce the thermal response was found to be linearly dependent on the heating rate, indicating that its thermal response is under a kinetic control and precluding the interpretation in terms of equilibrium thermodynamics. Furthermore, amyloid fibrils of amyloid beta peptides also exhibited a heating rate-dependent exothermic process before the fibril unfolding, indicating that the kinetically controlled thermal response may be a common phenomenon to amyloid fibrils. We suggest that the heating rate-dependent negative change in heat capacity is coupled to the association of amyloid fibrils with characteristic hydration pattern.

  18. “Sticky invasion” – the physical properties of Plantago lanceolata L. seed mucilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kreitschitz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mucilage envelope of seeds has various functions including the provision of different ways for the dispersal of diaspores. Chemical composition and water content of the mucilage yield particular adhesive and frictional properties in the envelope that also influence the dispersal of seeds. To determine the physical properties of Plantago lanceolata seed mucilage we studied (1 composition, (2 desiccation, (3 adhesion, and (4 friction properties of the mucilage under different hydration conditions. We revealed the presence of cellulose fibrils in the mucilage, which are responsible for a continuous and even distribution of the mucilaginous layer on the seed surface. The measured values of adhesive and frictional properties differed significantly in comparison to the previously studied pectic mucilage of Linum usitatissimum. Also, the water loss from the cellulose mucilage was more rapid. The obtained different values can result from the presence of cellulose fibrils and their interaction with pectins in the mucilage. Because of this feature the mucilage of P. lanceolata may represent a more regularly ordered and stabile system than the pectic mucilage of flax, which lacks cellulose. In spite of the fact that P. lanceolata mucilage revealed different adhesive and frictional properties than the pectic mucilage, it still demonstrates an effective system promoting zoochoric seed dispersal. Cellulose may additionally prevent the mucilage against loss from the seed surface.

  19. What Are Chia Seeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your diet? Chia seeds come from the desert plant Salvia hispanica , a member of the mint family. ... ancient Aztec diet. The seeds of a related plant, Salvia columbariae (golden chia), were used primarily by ...

  20. Seeds and Synergies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    'Seeds and Synergies presents inspiring evidence of change in practice and policy ... Seeds of inspiration: breathing new life into the formal agricultural research .... and Urban Development and Poverty Alleviation and Agricultural Commodity ...

  1. Seeds as biosocial commons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patnaik, Archana

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates and describes the conservation and use of Plant Genetic Resources (PGRs), especially seeds through processes of commonisation. Seeds form an important element for sustaining human life (through food production) and social relations (by maintaining agricultural

  2. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  3. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord is situated within the vertebral canal extending from the lower end of the medulla oblongata at the upper border of first cervical vertebra. In early foetal life, it extends throughout the length of the vertebral canal, and at the time of birth, it reaches the level of third lumbar vertebra. In adult, it ends at the lower border of first lumbar vertebra and thereafter continued as filum terminale, which gets attached to tip of coccyx. Spinal cord is covered by three protective membranes called spinal meninges, diameter, arachnoid and pia mater. The diameter and arachnoid mater extent up to second sacral vertebra and the pia mater forms filum terminale and extend at the tip of coccyx. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty spinal cord cadaveric specimen were studied by dissection method after exposing the vertebral canal. The roots of spinal nerve were sectioned on both sides and the cord is released along with its coverings. The dura and arachnoid mater were incised longitudinally and the subarachnoid space, blood vessels, nerve roots, ligament denticulata, cervical and lumbar enlargements were observed. The blood vessels including radicular arteries were also studied photographed. RESULTS The spinal cord is a highly vascular structure situated within the vertebral canal, covered by diameter, arachnoid mater and pia mater. Spinal dura is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly. The pia mater forms linea splendens, which extend along the whole length of the cord in front of the anterior median fissure. The average length of the cord is 38 cm. The length and breadth of cervical enlargement was more compared to lumbar enlargement. The number of rootlets in both dorsal and ventral roots accounts more in cervical compared to other regions of the cord. The ligament denticulata is a thin transparent bands of pia mater attached on either sides of the cord between the dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The tooth like extensions are well

  4. Cord Blood Chimerism And Relapse After Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besien, Koen; Koshy, Nebu; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Cushing, Melissa; Rennert, Hannah; Slotky, Ronit; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; Phillips, Adrienne; Vasovic, Liljana; Ferrante, Rosanna; Hsu, Michael; Shore, Tsiporah

    2018-01-01

    Haplo-cord stem cell transplantation combines the infusion of CD34 selected hematopoietic progenitors from a haplo-identical donor with an umbilical cord blood graft from an unrelated donor and allows faster count recovery, with low rates of disease recurrence and chronic GVHD. But the contribution of the umbilical cord blood graft to long-term transplant outcome remains unclear. We analyzed 39 recipients of haplo-cord transplants with AML and MDS, engrafted and in remission at 2 months. Median age was 66 (18-72) and all had intermediate, high, or very high risk disease. Less than 20% UCB chimerism in the CD33 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (54% vs 11% Pdisease recurrence (46% vs 12%, P=0.007) Persistent haplo-chimerism in the CD3 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (40% vs 15%, P=0.009) Chimerism did not predict for treatment related mortality. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD by day 100 was 43%. The cumulative incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD was only 5%. Engraftment of the umbilical cord blood grafts provides powerful GVL effects which protect against disease recurrence and is associated with low risk of chronic GVHD. Engraftment of CD34 selected haplo-identical cells can lead to rapid development of circulating T-cells, but when these cells dominate, GVL-effects are limited and rates of disease recurrence are high. PMID:27333804

  5. Spinal cord stimulation suppresses bradycardias and atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by mediastinal nerve stimulation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Bouchard, Caroline; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to the dorsal aspect of the cranial thoracic cord imparts cardioprotection under conditions of neuronally dependent cardiac stress. This study investigated whether neuronally induced atrial arrhythmias can be modulated by SCS. In 16 anesthetized dogs with intact stellate ganglia and in five with bilateral stellectomy, trains of five electrical stimuli were delivered during the atrial refractory period to right- or left-sided mediastinal nerves for up to 20 s before and after SCS (20 min). Recordings were obtained from 191 biatrial epicardial sites. Before SCS (11 animals), mediastinal nerve stimulation initiated bradycardia alone (12 nerve sites), bradycardia followed by tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation (50 sites), as well as tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation without a preceding bradycardia (21 sites). After SCS, the number of responsive sites inducing bradycardia was reduced by 25% (62 to 47 sites), and the cycle length prolongation in residual bradycardias was reduced. The number of responsive sites inducing tachyarrhythmia was reduced by 60% (71 to 29 sites). Once elicited, residual tachyarrhythmias arose from similar epicardial foci, displaying similar dynamics (cycle length) as in control states. In the absence of SCS, bradycardias and tachyarrhythmias induced by repeat nerve stimulation were reproducible (five additional animals). After bilateral stellectomy, SCS no longer influenced neuronal induction of bradycardia and atrial tachyarrhythmias. These data indicate that SCS obtunds the induction of atrial arrhythmias resulting from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons and that such protective effects depend on the integrity of nerves coursing via the subclavian ansae and stellate ganglia.

  6. Seed development and carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittich, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    Seeds assure the plant the onset of a next generation and a way of dispersal. They consist of endosperm and an embryo (originating from gametophytic tissue), enveloped by a seed coat (sporophytic tissue). Plants generate different types of seeds. For instance, the endosperm may either be

  7. Atrial fibrillation and vascular disease-a bad combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring Olesen, Jonas; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of (i) the risk of stroke associated with vascular disease (acute coronary syndromes and peripheral artery disease) in patients with atrial fibrillation, (ii) the frequent coexistence of vascular disease in patients with atrial fibrillation and, (iii...... fibrillation. Indeed, patients with atrial fibrillation often had coexisting vascular disease (around 18%), and the combination of the two diseases substantially increases the risk of future cardiovascular events. The increased risk associated with peripheral artery disease in atrial fibrillation is even more...... pronounced. Patients with atrial fibrillation and stable vascular disease should be treated with oral anticoagulation only, although when these patients present with acute coronary syndrome and/or undergo coronary stenting, concomitant treatment with antiplatelet drugs is indicated. To guide antithrombotic...

  8. Evidence of structurally continuous collagen fibrils in tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Herchenhan, Andreas; Starborg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    favor continuity. This study initially set out to trace the full length of individual fibrils in adult human tendons, using serial block face-scanning electron microscopy. But even with this advanced technique the required length could not be covered. Instead a statistical approach was used on a large...... volume of fibrils in shorter image stacks. Only a single end was observed after tracking 67.5 mm of combined fibril lengths, in support of fibril continuity. To shed more light on this observation, the full length of a short tendon (mouse stapedius, 125 μm) was investigated and continuity of individual...... fibrils was confirmed. In light of these results, possible mechanisms that could reconcile the opposing findings on fibril continuity are discussed. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: Connective tissues hold all parts of the body together and are mostly constructed from thin threads of the protein collagen...

  9. Endurance Sport Practice and Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo, Naiara; Mont, Lluis

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac rhythm disorder in clinical practice, with an estimated prevalence of 0.4% to 1% in the general population, increasing with age to 8% in those older than 80 years. The recognized risk factors for developing AF include age, hypertension, structural heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and hyperthyroidism. However, the etiology remains unclear in a significant number of patients younger than age 60 in whom no cardiovascular disease or any other k...

  10. Red Wine, Resveratrol and Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan, Laura Siga; Almeida, Eduardo Dytz; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros; Garavaglia, Juliano; Marcadenti, Aline

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. Excessive alcohol intake is a well-known risk factor for AF, but this correlation is less clear with light and moderate drinking. Besides, low doses of red wine may acutely prolong repolarization and slow cardiac conduction. Resveratrol, a bioactive polyphenol found in grapes and red wine, has been linked to antiarrhythmic properties and may act as a...

  11. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Horta Veloso

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  12. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veloso Henrique Horta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation in Eight New World Camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmanesh, R; Magdesian, K G; Estell, K E; Stern, J A; Swain, E A; Griffiths, L G

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information on the incidence of clinical signs, concurrent illness and treatment options for atrial fibrillation (AF) in New World Camelids (NWC). Describe clinical signs and outcome of AF in NWC. Eight New World Camelids admitted with AF. A retrospective observational study of camelids diagnosed with AF based on characteristic findings on electrocardiogram (ECG). All animals had an irregularly irregular heart rhythm detected on physical examination and 4 cases had obtunded mentation on admission. Three camelids were diagnosed with AF secondary to oleander intoxication, 3 animals had underlying cardiovascular disease, 1 was diagnosed with lone AF and 1 had AF diagnosed on examination for a urethral obstruction. Five of eight animals survived to discharge and nonsurvivors consisted of animals which died or were euthanized as a result of cardiovascular disease (2/8) or extra-cardiac disease unrelated to the AF (1/8). Atrial fibrillation occurs in NWC in association with cardiovascular disease, extra-cardiac disease or as lone AF. Amiodarone and transthoracic cardioversion were attempted in one llama with lone AF, but were unsuccessful. Atrial fibrillation was recorded in 0.1% of admissions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Atrial fibrillation pearls and perils of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenchuk, P J

    1996-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, a common arrhythmia, is responsible for considerable cardiovascular morbidity. Its management demands more than antiarrhythmic therapy alone, but must address the causes and consequences of the arrhythmia. Although remediable causes are infrequently found, a thorough search for associated heart disease or its risk factors results in better-informed patient management. Controlling the ventricular response and protecting from thromboembolic complications are important initial goals of therapy and may include the administration of aspirin in younger, low-risk patients. Older patients and those with risk factors for systemic embolism are not adequately protected from stroke complications by aspirin therapy alone. It remains controversial whether all high-risk patients should receive warfarin and at what intensity. Whether and how sinus rhythm should be restored and maintained poses the greatest therapeutic controversy for atrial fibrillation. The mortal risk of antiarrhythmic therapy is substantially greater in patients with evidence of heart failure. In such persons, the risks and benefits of maintaining normal sinus rhythm with antiarrhythmic medications should be weighted carefully. A definitive cure for atrial fibrillation remains elusive, but promising surgical and catheter ablation therapies are being developed. PMID:8686300

  15. Electromechanical vortex filaments during cardiac fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, J.; Chebbok, M.; Richter, C.; Schröder-Schetelig, J.; Bittihn, P.; Stein, S.; Uzelac, I.; Fenton, F. H.; Hasenfuß, G.; Gilmour, R. F., Jr.; Luther, S.

    2018-03-01

    The self-organized dynamics of vortex-like rotating waves, which are also known as scroll waves, are the basis of the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns in many excitable chemical and biological systems. In the heart, filament-like phase singularities that are associated with three-dimensional scroll waves are considered to be the organizing centres of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms that underlie the onset, maintenance and control of electromechanical turbulence in the heart are inherently three-dimensional phenomena. However, it has not previously been possible to visualize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of scroll waves inside cardiac tissues. Here we show that three-dimensional mechanical scroll waves and filament-like phase singularities can be observed deep inside the contracting heart wall using high-resolution four-dimensional ultrasound-based strain imaging. We found that mechanical phase singularities co-exist with electrical phase singularities during cardiac fibrillation. We investigated the dynamics of electrical and mechanical phase singularities by simultaneously measuring the membrane potential, intracellular calcium concentration and mechanical contractions of the heart. We show that cardiac fibrillation can be characterized using the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of mechanical phase singularities, which arise inside the fibrillating contracting ventricular wall. We demonstrate that electrical and mechanical phase singularities show complex interactions and we characterize their dynamics in terms of trajectories, topological charge and lifetime. We anticipate that our findings will provide novel perspectives for non-invasive diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  16. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Johansen, Pernille Palm

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit adults with atrial fibrillation or those who had been treated for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is caused by multiple micro re-entry circuits within the atrial tissue, which result in chaotic rapid activity in the atria....... OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based rehabilitation programmes, alone or with another intervention, compared with no-exercise training controls in adults who currently have AF, or have been treated for AF. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases; CENTRAL...... the benefits and harms of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation on patient-relevant outcomes....

  17. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  18. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  19. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  20. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.

    1993-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author)

  1. CORD PROLAPSE, ASSOCIATED FACTORS AND FETAL OUTCOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several factors predispose to cord prolapse, amongst which are breech presentation, abnormal lie and presentation, hydramnios and long cord [2-3, 5-7]. Perinatal mortality is the most feared complication and often seen in up to 91% of cases [8-9]. Little is known about the pattern of umbilical cord prolapse in Cameroon as ...

  2. Lymphangioma of the spermatic cord

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Antônio Carlos Ligocki; Costa, Marco Aurélio Raeder da; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério de Oliveira; Torres, Luiz Fernando Bleggi; Coelho, Júlio Cézar Uili

    1998-01-01

    We describe a case of a 22-year-old man that had been submitted to a left herniorraphy 11 years previously to the present admission. He returned to our hospital with another mass in the same side of the groin. At operation, several small cysts linked to the spermatic cord were demonstrated. At this time, an histological exam demonstrated the presence of conective tissue. The final histology report confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma of the spermatic cord in the groin region. The patient w...

  3. Spinal cord injury with central cord syndrome from surfing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Yaniv; Keren, Yaniv; Haddad, Elias

    2018-01-01

    Central cord syndrome (CCS) is an injury to the center of the spinal cord. It is well known as a hyperextension injury, but it has never been described as a surfing injury. Our report describes this injury in detail. A 35-year-old male novice surfer presented to the emergency department with acute tetraplegia following falling off his surfboard and hitting sea floor at a shallow beach break. He was rescued by a fellow surfer while floating in the sea and unable to raise his head above sea level. Upon arrival at the hospital, tetraplegia and sensory deficits were noted. Radiological investigations showed advanced spinal stenosis at C4-6 levels. T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated myelopathy at C5-C6 level. He was diagnosed as having central cord syndrome, treated conservatively, and regained near full neurologic recovery after a month of rehabilitation. Unique sport activities lead to unique injuries. It is important to accurately describe these injuries in order to create protective measures against them. Neurologic injuries in surfers are uncommon. With low-energy trauma, surfer's myelopathy is still the most common diagnosis, but central cord syndrome should be in the differential diagnosis.

  4. Hot seeding using large Y-123 seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruggs, S J; Putman, P T; Zhou, Y X; Fang, H; Salama, K

    2006-01-01

    There are several motivations for increasing the diameter of melt textured single domain discs. The maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that have traditionally been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators and electric propulsion. We have investigated the possibility of using large area epitaxial growth instead of the conventional point nucleation growth mechanism. This process involves the use of large Y123 seeds for the purpose of increasing the maximum achievable Y123 single domain size. The hot seeding technique using large Y-123 seeds was employed to seed Y-123 samples. Trapped field measurements indicate that single domain samples were indeed grown by this technique. Microstructural evaluation indicates that growth can be characterized by a rapid nucleation followed by the usual peritectic grain growth which occurs when large seeds are used. Critical temperature measurements show that no local T c suppression occurs in the vicinity of the seed. This work supports the suggestion of using an iterative method for increasing the size of Y-123 single domains that can be grown

  5. Oil palm seed distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand-Gasselin Tristan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available For a tropical plant, the oil palm commodity chain has the peculiarity of possessing a major seed production sector for reasons that are primarily genetic. This seed sector has numerous original aspects. Breeders are also propagators and usually also distribute their seeds. Oil palm seeds are semi-recalcitrant: they display pseudo-dormancy. Achieving seed germination is difficult and requires lengthy treatments and special installations. This restriction greatly influences seed distribution and the role of the different stakeholders in the commodity chain. It was only once it had been discovered how the “sh” gene functioned, which controls shell thickness, and when it became necessary to produce “tenera” seeds derived from exclusively “dura x pisifera” crosses, that a true seed market developed. In addition it is difficult to organize seed distribution to smallholders. This is partly due to difficulties that the profession, or a State-run organization, has in controlling middlemen networks, and partly to the absence of any protective systems (UPOV, plant breeder certificate, etc. that generally oblige breeders to preserve and propagate parents in their own installations. In fact there are major inequalities in the access to seeds between agroindustry and smallholders. Another peculiarity of the oil palm seed market is the virtually total absence of guarantees for buyers: the quality of the research conducted by breeders, the seed production strategies necessary for transferring genetic progress, and the technical quality of production. The only guarantee today comes from the relations of confidence established year after year between breeders/distributors and growers. In this fields, research can lead to some proposals: molecular biology offers some interesting prospects for certifying seed quality and social science develop effective communication methods.

  6. Banking on cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood gifted to non-profit public cord blood banks is now routinely used as an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation for children and adults with cancer, bone marrow failure syndromes, haemoglobinopathies and many genetic metabolic disorders. Because of the success and outcomes of public cord banking, many companies now provide private cord banking services. However, in the absence of any published transplant evidence to support autologous and non-directed family banking, commercial cord banks currently offer a superfluous service.

  7. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  8. Distribution of elements in human spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Kobayashi, T.; Qiu, Y.; Kameda, N.; Ito, Y.; Otomo, E.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of elements in human spinal cord was investigated on unfixed frozen cord material using PIXE technique. Distribution of Cu, Zn and Fe were not uniform in the cross section of the spinal cord and concentrations of these elements were higher in the anterior gray horn than in the other areas, while K and Cl distributed uniformly. The content of K changed along the spinal cord from the cervical to the lumbar level. These findings are discussed in relation to current understanding of the physiology of the spinal cord. (author)

  9. Does the informal seed system threaten cowpea seed health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.; Oguntade, O.; Lava Kumar, P.; Stomph, T.J.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Most smallholder farmers in developing countries depend on an informal Seed System (SS) for their seed. The informal SS is often criticized because farmer-produced seed samples are not tested for seed health, thus accepting the risk of planting infected seeds. Here we aimed at assessing the quality

  10. Does Myocardial Infarction Beget Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Fibrillation Beget Myocardial Infarction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermond, Rob A.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Crijns, Harry J.; Rienstra, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects millions of people worldwide.(1) It is already known several decades that AF is not a benign condition, and it's associated with a 5-fold increased risk of stroke, 3-fold increased risk of heart failure, and doubling of risk of dementia and death.(2-4) Myocardial

  11. Family history of atrial fibrillation is associated with earlier-onset and more symptomatic atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Kim, Sunghee

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We addressed whether patients with a family history of atrial fibrillation (AF) were diagnosed as having AF earlier in life, were more symptomatic, and had worse outcomes compared with those without a family history of AF. METHODS: Using the ORBIT-AF, we compared symptoms and disease...

  12. From Fibril Formation to Fibril Properties and Rheology of Food Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.; Venema, P.

    2013-01-01

    For control and design of food properties it is important to understand how molecules and their interactions give rise to formation of microstructures and resulting rheological properties. This will be illustrated by discussing the formation and properties of fibrils in aqueous and non-aqueous

  13. La fibrillation auriculaire chez le noir Africain: Aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this retrospective work realized during two years (1st january 2002 to 31 december 2003), relative to 300 cases hospitalized at the Cardiology Institute of Abidjan, the authors have studied the epidemiologic, etiologic and prognosis factors of black african atrial fibrillation in hospital cercle. The atrial fibrillation was the most ...

  14. Dronedarone in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Camm, A John; Halperin, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Dronedarone restores sinus rhythm and reduces hospitalization or death in intermittent atrial fibrillation. It also lowers heart rate and blood pressure and has antiadrenergic and potential ventricular antiarrhythmic effects. We hypothesized that dronedarone would reduce major vascular events...... in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation....

  15. Relevance of Electrical Remodeling in Human Atrial Fibrillation Results of the Asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Evaluation in Pacemaker Patients and the Atrial Fibrillation Reduction Atrial Pacing Trial Mechanisms of Atrial Fibrillation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Healey, Jeff S.; Israel, Carsten W.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Nair, Girish M.; Divakaramenon, Syamkumar; Capucci, Alessandro; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Lau, Chu-Pak; Gold, Michael R.; Carlson, Mark; Themeles, Ellison; Morillo, Carlos A.

