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Sample records for cord seed fibrils

  1. Superoxide dismutase 1 and tgSOD1 mouse spinal cord seed fibrils, suggesting a propagative cell death mechanism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Ruth Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that specifically affects motor neurons and leads to a progressive and ultimately fatal loss of function, resulting in death typically within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis. The disease starts with a focal centre of weakness, such as one limb, and appears to spread to other parts of the body. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 are known to cause disease and it is generally accepted they lead to pathology not by loss of enzymatic activity but by gain of some unknown toxic function(s. Although different mutations lead to varying tendencies of SOD1 to aggregate, we suggest abnormal proteins share a common misfolding pathway that leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that misfolding of superoxide dismutase 1 leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils associated with seeding activity, which can accelerate the formation of new fibrils in an autocatalytic cascade. The time limiting event is nucleation to form a stable protein "seed" before a rapid linear polymerisation results in amyloid fibrils analogous to other protein misfolding disorders. This phenomenon was not confined to fibrils of recombinant protein as here we show, for the first time, that spinal cord homogenates obtained from a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses mutant human superoxide dismutase 1 (the TgSOD1(G93A mouse also contain amyloid seeds that accelerate the formation of new fibrils in both wildtype and mutant SOD1 protein in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide new insights into ALS disease mechanism and in particular a mechanism that could account for the spread of pathology throughout the nervous system. This model of disease spread, which has analogies to other protein misfolding disorders such as prion disease, also suggests it may be possible to design assays for therapeutics that can inhibit fibril propagation and

  2. Effect of stirring and seeding on whey protein fibril formation.

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    Bolder, Suzanne G; Sagis, Leonard M C; Venema, Paul; van der Linden, Erik

    2007-07-11

    The effect of stirring and seeding on the formation of fibrils in whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied. More fibrils of a similar length are formed when WPI is stirred during heating at pH 2 and 80 degrees C compared to samples that were heated at rest. Addition of seeds did not show an additional effect compared to samples that were stirred. We propose a model for fibril formation, including an activation, nucleation, growth, and termination step. The activation and nucleation steps are the rate-determining steps. Fibril growth is relatively fast but terminates after prolonged heating. Two processes that possibly induce termination of fibril growth are hydrolysis of nonassembled monomers and inactivation of the growth ends of the fibrils. Stirring may break up immature fibrils, thus producing more active fibrils. Stirring also seems to accelerate the kinetics of fibril formation, resulting in an increase of the number of fibrils formed.

  3. Effect of Stirring and Seeding on Whey Protein Fibril Formation

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    Bolder, S.G.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of stirring and seeding on the formation of fibrils in whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied. More fibrils of a similar length are formed when WPI is stirred during heating at pH 2 and 80 C compared to samples that were heated at rest. Addition of seeds did not show an addition

  4. Preparation of Amyloid Fibrils Seeded from Brain and Meninges.

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    Scherpelz, Kathryn P; Lu, Jun-Xia; Tycko, Robert; Meredith, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Seeding of amyloid fibrils into fresh solutions of the same peptide or protein in disaggregated form leads to the formation of replicate fibrils, with close structural similarity or identity to the original fibrillar seeds. Here we describe procedures for isolating fibrils composed mainly of β-amyloid (Aβ) from human brain and from leptomeninges, a source of cerebral blood vessels, for investigating Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We also describe methods for seeding isotopically labeled, disaggregated Aβ peptide solutions for study using solid-state NMR and other techniques. These methods should be applicable to other types of amyloid fibrils, to Aβ fibrils from mice or other species, tissues other than brain, and to some non-fibrillar aggregates. These procedures allow for the examination of authentic amyloid fibrils and other protein aggregates from biological tissues without the need for labeling the tissue.

  5. Amplification of Tau fibrils from minute quantities of seeds.

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    Meyer, Virginia; Dinkel, Paul D; Rickman Hager, Emily; Margittai, Martin

    2014-09-16

    The propagation of Tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to proceed through templated conversion of Tau protein into fibrils and cell-to-cell transfer of elongation-competent seeds. To investigate the efficiency of Tau conversion, we adapted the protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay used for the conversion of prions. Utilizing heparin as a cofactor and employing repetitive cycles of shearing and growth, synthetic Tau fibrils and Tau fibrils in AD brain extract are progressively amplified. Concurrently, self-nucleation is suppressed. The results highlight breakage-induced replication of Tau fibrils as a potential facilitator of disease spread.

  6. Gallic acid is the major component of grape seed extract that inhibits amyloid fibril formation.

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    Liu, Yanqin; Pukala, Tara L; Musgrave, Ian F; Williams, Danielle M; Dehle, Francis C; Carver, John A

    2013-12-01

    Many protein misfolding diseases, for example, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's, are characterised by the accumulation of protein aggregates in an amyloid fibrillar form. Natural products which inhibit fibril formation are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In this study we have shown, using in vitro thioflavin T assays and transmission electron microscopy, that grape seed extract inhibits fibril formation of kappa-casein (κ-CN), a milk protein which forms amyloid fibrils spontaneously under physiological conditions. Among the components of grape seed extract, gallic acid was the most active component at inhibiting κ-CN fibril formation, by stabilizing κ-CN to prevent its aggregation. Concomitantly, gallic acid significantly reduced the toxicity of κ-CN to pheochromocytoma12 cells. Furthermore, gallic acid effectively inhibited fibril formation by the amyloid-beta peptide, the putative causative agent in Alzheimer's disease. It is concluded that the gallate moiety has the fibril-inhibitory activity.

  7. The emergence of superstructural order in insulin amyloid fibrils upon multiple rounds of self-seeding

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    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Babenko, Viktoria; Dec, Robert; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-08-01

    Typically, elongation of an amyloid fibril entails passing conformational details of the mother seed to daughter generations of fibrils with high fidelity. There are, however, several factors that can potentially prevent such transgenerational structural imprinting from perpetuating, for example heterogeneity of mother seeds or so-called conformational switching. Here, we examine phenotypic persistence of bovine insulin amyloid ([BI]) upon multiple rounds of self-seeding under quiescent conditions. According to infrared spectroscopy, with the following passages of homologous seeding, daughter fibrils gradually depart from the mother seed’s spectral characteristics. We note that this transgenerational structural drift in [BI] amyloid leads toward fibrils with infrared, chiroptical, and morphological traits similar to those of the superstructural variant of fibrils which normally forms upon strong agitation of insulin solutions. However, in contrast to agitation-induced insulin amyloid, the superstructural assemblies of daughter fibrils isolated through self-seeding are sonication-resistant. Our results suggest that formation of single amyloid fibrils is not a dead-end of the amyloidogenic self-assembly. Instead, the process appears to continue toward the self-assembly of higher-order structures although on longer time-scales. From this perspective, the fast agitation-induced aggregation of insulin appears to be a shortcut to amyloid superstructures whose formation under quiescent conditions is slow.

  8. Polymorphism of amyloid-like fibrils can be defined by the concentration of seeds

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    Tomas Sneideris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prions are infectious proteins where the same protein may express distinct strains. The strains are enciphered by different misfolded conformations. Strain-like phenomena have also been reported in a number of other amyloid-forming proteins. One of the features of amyloid strains is the ability to self-propagate, maintaining a constant set of physical properties despite being propagated under conditions different from those that allowed initial formation of the strain. Here we report a cross-seeding experiment using strains formed under different conditions. Using high concentrations of seeds results in rapid elongation and new fibrils preserve the properties of the seeding fibrils. At low seed concentrations, secondary nucleation plays the major role and new fibrils gain properties predicted by the environment rather than the structure of the seeds. Our findings could explain conformational switching between amyloid strains observed in a wide variety of in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  9. Data for ion and seed dependent fibril assembly of a spidroin core domain

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    Martin Humenik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This data article includes size exclusion chromatography data of soluble eADF4(C16, an engineered spider silk variant based on the core domain sequence of the natural dragline silk protein ADF4 of Araneus diadematus, in combination with light scattering; the protein is monomeric before assembly. The assembled mature fibrils were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Sonicated fibrils were used as seeds to by-pass the nucleation lag phase in eADF4(C16 assembly. We also provide data on the sedimentation kinetics of spider silk in the presence of different NaCl concentrations revealing very slow protein aggregation in comparison to the fast assembly triggered by phosphate ions published previously [1]. Experiments in the Data article represent supporting material for our work published recently [1], which described the assembly mechanism of recombinant eADF4(C16 fibrils.

  10. Single mutations in tau modulate the populations of fibril conformers through seed selection.

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    Meyer, Virginia; Dinkel, Paul D; Luo, Yin; Yu, Xiang; Wei, Guanghong; Zheng, Jie; Eaton, Gareth R; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Eaton, Sandra S; Margittai, Martin

    2014-02-03

    Seeded conversion of tau monomers into fibrils is a central step in the progression of tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Self-assembly is mediated by the microtubule binding repeats in tau. There are either three or four repeats present depending on the protein isoform. Here, double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate the conformational ensemble of four-repeat tau fibrils. Single point mutations at key positions in the protein (ΔK280, P301S, P312I, D314I) markedly change the distribution of fibril conformers after template-assisted growth, whereas other mutations in the protein (I308M, S320F, G323I, G326I, Q336R) do not. These findings provide unprecedented insights into the seed selection of tau disease mutants and establish conformational compatibility as an important driving force in tau fibril propagation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Seeded fibrillation as molecular basis of the species barrier in human prion diseases.

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    Lars Luers

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans and animals, including scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle, chronic wasting disease (CWD in deer, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans. The hallmark of prion diseases is the conversion of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C to its pathological isoform PrP(Sc, which is accompanied by PrP fibrillation. Transmission is not restricted within one species, but can also occur between species. In some cases a species barrier can be observed that results in limited or unsuccessful transmission. The mechanism behind interspecies transmissibility or species barriers is not completely understood. To analyse this process at a molecular level, we previously established an in vitro fibrillation assay, in which recombinant PrP (recPrP as substrate can be specifically seeded by PrP(Sc as seed. Seeding with purified components, with no additional cellular components, is a direct consequence of the "prion-protein-only" hypothesis. We therefore hypothesise, that the species barrier is based on the interaction of PrP(C and PrP(Sc. Whereas in our earlier studies, the interspecies transmission in animal systems was analysed, the focus of this study lies on the transmission from animals to humans. We therefore combined seeds from species cattle, sheep and deer (BSE, scrapie, CWD with human recPrP. Homologous seeding served as a control. Our results are consistent with epidemiology, other in vitro aggregation studies, and bioassays investigating the transmission between humans, cattle, sheep, and deer. In contrast to CJD and BSE seeds, which show a seeding activity we can demonstrate a species barrier for seeds from scrapie and CWD in vitro. We could show that the seeding activity and therewith the molecular interaction of PrP as substrate and PrP(Sc as seed is sufficient to explain the phenomenon of species barriers. Therefore our data supports the hypothesis

  12. Chronic spinal cord stimulation modifies intrinsic cardiac synaptic efficacy in the suppression of atrial fibrillation

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    Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Cardinal, René; Beaumont, Eric; Vermeulen, Michel; Smith, Frank M.; Armour, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy, when applied chronically to canines, imparts long-lasting cardio-protective effects on neurogenic atrial tachyarrhythmia induction and, if so, whether its effects can be attributable to i) changes in intrinsic cardiac (IC) neuronal transmembrane properties vs ii) modification of their interneuronal stochastic interactivity that initiates such pathology. Data derived from canines subjected to long-term SCS [(group 1 studied after 3–4 weeks SCS; n=5) (group 2: studied 5 weeks SCS; n=11)] were compared to data derived from 10 control animals (including 4 sham SCS electrode implantations). During terminal studies conducted under anesthesia, chronotropic and inotropic responses to vagal nerve or stellate ganglion stimulation were similar in all 3 groups. Chronic SCS suppressed atrial tachyarrhythmia induction evoked by mediastinal nerve stimulation. When induced, arrhythmia durations were shortened (controls: median of 27s; SCS 3–4 weeks: median of 16s; SCS 5 weeks: median of 7s). Phasic and accommodating right atrial neuronal somata displayed similar passive and active membrane properties in vitro, whether derived from sham or either chronic SCS groups. Synaptic efficacy was differentially enhanced in accommodating (not phasic) IC neurons by chronic SCS. Taken together these data indicate that chronic SCS therapy modifies IC neuronal stochastic inter-connectivity in atrial fibrillation suppression by altering synaptic function without directly targeting the transmembrane properties of individual IC neuronal somata. PMID:25301713

  13. Amyloid fibril formation and seeding by wild-type human lysozyme and its disease-related mutational variants.

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    Morozova-Roche, L A; Zurdo, J; Spencer, A; Noppe, W; Receveur, V; Archer, D B; Joniau, M; Dobson, C M

    2000-06-01

    Wild-type human lysozyme and its two stable amyloidogenic variants have been found to form partially folded states at low pH. These states are characterized by extensive disruption of tertiary interactions and partial loss of secondary structure. Incubation of the proteins at pH 2.0 and 37 degrees C (Ile56Thr and Asp67His variants) or 57 degrees C (wild-type) results in the formation of large numbers of fibrils over several days of incubation. Smaller numbers of fibrils could be observed under other conditions, including neutral pH. These fibrils were analyzed by electron microscopy, Congo red birefringence, thioflavine-T binding, and X-ray fiber diffraction, which unequivocally show their amyloid character. These data demonstrate that amyloidogenicity is an intrinsic property of human lysozyme and does not require the presence of specific mutations in its primary structure. The amyloid fibril formation is greatly facilitated, however, by the introduction of "seeds" of preformed fibrils to the solutions of the variant proteins, suggesting that seeding effects could be important in the development of systemic amyloidosis. Fibril formation by wild-type human lysozyme is greatly accelerated by fibrils of the variant proteins and vice versa, showing that seeding is not specific to a given protein. The fact that wild-type lysozyme has not been found in ex vivo deposits from patients suffering from this disease is likely to be related to the much lower population of incompletely folded states for the wild-type protein compared to its amyloidogenic variants under physiological conditions. These results support the concept that the ability to form amyloid is a generic property of proteins, but one that is mitigated against in a normally functioning organism. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. The role of biodegradable engineered scaffolds seeded with Schwann cells for spinal cord regeneration.

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    Tabesh, H; Amoabediny, Gh; Nik, N Salehi; Heydari, M; Yosefifard, M; Siadat, S O Ranaei; Mottaghy, K

    2009-02-01

    Spinal cord injury is very complicated, as there are factors in the body that inhibit its repair. Although regeneration of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) was once thought to be impossible, studies over the past two decades have shown that axonal growth after spinal cord injury can occur when provided with the correct substratum. Traditionally, tissue transplantation or peripheral nerve grafting are used to repair damaged or diseased regions of the CNS, but donor shortage and immunological problems associated with infectious disease are often encountered. Fortunately, recent advances in neuroscience, cell culture, and biomaterials provide optimistic future using new treatments for nerve injuries. Biomaterial scaffold creates substrate within which cells are instructed to form a tissue or an organ in a highly controlled way. The principal function of a scaffold is to direct cell behavior such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, maintenance of phenotype, and apoptosis by facilitating sensing and responding to the environment via cell-matrix and cell-cell communications. Therefore, having such abilities provides scaffolds seeded with a special type of cell as an important part of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine which spinal cord regeneration is an example of. Nevertheless, the vast number of biodegradable synthetic and natural biopolymers makes choosing the right one very difficult. In this review article, it was tried to provide an inclusive survey of biopolymers seeded with Schwann cells (SCs) to be used for axonal regeneration in the nervous system.

  15. Formation and seeding of amyloid fibrils from wild-type hen lysozyme and a peptide fragment from the beta-domain.

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    Krebs, M R; Wilkins, D K; Chung, E W; Pitkeathly, M C; Chamberlain, A K; Zurdo, J; Robinson, C V; Dobson, C M

    2000-07-14

    Wild-type hen lysozyme has been converted from its soluble native state into highly organized amyloid fibrils. In order to achieve this conversion, conditions were chosen to promote partial unfolding of the native globular fold and included heating of low-pH solutions and addition of organic solvents. Two peptides derived from the beta-sheet region of hen lysozyme were also found to form fibrils very readily. The properties and morphologies of the amyloid fibrils formed by incubation either of the protein or the peptides are similar to those produced from the group of proteins associated with clinical amyloidoses. Fibril formation by hen lysozyme was substantially accelerated when aliquots of solutions in which fibrils of either one of the peptides or the full-length protein had previously formed were added to fresh solutions of the protein, revealing the importance of seeding in the kinetics of fibril formation. These findings support the proposition that the beta-domain is of particular significance in the formation of fibrils from the full-length protein and suggest similarities between the species giving rise to fibril formation and the intermediates formed during protein folding. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Acellular spinal cord scaffold seeded with mesenchymal stem cells promotes long-distance axon regeneration and functional recovery in spinal cord injured rats.

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    Liu, Jia; Chen, Jian; Liu, Bin; Yang, Cuilan; Xie, Denghui; Zheng, Xiaochen; Xu, Song; Chen, Tianyu; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Zhongmin; Bai, Xiaochun; Jin, Dadi

    2013-02-15

    The stem cell-based experimental therapies are partially successful for the recovery of spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, acellular spinal cord (ASC) scaffolds which mimic native extracellular matrix (ECM) have been successfully prepared. This study aimed at investigating whether the spinal cord lesion gap could be bridged by implantation of bionic-designed ASC scaffold alone and seeded with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) respectively, and their effects on functional improvement. A laterally hemisected SCI lesion was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n=36) and ASC scaffolds seeded with or without hUCB-MSCs were implanted into the lesion immediately. All rats were behaviorally tested using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) test once a week for 8weeks. Behavioral analysis showed that there was significant locomotor recovery improvement in combined treatment group (ASC scaffold and ASC scaffold+hUCB-MSCs) as compared with the SCI only group (pspinal cord cavity and promote long-distance axon regeneration and functional recovery in SCI rats.

  17. PrP aggregation can be seeded by pre-formed recombinant PrP amyloid fibrils without the replication of infectious prions.

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    Barron, Rona M; King, Declan; Jeffrey, Martin; McGovern, Gillian; Agarwal, Sonya; Gill, Andrew C; Piccardo, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian prions are unusual infectious agents, as they are thought to consist solely of aggregates of misfolded prion protein (PrP). Generation of synthetic prions, composed of recombinant PrP (recPrP) refolded into fibrils, has been utilised to address whether PrP aggregates are, indeed, infectious prions. In several reports, neurological disease similar to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) has been described following inoculation and passage of various forms of fibrils in transgenic mice and hamsters. However, in studies described here, we show that inoculation of recPrP fibrils does not cause TSE disease, but, instead, seeds the formation of PrP amyloid plaques in PrP-P101L knock-in transgenic mice (101LL). Importantly, both WT-recPrP fibrils and 101L-recPrP fibrils can seed plaque formation, indicating that the fibrillar conformation, and not the primary sequence of PrP in the inoculum, is important in initiating seeding. No replication of infectious prions or TSE disease was observed following both primary inoculation and subsequent subpassage. These data, therefore, argue against recPrP fibrils being infectious prions and, instead, indicate that these pre-formed seeds are acting to accelerate the formation of PrP amyloid plaques in 101LL Tg mice. In addition, these data reproduce a phenotype which was previously observed in 101LL mice following inoculation with brain extract containing in vivo-generated PrP amyloid fibrils, which has not been shown for other synthetic prion models. These data are reminiscent of the "prion-like" spread of aggregated forms of the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ), α-synuclein and tau observed following inoculation of transgenic mice with pre-formed seeds of each misfolded protein. Hence, even when the protein is PrP, misfolding and aggregation do not reproduce the full clinicopathological phenotype of disease. The initiation and spread of protein aggregation in transgenic mouse lines following inoculation with pre

  18. Reduced inflammatory cell recruitment and tissue damage in spinal cord injury by acellular spinal cord scaffold seeded with mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Wang, Yu-Hai; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Nong, Feng; Lv, Jin-Han; Liu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Therapy using acellular spinal cord (ASC) scaffolds seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) has previously been shown to restore function of the damaged spinal cord and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute hemisected spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to determine whether BMSCs and ASC scaffolds promote the functional recovery of the damaged spinal cord in a rat SCI model through regulation of apoptosis and immune responses. Whether this strategy regulates secondary inflammation, which is characterized by the infiltration of immune cells and inflammatory mediators to the lesion site, in SCI repair was investigated. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores revealed that treatment with BMSCs seeded into an ASC scaffold led to a significant improvement in motor function recovery compared with treatment with an ASC scaffold alone or untreated controls at 2 and 8 weeks after surgery (Pscaffold significantly decreased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells, as compared with the ASC scaffold only and control groups. These results suggested that the use of BMSCs decreased the apoptosis of neural cells and thereby limited tissue damage at the lesion site. Notably, the use of BMSCs with an ASC scaffold also decreased the recruitment of macrophages (microglia; Pscaffold only groups. BMSCs regulated inflammatory cell recruitment to promote functional recovery. However, there was no significant difference in IgM-positive expression among the three groups (P>0.05). The results of this study demonstrated that BMSCs seeded into ASC scaffolds for repair of spinal cord hemisection defects promoted functional recovery through the early regulation of inflammatory cell recruitment with inhibition of apoptosis and secondary inflammation.

  19. Cartilage constructs from human cord blood stem cells seeded in structurally-graded polycaprolactone scaffolds

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    Munir, Samir; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    stimulation. This study demonstrated the chondrogenic potential of human cord blood-derived Multi-Lineage Progenitor Cells (MLPCs) under normoxic and hypoxic culture conditions. Second, MLPCs were seeded in a novel, structurally graded polycaprolactone (SGS-PCL) scaffold and chondrogenesis was evaluated....... MLPCs obtained from BioE Inc (St. Paul, MN, USA) were expanded, and subsequently cultured in a standard micromass pellet system. Pellets were cultured for 21 days in control or chondrogenic induction medium under 5% or 21% oxygen tension. Chondrogenic potential was evaluated by histology (alcian blue......Nano (Aarhus University, Denmark). Micromass pellets cultured in induction medium were larger with a more dense and well-defined spherical structure. GAG production in induced pellets was shown by alcian blue and safranin O staining with most GAG observed centrally in 21%-, and peripherally in 5%-oxygen...

  20. Templated Aggregation of TAR DNA-binding Protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) by Seeding with TDP-43 Peptide Fibrils*

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    Shimonaka, Shotaro; Nonaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Genjiro; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as the major component of ubiquitin-positive neuronal and glial inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Aggregation of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and spreading of the aggregates are suggested to account for the pathogenesis and progression of these diseases. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 aggregation, we attempted to identify the amino acid sequence required for the aggregation. By expressing a series of deletion mutants lacking 20 amino acid residues in the C-terminal region in SH-SY5Y cells, we established that residues 274–313 in the glycine-rich region are essential for aggregation. In vitro aggregation experiments using synthetic peptides of 40 amino acids from this sequence and adjacent regions showed that peptides 274–313 and 314–353 formed amyloid-like fibrils. Transduction of these fibrils induced seed-dependent aggregation of TDP-43 in cells expressing wild-type TDP-43 or TDP-43 lacking nuclear localization signal. These cells showed different phosphorylated C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 and different trypsin-resistant bands. These results suggest that residues 274–353 are responsible for the conversion of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and that templated aggregation of TDP-43 by seeding with different peptides induces various types of TDP-43 pathologies, i.e. the peptides appear to act like prion strains. PMID:26887947

  1. Templated Aggregation of TAR DNA-binding Protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) by Seeding with TDP-43 Peptide Fibrils.

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    Shimonaka, Shotaro; Nonaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Genjiro; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-04-22

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as the major component of ubiquitin-positive neuronal and glial inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Aggregation of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and spreading of the aggregates are suggested to account for the pathogenesis and progression of these diseases. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 aggregation, we attempted to identify the amino acid sequence required for the aggregation. By expressing a series of deletion mutants lacking 20 amino acid residues in the C-terminal region in SH-SY5Y cells, we established that residues 274-313 in the glycine-rich region are essential for aggregation. In vitro aggregation experiments using synthetic peptides of 40 amino acids from this sequence and adjacent regions showed that peptides 274-313 and 314-353 formed amyloid-like fibrils. Transduction of these fibrils induced seed-dependent aggregation of TDP-43 in cells expressing wild-type TDP-43 or TDP-43 lacking nuclear localization signal. These cells showed different phosphorylated C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 and different trypsin-resistant bands. These results suggest that residues 274-353 are responsible for the conversion of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and that templated aggregation of TDP-43 by seeding with different peptides induces various types of TDP-43 pathologies, i.e. the peptides appear to act like prion strains. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Short Fibrils Constitute the Major Species of Seed-Competent Tau in the Brains of Mice Transgenic for Human P301S Tau.

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    Jackson, Samuel J; Kerridge, Caroline; Cooper, Jane; Cavallini, Annalisa; Falcon, Benjamin; Cella, Claire V; Landi, Alessia; Szekeres, Philip G; Murray, Tracey K; Ahmed, Zeshan; Goedert, Michel; Hutton, Michael; O'Neill, Michael J; Bose, Suchira

    2016-01-20

    conformers from TgP301S tau mice and show that seed-competent tau species comprise small fibrils capable of seeding tau pathology in cell and animal models. Characterization of seed-competent tau gives insight into disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Jackson, Kerridge et al.

  3. Pressure-assisted dissociation and degradation of "proteinase K-resistant" fibrils prepared by seeding with scrapie-infected hamster prion protein.

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    Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Maeno, Akihiro; Murayama, Taichi; Tachibana, Hideki; Fujita, Yuzo; Yamanaka, Hitoki; Nishida, Noriyuki; Atarashi, Ryuichiro

    2014-01-01

    The crucial step for the fatal neurodegenerative prion diseases involves the conversion of a normal cellular protein, PrP(C), into a fibrous pathogenic form, PrP(Sc), which has an unusual stability against heat and resistance against proteinase K digestion. A successful challenge to reverse the reaction from PrP(Sc) into PrP(C) is considered valuable, as it would give a key to dissolving the complex molecular events into thermodynamic and kinetic analyses and may also provide a means to prevent the formation of PrP(Sc) from PrP(C) eventually in vivo. Here we show that, by applying pressures at kbar range, the "proteinase K-resistant" fibrils (rHaPrP(res)) prepared from hamster prion protein (rHaPrP [23-231]) by seeding with brain homogenate of scrapie-infected hamster, becomes easily digestible. The result is consistent with the notion that rHaPrP(res) fibrils are dissociated into rHaPrP monomers under pressure and that the formation of PrP(Sc) from PrP(C) is thermodynamically controlled. Moreover, the efficient degradation of prion fibrils under pressure provides a novel means of eliminating infectious PrP(Sc) from various systems of pathogenic concern.