    Background-In animal models of atrial fibrillation (AF), changes in atrial electrophysiological properties are associated with the development of AF. Their relevance to human AF is unclear. Methods and Results-The Asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Evaluation in Pacemaker Patients and the

  16. The safety of flecainide treatment of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almroth, H; Andersson, Torben Bech; Fengsrud, E

    2011-01-01

    To assess the safety of long-term treatment with flecainide in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death (SCD) and proarrhythmic events.......To assess the safety of long-term treatment with flecainide in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death (SCD) and proarrhythmic events....

  17. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  18. Atrial fibrillation and bleeding complication - risk factors and risk marker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breithardt, G.; Ravens, U.; Kirchhof, P.; van Gelder, I. C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of atrial fibrillation (AF) is closely linked to risk factors like hypertension and heart failure, diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction and valvular heart disease. These factors partly overlap with those which determine the progression of atrial fibrillation and the incidence of

  19. Aggregation properties of a short peptide that mediates amyloid fibril ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Short peptides have been identified from amyloidogenic proteins that form amyloid fibrils in isolation. The ... proteins. These peptide fibrils have the conformational features of β-structure that .... water and immediately deposited on freshly cleaved surface of mica .... with the peptide via electrostatic interactions. NaCl would.

  20. Polymorphism complexity and handedness inversion in serum albumin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, Ivan; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-12-23

    Protein-based amyloid fibrils can show a great variety of polymorphic structures within the same protein precursor, although the origins of these structural homologues remain poorly understood. In this work we investigate the fibrillation of bovine serum albumin--a model globular protein--and we follow the polymorphic evolution by a statistical analysis of high-resolution atomic force microscopy images, complemented, at larger length scales, by concepts based on polymer physics formalism. We identify six distinct classes of coexisting amyloid fibrils, including flexible left-handed twisted ribbons, rigid right-handed helical ribbons and nanotubes. We show that the rigid fibrils originate from flexible fibrils through two diverse polymorphic transitions, first, via a single-fibril transformation when the flexible left-handed twisted ribbons turn into the helical left-handed ribbons, to finally evolve into nanotube-like structures, and second, via a double-fibril transformation when two flexible left-handed twisted ribbons wind together resulting in a right-handed twisted ribbon, followed by a rigid right-handed helical ribbon polymorphic conformation. Hence, the change in handedness occurs with an increase in the level of the fibril's structural organization.

  1. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  2. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  3. Genetics of Atrial Fibrillation and Possible Implications for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Lemmens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia mainly caused by valvular, ischemic, hypertensive, and myopathic heart disease. Atrial fibrillation can occur in families suggesting a genetic background especially in younger subjects. Additionally recent studies have identified common genetic variants to be associated with atrial fibrillation in the general population. This cardiac arrhythmia has important public health implications because of its main complications: congestive heart failure and ischemic stroke. Since atrial fibrillation can result in ischemic stroke, one might assume that genetic determinants of this cardiac arrhythmia are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Ischemic stroke is a multifactorial, complex disease where multiple environmental and genetic factors interact. Whether genetic variants associated with a risk factor for ischemic stroke also increase the risk of a particular vascular endpoint still needs to be confirmed in many cases. Here we review the current knowledge on the genetic background of atrial fibrillation and the consequences for cerebrovascular disease.

  4. Cord Blood Banking for Potential Future Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William T; Lubin, Bertram H; Cairo, Mitchell S; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2017-11-01

    This policy statement is intended to provide information to guide pediatricians, obstetricians, and other medical specialists and health care providers in responding to parents' questions about cord blood donation and banking as well as the types (public versus private) and quality of cord blood banks. Cord blood is an excellent source of stem cells for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with some fatal diseases. Cord blood transplantation offers another method of definitive therapy for infants, children, and adults with certain hematologic malignancies, hemoglobinopathies, severe forms of T-lymphocyte and other immunodeficiencies, and metabolic diseases. The development of universal screening for severe immunodeficiency assay in a growing number of states is likely to increase the number of cord blood transplants. Both public and private cord blood banks worldwide hold hundreds of thousands of cord blood units designated for the treatment of fatal or debilitating illnesses. The procurement, characterization, and cryopreservation of cord blood is free for families who choose public banking. However, the family cost for private banking is significant and not covered by insurance, and the unit may never be used. Quality-assessment reviews by several national and international accrediting bodies show private cord blood banks to be underused for treatment, less regulated for quality control, and more expensive for the family than public cord blood banks. There is an unquestionable need to study the use of cord blood banking to make new and important alternative means of reconstituting the hematopoietic blood system in patients with malignancies and blood disorders and possibly regenerating tissue systems in the future. Recommendations regarding appropriate ethical and operational standards (including informed consent policies, financial disclosures, and conflict-of-interest policies) are provided for physicians, institutions, and organizations that

  5. NASA's First Atrial Fibrillation Case - Deke Slayton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about heart dysrhythmia have been present since the earliest days of the US manned space program. While information about an astronaut's health is general kept private, one of the original seven American astronaut's health status was played out in a very public forum. Donald "Deke" Slayton was removed from the second manned space flight when it was discovered he had idiopathic atrial fibrillation. Referencing the original medical documents, details of how this was discovered and managed from the medical perspective will be reviewed. This is NASA's first heart dysrhythmia case in an astronaut and it proves quite interesting when placed in historic perspective.

  6. Current approaches in atrial fibrillation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Sarı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. Its incidence increases with age. AF is classified into subtypes according to the duration and/or able to provide sinus rhytym. İnitially, patients should be evaluated for rhythm or rate control for appropriate treatment. Second stage of strategy aimed to investigate the feasibility of anticoagulation therapy. Recently, due to the progress made in treatment with rhythm control and anticoagulation therapy, either American or European guidelines have been renovated. These developments have taken place in the newly published guide. In this article, the current change in the management of AF is discussed.

  7. Hypothermia with Extreme Bradycardia following Spinal Cord Infarction of Septic Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Hantson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Among other autonomic dysfunctions complicating acute spinal cord injury, deep hypothermia is rare but may induce serious cardiovascular complications. There are few pharmacological options to influence hypothermia. A 66-year-old woman was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU for serious cardiac arrhythmias (atrial fibrillation and asystole in the context of a deep hypothermia (axillary temperature below 32°C. She had been admitted to the hospital two months before for an acute L4-L5 infectious spondylodiscitis without any initial neurological deficit. After surgery for epidural abscess drainage, she became paraplegic due to spinal cord infarction (from C7 to T6 levels in the upper territory of the anterior spinal artery. In the ICU, the patient experienced several episodes of asystole and hypotension associated with a core body temperature below 35°C. Common causes of hypothermia (drugs, hypothyroidism, etc. were excluded. A definitive pacemaker had to be inserted, but hypotension persisted. The prescription of oral progesterone (200 mg·d−1 helped to maintain a core temperature higher than 35°C, with a withdrawal of vasopressors. This case report illustrates that patients with incomplete spinal cord injury may present with delayed and deep hypothermia leading to serious cardiovascular complications. Progesterone could be able to influence positively central and peripheral thermal regulation.

  8. α-Synuclein aggregation, seeding and inhibition by scyllo-inositol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Tarek [Biological Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, M4N 3M5, ON (Canada); McLaurin, JoAnne, E-mail: jmclaurin@sri.utoronto.ca [Biological Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, M4N 3M5, ON (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Recent literature demonstrates the accelerated aggregation of α-synuclein, a protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), by the presence of preformed fibrillar conformers in vitro. Furthermore, these preformed fibrillar seeds are suggested to accelerate pathological induction in vivo when injected into the brains of mice. Variation in the results of in vivo studies is proposed to be caused by α-synuclein conformational variants. To investigate the impact of amino acid sequence on seeding efficiency, human and mouse α-synuclein seeds, which vary at 7 amino acid residues, were generated and cross-seeding kinetics studied. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we confirmed that mouse α-synuclein aggregated more rapidly than human α-synuclein. Subsequently, we determined that seeding of human and mouse α-synuclein was more rapid in the presence of seeds generated from the same species. In addition, an established amyloid inhibitor, scyllo-inositol, was examined for potential inhibitory effects on α-synuclein aggregation. TEM analysis of protein:inhibitor assays demonstrated that scyllo-inositol inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein, suggesting the therapeutic potential of the small molecule in PD. - Highlights: • Mouse α-syn fibrillizes in a significantly shorter timeframe than human α-syn. • Seeding of monomers is more efficient when seeds originate from the same species. • scyllo-Inositol has anti-aggregation effects on mouse and human α-syn.

  9. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  10. combining high seed number and weight to improve seed yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    ABSTRACT. Increasing seed size and seed weight is an important trait for trade, yield component and adaptation of chickpea ... determining yield or quality, and the development of rapid and ..... C.G. 1981. Control of seed growth in soybeans.

  11. Producing the target seed: Seed collection, treatment, and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2011-01-01

    The role of high quality seeds in producing target seedlings is reviewed. Basic seed handling and upgrading techniques are summarized. Current advances in seed science and technology as well as those on the horizon are discussed.

  12. Efficiency of alfalfa seed processing with different seed purity

    OpenAIRE

    Đokić, Dragoslav; Stanisavljević, Rade; Terzić, Dragan; Milenković, Jasmina; Radivojević, Gordana; Koprivica, Ranko; Štrbanović, Ratibor

    2015-01-01

    The work was carried out analysis of the impact of the initial purity of raw alfalfa seed on the resulting amount of processed seed in the processing. Alfalfa is very important perennial forage legume which is used for fodder and seed production. Alfalfa seed is possible to achieve high yields and very good financial effects. To obtain the seed material with good characteristics complex machines for cleaning and sorting seeds are used. In the processing center of the Institute for forage crop...

  13. Paper (essay on seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirić Mladen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on detailed studies of the past of the agrarian thought of the world (evolution of agro-innovation, and within it, the relationship of man and seed, the author has selected key data for Table 1. In addition, more or less known folk sayings, proverbs, curses and allegories in which the seed is the key word have been collected. Then, religious books, folk art and literature works (sayings of prominent individuals and experts and observations of the author himself have been studied. According to the collected opus, it can be concluded that the vast importance of seed meaningfully entwined into all spheres of folk life and cultural heritage. Seed is directly tied to the following eight key (revolutionary milestones in the food and economic life of mankind: 1. the first and for the longest time, the seed used to be the main food of the people and the first food reserve; 2. Neolithic Revolution was simply caused by the sowing of seeds; 3. for the sake of sowing man began to develop more complex processing techniques; 4. everywhere and forever, especially since the late 15th century, the seed has been a carrier of (rescuing plants between Europe and the New World, that is, between continents; 5. seed was the first product that has been chemically treated since the mid-18th century; 6. standard operation procedures and quality are promoted on seed by which it became the first product to have prescribed (compulsory methods, but it also became a good whose quality has to be tested before sale; 7. hybrid seed is a 'perpetrator' of the green revolution in the mid-20th century and at last there is disputable seed of genetically modified organisms that are spreading with certain reactions. The author proposes that the United Nations Standard International Trade Classification includes a special section (division which would classify the seed for sowing, while beyond this Classification terms such as seed, plant seed should be replaced with non-seed

  14. Seed dormancy and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfield, Steven

    2017-09-11

    Reproduction is a critical time in plant life history. Therefore, genes affecting seed dormancy and germination are among those under strongest selection in natural plant populations. Germination terminates seed dispersal and thus influences the location and timing of plant growth. After seed shedding, germination can be prevented by a property known as seed dormancy. In practise, seeds are rarely either dormant or non-dormant, but seeds whose dormancy-inducing pathways are activated to higher levels will germinate in an ever-narrower range of environments. Thus, measurements of dormancy must always be accompanied by analysis of environmental contexts in which phenotypes or behaviours are described. At its simplest, dormancy can be imposed by the formation of a simple physical barrier around the seed through which gas exchange and the passage of water are prevented. Seeds featuring this so-called 'physical dormancy' often require either scarification or passage through an animal gut (replete with its associated digestive enzymes) to disrupt the barrier and permit germination. In other types of seeds with 'morphological dormancy' the embryo remains under-developed at maturity and a dormant phase exists as the embryo continues its growth post-shedding, eventually breaking through the surrounding tissues. By far, the majority of seeds exhibit 'physiological dormancy' - a quiescence program initiated by either the embryo or the surrounding endosperm tissues. Physiological dormancy uses germination-inhibiting hormones to prevent germination in the absence of the specific environmental triggers that promote germination. During and after germination, early seedling growth is supported by catabolism of stored reserves of protein, oil or starch accumulated during seed maturation. These reserves support cell expansion, chloroplast development and root growth until photoauxotrophic growth can be resumed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased amount of atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, Guillaume S. C.; van Amersfoorth, Shirley C. M.; Hoogendijk, Mark G.; Kelder, Johannes C.; van Hemel, Norbert M.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Coronel, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Atrial fibrosis is related to atrial fibrillation but may differ in patients with mitral valve disease or lone atrial fibrillation. Therefore, we studied atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation + mitral valve disease or with lone atrial fibrillation and compared it with

  16. Atrial Fibrillation: When the heart is not in rhythm | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: When the heart is not in rhythm Past ... show, Deal With It . Photo: TBS/Deal Understanding Atrial Fibrillation Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common type ...

  17. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. Artificial Seeds and their Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    currently working on ... heterozygosity of seed, minute seed size, presence of reduced ... Advantages of Artificial or Synthetic Seeds over Somatic Embryos for Propagation .... hour gives optimum bead hardness and rigidity for the produc-.

  19. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  20. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  1. Seed thioredoxin h

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    , for example chloroplastic f- and m-type thioredoxins involved in regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle. The cytosolic h-type thioredoxins act as key regulators of seed germination and are recycled by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase. The present review on thioredoxin h systems in plant seeds focuses...

  2. Saving Seed Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Gabriele; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Plant seeds are home to diverse microbial communities whose composition is determined by plant genotype, environment, and management practices. Plant domestication is now recognized as an important driver of plant-associated microbial diversity. To what extent and how domestication affects seed

  3. Fibril formation from pea protein and subsequent gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munialo, Claire Darizu; Martin, Anneke H; van der Linden, Erik; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2014-03-19

    The objective of this study was to characterize fibrillar aggregates made using pea proteins, to assemble formed fibrils into protein-based gels, and to study the rheological behavior of these gels. Micrometer-long fibrillar aggregates were observed after pea protein solutions had been heated for 20 h at pH 2.0. Following heating of pea proteins, it was observed that all of the proteins were hydrolyzed into peptides and that 50% of these peptides were assembled into fibrils. Changes on a structural level in pea proteins were studied using circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. During the fibril assembly process, an increase in aggregate size was observed, which coincided with an increase in thioflavin T binding, indicating the presence of β-sheet aggregates. Fibrils made using pea proteins were more branched and curly. Gel formation of preformed fibrils was induced by slow acidification from pH 7.0 to a final pH of around pH 5.0. The ability of pea protein-based fibrillar gels to fracture during an amplitude sweep was comparable to those of soy protein and whey protein-based fibrillar gels, although gels prepared from fibrils made using pea protein and soy protein were weaker than those of whey protein. The findings show that fibrils can be prepared from pea protein, which can be incorporated into protein-based fibrillar gels.

  4. Sequence dependent aggregation of peptides and fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Ba; Le, Duy-Manh; Hoang, Trinh X.

    2017-09-01

    Deciphering the links between amino acid sequence and amyloid fibril formation is key for understanding protein misfolding diseases. Here we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the aggregation of short peptides in a coarse-grained model with hydrophobic-polar (HP) amino acid sequences and correlated side chain orientations for hydrophobic contacts. A significant heterogeneity is observed in the aggregate structures and in the thermodynamics of aggregation for systems of different HP sequences and different numbers of peptides. Fibril-like ordered aggregates are found for several sequences that contain the common HPH pattern, while other sequences may form helix bundles or disordered aggregates. A wide variation of the aggregation transition temperatures among sequences, even among those of the same hydrophobic fraction, indicates that not all sequences undergo aggregation at a presumable physiological temperature. The transition is found to be the most cooperative for sequences forming fibril-like structures. For a fibril-prone sequence, it is shown that fibril formation follows the nucleation and growth mechanism. Interestingly, a binary mixture of peptides of an aggregation-prone and a non-aggregation-prone sequence shows the association and conversion of the latter to the fibrillar structure. Our study highlights the role of a sequence in selecting fibril-like aggregates and also the impact of a structural template on fibril formation by peptides of unrelated sequences.

  5. Replica Exchange Simulations of the Thermodynamics of Aβ Fibril Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takako; Klimov, Dmitri K.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Replica exchange molecular dynamics and an all-atom implicit solvent model are used to probe the thermodynamics of deposition of Alzheimer's Aβ monomers on preformed amyloid fibrils. Consistent with the experiments, two deposition stages have been identified. The docking stage occurs over a wide temperature range, starting with the formation of the first peptide-fibril interactions at 500 K. Docking is completed when a peptide fully adsorbs on the fibril edge at the temperature of 380 K. The docking transition appears to be continuous, and occurs without free energy barriers or intermediates. During docking, incoming Aβ monomer adopts a disordered structure on the fibril edge. The locking stage occurs at the temperature of ≈360 K and is characterized by the rugged free energy landscape. Locking takes place when incoming Aβ peptide forms a parallel β-sheet structure on the fibril edge. Because the β-sheets formed by locked Aβ peptides are typically off-registry, the structure of the locked phase differs from the structure of the fibril interior. The study also reports that binding affinities of two distinct fibril edges with respect to incoming Aβ peptides are different. The peptides bound to the concave edge have significantly lower free energy compared to those bound on the convex edge. Comparison with the available experimental data is discussed. PMID:19167295

  6. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landreh, Michael; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Willander, Hanna; Söder, Olle; Johansson, Jan; Jörnvall, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. ► C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. ► C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. ► C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by β-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic β-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  7. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreh, Michael [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Willander, Hanna [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Soeder, Olle [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Jan [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Joernvall, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Jornvall@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  8. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

  9. Probing the mechanism of insulin fibril formation with insulin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L; Frokjaer, S; Brange, J; Uversky, V N; Fink, A L

    2001-07-27

    The molecular basis of insulin fibril formation was investigated by studying the structural properties and kinetics of fibril formation of 20 different human insulin mutants at both low pH (conditions favoring monomer/dimer) and at pH 7.4 (conditions favoring tetramer/hexamer). Small-angle X-ray scattering showed insulin to be monomeric in 20% acetic acid, 0.1 M NaCl, pH 2. The secondary structure of the mutants was assessed using far-UV circular dichroism, and the tertiary structure was determined using near-UV circular dichroism, quenching of intrinsic fluorescence by acrylamide and interactions with the hydrophobic probe 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS). The kinetics of fibril formation were monitored with the fluorescent dye, Thioflavin T. The results indicate that the monomer is the state from which fibrils arise, thus under some conditions dissociation of hexamers may be rate limiting or partially rate limiting. The insulin mutants were found to retain substantial nativelike secondary and tertiary structure under all conditions studied. The results suggest that fibril formation of the insulin mutants is controlled by specific molecular interactions that are sensitive to variations in the primary structure. The observed effects of several mutations on the rate of fibril formation are inconsistent with a previously suggested model for fibrillation [Brange, J., Whittingham, J., Edwards, D., Youshang, Z., Wollmer, A., Brandenburg, D., Dodson, G., and Finch, J. (1997) Curr. Sci. 72, 470-476]. Two surfaces on the insulin monomer are identified as potential interacting sites in insulin fibrils, one consisting of the residues B10, B16, and B17 and the other consisting of at least the residues A8 and B25. The marked increase in the lag time for fibril formation with mutations to more polar residues, as well as mutations to charged residues, demonstrates the importance of both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the initial stages of fibrillation

  10. Microdialysis to optimize cord perfusion and drug delivery in spinal cord injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Phang, I; Zoumprouli, A; Papadopoulos, MC; Saadoun, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is lack of monitoring from the injury site to guide management of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Here we describe a bedside microdialysis monitoring technique for optimizing spinal cord perfusion and drug delivery at the injury site. METHODS: 14 patients were recruited within 72 hours of severe spinal cord injury. We inserted intradurally at the injury site a pressure probe, to monitor continuously spinal cord perfusion pressure, and a microdialysis cathete...

  11. MRI in diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko; Kakinoki, Yoshio; Kimura, Humiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nagayama, Takashi; Okada, Takaharu; Watanabe, Hiromi

    1985-01-01

    64 MRI studies of 57 cases of spinal cord diseases were reviewed, and following results were obtained. (1) MRI is usefull for screening method of spinal cord diseases, as CT in cerebral diseases. (2) MRI might replaces myelography in most of spinal cord disease, and more reliable informations might be obtained by MRI than in myelography in some cases, but (3) in detection of small organic changes, some technological problems are layed regarding to the image resolution of MRI. (author)

  12. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  13. Contrast enhanced CT of spinal cord angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiko; Ebitani, Tsutomu; Honma, Takao; Sofue, Muroto; Nakamura, Shigeru

    1982-01-01

    Contrast enhanced CT on 6 patients with spinal cord angioma showed enhancement in 2 of them. The conditions to produce contrast enhancement were the window width of 100 - 200, and the window level of 0 - 50. In spinal cord angioma, contrast enhanced CT is presently only an adjunct to angiography and myelography. Nevertheless, contrast enhanced CT is useful in the screening test for spinal cord angioma, in the patients who are nonindicated to angiography, and in the postoperative follow-up. (Ueda, J.)