  4. Effect of Fenugreek Seed Extract (Trigonella Foenum-graecum on Brachial Region of the Spinal Cord of an 18-Day Old Rat Offspring with Diabetes

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    Z Khaksar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Diabetes can affect the spinal cord, an important part of the central nervous system. Fenugreek seed has been suggested to have potential antidiabetic effects. This study was conducted to assess the effects of Fenugreek seed extract (trigonella foenum-graecum on fetal spinal cord structure, specifically in the brachial enlargement cord in an 18-day old fetus of diabetic mothers treated with extracts in comparison with the control groups' mothers. Methods: In the present cross-sectional study, sixteen healthy female rats were randomly divided into four equal groups: Healthy control, Diabetes control, Fenugreek control, Fenugreek treatment. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotcin (50 mg/kg. All four groups became pregnant by natural mating. After formation of the nervous system, two fetuses from each group were expelled by cesarean after performing anesthesia on the animals on 18th day of pregnancy furthermore their brachial enlargement spinal cord samples were taken. Finally, the tissue sections were prepared by routine procedures and diverse histological parameters were examined. The collected data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: results showed that fetal body weight on the diabetic control group was significantly higher compared to the other groups (P≤ 0/05. Moreover, significant reductions in the transvers and vertical diameters in central channel of the spinal cord and as well in the number of neurons of the spinal cord gray matter in the diabetic control groups in comparison with the other groups were observed (P≤0/05. Conclusion: The hyperglycemic effect of maternal diabetes during fetal period causes abnormalities, especially in the brachial enlargement of spinal cord, including changes in the spinal cord and neurons number in the gray matter. Disorders occurring in the prenatal remains and may perhaps cause lack of ability to perform certain physical activities. Key words

  5. [Implantation of 125 iodine seeds in the dog vocal cord. An experimental morphologic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, C; Strutz, J; Bruggmoser, G; Knüfermann, H; Schaefer, H E

    1988-09-01

    Following the first positive therapeutic results of T1a vocal chord cancer with 125iodine seeds in man (brachytherapy), we were concerned with the effects of this low-energy photon source on healthy laryngeal tissue. In the larynx, changes in the area of the vocal chord and the cartilaginous laryngeal structures were investigated in particular. These experimental studies were performed on the larynx of the dog. Through direct laryngoscopy, two 125iodine seeds were implanted in the anterior third of each vocal chord in 8 dogs; the resulting prick canals were sealed with fibrin glue. During survival the correct position of the seeds was radiologically monitored. After survival periods of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months the larynges were fixed by perfusion, removed, imbedded in paraplast, and stained with H. E., Azan, and E. v. G. After this protracted irradiation with 125iodine seeds only slight and for the most part reversible pathological changes had occurred. One month after implantation, only a perivascular infection was found in the vocal chord. After three months an inhibition of the fibrin organization around the seeds was observed as well as a localized dyschylia with broadening of the gland ducts. Additionally, a circumscribed dysplasia of the squamous epithelium, swelling of the capillary endothelium, atrophy of muscular fibres around the seeds, and telangiectasia of blood vessels were discernable. 6 and 12 months after implantation, only the muscular atrophy and the telangiectasia of the blood vessels remained detectable, in addition to a reduced inhibition of the fibrin organisation by connective tissue.

  6. Atrial fibrillation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    patients with atrial fibrillation managed in a referral hospital in Port Harcourt, southern Nigeria. ... treatment despite all the patients having moderate to high risk of stroke ... Keywords: Atrial fibrillation, thrombosis, CHADS2 Score, stroke risk, ...

  7. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eissner, Guenther [Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich, E-mail: Guenther.Eissner@med.uni-muenchen.d [Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (registered) (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  8. Eumelanin fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueenie, Ross; Sutter, Jens; Karolin, Jan; Birch, David J. S.

    2012-07-01

    We describe the auto-oxidation of 3, 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) in the synthesis of eumelanin to spontaneously produce fibrils upon drying. The self-assembled fibrils are of characteristic diameter ~1 to 2 μm, composed of filaments, and are unidirectional, apart from branches that are formed at typically an angle of 20 to 22 deg. The fibrils are characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence decay times, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The fibrils mimic natural melanin in consisting of core eumelanin with efficient nonradiative properties, but they also display pockets of electronically isolated species with higher radiative rates on the nanosecond timescale. Eumelanin fibrils formed occasionally in solution are tentatively attributed to a scaffold of bacteria or fungus. Fabricating and characterizing novel synthetic eumelanin structures such as fibrils are of interest in helping to reveal a functional structure for eumelanin, in understanding its photophysics, in learning more about L-DOPA as it is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and in producing novel materials which might embody some of the diverse properties of eumelanin.

  9. Whey protein nanofibrils: the environment-morphology-functionality relationship in lyophilization, rehydration, and seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Simon M; Su, Jiahong; Rao, M Anandha; Anema, Skelte G; Singh, Harjinder

    2012-05-23

    Amyloid-like fibrils from β-lactoglobulin have potential as efficient thickening and gelling agents for food and biomedical applications, but the link between fibril morphology and bulk viscosity is poorly understood. We examined how lyophilization and rehydration affects the morphology and rheological properties of semiflexible (i.e., straight) and highly flexible (i.e., curly) fibrils, the latter made with 80 mM CaCl(2). Straight fibrils were fractured into short rods by lyophilization and rehydration, whereas curly fibrils sustained little damage. This was reflected in the viscosities of rehydrated fibril dispersions, which were much lower for straight fibrils than for curly fibrils. Lyophilized straight or curly fibrils seeded new fibril growth, but viscosity enhancement due to seeding was negligible. We believe that the increase in fibril concentration caused by seeding was counterbalanced by a decrease in fibril length, reducing the ability of fibrils to form physical entanglement networks.

  10. Strontium- and cobalt-substituted bioactive glasses seeded with human umbilical cord perivascular cells to promote bone regeneration via enhanced osteogenic and angiogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargozar, Saeid; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin; Ai, Jafar; Mozafari, Masoud; Brouki Milan, Peiman; Hamzehlou, Sepideh; Barati, Mahmood; Baino, Francesco; Hill, Robert G; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2017-08-01

    Designing and developing new biomaterials to accelerate bone healing are currently under progress. In this study, we attempted to promote osteogenesis using strontium- and cobalt-substituted bioactive glasses (BGs) seeded with human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) in a critical size defect in the distal femur of rabbit animal model. The BG particles were successfully synthesized in the form of granules using the melt-derived route. After being isolated, HUCPVCs were expanded and then characterized to use during in vitro and in vivo procedures. The in vitro effects of the synthesized glasses on the isolated HUCPVCs as well as on cell lines SaOS-2 (selected for screening the osteogenetic potential) and HUVEC (selected for screening the angiogenic potential) were assessed by analyzing cytotoxicity, cell attachment, bone-like nodule formation, and real time PCR. The results of in vitro tests indicated cytocompatibility of the synthesized BG particles. For in vivo study, the HUCPVCs-seeded BGs were implanted into the animal's body. Radiographic imaging, histology and immunohistology staining were performed on the harvested specimens at 4 and 12weeks post-surgery. The in vivo evaluation of the samples showed that all the cell/glass constructs accelerated bone healing process in comparison with blank controls. The best in vitro and in vivo results were associated to the BGs containing both strontium and cobalt ions. This group of bioactive glasses is able to promote both osteogenesis and angiogenesis and can therefore be highly suitable for the development of advanced functional bone substitutes. Bone regeneration is considered as an unmet clinical need. The most recent researches focused on incorporation of strontium (Sr(2+)) and cobalt (Co(2+)) ions into bioactive glasses structure. Strontium is an alkaline earth metal which is currently used in the treatment of osteoporosis. Also, cobalt is considered as another promising element in the bone regeneration

  11. Hypoxia Enhances Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cord Blood Multilineage Progenitor Cells Seeded on a Novel Scaffold of Freeze Dried Polycaprolactone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Figueroa, Ryan Jude; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard

    Background Cartilage defects are common and causes osteoarthritis. Articular chondrocytes or bone marrow-derived stromal cells are presently the favoured cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Human umbilical cord blood multilineage progenitor cells (MLPCs) are easily harvested and have capability...... blue. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) and secreted CD-RAP were assessed as markers of cartilage anabolism. Results MLPCs pellets and scaffolds induced in 5% O2 showed increased cellularity and matrix deposition compared with induction in 21% O2. Matrix deposition in pellets was observed in a zonal...

  12. Atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Fauchier, Laurent; Freedman, Saul B;

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disorder, and increases in prevalence with increasing age and the number of cardiovascular comorbidities. AF is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat that can be asymptomatic or lead to symptoms such as palpitations...

  13. Atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Nielsen, Morten W; Haunsø, Stig;

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. A number of studies have demonstrated that AF, and in particular lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. Monogenic mutations in lone and familial AF, although rare, have been recognized...

  14. Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimetbaum, Peter

    2017-03-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of atrial fibrillation, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  15. Fatigue and human umbilical cord stem cell seeding characteristics of calcium phosphate-chitosan-biodegradable fiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Burguera, Elena F; Xu, Hockin H K; Amin, Nikhil; Ryou, Heon; Arola, Dwayne D

    2010-02-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has in situ-setting ability and bioactivity, but the brittleness and low strength limit CPC to only non-load-bearing bone repairs. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) can be harvested without an invasive procedure required for the commonly studied bone marrow MSCs. However, little has been reported on hUCMSC delivery via bioactive scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were to develop CPC scaffolds with improved resistance to fatigue and fracture, and to investigate hUCMSC delivery for bone tissue engineering. In fast fracture, CPC with 15% chitosan and 20% polyglactin fibers (CPC-chitosan-fiber scaffold) had flexural strength of 26mPa, higher than 10mPa for CPC control (pfiber specimens that survived 2x10(6) cycles had the maximum stress of 10MPa, compared to 5MPa of CPC control. CPC-chitosan-fiber specimens that failed after multiple cycles had a mean stress-to-failure of 9MPa, compared to 5.8MPa for CPC control (pfiber scaffolds. The percentage of live cells reached 96-99%. Cell density was about 300cells/mm(2) at day 1; it proliferated to 700cells/mm(2) at day 4. Wst-1 assay showed that the stronger CPC-chitosan-fiber scaffold had hUCMSC viability that matched the CPC control (p>0.1). In summary, this study showed that chitosan and polyglactin fibers substantially increased the fatigue resistance of CPC, and that hUCMSCs had excellent proliferation and viability on the scaffolds.

  16. Glucagon Amyloid-like Fibril Morphology Is Selected via Morphology-Dependent Growth Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.B.; Otzen, D.; Christiansen, Gunna

    2007-01-01

    concentrations, we find that the lag time has an unexpected maximum at a concentration of 1 mg/mL, with faster fibrillation at both lower and higher concentrations. Seeding experiments show that small amounts of straight fibril seeds can accelerate fibril growth at both low and high glucagon concentration, while...... twisted fibril seeds cannot grow at high concentrations. We conclude that there exists a morphology-dependent mechanism for inhibition of glucagon fibril growth. Light scattering experiments indicate that glucagon is mainly monomeric below 1 mg/mL and increasingly trimeric above this concentration. We...... propose that the glucagon trimer is able to specifically inhibit growth of the twisted fibril morphology. Such inhibitory binding of molecules in an unproductive conformation could also play a role in the selection of morphologies for other fibril-forming peptides and proteins....

  17. Fracture and Growth Are Competing Forces Determining the Fate of Conformers in Tau Fibril Populations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Virginia; Holden, Michael R.; Weismiller, Hilary A.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Margittai, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tau fibrils are pathological aggregates that can transfer between neurons and then recruit soluble Tau monomers by template-assisted conversion. The propagation of different fibril polymorphs is thought to be a contributing factor to phenotypic diversity in Alzheimer disease and other Tauopathies. We found that a homogeneous population of Tau fibrils composed of the truncated version K18 (residues 244–372) gradually converted to a new set of fibril conformers when subjected to multiple cycles of seeding and growth. Using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we observed that the distances between spin labels at positions 311 and 328 in the fibril core progressively decreased. The findings were corroborated by changes in turbidity, morphology, and protease sensitivity. Fibrils that were initially formed under stirring conditions exhibited an increased fragility compared with fibrils formed quiescently after multiple cycles of seeding. The quiescently formed fibrils were marked by accelerated growth. The difference in fragility and growth between the different conformers explains how the change in incubation condition could lead to the amplification of a minor subpopulation of fibrils. Under quiescent conditions where fibril breakage is minimal, faster growing fibrils have a selective advantage. The findings are of general importance as they suggest that changes in selective pressures during fibril propagation in the human brain could result in the emergence of new fibril conformers with varied clinicopathological consequences. PMID:27080260

  18. Fracture and Growth Are Competing Forces Determining the Fate of Conformers in Tau Fibril Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Virginia; Holden, Michael R; Weismiller, Hilary A; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S; Margittai, Martin

    2016-06-03

    Tau fibrils are pathological aggregates that can transfer between neurons and then recruit soluble Tau monomers by template-assisted conversion. The propagation of different fibril polymorphs is thought to be a contributing factor to phenotypic diversity in Alzheimer disease and other Tauopathies. We found that a homogeneous population of Tau fibrils composed of the truncated version K18 (residues 244-372) gradually converted to a new set of fibril conformers when subjected to multiple cycles of seeding and growth. Using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we observed that the distances between spin labels at positions 311 and 328 in the fibril core progressively decreased. The findings were corroborated by changes in turbidity, morphology, and protease sensitivity. Fibrils that were initially formed under stirring conditions exhibited an increased fragility compared with fibrils formed quiescently after multiple cycles of seeding. The quiescently formed fibrils were marked by accelerated growth. The difference in fragility and growth between the different conformers explains how the change in incubation condition could lead to the amplification of a minor subpopulation of fibrils. Under quiescent conditions where fibril breakage is minimal, faster growing fibrils have a selective advantage. The findings are of general importance as they suggest that changes in selective pressures during fibril propagation in the human brain could result in the emergence of new fibril conformers with varied clinicopathological consequences. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  20. The changing face of glucagon fibrillation: Structural polymorphism and conformational imprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.; Dikov, D.; Flink, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    /CD spectra depending on salts, glucagon concentration and fibrillation temperature. Apparent fibrillar stability correlates with spectral and kinetic properties; generally, fibrils formed under conditions favourable for rapid fibrillation (ambient temperatures, high glucagon concentration or high salt......We have established a time-resolved fluorescence assay to study fibrillation of the 29 residue peptide hormone glucagon under a variety of different conditions in a high-throughput format. Fibrils formed at pH 2.5 differ in fibrillation kinetics, morphology, thioflavin T staining and FTIR...... concentration) appear less thermostable than those formed under more challenging conditions (high temperatures, low glucagon or low salt concentrations). Properties of preformed fibrils used for seeding are inherited in a prion-like manner. Thus, we conclude that the structure of fibrils formed by glucagon...

  1. Spin Labeling and Characterization of Tau Fibrils Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Virginia; Margittai, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Template-assisted propagation of Tau fibrils is essential for the spreading of Tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease. In this process, small seeds of fibrils recruit Tau monomers onto their ends. The physical properties of the fibrils play an important role in their propagation. Here, we describe two different electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques that have provided crucial insights into the structure of Tau fibrils. Both techniques rely on the site-directed introduction of one or two spin labels into the protein monomer. Continuous-wave (CW) EPR provides information on which amino acid residues are contained in the fibril core and how they are stacked along the long fibril axis. Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) determines distances between two spin labels within a single protein and hence provides insights into their spatial arrangement in the fibril cross section. Because of the long distance range accessible to DEER (~2-5 nm) populations of distinct fibril conformers can be differentiated.

  2. Atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Casper N

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication after myocardial infarction (MI) and new-onset AF has been demonstrated to be associated with adverse outcome and a large excess risk of death in both MI and aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Prevention of new-onset AF is therefore a potential therapeutic target in AS and MI patients. Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent AF. Accordingly, statins are recommended as a class IIa recommendation for prevention of new-onset AF after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, this preventive effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with AS or a large scale first-time MI patient sample and data in patients not undergoing invasive cardiac interventions are limited. This PhD thesis was conducted at the Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, with the aim to investigate the three aforementioned questions and to add to the existing evidence of AF prevention with statins. This was done using three different settings: 1) a randomized patients sample of 1,873 from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 2) a register patient sample of 97,499 with first-time MI, and 3) all published studies until beginning of June 2011 examining statin treatment on new-onset and recurrent AF in patients not undergoing cardiac surgery. This thesis revealed that statins did not lower the incidence or the time to new-onset AF in patients with asymptomatic AS. However, statin treatment showed an independently preventive effect on new-onset AF, including type-dependent effect and a trend to dosage-dependent effect. In addition, this thesis showed that good compliance to statin treatment was important to prevent new-onset AF. Finally, the meta-analysis in this PhD thesis showed a preventive effect in the observational studies although this effect was absent in the randomized controlled trials. Based on this PhD thesis

  3. Feasibility of stem cells from umbilical cord blood as seed cells for tooth regeneration%脐血干细胞作为牙再生种子细胞的可行性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    计宝辉; 陈娇; 王杭

    2010-01-01

    背景:近年来牙再生成为组织工程领域一项重要课题,但目前还没有最合适的种子细胞,迫切需要探索新的种子细胞.目的:综述脐血干细胞作为牙再生种子细胞的可行性.方法:应用计算机检索1998-01/2009-01 PubMed数据库相关文章,检索词为"tooth regeneration, seed cells, tissue engineering, umbilical cord blood,mesenchymal stem cells",并限定文章语言种类为English.同时计算机检索1998-01/2009-01中国期刊网全文数据库、万方数据库、中文科技期刊全文数据库相关文章,检索词为"组织工程,种子细胞,间充质干细胞,脐带血,牙再生",并限定文章语言种类为中文.共检索到文献40篇.结果与结论:各类种子细胞,如牙胚来源的成牙本质细胞,牙髓和乳牙来源的干细胞,以及第一腮弓来源的外胚层间充质干细胞都已经在基础研究中显示出了成牙分化潜能.但是,在临床实验中这些种子细胞很难获取.骨髓间充质干细胞虽然也显示出了成牙潜能,但是它们的分化能力随供体年龄的增长显著下降.脐血干细胞和骨髓间充质干细胞相比,拥有很多优势,并且呈现出典型的间充质干细胞的特点.所以,推测脐血干细胞可能被诱导成成牙细胞系,并且可能成为合适的牙再生的种子细胞来修复牙缺失.%BACKGROUND: With the development of tissue engineering, more attention has been paid to tooth regeneration. However, the resource of best seed cells is still uncertain. Therefore, alternative sources should be attached to intensive investigation. OBJECTIVE: To review the feasibility of stem cells from umbilical cord blood as seed cells for tooth regeneration. METHODS: A PubMed search was performed for articles published between January 1998 and January 2009. Key words were "tooth regeneration, seed cells, tissue engineering, umbilical cord blood, mesenchymal stem cells". Only studies written in English were included. Simultaneously

  4. Atrial Ectopics Precipitating Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2015-01-01

    Holter monitor tracing showing blocked atrial ectopics and atrial ectopic precipitating atrial fibrillation is being demonstrated. Initially it was coarse atrial fibrillation, which rapidly degenerated into fine atrial fibrillation.

  5. The changing face of glucagon fibrillation: Structural polymorphism and conformational imprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J.S.; Dikov, D.; Flink, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    concentration) appear less thermostable than those formed under more challenging conditions (high temperatures, low glucagon or low salt concentrations). Properties of preformed fibrils used for seeding are inherited in a prion-like manner. Thus, we conclude that the structure of fibrils formed by glucagon...

  6. The Japanese mutant Aβ (ΔE22-Aβ(1-39)) forms fibrils instantaneously, with low-thioflavin T fluorescence: seeding of wild-type Aβ(1-40) into atypical fibrils by ΔE22-Aβ(1-39).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloe, Adam L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Sachleben, Joseph R; Tycko, Robert; Meredith, Stephen C

    2011-03-29

    The ΔE693 (Japanese) mutation of the β-amyloid precursor protein leads to production of ΔE22-Aβ peptides such as ΔE22-Aβ(1-39). Despite reports that these peptides do not form fibrils, here we show that, on the contrary, the peptide forms fibrils essentially instantaneously. The fibrils are typical amyloid fibrils in all respects except that they cause only low levels of thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, which, however, develops with no lag phase. The fibrils bind ThT, but with a lower affinity and a smaller number of binding sites than wild-type (WT) Aβ(1-40). Fluorescence depolarization confirms extremely rapid aggregation of ΔE22-Aβ(1-39). Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) indicates very low concentrations of soluble monomer and oligomer, but only in the presence of some organic solvent, e.g., 2% (v/v) DMSO. The critical concentration is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower for ΔE22-Aβ(1-39) than for WT Aβ(1-40). Several lines of evidence point to an altered structure for ΔE22-Aβ(1-39) compared to that of WT Aβ(1-40) fibrils. In addition to differences in ThT binding and fluorescence, PITHIRDS-CT solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of ΔE22-Aβ(1-39) are not compatible with the parallel in-register β-sheet generally observed for WT Aβ(1-40) fibrils. X-ray fibril diffraction showed different D spacings: 4.7 and 10.4 Å for WT Aβ(1-40) and 4.7 and 9.6 Å for ΔE22-Aβ(1-39). Equimolar mixtures of ΔE22-Aβ(1-39) and WT Aβ(1-40) also produced fibrils extremely rapidly, and by the criteria of ThT fluorescence and electron microscopic appearance, they were the same as fibrils made from pure ΔE22-Aβ(1-39). X-ray diffraction of fibrils formed from 1:1 molar mixtures of ΔE22-Aβ(1-39) and WT Aβ(1-40) showed the same D spacings as fibrils of the pure mutant peptide, not the wild-type peptide. These findings are consistent with extremely rapid nucleation by ΔE22-Aβ(1-39), followed by fibril extension by WT Aβ(1-40), and

  7. Vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse, Michiel J.

    1998-03-01

    One of the factors that favors the development of ventricular fibrillation is an increase in the dispersion of refractoriness. Experiments will be described in which an increase in dispersion in the recovery of excitability was determined during brief episodes of enhanced sympathetic nerve activity, known to increase the risk of fibrillation. Whereas in the normal heart ventricular fibrillation can be induced by a strong electrical shock, a premature stimulus of moderate intensity only induces fibrillation in the presence of regional ischemia, which greatly increases the dispersion of refractoriness. One factor that is of importance for the transition of reentrant ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation during acute regional ischemia is the subendocardial Purkinje system. After selective destruction of the Purkinje network by lugol, reentrant tachycardias still develop in the ischemic region, but they do not degenerate into fibrillation. Finally, attempts were made to determine the minimal mass of thin ventricular myocardium required to sustain fibrillation induced by burst pacing. This was done by freezing of subendocardial and midmural layers. The rim of surviving epicardial muscle had to be larger than 20 g. Extracellular electrograms during fibrillation in both the intact and the "frozen" left ventricle were indistinguishable, but activation patterns were markedly different. In the intact ventricle epicardial activation was compatible with multiple wavelet reentry, in the "frozen" heart a single, or at most two wandering reentrant waves were seen.

  8. Amyloid Fibrils from Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadishka Jayawardena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood. A characteristic amyloid fibril morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM, with mean fibril dimensions of approximately 5 nm diameter and up to several microns in length. The thioflavin T assay confirmed the presence of β-sheet structures in apo-hemoglobin fibrils, and X-ray fiber diffraction showed the characteristic amyloid cross-β quaternary structure. Apo-hemoglobin nanofibers demonstrated high stability over a range of temperatures (−20 to 80 °C and pHs (2–10, and were stable in the presence of organic solvents and trypsin, confirming their potential as nanomaterials with versatile applications. This study conclusively demonstrates the formation of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin for the first time, and also introduces a cost-effective method for amyloid fibril manufacture using meat industry by-products.

  9. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  10. Dynamics of Focal Fibrillation Waves during Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanters, Eva A H; Allessie, Maurits A; DE Groot, Natasja M S

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and appearance of focal fibrillation waves on the right and left atrial epicardial surface were visualized during 10 seconds of persistent atrial fibrillation in a 71-year-old woman with valvular heart disease. The frequent, nonrepetitive, widespread, and capricious distribution of focal waves suggests that transmural conduction of fibrillation waves is most likely the mechanism underlying focal fibrillation waves.

  11. Conformational features of tau fibrils from Alzheimer's disease brain are faithfully propagated by unmodified recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Olga A; March, Zachary M; Robinson, Anne S; Colby, David W

    2013-10-08

    Fibrils composed of tau protein are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we show that when recombinant tau protein is seeded with paired helical filaments (PHFs) isolated from AD brain, the amyloid formed shares many of the structural features of AD PHFs. In contrast, tau amyloids formed with heparin as an inducing agent-a common biochemical model of tau misfolding-are structurally distinct from brain-derived PHFs. Using ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy, circular dichroism, and chemical denaturation, we found that AD seeded recombinant tau fibrils were not significantly different than tau fibrils isolated from AD brain tissue. Tau fibrils produced by incubating recombinant tau with heparin had significantly narrower fibrils with a longer periodicity, higher chemical stability, and distinct secondary structure compared to AD PHFs. The addition of heparin to the reaction of recombinant tau and AD PHFs also corrupted the templating process, resulting in a mixture of fibril conformations. Our results suggest that AD-isolated PHFs act as a conformational template for the formation of recombinant tau fibrils. Therefore, the use of AD PHFs as seeds to stimulate recombinant tau amyloid formation produces synthetic tau fibers that closely resemble those associated with AD pathology and provides a biochemical model of tau misfolding that may be of improved utility for structural studies and drug screening. These results also demonstrate that post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation are not a prerequisite for the propagation of the tau fibril conformation found in AD.

  12. GDNF reverses the inhibitory properties of reactive astrocytes allowing robust axonal regeneration through Schwann cell-seeded guidance channels after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Ling-Xiao; Hu, Jianguo; Liu, Naikui; Wang, Xiaofei; Smith, George M.; Wen, Xuejun; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Reactive astrogliosis has been considered as a major impediment for axonal regeneration after injuries in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Here we report that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), combined with transplanted Schwann cells (SCs), effectively reversed the inhibitory properties of astrocytes at graft-host interfaces allowing robust axonal regeneration, concomitant with vigorous migration of host astrocytes, into SC-seeded semi-permeable guidance channels ...

  13. Surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrance, Christopher P; Henn, Matthew C; Damiano, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and its treatment options include drug therapy or catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its fourth iteration (Cox-Maze IV). This article reviews the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. This article also reviews the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous cut-and-sew method.

  14. RNA Binds to Tau Fibrils and Sustains Template-Assisted Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkel, Paul D; Holden, Michael R; Matin, Nadira; Margittai, Martin

    2015-08-04

    Tau fibrils are the main proteinacious components of neurofibrillary lesions in Alzheimer disease. Although RNA molecules are sequestered into these lesions, their relationship to Tau fibrils is only poorly understood. Such understanding, however, is important, as short fibrils can transfer between neurons and nonproteinacious factors including RNA could play a defining role in modulating the latter process. Here, we used sedimentation assays combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy to determine the effects of RNA on Tau fibril structure and growth. We observe that, in the presence of RNA, three-repeat (3R) and four-repeat (4R) Tau form fibrils with parallel, in-register arrangement of β-strands and exhibit an asymmetric seeding barrier in which 4R Tau grows onto 3R Tau seeds but not vice versa. These structural features are similar to those previously observed for heparin-induced fibrils, indicating that basic conformational properties are conserved, despite their being molecular differences of the nucleating agents. Furthermore, RNA sustains template-assisted growth and binds to the fibril surface and can be exchanged by heparin. These findings suggest that, in addition to mediating fibrillization, cofactors decorating the surface of Tau fibrils may modulate biological interactions and thereby influence the spreading of Tau pathology in the human brain.

  15. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular beat. Certain cells in your heart make electric signals that cause the heart to contract and pump ... read your ECG to find out if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the heart’s ...

  16. Fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution in an interfacial shearing flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaraj, Vignesh; McBride, Samantha; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Although the association of fibril plaques with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is well established, in-depth understanding of the roles played by various physical factors in seeding and growth of fibrils is far from well known. Of the numerous factors affecting this complex phenomenon, the effect of fluid flow and shear at interfaces is paramount as it is ubiquitous and the most varying factor in vivo. Many amyloidogenic proteins have been found to denature upon contact at hydrophobic interfaces due to the self-assembling nature of protein in its monomeric state. Here, fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution is studied in an interfacial shearing flow. The transient surface rheological response of the insulin solution to the flow and its effect on the bulk fibrillization process has been quantified. Minute differences in hydrophobic characteristics between two variants of insulin- Human recombinant and Bovine insulin are found to result in very different responses. Results presented will be in the form of fibrillization assays, images of fibril plaques formed, and changes in surface rheological properties of the insulin solution. The interfacial velocity field, measured from images (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), is compared with computations. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Cord-Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Cord-Blood Banking KidsHealth > For Parents > Cord-Blood Banking Print A ... for you and your family. About Cord-Blood Banking Cord-blood banking basically means collecting and storing ...