  14. Normal and reversed supramolecular chirality of insulin fibrils probed by vibrational circular dichroism at the protofilament level of fibril structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Dukor, Rina K; Lu, Xuefang; Nafie, Laurence A; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-08-08

    Fibrils are β-sheet-rich aggregates that are generally composed of several protofibrils and may adopt variable morphologies, such as twisted ribbons or flat-like sheets. This polymorphism is observed for many different amyloid associated proteins and polypeptides. In a previous study we proposed the existence of another level of amyloid polymorphism, namely, that associated with fibril supramolecular chirality. Two chiral polymorphs of insulin, which can be controllably grown by means of small pH variations, exhibit opposite signs of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra. Herein, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrate that indeed VCD supramolecular chirality is correlated not only by the apparent fibril handedness but also by the sense of supramolecular chirality from a deeper level of chiral organization at the protofilament level of fibril structure. Our microscopic examination indicates that normal VCD fibrils have a left-handed twist, whereas reversed VCD fibrils are flat-like aggregates with no obvious helical twist as imaged by atomic force microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. A scheme is proposed consistent with observed data that features a dynamic equilibrium controlled by pH at the protofilament level between left- and right-twist fibril structures with distinctly different aggregation pathways for left- and right-twisted protofilaments. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C.; Czech, T.; Diekmann, K.; Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Prayer, D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  16. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  17. Physalis peruviana seed storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia L. M. de Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Physalis peruviana belongs to Solanaceae family and has a high nutritional and nutraceutical potential. The production is intended for fruit consumption and the propagation is mainly by seeds. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of priming on the kinetics of germination of P. peruviana seeds stored at different temperatures. The seeds were stored at 5 and 25 °C in a chamber saturated with zinc chloride solution and in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C. Every 4 months, the seeds were removed from storage for evaluation of germination and moisture content in the laboratory and emergence and development of seedlings in greenhouse. During the last evaluation at 16 months, the seeds under the same conditions were subjected to salt stress. The moisture content varied during the storage period, but was always higher for seeds kept at -196 ºC. These seeds kept high germination percentage in water until 16 months, regardless of the tested temperature; however, in salt solution the germination percentage was significantly reduced.

  18. Clinical characteristics, management, and control of permanent vs. nonpermanent atrial fibrillation: insights from the RealiseAF survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation can be categorized into nonpermanent and permanent atrial fibrillation. There is less information on permanent than on nonpermanent atrial fibrillation patients. This analysis aimed to describe the characteristics and current management, including the proportion of patients with successful atrial fibrillation control, of these atrial fibrillation subsets in a large, geographically diverse contemporary sample.

  19. Ultra-sensitive detection of prion protein fibrils by flow cytometry in blood from cattle affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Elke

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The definite diagnosis of prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle currently relies on the post mortem detection of the pathological form of the prion protein (PrPSc in brain tissue. Infectivity studies indicate that PrPSc may also be present in body fluids, even at presymptomatic stages of the disease, albeit at concentrations well below the detection limits of currently available analytical methods. Results We developed a highly sensitive method for detecting prion protein aggregates that takes advantage of kinetic differences between seeded and unseeded polymerization of prion protein monomers. Detection of the aggregates was carried out by flow cytometry. In the presence of prion seeds, the association of labelled recombinant PrP monomers in plasma and serum proceeds much more efficiently than in the absence of seeds. In a diagnostic model system, synthetic PrP aggregates were detected down to a concentration of approximately 10-8 nM [0.24 fg/ml]. A specific signal was detected in six out of six available serum samples from BSE-positive cattle. Conclusion We have developed a method based on seed-dependent PrP fibril formation that shows promising results in differentiating a small number of BSE-positive serum samples from healthy controls. This method may provide the basis for an ante mortem diagnostic test for prion diseases.

  20. Effects of seed fermentation method on seed germination and vigor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to examine the influence of Lagenaria siceraria seed fermentation method on seed germination and vigor. Three seed fermentation methods (fermented in ambient air, plastic bag stored in ambient or in plastic bag buried) were tested on two cultivars during two years. Seed germination and ...

  1. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...... cardiologists towards catheter ablation for AF, using a nationwide survey. METHODS AND RESULTS: We developed a purpose-designed questionnaire to evaluate attitudes towards catheter ablation for AF that was sent to all Danish cardiologists (n = 401; response n = 272 (67.8%)). There was no association between...... attitudes towards ablation and the experience or age of the cardiologist with respect to patients with recurrent AF episodes with a duration of 7 days and/or need for cardioversion. The majority (69%) expected a recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in more than 30% of the cases...

  2. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Atrial Fibrillation in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most common arrhythmias. It reduces quality of life and its duration due to thromboembolic complications. Obesity contributes to the structural and electrical remodeling of atrial myocardium. This leads to occurrence of ectopic foci in the mouths of the pulmonary veins and the disruption of normal electrical conduction in the atria. Systemic inflammation, myocardial fibrosis, cardiomyocyte overload by Na+ and Ca2+ ions, accumulation in the cells of unoxidized metabolic products, imbalance of the autonomic regulation are considered as the main mechanisms of arrhythmogenic substrate formation. Hypertension, insulin resistance, and obstructive sleep apnea, associated with obesity, increase the risk of development and progression of the arrhythmia. Study of pathogenetic mechanisms of AF in obesity is necessary to develop new strategies for its prevention and the creation of more effective methods of treatment of these patients.

  3. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Silva, A.; Wright, M.; Wright, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electro anatomic mapping systems, pre procedural computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electro physiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment

  4. Alcohol and Atrial Fibrillation: A Sobering Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboinik, Aleksandr; Prabhu, Sandeep; Ling, Liang-Han; Kalman, Jonathan M; Kistler, Peter M

    2016-12-13

    Alcohol is popular in Western culture, supported by a perception that modest intake is cardioprotective. However, excessive drinking has detrimental implications for cardiovascular disease. Atrial fibrillation (AF) following an alcohol binge or the "holiday heart syndrome" is well characterized. However, more modest levels of alcohol intake on a regular basis may also increase the risk of AF. The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the relationship between alcohol and AF may include direct toxicity and alcohol's contribution to obesity, sleep-disordered breathing, and hypertension. We aim to provide a comprehensive review of the epidemiology and pathophysiology by which alcohol may be responsible for AF and determine whether alcohol abstinence is required for patients with AF. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Atrial fibrillation concomitant with valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease frequently have atrial fibrillation(AF) due to elevated pressure and dilatation of the left and right atria and pulmonary veins. Guidelines for valvular heart disease and AF recommend that surgical treatment for the valvular heart disease should be performed concomitantly with AF surgery. The Full-Maze procedure has evolved into the gold standard of treatment for medically refractory AF. In addition to the pulmonary vein isolation, the right and left atrial incisions of the Full-Maze procedure are designed to block potential macroreentrant pathways. According to the mechanisms of AF with valvular heart disease, the Full-Maze procedure is more effective for the patients than the pulmonary vein isolation alone.

  6. Prognosis of ventricular fibrillation in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, G V; Torp-Pedersen, C; Køber, L

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 520 patients with in-hospital ventricular fibrillation 421 (81%) had acute myocardial infarction (MI), 66 (13%) had ischaemic heart disease (IHD) without MI, 33 (6%) had no signs of IHD. The in-hospital mortality of these three groups was 51%, 52%, and 27%, respectively...... (P = 0.01). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that heart failure and cardiogenic shock were significant risk factors for in-hospital death among patients with IHD. Among discharged patients 1 and 5 years survival was 78% and 51% for patients with MI, 63% and 25% for patients with IHD, 67...... with known IHD suffering in-hospital VF without AMI have a very poor short- and long-term prognosis. These patients need extensive cardiac examination....

  7. Evaluation of the expansion of umbilical cord blood derived from CD133+ cells on biocompatible microwells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Soufizomorrod

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a therapeutic approach for treatment of hematological malignancies and incompatibility of Bone marrow. Umbilical cord blood (UCB has known as an alternative for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPSC in allogeneic transplantation. The low volume of collected samples is the main hindrance in application of HPSC derived from umbilical cord blood. So, ex vivo expansion of HPSCs is the useful approach to overcome this restriction. The goal of using this system is to produce appropriate amount of hematopoietic stem cells, which have the ability of transplantation and long term haematopoiesis. Material & Methods: In current study CD133+ cells were isolated from cord blood (CB. Isolated cells were seeded on microwells. Then expanded cells proliferation rate and ability in colony formation were assessed and finally were compared with 2 Dimensional (2D culture systems. Results: Our findings demonstrated that CD133+ cells derived from UCB which were cultivated on microwells had significantly higher rate of proliferation in compared with routine cell culture systems. Conclusion: In Current study, it was shown that CD133+ cells’ proliferations which were seeded on PDMS microwells coated with collagen significantly increased. We hope that 3 dimensional (3D microenvironment which mimics the 3D structure of bone marrow can solve the problem of using UCB as an alternative source of bone marrow.

  8. Visualisation of collagen fibrils in joint cartilage using STIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gruender, W.

    2001-01-01

    The scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) method was used to investigate the collagen network structure of the articular cartilage from a pig's knee in comparison with high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (microscopic NMR-tomography) and polarised light microscopy (PLM). Single collagen fibrils down to 200 nm in diameter were visualised. It was proved that the cartilage collagen network consists partly of zones of oriented fibrils as suggested by NMR measurements. Radially oriented fibrils were found in the zone near the calcified zone (hypertrophic zone) of both tibia and femur, and in the tibial radial zone. Tangentially oriented fibrils were found in the femoral and tibial superficial zone and in a second zone of the femoral cartilage. Polarisation light microscopy reveals broader zones of orientation than it was found with STIM

  9. Dabigatran use in Danish atrial fibrillation patients in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dabigatran was recently approved for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF); data regarding real-world use, comparative effectiveness and safety are sparse. Design: Pharmacoepidemiological cohort study. Methods/settings: From nationwide registers, we identified...

  10. Analysis of XFEL serial diffraction data from individual crystalline fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wojtas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serial diffraction data collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source from crystalline amyloid fibrils delivered in a liquid jet show that the fibrils are well oriented in the jet. At low fibril concentrations, diffraction patterns are recorded from single fibrils; these patterns are weak and contain only a few reflections. Methods are developed for determining the orientation of patterns in reciprocal space and merging them in three dimensions. This allows the individual structure amplitudes to be calculated, thus overcoming the limitations of orientation and cylindrical averaging in conventional fibre diffraction analysis. The advantages of this technique should allow structural studies of fibrous systems in biology that are inaccessible using existing techniques.

  11. Women Sex Importance in Stroke Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemile Handan Mısırlı

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was shown the differences in age, risk factors and treatment between women and men in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation METHODS: The stroke patients with atrial fibrillation who were hospitalized in our department at the last 2 years were seperated into 2 groups of aged above 75 and below 75, investigated with CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASc scores and looked at the sex differences of women and men. RESULTS: Stroke ratio according to sex was statistically meaningful especially in women above the age of 75. Risc factors also were founded in elderly women and CHA2DS2VASc scores were higher in women than men so more anticoagulan treatment were begun. No differences were shown between sexes at lone atrial fibrillation and no treatment were begun. CONCLUSION: Women with atrial fibrillation had more risk factors, higher stroke rate and higher anticoagulation treatment.

  12. Atrial fibrillation in the dog: a review of eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R. E. [Vet. Hospital, 34 New Dover Rd, Canterbury, Kent (United Kingdom)

    1984-07-01

    Eight cases of canine atrial fibrillation encountered in small animal practice are reported. Details are included of age, sex and breed, history and clinical signs, thoracic radiography, electrocardiography, clinical pathology, treatment and survival periods.

  13. Atrial fibrillation in the dog: a review of eight cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Eight cases of canine atrial fibrillation encountered in small animal practice are reported. Details are included of age, sex and breed, history and clinical signs, thoracic radiography, electrocardiography, clinical pathology, treatment and survival periods

  14. Inflammation in the genesis and perpetuation of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Mads D M; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence and persistence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the relative inefficacy of the currently available pharmacotherapy requires development of new treatment strategies. Recent findings have suggested a mechanistic link between inflammatory processes and the development of AF...

  15. Ventricular fibrillation after accidental injection of bupivacaine into the pericardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Even, B. J.; de Jongh, R. F.; de Hert, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    A postoperative cardiac surgical patient developed ventricular fibrillation immediately after accidental pericardial injection of bupivacaine at room temperature. The possible causes, which include systemic toxicity, local vasoconstriction with myocardial ischaemia, local toxic effect of bupivacaine

  16. Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T.; Batty, G. David

    2017-01-01

    long hours (≤55 per week) and those working standard 35-40 h/week. Methods and results In this prospective multi-cohort study from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-Analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium, the study population was 85 494 working men and women (mean age 43.4 years...... of atrial fibrillation (10-year cumulative incidence 12.4 per 1000). After adjustment for age, sex and socioeconomic status, individuals working long hours had a 1.4-fold increased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with those working standard hours (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% CI= 1.13-1.80, P= 0......Aims Studies suggest that people who work long hours are at increased risk of stroke, but the association of long working hours with atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, is unknown. We examined the risk of atrial fibrillation in individuals working...

  17. Analysis of amyloid fibrils in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Joakim; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Une, Yumi; Sun, Xuguo; Misumi, Shogo; Shoji, Shozo; Ando, Yukio

    2006-06-01

    Recently, a high prevalence of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis has been documented among captive cheetahs worldwide. Biochemical analysis of amyloid fibrils extracted from the liver of a Japanese captive cheetah unequivocally showed that protein AA was the main fibril constituent. Further characterization of the AA fibril components by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis revealed three main protein AA bands with approximate molecular weights of 8, 10 and 12 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 12-kDa component observed in SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the molecular weight of a 12,381-Da peak. Our finding of a 12-kDa protein AA component provides evidence that the cheetah SAA sequence is longer than the previously reported 90 amino acid residues (approximately 10 kDa), and hence SAA is part of the amyloid fibril.

  18. Dronedarone in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Camm, A John; Halperin, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Dronedarone restores sinus rhythm and reduces hospitalization or death in intermittent atrial fibrillation. It also lowers heart rate and blood pressure and has antiadrenergic and potential ventricular antiarrhythmic effects. We hypothesized that dronedarone would reduce major vascular events in ...

  19. Insulin fibrillation: The influence and coordination of Zn2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Sønderby, Pernille; Bang, Maria Blanner

    2017-01-01

    fibrils has been debated for some years. We have therefore investigated the influence and binding geometry of zinc in fibrillated insulin using extended X-ray absorption fine-structure and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The results were validated with fibre diffraction, Transmission...... Electron Microscopy and Thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. It is well-known that Zn2+ ions coordinate and stabilize the hexameric forms of insulin. However, this study is the first to show that zinc indeed binds to the insulin fibrils. Furthermore, zinc influences the kinetics and the morphology...... of the fibrils. It also shows that zinc coordinates to histidine residues in an environment, which is similar to the coordination seen in the insulin R6 hexamers, where three histidine residues and a chloride ion is coordinating the zinc....

  20. Ultrastructural study of myelinating cells and sub-pial astrocytes in developing rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, K

    1979-12-01

    The anterior funiculus of the spinal cervical cord of post-natal rats was examined ultrastructurally. The myelinating cells found one day after brith contained a large amount of evenly distributed ribosomes up to the outer tongue of mesaxons, representing the cytoplasmic density. These cells were separated by astrocytic processes from the pial basement membrane, even when they were located on the pial surface. Astrocytes contained glial fibrils from one day onwards and often attached their processes to the pial basement membrane. Although the cytoplasmic processes of astrocytes occasionally wrapped axons, they were never shown to form the initial layer of myelin sheaths. However, the tenuous processes of the sub-pial astrocytes were occasionally rolled in myelin lamellae, as if a part of the myelin sheaths was constructed by astrocytic processes. The interpretation for this finding is discussed in relation to function and potency of the astrocytes, and variations and anomalies of nervous ontogeny.

  1. Prosopis Africana SEEDS (OKPEYE)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Keywords: Prosopis africana, okpeye seeds, thermal heat conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal heat diffusivity, .... 2.3 Determination of Thermal Properties of Prosopis. Africana .... and the guard ring was filled with fiber glass at both the.

  2. Oil seed marketing prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceroni, G.

    1992-01-01

    With its 100 million tonnes annual production, the American continent is by far the world's biggest producer of oil seed, followed by Asia - 52 million, and Europe - 27 million tonnes. The Italian and European Communities have the farming capacity to double their production, but international agreements currently prohibit such initiatives. After first providing a panorama of the world oil seed market, this paper discusses new reforms in European Communities internal agricultural policies which currently limit production. These reforms, intended to encourage the production of oil seed for use as an ecological automotive fuel alternative, call for an obligatory set-aside of 15% of producing farm-land in exchange for the compensatory removal of oil seed production limits

  3. Ultrafast Hydrogen-Bonding Dynamics in Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Mukherjee, Debopreeti; Gai, Feng

    2018-06-08

    While there are many studies on the subject of hydrogen bonding dynamics in biological systems, few, if any, have investigated this fundamental process in amyloid fibrils. Herein, we seek to add insight into this topic by assessing the dynamics of a hydrogen bond buried in the dry interface of amyloid fibrils. To prepare a suitable model peptide system for this purpose, we introduce two mutations into the amyloid-forming Aβ(16-22) peptide. The first one is a lysine analog at position 19, which is used to help form structurally homogeneous fibrils, and the second one is an aspartic acid derivative (DM) at position 17, which is intended (1) to be used as a site-specific infrared probe and (2) to serve as a hydrogen-bond acceptor to lysine so that an inter-β-sheet hydrogen bond can be formed in the fibrils. Using both infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, we show that (1) this mutant peptide indeed forms well defined fibrils, (2) when bulk solvent is removed, there is no detectable water present in the fibrils, (3) infrared results obtained with the DM probe are consistent with a protofibril structure that is composed of two antiparallel β-sheets stacked in a parallel fashion, leading to formation of the expected hydrogen bond. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we further show that the dynamics of this hydrogen bond occur on a timescale of ~2.3 ps, which is attributed to the rapid rotation of the -NH3+ group of lysine around its Cε-Nζ bond. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) DM is a useful infrared marker in facilitating structure determination of amyloid fibrils and (2) even in the tightly packed core of amyloid fibrils certain amino acid sidechains can undergo ultrafast motions, hence contributing to the thermodynamic stability of the system.

  4. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  5. Nanomechanical mapping of hydrated rat tail tendon collagen I fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Quigley, Andrew S; Clegg, Charlotte; Kreplak, Laurent

    2014-10-21

    Collagen fibrils play an important role in the human body, providing tensile strength to connective tissues. These fibrils are characterized by a banding pattern with a D-period of 67 nm. The proposed origin of the D-period is the internal staggering of tropocollagen molecules within the fibril, leading to gap and overlap regions and a corresponding periodic density fluctuation. Using an atomic force microscope high-resolution modulus maps of collagen fibril segments, up to 80 μm in length, were acquired at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s. The maps revealed a periodic modulation corresponding to the D-period as well as previously undocumented micrometer scale fluctuations. Further analysis revealed a 4/5, gap/overlap, ratio in the measured modulus providing further support for the quarter-staggered model of collagen fibril axial structure. The modulus values obtained at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s are significantly larger than those previously reported. Probing the effect of indentation speed over four decades reveals two distinct logarithmic regimes of the measured modulus and point to the existence of a characteristic molecular relaxation time around 0.1 ms. Furthermore, collagen fibrils exposed to temperatures between 50 and 62°C and cooled back to room temperature show a sharp decrease in modulus and a sharp increase in fibril diameter. This is also associated with a disappearance of the D-period and the appearance of twisted subfibrils with a pitch in the micrometer range. Based on all these data and a similar behavior observed for cross-linked polymer networks below the glass transition temperature, we propose that collagen I fibrils may be in a glassy state while hydrated.

  6. Genetics and Forest Seed Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars Holger

    2016-01-01

    High genetic quality seed is obtained from seed sources that match the planting site, have a good outcrossing rate, and are superior in some desirable characters. Non-degraded natural forests and plantations may be used as untested seed sources, which can sometimes be managed to promote outbreeding...... and increase seed production. Planted seed orchards aim at capturing large genetic variation and are planted in a design that facilitates genetic evaluation and promotes outbred seed production. Good seed production relies upon success of the whole range of reproductive events from flower differentiation...

  7. Seeds of impurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pavoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ai Weiwei’s art installation Kui Hua Zi [Sunflower Seeds] took place between 2010 and 2011 in the gigantic Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern Gallery, in London. It consisted of 100 millions hand-crafted porcelain seeds made in Jingdezhen, China.1 An uneven surface to dive into, a haptic space of undulating vision, rustling steps, unusual horizontality, a meaningless quicksand where the separation between artwork and spectator is engulfed, the immunity of distant contemplation denied.

  8. Intrinsic Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Human Spinal Cord at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Emeterio Nateras, Oscar; Yu, Fang; Muir, Eric R; Bazan, Carlos; Franklin, Crystal G; Li, Wei; Li, Jinqi; Lancaster, Jack L; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-04-01

    To apply resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to map functional connectivity of the human spinal cord. Studies were performed in nine self-declared healthy volunteers with informed consent and institutional review board approval. Resting-state functional MR imaging was performed to map functional connectivity of the human cervical spinal cord from C1 to C4 at 1 × 1 × 3-mm resolution with a 3.0-T clinical MR imaging unit. Independent component analysis (ICA) was performed to derive resting-state functional MR imaging z-score maps rendered on two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. Seed-based analysis was performed for cross validation with ICA networks by using Pearson correlation. Reproducibility analysis of resting-state functional MR imaging maps from four repeated trials in a single participant yielded a mean z score of 6 ± 1 (P 3, P 3.0-T clinical MR imaging unit and standard MR imaging protocols and hardware reveals prominent functional connectivity patterns within the spinal cord gray matter, consistent with known functional and anatomic layouts of the spinal cord.