  18. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freedman, Ben; Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is found in a third of all ischaemic strokes, even more after post-stroke atrial fibrillation monitoring. Data from stroke registries show that both unknown and untreated or under treated atrial fibrillation is responsible for most of these strokes, which are often fatal...... or debilitating. Most could be prevented if efforts were directed towards detection of atrial fibrillation before stroke occurs, through screening or case finding, and treatment of all patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk of stroke with well-controlled vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K...

  19. Control the kinetics and pathway of insulin fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhongli; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2012-02-01

    Protein fibrils have been proposed as possible toxic agents for many amyloid related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, however the reaction pathway toward the amyloid fibrillation remain inadequately understood. In this work, we examine the conformational transition of human insulin as the model amyloid protein by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. By controlling the pH cycling, insulin monomer and oligomers are indentified at given pH variation condition. Furthermore, low frequency ac-electric fields are employed to control the insulin aggregation from its monomers in a microchannel. It is observed that lag time to induce insulin fibrillation can be significantly shortened, in compassion to the commonly used cooling and seeding methods, and exhibits a strong dependence on applied ac-field strength. Additionally, the structure of insulin aggregates under ac-electric fields is observed to be drastically different from that under the temperature control.

  20. Conformational features of tau fibrils from Alzheimer’s disease brain are faithfully propagated by unmodified recombinant protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Olga A.; March, Zachary M.; Robinson, Anne S.; Colby, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrils composed of tau protein are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we show that when recombinant tau protein is seeded with paired helical filaments (PHFs) isolated from AD brain, the amyloid formed shares many of the structural features of AD PHFs. In contrast, tau amyloids formed with heparin as an inducing agent—a common biochemical model of tau misfolding—are structurally distinct from brain-derived PHFs. Using ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy, circular dichroism, and chemical denaturation, we found that AD seeded recombinant tau fibrils were not significantly different than tau fibrils isolated from AD brain tissue. Tau fibrils produced by incubating recombinant tau with heparin had significantly narrower fibrils with a longer periodicity, higher chemical stability, and distinct secondary structure compared to AD PHFs. The addition of heparin to the reaction of recombinant tau and AD PHFs also corrupted the templating process, resulting in a mixture of fibril conformations. Our results suggest that AD-isolated PHFs act as a conformational template for the formation of recombinant tau fibrils. Therefore, the use of AD PHFs as seeds to stimulate recombinant tau amyloid formation produces synthetic tau fibers that that closely resemble those associated with AD pathology and provides a biochemical model of tau misfolding that may be of improved utility for structural studies and drug screening. These results also demonstrate that posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation are not a prerequisite for the propagation of the tau fibril conformation found in AD. PMID:24033133

  1. Modulation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, G.S.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the results of various surgical procedures for atrial fibrillation which have been performed in the last 2 decades in the Sint Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. In the 1990s the classical Maze III procedure was the main surgical technique for drug-refracto

  2. Lesson Five Atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 吴文烈

    2003-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation(AF) may occur in paroxysmaland persistent forms. It may be seen in normal subjects,particularly during emotional stress or follow-ing surgery,exercise, or acute alcoholic intoxication.It also may occur in patients with heart or lungdisease who develop acute hypoxia, hypercapnia,ormetabolic or hemodynamic derangements.

  3. Benzalkonium Chloride Accelerates the Formation of the Amyloid Fibrils of Corneal Dystrophy-associated Peptides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies. PMID:23861389

  4. HYPERTHYROIDISM AND ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Marusenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Review on a problem of the development of atrial fibrillation in patients with thyrotoxicosis is presented. Thyrotoxicosis is one of the most frequent endocrine diseases, conceding only to a diabetes mellitus. The most frequent reasons of hyperthyroidism are Graves’ disease and functional thyroid autonomy. The authors give an analysis of data on the cardiac effects of thyrotoxicosis, features of heart remodeling under the influence of thyroid hyperfunction, prevalence of atrial fibrillation in thyrotoxicosis, depending on age, as well as the possibility of restoring sinus rhythm in the combination of these diseases. Particular attention is paid to the effect on the heart of subclinical thyrotoxicosis, which is defined as a dysfunction of the thyroid gland, characterized by low serum concentration of thyrotropin, normal values of free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is also capable of causing heart remodeling and diastolic dysfunction.Prevalence of thyrotoxicosis in elderly people is higher in areas of iodine deficiency; it is relevant for our country due to the large territory of iodine deficiency. In elderly patients, the cardiac effects of thyrotoxicosis prevail in the clinical picture, that makes it difficult to diagnose endocrine disorders, and correction of thyrotoxicosis is critically important for the successful control of the heart rhythm. The article also discusses the problem of thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy, caused by the toxic effect of excess thyroid hormones: features of this heart disorder, factors affecting its formation, clinical significance and contribution to the development of rhythm disturbances. The greatest significance is the development of atrial fibrillation as a result of thyrotox-icosis in older patients who already have various cardiovascular diseases.Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in thyrotoxicosis. The main cause of arrhythmia in hyperthyroidism is the

  5. Supersaturation-limited and Unlimited Phase Transitions Compete to Produce the Pathway Complexity in Amyloid Fibrillation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masayuki; So, Masatomo; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kardos, József; Goto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Although amyloid fibrils and amorphous aggregates are two types of aggregates formed by denatured proteins, their relationship currently remains unclear. We used β2-microglobulin (β2m), a protein responsible for dialysis-related amyloidosis, to clarify the mechanism by which proteins form either amyloid fibrils or amorphous aggregates. When ultrasonication was used to accelerate the spontaneous fibrillation of β2m at pH 2.0, the effects observed depended on ultrasonic power; although stronger ultrasonic power effectively accelerated fibrillation, excessively strong ultrasonic power decreased the amount of fibrils formed, as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence. An analysis of the products formed indicated that excessively strong ultrasonic power generated fibrillar aggregates that retained β-structures but without high efficiency as seeds. On the other hand, when the spontaneous fibrillation of β2m was induced at higher concentrations of NaCl at pH 2.0 with stirring, amorphous aggregates became more dominant than amyloid fibrils. These apparent complexities in fibrillation were explained comprehensively by a competitive mechanism in which supersaturation-limited reactions competed with supersaturation-unlimited reactions. We link the kinetics of protein aggregation and a conformational phase diagram, in which supersaturation played important roles. PMID:26063798

  6. Supersaturation-limited and Unlimited Phase Transitions Compete to Produce the Pathway Complexity in Amyloid Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masayuki; So, Masatomo; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kardos, József; Goto, Yuji

    2015-07-17

    Although amyloid fibrils and amorphous aggregates are two types of aggregates formed by denatured proteins, their relationship currently remains unclear. We used β2-microglobulin (β2m), a protein responsible for dialysis-related amyloidosis, to clarify the mechanism by which proteins form either amyloid fibrils or amorphous aggregates. When ultrasonication was used to accelerate the spontaneous fibrillation of β2m at pH 2.0, the effects observed depended on ultrasonic power; although stronger ultrasonic power effectively accelerated fibrillation, excessively strong ultrasonic power decreased the amount of fibrils formed, as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence. An analysis of the products formed indicated that excessively strong ultrasonic power generated fibrillar aggregates that retained β-structures but without high efficiency as seeds. On the other hand, when the spontaneous fibrillation of β2m was induced at higher concentrations of NaCl at pH 2.0 with stirring, amorphous aggregates became more dominant than amyloid fibrils. These apparent complexities in fibrillation were explained comprehensively by a competitive mechanism in which supersaturation-limited reactions competed with supersaturation-unlimited reactions. We link the kinetics of protein aggregation and a conformational phase diagram, in which supersaturation played important roles. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Tau protein assembles into isoform- and disulfide-dependent polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kumi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2011-08-05

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases in which insoluble fibrillar aggregates of a microtubule-binding protein, Tau, are abnormally accumulated. Pathological Tau fibrils often exhibit structural polymorphisms that differ among phenotypically distinct tauopathies; however, a molecular mechanism to generate polymorphic Tau fibrils remains obscure. Here, we note the formation of a disulfide bond in isoforms of full-length Tau and show that the thiol-disulfide status as well as the isoform composition determines structural and morphological properties of Tau fibrils in vitro. Mainly two regions in a Tau primary sequence are found to act as structural blocks for building a protease-resistant core of Tau fibrils. Interactions among those two blocks for building a core structure depend upon the thiol-disulfide status in each isoform of Tau, which results in the formation of polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties. Furthermore, we have found that more diverse structures of Tau fibrils emerge through a cross-seeded fibrillation between heterologous pairs of Tau isoforms. We thus propose that isoform- and disulfide-dependent combinatorial interactions among multiple regions in a Tau sequence endow Tau fibrils with various structures, i.e. polymorphism.

  8. Tau Protein Assembles into Isoform- and Disulfide-dependent Polymorphic Fibrils with Distinct Structural Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kumi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases in which insoluble fibrillar aggregates of a microtubule-binding protein, Tau, are abnormally accumulated. Pathological Tau fibrils often exhibit structural polymorphisms that differ among phenotypically distinct tauopathies; however, a molecular mechanism to generate polymorphic Tau fibrils remains obscure. Here, we note the formation of a disulfide bond in isoforms of full-length Tau and show that the thiol-disulfide status as well as the isoform composition determines structural and morphological properties of Tau fibrils in vitro. Mainly two regions in a Tau primary sequence are found to act as structural blocks for building a protease-resistant core of Tau fibrils. Interactions among those two blocks for building a core structure depend upon the thiol-disulfide status in each isoform of Tau, which results in the formation of polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties. Furthermore, we have found that more diverse structures of Tau fibrils emerge through a cross-seeded fibrillation between heterologous pairs of Tau isoforms. We thus propose that isoform- and disulfide-dependent combinatorial interactions among multiple regions in a Tau sequence endow Tau fibrils with various structures, i.e. polymorphism. PMID:21659525

  9. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is born. The umbilical cord is the cord connecting the baby to the mother's womb. Cord blood ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  10. Spinal Cord Contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ju; Jian Wang; Yazhou Wang; Xianghui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and lim-ited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  11. Seed quality in informal seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords:     informal seed systems, seed recycling, seed quality, germination, seed pathology, seed health, seed-borne diseases, mycotoxigenic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides, mycotoxins, Vigna unguiculata, Zea mays, Nigeria.   Seed is a crucial input for agricultural producti

  12. Seed quality in informal seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords:     informal seed systems, seed recycling, seed quality, germination, seed pathology, seed health, seed-borne diseases, mycotoxigenic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides, mycotoxins, Vigna unguiculata, Zea mays, Nigeria.   Seed is a crucial input for agricultural

  13. End-to-end Structural Restriction of α-Synuclein and Its Influence on Amyloid Fibril Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Chul Suk; Park, Jae Hyung; Choe, Young Jun; Paik, Seung R. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Relationship between molecular freedom of amyloidogenic protein and its self-assembly into amyloid fibrils has been evaluated with α-synuclein, an intrinsically unfolded protein related to Parkinson's disease, by restricting its structural plasticity through an end-to-end disulfide bond formation between two newly introduced cysteine residues on the N- and C-termini. Although the resulting circular form of α-synuclein exhibited an impaired fibrillation propensity, the restriction did not completely block the protein's interactive core since co-incubation with wild-type α-synuclein dramatically facilitated the fibrillation by producing distinctive forms of amyloid fibrils. The suppressed fibrillation propensity was instantly restored as the structural restriction was unleashed with β-mercaptoethanol. Conformational flexibility of the accreting amyloidogenic protein to pre-existing seeds has been demonstrated to be critical for fibrillar extension process by exerting structural adjustment to a complementary structure for the assembly.

  14. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto A.Franken; Ronaldo F.Rosa; Silvio CM Santos

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses atrial fibrillation according to the guidelines of Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias and the Brazilian Cardiogeriatrics Guidelines. We stress the thromboembolic burden of atrial fibrillation and discuss how to prevent it as well as the best way to conduct cases of atrial fibrillatios in the elderly, reverting the arrhythmia to sinus rhythm, or the option of heart rate control. The new methods to treat atrial fibrillation, such as radiofrequency ablation, new oral direct thrombin inhibitors and Xa factor inhibitors, as well as new antiarrhythmic drugs, are depicted.

  15. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  16. Hypertension and Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S.; Shahid, Farhan; Shantsila, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent sustained arrhythmia found in clinical practice. AF rarely exists as a single entity but rather as part of a diverse clinical spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, related to structural and electrical remodeling within the left atrium, leading to AF o...... of complications as the first clinical manifestation of the disease. Antithrombotic prevention in AF combined with strict blood pressure control is of primary importance, since stroke risk and bleeding risk are both greater with underlying hypertension....... onset, perpetuation, and progression. Due to the high overall prevalence within the AF population arterial hypertension plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of AF and its complications. Fibroblast proliferation, apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, gap junction remodeling, accumulation of collagen both...... in atrial and ventricular myocardium all accompany ageing-related structural remodeling with impact on electrical activity. The presence of hypertension also stimulates oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic activation, which further drives the remodeling...

  17. Rapid patterning of 1-D collagenous topography as an ECM protein fibril platform for image cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niannan Xue

    Full Text Available Cellular behavior is strongly influenced by the architecture and pattern of its interfacing extracellular matrix (ECM. For an artificial culture system which could eventually benefit the translation of scientific findings into therapeutic development, the system should capture the key characteristics of a physiological microenvironment. At the same time, it should also enable standardized, high throughput data acquisition. Since an ECM is composed of different fibrous proteins, studying cellular interaction with individual fibrils will be of physiological relevance. In this study, we employ near-field electrospinning to create ordered patterns of collagenous fibrils of gelatin, based on an acetic acid and ethyl acetate aqueous co-solvent system. Tunable conformations of micro-fibrils were directly deposited onto soft polymeric substrates in a single step. We observe that global topographical features of straight lines, beads-on-strings, and curls are dictated by solution conductivity; whereas the finer details such as the fiber cross-sectional profile are tuned by solution viscosity. Using these fibril constructs as cellular assays, we study EA.hy926 endothelial cells' response to ROCK inhibition, because of ROCK's key role in the regulation of cell shape. The fibril array was shown to modulate the cellular morphology towards a pre-capillary cord-like phenotype, which was otherwise not observed on a flat 2-D substrate. Further facilitated by quantitative analysis of morphological parameters, the fibril platform also provides better dissection in the cells' response to a H1152 ROCK inhibitor. In conclusion, the near-field electrospun fibril constructs provide a more physiologically-relevant platform compared to a featureless 2-D surface, and simultaneously permit statistical single-cell image cytometry using conventional microscopy systems. The patterning approach described here is also expected to form the basics for depositing other protein

  18. Mechanical properties of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Bozec, L.; Horton, M. A.; Mesquida, P

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibers from staggered subfibrils still lacks a universally accepted model. Determining the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils ( diameter 50 - 200 nm) provides new insights into collagen structure. In this work, the reduced modulus of collagen was measured by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy. For individual type 1 collagen fibrils from rat tail, the modulus was found to be in the range from 5 GPa to 11.5 GPa ( in air and at room temperature)...

  19. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... roots may be cut to relieve pain. In adults, surgery to free (detether) the spinal cord can reduce the size ... is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord ...

  20. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  1. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure: is atrial fibrillation a disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilman, V

    2014-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation in heart failure often occur together. The relationship between atrial fibrillation and heart failure has remained a subject of research. The main manifestation of the violation of hydrodynamics in heart failure is the increased end-diastolic pressure, which is transmitted through the intercommunicated system (left ventricle-left atrium-pulmonary veins-alveolar capillaries) causing increased pulmonary wedge pressure with the danger for pulmonary edema. End-diastolic pressure is the sum of left ventricle diastolic pressure and left atrial systolic pressure. Stopping the mechanical systole of the left atrium can reduce the pressure in the system in heart failure. Atrial fibrillation stops the mechanical systole of the left atrium and decreases the intercommunicating pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure. It is possible that atrial fibrillation is a mechanism for protection from increasing end-diastolic pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure, and prevents the danger of pulmonary edema. This hypothesis may explain the relationship between heart failure and atrial fibrillation and their frequent association.

  2. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  3. Molecular recycling within amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulla, Natàlia; Caddy, Gemma L; Hall, Damien R; Zurdo, Jesús; Gairí, Margarida; Feliz, Miguel; Giralt, Ernest; Robinson, Carol V; Dobson, Christopher M

    2005-07-28

    Amyloid fibrils are thread-like protein aggregates with a core region formed from repetitive arrays of beta-sheets oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Such structures were first recognized in clinical disorders, but more recently have also been linked to a variety of non-pathogenic phenomena ranging from the transfer of genetic information to synaptic changes associated with memory. The observation that many proteins can convert into similar structures in vitro has suggested that this ability is a generic feature of polypeptide chains. Here we have probed the nature of the amyloid structure by monitoring hydrogen/deuterium exchange in fibrils formed from an SH3 domain using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The results reveal that under the conditions used in this study, exchange is dominated by a mechanism of dissociation and re-association that results in the recycling of molecules within the fibril population. This insight into the dynamic nature of amyloid fibrils, and the ability to determine the parameters that define this behaviour, have important implications for the design of therapeutic strategies directed against amyloid disease.

  4. Mapping out the multistage fibrillation of glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghodke, Shirin; Nielsen, Søren B.; Christiansen, Gunna

    2012-01-01

    unusual far‐UV CD spectra to tertiary‐level structural changes during the formation and maturation of fibrils. The fibrillation model for the whole process involves the formation of three oligomeric species and two different morphologies of fibrils in the same solution. The visualization of annular pore...... fibrillar state and identifies the importance of fibril twisting for its thermodynamic stabilization. Structured digital abstract and by () and by () and by ()...

  5. Structural conservation of prion strain specificities in recombinant prion protein fibrils in real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kazunori; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    A major unsolved issue of prion biology is the existence of multiple strains with distinct phenotypes and this strain phenomenon is postulated to be associated with the conformational diversity of the abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QUIC) assay that uses Escherichia coli-derived recombinant prion protein (rPrP) for the sensitive detection of PrP(Sc) results in the formation of rPrP-fibrils seeded with various strains. We demonstrated that there are differences in the secondary structures, especially in the β-sheets, and conformational stability between 2 rPrP-fibrils seeded with either Chandler or 22L strains in the first round of RT-QUIC. In particular, the differences in conformational properties of these 2 rPrP-fibrils were common to those of the original PrP(Sc). However, the strain specificities of rPrP-fibrils seen in the first round were lost in subsequent rounds. Instead, our findings suggest that nonspecific fibrils became the major species, probable owing to their selective growth advantage in the RT-QUIC. This study shows that at least some strain-specific conformational properties of the original PrP(Sc) can be transmitted to rPrP-fibrils in vitro, but further conservation appears to require unknown cofactors or environmental conditions or both.

  6. Proteopathic tau seeding predicts tauopathy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Brandon B; Furman, Jennifer L; Mahan, Thomas E; Yamasaki, Tritia R; Mirbaha, Hilda; Eades, William C; Belaygorod, Larisa; Cairns, Nigel J; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2014-10-14

    Transcellular propagation of protein aggregates, or proteopathic seeds, may drive the progression of neurodegenerative diseases in a prion-like manner. In tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, this model predicts that tau seeds propagate pathology through the brain via cell-cell transfer in neural networks. The critical role of tau seeding activity is untested, however. It is unknown whether seeding anticipates and correlates with subsequent development of pathology as predicted for a causal agent. One major limitation has been the lack of a robust assay to measure proteopathic seeding activity in biological specimens. We engineered an ultrasensitive, specific, and facile FRET-based flow cytometry biosensor assay based on expression of tau or synuclein fusions to CFP and YFP, and confirmed its sensitivity and specificity to tau (∼ 300 fM) and synuclein (∼ 300 pM) fibrils. This assay readily discriminates Alzheimer's disease vs. Huntington's disease and aged control brains. We then carried out a detailed time-course study in P301S tauopathy mice, comparing seeding activity versus histological markers of tau pathology, including MC1, AT8, PG5, and Thioflavin S. We detected robust seeding activity at 1.5 mo, >1 mo before the earliest histopathological stain. Proteopathic tau seeding is thus an early and robust marker of tauopathy, suggesting a proximal role for tau seeds in neurodegeneration.

  7. Seed quality in informal seed systems

    OpenAIRE

    Biemond, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords:     informal seed systems, seed recycling, seed quality, germination, seed pathology, seed health, seed-borne diseases, mycotoxigenic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides, mycotoxins, Vigna unguiculata, Zea mays, Nigeria.   Seed is a crucial input for agricultural production. Approximately 80% of the smallholder farmers in Africa depend for their seed on the informal seed system, consisting of farmers involved in selection, production and dissemination of seed. The la...

  8. Seed cell source study on the transplantation and repair of brain impairment:tau protein mRNA expression in cord blood mononuclear cells%移植修复脑功能损害种子细胞源研究:τ蛋白mRNA在脐血单个核细胞中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢文海; 曹孟德; 王建枝; 刘计荣; 龚光明; 许燕; 邢莹

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cord blood mononuclear cells(MNCs) can be used as seed cell source to transplant and repair the brain impairment caused by different reasons. However, it is still uncertain ff it can express another specific molecule tau(J) protein. OBJECTIVE: To explore the mRNA expression of r protein in cord blood mononuclear cells before and after culture and with the induction of cytokines. DESIGN: Randomized case control study.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: Experiment site: Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Eight specimens of cord blood were collected form healthy newborns each of 80 mL. INTERVENTIONS: Cytokines were used during cell culture: epidermal growth factor(EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGF).pression of MNCs in cord blood. RESULTS: The soma of cord blood mononuclear cell was small and round before culture. It turned big and formed thick and long cytodenrities in EGF + bFGF group after culture. The cell soma was smaller and had shorter and thinner cytodenrities which looked like astrocytes when cultured without cytokines. There was negative expression of τ protein mRNA and positive expression of MAP2 mRNA in uncultured MNCs. The expression of both τ protein mRNA and MAP2 mRNA were positive after culture when assaying by RT-PCR. The expressions had increased by induction of EGF + bFGF. CONCLUSION: There is expression of MAP2 mRNA of cord blood MNCs. It will also express r protein mRNA after culture. Cytokines can increase this expression.%背景:脐血单个核细胞可作为种子细胞源以移植修复不同原因所致脑功能损害,但能否表达神经元另一重要特有分子τ蛋白?目的:探讨脐血单个核细胞在培养前后及细胞因子诱导作用下,τ蛋白mRNA的表达.设计:随机对照研究.地点和对象:实验地点:华中科技大学同济医学院.采集健康新生儿脐血8份,每份80mL.干预:在细胞培养过程中,使用细胞因子:表皮生长因子(epidermal growthfactor,EGF)

  9. Glycosaminoglycans enhance the fibrillation propensity of the ß2-microglobulin cleavage variant--¿K58-ß2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H

    2010-01-01

    in the early aggregates, hereby promoting the assembly of these into fibrils, whereas the copper ions appear to have a destabilizing effect on the monomers. This keeps them in a structure forming amorphous aggregates for a longer period of time, leading to the formation of spherical bodies followed....... In this study, we show that fibrillogenesis of a cleavage variant of ß2m, ¿K58-ß2m, which can be found in the circulation of hemodialysis patients and is able to fibrillate at near-physiological pH in vitro, is affected by the presence of copper ions and heparan sulfate. It is found that the fibrils generated...... when heparan sulfate is present have increased length and diameter, and possess enhanced stability and seeding properties. However, when copper ions are present the fibrils are short, thin and less stable, and form at a slower rate. We suggest that heparan sulfate stabilizes the cleaved monomers...

  10. Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora C Botwinick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying (DGE are common after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Our aim was to investigate a potential relationship between atrial fibrillation and DGE, which we defined as failure to tolerate a regular diet by the 7(th postoperative day. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 249 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy at our institution between 2000 and 2009. Data was analyzed with Fisher exact test for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney U or unpaired T-test for continuous variables. RESULTS: Approximately 5% of the 249 patients included in the analysis experienced at least one episode of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Median age of patients with atrial fibrillation was 74 years, compared with 66 years in patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0005. Patients with atrial fibrillation were more likely to have a history of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03. 92% of the patients with atrial fibrillation suffered from DGE, compared to 46% of patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0007. This association held true when controlling for age. CONCLUSION: Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation are more likely to experience delayed gastric emptying. Interventions to manage delayed gastric function might be prudent in patients at high risk for postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  11. Dynamics of Fibril Growth and Feedback Motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordsen, Pia

    in the literature were found, such as length distribution and apparant persistence lengths. It is found that at all concentrations, fibril growth is characterized by Poissonian stop-go dynamics where the fibril either grows (``go'') or does not grow (``stop''). A monomer-trimer model is proposed in which monomers...... and trimers exist in equilibrium with monomers dominating at low concentrations and trimers dominating at high concentrations. In the model, fibrils consist either of monomers or of trimers and fibril growth is inhibited when the other species binds reversibly to the fibril. Growth probability is derived from...... chemical reaction rates of the model, and the theoretical and experimental growth probabilities are found to be in good agreement. Speed distributions of fibrils are also analysed and found to be in good agreement with the predictions of the model. Fibrils of the protein alpha-synuclein which are involved...

  12. A beta2-microglobulin cleavage variant fibrillates at near-physiological pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) deposits as amyloid in dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), predominantly in joints. The molecular mechanisms underlying the amyloidogenicity of beta2m are still largely unknown. In vitro, acidic conditions, pH ... several days. Here, we show that amyloid fibrils are generated in less than an hour when a cleavage variant of beta2m--found in the circulation of many dialysis patients--is exposed to pH levels (pH 6.6) occurring in joints during inflammation. Aggregation and fibrillation, including seeding effects...... with intact, native beta2m were studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry, capillary electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. We conclude that a biologically relevant variant of beta2m is amyloidogenic at slightly acidic pH. Also, only a very small amount of preformed fibrils...

  13. [New antithrombotics for atrial fibrillation].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is the most serious complication of atrial fibrillation. Coumarin derivatives (vitamin K antagonists) counteract systemic thromboembolism and reduce the risk of stroke by more than 60%, but carry a risk of serious bleeding. Antiplatelet therapy and subcutaneous low-molecular-weig

  14. Radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesfeld, ACP; Tan, ES; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five patients (16 males, mean age 46 years.) underwent radiofrequency ablation because of either paroxysmal (13 patients) or persistent atrial fibrillation (12 patients). Ablation aimed at earliest activation of spontaneous and catheter-induced repetitive ectopy in left and right atria and ap

  15. Genetic basis of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Campuzano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and remains as one of main challenges in current clinical practice. The disease may be induced secondary to other diseases such as hypertension, valvular heart disease, and heart failure, conferring an increased risk of stroke and sudden death. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that genetic factors play an important role and up to 30% of clinically diagnosed patients may have a family history of atrial fibrillation. To date, several rare variants have been identified in a wide range of genes associated with ionic channels, calcium handling protein, fibrosis, conduction and inflammation. Important advances in clinical, genetic and molecular basis have been performed over the last decade, improving diagnosis and treatment. However, the genetics of atrial fibrillation is complex and pathophysiological data remains still unraveling. A better understanding of the genetic basis will induce accurate risk stratification and personalized clinical treatment. In this review, we have focused on current genetics basis of atrial fibrillation.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis of Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerin, John A.; Sporrer, Justin M.; Egolf, David A.

    2013-03-01

    The development of spatiotemporal chaotic behavior in heart tissue, termed fibrillation, is a devastating, life-threatening condition. The chaotic behavior of electrochemical signals, in the form of spiral waves, causes the muscles of the heart to contract in an incoherent manner, hindering the heart's ability to pump blood. We have applied the mathematical tools of nonlinear dynamics to large-scale simulations of a model of fibrillating heart tissue to uncover the dynamical modes driving this chaos. By studying the evolution of Lyapunov vectors and exponents over short times, we have found that the fibrillating tissue is sensitive to electrical perturbations only in narrow regions immediately in front of the leading edges of spiral waves, especially when these waves collide, break apart, or hit the edges of the tissue sample. Using this knowledge, we have applied small stimuli to areas of varying sensitivity. By studying the evolution of the effects of these perturbations, we have made progress toward controlling the electrochemical patterns associated with heart fibrillation. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0094178) and Research Corporation.

  17. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...

  18. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability to de...

  19. Umbilical cord and preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaya-C, M; Salcedo-Betancourt, J; Galvis, S H; Ortiz, A M; Gutierrez, S; Bernal, J E

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with abnormalities in the umbilical cord in several ways: morphological, biochemical and functional. Alteration in blood vessels of the placenta, decidua and circulatory system of the fetus might be related to factors that cause preeclampsia and may be associated with alterations of the umbilical cord. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between each type of umbilical cord abnormality and the different subtypes of hypertensive gestational disorders. We conducted a prospective study on consecutive autopsies and its placentas, looking for abnormalities in the umbilical cord's features and their clinical associations. Umbilical cord abnormalities including length, diameter, insertion, entanglements, knots and coils were associated with maternal gestational hypertension. In women with gestational hypertension, umbilical cord abnormalities are associated with fetal and neonatal consequences.

  20. [Atrial fibrillation and cognitive function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Emmanuelle; Hanon, Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), which prevalence increases with age, is a growing public health problem and a well known risk factor for stroke. On the other hand, dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly, and with aging of the population in developed countries, the number of demented patients will increase in absence of prevention. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity and metabolic syndrome, hypercholesterolemia) have been found, with various degree of evidence, to be associated with vascular dementia but also, surprisingly, with Alzheimer's disease. This review is devoted to the links between atrial fibrillation, cognitive decline and dementia. Globally, transversal studies showed a significant association between atrial fibrillation, cognitive decline and dementia. However, these studies are particularly sensitive to various biases. In this context, recent longitudinal studies of higher level of evidence have been conducted to assess the link between AF and dementia. One study disclosed a high incidence of dementia among patients suffering from atrial fibrillation during a 4.6 years follow-up. Similarly another study showed that atrial fibrillation was significantly associated with conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia during a 3 years follow-up. Nevertheless two other longitudinal studies did not find any significant association between AF and dementia, but this discrepancy should be interpreted taking into account that the comparability of all these studies is moderate because they were using different methodologies (population, cognitive testing, and mean follow-up). Possible explanatory mechanisms for the association between AF and the risk of dementia are proposed, such as thrombo-embolic ischemic damage and cerebral hypo perfusion due to fluctuations in the cardiac output. Thus, there is some evidence that FA could be associated with cognitive decline and dementia but this

  1. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  2. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouza, Maksim, E-mail: mkouza@chem.uw.edu.pl; Kolinski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszaw (Poland); Co, Nguyen Truong [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of HCM City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Phuong H. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan, E-mail: masli@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  3. Conformational diversity of wild-type Tau fibrils specified by templated conformation change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Bess; Ollesch, Julian; Wille, Holger; Diamond, Marc I

    2009-02-06

    Tauopathies are sporadic and genetic neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. Tau pathology occurs in over 20 phenotypically distinct neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. The molecular basis of this diversity among sporadic tauopathies is unknown, but distinct fibrillar wild-type (WT) Tau conformations could play a role. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, we show that WT Tau fibrils and P301L/V337M Tau fibrils have distinct secondary structures, fragilities, and morphologies. Furthermore, P301L/V337M fibrillar seeds induce WT Tau monomer to form a novel fibrillar conformation, termed WT*, that is maintained over multiple seeding reactions. WT* has secondary structure, fragility, and morphology that are similar to P301L/V337M fibrils and distinct from WT fibrils. WT Tau is thus capable of conformational diversity that arises via templated conformation change, as has been described for amyloid beta, beta2-microglobulin, and prion proteins.

  4. Heterogeneous Seeding of a Prion Structure by a Generic Amyloid Form of the Fungal Prion-forming Domain HET-s(218-289)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, William; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kijac, Aleksandra; Wemmer, David E.; Stubbs, Gerald [UCB; (Vanderbilt); (LBNL)

    2013-11-13

    The fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289) forms infectious amyloid fibrils at physiological pH that were shown by solid-state NMR to be assemblies of a two-rung β-solenoid structure. Under acidic conditions, HET-s(218–289) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils that have very low infectivity in vivo, but structural information about these fibrils has been very limited. We show by x-ray fiber diffraction that the HET-s(218–289) fibrils formed under acidic conditions have a stacked β-sheet architecture commonly found in short amyloidogenic peptides and denatured protein aggregates. At physiological pH, stacked β-sheet fibrils nucleate the formation of the infectious β-solenoid prions in a process of heterogeneous seeding, but do so with kinetic profiles distinct from those of spontaneous or homogeneous (seeded with infectious β-solenoid fibrils) fibrillization. Several serial passages of stacked β-sheet-seeded solutions lead to fibrillization kinetics similar to homogeneously seeded solutions. Our results directly show that structural mutation can occur between substantially different amyloid architectures, lending credence to the suggestion that the processes of strain adaptation and crossing species barriers are facilitated by structural mutation.

  5. Self-Assembling Peptides Form Immune Suppressive Amyloid Fibrils Effective in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Steinman, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins have long been linked to neurodegenerative diseases. However, amyloid fibrils composed of six amino acids are protective in an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decrease in the number of inflammatory foci in the parenchyma and meninges of the brain and spinal cord, and amelioration of the neurological signs of EAE when amyloid fibril-forming hexapeptides are administered reveal that some fibrils provide benefit. The therapeutic activity of the amyloid fibrils arise from diverse pathways that include binding of pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma, reduction of IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels, and induction of type 1 interferon (IFN). Type 1 IFN has been used widely as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of MS and has been shown to be therapeutic in EAE with adoptive transfer of Th1 lymphocytes. However, type 1 IFN is known to exacerbate EAE with adoptive transfer of Th17 lymphocytes. Indeed, the amyloid fibril-forming peptide Tau 623-628 was therapeutic in Th1 adoptively transferred EAE, but ineffective in Th17 adoptively transferred EAE. However, the therapeutic effect of Tau 623-628 was restored in IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR) knockout mice, indicating that other immune pathways independent of type 1 IFN induction play a role in the amelioration of EAE. Moreover, Amylin 28-33, a polar, non-ionizable peptide that does not form fibrils as rapidly as Tau 623-628, induces a small fraction of type 1 IFN compared to Tau 623-628 and is therapeutic in Th17 EAE. The diverse immunological pathways modulated by the self-assembling hexapeptides are under investigation with a goal to develop novel, safe, and potent therapeutics for neuroinflammation.

  6. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  7. Risk of atrial fibrillation in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L.; Schjerning, Anne-Marie; Lindhardt, Tommi B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Diabetes has been associated with atrial fibrillation but the current evidence is conflicting. In particular knowledge regarding young diabetes patients and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation is sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients...... with diabetes compared to the background population in Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through Danish nationwide registries we included persons above 18 years of age and without prior atrial fibrillation and/or diabetes from 1996 to 2012. The study cohort was divided into a background population without diabetes...... and a diabetes group. The absolute risk of developing atrial fibrillation was calculated and Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and comorbidities were used to calculate incidence rate ratios of atrial fibrillation. The total study cohort included 5,081,087 persons, 4,827,713 (95%) in the background...

  8. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger Kerzner; Michael W. Rich

    2005-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an extremely common condition in the elderly, with increasing prevalence around the world as the population ages. AF may be associated with serious health consequences, including stroke, heart failure, and decreased quality of life, so that careful management of AF by geriatric health care providers is required. With careful attention to anticoagulation therapy, and prudent use of medications and invasive procedures to minimize symptoms, many of the adverse health consequences of AF can be prevented.

  9. Split Cord Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdal Gezercan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Split cord malformations are rare form of occult spinal dysraphism in children. Split cord malformations are characterized by septum that cleaves the spinal canal in sagittal plane within the single or duplicated thecal sac. Although their precise incidence is unknown, split cord malformations are exceedingly rare and represent %3.8-5 of all congenital spinal anomalies. Characteristic neurological, urological, orthopedic clinical manifestations are variable and asymptomatic course is possible. Earlier diagnosis and surgical intervention for split cord malformations is associated with better long-term fuctional outcome. For this reason, diagnostic imaging is indicated for children with associated cutaneous and orthopedic signs. Additional congenital anomalies usually to accompany the split cord malformations. Earlier diagnosis, meticuolus surgical therapy and interdisciplinary careful evaluation and follow-up should be made for good prognosis. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 199-207

  10. [Spontaneous spinal cord herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J J; de la Lama, A; Gonza Lez, P; Ramos, A; Zurdo, M; Alday, R

    2004-10-01

    Spontaneous spinal cord herniation through a dural defect is an unusual condition. This entity has been probably underestimated before the introduction of MRI. We report a case of a 49-year-old man with a progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. MRI and CT myelogram showed a ventrally displaced spinal cord at level T6-T7 and expansion of the posterior subarachnoid space. Through a laminectomy, a spinal cord herniation was identified and reduced. The anterior dural defect was repaired with a patch of lyophilized dura. The patient recovered muscle power but there was no improvement of the sensory disturbance. The diagnosis of spontaneous spinal cord herniation must be considered when progressive myelopathy occurs in middle-aged patients, without signs of spinal cord compression and typical radiological findings. Surgical treatment may halt the progressive deficits and even yield improvement in many cases.

  11. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-02-16

    We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  12. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  13. Cuminaldehyde as the Major Component of Cuminum cyminum, a Natural Aldehyde with Inhibitory Effect on Alpha-Synuclein Fibrillation and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedi, Dina; Aliakbari, Farhang; Tayaranian-Marvian, Amir; Fassihi, Afshin; Pan-Montojo, Francisco; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio

    2015-10-01

    Fibrillation of alpha-synuclein (α-SN) is a critical process in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases, especially Parkinson's disease. Application of bioactive inhibitory compounds from herbal extracts is a potential therapeutic approach for this cytotoxic process. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effects of the Iranian Cuminum cyminum essential oil on the fibrillation of α-SN. Analysis of different fractions from the total extract identified cuminaldehyde as the active compound involved in the antifibrillation activity. In comparison with baicalein, a well-known inhibitor of α-SN fibrillation, cuminaldehyde showed the same activity in some aspects and a different activity on other parameters influencing α-SN fibrillation. The presence of spermidine, an α-SN fibrillation inducer, dominantly enforced the inhibitory effects of cuminaldehyde even more intensively than baicalein. Furthermore, the results from experiments using preformed fibrils and monobromobimane-labeled monomeric protein also suggest that cuminaldehyde prevents α-SN fibrillation even in the presence of seeds, having no disaggregating impact on the preformed fibrils. Structural studies showed that cuminaldehyde stalls protein assembly into β-structural fibrils, which might be achieved by the interaction with amine groups through its aldehyde group as a Schiff base reaction. This assumption was supported by FITC labeling efficiency assay. In addition, cytotoxicity assays on PC12 cells showed that cuminaldehyde is a nontoxic compound, treatment with cuminaldehyde throughout α-SN fibrillation showed no toxic effects on the cells. Taken together, these results show for the first time that the small abundant natural compound, cuminaldehyde, can modulate α-SN fibrillation. Hence, suggesting that such natural active aldehyde could have potential therapeutic applications.

  14. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  15. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  16. The role of protonation in protein fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Martin D; Westh, Peter; Otzen, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins fibrillate at low pH despite a high population of charged side chains. Therefore exchange of protons between the fibrillating peptide and its surroundings may play an important role in fibrillation. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry to measure exchange of protons between...... buffer and the peptide hormone glucagon during fibrillation. Glucagon absorbs or releases protons to an extent which allows it to attain a net charge of zero in the fibrillar state, both at acidic and basic pH. Similar results are obtained for lysozyme. This suggests that side chain pKa values change...

  17. Collagen fibril diameter and leather strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Hannah C; Edmonds, Richard L; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2013-11-27

    The main structural component of leather and skin is type I collagen in the form of strong fibrils. Strength is an important property of leather, and the way in which collagen contributes to the strength is not fully understood. Synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to measure the collagen fibril diameter of leather from a range of animals, including sheep and cattle, that had a range of tear strengths. SAXS data were fit to a cylinder model. The collagen fibril diameter and tear strength were found to be correlated in bovine leather (r(2) = 0.59; P = 0.009), with stronger leather having thicker fibrils. There was no correlation between orientation index, i.e., fibril alignment, and fibril diameter for this data set. Ovine leather showed no correlation between tear strength and fibril diameter, nor was there a correlation across a selection of other animal leathers. The findings presented here suggest that there may be a different structural motif in skin compared with tendon, particularly ovine skin or leather, in which the diameter of the individual fibrils contributes less to strength than fibril alignment does.

  18. Seed regulations and local seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwaars, N.

    2000-01-01

    Seed regulations have been introduced in most countries based on the development of formal seed production. Concerns about seed quality and about the varietal identity of the seeds have commonly led to seed laws. However, formal regulations are often inappropriate for informal seed systems, which

  19. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate internalization and propagation of specific proteopathic seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Brandon B.; DeVos, Sarah L.; Kfoury, Najla; Li, Mei; Jacks, Rachel; Yanamandra, Kiran; Ouidja, Mohand O.; Brodsky, Frances M.; Marasa, Jayne; Bagchi, Devika P.; Kotzbauer, Paul T.; Miller, Timothy M.; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Diamond, Marc I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that transcellular propagation of fibrillar protein aggregates drives the progression of neurodegenerative diseases in a prion-like manner. This phenomenon is now well described in cell and animal models and involves the release of protein aggregates into the extracellular space. Free aggregates then enter neighboring cells to seed further fibrillization. The mechanism by which aggregated extracellular proteins such as tau and α-synuclein bind and enter cells to trigger intracellular fibril formation is unknown. Prior work indicates that prion protein aggregates bind heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the cell surface to transmit pathologic processes. Here, we find that tau fibril uptake also occurs via HSPG binding. This is blocked in cultured cells and primary neurons by heparin, chlorate, heparinase, and genetic knockdown of a key HSPG synthetic enzyme, Ext1. Interference with tau binding to HSPGs prevents recombinant tau fibrils from inducing intracellular aggregation and blocks transcellular aggregate propagation. In vivo, a heparin mimetic, F6, blocks neuronal uptake of stereotactically injected tau fibrils. Finally, uptake and seeding by α-synuclein fibrils, but not huntingtin fibrils, occurs by the same mechanism as tau. This work suggests a unifying mechanism of cell uptake and propagation for tauopathy and synucleinopathy. PMID:23898162

  20. Intracerebral injection of preformed synthetic tau fibrils initiates widespread tauopathy and neuronal loss in the brains of tau transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraer, Eve; Bottelbergs, Astrid; Van Kolen, Kristof; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Mahieu, Michel; Duytschaever, Hilde; Ver Donck, Luc; Torremans, An; Sluydts, Ellen; Van Acker, Nathalie; Kemp, John A; Mercken, Marc; Brunden, Kurt R; Trojanowski, John Q; Dewachter, Ilse; Lee, Virginia M Y; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated fibrillized tau are found in numerous tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that tau pathology can be transmitted from cell-to-cell; however the mechanisms involved in the initiation of tau fibrillization and spreading of disease linked to progression of tau pathology are poorly understood. We show here that intracerebral injections of preformed synthetic tau fibrils into the hippocampus or frontal cortex of young tau transgenic mice expressing mutant human P301L tau induces tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation around the site of injection, as well as a time-dependent propagation of tau pathology to interconnected brain areas distant from the injection site. Furthermore, we show that the tau pathology as a consequence of injection of tau preformed fibrils into the hippocampus induces selective loss of CA1 neurons. Together, our data confirm previous studies on the seeded induction and the spreading of tau pathology in a different tau transgenic mouse model and reveals neuronal loss associated with seeded tau pathology in tau transgenic mouse brain. These results further validate the utility of the tau seeding model in studying disease transmission, and provide a more complete in vivo tauopathy model with associated neurodegeneration which can be used to investigate the mechanisms involved in tau aggregation and spreading, as well as aid in the search for disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  2. Seed planting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes prairie seed plantings on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1992 and 2009.

  3. Left atrium segmentation for atrial fibrillation ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, R.; Mohiaddin, R.; Rueckert, D.

    2008-03-01

    Segmentation of the left atrium is vital for pre-operative assessment of its anatomy in radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) surgery. RFCA is commonly used for treating atrial fibrillation. In this paper we present an semi-automatic approach for segmenting the left atrium and the pulmonary veins from MR angiography (MRA) data sets. We also present an automatic approach for further subdividing the segmented atrium into the atrium body and the pulmonary veins. The segmentation algorithm is based on the notion that in MRA the atrium becomes connected to surrounding structures via partial volume affected voxels and narrow vessels, the atrium can be separated if these regions are characterized and identified. The blood pool, obtained by subtracting the pre- and post-contrast scans, is first segmented using a region-growing approach. The segmented blood pool is then subdivided into disjoint subdivisions based on its Euclidean distance transform. These subdivisions are then merged automatically starting from a seed point and stopping at points where the atrium leaks into a neighbouring structure. The resulting merged subdivisions produce the segmented atrium. Measuring the size of the pulmonary vein ostium is vital for selecting the optimal Lasso catheter diameter. We present a second technique for automatically identifying the atrium body from segmented left atrium images. The separating surface between the atrium body and the pulmonary veins gives the ostia locations and can play an important role in measuring their diameters. The technique relies on evolving interfaces modelled using level sets. Results have been presented on 20 patient MRA datasets.

  4. Formation and properties of whey protein fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes-Nijboer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein fibrils are threadlike aggregates that are about one molecule thick and more than thousand molecules long. Due to their threadlike structure they could potentially be used to form meat-like structures. Protein fibrils can be produced from milk protein and plant protein, opening opportunities

  5. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    on the strain. The slope of the viscous response showed a strain rate dependence corresponding to a power function of powers 0.242 and 0.168 for the two patellar tendon fibrils, respectively. In conclusion, the present work provides direct evidence of viscoelastic behavior at the single fibril level, which has...

  6. PAROXYSMAL ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: CHOICE OF CARDIOVERSION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Tatarskii

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics and classification of different patterns of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation are presented. Main indications to restoration of sinus rhythm are discussed. The features of main medications used to terminate of atrial fibrillation are given. The choice of antiarrhythmic drug is considerate. Necessity of individual approach to therapy tactics is proved.

  7. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René; Hassenkam, Tue; Hansen, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Whole tendon and fibril bundles display viscoelastic behavior, but to the best of our knowledge this property has not been directly measured in single human tendon fibrils. In the present work an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach was used for tensile testing of two human patellar tendon fibr...

  8. Graphene oxide strongly inhibits amyloid beta fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Akhavan, Omid; Ghavami, Mahdi; Rezaee, Farhad; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin

    2012-01-01

    Since amyloid beta fibrillation (AbF) plays an important role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and their protein-coated surfaces on the kinetics of Ab fibrillation in the aqueous solution. We showed that GO and their protein-covered

  9. Fibril assembly in whey protein mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to study fibril assembly in mixtures of whey proteins. The effect of the composition of the protein mixture on the structures and the resulting phase behaviour was investigated. The current work has shown that beta-lactoglobulin is responsible for the fibril assembly

  10. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the level of injury. People who survive a spinal cord injury will most likely have medical complications such as chronic pain and bladder and bowel ...

  11. Spinal cord abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs The infection often begins in the bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess ... Boils Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection Epidural abscess Osteomyelitis Pulmonary tuberculosis Sepsis Spinal cord trauma Swelling Review ...

  12. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers and the accumulation of complexe...

  13. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Frost, Lars; Eagle, Kim A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care...... and outcomes in a cohort of first-time ischemic stroke patients with and without atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Based on linkage of public medical databases, we did a population-based follow-up study among 3,849 stroke patients from the County of Aarhus, Denmark admitted in the period of 2003......-2007 and prospectively registered in the Danish National Indicator Project. RESULTS: Atrial fibrillation was associated with an adverse prognostic profile but not with an overall poorer quality of in-hospital care. Patients with atrial fibrillation had a longer total length of stay (median: 15 vs 9 days), and were...

  14. Molecular basis for insulin fibril assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Sievers, Stuart A.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Wall, Joseph S.; Eisenberg, David; (HHMI); (BNL)

    2009-12-01

    In the rare medical condition termed injection amyloidosis, extracellular fibrils of insulin are observed. We found that the segment of the insulin B-chain with sequence LVEALYL is the smallest segment that both nucleates and inhibits the fibrillation of full-length insulin in a molar ratio-dependent manner, suggesting that this segment is central to the cross-{beta} spine of the insulin fibril. In isolation from the rest of the protein, LVEALYL forms microcrystalline aggregates with fibrillar morphology, the structure of which we determined to 1 {angstrom} resolution. The LVEALYL segments are stacked into pairs of tightly interdigitated {beta}-sheets, each pair displaying the dry steric zipper interface typical of amyloid-like fibrils. This structure leads to a model for fibrils of human insulin consistent with electron microscopic, x-ray fiber diffraction, and biochemical studies.

  15. Nanoscale scraping and dissection of collagen fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, M P E; Horton, M A; Mesquida, P

    2008-09-24

    The main function of collagen is mechanical, hence there is a fundamental scientific interest in experimentally investigating the mechanical and structural properties of collagen fibrils on the nanometre scale. Here, we present a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based scraping technique that can dissect the outer layer of a biological specimen. Applied to individual collagen fibrils, the technique was successfully used to expose the fibril core and reveal the presence of a D-banding-like structure. AFM nanoindentation measurements of fibril shell and core indicated no significant differences in mechanical properties such as stiffness (reduced modulus), hardness, adhesion and adhesion work. This suggests that collagen fibrils are mechanically homogeneous structures. The scraping technique can be applied to other biological specimens, as demonstrated on the example of bacteria.

  16. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.

    2006-01-01

    produced in the presence of perlecan. Interestingly, the enhancement of collagen fibril formation is independent on the core protein and is mimicked by chondroitin sulfate E but neither by chondroitin sulfate D nor dextran sulfate. Furthermore, perlecan chondroitin sulfate contains the 4,6-disulfated......Inactivation of the perlecan gene leads to perinatal lethal chondrodysplasia. The similarity to the phenotypes of the Col2A1 knock-out and the disproportionate micromelia mutation suggests perlecan involvement in cartilage collagen matrix assembly. We now present a mechanism for the defect...... in collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...

  17. Fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for the fibrillization of human Tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Sheng-Rong; Zhu, Ying-Zhu; Guo, Tong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The misfolding of amyloidogenic proteins including human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human α-synuclein is involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, prion disease, and Parkinson disease. Although a lot of research on such amyloidogenic proteins has been done, we do not know the determinants that drive these proteins to form fibrils and thereby induce neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we want to know the role of fibril-forming motifs from such amyloidogenic proteins in the fibrillization of human Tau protein. As evidenced by thioflavin T binding and turbidity assays, transmission electron microscopy, and circular dichroism, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for the fibrillization of microtubule-associated protein Tau: only when both of its fibril-forming motifs, PHF6 and PHF6*, are deleted can recombinant human Tau fragment Tau(244-372) lose its ability to form fibrils, and the insertion of unrelated fibril-forming motifs from other amyloidogenic proteins, such as human prion protein, yeast prion protein, human α-synuclein, and human amyloid β, into the disabled Tau protein can retrieve its ability to form fibrils. Furthermore, this retrieval is independent of the insertion location on Tau(244-372). We demonstrate for the first time that insertion of fibril-forming motifs can replace PHF6/PHF6* motifs, driving human Tau protein to form fibrils with different morphologies and different kinetic parameters. Our results suggest that fibril-forming motifs play a key role in the fibrillization of human Tau protein and could be the determinants of amyloidogenic proteins tending to misfold, thereby causing the initiation and development of neurodegenerative diseases. Our study also touches on the importance of amyloid "strains": changes to the amyloidgenic driver region results in altered structural morphologies at the macromolecular level.

  18. Fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for the fibrillization of human Tau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Rong Meng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The misfolding of amyloidogenic proteins including human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human α-synuclein is involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, prion disease, and Parkinson disease. Although a lot of research on such amyloidogenic proteins has been done, we do not know the determinants that drive these proteins to form fibrils and thereby induce neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we want to know the role of fibril-forming motifs from such amyloidogenic proteins in the fibrillization of human Tau protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As evidenced by thioflavin T binding and turbidity assays, transmission electron microscopy, and circular dichroism, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for the fibrillization of microtubule-associated protein Tau: only when both of its fibril-forming motifs, PHF6 and PHF6*, are deleted can recombinant human Tau fragment Tau(244-372 lose its ability to form fibrils, and the insertion of unrelated fibril-forming motifs from other amyloidogenic proteins, such as human prion protein, yeast prion protein, human α-synuclein, and human amyloid β, into the disabled Tau protein can retrieve its ability to form fibrils. Furthermore, this retrieval is independent of the insertion location on Tau(244-372. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate for the first time that insertion of fibril-forming motifs can replace PHF6/PHF6* motifs, driving human Tau protein to form fibrils with different morphologies and different kinetic parameters. Our results suggest that fibril-forming motifs play a key role in the fibrillization of human Tau protein and could be the determinants of amyloidogenic proteins tending to misfold, thereby causing the initiation and development of neurodegenerative diseases. Our study also touches on the importance of amyloid "strains": changes to the amyloidgenic driver region results in altered structural morphologies at the

  19. Molecular insights into the reversible formation of tau protein fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yin; Dinkel, Paul; Yu, Xiang; Margittai, Martin; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Wei, Guanghong; Ma, Buyong

    2013-05-04

    We computationally and experimentally showed that tau protein fibrils can be formed at high temperature. When cooled, the fibrils dissociate back to monomers. Heparin promotes tau fibril formation and prevents its reversion. Our results revealed the physicochemical mechanism of reversible formation of tau fibrils.

  20. Anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylek, Elaine M

    2013-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common significant cardiac rhythm disorder, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. Atrial fibrillation confers a fivefold increased risk of stroke, and these strokes are associated with significant mortality and disability. The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, has been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for patients with AF, reducing the risk of stroke by 65%. Despite its efficacy, warfarin remains underused in clinical practice because of its variable dose response, diet and medication interactions, and need for frequent monitoring. Stroke prevention in AF has entered an exciting therapeutic era with new classes of targeted anticoagulants that avoid the many pitfalls of the vitamin K antagonists. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin inhibitor, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have demonstrated efficacy for stroke prevention and a reduced risk of intracranial hemorrhage relative to warfarin. Translating the efficacy of clinical trials into effective use of these novel agents in clinical practice will require an understanding of their pharmacokinetic profiles, dose selection, and management in select clinical situations.