  9. Viologen-Phosphorus Dendrimers Inhibit α-Synuclein Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Grochowina, Justyna; Katir, Nadia; El Kadib, Abdelkrim; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bryszewska, Maria; Gabryelak, Teresa

    2013-03-04

    Inhibition of α-synuclein (ASN) fibril formation is a potential therapeutic strategy in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. The aim of this study was to examine the role of viologen-phosphorus dendrimers in the α-synuclein fibrillation process and to assess the structural changes in α-synuclein under the influence of dendrimers. ASN interactions with phosphonate and pegylated surface-reactive viologen-phosphorus dendrimers were examined by measuring the zeta potential, which allowed determining the number of dendrimer molecules that bind to the ASN molecule. The fibrillation kinetics and the structural changes were examined using ThT fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. Depending on the concentration of the used dendrimer and the nature of the reactive groups located on the surface, ASN fibrillation kinetics can be significantly reduced, and even, in the specific case of phosphonate dendrimers, the fibrillation can be totally inhibited at low concentrations. The presented results indicate that viologen-phosphorus dendrimers are able to inhibit ASN fibril formation and may be used as fibrillar regulating agents in neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Stabilization and anomalous hydration of collagen fibril under heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasun G Gevorkian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: When heating a native fibril sample, its Young's modulus decreases in temperature range 20-58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58-75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58-75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen.

  11. Storage of sunflower seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise de Castro Lima

    Full Text Available The sunflower is among the top five crops in the world for the production of edible vegetable oil. The species displays rustic behavior, with an excellent edaphic and climatic adaptability index, being able to be cultivated throughout Brazil. Seed quality is the key to increasing production and productivity in the sunflower. The objective of this work was to monitor the viability of sunflower seeds with a view to their conservation when stored in different environments and packaging. The seeds were packed in paper bags, multilayered paper, black polyethylene and PET bottles; and stored for a period of twelve months in the following environments: dry cold room (10 ºC and 55% RH, the ambient conditions of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil (30-32 ºC and 75% RH, refrigerator (4 ºC and 38-43% RH and freezer (-20 ºC. Every three months, the water content of the seeds was determined and germination, accelerated ageing, speed of emergence index, and seedling dry weight were evaluated. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a scheme of split-lots, with four replications. It can be concluded that the natural environment is not suitable for the storage of sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds remain viable for 12 months when stored in a dry cold room, refrigerator or freezer, irrespective of the type of packaging used.

  12. Seed dispersal in fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  13. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  14. A clinical perspective of spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Hurtado, A.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of nervous tissue in the spinal cord and consequently loss of motor and sensory function. The impairments are permanent because endogenous repair events fail to restore the damaged axonal circuits that are involved in function. There is no treatment available

  15. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  16. Complement elevation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhun, J; Botvin, J

    1980-05-01

    Laboratory studies revealed an elevated complement in 66% of patients with spinal cord injury. It is postulated that the activated complement may be a component of self-feeding immunological mechanism responsible for the failure of regeneration of a mature mammalian spinal cord. There was no evidence that such an injury had any effect on pre-existing atopy.

  17. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  18. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M

    2011-11-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available.

  19. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): Evaluation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project evaluation will determine the extent to which the CORD model of linking primary care (PC) interventions to public health (PH) interventions in multiple community sectors affects BMI and behavior in children (2 to 12 years). The evaluation c...

  20. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  2. Clinical Use and Patentability of Cord Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, Turker; Kilic, Kubilay Dogan; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Tomruk, Canberk; Turgut, Mehmet; Uyanikgil, Yigit

    2018-03-14

    The blood in the umbilical cord that provides the connection between mother and fetus during pregnancy is called cord blood. The blood of umbilical cord which is usually got rid of following birth, is a very rich stem cell source. Cord blood collection gives no harm to the mother and baby. Besides, its allogeneic and au-tologous usage, the most important disadvantage is that the number of cells is insufficient in adults. Today, it is predominantly used for therapeutic purposes for many diseases. The aim of this review is giving a detailed information about groups of stem cells in cord blood and determining the point of clinical use. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. [A Case of Transverse Colon Cancer Metastasized to the Spermatic Cord after Resection of Peritoneal Dissemination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Isao; Kimura, Tomoaki; Azuma, Saya; Shimbo, Tomonori; Wakabayashi, Toshiki; Ota, Sakae; Sato, Tsutomu; Itoh, Seiji; Ishida, Toshiya; Sageshima, Masato

    2017-11-01

    We report a rare case of spermatic cord metastasis from colon cancer. A man in his 50s underwent extended right hemicolectomy for transverse colon cancer followed by resection of a peritoneal recurrence. After receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months, he became aware of a right inguinal mass. A spermatic cord tumor was noted on computed tomography(CT) and FDG/PET-CT. He underwent radical orchiectomy. The resected tumor was histologically compatible with the colon cancer. Although he received additional chemotherapy, right inguinal recurrence was resected 6 months after orchiectomy. Colon cancer is the second most common origin, after gastric cancer, of metastatic spermatic tumor. As several metastatic routes have been reported, peritoneal seeding is mostly suspected in this case.

  4. Seed-borne pathogens and electrical conductivity of soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Luiza Wain-Tassi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Adequate procedures to evaluate seed vigor are important. Regarding the electrical conductivity test (EC, the interference in the test results caused by seed-borne pathogens has not been clarified. This research was carried out to study the influence of Phomopsis sojae (Leh. and Colletotrichum dematium (Pers. ex Fr. Grove var. truncata (Schw. Arx. fungi on EC results. Soybean seeds (Glycine max L. were inoculated with those fungi using potato, agar and dextrose (PDA medium with manitol (-1.0 MPa and incubated for 20 h at 25 °C. The colony diameter, index of mycelial growth, seed water content, occurrence of seed-borne pathogens, physiological potential of the seeds, measured by germination and vigor tests (seed germination index, cold test, accelerated aging and electrical conductivity, and seedling field emergence were determined. The contents of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the seed and in the soaking solution were also determined. A complete 2 × 4 factorial design with two seed sizes (5.5 and 6.5 mm and four treatments (control, seeds incubated without fungi, seeds incubated with Phomopsis and seeds incubated with Colletotrichum were used with eight (5.5 mm large seeds and six (6.5 mm large seeds replications. All seeds submitted to PDA medium had their germination reduced in comparison to the control seeds. This reduction was also observed when seed vigor and leached ions were considered. The presence of Phomopsis sojae fungus in soybean seed samples submitted to the EC test may be the cause of misleading results.

  5. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C

    2015-01-01

    Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the G......Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril...

  6. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. The importance of using certified seed

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanović Sandra; Mladenov Velimir; Balešević-Tubić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Certified seed is produced from the seed of known genetic origin and genetic purity with controlled and tested production, processed and declared in accordance with the Law on Seeds. Production of certified seed is carried out under the supervision of the Ministry of Agriculture and Environmental Protection, by seed producers formally listed in the Seed Register. Seed is processed in registered seed processing centres and quality is tested in laboratories accredited for seed testing. The orga...

  8. Recurrence of pulmonary vein conduction and atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Brian; Chen, Xu; Pehrson, Steen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both segmental ostial and circumferential extraostial pulmonary vein (PV) isolation have been proven effective in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the recurrence of AF and PV conduction after the 2 ablation strategies has never been compared in a randomized study...... isolation. Extraostial PV isolation was performed by encircling the paired left and right PVs, respectively, guided by an electroanatomic mapping system. RESULTS: A total of 84% of the patients had recurrent AF after the first PV isolation procedure, showing 72% with AF and 12% with organized left atrial...

  9. Spinal Cord Independence Measure, version III: applicability to the UK spinal cord injured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Clive A; Tesio, Luigi; Itzkovich, Malka; Soni, Bakul M; Silva, Pedro; Mecci, Munawar; Chadwick, Raymond; el Masry, Waghi; Osman, Aheed; Savic, Gordana; Gardner, Brian; Bergström, Ebba; Catz, Amiram

    2009-09-01

    To examine the validity, reliability and usefulness of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure for the UK spinal cord injury population. Multi-centre cohort study. Four UK regional spinal cord injury centres. Eighty-six people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord Independence Measure and Functional Independence Measure on admission analysed using inferential statistics, and Rasch analysis of Spinal Cord Independence Measure. Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, discriminant validity; Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscale match between distribution of item difficulty and patient ability measurements; reliability of patient ability measures; fit of data to Rasch model; unidimensionality of subscales; hierarchical ordering of categories within items; differential item functioning across patient groups. Scale reliability (kappa coefficients range 0.491-0.835; (p Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscales compatible with stringent Rasch requirements; mean infit indices high; distinct strata of abilities identified; most thresholds ordered; item hierarchy stable across clinical groups and centres. Misfit and differences in item hierarchy identified. Difficulties assessing central cord injuries highlighted. Conventional statistical and Rasch analyses justify the use of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure in clinical practice and research in the UK. Cross-cultural validity may be further improved.

  10. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, T.Y.; Chin, C.J.; Lu, S.C.; Yiacoumi, S.

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration consists of two steps: heterogeneous particle flocculation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a stirred tank and high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic-seeding filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic seeding filtration are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A trajectory model that includes hydrodynamic resistance, van der Waals, and electrostatic forces is developed to calculate the flocculation frequency in a turbulent-shear regime. Fractal dimension is introduced to simulate the open structure of aggregates. A magnetic-filtration model that consists of trajectory analysis, a particle build-up model, a breakthrough model, and a bivariate population-balance model is developed to predict the breakthrough curve of magnetic-seeding filtration. A good agreement between modeling results and experimental data is obtained. The results show that the model developed in this study can be used to predict the performance of magnetic-seeding filtration without using empirical coefficients or fitting parameters. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  11. Molecular physiology of seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajduch, M.

    2014-05-01

    Plant development is well described. However, full understanding of the regulation of processes associated with plant development is still missing. Present Dr.Sc. thesis advances our understanding of the regulation of plant development by quantitative proteomics analyses of seed development of soybean, canola, castor, flax, and model plant arabidopsis in control and environmentally challenged environments. The analysis of greenhouse-grown soybean, canola, castor, and arabidospis provided complex characterization of metabolic processes during seed development, for instance, of carbon assimilation into fatty acids. Furthermore, the analyses of soybean and flax grown in Chernobyl area provided in-depth characterization of seed development in radio-contaminated environment. Soybean and flax were altered by radio-contaminated environment in different way. However, these alterations resulted into modifications in seed oil content. Further analyses showed that soybean and flax possess alterations of carbon metabolism in cytoplasm and plastids along with increased activity of photosynthetic apparatus. Our present experiments are focused on further characterization of molecular bases that might be responsible for alterations of seed oil content in Chernobyl grown plants. (author)

  12. The inhalation toxicology of p-aramid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The pandemic of lung disease caused by asbestos has cast suspicion on any industrial fibrous material that can become airborne in respirable form in workplaces, such that the respirable fibres might be inhaled. Fibre toxicology arose as a sub-specialty of particle toxicology to address the specialised nature of fibre effects and has evolved substantially in the last 25 years. It has yielded valuable information on the dosimetry, structure-activity relationships, and mechanism involved in toxicological effects of a range of fibrous materials, including asbestos, other naturally occurring fibrous materials, and synthetic vitreous fibres. A robust structure/activity paradigm has emerged from this research that highlights fibre length, thinness, and biopersistence as major factors in determining the pathogenicity of a fibre. p-Aramid is a manufactured fibre composed of synthetic polyamide (poly paraphenylene terephthalamide) manufactured on a commercial scale since 1970 by polymerisation and spinning steps. It is used as an advanced composite and in fabrics, body armour, friction materials, etc. Respirable fibrils of p-aramid can be released from the fibres during working and can become airborne. A considerable body of research has been carried out into the hazard posed by inhaled p-aramid fibrils, and this review considers this body of literature and summarises the state-of-the-science in the toxicology of p-aramid fibrils in the light of the existing overarching fibre toxicology paradigm. The peer-reviewed studies demonstrate that p-aramid fibrils can be long and thin but that the fibrils are not biopersistent. Residence in the milieu of the lungs leads to fibre shortening, allowing efficient and complete phagocytosis and effective clearance. Subsequently the p-aramid hazard is low, and this is confirmed in animal studies. The mechanism of shortening of p-aramid fibrils is not well-understood, but may involve the action of macrophages on the fibrils following

  13. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under... seeds. (b) Seed consigned to a seed cleaning or processing establishment, for cleaning or processing for... pertaining to such seed show that it is “Seed for processing,” or, if the seed is in containers and in...

  15. Wool fibril sponges with perspective biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrucco, A.; Cristofaro, F.; Simionati, M.; Zoccola, M.; Bruni, G.; Fassina, L.; Visai, L.; Magenes, G.

    2016-01-01

    Sheep's wool was used as a natural source to prepare keratin microfibril sponges for scaffolding, by disruption of the histological structure of the fibres through mild alkali treatment, followed by ultrasonication, casting and salt-leaching. The wool sponges showed highly interconnected porosity (93%) and contain intrinsic sites of cellular recognition that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). They displayed good thermal and water stability due to the conversion of disulphide cystine bonds into shorter monosulphide lanthionine intermolecular bonds, but significantly swelled in water, because of the high hydrophilicity and porosity, with a volume increasing up to 38%. Nevertheless, sponges were stable in water without structural changes, with a neutral pH in aqueous media, and showed excellent resilience to repeated compression stresses. According to in vitro biocompatibility assays, wool fibril sponges showed a good cell adhesion and proliferation as proved by MTT, FDA assays and SEM observations. The unique structure of the cortical cell network made by wool keratin proteins with controlled-size macro-porosity suitable for cell guesting, and nutrient feeding, provides an excellent scaffold for future tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Scaffolds were prepared from wool exploiting the fibres' histology structure. • The scaffold showed high interconnected micro- and macro-porosity. • The microscopic structure is very similar to the extracellular bone matrix. • Scaffolds reversibly swell in water with high resilience to repeated compression. • Composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of SAOS-2 cell line.

  16. Red Wine, Resveratrol and Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Juliano; Marcadenti, Aline

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. Excessive alcohol intake is a well-known risk factor for AF, but this correlation is less clear with light and moderate drinking. Besides, low doses of red wine may acutely prolong repolarization and slow cardiac conduction. Resveratrol, a bioactive polyphenol found in grapes and red wine, has been linked to antiarrhythmic properties and may act as an inhibitor of both intracellular calcium release and pathological signaling cascades in AF, eliminating calcium overload and preserving the cardiomyocyte contractile function. However, there are still no clinical trials at all that prove that resveratrol supplementation leads to improved outcomes. Besides, no observational study supports a beneficial effect of light or moderate alcohol intake and a lower risk of AF. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe possible beneficial effects of red wine and resveratrol in AF, and also present studies conducted in humans regarding chronic red wine consumption, resveratrol, and AF. PMID:29084143

  17. Red Wine, Resveratrol and Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Siga Stephan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. Excessive alcohol intake is a well-known risk factor for AF, but this correlation is less clear with light and moderate drinking. Besides, low doses of red wine may acutely prolong repolarization and slow cardiac conduction. Resveratrol, a bioactive polyphenol found in grapes and red wine, has been linked to antiarrhythmic properties and may act as an inhibitor of both intracellular calcium release and pathological signaling cascades in AF, eliminating calcium overload and preserving the cardiomyocyte contractile function. However, there are still no clinical trials at all that prove that resveratrol supplementation leads to improved outcomes. Besides, no observational study supports a beneficial effect of light or moderate alcohol intake and a lower risk of AF. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe possible beneficial effects of red wine and resveratrol in AF, and also present studies conducted in humans regarding chronic red wine consumption, resveratrol, and AF.

  18. Red Wine, Resveratrol and Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Laura Siga; Almeida, Eduardo Dytz; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros; Garavaglia, Juliano; Marcadenti, Aline

    2017-10-30

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. Excessive alcohol intake is a well-known risk factor for AF, but this correlation is less clear with light and moderate drinking. Besides, low doses of red wine may acutely prolong repolarization and slow cardiac conduction. Resveratrol, a bioactive polyphenol found in grapes and red wine, has been linked to antiarrhythmic properties and may act as an inhibitor of both intracellular calcium release and pathological signaling cascades in AF, eliminating calcium overload and preserving the cardiomyocyte contractile function. However, there are still no clinical trials at all that prove that resveratrol supplementation leads to improved outcomes. Besides, no observational study supports a beneficial effect of light or moderate alcohol intake and a lower risk of AF. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe possible beneficial effects of red wine and resveratrol in AF, and also present studies conducted in humans regarding chronic red wine consumption, resveratrol, and AF.

  19. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimovic, Ruzica [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Dill, Thorsten [Kerckhoff-Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M. [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia)

    2006-11-15

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  20. Atrial fibrillation: effects beyond the atrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Casadei, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained clinical arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity, mostly secondary to heart failure and stroke, and an estimated two-fold increase in premature death. Efforts to increase our understanding of AF and its complications have focused on unravelling the mechanisms of electrical and structural remodelling of the atrial myocardium. Yet, it is increasingly recognized that AF is more than an atrial disease, being associated with systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and adverse effects on the structure and function of the left ventricular myocardium that may be prognostically important. Here, we review the molecular and in vivo evidence that underpins current knowledge regarding the effects of human or experimental AF on the ventricular myocardium. Potential mechanisms are explored including diffuse ventricular fibrosis, focal myocardial scarring, and impaired myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve. The complex relationship between AF, systemic inflammation, as well as endothelial/microvascular dysfunction and the effects of AF on ventricular calcium handling and oxidative stress are also addressed. Finally, consideration is given to the clinical implications of these observations and concepts, with particular reference to rate vs. rhythm control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  1. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, Ruzica; Dill, Thorsten; Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M.

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  2. Wool fibril sponges with perspective biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrucco, A., E-mail: a.patrucco@bi.ismac.cnr.it [CNR-ISMAC, Italian National Research Council, Institute for Macromolecular Studies, Corso G. Pella 16, 13900, Biella (Italy); Cristofaro, F., E-mail: francesco.cristofaro01@universitadipavia.it [Department of Molecular Medicine, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 3/B, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Simionati, M., E-mail: m.simionati@bi.ismac.cnr.it [CNR-ISMAC, Italian National Research Council, Institute for Macromolecular Studies, Corso G. Pella 16, 13900, Biella (Italy); Zoccola, M., E-mail: m.zoccola@bi.ismac.cnr.it [CNR-ISMAC, Italian National Research Council, Institute for Macromolecular Studies, Corso G. Pella 16, 13900, Biella (Italy); Bruni, G., E-mail: giovanna.bruni@unipv.it [Department of Chemistry, — Physical-Chemistry Section, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 16, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Fassina, L., E-mail: lorenzo.fassina@unipv.it [Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Visai, L., E-mail: livia.visai@unipv.it [Department of Molecular Medicine, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 3/B, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicology and Environmental Risks, S. Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Via S. Boezio, 28, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Magenes, G., E-mail: giovanni.magenes@unipv.it [Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); and others

    2016-04-01

    Sheep's wool was used as a natural source to prepare keratin microfibril sponges for scaffolding, by disruption of the histological structure of the fibres through mild alkali treatment, followed by ultrasonication, casting and salt-leaching. The wool sponges showed highly interconnected porosity (93%) and contain intrinsic sites of cellular recognition that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). They displayed good thermal and water stability due to the conversion of disulphide cystine bonds into shorter monosulphide lanthionine intermolecular bonds, but significantly swelled in water, because of the high hydrophilicity and porosity, with a volume increasing up to 38%. Nevertheless, sponges were stable in water without structural changes, with a neutral pH in aqueous media, and showed excellent resilience to repeated compression stresses. According to in vitro biocompatibility assays, wool fibril sponges showed a good cell adhesion and proliferation as proved by MTT, FDA assays and SEM observations. The unique structure of the cortical cell network made by wool keratin proteins with controlled-size macro-porosity suitable for cell guesting, and nutrient feeding, provides an excellent scaffold for future tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Scaffolds were prepared from wool exploiting the fibres' histology structure. • The scaffold showed high interconnected micro- and macro-porosity. • The microscopic structure is very similar to the extracellular bone matrix. • Scaffolds reversibly swell in water with high resilience to repeated compression. • Composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of SAOS-2 cell line.

  3. Ventricular fibrillation time constant for swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Sun, Hongyu; Nimunkar, Amit J; Webster, John G; O'Rourke, Ann; Huebner, Shane; Will, James A

    2008-01-01

    The strength–duration curve for cardiac excitation can be modeled by a parallel resistor–capacitor circuit that has a time constant. Experiments on six pigs were performed by delivering current from the X26 Taser dart at a distance from the heart to cause ventricular fibrillation (VF). The X26 Taser is an electromuscular incapacitation device (EMD), which generates about 50 kV and delivers a pulse train of about 15–19 pulses s −1 with a pulse duration of about 150 µs and peak current about 2 A. Similarly a continuous 60 Hz alternating current of the amplitude required to cause VF was delivered from the same distance. The average current and duration of the current pulse were estimated in both sets of experiments. The strength–duration equation was solved to yield an average time constant of 2.87 ms ± 1.90 (SD). Results obtained may help in the development of safety standards for future electromuscular incapacitation devices (EMDs) without requiring additional animal tests

  4. The mechanisms of atrial fibrillation in hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielecka-Dabrowa Agata

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF is a complex condition with several possible contributing factors. The rapid and irregular heartbeat produced by AF increases the risk of blood clot formation inside the heart. These clots may eventually become dislodged, causing embolism, stroke and other disorders. AF occurs in up to 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism compared to 4% of people in the general population and is more common in men and in patients with triiodothyronine (T3 toxicosis. The incidence of AF increases with advancing age. Also, subclinical hyperthyroidism is a risk factor associated with a 3-fold increase in development of AF. Thyrotoxicosis exerts marked influences on electrical impulse generation (chronotropic effect and conduction (dromotropic effect. Several potential mechanisms could be invoked for the effect of thyroid hormones on AF risk, including elevation of left atrial pressure secondary to increased left ventricular mass and impaired ventricular relaxation, ischemia resulting from increased resting heart rate, and increased atrial eopic activity. Reentry has been postulated as one of the main mechanisms leading to AF. AF is more likely if effective refractory periods are short and conduction is slow. Hyperthyroidism is associated with shortening of action potential duration which may also contribute to AF.