  1. Neuronal Classification of Atria Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed BEN MESSAOUD

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. In medical field, particularly the cardiology, the diagnosis systems constitute the essential domain of research. In some applications, the traditional methods of classification present some limitations. The neuronal technique is considered as one of the promising algorithms to resolve such problem.Method. In this paper, two approaches of the Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN technique are investigated to classify the heart beats which are Multi Layer Perception (MLP and Radial Basis Function (RBF. A calculation algorithm of the RBF centers is proposed. For the Atria Fibrillation anomalies, an artificial neural network was used as a pattern classifier to distinguish three classes of the cardiac arrhythmias. The different classes consist of the normal beats (N, the Arrhythmia (AFA and Tachycardia (TFA Atria Fibrillation cases. The global and the partition classifier are performed. The arrhythmias of MIT-BIH database are analyzed. The ANN inputs are the temporal and morphological parameters deduced from the electrocardiograph.Results. The simulation results illustrate the performances of the studied versions of the neural network and give the fault detection rate of the tested data, a rate of classification reaching the 3.7%.Conclusion. This system can constitute a mesh in a chain of automated diagnosis and can be a tool for assistance for the classification of the cardiac anomalies in the services of urgencies before the arrival of a qualified personal person.

  2. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord is ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in the ...

  3. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  4. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  6. Characterization of tau fibrillization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaohua; Brunden, Kurt R; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2010-03-01

    The assembly of tau proteins into paired helical filaments, the building blocks of neurofibrillary tangles, is linked to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. A greater understanding of this assembly process could identify targets for the discovery of drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. By using recombinant human tau, we have delineated events leading to the conversion of normal soluble tau into tau fibrils. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy methodologies were used to determine the structure of tau assemblies that formed when soluble tau was incubated with heparin for increasing lengths of time. Tau initially oligomerizes into spherical nucleation units of 18- to 21-nm diameter that appear to assemble linearly into nascent fibrils. Among the earliest tau fibrils are species that resemble a string of beads formed by linearly aligned spheres that with time seem to coalesce to form straight and twisted ribbon-like filaments, as well as paired helical filaments similar to those found in human tauopathies. An analysis of fibril cross sections at later incubation times revealed three fundamental axial structural features. By monitoring tau fibrillization, we showed that different tau filament morphologies coexist. Temporal changes in the predominant tau structural species suggest that tau fibrillization involves the generation of structural intermediates, resulting in the formation of tau fibrils with verisimilitude to their authentic human counterparts. 2010 The Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracellular association of APP and tau fibrils induces intracellular aggregate formation of tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Muneaki; Miyata, Haruka; Kametani, Fuyuki; Nonaka, Takashi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2015-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and intracellular tau aggregation. Many studies have indicated some association between these processes, but it remains unknown how the two pathologies are linked. In this study, we investigated whether expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) influences extracellular seed-dependent intracellular tau accumulation in cultured cells. Treatment of tau-expressing SH-SY5Y cells with Aβ fibrils did not induce intracellular tau aggregation. On the other hand, in cells expressing both tau and APP, treatment with tau fibrils or Sarkosyl-insoluble tau from AD brains induced intracellular tau aggregation. The seed-dependent intracellular tau aggregation was not induced by expression of APP lacking the extracellular domain. The amount of phosphorylated tau aggregates in cultured cells was dose dependently elevated in response to increased levels of APP on the cell membrane. Our results indicate that the extracellular region of APP is involved in uptake of tau fibrils into cells, raising the possibility that APP, but not Aβ, influences cell-to-cell spreading of tau pathologies in AD by serving as a receptor of abnormal tau aggregates.

  8. The atrial fibrillation ablation pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study is a prospective registry designed to describe the clinical epidemiology of patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation (AFib) ablation, and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across Europe. The aims of the 1-year follow-up were to analyse...... tachycardia, and 4 patients died (1 haemorrhagic stroke, 1 ventricular fibrillation in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, 1 cancer, and 1 of unknown cause). CONCLUSION: The AFib Ablation Pilot Study provided crucial information on the epidemiology, management, and outcomes of catheter ablation of AFib...

  9. On fibrils and field lines: The nature of H$\\alpha$ fibrils in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaarts, Jorrit; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the solar chromosphere in the line-core of the \\Halpha\\ line show dark elongated structures called fibrils that show swaying motion. We performed a 3D radiation-MHD simulation of a network region, and computed synthetic \\Halpha\\ images from this simulation to investigate the relation between fibrils and the magnetic field lines in the chromosphere. The periods, amplitudes and phase-speeds of the synthetic fibrils are consistent with those observed. We analyse the relation between the synthetic fibrils and the field lines threading through them, and find that some fibrils trace out the same field line along the fibril's length, but there are also fibrils that sample different field lines at different locations along their length. Fibrils sample the same field lines on a time scale of $\\sim200$~s. This is shorter than their own lifetime. We analysed the evolution of the atmosphere along a number of field lines that thread through fibrils and find that they carry slow-mode waves that load mass in...

  10. [Spinal cord infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  11. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  12. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsett, Mark; Hamilton, Douglas; Lemery, Jay; Polk, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible scenario of an astronaut having Atrial Fibrillation during a Mars Mission. In the case review the presentation asks several questions about the alternatives for treatment, medications and the ramifications of the decisions.

  13. Aggregate geometry in amyloid fibril nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, A; Linnemann, N; Linse, B; Wallin, S; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.058101

    2013-01-01

    We present and study a minimal structure-based model for the self-assembly of peptides into ordered beta-sheet-rich fibrils. The peptides are represented by unit-length sticks on a cubic lattice and interact by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity forces. By Monte Carlo simulations with >100,000 peptides, we show that fibril formation occurs with sigmoidal kinetics in the model. To determine the mechanism of fibril nucleation, we compute the joint distribution in length and width of the aggregates at equilibrium, using an efficient cluster move and flat-histogram techniques. This analysis, based on simulations with 256 peptides in which aggregates form and dissolve reversibly, shows that the main free-energy barriers that a nascent fibril has to overcome are associated with changes in width.

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Dang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of stroke, with an estimated annual cost of $71.5 billion, has made it a major health problem that increases disability and death, particularly in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although advanced age and atrial fibrillation are recognized as strong risk factors for stroke, the basis for this susceptibility are not well defined. Aging or associated diseases are accompanied by changes in rheostatic, humoral, metabolic and hemodynamic factors that may contribute more to stroke predisposition than rhythm abnormality alone. Several thromboembolism-predisposing clinical characteristics and serum biomarkers with prognostic significance have been identified in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although anticoagulation decreases the risk of thromboembolism, management in the elderly remains complex due to major concerns about bleeding. New anticoagulants and nonpharmacologic strategies are helpful to reduce the risk of bleeding, particularly in older-elderly patients. Herein, we review the pathogenesis and management of select issues of thromboembolism in the elderly with atrial fibrillation.

  15. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  16. [Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitt, Axel; Kamke, Wolfram; Guha, Manju; Haberecht, Olaf; Völler, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The course of cardiac rehabilitation is often altered due to episodes of paroxysmal, predominantly postoperative atrial fibrillation. In symptomatic patients, a TEE-guided cardioversion - preferential DC shock - is indicated. In patients with persistent / permanent atrial fibrillation, a heart rate up to 110 / min and 170 / min at rest and during physical activity should, respectively, be tolerated. Therefore, training should not be quitted by heart rate but rather by load. The antithrombotic management is in addition a great task in treating patients with atrial fibrillation. With the exception of patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc-Score < 1, oral anticoagulation is indicated. Atrial fibrillation has little impact on social aspects, whereas the underlying heart disease and drug treatment (oral anticoagulation) has an important impact.

  17. Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that alcohol consumption, both observational (self-reported) and estimated by genetic instruments, is associated with a risk of atrial fibrillation and to determine whether people with high cardiovascular risk are more sensitive towards...... register. As a measure of alcohol exposure, both self-reported consumption and genetic variations in alcohol metabolizing genes (ADH1B/ADH1C) were used as instrumental variables. The endpoint was admission to hospital for atrial fibrillation as recorded in a validated hospital register. RESULTS: A total...... of 3493 cases of atrial fibrillation occurred during follow-up. High alcohol consumption was associated with a risk of atrial fibrillation among men, but not among women. Among the men who drank 28-35 and 35+ drinks/week, the hazards ratios were 1.40 (95% confidence interval 1.09-1.80) and 1.62 (95...

  18. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more......Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...

  19. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation - an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antz, Matthias; Hullmann, Bettina; Neufert, Christian; Vocke, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    The correct anticoagulation regimen for prevention of thromboembolic events is essential in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, only a minority of patients receives anticoagulation according to the guidelines. The current guidelines are intended to make the indication for anticoagulation more simple and are summarized in the present article. This includes recommendations for chronic anticoagulation, prevention of thromboembolic events after cardioversion and in ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  20. Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cell-induced neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Li; Wei Zhao; Wei Liu; Ye Zhou; Jingqiao Jia; Lifeng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Because of their strong proliferative capacity and multi-potency, placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells have gained interest as a cell source in the ifeld of nerve damage repair. In the present study, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neural stem cells, which were then transplanted into the spinal cord after local spinal cord injury in rats. The motor functional recovery and pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were observed for 3 successive weeks. The results showed that human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neuron-like cells and that induced neural stem cells contribute to the resto-ration of injured spinal cord without causing transplant rejection. Thus, these cells promote the recovery of motor and sensory functions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Therefore, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells may be useful as seed cells during the repair of spinal cord injury.

  1. Delayed cord clamping and cord gas analysis at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xodo, Serena; Xodo, Luigi; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2017-09-16

    Delayed cord clamping for at least 60 seconds in both term and preterm babies is a major recent change in clinical care. Delayed cord clamping has several effects on other possible interventions. One of these is the effect of delayed cord clamping on umbilical artery gas analysis. When indicated, umbilical artery gas analysis can safely be done either with early cord clamping, or, probably most of the times it is necessary, during delayed cord clamping with the cord still unclamped. Paired blood samples (one from the umbilical artery and one from the umbilical vein) can be taken from the pulsating and unclamped cord, immediately after birth, during delayed cord clamping, without any effect on either the accuracy of umbilical artery gas analysis or on the transfusion of blood through delayed cord clamping. Umbilical artery gas analysis should instead not be done after delayed cord clamping, since delayed cord clamping alters several acid-based parameters and lactate values. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. SDS-Induced Fibrillation of α-Synuclein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giehm, L.; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De; Pedersen, J.S.;

    2010-01-01

    -stabilized micelles. Thus, fibrillation in this case occurs by a process of continuous accretion rather than by the rate-limiting accumulation of a distinct nucleus. The morphology of the SDS-induced fibrils does not exhibit the classical rod-like structures formed by αSN when aggregated by agitation in the absence......, and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate a fibrillation pathway that is remarkably different from the fibrillation pathway in the absence of SDS. Fibrillation occurs most extensively and most rapidly (starting within 45 min) under conditions where 12 SDS molecules are bound per αSN molecule, which is also...... of SDS. The SDS-induced fibrils have a flexible worm-like appearance, which can be converted into classical straight fibrils by continuous agitation. SDS-induced fibrillation represents an alternative and highly reproducible mechanism for fibrillation where protein association is driven by the formation...

  3. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  4. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties.

  5. Phospholipids as inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Vus

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are the protein aggregates, whose formation is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, systemic amyloidosis, etc. Since there is no effective ways to treat these diseases, developing the new anti-amyloid drugs is of great importance. In this study a series of phospholipids have been tested for their ability to inhibit lysozyme and insulin amyloid fibril formation at acidic or neutral pH and elevated temperature.  The lag time, elongation rate and fibrillization extent were estimated using Thioflavin T fluorescence assay. It is found that the oxidized and charged phospholipids, included into the liposomes, were the most effective inhibitors of the protein fibrillization. By comparing the magnitude and direction of the lipid effect in different lipid-protein systems it was concluded that the reduction of the amyloid fibril formation is governed by hydrophobic and specific liposome-protein interactions. It is hypothesized that the presence of the surface formed by the lipid polar heads is critical for reducing the protein fibrillization extent.

  6. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, D., E-mail: denis.michel@live.fr [Universite de Rennes1-IRSET, Campus de Beaulieu Bat. 13, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-01-21

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation, and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers, and the accumulation of complexes in vivo by rescue from degradation. Overlooked aspects of these processes are also pointed: the exponential distribution of fibril lengths can be recovered using various models because it is attributable to randomness only. It is also suggested that the same term “critical concentration” is used for different things, involved in either nucleation or elongation.

  7. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  8. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  9. Effect of age on stroke prevention therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation: the atrial fibrillation investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Walraven, Carl; Hart, Robert G; Connolly, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    on the relative efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiplatelet (AP) therapy (including acetylsalicylic acid and triflusal) on ischemic stroke, serious bleeding, and vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: This is an analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Investigators database, which...

  10. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  11. A Two-Component Adhesive: Tau Fibrils Arise from a Combination of a Well-Defined Motif and Conformationally Flexible Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shengqi; Kulminskaya, Natalia; Habenstein, Birgit; Biernat, Jacek; Tepper, Katharina; Paulat, Maria; Griesinger, Christian; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Linser, Rasmus

    2017-02-22

    Fibrillar aggregates of Aβ and Tau in the brain are the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Most Tau fibers have a twisted appearance, but the twist can be variable and even absent. This ambiguity, which has also been associated with different phenotypes of tauopathies, has led to controversial assumptions about fibril constitution, and it is unclear to-date what the molecular causes of this polymorphism are. To tackle this question, we used solid-state NMR strategies providing assignments of non-seeded three-repeat-domain Tau(3RD) with an inherent heterogeneity. This is in contrast to the general approach to characterize the most homogeneous preparations by construct truncation or intricate seeding protocols. Here, carbon and nitrogen chemical-shift conservation between fibrils revealed invariable secondary-structure properties, however, with inter-monomer interactions variable among samples. Residues with variable amide shifts are localized mostly to N- and C-terminal regions within the rigid beta structure in the repeat region of Tau(3RD). By contrast, the hexapeptide motif in repeat R3, a crucial motif for fibril formation, shows strikingly low variability of all NMR parameters: Starting as a nucleation site for monomer-monomer contacts, this six-residue sequence element also turns into a well-defined structural element upon fibril formation. Given the absence of external causes in vitro, the interplay of structurally differently conserved elements in this protein likely reflects an intrinsic property of Tau fibrils.

  12. Mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bumjoon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Sang Woo; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-14

    Amyloid fibrils have recently received attention due to their remarkable mechanical properties, which are highly correlated with their biological functions. We have studied the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils as a function of their length scales by using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the length of amyloid fibrils plays a role in their deformation and fracture mechanisms in such a way that the competition between shear and bending deformations is highly dependent on the fibril length, and that as the fibril length increases, so does the bending strength of the fibril while its shear strength decreases. The dependence of rupture force for amyloid fibrils on their length is elucidated using the Bell model, which suggests that the rupture force of the fibril is determined from the hydrogen bond rupture mechanism that critically depends on the fibril length. We have measured the toughness of amyloid fibrils, which is shown to depend on the fibril length. In particular, the toughness of the fibril with its length of ∼3 nm is estimated to be ∼30 kcal mol(-1) nm(-3), comparable to that of a spider silk crystal with its length of ∼2 nm. Moreover, we have shown the important effect of the pulling rate on the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibril. It is found that as the pulling rate increases, so does the contribution of the shear effect to the elastic deformation of the amyloid fibril with its length of deformation mechanism of the amyloid fibril with its length of >15 nm is almost independent of the pulling rate. Our study sheds light on the role of the length scale of amyloid fibrils and the pulling rate in their mechanical behaviors and properties, which may provide insights into how the excellent mechanical properties of protein fibrils can be determined.

  13. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  14. GENETIC PREDICTORS OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kuskaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common heart rhythm disturbance. It is believed that the primary form of AF is genetically determined in most cases, but the genetic component cannot be excluded in the secondary form of AF. AF is a heterogeneous disease and many authors proved its relationship with other genetic heart disease. In most cases, certain combinations of polymorphisms of different genes promote the development of AF. The study of genes of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is especially important, because the role of this system in AF pathogenesis is currently studding most intensively. These studies are of great practical interest, as associative effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists in the prevention of AF is revealed. RAAS blockers are able not only to reduce the risk of new-onset AF in hypertensive and normotensive patients but also prevent recurrence of AF. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that RAAS blockers prevent not only the remodeling of the left ventricle, and also the left atrium, pointing to the pathogenesis of AF. So, screening for susceptibility genes and the study of their polymorphism is currently an important focus in the study of AF.

  15. Seed Treatment. Bulletin 760.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Harvey C.

    This manual gives a definition of seed treatment, the types of seeds normally treated, diseases and insects commonly associated with seeds, fungicides and insecticides used, types of equipment used for seed treatment, and information on labeling and coloring of treated seed, pesticide carriers, binders, stickers, and safety precautions. (BB)

  16. Amyloid-like fibril elongation follows michaelis-menten kinetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milto, Katazyna; Botyriute, Akvile; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    ... are. We obtained experimental data on insulin amyloid-like fibril elongation at the conditions where other processes which may impact kinetics of fibril formation are minor and fitted it using Michaelis-Menten equation...

  17. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  18. Management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in the diabetic patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is considerable, and prevalence rates are increasing. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation; however, diabetes also influences the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation. I...... and outcomes of heart failure and the success rates of both ablation and cardioversion in atrial fibrillation patients with diabetes. Finally, this article describes the association of HbA1c levels with the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation patients.......The global burden of atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is considerable, and prevalence rates are increasing. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation; however, diabetes also influences the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation...

  19. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Hiari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most commonly sustained arrhythmia in man. While it affects millions of patients worldwide, its incidence will markedly increase with an aging population. Primary goals of AF therapy are to (1 reduce embolic complications, particularly stroke, (2 alleviate symptoms, and (3 prevent long-term heart remodelling. These have been proven to be a challenge as there are major limitations in our knowledge of the pathological and electrophysiological mechanisms underlying AF. Although advances continue to be made in the medical management of this condition, pharmacotherapy is often unsuccessful. Because of the high recurrence rate of AF despite antiarrhythmic drug therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm and the adverse effects of these drugs, there has been growing interest in nonpharmacological strategies. Surgery for treatment of AF has been around for some time. The Cox-Maze procedure is the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and has more than 90% success in eliminating atrial fibrillation. Although the cut and sew maze is very effective, it has been superseded by newer operations that rely on alternate energy sources to create lines of conduction block. In addition, the evolution of improved ablation technology and instrumentation has facilitated the development of minimally invasive approaches. In this paper, the rationale for surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation and the different surgical techniques that were developed will be explored. In addition, it will detail the new approaches to surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation that employ alternate energy sources.

  20. A resorcinarene for inhibition of Aβ fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Park, Jiyong; Wu, Wei; Malagon, Andres; Wang, Lingyu; Vargas, Edgar; Wikramanayake, Athula; Houk, K N; Leblanc, Roger M

    2017-03-01

    Amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) fibrillation is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it has been challenging to discover potent agents in order to inhibit Aβ fibrillation. Herein, we demonstrated the effect of resorcinarene on inhibiting Aβ fibrillation in vitro via experimental and computational methods. Aβ were incubated with different concentrations of resorcinarene so as to monitor the kinetics by using thioflavin T binding assay. The results, which were further confirmed by far-UV CD spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, strongly indicated that the higher concentration of resorcinarene, the more effective the inhibition of Aβ fibrillation. A cytotoxicity study showed that when sea urchin embryos were exposed to the resorcinarene, the majority survived due to the resorcinarene low toxicity. In addition, when the resorcinarene was added, the formation of toxic Aβ 42 species was delayed. Computational studies of Aβ fibrillation, including docking simulations and MD simulations, illustrated that the interaction between inhibitor resorcinarene and Aβ is driven by the non-polar interactions. These studies display a novel strategy for the exploration of promising antiamyloiddogenic agents for AD treatments.

  1. Contribution of Long Fibrils and Peptides to Surface and Foaming Behavior of Soy Protein Fibril System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-08-16

    When soy glycinin (11S) is heated for a prolonged time at pH 2 (20 h at 85 °C), a mixture is formed consisting of long semiflexible 11S fibrils and small peptides. The surface and foaming properties of this mixture were investigated at different pHs, and compared to the behavior of pure fibrils and pure peptides, to determine the individual contributions of these two factions to the behavior of the mixture. The adsorption of these three systems at air-water interfaces and the resulting surface rheological properties were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and surface large amplitude oscillatory dilatational (LAOD) rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. Our results show that the adsorption kinetics, dilatational rheological properties, and the foaming behavior of the mixture were mainly dominated by the small peptides in the fibril system. Compared to pH 2, the fibril mixture at pH 5 and 7 provides much better foam stability and appears to be a very promising protein material to make stable foams, even at low protein concentration (0.1 wt %). The presence of fibril clusters and peptide aggregates at pH 5 and 7 contributed to foam stability of the mixture. In contrast, pure fibril formed an interface with a highly pH-responsive adsorption and rheological behavior, and the foamability and foam stability of the pure fibrils were very poor.

  2. Is early cord clamping, delayed cord clamping or cord milking best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Binay; Demirel, Gamze; Ciler Eren, Elif; Erel, Ozcan; Neselioglu, Salim; Karavar, Hande Nur; Gundogdu, Semra; Ulfer, Gozde; Bahadir, Selcen; Tastekin, Ayhan

    2017-03-20

    To compare the antioxidant status of three cord clamping procedures (early clamping, delayed clamping and milking) by analyzing the thiol-disulfide balance. This randomized controlled study enrolled 189 term infants who were divided into three groups according to the cord clamping procedure: early clamping, delayed clamping and milking. Blood samples were collected from the umbilical arteries immediately after clamping, and the thiol/disulfide homeostasis was analyzed. The native and total thiol levels were significantly (p cord clamping group compared with the other two groups. The disulfide/total thiol ratio was significantly (p = .026) lower in the delayed cord clamping and milking groups compared with the early clamping groups. Early cord clamping causes the production of more disulfide bonds and lower thiol levels, indicating that oxidation reactions are increased in the early cord clamping procedure compared with the delayed cord clamping and milking procedures. The oxidant capacity is greater with early cord clamping than with delayed clamping or cord milking. Delayed cord clamping or milking are beneficial in neonatal care, and we suggest that they be performed routinely in all deliveries.

  3. Sonography of the umbilical cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudiak, C M; Salomon, C G; Posniak, H V; Olson, M C; Flisak, M E

    1995-09-01

    Knowledge of the development, normal sonographic appearance, and potential abnormalities of the umbilical cord is important in fetal assessment. The umbilical cord can be visualized throughout most of gestation and is detectable sonographically soon after visualization of the fetal pole. The normal umbilical cord is 50-60 cm long and may coil as many as 40 times, usually to the left. Abnormalities in umbilical cord size, degree of coiling, attachment, and position can have important implications for the outcome of the pregnancy. Structural abnormalities of the umbilical cord such as single umbilical artery, knots, cysts, and tumors may be associated with fetal distress or malformations. Color Doppler ultrasound (US) is useful in the identification and evaluation of structural abnormalities of the cord. By allowing measurement of blood flow velocity in the umbilical artery, duplex Doppler US may provide additional information in the evaluation of intrauterine growth retardation and twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

  4. Fracture of Protein Fibrils As Induced by Elongational Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes-Nijboer, A.; Venema, P.; Baptist, H.G.M.; Linden, van der E.

    2010-01-01

    The length distribution of whey protein fibrils is important for application purposes. However, it is hard to influence the length distribution of whey protein fibrils during production. One way of influencing the length distribution of the mature fibrils is exposing them to an external field, like

  5. Artificial atrial fibrillation in the dog. An artifact?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strackee, J.; Hoelen, A.J.; Zimmerman, A.N.E.; Meijler, F.L.

    1971-01-01

    R-R interval sequences during artificial atrial fibrillation in dogs were studied in the same way as in patients in a previous study and compared with results obtained in dogs with spontaneous atrial fibrillation. Artificial atrial fibrillation was effected by right atrial stimulation in three close

  6. Autonomic and surgical substrate modulation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, S.P.J.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the effects of fibrosis and the autonomic nervous system on conduction in patients with atrial fibrillation and the surgical ablation of the atria and autonomic nervous system as treatment of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and results fr

  7. Galectin-3 in patients undergoing ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Clementy

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Persistent type of atrial fibrillation is an independent predictor of higher Galectin-3 concentration. This biomarker of fibrosis may be implied in the mechanisms of atrial remodeling and maintenance of atrial fibrillation, and thus be helpful for the design of therapeutic strategy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  8. Universal Behavior in the Mesoscale Properties of Amyloid Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, Salvatore; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ubiquitous proteinaceous aggregates occurring in vivo and in vitro, with an invariant structural fingerprint at the molecular length scale. However, interpretation of their mesoscopic architectures is complicated by diverse observable polymorphic states. We here present a constitutive model for amyloid fibrils based on the minimization of the total energy per fibril. The model is benchmarked on real amyloid fibrils studied by atomic force microscopy. We use multistranded β -lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils as a model system exhibiting a rich polymorphism. The constitutive model quantitatively recapitulates the main mesoscopic topological features of amyloid fibrils, that is, the evolution of fibril periodicity as a function of the ionic strength of the solution and of the fibril width. A universal mesoscopic structural signature of the fibrils emerges from this picture, predicting a general, parameter-free law for the periodicity of the fibrils, that depends solely on the number of protofilaments per fibril. These predictions are validated experimentally and conclusively highlight the role of competing electrostatic and elastic contributions as the main players in the establishment of amyloid fibrils structure.

  9. POSTOPERATIVE ATRIAL FIBRILLATION – AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common perioperative cardiac arrhythmia. Sympathetic overactivity, inflammatory state and oxidative stress are important contributors to the genesis of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Advancing age and mitral valve disease along with left atrial size are important parameters in noted in multivariate prediction model. Genetic predisposition has also been noted. Preventive strategies tried include beta blockers, statins, posterior pericardiotomy, carperitide infusion and thoracic epidural analgesia. Treatment options include rate and rhythm control along with anticoagulation if it persists more than 48 hours with high CHADS2 score. Some of the therapeutic modalities which have been found to be NOT useful in preventing post operative atrial fibrillation are dexamethasone, magnesium infusion and concomitant pulmonary vein isolation.

  10. Antihypertensive treatment and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Nielsen, Sune F; Benn, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the associations between antihypertensive treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), β-blockers, diuretics, or calcium-antagonists, and risk of atrial fibrillation. We examined these associations using the entire Danish...... population from 1995 through 2010. METHODS AND RESULTS: Excluding medication used in atrial fibrillation, we matched individuals on ACEi monotherapy 1:1 with individuals on β-blocker (n = 48 658), diuretic (n = 69 630), calcium-antagonist (n = 57 646), and ARB monotherapy (n = 20 158). Likewise, individuals...... on ARB monotherapy were matched 1:1 with individuals on β-blocker (n = 20 566), diuretic (n = 20 832), calcium-antagonist (n = 20 232), and ACEi monotherapy (n = 20 158). All were free of atrial fibrillation and of predisposing diseases like heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus...

  11. Pain following spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to assess and characterise nociceptive and neuropathic pain, the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain treatment, and the influence of pain on the quality of sleep in a population following spinal cord injury (SCI). This thesis is divided into five separate studies: I. Pain in a Swedish spinal cord injury population. II. Gender related differences in pain in spinal cord injured individuals. III. Use of analgesic drugs in indi...

  12. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  13. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.