  5. Atrial Fibrillation Predictors: Importance of the Electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, David M; Kabir, Muammar M; Dewland, Thomas A; Henrikson, Charles A; Tereshchenko, Larisa G

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in adults and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Substantial interest has developed in the primary prevention of AF, and thus the identification of individuals at risk for developing AF. The electrocardiogram (ECG) provides a wealth of information, which is of value in predicting incident AF. The PR interval and P wave indices (including P wave duration, P wave terminal force, P wave axis, and other measures of P wave morphology) are discussed with regard to their ability to predict and characterize AF risk in the general population. The predictive value of the QT interval, ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy, and findings of atrial and ventricular ectopy are also discussed. Efforts are underway to develop models that predict AF incidence in the general population; however, at present, little information from the ECG is included in these models. The ECG provides a great deal of information on AF risk and has the potential to contribute substantially to AF risk estimation, but more research is needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Naik, Arun L; Rao, Shailesh V

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of spinal tractography in patients of spinal cord injury vs a control group and to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the groups. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in the spinal cord of 29 patients (18 patients and 11 controls). DTI was done in the cervical region if the cord injury was at the dorsal or lumbar region and in the conus region if cord injury was in the cervical or dorsal region. FA was calculated for the patients and the controls and the values were compared. The mean FA value was 0.550±0.09 in the control group and 0.367±0.14 in the patients; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). Spinal tractography is a feasible technique to assess the extent of spinal cord injury by FA, which is reduced in patients of spinal cord injury, suggesting possible Wallerian degeneration. In future, this technique may become a useful tool for assessing cord injury patients after stem cell therapy, with improvement in FA values indicating axonal regeneration

  8. Michler’s Hydrol Blue: A Sensitive Probe for Amyloid Fibril Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kitts, Catherine C.; Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Nordén, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    amyloid probe, can differentiate between insulin and lysozyme fibrils by a more red-shifted excitation spectrum for insulin fibrils. To support the experimental observations, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed

  9. Risk of atrial fibrillation as a function of the electrocardiographic PR interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Bille; Pietersen, Adrian; Graff, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Prolongation of the PR interval has been associated with an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation (AF).......Prolongation of the PR interval has been associated with an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation (AF)....

  10. A randomized study of the effects of exercise training on patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip Samuel; Mourier, Malene; Kjaer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Exercise training is beneficial in ischemic and congestive heart disease. However, the effect on atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown.......Exercise training is beneficial in ischemic and congestive heart disease. However, the effect on atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown....

  11. Determination of collagen fibril structure and orientation in connective tissues by X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, S. J.; Hukins, D. W. L.

    1999-08-01

    Elastic scattering of X-rays can provide the following information on the fibrous protein collagen: its molecular structure, the axial arrangement of rod-like collagen molecules in a fibril, the lateral arrangement of molecules within a fibril, and the orientation of fibrils within a biological tissue. The first part of the paper reviews the principles involved in deducing this information. The second part describes a new computer program for measuring the equatorial intensity distribution, that provides information on the lateral arrangement of molecules within a fibril, and the angular distribution of the equatorial peaks that provides information on the orientation of fibrils. Orientation of fibrils within a tissue is quantified by the orientation distribution function, g( φ), which represents the probability of finding a fibril oriented between φ and φ+ δφ. The application of the program is illustrated by measurement of g( φ) for the collagen fibrils in demineralised cortical bone from cow tibia.

  12. Long-Term Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Maria; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Christensen, Jeppe Schultz

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The few studies conducted on short-term effects of air pollution on episodes of atrial fibrillation indicates a positive association, though not consistently...

  13. CT-myelography of cervical cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    1986-01-01

    We reported seven cases of acute cervical cord injuries who were examined by CT-Myelography (CTM) within 7 days after trauma. The presence or absence of spinal cord enlargement, the initial neurological status and the neurological prognosis of these patients were studied. The neurological status of each patient was graded by the method of Frankel who defined five grades from A to E according to the severity of neurological deficits. Seven patients were all males. The youngest was 18 and the oldest was 73 years old, with a mean age of 40.7 years. Follows up periods ranged from 7 to 23 months. Result: CTM revealed the enlargement of spinal cord in two cases, who had severe neurological deficits and were graded to A. No neurological improvements were obtained in these cases. Five cases without cord enlargement were graded to A in one patient, B in one patient and C in three patients. Four of these five patients improved neurologically. One grade C patient remained grade C. Complete block of subarachnoid space was observed in two out of seven cases. Cord enlargement was present in one of them. Another case of complete block improved from C to D. Conclusion: We consider the presence of cord enlargement which can be demonstrated by CTM well correlates the severity of the cord damage and presume poor neurological prognosis. Internal decompression, such as posterior longitudinal myelotomy may be recommended to the case of cord enlargement. When the cord enlargement is absent, improvement of neurological grade is expected although the initial neurological status shows severe deficits. (author)

  14. Improving Soil Seed Bank Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Steven C; Flessner, Michael L

    2018-05-08

    Problems associated with simplified weed management motivate efforts for diversification. Integrated weed management uses fundamentals of weed biology and applied ecology to provide a framework for diversified weed management programs; the soil seed bank comprises a necessary part of this framework. By targeting seeds, growers can inhibit the propagule pressure on which annual weeds depend for agricultural invasion. Some current management practices affect weed seed banks, such as crop rotation and tillage, but these tools are often used without specific intention to manage weed seeds. Difficulties quantifying the weed seed bank, understanding seed bank phenology, and linking seed banks to emerged weed communities challenge existing soil seed bank management practices. Improved seed bank quantification methods could include DNA profiling of the soil seed bank, mark and recapture, or 3D LIDAR mapping. Successful and sustainable soil seed bank management must constrain functionally diverse and changing weed communities. Harvest weed seed controls represent a step forward, but over-reliance on this singular technique could make it short-lived. Researchers must explore tools inspired by other pest management disciplines, such as gene drives or habitat modification for predatory organisms. Future weed seed bank management will combine multiple complementary practices that enhance diverse agroecosystems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Seeds of confusion : the impact of policies on seed systems

    OpenAIRE

    Louwaars, N.P.

    2007-01-01

    Seed is basic to crop production. Next to its importance in production, food security and rural development, seed is a key element in many debates about technology development and transfer, biodiversity, globalisation and equity. The sustainable availability of good quality seed is thus an important development issue. This study deals with the impact different types of regulation have on how farmers access seed. I have analysed current regulatory frameworks in terms of their impact on differe...

  16. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depaoli, D.

    1996-01-01

    This task will investigate the capabilities of magnetic-seeding filtration for the enhanced removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic particulates from liquids. This technology appies to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatant. Magnetic-seeding filtration can be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal-size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes

  17. Newer Anticoagulants for Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Harburger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-valvular atrial fibrillation is a recognized risk factor for stroke and systemic embolism. It has been clearly established that warfarin reduces the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in persons with atrial fibrillation and additional risk factors for stroke. The use of warfarin, however, requires frequent monitoring, and there is great variability in patient response to warfarin. Warfarin interacts with several medications and foods. In addition, warfarin use portends a significant risk of bleeding. For these reasons, warfarin is frequently not prescribed to persons for whom the drug would provide a clear benefit. Over the past decade, attempts have been made to develop drugs that are at least as safe and effective as warfarin for the treatment of atrial fibrillation that do not require monitoring nor have as many interactions. Initial studies of compounds in this regard ultimately failed due to safety concerns, but over the past two years two novel agents have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Association for anticoagulation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, another drug is under review, and additional compounds are being studied. This article will review the use of warfarin and these new agents in the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

  18. Heart failure and atrial fibrillation: current concepts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, M. P.; Tuinenburg, A. E.; Crijns, H. J.; Van Gelder, I. C.; Gosselink, A. T.; Lie, K. I.

    1997-01-01

    Heart failure and atrial fibrillation are very common, particularly in the elderly. Owing to common risk factors both disorders are often present in the same patient. In addition, there is increasing evidence of a complex, reciprocal relation between heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Thus heart failure may cause atrial fibrillation, with electromechanical feedback and neurohumoral activation playing an important mediating role. In addition, atrial fibrillation may promote heart failure; in particular, when there is an uncontrolled ventricular rate, tachycardiomyopathy may develop and thereby heart failure. Eventually, a vicious circle between heart failure and atrial fibrillation may form, in which neurohumoral activation and subtle derangement of rate control are involved. Treatment should aim at unloading of the heart, adequate control of ventricular rate, and correction of neurohumoral activation. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may help to achieve these goals. Treatment should also include an attempt to restore sinus rhythm through electrical cardioversion, though appropriate timing of cardioversion is difficult. His bundle ablation may be used to achieve adequate rate control in drug refractory cases. PMID:9155607

  19. Elasticity in Physically Cross-Linked Amyloid Fibril Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiping; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2018-04-01

    We provide a constitutive model of semiflexible and rigid amyloid fibril networks by combining the affine thermal model of network elasticity with the Derjaguin-Landau-Vervey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of electrostatically charged colloids. When compared to rheological experiments on β -lactoglobulin and lysozyme amyloid networks, this approach provides the correct scaling of elasticity versus both concentration (G ˜c2.2 and G ˜c2.5 for semiflexible and rigid fibrils, respectively) and ionic strength (G ˜I4.4 and G ˜I3.8 for β -lactoglobulin and lysozyme, independent from fibril flexibility). The pivotal role played by the screening salt is to reduce the electrostatic barrier among amyloid fibrils, converting labile physical entanglements into long-lived cross-links. This gives a power-law behavior of G with I having exponents significantly larger than in other semiflexible polymer networks (e.g., actin) and carrying DLVO traits specific to the individual amyloid fibrils.

  20. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  1. Idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare and often missed cause of thoracic myelopathy. The clinical presentation and radiological appearance is inconsistent and commonly confused with a dorsal arachnoid cyst and often is a misdiagnosed entity. While ventral spinal cord herniation through a dural defect has been previously described, intravertebral herniation is a distinct entity and extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year old man with idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation and discuss the clinico-radiological presentation, pathophysiology and operative management along with a review the literature of this unusual entity.

  2. Incarcerated umbilical cord hernia containing the gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Kulungowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 16 day-old boy infant with an umbilical mass underwent operative exploration of the umbilicus. The mass proved to be a gallbladder incarcerated in a hernia of the umbilical cord. Distinguishing an omphalocele from an umbilical cord hernia is not obvious and can be arbitrary. Morphologically, the two terms both describe congenital abdominal wall defects covered by a membrane, typically containing abdominal organs. Subtle differences and clinical features between omphalocele and umbilical cord hernia are highlighted in this report.

  3. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  4. genetics and inheritance of seed dormancy inflicted by seed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. The study was undertaken to investigate the genetic mode of inheritance of dormancy imposed by the hull (seed coat) in rice seeds. Freshly harvested seeds of parents, F1 and F2 populations of a cross between a dormant cultivar Kisegese and non-dormant strain K2004 were used. Germination test of the ...

  5. Seeds of confusion : the impact of policies on seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwaars, N.P.

    2007-01-01

    Seed is basic to crop production. Next to its importance in production, food security and rural development, seed is a key element in many debates about technology development and transfer, biodiversity, globalisation and equity. The sustainable availability of good quality seed is thus an important

  6. Effects of seed collecting date and storage duration on seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of seed collecting dates (5 to 6 times from mid-November to early January, 10 days intervals) and seed storage duration (4, 8, and 12 months) at room temperature on seed germination of four Artemisia species (Artemisia sieberi, A. diffusa, A. kupetdaghensis, and A.

  7. Cone and seed yields in white spruce seed production areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Pitcher

    1966-01-01

    The source of seed is an important consideration in the reforestation program on the National Forests in the North Central Region. Thirty-five seed production areas have been set up in the Region, along the lines proposed by the North Central Forest Experiment Station, to provide control of seed source. Red pine, white pine, shortleaf and loblolly pine, and white...

  8. Observation of the efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation on patients with different forms of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R-C; Han, W; Han, J; Yu, J; Guo, J; Fu, J-L; Li, Z; Zhao, R-Z

    2016-10-01

    To study the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in patients with different forms of atrial fibrillation. By retrospective analysis, we summarize 720 cases, where patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation in our hospital were treated with RFCA from February 2010 to October 2014. Among the cases, 425 were diagnosed with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 295 with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (including persistent atrial fibrillation and permanent atrial fibrillation). All patients were followed up until June 2015 to compare and analyze the differences in operation success rates, complications and recurrence rates. 395 cases (92.9%) of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 253 cases (85.8%) with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were subject to surgery and followed up. The age of onset, disease course, underlying diseases, left atrial diameter and combined anti-arrhythmics of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were lower than those of patients with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and the differences were statistically significant (p success rate of the first ablation was higher than that of non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Procedure time, procedure method, complications and recurrence rate of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were lower than those of non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation group, and the differences were statistically significant (p failure caused by atrial fibrillation in the two groups, the difference was not statistically significant (Apoplexy: p = 0.186; Heart failure: p = 0.170). The individual ablation success rate was higher for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and long-term follow-up showed that the occurrence of apoplexy and heart failure was not different from the non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation group.

  9. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles......The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... from individuals with chronic SCI show less resistance to fatigue, and the speed-related contractile properties change, becoming faster. These findings are also present in animals. Future studies should longitudinally examine changes in muscles from early SCI until steady state is reached in order...

  10. seed germination and seedlings growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2007-12-17

    Dec 17, 2007 ... The role of 20E in plant physiology including seed germination is not studied. ..... GA3, ABA and CKs on lettuce Lactuca sativa seed germination are ..... Practical uses for ecdysteroids in mammals and humans: an update. J.

  11. 77 FR 11121 - Scientific Information Request on Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Information Request on Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality... Review of the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation, which is currently being conducted by the Evidence-based... the treatment of atrial fibrillation. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as many studies as...

  12. 78 FR 11207 - Clinical Study Designs for Surgical Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ...] Clinical Study Designs for Surgical Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation; Guidance for... devices intended for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. DATES: Submit either electronic or written... Study Designs for Surgical Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation'' to the Division of...

  13. SAFETY OF AMIODARONE USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH WOLFF-PARKINSON-WHITE SYNDROME AND ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kuzhel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amiodarone is one of the basic antiarrhytmic drugs for atrial fibrillation treatment. However application of amiodarone in patients with atrial fibrillation and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome can induce ventricular fibrillation. Amiodarone usage in these patients should be accompanied by readiness for performance of resuscitation. This is confirmed by clinical case presentation.

  14. Meta-analysis identifies six new susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellinor, Patrick T; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Albert, Christine M; Glazer, Nicole L; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Lubitz, Steven A; Bis, Joshua C; Chung, Mina K; Dörr, Marcus; Ozaki, Kouichi; Roberts, Jason D; Smith, J Gustav; Pfeufer, Arne; Sinner, Moritz F; Lohman, Kurt; Ding, Jingzhong; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Jonathan D; Rienstra, Michiel; Rice, Kenneth M; Van Wagoner, David R; Magnani, Jared W; Wakili, Reza; Clauss, Sebastian; Rotter, Jerome I; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Launer, Lenore J; Davies, Robert W; Borkovich, Matthew; Harris, Tamara B; Lin, Honghuang; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Milan, David J; Hofman, Albert; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chen, Lin Y; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Voight, Benjamin F; Li, Guo; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kubo, Michiaki; Tedrow, Usha B; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Conen, David; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Xu, Siyan; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Levy, Daniel; Nakamura, Yusuke; Parvez, Babar; Mahida, Saagar; Furie, Karen L; Rosand, Jonathan; Muhammad, Raafia; Psaty, Bruce M; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Wichmann, H-Erich; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Kao, W H Linda; Kathiresan, Sekar; Roden, Dan M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McKnight, Barbara; Sjögren, Marketa; Newman, Anne B; Liu, Yongmei; Gollob, Michael H; Melander, Olle; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Felix, Stephan B; Alonso, Alvaro; Darbar, Dawood; Barnard, John; Chasman, Daniel I; Heckbert, Susan R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kääb, Stefan

    Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and death. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry, including 6,707 with and 52,426 without atrial fibrillation. Six new atrial fibrillation

  15. Optimizing cellulose fibrillation for the production of cellulose nanofibrils by a disk grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanshuang Hu; Yu Zhao; Kecheng Li; J.Y. Zhu; Roland Gleisner

    2015-01-01

    The fibrillation of a bleached kraft eucalyptus pulp was investigated by means of a laboratory-scale disk grinder for the production of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), while the parameters disk rotating speed, solid loading, and fibrillation duration were varied. The cumulative energy consumption was monitored during fibrillation. The degree of polymerization (DP) and...

  16. Seed research for improved technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Bino,R.J.; Jalink,H.; Oluoch,M.O.; Groot,S.P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The production of high-quality seed is the basis for a durable a profitable agriculture. After production, seed is processed, conditioned, stored, shipped and germinated. For quality assurance, seed quality has to be controlled at all steps of the production chain. Seed functioning is accompanied by programmed transitions from cell proliferation to quiescence upon maturation and from quiescence to reinitiation of cellular metabolism upon imbibition. Despite the obvious importance of these con...

  17. (Lupinus albus) SEEDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-08-08

    Aug 8, 2010 ... lupin samples indicated that lupins can be used as a raw material for various food ... lupin seeds can be utilized for milk and meat imitation products. ... estimated by multiplying the percentage of crude protein, crude fat and ...

  18. Seed for change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassena Beko, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Ethiopia is an agrarian country where agriculture dominates the economy, and thus agriculture is considered as an engine of growth by the government. Seed as one of the agricultural technologies, in fact, a carrier of many technologies, is critical to increasing production, but the use of quality

  19. Managing Stress. Project Seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Donna; Wilk, Jan

    One of eight papers from Project Seed, this paper describes a stress management project undertaken with high school sophomores. Managing Stress is described as an interactive workshop that offers young people an opportunity to examine specific areas of stress in their lives and to learn effective ways to deal with them. The program described…

  20. Grape Seed Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Greece people have used grapes, grape leaves, and sap for health purposes. Grape seed extract was developed ... sharing research results, and educating the public. Its resources include publications (such as Dietary ... Department of Health & Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Center for ...

  1. The SEED Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Committed to fulfilling the promise of the green economy, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) launched the Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative (www.theseedcenter.org) in October 2010. The project advances sustainability and clean energy workforce development practices at community colleges by…

  2. Dormancy in Plant Seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, H.W.M.; Finch-Savage, W.E.; Buitink, J.; Bolingue, W.; Leubner-Metzger, G.

    2010-01-01

    Seed dormancy has been studied intensely over the past decades and, at present, knowledge of this plant trait is at the forefront of plant biology. The main model species is Arabidopsis thaliana, an annual weed, possessing nondeep physiological dormancy. This overview presents the state-of-the-art

  3. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  4. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, Sotira.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process

  5. [Study on seed testing for Salvia miltiorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Hong-mei; Qi, Jian-jun; Zhou, Li-li; Li, Xian-en

    2008-09-01

    To establish a seed testing methods for Salvia miltiorrhiza. Referring to the International Seed Testing Rules made by ISTA and the Seed Testing for Crops (GB/T3543. 1-1995) issued by China. The seeds are selected by winnowing; the seed purity is about 50%-60%; 100 grain weight is used to determine the quality of the seed; the seed moisture content is determined by air drying, the drying hour is 3 h. Seed viability is tested by TFC method.

  6. Germination of red alder seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.A. Radwan; D.S. DeBell

    1981-01-01

    Red alder seeds were collected from six locations throughout the natural range of the species. Each seed lot was obtained from a single tree, and the seeds were used to determine germination with and without stratification treatment. Irrespective of treatment, germination varied significantly (P

  7. Nest-mediated seed dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Warren; Jason P. Love; Mark A. Bradford

    2017-01-01

    Many plant seeds travel on the wind and through animal ingestion or adhesion; however, an overlooked dispersal mode may lurk within those dispersal modes. Viable seeds may remain attached or embedded within materials birds gather for nest building. Our objective was to determine if birds inadvertently transport seeds when they forage for plant materials to...

  8. Seed systems support in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munyi, Peter; Jonge, De Bram

    2015-01-01

    The threats of climate change and rising food prices have stirred renewed attention for seed and food security in Africa, inviting new thinking on the role of seed sector development in coping with these concerns. One conceptual framework that has gained attention is the Integrated Seed Sector

  9. Disease management: atrial fibrillation and home monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Renato Pietro

    2013-06-01

    Device-detected atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes predict poor clinical outcome regardless of symptoms. Potential benefits of remote monitoring are early arrhythmia detection and patient continuous monitoring. Several studies of device remote monitoring consistently demonstrated that AF represents the most common clinical alert and that detailed information on arrhythmia onset, duration, and burden as well as on the ventricular rate may be early available for clinical evaluation. Reaction time to AF alerts was very short in all series involving either pacemakers or defibrillators and action ability of AF alerts was very high. In the Home Guide Registry, in which 1650 patients were enrolled, AF was detected in 16.3% of patients and represented 36% of all cardiovascular events during the follow-up. Timely anticoagulation introduction in asymptomatic patients may impact on the stroke rate. According to the results of repeated Monte Carlo simulations based on a real population of 166 patients, daily monitoring may reduce the 2-year stroke risk by 9-18% with an absolute reduction of 0.2-0.6%, compared with conventional inter-visit intervals of 6-12 months. In the COMPAS trial, the incidence of hospitalizations for atrial arrhythmias and related stroke was significantly higher in the control group than in the remote monitoring group. Major questions will be addressed by the ongoing IMPACT trial in which a remote monitoring guided anticoagulation strategy based on AF detection will be compared with a physician-directed standard strategy. In patients with heart failure, AF early detection combined with other indexes may help prevent hospitalizations.

  10. Calcium signalling silencing in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiser, Maura

    2017-06-15

    Subcellular calcium signalling silencing is a novel and distinct cellular and molecular adaptive response to rapid cardiac activation. Calcium signalling silencing develops during short-term sustained rapid atrial activation as seen clinically during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is the first 'anti-arrhythmic' adaptive response in the setting of AF and appears to counteract the maladaptive changes that lead to intracellular Ca 2+ signalling instability and Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity. Calcium signalling silencing results in a failed propagation of the [Ca 2+ ] i signal to the myocyte centre both in patients with AF and in a rabbit model. This adaptive mechanism leads to a substantial reduction in the expression levels of calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the frequency of Ca 2+ sparks and arrhythmogenic Ca 2+ waves remains low. Less Ca 2+ release per [Ca 2+ ] i transient, increased fast Ca 2+ buffering strength, shortened action potentials and reduced L-type Ca 2+ current contribute to a substantial reduction of intracellular [Na + ]. These features of Ca 2+ signalling silencing are distinct and in contrast to the changes attributed to Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity. Some features of Ca 2+ signalling silencing prevail in human AF suggesting that the Ca 2+ signalling 'phenotype' in AF is a sum of Ca 2+ stabilizing (Ca 2+ signalling silencing) and Ca 2+ destabilizing (arrhythmogenic unstable Ca 2+ signalling) factors. Calcium signalling silencing is a part of the mechanisms that contribute to the natural progression of AF and may limit the role of Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity after the onset of AF. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  11. Umbilical Cord Blood: Counselling, Collection, and Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armson, B Anthony; Allan, David S; Casper, Robert F

    2015-09-01

    To review current evidence regarding umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking and to provide guidelines for Canadian health care professionals regarding patient education, informed consent, procedural aspects, and options for cord blood banking in Canada. Selective or routine collection and banking of umbilical cord blood for future stem cell transplantation for autologous (self) or allogeneic (related or unrelated) treatment of malignant and non-malignant disorders in children and adults. Cord blood can be collected using in utero or ex utero techniques. Umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking, education of health care professionals, indications for cord blood collection, short- and long-term risk and benefits, maternal and perinatal morbidity, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and PubMed beginning in September 2013 using appropriate controlled MeSH vocabulary (fetal blood, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics) and key words (umbilical cord blood, banking, collection, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics, public, private). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date limits, but results were limited to English or French language materials. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to September 2014. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoetic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to

  12. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the UAB-SCIMS More The UAB-SCIMS Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as a resource to promote knowledge in the ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research? Where can I get more information? Glossary Introduction Until World War II, a serious spinal cord ... muscle, the bony structure appears white on the film. Vertebral misalignment or fracture can be seen within ...

  14. Alcohol application natural drying of umbilical cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, M.F.; Ali, S.; Roshan, E.; Jamal, S.

    2006-01-01

    To compare the outcome, between the application of Alcohol and natural drying to umbilical stump in low risk newborns. Newborns delivered in Military Hospital and Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi were randomized into group A (70% Alcohol) and group B (No antiseptic). In group A, 70% Alcohol was applied once daily to the umbilical stump, whereas no antiseptic was applied in group B. These newborns were followed till four weeks of life. Age at separation of umbilical cord was noted. Cases showing signs of neonatal sepsis and omphalitis were documented. Of 100 singleton full-term newborns enrolled, 90 completed the study. No newborn in either group developed a cord infection or neonatal sepsis. The difference of cord separation time between the two groups was statistically significant. Evidence does not support continued use of alcohol for low risk newborn cord care. (author)

  15. Apolipoprotein E in umbilical cord blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, T.M.; Davis, P.A.; Blum, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Adolipoprotein E (apo E), with a molecular weight of approximately 37,000 daltons, is a minor apolipoprotein constituent in adult plasma lipoproteins. This apolipoprotein, like apolipoprotein B, is a ligand recognized by specific lipoprotein receptor sites (B-E receptors) on cell surfaces. We have recently shown that a pronounced apo E band appears in umbilical cord blood low-density (LDL) lipoproteins and also in high density (HDL) lipoproteins. Densitometric scans of Coomassie blue G-250 stained polyacrylamide gels suggested that apo E was probably elevated in cord blood lipoproteins. To pursue this suggestion, apo E in cord blood was quantitated by radioimmunoassay and correlated with cord blood lipid levels. In addition, apo E levels in 20 normal adult volunteers were also examined

  16. Clinical application of low energy intracardiac cardioversion of atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Liqun; Gu Gang; Su Kan; Su Renying; Shen Yongchu; Shen Weifeng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low energy intracardiac cardioversion in persistent atria fibrillation. Methods: Low energy intracardiac cardioversion was performed by delivering R wave-synchronized biphasic shocks in 7 patients (4 men, 3 women) with persistent atrial fibrillation. Prior to the procedure, all patients underwent transesophageal echocardiographic examinations to rule out the presence of intracardiac thrombus and received subcutaneous injection of low molecular weight heparin for 3-5 days. Two custom-made 6 Fr catheters (Rhythm Technologies of Getz, USA) were used for de-fibrillation shock delivery. One catheter was positioned in the lower right atrium so that the majority of the catheter electrodes had firm contact with the right atrial free wall. The second catheter was placed randomly either in coronary sinus through right internal jugular vein or in the left pulmonary artery through femoral vein. In addition, a standard diagnostic 6-F quadrupolar catheter was placed at the right ventricular apex for ventricular synchronization and postshock ventricular pacing. Shocks were delivered by Implant Support Device (Model 4510, Teleceronics). After conversion, all patients were treated with intravenous amiodarone in the first 24 hours followed by oral administration. Results: In all 7 patients cardioversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm was successfully obtained. A mean of 2 ± 1 shocks per patient has been delivered with a total amount of 13 shocks. The average delivered energy was 7.8 ± 2.2 Joules. No complication occurred. At a mean follow-up of 18 ± 9 months, 4 of the 7 patients treated successfully showed sinus rhythm there after. Atrial fibrillation recurred in 3 patients at the second, fifth day and eighth month after cardioversion. Conclusions: Low energy intracardiac cardioversion is effective and safe, and can be easily performed in patients without general anesthesia. It offers a new option for restoring sinus

  17. Failure of antiarrhythmic drugs to prevent experimental reperfusion ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, M; Michelson, E L; Kmetzo, J J; Kaplinsky, E; Dreifus, L S

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-nine adult mongrel dogs underwent acute ligation of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Thirty minutes later, the occlusion was released to evaluate the effectiveness of five antiarrhythmic protocols in eliminating reperfusion ventricular fibrillation. The five protocols included: protocol 1 --i.v. lidocaine, preligation and prerelease (n = 19); protocol 2 -- i.v. lidocaine, prereperfusion only (n = 22); protocol 3 -- chronic, oral, daily amiodarone for 2 weeks preligation (n = 19); protocol 4 -- i.v. procainamide, preligation and prereperfusion (n = 21); and protocol 5 -- i.v. verapamil, prereperfusion (n = 18). Each regimen was evaluated with respect to the incidence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation in dogs that survived to reperfusion, and the results were compared to 77 control dogs that underwent identical coronary artery occlusion and release procedures without drug therapy. The incidence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation was as follows: protocol 1 -- seven of 15 dogs (47%); protocol 2 -- six of 18 (33%); protocol 3 -- 11 of 16 dogs (69%); protocol 4 -- eight of 17 dogs (47%); and protocol 5 -- 10 of 17 dogs (59%), compared with 36 of 60 (60%) in control dogs. Using chi-square analysis, protocol 2 was beneficial (p antecedent coronary artery ligation periods, and predictive risk indexes for the occurrence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation were developed. the Mantel-Haenszel method of statistical analysis revealed that none of these protocols resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation. Thus, use of these predictive indexes plus appropriate statistical methods has revealed, unexpectedly, limitations in the efficacy of a spectrum of antiarrhythmic agents in preventing reperfusion ventricular fibrillation.

  18. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Nabina Shah; Binav Shrestha; Kamana Subba

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the...

  20. Tuberculosis of the Spermatic Cord: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Benjelloun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The spermatic cord tuberculoma is uncommon, especially in its lower portion. Most cases were described in Japanese literature. We report a case of tuberculosis of the spermatic cord in a sexually active young man, revealed by a scrotal mass mimicking a tumor of the testicle and discuss the suitable diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with preservation of the testes and the other sexual organs.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  2. Exposure-Based Therapy for Symptom Preoccupation in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Särnholm, Josefin; Skúladóttir, Helga; Rück, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Patients often experience a range of symptoms resulting in a markedly reduced quality of life, and commonly show symptom preoccupation in terms of avoidance and control behaviors. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been shown...... with symptomatic paroxysmal (intermittent) atrial fibrillation who were assessed pre- and posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up. The CBT lasted 10 weeks and included exposure to physical sensations similar to AF symptoms, exposure to avoided situations or activities, and behavioral activation. We observed large...

  3. SDS-Induced Fibrillation of α-Synuclein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giehm, L.; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De; Pedersen, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    . In this fibrillogenic complex, 4 αSN molecules initially associate with 40-50 SDS molecules to form a shared micelle that gradually grows in size. The complex initially exhibits a mixture of random coil and α-helix, but incubation results in a structural conversion into β-sheet structure and concomitant formation......-stabilized micelles. Thus, fibrillation in this case occurs by a process of continuous accretion rather than by the rate-limiting accumulation of a distinct nucleus. The morphology of the SDS-induced fibrils does not exhibit the classical rod-like structures formed by αSN when aggregated by agitation in the absence...

  4. Gender Differences in Antithrombotic Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Michał; Huisman, Menno V; Rothman, Kenneth J

    2018-01-01

    was -0.5% (95% CI, -1.8%, 0.8%). VKAs were prescribed to 32.8% and 31.9% (NOACs 46.8% and 48.3%) of women and men, respectively. No confounder for the association between gender and anticoagulant prescription was identified. Between-gender differences in anticoagulant use (lower use in women compared......AIMS: Data on gender differences in oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation are conflicting, largely limited to regional reports and Vitamin K antagonist (VKA) use. We aimed to analyze gender-specific anticoagulant prescription patterns early following...... atrial fibrillation (difference in prevalence of anticoagulant use...

  5. New fluorescent probes for detection and characterization of amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Kirilova, Elena; Kirilov, Georgiy; Kalnina, Inta; Vasilev, Aleksey; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Deligeorgiev, Todor

    2010-08-01

    The applicability of the novel fluorescent probes, aminoderivative of benzanthrone ABM, squaraine dye SQ-1 and polymethine dye V2 to identification and structural analysis of amyloid fibrils has been evaluated using the lysozyme model system in which fibrillar aggregates have been formed in concentrated ethanol solution. The association constant, binding stoichiometry and molar fluorescence of the bound dye have been determined. ABM was found to surpass classical amyloid marker ThT in the sensitivity to the presence of fibrillar aggregates. Resonance energy transfer measurements involving ABM-SQ-1 and SQ-1-V2 donor-acceptor pairs yielded the limits for fractal-like dimension of lysozyme fibrils.

  6. Nearly reversible conformational change of amyloid fibrils as revealed by pH-jump experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Kamatari, Yuji O; Fukuoka, Mayuko; Miyaji, Reiji; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    pH-jump induced conformational transitions between substates of preformed amyloid fibrils made by a fragmented peptide of helix 2 (H2 peptide) of MoPrP were detected, and their kinetics were analyzed using a novel pH-jump apparatus specially designed for observing amyloids. Previously, we reported that H2 peptide formed ordered fibrils with a minimum at 207 nm on CD spectra at pH 2.9 (named pH 2.9 fibrils), but formed aggregate-like fibrils with a minimum at 220 nm at pH 7.5 (named pH 7.5 fibrils). When pH-jump from 2.9 to 7.5 was performed, the CD spectrum changed instantly, but the finally observed ellipticities were clearly distinct from those of pH 7.5 fibrils. Thus, the finally observed state is termed 'pH 7.5-like fibrils'. However, pH 7.5-like fibrils reverted to the conformation very similar to that of the pH 2.9 fibrils when the pH of the solution was restored to 2.9. Then, we examined the kinetics of the nearly reversible conformational changes between pH 2.9 fibrils and pH 7.5-like fibrils using ANS fluorescence stopped-flow, and we observed relatively fast phases (0.7-18 s(-1)). In contrast, the conversion between pH 7.5-like fibrils and pH 7.5 fibrils never occurred (<0.2 day(-1)). Thus, H2 fibrils can be switched readily between distinct conformations separated by a low energy barrier, while a large energy barrier clearly separated the different conformations. These conformational varieties of amyloid fibrils may explain the physical basis of the diversity in prion.

  7. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  8. Mechanical harvesting of pumpkin seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Sito, Stjepan; Ivančan, Stjepan; Barković, Edi; Mucalo, Ana

    2009-01-01

    One of the key problems in production technology of pumpkin seed for oil production is mechanized harvesting and losses of seed during mechanical harvesting. The losses of pumpkin seed during mechanical harvesting at peripheral velocity of 1.57 m/s (optimally adjusted machine) were 4.4% for Gleisdorf species, 5.2% for Slovenska species and 7.8% for pumpkin with husk. The higher average losses of pumpkin seed with husk were caused by tight connection of seed and pumpkin fruit.

  9. Circadian variation in dominant atrial fibrillation frequency in persistent atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, Frida; Stridh, Martin; Sörnmo, Leif; Bollmann, Andreas; Husser, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Circadian variation in atrial fibrillation (AF) frequency is explored in this paper by employing recent advances in signal processing. Once the AF frequency has been estimated and tracked by a hidden Markov model approach, the resulting trend is analyzed for the purpose of detecting and characterizing the presence of circadian variation. With cosinor analysis, the results show that the short-term variations in the AF frequency exceed the variation that may be attributed to circadian. Using the autocorrelation method, circadian variation was found in 13 of 18 ambulatory ECG recordings (Holter) acquired from patients with long-standing persistent AF. Using the ensemble correlation method, the highest AF frequency usually occurred during the afternoon, whereas the lowest usually occurred during late night. It is concluded that circadian variation is present in most patients with long-standing persistent AF though the short-term variation in the AF frequency is considerable and should be taken into account

  10. Analysis of brain natriuretic peptide in 30 patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Qiang; Lu Jianghui; Li Weipeng; Yuan Yuan; Sun Weili

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between atrial fibrillation and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), plasma levels of BNP in 30 patients with atrial fibrillation and 30 health controls were assayed and compared. The results showed that plasma levels of BNP in patients with atrial fibrillation were significantly higher than those of health controls (P<0.05). When the patients with atrial fibrillation were restored sinus rhythm, the concentration of BNP decreased significantly (P<0.05). BNP was a sensitive marker of cardiac dysfunction, and BNP was positively correlated with atrial fibrillation. (authors)

  11. Irradiation effect on the seed vigor, SOD activity and MDA content in germinating seeds of yellow-seeded and black-seeded rape seed (Brassica napus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jixiang; Hu Danhong; Liu Houli

    1993-01-01

    Seeds of a set of near-isogenic lines (Brassica napus L.) with different seed coat color from yellow to black were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays of 150 krad. Seed vigor, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in germinating seeds were analysed. In these characters, no significant difference between yellow-seeded lines (YLs) and black-seeded lines (BLs) showed before irradiation. But after irradiation, SOD activity in YLs was lower than that in BLs. While MDA content in YLs was obviously higher that that in DLs. As a result of irradiation, seed vigor of YLs was lower than that in BLs. these results indicated that the irradiation resistance of rape seed was related to the level of SOD as well as protective structure or substances in seed coat and that the radiosensitivity of YLs was higher than that of DLs

  12. Breeding for Grass Seed Yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Birte; Studer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Seed yield is a trait of major interest for many fodder and amenity grass species and has received increasing attention since seed multiplication is economically relevant for novel grass cultivars to compete in the commercial market. Although seed yield is a complex trait and affected...... by agricultural practices as well as environmental factors, traits related to seed production reveal considerable genetic variation, prerequisite for improvement by direct or indirect selection. This chapter first reports on the biological and physiological basics of the grass reproduction system, then highlights...... important aspects and components affecting the seed yield potential and the agronomic and environmental aspects affecting the utilization and realization of the seed yield potential. Finally, it discusses the potential of plant breeding to sustainably improve total seed yield in fodder and amenity grasses....

  13. Ventricular fibrillation development following atrial fibrillation after the ingestion of sildenaphil in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Sinan; Izgu, Ibrahim; Aktas, Halil; Dogan, Pinar; Dogan, Ali

    2015-08-01

    Complications in the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome could cause different clinical conditions by inducing different arrhythmias. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of these arrhythmias and is important as it causes life-threatening arrhythmias. It is known that some drugs, underlying cardiac diseases, and the number of accessory pathways, cause a predisposition to this condition. In the current report, we presented a patient with WPW who was admitted to the emergency department with AF, wide QRS and a rapid ventricular response that progressed to ventricular fibrillation.

  14. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Physiological quality and seed respiration of primed Jatropha curcas seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheli Angelica Horbach

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seed deterioration is a natural and irreversible process. Nevertheless, seed priming with water and antioxidants can minimize oxidative damage in oilseeds, resulting in attenuation of seed deterioration. The objective of this assay was to evaluate seed priming on respiratory activity of Jatropha curcas submitted to accelerated aging. Seeds from two provenances (Janauba and Pedro J. Caballero were submitted to three priming treatments (control, immersion in deionized water, and with 750 µmol L-1 of ascorbic acid and treated for accelerated aging at 41 °C for 72 h. The results showed that the priming of J. curcas seeds promoted tolerance to accelerated aging. Primed seeds, with ascorbic acid from Janauba and deionized water from Pedro J. Caballero, resulted in a higher percentage of normal seedlings, and increased germination speed index and seed respiration. The decline of physiological quality of J. curcas seeds after accelerated aging is directly associated with a reduction in respiratory activity that is related to seed moisture content.

  16. Fibril morphology and tendon mechanical properties in patellar tendinopathy: effects of heavy slow resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, Mads; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellar tendinopathy is characterized by pathologic abnormalities. Heavy slow resistance training (HSR) is effective in the management of patellar tendinopathy, but the underlying functional mechanisms remain elusive. PURPOSE: To investigate fibril morphology and mechanical properties...... assessed symptoms/function and maximal tendon pain during activity. Tendon biopsy samples were analyzed for fibril density, volume fraction, and mean fibril area. Tendon mechanical properties were assessed using force and ultrasonography samplings. RESULTS: Patients improved in symptoms/function (P = .02...... area decreased (-26% +/- 21%, P = .04) in tendinopathic tendons after HSR. CONCLUSION: Fibril morphology is abnormal in tendinopathy, but tendon mechanical properties are not. Clinical improvements after HSR were associated with changes in fibril morphology toward normal fibril density and mean fibril...

  17. Embolic risk in atrial fibrillation that arises from hyperthyroidism: review of the medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Elie; Coplan, Neil L

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac complication of hyperthyroidism, occurs in an estimated 10% to 25% of overtly hyperthyroid patients. The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases with age in the general population and in thyrotoxic patients. Other risk factors for atrial fibrillation in thyrotoxic patients include male sex, ischemic or valvular heart disease, and congestive heart failure. The incidence of arterial embolism or stroke in thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation is less clear. There are many reports of arterial thromboembolism associated with hyperthyroidism, including cases of young adults without coexisting risk factors other than thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation. The use of anticoagulative agents to prevent thromboembolic sequelae of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation is controversial: National organizations provide conflicting recommendations in their practice guidelines. Herein, we review the medical literature and examine the evidence behind the recommendations in order to determine the best approach to thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients who have atrial fibrillation that is associated with hyperthyroidism.

  18. Empty seeds are not always bad: simultaneous effect of seed emptiness and masting on animal seed predation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Perea

    Full Text Available Seed masting and production of empty seeds have often been considered independently as different strategies to reduce seed predation by animals. Here, we integrate both phenomena within the whole assemblage of seed predators (both pre and post-dispersal and in two contrasting microsites (open vs. sheltered to improve our understanding of the factors controlling seed predation in a wind-dispersed tree (Ulmus laevis. In years with larger crop sizes more avian seed predators were attracted with an increase in the proportion of full seeds predated on the ground. However, for abundant crops, the presence of empty seeds decreased the proportion of full seeds predated. Empty seeds remained for a very long period in the tree, making location of full seeds more difficult for pre-dispersal predators and expanding the overall seed drop period at a very low cost (in dry biomass and allocation of C, N and P. Parthenocarpy (non-fertilized seeds was the main cause of seed emptiness whereas seed abortion was produced in low quantity. These aborted seeds fell prematurely and, thus, could not work as deceptive seeds. A proportion of 50% empty seeds significantly reduced ground seed predation by 26%. However, a high rate of parthenocarpy (beyond 50% empty seeds did not significantly reduce seed predation in comparison to 50% empty seeds. We also found a high variability and unpredictability in the production of empty seeds, both at tree and population level, making predator deception more effective. Open areas were especially important to facilitate seed survival since rodents (the main post-dispersal predators consumed seeds mostly under shrub cover. In elm trees parthenocarpy is a common event that might work as an adaptive strategy to reduce seed predation. Masting per se did not apparently reduce the overall proportion of seeds predated in this wind-dispersed tree, but kept great numbers of seeds unconsumed.

  19. Seeds of the Future

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Five of the global issues most frequently debated today are the decline of biodiversity in general and of agrobiodiversity in particular, climate change, hunger and malnutrition, poverty and water. These issues are connected with each other, and should be dealt with as such. Most of our food comes from seeds (even when we eat meat, we indirectly eat plants, which come from seeds) and food affects our health. The evolution of plant breeding, the science which is responsible for the type and the diversity of seed that farmers plant, and hence for the diversity of food that we eat, helps us understand how agrobiodiversity has decreased. An agro-ecological model of agriculture could be solution to the most important problems affecting the planet, but is often criticized for not being able to produce enough food for a growing population casting doubts on whether food security and food safety can be compatible objectives. Participatory and evolutionary plant breeding, while benefiting from advances in molecular g...