  14. Elastic Response of Crimped Collagen Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils have a three-dimensional structure at the micrometer scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this waveform allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendineae

  15. Preformed Seeds Modulate Native Insulin Aggregation Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Colina; Yang, Mu; Long, Fei; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-12-10

    Insulin aggregates under storage conditions via disulfide interchange reaction. It is also known to form aggregates at the site of repeated injections in diabetes patients, leading to injection amyloidosis. This has fueled research in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry as well as in academia to understand factors that modulate insulin stability and aggregation. The main aim of this study is to understand the factors that modulate aggregation propensity of insulin under conditions close to physiological and measure effect of "seeds" on aggregation kinetics. We explored the aggregation kinetics of insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C in the presence of disulfide-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT), using spectroscopy (UV-visible, fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) techniques. We prepared insulin "seeds" by incubating disulfide-reduced insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C for varying lengths of time (10 min to 12 h). These seeds were added to the native protein and nucleation-dependent aggregation kinetics was measured. Aggregation kinetics was fastest in the presence of 10 min seeds suggesting they were nascent. Interestingly, intermediate seeds (30 min to 4 h incubation) resulted in formation of transient fibrils in 4 h that converted to amorphous aggregates upon longer incubation of 24 h. Overall, the results show that insulin under disulfide reducing conditions at pH and temperature close to physiological favors amorphous aggregate formation and seed "maturity" plays an important role in nucleation dependent aggregation kinetics.

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure and chronic atrial fibrillation : Role of duration of at atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, MP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van Gelder, IC; De Kam, PJ; Lie, KI

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants of atrial natriuretic peptide level in patients with congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. In particular, the duration of atrial fibrillation was analyzed because atrial fibrillation per se might have a specific effect on atrial n

  17. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Brown, Aidan I.; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully processed collagen using conservative bounds. More realistic bounds may leave no consistent concentrations. Therefore, we propose that unprocessed pC-collagen diffuses from the bundle periphery followed by local C-proteinase activity and subsequent collagen incorporation at each fibril. We suggest that C-proteinase is localized within bundles, at fibril surfaces, during radial fibrillar growth. The much greater critical concentration of pC-collagen, as compared to fully processed collagen, then provides broad consistency between homogeneous fibril radii and the lack of fibril nucleation during fibril growth.

  18. Stop-and-go kinetics in amyloid fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Fonslet, Jesper; Andersen, Christian Beyschau

    2010-01-01

    in an intermittent fashion, with periods of growth followed by long pauses. The observed exponential distributions of stop and growth times support a Markovian model, in which fibrils shift between the two states with specific rates. Even if the individual rates vary considerably, we observe that the probability......Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow...

  19. New risk factors for atrial fibrillation : causes of 'not-so-lone atrial fibrillation'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonderwoerd, Bas A.; Smit, Marcelle D.; Pen, Lucas; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent arrhythmia in patients with cardiovascular disease. The classical risk factors for developing AF include hypertension, valvular disease, (ischaemic) cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus, and thyroid disease. In some patients with AF, no underlying

  20. New risk factors for atrial fibrillation : causes of 'not-so-lone atrial fibrillation'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonderwoerd, Bas A.; Smit, Marcelle D.; Pen, Lucas; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent arrhythmia in patients with cardiovascular disease. The classical risk factors for developing AF include hypertension, valvular disease, (ischaemic) cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus, and thyroid disease. In some patients with AF, no underlying (cardiovascular

  1. Multifocal meningeal melanocytoma: a new pathological entity or the result of leptomeningeal seeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Youssef; Rahme, Ralph; Moussa, Ronald; Abadjian, Gerard; Menassa-Moussa, Lina; Samaha, Elie

    2009-09-01

    Meningeal melanocytoma is a rare benign CNS tumor derived from the leptomeningeal melanocytes. Although unusual, malignant transformation with leptomeningeal seeding into the brain or spinal cord may occur years after the initial diagnosis. The authors report a unique case of multifocal benign meningeal melanocytoma involving both cerebellopontine angles and the thoracic spinal cord, with associated diffuse leptomeningeal hyperpigmentation. They review the literature relevant to this topic and discuss the radiological and pathological features of this disease as well as its treatment options.

  2. Seeded aggregation and toxicity of {alpha}-synuclein and tau: cellular models of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Sayuri T; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2010-11-05

    The deposition of amyloid-like filaments in the brain is the central event in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we report cellular models of intracytoplasmic inclusions of α-synuclein, generated by introducing nucleation seeds into SH-SY5Y cells with a transfection reagent. Upon introduction of preformed seeds into cells overexpressing α-synuclein, abundant, highly filamentous α-synuclein-positive inclusions, which are extensively phosphorylated and ubiquitinated and partially thioflavin-positive, were formed within the cells. SH-SY5Y cells that formed such inclusions underwent cell death, which was blocked by small molecular compounds that inhibit β-sheet formation. Similar seed-dependent aggregation was observed in cells expressing four-repeat Tau by introducing four-repeat Tau fibrils but not three-repeat Tau fibrils or α-synuclein fibrils. No aggregate formation was observed in cells overexpressing three-repeat Tau upon treatment with four-repeat Tau fibrils. Our cellular models thus provide evidence of nucleation-dependent and protein-specific polymerization of intracellular amyloid-like proteins in cultured cells.

  3. Evidence of structurally continuous collagen fibrils in tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Herchenhan, Andreas; Starborg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    in this structure-function relationship is the collagen fibril length. During embryogenesis short fibrils are produced but they grow rapidly with maturation. There is some controversy regarding fibril length in adult tendon, with mechanical data generally supporting discontinuity while structural investigations......Tendons transmit muscle-generated force through an extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils. The force applied by the muscle at one end of a microscopic fibril has to be transmitted through the macroscopic length of the tendon by mechanisms that are poorly understood. A key element...... fibrils was confirmed. In light of these results, possible mechanisms that could reconcile the opposing findings on fibril continuity are discussed. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: Connective tissues hold all parts of the body together and are mostly constructed from thin threads of the protein collagen...

  4. Amyloid-like fibril elongation follows michaelis-menten kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milto, Katazyna; Botyriute, Akvile; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    A number of proteins can aggregate into amyloid-like fibrils. It was noted that fibril elongation has similarities to an enzymatic reaction, where monomers or oligomers would play a role of substrate and nuclei/fibrils would play a role of enzyme. The question is how similar these processes really are. We obtained experimental data on insulin amyloid-like fibril elongation at the conditions where other processes which may impact kinetics of fibril formation are minor and fitted it using Michaelis-Menten equation. The correlation of the fit is very good and repeatable. It speaks in favour of enzyme-like model of fibril elongation. In addition, obtained [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values at different conditions may help in better understanding influence of environmental factors on the process of fibril elongation.

  5. Evidence of structurally continuous collagen fibrils in tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Herchenhan, Andreas; Starborg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    fibrils was confirmed. In light of these results, possible mechanisms that could reconcile the opposing findings on fibril continuity are discussed. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: Connective tissues hold all parts of the body together and are mostly constructed from thin threads of the protein collagen......Tendons transmit muscle-generated force through an extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils. The force applied by the muscle at one end of a microscopic fibril has to be transmitted through the macroscopic length of the tendon by mechanisms that are poorly understood. A key element...... in this structure-function relationship is the collagen fibril length. During embryogenesis short fibrils are produced but they grow rapidly with maturation. There is some controversy regarding fibril length in adult tendon, with mechanical data generally supporting discontinuity while structural investigations...

  6. AFM study of glucagon fibrillation via oligomeric structures resulting in interwoven fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Mingdong [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hovgaard, Mads Bruun [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Xu Sailong [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Otzen, Daniel Erik [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2006-08-28

    Glucagon is a 29-residue amphiphatic hormone involved in the regulation of blood glucose levels in conjunction with insulin. In concentrated aqueous solutions, glucagon spontaneously aggregates to form amyloid fibrils, destroying its biological activity. In this study we utilize the atomic force microscope (AFM) to elucidate the fibrillation mechanism of glucagon at the nanoscale under acidic conditions (pH 2.0) by visualizing the nanostructures of fibrils formed at different stages of the incubation. Hollow disc-shaped oligomers form at an early stage in the process and subsequently rearrange to more solid oligomers. These oligomers co-exist with, and most likely act as precursors for, protofibrils, which subsequently associate to form at least three different classes of higher-order fibrils of different heights. A repeat unit of around 50 nm along the main fibril axis suggests a helical arrangement of interwoven protofibrils. The diversity of oligomeric and fibrillar arrangements formed at pH 2.0 complements previous spectroscopic analyses that revealed that fibrils formed under different conditions can differ substantially in stability and secondary structure.

  7. Organic Leek Seed Production - Securing Seed Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, L C; Boelt, B

    2011-01-01

    To maintain integrity in organic farming, availability of organically produced GM-free seed of varieties adapted to organic production systems is of vital impor-tance. Despite recent achievements, organic seed supply for a number of vegetable species is insufficient. Still, in many countries...... organic vegetable growers can get derogations to use non-organic seeds in their productions. Potentially, this could lead to the organic consumers’ loss of faith and interest in organic products. The pre-requisite for an organic vegetable production is the presence of organically produced high quality...... seeds. Tunnel production is a means of securing seed of high genetic purity and quality, and organic leek (Allium porrum L.) seed production was tested in tunnels in Denmark. The present trial focused on steckling size and in all years large stecklings had a positive effect on both seed yield...

  8. Organic Leek Seed Production - Securing Seed Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, L C; Boelt, B

    2011-01-01

    To maintain integrity in organic farming, availability of organically produced GM-free seed of varieties adapted to organic production systems is of vital impor-tance. Despite recent achievements, organic seed supply for a number of vegetable species is insufficient. Still, in many countries...... organic vegetable growers can get derogations to use non-organic seeds in their productions. Potentially, this could lead to the organic consumers’ loss of faith and interest in organic products. The pre-requisite for an organic vegetable production is the presence of organically produced high quality...... seeds. Tunnel production is a means of securing seed of high genetic purity and quality, and organic leek (Allium porrum L.) seed production was tested in tunnels in Denmark. The present trial focused on steckling size and in all years large stecklings had a positive effect on both seed yield...

  9. Organic leek seed production - securing seed quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Lise Christina; Boelt, Birte

    2011-01-01

    To maintain integrity in organic farming, availability of organically produced GM-free seed of varieties adapted to organic production systems is of vital impor-tance. Despite recent achievements, organic seed supply for a number of vegetable species is insufficient. Still, in many countries...... organic vegetable growers can get derogations to use non-organic seeds in their productions. Potentially, this could lead to the organic consumers’ loss of faith and interest in organic products. The pre-requisite for an organic vegetable production is the presence of organically produced high quality...... seeds. Tunnel production is a means of securing seed of high genetic purity and quality, and organic leek (Allium porrum L.) seed production was tested in tunnels in Denmark. The present trial focused on steckling size and in all years large stecklings had a positive effect on both seed yield...

  10. Hypercoagulability promotes atrial fibrosis and fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, Henri M.H.; De Jong, Anne-Margreet; De Boer, Hetty C.; Maas, Alexander; Verheule, Sander; Rienstra, Michiel; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Ten Cate, Hugo; Crijns, Harry J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle; Van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Schotten, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is well known that atrial fibrillation (AF) induces a hypercoagulable state, which significantly increases stroke risk in patients with AF contributing to morbidity and mortality in these patients. Active coagulation factors can also provoke diverse cellular responses through stimulat

  11. Primary care aspects of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Tweel, I. van der

    1985-01-01

    A better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms that determine the random pattem of ventricular rhythm may assist the primary care physician in treating and guiding atrial fibrillation patients. These mechanisms also form the basis for our understanding of drug action and effect on ventric

  12. Spontaneous conversion of first onset atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; Hansen, Sidsel; Nielsen, Tonny

    2011-01-01

    Background  We studied all patients admitted to hospital with first onset atrial fibrillation (AF) to determine the probability of spontaneous conversion to sinus rhythm and to identify factors predictive of such a conversion. Methods and Results  We retrospectively reviewed charts of 438...

  13. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  14. Genetic aspects of lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Laura; Nielsen, Jonas B; Olesen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. A subgroup of patients presents with AF without traditional risk factors and is diagnosed before the age of 60 years. Such patients are commonly referred as having "lone AF" and comprise 10-20% of all cases. A number of studies have...

  15. Genetic Risk Prediction of Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Yin, Xiaoyan; Lin, Henry; Kolek, Matthew; Smith, J Gustav; Trompet, Stella; Rienstra, Michiel; Rost, Natalia S; Teixeira, Pedro; Almgren, Peter; Anderson, Christopher D; Chen, Lin Y; Engström, Gunnar; Ford, Ian; Furie, Karen L; Guo, Xiuqing; Larson, Martin G; Lunetta, Kathryn; Macfarlane, Peter W; Psaty, Bruce M; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stott, David J; Taylor, Kent D; Weng, Lu-Chen; Yao, Jie; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Verweij, Niek; Siland, Joylene E; Kathiresan, Sekar; Roselli, Carolina; Roden, Dan M; van der Harst, Pim; Darbar, Dawood; Jukema, J Wouter; Melander, Olle; Rosand, Jonathan; Rotter, Jerome I; Heckbert, Susan R; Ellinor, Patrick T; Alonso, Alvaro; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Atrial fibrillation (AF) has a substantial genetic basis. Identification of individuals at greatest AF risk could minimize the incidence of cardioembolic stroke. METHODS: -To determine whether genetic data can stratify risk for development of AF, we examined associations between AF gene

  16. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Maksimović (Ružica); T. Dill (Thorsten); A.D. Ristić (Arsen); P.M. Seferovic (Petar)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPercutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant

  17. Corticosteroids and the risk of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hooft, CS; Heeringa, J; Brusselle, GG; Hofman, A; Witteman, JCM; Kingma, JH; Sturkenboom, MCJM; Stricker, BHC

    2006-01-01

    Background: High-dose ( pulse) corticosteroid therapy has been associated with the development of atrial fibrillation. This association, however, is mainly based on case reports. Methods: To test the hypothesis that high-dose corticosteroid exposure increases the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillatio

  18. Aggregation and fibrillation of bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, NK; Jespersen, SK; Thomassen, LV;

    2007-01-01

    The all-alpha helix multi-domain protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) aggregates at elevated temperatures. Here we show that these thermal aggregates have amyloid properties. They bind the fibril-specific dyes Thioflavin T and Congo Red, show elongated although somewhat worm-like morphology...

  19. Barley seed aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, Manuela; Kodde, Jan; Pistrick, Sibylle; Mascher, Martin; Börner, Andreas; Groot, Steven P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental seed aging approaches intend to mimic seed deterioration processes to achieve a storage interval reduction. Common methods apply higher seed moisture levels and temperatures. In contrast, the “elevated partial pressure of oxygen” (EPPO) approach treats dry seed stored at ambient temp

  20. Biomarkers in spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Verbeek, M.M.; Vos, P.E.; Meent, H. van de

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Literature review. OBJECTIVES: In traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), much effort has been put into the evaluation of SCI severity and the prediction of recovery potential. An accurate prediction of the initial damage of the spinal cord that differentiates between the severities of SCI

  1. Cutting the Cord-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  2. Cutting the Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  3. Vocal cord dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Blakeslee E; Kemp, James S

    2007-06-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction during inspiration has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction, but historical factors and pulmonary function findings may provide adequate clues to the correct diagnosis. Speech therapy, and in some cases psychological counselling, is often beneficial in this disorder. The natural course and prognosis of vocal cord dysfunction are still not well described in adults or children.

  4. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Rutenberg, Andrew D; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully-processed collagen using conservative bounds. More real...

  5. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  6. Umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hong Hoe; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2012-07-01

    Since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) in 1998, cord blood (CB) has now become one of the most commonly used sources of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. CBT has advantages of easy procurement, no risk to donor, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability and immune tolerance allowing successful transplantation despite human leukocyte antigen disparity. Several studies have shown that the number of cells transplanted is the most important factor for engraftment in CBT, and it limits the wide use of CB in adult patients. New strategies for facilitating engraftment and reducing transplantation-related mortality are ongoing in the field of CBT and include the use of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, double-unit CBT, ex vivo expansion of CB, and co-transplantation of CB and mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, the results of two international studies with large sample sizes showed that CB is an acceptable alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for adult recipients who lack human leukocyte antigen-matched adult donors. Along with the intensive researches, development in banking process of CB will amplify the use of CB and offer the chance for cure in more patients.

  7. Umbilical cord blood transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hoe Koo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT in 1998, cord blood (CB has now become one of the most commonly used sources of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. CBT has advantages of easy procurement, no risk to donor, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability and immune tolerance allowing successful transplantation despite human leukocyte antigen disparity. Several studies have shown that the number of cells transplanted is the most important factor for engraftment in CBT, and it limits the wide use of CB in adult patients. New strategies for facilitating engraftment and reducing transplantation-related mortality are ongoing in the field of CBT and include the use of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, double-unit CBT, ex vivo expansion of CB, and co-transplantation of CB and mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, the results of two international studies with large sample sizes showed that CB is an acceptable alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for adult recipients who lack human leukocyte antigen-matched adult donors. Along with the intensive researches, development in banking process of CB will amplify the use of CB and offer the chance for cure in more patients.

  8. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  9. Bending rigidity of type I collagen homotrimer fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sejin; Leikin, Sergey; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    Normal type I collagen is an α1(I)2α2(I) heterotrimeric triple helix, but α1(I)3 homotrimers are also found in fetal tissues and various pathological conditions, e.g., causing bone fragility and reducing tendon tensile strength. It remains unclear whether homotrimers alter mechanical properties of individual fibrils or affect tissues by altering their organization at a higher level. To address this question, we investigated how homotrimers affect fibril bending rigidity. Homotrimer fibrils have been shown to be more loosely packed so that we expected them to be more susceptible to bending. However, homotrimer fibrils were more rigid despite being thinner and more hydrated. To quantify fibril rigidity, we analyzed their shape by Fourier decomposition, determined the correlation function for the direction along each fibril, and calculated the distribution of local fibril curvature. The estimated persistence length of homotrimer fibrils was 3 ˜ 10 times longer than for heterotrimer fibrils, indicating much higher bending rigidity of homotrimer fibrils.

  10. Aminothienopyridazines and methylene blue affect Tau fibrillization via cysteine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alex; James, Michael J; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Smith, Amos B; Trojanowski, John Q; Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R

    2013-04-19

    Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of intraneuronal fibrils comprised of the protein Tau. Tau is normally a soluble protein that stabilizes microtubules, with splice isoforms that contain either three (3-R) or four (4-R) microtubule binding repeats. The formation of Tau fibrils is thought to result in neuronal damage, and inhibitors of Tau fibrillization may hold promise as therapeutic agents. The process of Tau fibrillization can be replicated in vitro, and a number of small molecules have been identified that inhibit Tau fibril formation. However, little is known about how these molecules affect Tau fibrillization. Here, we examined the mechanism by which the previously described aminothieno pyridazine (ATPZ) series of compounds inhibit Tau fibrillization. Active ATPZs were found to promote the oxidation of the two cysteine residues within 4-R Tau by a redox cycling mechanism, resulting in the formation of a disulfide-containing compact monomer that was refractory to fibrillization. Moreover, the ATPZs facilitated intermolecular disulfide formation between 3-R Tau monomers, leading to dimers that were capable of fibrillization. The ATPZs also caused cysteine oxidation in molecules unrelated to Tau. Interestingly, methylene blue, an inhibitor of Tau fibrillization under evaluation in Alzheimer disease clinical trials, caused a similar oxidation of cysteines in Tau and other molecules. These findings reveal that the ATPZs and methylene blue act by a mechanism that may affect their viability as potential therapeutic agents.

  11. Seed vigour and seed lot quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekić Slavoljub S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses seed vigour as the most important seed characteristic the seed lot quality depends on. In Serbian, the terms such as vigor, viability and germ inability are used in various ways, depending on the author, which leaves room to possible misunderstanding in interpretation of research results and misuse of expert terminology. The modest lexical fund, compared to that of the English language, for instance, greatly contributes to the problem, and so does the absence of terminological standardization. Since the current technology and research level in seed science and technology requires appropriate terminology, this article offers an outline of basic seed traits related expert terminology as a foundation of future seed research and technology development. .

  12. Vitamins K interact with N-terminus α-synuclein and modulate the protein fibrillization in vitro. Exploring the interaction between quinones and α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fernanda Luna; Coelho Cerqueira, Eduardo; de Freitas, Mônica Santos; Gonçalves, Daniela Leão; Costa, Lilian Terezinha; Follmer, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades, a series of compounds, including quinones and polyphenols, has been described as having anti-fibrillogenic action on α-synuclein (α-syn) whose aggregation is associated to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of these molecules act as promiscuous anti-amyloidogenic agents, interacting with the diverse amyloidogenic proteins (mostly unfolded) through non-specific hydrophobic interactions. Herein we investigated the effect of the vitamins K (phylloquinone, menaquinone and menadione), which are 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) derivatives, on α-syn aggregation, comparing them with other anti-fibrillogenic molecules such as quinones, polyphenols and lipophilic vitamins. Vitamins K delayed α-syn fibrillization in substoichiometric concentrations, leading to the formation of short, sheared fibrils and amorphous aggregates, which are less prone to produce leakage of synthetic vesicles. In seeding conditions, menadione and 1,4-NQ significantly inhibited fibrils elongation, which could be explained by their ability to destabilize preformed fibrils of α-syn. Bidimensional NMR experiments indicate that a specific site at the N-terminal α-syn (Gly31/Lys32) is involved in the interaction with vitamins K, which is corroborated by previous studies suggesting that Lys is a key residue in the interaction with quinones. Together, our data suggest that 1,4-NQ, recently showed up by our group as a potential scaffold for designing new monoamine oxidase inhibitors, is also capable to modulate α-syn fibrillization in vitro.

  13. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    the final version. RESULTS: The data set consists of nine variables: (1) Intervention/Procedure Date and start time (2) Non-surgical bed rest and external immobilization, (3) Spinal intervention-closed manipulation and/or reduction of spinal elements, (4) Surgical procedure-approach, (5) Date and time......STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS...... of the completion of the intervention or surgical closure; (6) Surgical procedure-open reduction, (7) Surgical procedure-direct decompression of neural elements, and (8 and 9) Surgical procedure-stabilization and fusion (spinal segment number and level). All variables are coded using numbers or characters. Each...

  14. Effect of Genotypes and Seed Production Environments on Seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Genotypes. plant popUlation, seed production. seed quality. sesame. ..... (68%). Greater standard gennination and EWSG occurred in seed produced in 2001 .... Table 7: Heritability (H2B) and genetic advance (GA) of seed quality ...

  15. Dronedarone for atrial fibrillation: a new therapeutic agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan D Patel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pawan D Patel, Rohit Bhuriya, Dipal D Patel, Bhaskar L Arora, Param P Singh, Rohit R AroraDepartment of Cardiology, Chicago Medical School, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation is the most common of the serious cardiac rhythm disturbances and is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality. Amiodarone is currently one of the most widely used and most effective antiarrhythmic agents for atrial fibrillation. But during chronic usage amiodarone can cause some serious extra cardiac adverse effects, including effects on the thyroid. Dronedarone is a newer therapeutic agent with a structural resemblance to amiodarone, with two molecular changes, and with a better side effect profile. Dronedarone is a multichannel blocker and, like amiodarone, possesses both a rhythm and a rate control property in atrial fibrillation. The US Food and Drug Administration approved dronedarone for atrial fibrillation on July 2, 2009. In this review, we discuss the role of dronedarone in atrial fibrillation.Keywords: dronedarone, amiodarone, atrial fibrillation

  16. Atrial fibrillation associated with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2009-05-29

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is an increasingly recognized entity that is defined as a normal serum free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine levels with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level suppressed below the normal range and usually undetectable. It has been reported that subclinical hyperthyroidism is not associated with coronary heart disease or mortality from cardiovascular causes but it is sufficient to induce arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. It has also been reported that increased factor X activity in patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism represents a potential hypercoagulable state. We present a case of atrial fibrillation associated with subclinical hyperthyroidism, in a 78-year-old Italian woman. Also this case focuses attention on the importance of a correct evaluation of subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  17. [Atrial fibrillation ablation: application of nurse methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-González-Serna, Amelia; Mateos-García, M Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of atrial fibrillation involves applying radiofrequency energy wave by a catheter that causes a circumferential lesion to achieve electrical isolation and voltage drop in the interior. It is mainly applied when there is resistance to treatment and recurrence of symptoms affecting the quality of life of patients. The nurse is an important part of the multidisciplinary team who care for patients who undergo this procedure. The provision of comprehensive nursing care should include nursing procedures prior to, during, and after treatment to ensure the careful and systematic quality required. The aims of this article are: to provide specialised knowledge on the procedure of atrial fibrillation ablation, to describe the preparation of the electrophysiology laboratory, analyse nursing care and develop a standardized care plan for patients on whom this procedure is performed using the NANDA (North American Nursing Association) taxonomy and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification).

  18. [Ventricular fibrillation following deodorant spray inhalation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, F; Le Tacon, S; Maria, M; Pierrard, O; Monin, P

    2008-01-01

    We report one case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation following butane poisoning after inhalation of antiperspiration aerosol. An early management using semi-automatic defibrillator explained the success of the resuscitation. The mechanism of butane toxicity could be an increased sensitivity of cardiac receptors to circulating catecholamines, responsible for cardiac arrest during exercise and for resuscitation difficulties. The indication of epinephrine is discussed.

  19. Atrial fibrillation in obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with rising incidence. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among patients with AF. This observation has prompted significant research in understanding the relationship between OSA and AF. Multiple studies support a role of OSA in the initiation and progression of AF. This association has been independent of obesity, body mass index and hypertension. Instability of autonomic tone and wide swings in intrathoracic pressure are seen in OSA. T...

  20. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veloso Henrique Horta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  1. Cardiac fibrillation risk of Taser weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    The debate on potential health hazards associated with delivering electric discharges to incapacitated subjects, in particular on whether electric discharge weapons are lethal, less lethal or non-lethal, is still controversial. The cardiac fibrillation risks of Taser weapons X26 and X3 have been investigated by measuring the delivered high-tension pulses in dependence on load impedance. Excitation thresholds and sinus-to-Taser conversion factors have been determined by numerical modeling of endocardial, myocardial, and epicardial cells. Detailed quantitative assessment of cardiac electric exposure has been performed by numerical simulation at the normal-weighted anatomical model NORMAN. The impact of anatomical variation has been quantified at an overweight model (Visible Man), both with a spatial resolution of 2 × 2 × 2 mm voxels. Spacing and location of dart electrodes were systematically varied and the worst-case position determined. Based on volume-weighted cardiac exposure assessment, the fibrillation probability of the worst-case hit was determined to 30% (Taser X26) and 9% (Taser X3). The overall risk assessment of Taser application accounting for realistic spatial hit distributions was derived from training sessions of police officers under realistic scenarios and by accounting for the influence of body (over-)weight as well as gender. The analysis of the results showed that the overall fibrillation risk of Taser use is not negligible. It is higher at Taser X26 than at Taser X3 and amounts to about 1% for Europeans with an about 20% higher risk for Asians. Results demonstrate that enhancement as well as further reduction of fibrillation risk depends on responsible use or abuse of Taser weapons.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipset, Mark A.; Lemery, Jay; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A long-duration exploration class mission is fraught with numerous medical contingency plans. Herein, we explore the challenges of symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) occurring during an exploration class mission. The actions and resources required to ameliorate the situation, including the availability of appropriate pharmaceuticals, monitoring devices, treatment modalities, and communication protocols will be investigated. Challenges of Atrial Fibrillation during an Exploration Mission: Numerous etiologies are responsible for the initiation of AF. On Earth, we have the time and medical resources to evaluate and determine the causative situation for most cases of AF and initiate therapy accordingly. During a long-duration exploration class mission resources will be severely restricted. How is one to determine if new onset AF is due to recent myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, fluid overload, thyrotoxicosis, cardiac structural abnormalities, or CO poisoning? Which pharmaceutical therapy should be initiated and what potential side effects can be expected? Should anti-coagulation therapy be initiated? How would one monitor the therapeutic treatment of AF in microgravity? What training would medical officers require, and which communication strategies should be developed to enable the best, safest therapeutic options for treatment of AF during a long-duration exploration class mission? Summary: These questions will be investigated with expert opinion on disease elucidation, efficient pharmacology, therapeutic monitoring, telecommunication strategies, and mission cost parameters with emphasis on atrial fibrillation being just one illustration of the tremendous challenges that face a long-duration exploration mission. The limited crew training time, medical hardware, and drugs manifested to deal with such an event predicate that aggressive primary and secondary prevention strategies be developed to protect a multibillion-dollar asset like the

  3. STRATEGIES OF PROPHYLAXIS AND MANAGEMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembele, A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses different strategies of prophylaxis and management of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG at different periods after acute myocardial infarction (AMI. It examines the efficacy of early administration of beta-adrenergic blocking agents (metoprolol and amiodarone (in prophylactic doses in the diminution of the risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation in different groups of patients. The article also discerns the effectiveness of digoxin in the management of episodes of postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  4. Genetics of Atrial Fibrillation and Possible Implications for Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Robin Lemmens; Sylvia Hermans; Dieter Nuyens; Vincent Thijs

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia mainly caused by valvular, ischemic, hypertensive, and myopathic heart disease. Atrial fibrillation can occur in families suggesting a genetic background especially in younger subjects. Additionally recent studies have identified common genetic variants to be associated with atrial fibrillation in the general population. This cardiac arrhythmia has important public health implications because of its main complications: congestive heart...