  20. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients on statins undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The efficacy of perioperative statin therapy in decreasing postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing valve replacements and repairs is unknown. The aim of our study was to determine whether or not the literature supports the hypothesis that statins decrease postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), and hence ...

  1. Atrial Fibrillation in Embolic Stroke: Anticoagulant Therapy at UNTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The decision to commence anticoagulation in a patient with embolic stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF) is often a difficult one for many clinicians. The result can have significant impact on the patient. This study was therefore undertaken to review the use of anticoagulation in embolic stroke in the setting of atrial ...

  2. Frequency analysis of the ECG before and during ventricular fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbschleb, J.N.; Heethaar, R.M.; Tweel, I. van der; Meijler, F.L.

    1980-01-01

    Frequency analysis of cardiac electrograms of dogs with ventricular fibrillation (VF) during complete cardiopulmonary bypass and coronary perfusion showed a power spectrum with a peak around 12 Hz and its higher harmonics, suggesting more organization than generally assumed. As a next step to see

  3. Occlusion of left atrial appendage in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Н. Ганеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews a new method of prophylaxis of thromboembolitic complications, specifically occlusion of left atrial appendage, in patients with atrial fibrillation. Indications and contraindications for the procedure, as well as a step-by-step process of the intervention itself are described. Special emphasis is placed on the up-to-date evidence and the review of clinical trials.

  4. Abnormal atrial activation in young patients with lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmqvist, Fredrik; Olesen, Morten S; Tveit, Arnljot

    2011-01-01

    Patients with a history of atrial fibrillation (AF) have previously been shown to have altered atrial conduction, as seen non-invasively using signal-averaged P-wave analysis. However, little is known about the P-wave morphology in patients in the early phases of AF with structurally normal hearts....

  5. Cancer antigen-125 and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Angel; Gong, Mengqi; Bellanti, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cancer antigen-125 (Ca-125) is traditionally recognised as a tumour marker and its role in cardiovascular diseases has been studied only in recent years. Whether Ca-125 is elevated in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and its levels predict the risk of AF remains controversial. T...

  6. Fibril Formation from Pea Protein and Sesequent Gel Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munialo, C.D.; Martin, A.H.; Linden, van der E.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fibrillar aggregates made using pea proteins, to assemble formed fibrils into protein-based gels, and to study the rheological behavior of these gels. Micrometer-long fibrillar aggregates were observed after pea protein solutions had been heated for 20

  7. Fibril Formation from Pea Protein and Subsequent Gel Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munialo, XC.D.; Martin, A.H.; Linden, E. van der; Jongh, H.H.J de

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fibrillar aggregates made using pea proteins, to assemble formed fibrils into protein-based gels, and to study the rheological behavior of these gels. Micrometer-long fibrillar aggregates were observed after pea protein solutions had been heated for 20

  8. P-wave duration and the risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas B; Kühl, Jørgen T; Pietersen, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results on the association between P-wave duration and the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) are conflicting. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to obtain a detailed description of the relationship between P-wave duration and the risk of AF. METHODS: Using computerized analysis o...

  9. Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in a Mission-Assigned Astronaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Peter A.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation will explore the clinical and administrative conundrums faced by the flight surgeon upon discovering asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation seven months prior to scheduled long duration spaceflight. The presenter will discuss the decision-making process as well as the clinical and operational outcomes.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms and New Treatment Paradigm for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirish, Padmini; Li, Ning; Timofeyev, Valeriy; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Lianguo; Yang, Jun; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Ma, Sin Mei; Lee, Jeong Han; Su, Demetria; Lau, Victor C; Myers, Richard E; Lieu, Deborah K; López, Javier E; Young, J Nilas; Yamoah, Ebenezer N; Haj, Fawaz; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Hammock, Bruce D; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2016-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation represents the most common arrhythmia leading to increased morbidity and mortality, yet, current treatment strategies have proven inadequate. Conventional treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs carries a high risk for proarrhythmias. The soluble epoxide hydrolase enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of anti-inflammatory epoxy fatty acids, including epoxyeicosatrienoic acids from arachidonic acid to the corresponding proinflammatory diols. Therefore, the goal of the study is to directly test the hypotheses that inhibition of the soluble epoxide hydrolase enzyme can result in an increase in the levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, leading to the attenuation of atrial structural and electric remodeling and the prevention of atrial fibrillation. For the first time, we report findings that inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase reduces inflammation, oxidative stress, atrial structural, and electric remodeling. Treatment with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor significantly reduces the activation of key inflammatory signaling molecules, including the transcription factor nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and transforming growth factor-β. This study provides insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to atrial fibrillation by inflammation and represents a paradigm shift from conventional antiarrhythmic drugs, which block downstream events to a novel upstream therapeutic target by counteracting the inflammatory processes in atrial fibrillation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Atrial fibrillation: Therapeutic potential of atrial K+ channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravens, Ursula; Odening, Katja E

    2017-08-01

    Despite the epidemiological scale of atrial fibrillation, current treatment strategies are of limited efficacy and safety. Ideally, novel drugs should specifically correct the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for atrial fibrillation with no other cardiac or extracardiac actions. Atrial-selective drugs are directed toward cellular targets with sufficiently different characteristics in atria and ventricles to modify only atrial function. Several potassium (K + ) channels with either predominant expression in atria or distinct electrophysiological properties in atria and ventricles can serve as atrial-selective drug targets. These channels include the ultra-rapidly activating, delayed outward-rectifying Kv1.5 channel conducting I Kur , the acetylcholine-activated inward-rectifying Kir3.1/Kir3.4 channel conducting I K,ACh , the Ca 2+ -activated K + channels of small conductance (SK) conducting I SK , and the two pore domain K + (K2P) channels TWIK-1, TASK-1 and TASK-3 that are responsible for voltage-independent background currents I TWIK-1 , I TASK-1 , and I TASK-3 . Here, we briefly review the characteristics of these K + channels and their roles in atrial fibrillation. The antiarrhythmic potential of drugs targeting the described channels is discussed as well as their putative value in treatment of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Posibilities of cardiac pacemaker use in paroxsysmal atrial fibrilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Kamenik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of atrial fibrillation is a big therapeutic challenge because of all known negative consequences of this the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia. Numerous of clinical studies showed bad control or ineffectiveness of antiarhythmic drugs. Nonfarmakological therapies like surgical treatment, radiofrequency ablation and atrial pacing are being tested. Effectiveness of atrial pacing in prevention of paroxysmal artial fibrillation has been documented in numerous prospective studies and is effective for a long time interval, but only for patients with bradicardic underlying cardiac rhythm. In Normocardic rhythm or normal AV conduction the effective Atrial fibrillation prevention was not proven. The mechanism of action is based on premature atrial complex suppression, reduction of dispersion of refractoriness after short-long cycles and reduction of interatrial conduction delay. The atrial stimulation site or multi-site atrial pacing could be effective in AF prevention when interatrial conduction delay is present; otherwise the difference is not significant.Conclusions: In bradicardic patient who has frequent paroxysms of atrial fibrillation, regardless if bradycardia is due to ineffective antiarrhythmic drug treathement, implantation of DDDR pacemaker with atrial prevention algorhythm is indicated. If the P-wave duration is >120 milliseconds multi-site atrial pacing or septal atrial pacing should be considered. Pacemaker diagnostic tools could be used for adequate start of anticoagulant therapy and control of effectiveness of anthyarhythmic drug therapy.

  13. Pattern of atrial fibrillation and risk of outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Taillandier, Sophie; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risk of stroke and thromboembolism (TE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is categorised in stroke risk stratification scores. The role of pattern of NVAF in risk prediction is unclear in contemporary 'real world' cohorts. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with NVAF...

  14. Effect of Mechanical Stretching of the Skin on Collagen Fibril ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dell

    MATERIALS AND METHODS. In vitro Skin Incubation. Samples of tissue were .... experimentally obtained melting curves. Calculation of the entropy of denaturation was ... Temperature (TD), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) of denaturation of fibrils formed from type I collagen synthesized in the skin in the absence of tensile ...

  15. Outcomes Associated With Familial Versus Nonfamilial Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Staerk, Laila

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined all-cause mortality and long-term thromboembolic risk (ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, systemic thromboembolism) in patients with and without familial atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide registry data, we identified all patients...

  16. Ebstein's anomaly as a cause of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanović Miodrag R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ebstein's anomaly is characterized by a displacement of the tricuspid valve toward apex, because of anomalous attachment of the tricuspid leaflets. There are type B of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome and paroxysmal arrhythmias in more than a half of all patients. Case report. We presented a female, 32-year old, with frequent paroxysms of atrial fibrillation. After conversion of rhythm an ECG showed WPW syndrome. Echocardiographic examination discovered normal size of the left cardiac chambers with paradoxical ventricular septal motion. The right ventricle was very small because of its atrialization. The origin of the tricuspid valve was 20 mm closer to apex of the right ventricle than the origin of the mitral valve. Electrophysiological examination showed a posterolateral right accesorial pathway. Atrial fibrillation was induced very easily in electrophysiological laboratory and a successful ablation of accessorial pathway was made. There were no WPW syndrome and paroxysms of atrial fibrillation after that. Conclusion. Ebstein's anomaly is one of the reasons of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, especially in young persons with WPW syndrome.

  17. Apixaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granger, C.B.; Alexander, J.H.; McMurray, J.J.; Lopes, R.D.; Hylek, E.M.; Hanna, M.; Al-Khalidi, H.R.; Ansell, J.; Atar, D.; Avezum, A.; Bahit, M.C.; Diaz, R.; Easton, J.D.; Ezekowitz, J.A.; Flaker, G.; Garcia, D.; Geraldes, M.; Gersh, B.J.; Golitsyn, S.; Goto, S.; Hermosillo, A.G.; Hohnloser, S.H.; Horowitz, J.; Mohan, P.; Jansky, P.; Lewis, B.S.; Lopez-Sendon, J.L.; Pais, P.; Parkhomenko, A.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Zhu, J.; Wallentin, L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin K antagonists are highly effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but have several limitations. Apixaban is a novel oral direct factor Xa inhibitor that has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke in a similar population in comparison with aspirin.

  18. Hospitalisation patterns change over time in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup Qvist, Janne; Høgh Sørensen, Pernille; Dixen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a cardiac epidemic. In this study, we aimed to describe the causes of hospital-isation in an AF population over time and to study how different AF treatment strategies affected hospitalization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was an observational study in which...

  19. Ganglion Plexus Ablation in Advanced Atrial Fibrillation: The AFACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Antoine H. G.; Berger, Wouter R.; Krul, Sébastien P. J.; van den Berg, Nicoline W. E.; Neefs, Jolien; Piersma, Femke R.; Chan Pin Yin, Dean R. P. P.; de Jong, Jonas S. S. G.; van Boven, WimJan P.; de Groot, Joris R.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long duration of atrial fibrillation (AF), enlarged atria, or failed catheter ablation have advanced AF and may require more extensive treatment than pulmonary vein isolation. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of additional ganglion plexus (GP) ablation

  20. Evalutating Inward Rectifier Current Inhibiton for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common forms of cardiac arrhythmia and affects a large percentage of the human population, especially in the elderly. Currently, more than 6 million Europeans suffer from AF, and due to ageing this number will at least double in the next 50 years.

  1. Dabigatran versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connolly, Stuart J.; Ezekowitz, Michael D.; Yusuf, Salim; Eikelboom, John; Oldgren, Jonas; Parekh, Amit; Pogue, Janice; Reilly, Paul A.; Themeles, Ellison; Varrone, Jeanne; Wang, Susan; Alings, Marco; Xavier, Denis; Zhu, Jun; Diaz, Rafael; Lewis, Basil S.; Darius, Harald; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Joyner, Campbell D.; Wallentin, Lars; Connolly, S. J.; Ezekowitz, M. D.; Yusuf, S.; Eikelboom, J.; Oldgren, J.; Parekh, A.; Reilly, P. A.; Themeles, E.; Varrone, J.; Wang, S.; Palmcrantz-Graf, E.; Haehl, M.; Wallentin, L.; Alings, A. M. W.; Amerena, J. V.; Avezum, A.; Baumgartner, I.; Brugada, J.; Budaj, A.; Caicedo, V.; Ceremuzynski, L.; Chen, J. H.; Commerford, P. J.; Dans, A. L.; Darius, H.; Di Pasquale, G.; Diaz, R.; Erol, C.; Ferreira, J.; Flaker, G. C.; Flather, M. D.; Franzosi, M. G.; Gamboa, R.; Golitsyn, S. P.; Gonzalez Hermosillo, J. A.; Halon, D.; Heidbuchel, H.; Hohnloser, S. H.; Hori, M.; Huber, K.; Jansky, P.; Kamensky, G.; Keltai, M.; Kim, S.; Lau, C. P.; Le Heuzey, J. Y. F.; Lewis, B. S.; Liu, L. S.; Nanas, J.; Razali, O.; Pais, P. S.; Parkhomenko, A. N.; Pedersen, K. E.; Piegas, L. S.; Raev, D.; Simmers, T. A.; Smith, P. J.; Talajic, M.; Tan, R. S.; Tanomsup, S.; Toivonen, L.; Vinereanu, D.; Xavier, D.; Zhu, J.; Diener, H. C.; Joyner, C. D.; Diehl, A.; Ford, G.; Robinson, M.; Silva, J.; Sleight, P.; Wyse, D. G.; Collier, J.; de Mets, D.; Hirsh, J.; Lesaffre, E.; Ryden, L.; Sandercock, P.; Anastasiou-Nana, M. I.; Andersen, G.; Annex, B. H.; Atra, M.; Bornstein, N. M.; Boysen, G.; Brouwers, P. J. A. M.; Buerke, M.; Burrell, L. M.; Chan, Y. K.; Chen, W. H.; Cheung, R. T. F.; Divakaramenon, S.; Donnan, G. A.; Duray, G. Z.; Dvorakova, H.; Fiedler, J.; Gardinale, E.; Gates, P. C.; Goshev, E. G.; Goto, S.; Gross, B.; Guimaraes, H. P.; Gulkevych, O.; Haberl, R. L.; Hankey, G.; Hartikainen, J.; Healey, J.; Iliesiu, A. M.; Irkin, O.; Jaxa-Chamiec, T.; Jolly, S.; Kaste, K. A. M.; Kies, B.; Kostov, K. D.; Kristensen, K. S.; Labovitz, A. J.; Lassila, R. P. T.; Lee, K. L. F.; Lutay, Y. M.; Magloire, P.; Mak, K. H.; Meijer, A.; Mihov, L.; Morillo, C. A.; Morillo, L. E.; Nair, G. M.; Norrving, B.; Ntalianis, A.; Ntsekhe, M.; Olah, L.; Pasco, P. M. D.; Peeters, A.; Perovic, V.; Petrov, I.; Pizzolato, G.; Rafti, F.; Rey, N. R.; Ribas, S.; Rokoss, M.; Sarembock, I. J.; Sheth, T.; Shuaib, A.; Sitkei, E.; Sorokin, E.; Srámek, M.; Strozynska, E.; Tanne, D.; Thijs, V. N. S.; Tomek, A.; Turazza, F.; Vanhooren, G.; Vizel, S. A.; Vos, J.; Wahlgren, N.; Weachter, R.; Zaborska, B.; Zaborski, J.; Zimlichman, R.; Cong, J.; Fendt, K.; Muldoon, S.; Bajkor, S.; Grinvalds, A.; Malvaso, M.; Pogue, J.; Simek, K.; Yang, S.; Alzogaray, M. F.; Bono, J. O.; Caccavo, A.; Cartasegna, L.; Casali, W. P.; Cuello, J. L.; Cuneo, C. A.; Elizari, M. V.; Fernandez, A. A.; Ferrari, A. E.; Gabito, A. J.; Goicoechea, R. F.; Gorosito, V. M.; Hirschson, A.; Hominal, M. A.; Hrabar, A. D.; Liberman, A.; Mackinnon, I. J.; Manzano, R. D.; Muratore, C. A.; Nemi, S. A.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Sanchez, A. S.; Secchi, J.; Vogel, D. R.; Colquhoun, D. M.; Crimmins, D. S.; Dart, A. M.; Davis, S. M.; Hand, P. J.; Kubler, P. A.; Lehman, R. G.; McBain, G.; Morrison, H. C.; New, G.; Singh, B. B.; Spence, C. Z.; Waites, J. H.; Auer, J.; Doweik, L.; Freihoff, F.; Gaul, G.; Gazo, F.; Geiger, H.; Giacomini, G.; Huber, G. W.; Jukic, I.; Lamm, G.; Niessner, H.; Podczeck, A.; Schuh, J.; Siostrzonek, P.; Steger, C.; Vogel, B.; Watzak, R.; Weber, H. S.; Weihs, W.; Blankoff, I.; Boland, J. L.; Brike, C.; Carlier, M.; Cools, F.; de Meester, A.; de Raedt, H. J.; de Wolf, L.; Dhooghe, G. M.; Dilling-Boer, D.; Elshot, S. R.; Fasseaux, S.; Goethals, M.; Goethals, P.; Gurne, O.; Hellemans, S.; Ivan, B.; Jottrand, M.; Kersschot, I.; Lecoq, E.; Marcovitch, O.; Melon, D.; Miljoen, H.; Missault, L.; Pierard, L. A.; Provenier, F.; Rousseau, M. F.; Stockman, D.; Tran-Ngoc, E.; van Mieghem, W.; Vandekerckhove, Y.; Vandervoort, P.; Verrostte, J.; Vijgen, J.; Armaganijan, D.; Braga, C.; Braga, J. C. F.; Cipullo, R.; Cunha, C. L. P.; de Paola, A.; Delmonaco, M. I.; Guimaraes, F. V.; Herek, L.; Kerr Saraiva, J. F.; Maia, L. N.; Lorga, A. M.; Lorga-Filho, A. M.; Marino, R. L.; Melo, C. S.; Mouco, O. M.; Pereira, V. C.; Precoma, D. B.; Rabelo, W.; Rassi, S.; Rossi, P. R.; Rossi Neto, J. M.; Silva, F. M.; Vidotti, M. H.; Zimmermann, S. L.; Anev, E. D.; Balabanov, T. A.; Baldjiev, E. S.; Bogusheva, E. S.; Chaneva, M. A.; Filibev, I. G.; Gotcheva, N. N.; Goudev, A. R.; Gruev, I. T.; Guenova, D. T.; Kamenova, Z. A.; Manov, E. I.; Panov, I. A.; Parvanova, Z. I.; Pehlivanova, M. B.; Penchev, P. T.; Penkov, N. Y.; Radoslavov, A. L.; Ramshev, K. N.; Runev, N. M.; Sindzhielieva, M. N.; Spirova, D. A.; Tsanova, V. M.; Tzekova, M. L.; Yaramov, G. K.; Aggarwal, R.; Bakbak, A. I.; Bayly, K.; Berlingieri, J. C.; Blackburn, K.; Bobbie, C.; Booth, A. W.; Borts, D.; Bose, S.; Boucher, P.; Brown, K.; Burstein, J. M.; Butt, J. C.; Carlson, B. D.; Chetty, R.; Chiasson, J. D.; Constance, C.; Costi, P.; Coutu, B.; Deneufbourg, I.; Dion, D.; Dorian, P.; Douketis, J. D.; Farukh, S.; Filipchuk, N. G.; Fox, B. A.; Fox, H. I.; Gailey, C. B.; Gauthier, M.; Glanz, A.; Green, M. S.; Habot, J.; Hink, H.; Kearon, C.; Kouz, S.; Lai, C.; Lai, K.; Lalani, A. V.; Lam, A. S.; Lapointe, L. A.; Leather, R. A.; Ma, P. T. S.; MacKay, E.; Mangat, I.; Mansour, S.; Melton, E.; Mitchell, L. B.; Morris, A. L.; Nisker, W. A.; O'Donnell, M. J.; O'Hara, G.; Omichinski, L. M.; Pandey, A. S.; Parkash, R.; Pesant, Y.; Pilon, C.; Pistawka, K. J.; Powell, C. N.; Price, J. B.; Prieur, S.; Rebane, T. M.; Ricci, A. J.; Roberge, J.; Roy, M.; Sapp, J. L.; Savard, D.; Schulman, S.; Sehl, M. J.; Sestier, F.; Shandera, R.; Shu, D.; Sterns, L. D.; St-Hilaire, R.; Syan, G. S.; Talbot, P.; Teitelbaum, I.; Tytus, R. H.; Winkler, L.; Zadra, R.; Zidel, B. S.; Bai, X. J.; Gao, W.; Gao, X.; Guan, D. M.; He, Z. S.; Hua, Q.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, W. M.; Lu, G. P.; Lv, S.; Meng, K.; Niu, H. Y.; Qi, D. G.; Qi, S. Y.; Qian, F.; Sun, N. L.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, N. F.; Yang, Y. M.; Zeng, H.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, F. R.; Zhang, L.; Bohorquez, R.; Rosas, J. F.; Saent, L.; Vacca, M.; Velasco, V. M.; Belohlavek, J.; Cernohous, M.; Choura, M.; Dedek, V.; Filipensky, B.; Hemzsky, L.; Karel, I.; Kopeckova, I.; Kovarova, K.; Labrova, R.; Madr, T.; Poklopova, Z.; Rucka, D.; Simon, J.; Skalicka, H.; Smidova, M.; Spinar, J.; Dodt, K. K.; Egstrup, K.; Friberg, J.; Haar, D.; Husted, S.; Jensen, G. V.; Joensen, A. M.; Klarlund, K. K.; Lind Rasmussen, S.; Melchior, T. M.; Olsen, M. E.; Poulsen, M. K.; Ralfkiaer, N.; Rasmussen, L. H.; Skagen, K.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Huikuri, H. V.; Hussi, E. J.; Kettunen, P.; Mänttäri, M.; Melin, J. H.; Mikkelsson, J.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Virtanen, V. K.; Ylitalo, A.; Agraou, B.; Boucher, L.; Bouvier, J. M.; Boye, A.; Boye, B.; Decoulx, E. 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W.; Meisner, J. S.; Melucci, M. B.; Mercando, A.; Merlino, J. D.; Meymandi, S. K.; Miele, M. B.; Miller, R. H.; Miller, S. H.; Minor, S. T.; Mitchell, M. R.; Modi, M.; Mody, F. V.; Moeller, C. L.; Moloney, J. F.; Moran, J. E.; Morcos, N. C.; Morgan, A.; Mukherjee, S. K.; Mullinax, K.; Murphy, A. L.; Mustin, A. J.; Myers, G. I.; Naccarelli, G. V.; Nadar, V. K.; Nallasivan, M.; Navas, J. P.; Niazi, I. K.; Nsah, E. N.; Nunamaker, J. L.; Ochalek, T. B.; O'dea, D. J.; Ogilvie, P. D.; Olliff, B.; Omalley, A. K.; O'Neill, P. G.; Onufer, J. R.; Orchard, R. C.; Orihuela, L. A.; Ortiz, E. C.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Padanilam, B. J.; Pandey, P.; Patel, D. V.; Patel, R. J.; Patel, V. B.; Patlola, R. R.; Pennock, G. D.; Perlman, R.; Peters, P. H.; Petrillo, A. V.; Pezzella, S.; Phillips, D.; Pierre-Louis, J. R.; Pilcher, G.; Pillai, C.; Pollock, S. G.; Pond, M. S.; Porterfield, J. K.; Presant, L.; Pressler, J.; Pribble, A. H.; Promisloff, S. D.; Pudi, K. K.; Putnam, D. L.; Quartner, J.; Quinn, J. C.; Quinnell, C. M.; Raad, G. L.; Rasmussen, L. A.; Ray, C.; Reiffel, J. A.; Reynertson, S.; Richardson, J. W.; Riley, C. P.; Rippy, J. S.; Rittelmeyer, J. T.; Roberts, D. M.; Robertson, R.; Robinson, V. J. B.; Rocco, T. A.; Rosenbaum, D.; Roth, E. M.; Rottman, J. N.; Rough, R. R.; Rubenstein, J. J.; Sakkal, A. M.; Saleem, T.; Salerno, D. M.; Samendinger, M. L.; Sandeno, S.; Santilli, T. M.; Santucci, P.; Sattar, P.; Saxman, K. A.; Schaefer, S.; Schmidt, J.; Schneider, R. M.; Schocken, D. D.; Schrader, M. K.; Schramm, B. A.; Schultz, R. W.; Schussheim, A. E.; Schwarz, E. F.; Seamon, M. C.; Sestero, J. D.; Shah, M. P.; Shah, R.; Shalaby, A.; Shanes, J. G.; Sheftel, G. L.; Sheikh, K. H.; Shein, A. B.; Shemonsky, N. K.; Shepler, A.; Sheridan, E.; Shipwash, T. M.; Shopnick, R. I.; Short, W. G.; Shoukfeh, M. F.; Sibia, R. S.; Siler, T. M.; Silva, J. A.; Simons, G. R.; Simpson, A. G.; Simpson, H. R.; Simpson, V. J.; Singh, B. N.; Singh, N.; Singh, V. N.; Sitz, C. J.; Skatrud, L.; Sklar, J.; Slotwiner, D. J.; Smith, P. F.; Smith, P. N.; Smith, R. H.; Smith, J. E.; Sodowick, B. C.; Solomon, A. J.; Soltero, E. A.; Sonel, A. F.; Sperling, R.; Spiller, C.; Spink, B. Z.; Sprinkle, L. W.; Spyropoulos, A. C.; Stamos, T. D.; Steljes, A. D.; Stillabower, M. E.; Stover, T.; Strain, J. E.; Strickland, T. L.; Suresh, D. P.; Takata, T. S.; Taylor, J. S.; Taylor, M.; Teague, S. M.; Teixeia, J. M.; Telfer, E. A.; Terry, P. S.; Terry, R. W.; Thai, H. M.; Thalin, M.; Thomas, V. N.; Thompson, C. A.; Thompson, M. A.; Thornton, J. W.; Tidman, R. E.; Toler, B. S.; Traina, M. I.; Trippi, J. A.; Ujiiye, D. L.; Usedom, J. E.; van de Graaff, E.; van de Wall, L. R.; Vaughn, J. W.; Ver Steeg, D.; Vicari, R. M.; Vijay, N.; Vitale, C. B.; Vlastaris, A. G.; Voda, J.; Vora, K. N.; Voyles, W. F.; Vranian, R. B.; Vrooman, P. S.; Waack, P.; Waldo, A. L.; Walker, J. L.; Wallace, M. A.; Walsh, E. A.; Walsh, R. L.; Walton, A.; Washam, M.; Wehner, P. S.; Wei, J. Y.; Weiner, S.; Weiss, R. J.; Wells, D. M.; Wera-Archakul, W.; Wertheimer, J. H.; West, S. A.; Whitaker, J. H.; White, M. L.; White, R. H.; Whitehill, J. N.; Wiegman, P. J.; Wiesel, J.; Williams, J.; Williams, L. E.; Williams, M. L.; Williamson, V. K.; Wilson, V. E.; Wilson, W. W.; Woodfield, S. L.; Wulff, C. W.; Yates, S. W.; Yousuf, K. A.; Zakhary, B. G.; Zambrano, R.; Zimetbaum, P.; Zoble, R.; Zopo, A. R.; Zwerner, P. L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin reduces the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but increases the risk of hemorrhage and is difficult to use. Dabigatran is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor. METHODS: In this noninferiority trial, we randomly assigned 18,113 patients who had atrial

  2. Comparative study of atrial fibrillation and AV conduction in mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Tweel, I. van der

    1987-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one ofthe most common cardiac arrhythmias in humans. It a1so occurs quite frequent1y in dogs and horses. Comparative study of this arrhythmia may contribute to better understanding of the pathophysiologica1 mechanisms involved. In this study, we present a quantitative

  3. Quinidine-induced ventricular flutter and fibrillation without digitalis therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, R. W.; Wellens, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three cases are described with documented ventricular flutter and fibrillation during quinidine medication without concomitant digitalis therapy. In all three patients the arrhythmia developed while they were receiving moderate doses of quinidine. Although no changes in QRS width were observed after

  4. Managing atrial fibrillation in the elderly: critical appraisal of dronedarone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trigo P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Paula Trigo, Gregory W FischerDepartment of Anesthesiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation is the most commonly seen arrhythmia in the geriatric population and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment of the elderly with atrial fibrillation remains challenging for physicians, because this unique subpopulation is characterized by multiple comorbidities requiring chronic use of numerous medications, which can potentially lead to severe drug interactions. Furthermore, age-related changes in the cardiovascular system as well as other physiological changes result in altered drug pharmacokinetics. Dronedarone is a new drug recently approved for the treatment of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation and/or atrial flutter. Dronedarone is a benzofuran amiodarone analog which lacks the iodine moiety and contains a methane sulfonyl group that decreases its lipophilicity. These differences in chemical structure are responsible for making dronedarone less toxic than amiodarone which, in turn, results in fewer side effects. Adverse events for dronedarone include gastrointestinal side effects and rash. No dosage adjustments are required for patients with renal impairment. However, the use of dronedarone is contraindicated in the presence of severe hepatic dysfunction.Keywords: atrial fibrillation, elderly, antiarrhythmic agents, amiodarone, dronedarone

  5. Amyloid fibril systems reduce, stabilize and deliver bioavailable nanosized iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Posavec, Lidija; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Hilty, Florentine M.; Nyström, Gustav; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Hilbe, Monika; Rossi, Antonella; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2017-07-01

    Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a major global public health problem. A sustainable and cost-effective strategy to reduce IDA is iron fortification of foods, but the most bioavailable fortificants cause adverse organoleptic changes in foods. Iron nanoparticles are a promising solution in food matrices, although their tendency to oxidize and rapidly aggregate in solution severely limits their use in fortification. Amyloid fibrils are protein aggregates initially known for their association with neurodegenerative disorders, but recently described in the context of biological functions in living organisms and emerging as unique biomaterial building blocks. Here, we show an original application for these protein fibrils as efficient carriers for iron fortification. We use biodegradable amyloid fibrils from β-lactoglobulin, an inexpensive milk protein with natural reducing effects, as anti-oxidizing nanocarriers and colloidal stabilizers for iron nanoparticles. The resulting hybrid material forms a stable protein-iron colloidal dispersion that undergoes rapid dissolution and releases iron ions during acidic and enzymatic in vitro digestion. Importantly, this hybrid shows high in vivo iron bioavailability, equivalent to ferrous sulfate in haemoglobin-repletion and stable-isotope studies in rats, but with reduced organoleptic changes in foods. Feeding the rats with these hybrid materials did not result in abnormal iron accumulation in any organs, or changes in whole blood glutathione concentrations, inferring their primary safety. Therefore, these iron-amyloid fibril hybrids emerge as novel, highly effective delivery systems for iron in both solid and liquid matrices.

  6. Antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation associated with valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Collet, Jean Philippe; Caterina, Raffaele de

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major worldwide public health problem, and AF in association with valvular heart disease (VHD) is also common. However, management strategies for this group of patients have been less informed by randomized trials, which have largely focused on 'non-valvular AF' pati...

  7. Edoxaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giugliano, R.P.; Ruff, C.T.; Braunwald, E.; Murphy, S.A.; Wiviott, S.D.; Halperin, J.L.; Waldo, A.L.; Ezekowitz, M.D.; Weitz, J.I.; Spinar, J.; Ruzyllo, W.; Ruda, M.; Koretsune, Y.; Betcher, J.; Shi, M.; Grip, L.T.; Patel, S.P.; Patel, I.; Hanyok, J.J.; Mercuri, M.; Antman, E.M.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edoxaban is a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor with proven antithrombotic effects. The long-term efficacy and safety of edoxaban as compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation is not known. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial comparing two

  8. Edoxaban versus Warfarin in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giugliano, Robert P.; Ruff, Christian T.; Braunwald, Eugene; Murphy, Sabina A.; Wiviott, Stephen D.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Waldo, Albert L.; Ezekowitz, Michael D.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Špinar, Jindřich; Ruzyllo, Witold; Ruda, Mikhail; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Betcher, Joshua; Shi, Minggao; Grip, Laura T.; Patel, Shirali P.; Patel, Indravadan; Hanyok, James J.; Mercuri, Michele; Antman, Elliott M.; Braunwald, E.; Antman, E. M.; Giugliano, R. P.; Ruff, C. T.; Morin, S. E.; Hoffman, E. B.; Murphy, S. A.; Deenadayalu, N.; Grip, L.; Mercuri, M.; Lanz, H.; Patel, I.; Curt, V.; Duggal, A.; Hanyok, J.; Davé, J.; Morgan, D.; Choi, Y.; Shi, M.; Jin, J.; Xie, J.; Crerand, W.; Kappelhof, J.; Maxwell, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; de Groot, J. [=Joris R.; de Vos, R.; Hoekstra, J.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundEdoxaban is a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor with proven antithrombotic effects. The long-term efficacy and safety of edoxaban as compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation is not known. MethodsWe conducted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial comparing two

  9. Atrial fibrillation in patients with sick sinus syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Thomsen, Poul Erik B; Højberg, Søren

    2012-01-01

    between minimal-paced programmed AVI = 100 and >100 ms (median value), respectively (P= 0.60).ConclusionsThe present study indicates that a longer baseline PQ-interval is associated with an increased risk of AF in patients with sick sinus syndrome. Atrial fibrillation burden is not associated...

  10. Management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Said, Salah A; Laroche, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most important cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical correlates of DM, including management and outcomes, in the EURObservational Research Programme (EORP) - Atrial Fibrillation (AF) General Pilot (EORP-AF) Regi...

  11. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery.

  12. Atrial fibrillation: To map or not to map?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Yaksh (Ameeta); C. Kik (Charles); S.P. Knops (Simon); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); F. Zijlstra (Felix); M.A. Allessie (Maurits); N.M.S. de Groot (Natasja)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIsolation of the pulmonary veins may be an effective treatment modality for eliminating atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes but unfortunately not for all patients. When ablative therapy fails, it is assumed that AF has progressed from a trigger-driven to a substrate-mediated arrhythmia.

  13. Role of the Atrioventricular Node in Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Wittkampf, F.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is probably the most cornmon cardiac arrhythmia in humans, particularly in the elderly (1-3). The irregularity and inequality of the he art beat first described by Hering in 1903 were, and continue to be, the landmark of the clinical diagnosis of AF (4,5). Sir Thomas

  14. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Bax, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    . Hence, there are important unmet clinical and research needs in the evaluation and management of AF patients. The ensuing needs and opportunities for improving the quality of AF care were discussed during the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference...

  15. Sonographic findings of normal newborn spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Dong Gyu

    1988-01-01

    The authors performed spinal cord ultrasonography of 21 healthy newborn infants in Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Normal spinal cord revealed low echogenecity at that of cerebrospinal fluid and was demarcated by intense reflections from its dorsal and ventral surfaces. The central canal was routinely seen as a thin linear reflection in the center of the cord. The nerve roots making up the cauda equina formed a poorly defined collection of intense linear echoes extending from the conus. On real time image, the normal spinal cord exhibited rather slow and rhythmical anteroposterior movement within the subarachnoid fluid. A distinct and rapid vascular pulsation of the spinal cord was usually recognizable. The approximate level of vertebral bodies was determined as follows; most ventrally located vertebral body was thought to be L5 and S1 was seen slightly posterior to the L5 directed inferoposteriorly. According to the above criteria terminal portions of spinal cord were seen around the L2 body in 5 MHz and pointed termination of conus medullaris was clearly seen at L2-3 junction and in upper body of L3 by 7.5 MHz. So it would be better to examine by 5 MHz for spatial orientation and then by 7.5 MHz for more accurate examination. High-resolution, real-time ultrasonography was a safe, rapid screening technique for evaluation of the spinal cord in infants. Additional applications of spinal sonography may be possible in the evaluation of neonatal syringohydromyelia and meningocele as well as intraspinal cyst localization for possible percutaneous puncture by ultrasound guidance

  16. Physicochemical Evaluation of Seeds and Oil of Nontraditional Oil Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ismail Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work was conducted in the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Food science department, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, University of Kordofan, in order to evaluate some nontraditional oil seeds these are i.e. Marula (Sclerocarya birrea, Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. seeds and Christ’s thorn (Zizyphus spina-christi seeds. The seeds of the roselle and Christ’s thorn fruits were procured from Elobeid local market, North Kordofan State, while marula fruits were obtained from Elnuhod, West Kordofan State. The proximate composition of the seeds, cake and christ’s thorn pulp was done. Some chemical and physical properties were performed for the extracted oil. The results revealed that proximate composition of the seeds and cake differ statistically among the studied materials. Significant differences were observed among the oil extracted from these species; moreover, these oils differ significantly in color and viscosity only.

  17. Sunflower seed allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukleja-Sokołowska, Natalia; Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew; Sokołowski, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    Sunflower seeds are a rare source of allergy, but several cases of occupational allergies to sunflowers have been described. Sunflower allergens on the whole, however, still await precise and systematic description. We present an interesting case of a 40-year-old male patient, admitted to hospital due to shortness of breath and urticaria, both of which appeared shortly after the patient ingested sunflower seeds. Our laryngological examination revealed swelling of the pharynx with retention of saliva and swelling of the mouth and tongue. During diagnostics, 2 months later, we found that skin prick tests were positive to mugwort pollen (12/9 mm), oranges (6/6 mm), egg protein (3/3 mm), and hazelnuts (3/3 mm). A native prick by prick test with sunflower seeds was strongly positive (8/5 mm). Elevated concentrations of specific IgE against weed mix (inc. lenscale, mugwort, ragweed) allergens (1.04 IU/mL), Artemisia vulgaris (1.36 IU/mL), and Artemisia absinthium (0.49 IU/mL) were found. An ImmunoCap ISAC test found an average level of specific IgE against mugwort pollen allergen component Art v 1 - 5,7 ISU-E, indicating an allergy to mugwort pollen and low to medium levels of specific IgE against lipid transfer proteins (LTP) found in walnuts, peanuts, mugwort pollen, and hazelnuts. Through the ISAC inhibition test we proved that sunflower seed allergen extracts contain proteins cross-reactive with patients’ IgE specific to Art v 1, Art v 3, and Jug r 3. Based on our results and the clinical pattern of the disease we confirmed that the patient is allergic to mugwort pollen and that he had an anaphylactic reaction as a result of ingesting sunflower seeds. We suspected that hypersensitivity to sunflower LTP and defensin-like proteins, both cross-reactive with mugwort pollen allergens, were the main cause of the patient’s anaphylactic reaction. PMID:27222528

  18. Regulated viral BDNF delivery in combination with Schwann cells promotes axonal regeneration through capillary alginate hydrogels after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengwen; Sandner, Beatrice; Schackel, Thomas; Nicholson, LaShae; Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Puttagunta, Radhika; Müller, Rainer; Weidner, Norbert; Blesch, Armin

    2017-09-15

    Grafting of cell-seeded alginate capillary hydrogels into a spinal cord lesion site provides an axonal bridge while physically directing regenerating axonal growth in a linear pattern. However, without an additional growth stimulus, bridging axons fail to extend into the distal host spinal cord. Here we examined whether a combinatory strategy would support regeneration of descending axons across a cervical (C5) lateral hemisection lesion in the rat spinal cord. Following spinal cord transections, Schwann cell (SC)-seeded alginate hydrogels were grafted to the lesion site and AAV5 expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter was injected caudally. In addition, we examined whether SC injection into the caudal spinal parenchyma would further enhance regeneration of descending axons to re-enter the host spinal cord. Our data show that both serotonergic and descending axons traced by biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) extend throughout the scaffolds. The number of regenerating axons is significantly increased when caudal BDNF expression is activated and transient BDNF delivery is able to sustain axons after gene expression is switched off. Descending axons are confined to the caudal graft/host interface even with continuous BDNF expression for 8weeks. Only with a caudal injection of SCs, a pathway facilitating axonal regeneration through the host/graft interface is generated allowing axons to successfully re-enter the caudal spinal cord. Recovery from spinal cord injury is poor due to the limited regeneration observed in the adult mammalian central nervous system. Biomaterials, cell transplantation and growth factors that can guide axons across a lesion site, provide a cellular substrate, stimulate axon growth and have shown some promise in increasing the growth distance of regenerating axons. In the present study, we combined an alginate biomaterial with linear channels with transplantation of Schwann cells within

  19. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into dermal fibroblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yanfu [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Chai, Jiake, E-mail: cjk304@126.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Sun, Tianjun; Li, Dongjie; Tao, Ran [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential seed cells for tissue-engineered skin. {yields} Tissue-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UCMSCs) can readily be isolated in vitro. {yields} We induce UCMSCs to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts via conditioned medium. {yields} Collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA level was higher in differentiated cells. {yields} UCMSCs-derived fibroblast-like cells strongly express fibroblast-specific protein. -- Abstract: Tissue-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) can be readily obtained, avoid ethical or moral constraints, and show excellent pluripotency and proliferation potential. UCMSCs are considered to be a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In this study, we collected newborn umbilical cord tissue under sterile conditions and isolated UCMSCs through a tissue attachment method. UCMSC cell surface markers were examined using flow cytometry. On the third passage, UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts in conditioned induction media. The induction results were detected using immunofluorescence with a fibroblast-specific monoclonal antibody and real time PCR for type I and type III collagen. UCMSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and reached 90% confluency 14 to 18 days after primary culture. Cultured UCMSCs showed strong positive staining for CD73, CD29, CD44, CD105, and HLA-I, but not CD34, CD45, CD31, or HLA-DR. After differentiation, immunostaining for collagen type I, type III, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin, and desmin were all strongly positive in induced cells, and staining was weak or negative in non-induced cells; total transcript production of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA was higher in induced cells than in non-induced cells. These results demonstrate that UCMSCs can be induced to differentiate into fibroblasts with conditioned induction media and, in turn, could be used as seed cells for tissue

  20. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into dermal fibroblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yanfu; Chai, Jiake; Sun, Tianjun; Li, Dongjie; Tao, Ran

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential seed cells for tissue-engineered skin. → Tissue-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UCMSCs) can readily be isolated in vitro. → We induce UCMSCs to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts via conditioned medium. → Collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA level was higher in differentiated cells. → UCMSCs-derived fibroblast-like cells strongly express fibroblast-specific protein. -- Abstract: Tissue-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) can be readily obtained, avoid ethical or moral constraints, and show excellent pluripotency and proliferation potential. UCMSCs are considered to be a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In this study, we collected newborn umbilical cord tissue under sterile conditions and isolated UCMSCs through a tissue attachment method. UCMSC cell surface markers were examined using flow cytometry. On the third passage, UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts in conditioned induction media. The induction results were detected using immunofluorescence with a fibroblast-specific monoclonal antibody and real time PCR for type I and type III collagen. UCMSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and reached 90% confluency 14 to 18 days after primary culture. Cultured UCMSCs showed strong positive staining for CD73, CD29, CD44, CD105, and HLA-I, but not CD34, CD45, CD31, or HLA-DR. After differentiation, immunostaining for collagen type I, type III, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin, and desmin were all strongly positive in induced cells, and staining was weak or negative in non-induced cells; total transcript production of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA was higher in induced cells than in non-induced cells. These results demonstrate that UCMSCs can be induced to differentiate into fibroblasts with conditioned induction media and, in turn, could be used as seed cells for tissue-engineered dermis.