  5. Glassy state of native collagen fibril?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, S. G.; Allahverdyan, A. E.; Gevorgyan, D. S.; Hu, C.-K.

    2011-07-01

    Our micromechanical experiments show that viscoelastic features of type-I collagen fibril at physiological temperatures display essential dependence on the frequency and speed of heating. For temperatures of 20-30 °C the internal friction has a sharp maximum for a frequency less than 2 kHz. Upon heating the internal friction displays a peak at a temperature Tsoft(v) that essentially depends on the speed of heating v: Tsoft≈70°C for v=1°C/min, and Tsoft≈25°C for v=0.1°C/min. At the same temperature Tsoft(v) Young's modulus passes through a minimum. All these effects are specific for the native state of the fibril and disappear after heat-denaturation. Taken together with the known facts that the fibril is axially ordered as quasicrystal, but disordered laterally, we interpret our findings as indications of a glassy state, where Tsoft is the softening transition.

  6. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  7. Evidence of structurally continuous collagen fibrils in tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Rene B; Herchenhan, Andreas; Starborg, Tobias; Larsen, Michael; Kadler, Karl E; Qvortrup, Klaus; Magnusson, S Peter

    2017-03-01

    Tendons transmit muscle-generated force through an extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils. The force applied by the muscle at one end of a microscopic fibril has to be transmitted through the macroscopic length of the tendon by mechanisms that are poorly understood. A key element in this structure-function relationship is the collagen fibril length. During embryogenesis short fibrils are produced but they grow rapidly with maturation. There is some controversy regarding fibril length in adult tendon, with mechanical data generally supporting discontinuity while structural investigations favor continuity. This study initially set out to trace the full length of individual fibrils in adult human tendons, using serial block face-scanning electron microscopy. But even with this advanced technique the required length could not be covered. Instead a statistical approach was used on a large volume of fibrils in shorter image stacks. Only a single end was observed after tracking 67.5mm of combined fibril lengths, in support of fibril continuity. To shed more light on this observation, the full length of a short tendon (mouse stapedius, 125μm) was investigated and continuity of individual fibrils was confirmed. In light of these results, possible mechanisms that could reconcile the opposing findings on fibril continuity are discussed. Connective tissues hold all parts of the body together and are mostly constructed from thin threads of the protein collagen (called fibrils). Connective tissues provide mechanical strength and one of the most demanding tissues in this regard are tendons, which transmit the forces generated by muscles. The length of the collagen fibrils is essential to the mechanical strength and to the type of damage the tissue may experience (slippage of short fibrils or breakage of longer ones). This in turn is important for understanding the repair processes after such damage occurs. Currently the issue of fibril length is contentious, but this

  8. Mechanical properties of a collagen fibril under simulated degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David C; Szleifer, Igal; Dhaher, Yasin

    2017-11-01

    Collagen fibrils are a very important component in most of the connective tissue in humans. An important process associated with several physiological and pathological states is the degradation of collagen. Collagen degradation is usually mediated by enzymatic and non-enzymatic processes. In this work we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of simulated degradation on the mechanical properties of the collagen fibril. We applied tensile stress to the collagen fiber at different stages of degradation. We compared the difference in the fibril mechanical priorities due the removal of enzymatic crosslink, surface degradation and volumetric degradation. As anticipated, our results indicated that, regardless of the degradation scenario, fibril mechanical properties is reduced. The type of degradation mechanism (crosslink, surface or volumetric) expressed differential effect on the change in the fibril stiffness. Our simulation results showed dramatic change in the fibril stiffness with a small amount of degradation. This suggests that the hierarchical structure of the fibril is a key component for the toughness and is very sensitive to changes in the organization of the fibril. The overall results are intended to provide a theoretical framework for the understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen fibrils under degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Seeds as biosocial commons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patnaik, Archana

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates and describes the conservation and use of Plant Genetic Resources (PGRs), especially seeds through processes of commonisation. Seeds form an important element for sustaining human life (through food production) and social relations (by maintaining agricultural socialities)

  10. Seeds as biosocial commons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patnaik, Archana

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates and describes the conservation and use of Plant Genetic Resources (PGRs), especially seeds through processes of commonisation. Seeds form an important element for sustaining human life (through food production) and social relations (by maintaining agricultural

  11. Grape Seed Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to reduce inflammation. Grape seed extract contains the antioxidant compound oligomeric proanthocyanidin (OPC), which has been studied for a variety of health conditions. OPCs are found in extracts of grape skin and seeds, which are by-products of the ...

  12. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  13. Repair of acutely injured spinal cord through constructing tissue-engineered neural complex in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Yu; GUO Qing-shan; WANG Ai-min; WU Si-yu; XING Shu-xing; ZHANG Zhong-rong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To construct tissue-engineered neural complex in vitro and study its effect in repairing acutely injured spinal cord in adult rats. Methods: Neural stem cells were harvested from the spinal cord of embryo rats and propagated in vitro. Then the neural stem cells were seeded into polyglycolic acid scaffolds and co-cultured with extract of embryonic spinal cord in vitro. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and scanning electron microscope were used to observe the microstructure of this complex. Animal model of spine semi-transection was made and tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted by surgical intervention. Six weeks after transplantation, functional evaluation and histochemistry were applied to evaluate the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction. Results: The tissue-engineered neural complex had a distinct structure, which contained neonatal neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. After tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted into the injured spinal cord, the cell components such as neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, could survive and keep on developing. The adult rats suffering from spinal cord injury got an obvious neurological recovery in motor skills. Conclusions: The tissue-engineered neural complex appears to have therapeutic effects on the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction of the adult rats with spinal cord injury.

  14. Seed development and carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittich, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    Seeds assure the plant the onset of a next generation and a way of dispersal. They consist of endosperm and an embryo (originating from gametophytic tissue), enveloped by a seed coat (sporophytic tissue). Plants generate different types of seeds. For instance, the endosperm may either be

  15. Seed Development and Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed is the fertilized and matured ovule of angiosperms and gymnosperms and represents a crucial stage in the life cycle of plants. Seeds of diverse plant species may display differences in size, shape and color. Despite apparent morphological variations, most mature seeds consist of three major com...

  16. Seed development and carbohydrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittich, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    Seeds assure the plant the onset of a next generation and a way of dispersal. They consist of endosperm and an embryo (originating from gametophytic tissue), enveloped by a seed coat (sporophytic tissue). Plants generate different types of seeds. For instance, the endosperm may either be consumed by

  17. Seeds and Varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Sara; Sorenson, Crista; Heineman, Bethany; Workman, Ashley Walker

    2010-01-01

    To be certified organic you must order organic seed. If for some reason organic seed is not available for a certain plant or variety, you have to write a paragraph stating that organic seed is not available and why that the certain plant or variety is needed for your system.

  18. The seed nuclear proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Ombretta; Rogniaux, Hélène; Larré, Colette; Thompson, Richard; Gallardo, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory networks coordinating seed development will help to manipulate seed traits, such as protein content and seed weight, in order to increase yield and seed nutritional value of important food crops, such as legumes. Because of the cardinal role of the nucleus in gene expression, sub-proteome analyses of nuclei from developing seeds were conducted, taking advantage of the sequences available for model species. In this review, we discuss the strategies used to separate and identify the nuclear proteins at a stage when the seed is preparing for reserve accumulation. We present how these data provide an insight into the complexity and distinctive features of the seed nuclear proteome. We discuss the presence of chromatin-modifying enzymes and proteins that have roles in RNA-directed DNA methylation and which may be involved in modifying genome architecture in preparation for seed filling. Specific features of the seed nuclei at the transition between the stage of cell divisions and that of cell expansion and reserve deposition are described here which may help to manipulate seed quality traits, such as seed weight.

  19. An overview of tissue engineering approaches for management of spinal cord injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samadikuchaksaraei Ali

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe spinal cord injury (SCI leads to devastating neurological deficits and disabilities, which necessitates spending a great deal of health budget for psychological and healthcare problems of these patients and their relatives. This justifies the cost of research into the new modalities for treatment of spinal cord injuries, even in developing countries. Apart from surgical management and nerve grafting, several other approaches have been adopted for management of this condition including pharmacologic and gene therapy, cell therapy, and use of different cell-free or cell-seeded bioscaffolds. In current paper, the recent developments for therapeutic delivery of stem and non-stem cells to the site of injury, and application of cell-free and cell-seeded natural and synthetic scaffolds have been reviewed.

  20. Association between familial atrial fibrillation and risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubitz, Steven A.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Fontes, Joao D.; Magnani, Jared W.; Rienstra, Michel; Pai, Manju; Villalon, Mark L.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Pencina, Michael J.; Levy, Daniel; Larson, Martin G.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Although the heritability of atrial fibrillation (AF) is established, the contribution of familial AF to predicting new-onset AF remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether familial occurrence of AF is associated with new-onset AF beyond established risk factors. DESIGN, SETTING, AND

  1. Association between familial atrial fibrillation and risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubitz, Steven A.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Fontes, Joao D.; Magnani, Jared W.; Rienstra, Michel; Pai, Manju; Villalon, Mark L.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Pencina, Michael J.; Levy, Daniel; Larson, Martin G.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Although the heritability of atrial fibrillation (AF) is established, the contribution of familial AF to predicting new-onset AF remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether familial occurrence of AF is associated with new-onset AF beyond established risk factors. DESIGN, SETTING, AND P

  2. Does Myocardial Infarction Beget Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Fibrillation Beget Myocardial Infarction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermond, Rob A.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Crijns, Harry J.; Rienstra, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects millions of people worldwide.(1) It is already known several decades that AF is not a benign condition, and it's associated with a 5-fold increased risk of stroke, 3-fold increased risk of heart failure, and doubling of risk of dementia and death.(2-4) Myocardial

  3. Bancos de cordón umbilical Umbilical cord banks

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    La utilización de sangre de cordón como fuente de precursores hematológicos se remonta a 1983 cuando Boyse apuntó el potencial en progenitores existente en la sangre de cordón, realizándose un año más tarde las primeras experiencias sobre modelos murinos. Tuvieron que pasar más de cinco años para que Gluckman realizara la primera experiencia en humanos. Un niño afecto de anemia de Fanconi fue trasplantado con progenitores de sangre de cordón umbilical de su hermana HLA idéntica, realizándose ...

  4. Ethnic Differences in Atrial Fibrillation Identified Using Implanted Cardiac Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lau, Chu-Pak; Gbadebo, T. David; Connolly, Stuart J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Capucci, Alessandro; Gold, Michael R.; Israel, Carsten W.; Morillo, Carlos A.; Siu, Chung-Wah; Abe, Haruhiko; Carlson, Mark; Tse, Hung-Fat; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Healey, Jeff S.

    2013-01-01

    Ethnic Difference in Atrial Fibrillation Incidence.Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is suggested to be less common among black and Asian individuals, which could reflect bias in symptom reporting and access to care. In the Asymptomatic AF and Stroke Evaluation in Pacemaker Patients and the AF

  5. Dronedarone in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Camm, A John; Halperin, Jonathan L;

    2011-01-01

    Dronedarone restores sinus rhythm and reduces hospitalization or death in intermittent atrial fibrillation. It also lowers heart rate and blood pressure and has antiadrenergic and potential ventricular antiarrhythmic effects. We hypothesized that dronedarone would reduce major vascular events...... in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation....

  6. Rising rates of hospital admissions for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Jens; Buch, Nina Pernille Gardshodn; Scharling, Henrik;

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia associated with excess morbidity and mortality. We studied temporal changes in hospital admission rates for atrial fibrillation using data from a prospective population-based cohort study spanning 2 decades (the Copenhagen City Heart Study)....

  7. Atrial fibrillation: Is ablation the way of the future?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Olshansky

    2004-01-01

    @@ This issue of the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology features a manuscript entitled "A three-pulmonary vein isolation approach to treat paroxysmal atrial fibrillation".Dr. Lexin Wang addresses an important issue, and is to be congratulated for taking a new look at an approach to ablate atrial fibrillation.

  8. The immediate future for the medical treatment of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Brendorp, Bente; Køber, Lars;

    2002-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most commonly sustained cardiac arrhythmia and a common reason for mortality and morbidity. Atrial fibrillation causes disease for three reasons: i) the ventricular rate is often high, which leads to symptoms ranging from discomfort to life threatening heart failure; ii...

  9. Vascular disease and stroke risk in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease (including myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease) has been proposed as a less well-validated risk factor for stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. We investigated whether vascular disease is an independent risk factor of stroke/thromboembolism in atrial...... fibrillation and whether adding vascular disease improves Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age 75 years, Diabetes, previous Stroke (CHADS(2)) risk stratification....

  10. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka;

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.......There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  11. Atrial fibrillation: a new look at an old arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.

    1983-01-01

    The ventricular rhythm during atrial fibrillation in human beings is random because the excitatory process of atrial fibrillation itself is almost certainly a random phenomenon. It remains random because A V junctional memory is too short to inftuence the sequence of conducted impulses . In human be

  12. Atrial fibrillation and bleeding complication - risk factors and risk marker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breithardt, G.; Ravens, U.; Kirchhof, P.; van Gelder, I. C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of atrial fibrillation (AF) is closely linked to risk factors like hypertension and heart failure, diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction and valvular heart disease. These factors partly overlap with those which determine the progression of atrial fibrillation and the incidence of

  13. EFFECT OF SOYBEAN SEED SIZE ON SEED QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atin Yulyatin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soybean seed is a seed that is rapidly deteriorate or decrease in viability and vigor, especially if stored in conditions that are less optimum savings. Soybean seed size can affect the quality of the seed. Seed quality is characterized by germination of seeds. Grain size effect on soybean utilization. Large seed size tends to be used as an industrial raw material utilization while small seed size as a seed planted back. Purpose of this study was to determine whether soybean seed size can affect the quality of the seeds while in storage. The experimental design used a Completely Randomized Design (CRD using soybean seed size is a large size (Grobogan, medium (Kaba, and small (Willis is repeated four times. Parameter observations are normal seeds, dirt seed, weight of 100 grains, moisture content, germination. Data were tabulated and analyzed using the F test, if significantly different then tested further by DMRT level of 5 percent. Large size seed has the normal number of seeds, seed dirt, moisture content higher than medium and small seed size. But has a lower germination than seeds of medium and small size. To maintain the water content of <11 percent should be larger seed size is more frequent than the dried seed medium and small sizes.

  14. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival.

  15. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Melnikova, Lucia, E-mail: melnikova@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Bednarikova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Safarik University, Kosice (Slovakia); Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasil M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Street 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gazova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Medical and Clinical Biochemistry and LABMED, Tr. SNP 1, 040 11 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size. - Highlights: • The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. • Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  16. Genetics of Atrial Fibrillation and Possible Implications for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Lemmens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia mainly caused by valvular, ischemic, hypertensive, and myopathic heart disease. Atrial fibrillation can occur in families suggesting a genetic background especially in younger subjects. Additionally recent studies have identified common genetic variants to be associated with atrial fibrillation in the general population. This cardiac arrhythmia has important public health implications because of its main complications: congestive heart failure and ischemic stroke. Since atrial fibrillation can result in ischemic stroke, one might assume that genetic determinants of this cardiac arrhythmia are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Ischemic stroke is a multifactorial, complex disease where multiple environmental and genetic factors interact. Whether genetic variants associated with a risk factor for ischemic stroke also increase the risk of a particular vascular endpoint still needs to be confirmed in many cases. Here we review the current knowledge on the genetic background of atrial fibrillation and the consequences for cerebrovascular disease.

  17. NASA's First Atrial Fibrillation Case - Deke Slayton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about heart dysrhythmia have been present since the earliest days of the US manned space program. While information about an astronaut's health is general kept private, one of the original seven American astronaut's health status was played out in a very public forum. Donald "Deke" Slayton was removed from the second manned space flight when it was discovered he had idiopathic atrial fibrillation. Referencing the original medical documents, details of how this was discovered and managed from the medical perspective will be reviewed. This is NASA's first heart dysrhythmia case in an astronaut and it proves quite interesting when placed in historic perspective.

  18. Atrial fibrillation in China: a brief review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chang-sheng; DU Xin; JIANG Chen-xi

    2009-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disturbance encountered in clinical practice.It affects at least ten million Chinese, constituting a major public health epidemic. For the shortness of resource in the initial stage of new China and the chaos during the culture revolution, there was a scarcity of AF data on the Chinese population. However, Chinese physicians had never stopped exploring in this field, which has provided a solid foundation for today's flourishing development in the research of AF. This paper aims to review the major achievements in dealing with AF in the past 60 years in China, especially in the latest 15 years.

  19. Current approaches in atrial fibrillation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Sarı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. Its incidence increases with age. AF is classified into subtypes according to the duration and/or able to provide sinus rhytym. İnitially, patients should be evaluated for rhythm or rate control for appropriate treatment. Second stage of strategy aimed to investigate the feasibility of anticoagulation therapy. Recently, due to the progress made in treatment with rhythm control and anticoagulation therapy, either American or European guidelines have been renovated. These developments have taken place in the newly published guide. In this article, the current change in the management of AF is discussed.

  20. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  1. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Go New to Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ...

  2. Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100196.htm Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... or blood disorder, your doctor may recommend percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling (PUBS), which is performed at 18 ...

  3. Efficient Seeds Computation Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Christou, Michalis; Iliopoulos, Costas S; Kubica, Marcin; Pissis, Solon P; Radoszewski, Jakub; Rytter, Wojciech; Szreder, Bartosz; Walen, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    The notion of the cover is a generalization of a period of a string, and there are linear time algorithms for finding the shortest cover. The seed is a more complicated generalization of periodicity, it is a cover of a superstring of a given string, and the shortest seed problem is of much higher algorithmic difficulty. The problem is not well understood, no linear time algorithm is known. In the paper we give linear time algorithms for some of its versions --- computing shortest left-seed array, longest left-seed array and checking for seeds of a given length. The algorithm for the last problem is used to compute the seed array of a string (i.e., the shortest seeds for all the prefixes of the string) in $O(n^2)$ time. We describe also a simpler alternative algorithm computing efficiently the shortest seeds. As a by-product we obtain an $O(n\\log{(n/m)})$ time algorithm checking if the shortest seed has length at least $m$ and finding the corresponding seed. We also correct some important details missing in th...

  4. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of

  5. Ultrastructural organization of amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, A K; MacPhee, C E; Zurdo, J; Morozova-Roche, L A; Hill, H A; Dobson, C M; Davis, J J

    2000-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been employed to investigate the structural organization of amyloid fibrils produced in vitro from three very different polypeptide sequences. The systems investigated are a 10-residue peptide derived from the sequence of transthyretin, the 90-residue SH3 domain of bovine phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase, and human wild-type lysozyme, a 130-residue protein containing four disulfide bridges. The results demonstrate distinct similarities between the structures formed by the different classes of fibrils despite the contrasting nature of the polypeptide species involved. SH3 and lysozyme fibrils consist typically of four protofilaments, exhibiting a left-handed twist along the fibril axis. The substructure of TTR(10-19) fibrils is not resolved by atomic force microscopy and their uniform appearance is suggestive of a regular self-association of very thin filaments. We propose that the exact number and orientation of protofilaments within amyloid fibrils is dictated by packing of the regions of the polypeptide chains that are not directly involved in formation of the cross-beta core of the fibrils. The results obtained for these proteins, none of which is directly associated with any human disease, are closely similar to those of disease-related amyloid fibrils, supporting the concept that amyloid is a generic structure of polypeptide chains. The detailed architecture of an individual fibril, however, depends on the manner in which the protofilaments assemble into the fibrillar structure, which in turn is dependent on the sequence of the polypeptide and the conditions under which the fibril is formed.

  6. Progression of atrial fibrillation in the REgistry on Cardiac rhythm disORDers assessing the control of Atrial Fibrillation cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vos, Cees B; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John;

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) may progress to persistent AF. We studied the clinical correlates and the effect of rhythm-control strategy on AF progression.......Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) may progress to persistent AF. We studied the clinical correlates and the effect of rhythm-control strategy on AF progression....

  7. Hot seeding using large Y-123 seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scruggs, S J; Putman, P T; Zhou, Y X; Fang, H; Salama, K [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    There are several motivations for increasing the diameter of melt textured single domain discs. The maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that have traditionally been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators and electric propulsion. We have investigated the possibility of using large area epitaxial growth instead of the conventional point nucleation growth mechanism. This process involves the use of large Y123 seeds for the purpose of increasing the maximum achievable Y123 single domain size. The hot seeding technique using large Y-123 seeds was employed to seed Y-123 samples. Trapped field measurements indicate that single domain samples were indeed grown by this technique. Microstructural evaluation indicates that growth can be characterized by a rapid nucleation followed by the usual peritectic grain growth which occurs when large seeds are used. Critical temperature measurements show that no local T{sub c} suppression occurs in the vicinity of the seed. This work supports the suggestion of using an iterative method for increasing the size of Y-123 single domains that can be grown.

  8. Oil palm seed distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand-Gasselin Tristan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available For a tropical plant, the oil palm commodity chain has the peculiarity of possessing a major seed production sector for reasons that are primarily genetic. This seed sector has numerous original aspects. Breeders are also propagators and usually also distribute their seeds. Oil palm seeds are semi-recalcitrant: they display pseudo-dormancy. Achieving seed germination is difficult and requires lengthy treatments and special installations. This restriction greatly influences seed distribution and the role of the different stakeholders in the commodity chain. It was only once it had been discovered how the “sh” gene functioned, which controls shell thickness, and when it became necessary to produce “tenera” seeds derived from exclusively “dura x pisifera” crosses, that a true seed market developed. In addition it is difficult to organize seed distribution to smallholders. This is partly due to difficulties that the profession, or a State-run organization, has in controlling middlemen networks, and partly to the absence of any protective systems (UPOV, plant breeder certificate, etc. that generally oblige breeders to preserve and propagate parents in their own installations. In fact there are major inequalities in the access to seeds between agroindustry and smallholders. Another peculiarity of the oil palm seed market is the virtually total absence of guarantees for buyers: the quality of the research conducted by breeders, the seed production strategies necessary for transferring genetic progress, and the technical quality of production. The only guarantee today comes from the relations of confidence established year after year between breeders/distributors and growers. In this fields, research can lead to some proposals: molecular biology offers some interesting prospects for certifying seed quality and social science develop effective communication methods.

  9. Timing of Surgery After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Matthew; Schuster, James

    2017-01-01

    Although timing for surgical intervention after spinal cord injury remains controversial, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that early surgery may improve neurologic outcomes, particularly with incomplete spinal cord injury, and may reduce non-neurologic complications and health care resource utilization. Moreover, even in patients with complete spinal cord injury, minor improvement in neurologic function can lead to significant changes in quality of life. This article reviews the experimental and clinical data examining surgical timing after spinal cord injury.

  10. Management of umbilical cord clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbon, Lucy

    2013-02-01

    The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has updated its third stage of labour guidelines (RCM 2012) to be clearly supportive of a delay in umbilical cord clamping, although specific guidance on timing is yet to be announced. It is therefore imperative that both midwives and student midwives understand and are able to integrate delaying into their practice, as well as communicating to women the benefits; only in this way can we give women fully informed choices on this aspect of care. The main benefit of delayed cord clamping is the protection it can provide in reducing childhood anaemia, which is a major issue, especially in poorer countries. A review of the evidence found no risks linked to delayed clamping, and no evidence that it cannot be used in combination with the administration of uterotonic drugs. Delayed cord clamping can be especially beneficial for pre term and compromised babies.

  11. Aquaporins in the Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal K. Oklinski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are water channel proteins robustly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS. A number of previous studies described the cellular expression sites and investigated their major roles and function in the brain and spinal cord. Among thirteen different mammalian AQPs, AQP1 and AQP4 have been mainly studied in the CNS and evidence has been presented that they play important roles in the pathogenesis of CNS injury, edema and multiple diseases such as multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, glioblastoma multiforme, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. The objective of this review is to highlight the current knowledge about AQPs in the spinal cord and their proposed roles in pathophysiology and pathogenesis related to spinal cord lesions and injury.

  12. Does the informal seed system threaten cowpea seed health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.; Oguntade, O.; Lava Kumar, P.; Stomph, T.J.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Most smallholder farmers in developing countries depend on an informal Seed System (SS) for their seed. The informal SS is often criticized because farmer-produced seed samples are not tested for seed health, thus accepting the risk of planting infected seeds. Here we aimed at assessing the quality

  13. Does the informal seed system threaten cowpea seed health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, P.C.; Oguntade, O.; Lava Kumar, P.; Stomph, T.J.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Most smallholder farmers in developing countries depend on an informal Seed System (SS) for their seed. The informal SS is often criticized because farmer-produced seed samples are not tested for seed health, thus accepting the risk of planting infected seeds. Here we aimed at assessing the quality

  14. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  15. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Marong Fang; Haohao Chen; Fangming Gou; Mingxing Ding

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies.

  16. Delayed umbilical cord separation in alloimmune neutropenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, A S; Lubitz, L

    1993-01-01

    Delayed umbilical cord separation in association with neonatal alloimmune neutropenia is reported. Delayed umbilical cord separation has been described in association with defects in neutrophil function. The present case indicates that deficiency in neutrophil number should also be considered as a cause of delayed cord separation.

  17. Phase statistics approach to human ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Chya; Watanabe, Eiichi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hu, Chin-Kun; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2009-11-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is known to be the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmia, frequently leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). During VF, cardiac output drops to nil and, unless the fibrillation is promptly halted, death usually ensues within minutes. While delivering life saving electrical shocks is a method of preventing SCD, it has been recognized that some, though not many, VF episodes are self-terminating, and understanding the mechanism of spontaneous defibrillation might provide newer therapeutic options for treatment of this otherwise fatal arrhythmia. Using the phase statistics approach, recently developed to study financial and physiological time series, here, we reveal the timing characteristics of transient features of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (mostly VF) electrocardiogram (ECG) and find that there are three distinct types of probability density function (PDF) of phase distributions: uniform (UF), concave (CC), and convex (CV). Our data show that VF patients with UF or CC types of PDF have approximately the same probability of survival and nonsurvival, while VF patients with CV type PDF have zero probability of survival, implying that their VF episodes are never self-terminating. Our results suggest that detailed phase statistics of human ECG data may be a key to understanding the mechanism of spontaneous defibrillation of fatal VF.

  18. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-07

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Atrial fibrillation associated with exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2010-11-19

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is an increasingly recognized entity that is defined as a normal serum free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine levels with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level suppressed below the normal range and usually undetectable. It has been reported that subclinical hyperthyroidism is not associated with coronary heart disease or mortality from cardiovascular causes but it is sufficient to induce arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. It has also been reported that increased factor X activity in patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism represents a potential hypercoagulable state. Moreover acute myocardial infarction has been reported during L-thyroxine substitution therapy. Far more common and relatively less studied is exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism caused by L-thyroxine administration to thyroidectomized or hypothyroid patients or patients with simple or nodular goiter. We present a case of atrial fibrillation associated with exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism, in a 72-year-old Italian woman. Also this case focuses attention on the importance of a correct evaluation of subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  20. α-Synuclein aggregation, seeding and inhibition by scyllo-inositol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Tarek [Biological Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, M4N 3M5, ON (Canada); McLaurin, JoAnne, E-mail: jmclaurin@sri.utoronto.ca [Biological Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute (Canada); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, M4N 3M5, ON (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Recent literature demonstrates the accelerated aggregation of α-synuclein, a protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), by the presence of preformed fibrillar conformers in vitro. Furthermore, these preformed fibrillar seeds are suggested to accelerate pathological induction in vivo when injected into the brains of mice. Variation in the results of in vivo studies is proposed to be caused by α-synuclein conformational variants. To investigate the impact of amino acid sequence on seeding efficiency, human and mouse α-synuclein seeds, which vary at 7 amino acid residues, were generated and cross-seeding kinetics studied. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we confirmed that mouse α-synuclein aggregated more rapidly than human α-synuclein. Subsequently, we determined that seeding of human and mouse α-synuclein was more rapid in the presence of seeds generated from the same species. In addition, an established amyloid inhibitor, scyllo-inositol, was examined for potential inhibitory effects on α-synuclein aggregation. TEM analysis of protein:inhibitor assays demonstrated that scyllo-inositol inhibits the aggregation of α-synuclein, suggesting the therapeutic potential of the small molecule in PD. - Highlights: • Mouse α-syn fibrillizes in a significantly shorter timeframe than human α-syn. • Seeding of monomers is more efficient when seeds originate from the same species. • scyllo-Inositol has anti-aggregation effects on mouse and human α-syn.

  1. Fibril morphology and tendon mechanical properties in patellar tendinopathy: effects of heavy slow resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, Mads; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Jytte;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patellar tendinopathy is characterized by pathologic abnormalities. Heavy slow resistance training (HSR) is effective in the management of patellar tendinopathy, but the underlying functional mechanisms remain elusive. PURPOSE: To investigate fibril morphology and mechanical properties...... area decreased (-26% +/- 21%, P = .04) in tendinopathic tendons after HSR. CONCLUSION: Fibril morphology is abnormal in tendinopathy, but tendon mechanical properties are not. Clinical improvements after HSR were associated with changes in fibril morphology toward normal fibril density and mean fibril...... area. Heavy slow resistance training improved the clinical outcome of patellar tendinopathy, and these improvements were associated with normalization of fibril morphology, most likely due to a production of new fibrils....

  2. Delayed umbilical cord clamping in premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaempf, Joseph W; Tomlinson, Mark W; Kaempf, Andrew J; Wu, YingXing; Wang, Lian; Tipping, Nicole; Grunkemeier, Gary

    2012-08-01

    Delayed umbilical cord clamping is reported to increase neonatal blood volume. We estimated the clinical outcomes in premature neonates who had delayed umbilical cord clamping compared with a similar group who had early umbilical cord clamping. This was a before-after investigation comparing early umbilical cord clamping with delayed umbilical cord clamping (45 seconds) in two groups of singleton neonates, very low birth weight (VLBW) (401-1,500 g) and low birth weight (LBW) (greater than 1,500 g but less than 35 weeks gestation). Neonates were excluded from delayed umbilical cord clamping if they needed immediate major resuscitation. Primary outcomes were provision of delivery room resuscitation, hematocrit, red cell transfusions, and the principle Vermont Oxford Network outcomes. In VLBW neonates (77 delayed umbilical cord clamping, birth weight [mean±standard deviation] 1,099±266 g; 77 early umbilical cord clamping 1,058±289 g), delayed umbilical cord clamping was associated with less delivery room resuscitation, higher Apgar scores at 1 minute, and higher hematocrit. Delayed umbilical cord clamping was not associated with significant differences in the overall transfusion rate, peak bilirubin, any of the principle Vermont Oxford Network outcomes, or mortality. In LBW neonates (172 delayed umbilical cord clamping, birth weight [mean±standard deviation] 2,159±384 g; 172 early umbilical cord clamping 2,203±447 g), delayed umbilical cord clamping was associated with higher hematocrit and was not associated with a change in delivery room resuscitation or Apgar scores or with changes in the transfusion rate or peak bilirubin. Regression analysis showed increasing gestational age and birth weight and delayed umbilical cord clamping were the best predictors of higher hematocrit and less delivery room resuscitation. Delayed umbilical cord clamping can safely be performed in singleton premature neonates and is associated with a higher hematocrit, less delivery room

  3. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation. PMID:26184996

  4. Crystallization on prestructured seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The crystallization transition of an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid in the presence of small prestructured seeds is studied with transition path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the homogeneous crystallization, clusters of a few particles arranged into a face- and body-centered cubic structure enhance the crystallization, while icosahedrally ordered seeds do not change the reaction rate. We identify two distinct nucleation regimes-close to the seed and in the bulk. Crystallites form close to the face- and body-centered structures and tend to stay away from the icosahedrally ordered seeds.

  5. Repair of injured spinal cord using biomaterial scaffolds and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bikesh; Coykendall, Katherine; Li, Yongchao; Moon, Alex; Priyadarshani, Priyanka; Yao, Li

    2014-08-01

    The loss of neurons and degeneration of axons after spinal cord injury result in the loss of sensory and motor functions. A bridging biomaterial construct that allows the axons to grow through has been investigated for the repair of injured spinal cord. Due to the hostility of the microenvironment in the lesion, multiple conditions need to be fulfilled to achieve improved functional recovery. A scaffold has been applied to bridge the gap of the lesion as contact guidance for axonal growth and to act as a vehicle to deliver stem cells in order to modify the microenvironment. Stem cells may improve functional recovery of the injured spinal cord by providing trophic support or directly replacing neurons and their support cells. Neural stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells have been seeded into biomaterial scaffolds and investigated for spinal cord regeneration. Both natural and synthetic biomaterials have increased stem cell survival in vivo by providing the cells with a controlled microenvironment in which cell growth and differentiation are facilitated. This optimal multi‒disciplinary approach of combining biomaterials, stem cells, and biomolecules offers a promising treatment for the injured spinal cord.

  6. Producing the target seed: Seed collection, treatment, and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2011-01-01

    The role of high quality seeds in producing target seedlings is reviewed. Basic seed handling and upgrading techniques are summarized. Current advances in seed science and technology as well as those on the horizon are discussed.

  7. Effects of tallowtree seed coat on seed germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-xian; GU Hong-biao; MAO Yan; YIN Tong-ming; GAO Han-dong

    2012-01-01

    We measured physiological parameters including water uptake,in-vitro embryo germination ratio,and seed coat structure observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to explore the influence of seed coat on the germination of seeds of tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum (Linn) Roxb.).Tallow tree seeds had good water permeability.We found that germination of cabbage seeds was inhibited when cabbage seeds were soaked in extracted solutions from tallow tree seed coat.Seed coat structure at the side of the radicle appeared to be a barrier to seed germination.We tested methods to break tallow tree seed dormancy.Dormancy of tallow tree seeds was overcome by soaking the seeds in 500 mg·L-1 or 1000 mg·L-1 GA3,followed by 100 days of cold stratification.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Single Collagen Fibrils Revealed by Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John; Phillips, Charlotte; Grandbois, Michel

    2004-03-01

    In the field of biomechanics, collagen fibrils are believed to be robust mechanical structures characterized by a low extensibility. Until very recently, information on the mechanical properties of collagen fibrils could only be derived from ensemble measurements performed on complete tissues such as bone, skin and tendon. Here we measure force-elongation/relaxation profiles of single collagen fibrils using atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy. The elongation profiles indicate that in vitro assembled heterotrimeric type I collagen fibrils are characterized by a large extensibility. Numerous discontinuities and a plateau in the force profile indicate major reorganization occurs within the fibrils in the 1.5 -- 4.5 nN range. Our study demonstrates that newly assembled collagen fibrils are robust structures with a significant reserve of elasticity that could play a determinant role in cellular motion in the context of tissue growth and morphogenesis. In contrast, homotrimeric collagen fibrils corresponding to osteogenesis imperfecta pathology exhibit a marked difference in their elasticity profile.

  9. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid β fibrillation kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ► Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ► Aβ(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ► We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of Aβ(1–40) fibril formation. ► At high Aβ(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ► Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid β (Aβ) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. Aβ(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  10. Amyloid fibrils nucleated and organized by DNA origami constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomprasert, Anuttara; Bongiovanni, Marie N.; Sha, Ruojie; Sherman, William B.; Wang, Tong; Arora, Paramjit S.; Canary, James W.; Gras, Sally L.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered, insoluble protein aggregates that are associated with neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The fibrils have a common rod-like core structure, formed from an elongated stack of β-strands, and have a rigidity similar to that of silk (Young's modulus of 0.2-14 GPa). They also exhibit high thermal and chemical stability and can be assembled in vitro from short synthetic non-disease-related peptides. As a result, they are of significant interest in the development of self-assembled materials for bionanotechnology applications. Synthetic DNA molecules have previously been used to form intricate structures and organize other materials such as metal nanoparticles and could in principle be used to nucleate and organize amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that DNA origami nanotubes can sheathe amyloid fibrils formed within them. The fibrils are built by modifying the synthetic peptide fragment corresponding to residues 105-115 of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin and a DNA origami construct is used to form 20-helix DNA nanotubes with sufficient space for the fibrils inside. Once formed, the fibril-filled nanotubes can be organized onto predefined two-dimensional platforms via DNA-DNA hybridization interactions.

  11. Fibril formation from pea protein and subsequent gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munialo, Claire Darizu; Martin, Anneke H; van der Linden, Erik; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2014-03-19

    The objective of this study was to characterize fibrillar aggregates made using pea proteins, to assemble formed fibrils into protein-based gels, and to study the rheological behavior of these gels. Micrometer-long fibrillar aggregates were observed after pea protein solutions had been heated for 20 h at pH 2.0. Following heating of pea proteins, it was observed that all of the proteins were hydrolyzed into peptides and that 50% of these peptides were assembled into fibrils. Changes on a structural level in pea proteins were studied using circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. During the fibril assembly process, an increase in aggregate size was observed, which coincided with an increase in thioflavin T binding, indicating the presence of β-sheet aggregates. Fibrils made using pea proteins were more branched and curly. Gel formation of preformed fibrils was induced by slow acidification from pH 7.0 to a final pH of around pH 5.0. The ability of pea protein-based fibrillar gels to fracture during an amplitude sweep was comparable to those of soy protein and whey protein-based fibrillar gels, although gels prepared from fibrils made using pea protein and soy protein were weaker than those of whey protein. The findings show that fibrils can be prepared from pea protein, which can be incorporated into protein-based fibrillar gels.

  12. Sequence dependent aggregation of peptides and fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Ba; Le, Duy-Manh; Hoang, Trinh X.

    2017-09-01

    Deciphering the links between amino acid sequence and amyloid fibril formation is key for understanding protein misfolding diseases. Here we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the aggregation of short peptides in a coarse-grained model with hydrophobic-polar (HP) amino acid sequences and correlated side chain orientations for hydrophobic contacts. A significant heterogeneity is observed in the aggregate structures and in the thermodynamics of aggregation for systems of different HP sequences and different numbers of peptides. Fibril-like ordered aggregates are found for several sequences that contain the common HPH pattern, while other sequences may form helix bundles or disordered aggregates. A wide variation of the aggregation transition temperatures among sequences, even among those of the same hydrophobic fraction, indicates that not all sequences undergo aggregation at a presumable physiological temperature. The transition is found to be the most cooperative for sequences forming fibril-like structures. For a fibril-prone sequence, it is shown that fibril formation follows the nucleation and growth mechanism. Interestingly, a binary mixture of peptides of an aggregation-prone and a non-aggregation-prone sequence shows the association and conversion of the latter to the fibrillar structure. Our study highlights the role of a sequence in selecting fibril-like aggregates and also the impact of a structural template on fibril formation by peptides of unrelated sequences.

  13. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreh, Michael [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Willander, Hanna [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Soeder, Olle [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Jan [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Joernvall, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Jornvall@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  14. Silent Atrial Fibrillation: Definition, Clarification, and Unanswered Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Harold L

    2015-11-01

    Silent or subclinical asymptomatic atrial fibrillation has currently gained wide interest in the epidemiologic, neurologic and cardiovascular communities. The association of brief episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or surrogate atrial arrhythmias which predict future clinical adverse events have been established. Nevertheless there exists a confounding array of definitions to indicate its presence without discrete indication of which populations should be examined. Moreover the term "atrial fibrillation burden" (AFB) has emerged from such studies with a plethora of descriptions to prognosticate both arrhythmic and clinical adverse events. This presentation suggests clarification of diagnostic definitions associated with silent atrial fibrillation, and a more precise description of AFB. It examines the populations across the current disease and cardiovascular invasive therapeutic spectrum that lead to both silent atrial fibrillation and AFB. It describes the diagnostic methods of arrhythmia detection utilizing the surface ECG, subcutaneous ECG or intra-cardiac devices and their relationship in seeking meaningful arrhythmic markers of silent atrial fibrillation. Whereas a wide range of clinical risk factors of silent atrial fibrillation have been validated in the literature, there is an ongoing search for those arrhythmic risk factors that precisely identify and prognosticate outcome events in diverse populations at risk of atrial fibrillation and its complications. This presentation identifies this chaos, and focuses attention on the issues to be addressed to facilitate descriptive and comparative scientific studies in the future. It is a call to action specifically to the medical arrhythmic community and its specialty societies (i.e., ISHNE, HRS, EHRA) to begin a quest to unravel the arrhythmic quagmire associated with "silent atrial fibrillation."

  15. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  16. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Patient Care Resources Information & Education SCI Empowerment Project Projects & Research FAQ © 2017 University of Washington ... Cord Injury” (PDF - 477KB)] Depression is a common illness that can affect ... or a mental health specialist immediately. Also, inform those around you ...

  17. Detecting and Diagnosing Atrial Fibrillation (D2AF): study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Uittenbogaart, Steven B.; Verbiest-van Gurp, Nicole; Erkens, Petra M. G.; Lucassen, Wim A M; Knottnerus, J. André; Winkens, Bjorn; van Weert, Henk C P M; Stoffers, Henri E. J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is a common cause of stroke and other morbidity. Adequate treatment with anticoagulants reduces the risk of stroke by 60 %. Early detection and treatment of atrial fibrillation could prevent strokes. Atrial fibrillation is often asymptomatic and/or paroxysmal. Case-finding with pulse palpation is an effective screening method, but new methods for detecting atrial fibrillation have been developed. To detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation ambulatory rhythm recordi...

  18. Angiomyxoma: a rare tumor of the umbilical cord

    OpenAIRE

    Göksever, Hale; Celiloğlu, Murat; Küpelioğlu, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Tumors of the umbilical cord are rare anomalies and should be considered when using prenatal ultrasound for detection of cystic lesions. Differential diagnosis of umbilical cord tumors should comprise umbilical cord teratoma, hemangioma and angiomyxoma. It can also be an umbilical cord polyp, umbilical cord cyst, hernia into the cord and omphalocele, which are mostly isolated findings, except omphalocele. Angiomyxoma is a rare tumor of the umbilical cord and is associated with incresaed perin...

  19. YKL-40 levels and atrial fibrillation in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Benn, Marianne; Johansen, Julia S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is associated with inflammation. In contrast to inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen produced in the liver, YKL-40 is produced at the site of inflammation including in the myocardium. We hypothesized that elevated plasma YKL-40 levels...... associate with increased risk of atrial fibrillation. METHOD AND RESULTS: We measured plasma YKL-40 in 8731 participants from the prospective Copenhagen City Heart Study including 896 individuals who developed atrial fibrillation during up to 18years of follow-up. Additionally, we measured YKL-40 in 6621...

  20. 'Real-world' atrial fibrillation management in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proietti, Marco; Laroche, Cécile; Opolski, Grzegorz;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is commonly associated with a high risk of stroke, thromboembolism, and mortality. The 1-year follow-up of the EURObservational Research Programme-Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot Registry demonstrated a high mortality but good outcomes with European Society...... (61.8%). Atrial fibrillation readmissions were frequent, particularly related to arrhythmias and heart failure. On multivariate analyses, any cardiovascular reason for admission rather than AF was significantly associated with increased mortality during the 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: In this 2-year...

  1. Muskmelon seed priming in relation to seed vigor

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento Warley Marcos; Aragão Fernando Antônio Souza de

    2004-01-01

    A number of important factors may affect seed priming response, including seed quality. Effects of seed vigor on seed priming response were investigated using seed lots of two muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) cultivars. Seeds of muskmelon, cvs. Mission and Top Net SR were artificially aged at 43°C for 0, 20 and 40 hours. Seeds were primed for six days in darkness at 25°C in KNO3 (0.35 mol L-1) aerated solution. Aged seeds germinated poorly at 17°C. Priming increased germination rate at 17 and 25°C...

  2. Effects of Soybean Oil Modified Cellulose Fibril and Organosilane Modified Cellulose Fibril on Crystallization of Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Thanomchat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean oil modified cellulose fibril (Oil-g-CF and organosilane modified cellulose fibril (Silane-g-CF were prepared using maleinized soybean oil and hexadecyltrimethoxysilane, respectively. Thus obtained modified cellulose fibril was added to polypropylene by a simple melt mixing on a hotplate. PP/modified CF composites with 4.0 wt% filler content were prepared. The composites were subject to a polarized optical microscope to investigate particle dispersion, supramolecular morphology, and crystallization behavior. It was found that Silane-g-CF exhibited smaller particle sizes with better particle distribution when compared to Oil-g-CF. In addition, the etched composite samples unveiled an increase in a number of spherulite crystals as well as a decrease in the spherulite size. The nonisothermal crystallization study of composites revealed that both Oil-g-CF and Silane-g-CF were capable of nucleating PP by facilitating faster crystallization process and raising the number of spherulites. The DSC results indicated that Silane-g-CF was able to perform a more effective nucleation than Oil-g-CF, judged by a higher crystallization temperature. Moreover, PP composites containing Oil-g-CF and Silane-g-CF had higher crystallinity by 7% and 10%, for the first and the latter, respectively, when compared to neat PP.

  3. Collagen fibril surface displays a constellation of sites capable of promoting fibril assembly, stability, and hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgel, J.P.; Antipova, O.; Sagi, I.; Bitler, A.; Qiu, D.; Wang, R.; Xu, Y.; San Antonio, J.D. (IIT)

    2011-12-14

    Fibrillar collagens form the structural basis of organs and tissues including the vasculature, bone, and tendon. They are also dynamic, organizational scaffolds that present binding and recognition sites for ligands, cells, and platelets. We interpret recently published X-ray diffraction findings and use atomic force microscopy data to illustrate the significance of new insights into the functional organization of the collagen fibril. These data indicate that collagen's most crucial functional domains localize primarily to the overlap region, comprising a constellation of sites we call the 'master control region.' Moreover, the collagen's most exposed aspect contains its most stable part - the C-terminal region that controls collagen assembly, cross-linking, and blood clotting. Hidden beneath the fibril surface exists a constellation of 'cryptic' sequences poised to promote hemostasis and cell - collagen interactions in tissue injury and regeneration. These findings begin to address several important, and previously unresolved, questions: How functional domains are organized in the fibril, which domains are accessible, and which require proteolysis or structural trauma to become exposed? Here we speculate as to how collagen fibrillar organization impacts molecular processes relating to tissue growth, development, and repair.

  4. What Are Chia Seeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet? Chia seeds come from the desert plant Salvia hispanica , a member of the mint family. Salvia hispanica seed is often sold under its common name "chia" as well as several trademarked names. Its origin is believed to be in ... plant, Salvia columbariae (golden chia), were used primarily by Native ...

  5. Seed thioredoxin h

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    , for example chloroplastic f- and m-type thioredoxins involved in regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle. The cytosolic h-type thioredoxins act as key regulators of seed germination and are recycled by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase. The present review on thioredoxin h systems in plant seeds focuses...

  6. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and redu

  7. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management : proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Guenter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S. Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbuechel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Moeller, Steen; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A.; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C.; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Vardas, Panagiotis E.; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, Andre; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Camm, A. John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations,

  8. Ultra-sensitive detection of prion protein fibrils by flow cytometry in blood from cattle affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Elke

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The definite diagnosis of prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE in cattle currently relies on the post mortem detection of the pathological form of the prion protein (PrPSc in brain tissue. Infectivity studies indicate that PrPSc may also be present in body fluids, even at presymptomatic stages of the disease, albeit at concentrations well below the detection limits of currently available analytical methods. Results We developed a highly sensitive method for detecting prion protein aggregates that takes advantage of kinetic differences between seeded and unseeded polymerization of prion protein monomers. Detection of the aggregates was carried out by flow cytometry. In the presence of prion seeds, the association of labelled recombinant PrP monomers in plasma and serum proceeds much more efficiently than in the absence of seeds. In a diagnostic model system, synthetic PrP aggregates were detected down to a concentration of approximately 10-8 nM [0.24 fg/ml]. A specific signal was detected in six out of six available serum samples from BSE-positive cattle. Conclusion We have developed a method based on seed-dependent PrP fibril formation that shows promising results in differentiating a small number of BSE-positive serum samples from healthy controls. This method may provide the basis for an ante mortem diagnostic test for prion diseases.

  9. Prognosis of ventricular fibrillation in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, G V; Torp-Pedersen, C; Køber, L

    1992-01-01

    (P = 0.01). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that heart failure and cardiogenic shock were significant risk factors for in-hospital death among patients with IHD. Among discharged patients 1 and 5 years survival was 78% and 51% for patients with MI, 63% and 25% for patients with IHD, 67......In a retrospective study of 520 patients with in-hospital ventricular fibrillation 421 (81%) had acute myocardial infarction (MI), 66 (13%) had ischaemic heart disease (IHD) without MI, 33 (6%) had no signs of IHD. The in-hospital mortality of these three groups was 51%, 52%, and 27%, respectively...... with known IHD suffering in-hospital VF without AMI have a very poor short- and long-term prognosis. These patients need extensive cardiac examination....

  10. [Atrial fibrillation concomitant with valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease frequently have atrial fibrillation(AF) due to elevated pressure and dilatation of the left and right atria and pulmonary veins. Guidelines for valvular heart disease and AF recommend that surgical treatment for the valvular heart disease should be performed concomitantly with AF surgery. The Full-Maze procedure has evolved into the gold standard of treatment for medically refractory AF. In addition to the pulmonary vein isolation, the right and left atrial incisions of the Full-Maze procedure are designed to block potential macroreentrant pathways. According to the mechanisms of AF with valvular heart disease, the Full-Maze procedure is more effective for the patients than the pulmonary vein isolation alone.

  11. Propofol effects on atrial fibrillation wavefront delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; Millet, José; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2010-08-01

    Since the cardiac activity during atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by autonomic modulations, in this study, a novel method to quantify the effects of the most common anesthetic agent (propofol) in AF ablation procedures is introduced. This study has two main objectives: first, to assess whether the sedation earlier to radio frequency ablation affects the arrhythmia itself, and second, to provide new information that contributes to a better understanding of the influence of the autonomic nervous system on AF. The methodology presented is based on the measurement of synchronization and delay indexes between two atrial activations at adjacent intracavitary electrodes. These parameters aim to estimate whether two activations at different sites may be caused by the same propagating wavefront, or otherwise, are the consequence of independent wavefronts. The results showed that the mentioned indexes have a different behavior at both atria: the right atrium becomes more synchronized with propofol administration, whereas the synchronization index decreases at the left atrium.

  12. Atrial Fibrillation, Cognitive Decline And Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alvaro; Arenas de Larriva, Antonio P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia. Growing evidence supports a role for AF as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia. In this review, we summarize epidemiologic observations linking AF with cognitive outcomes, describe potential mechanisms, and explore the impact of AF treatments on cognitive decline and dementia. Community-based, observational studies show a consistent higher rate of cognitive decline and risk of dementia in persons with AF. These associations are partly due to the increased risk of clinical stroke in AF, but other mechanisms, including incidence of silent cerebral infarcts, microbleeds, and cerebral hypoperfusion, are likely additional contributors. Adequate oral anticoagulation and improved management of the overall cardiovascular risk profile in persons with AF offer the promise of reducing the impact of AF on cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:27547248

  13. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Atrial Fibrillation in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most common arrhythmias. It reduces quality of life and its duration due to thromboembolic complications. Obesity contributes to the structural and electrical remodeling of atrial myocardium. This leads to occurrence of ectopic foci in the mouths of the pulmonary veins and the disruption of normal electrical conduction in the atria. Systemic inflammation, myocardial fibrosis, cardiomyocyte overload by Na+ and Ca2+ ions, accumulation in the cells of unoxidized metabolic products, imbalance of the autonomic regulation are considered as the main mechanisms of arrhythmogenic substrate formation. Hypertension, insulin resistance, and obstructive sleep apnea, associated with obesity, increase the risk of development and progression of the arrhythmia. Study of pathogenetic mechanisms of AF in obesity is necessary to develop new strategies for its prevention and the creation of more effective methods of treatment of these patients.

  14. Mapping techniques for atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2007-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia. Although significant work still needs to be done, recent advances in understanding the mechanism of AF have led to the development of elegant catheter mapping techniques for ablation of AF. These improved mapping techniques are complemented by an evolution in various imaging and navigational technologies, several of which can now be combined in a process called registration, so that the physician no longer needs to rely solely on a mental image of the anatomy of the left atrium and the pulmonary vein while attempting to ablate the region. Ongoing advances in mapping technique will increase safety and efficacy and it is likely that AF ablation will become the first-line therapy in most patients with this complicated arrhythmia.

  15. Seed germination and vigor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajjou, Loïc; Duval, Manuel; Gallardo, Karine; Catusse, Julie; Bally, Julia; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Germination vigor is driven by the ability of the plant embryo, embedded within the seed, to resume its metabolic activity in a coordinated and sequential manner. Studies using "-omics" approaches support the finding that a main contributor of seed germination success is the quality of the messenger RNAs stored during embryo maturation on the mother plant. In addition, proteostasis and DNA integrity play a major role in the germination phenotype. Because of its pivotal role in cell metabolism and its close relationships with hormone signaling pathways regulating seed germination, the sulfur amino acid metabolism pathway represents a key biochemical determinant of the commitment of the seed to initiate its development toward germination. This review highlights that germination vigor depends on multiple biochemical and molecular variables. Their characterization is expected to deliver new markers of seed quality that can be used in breeding programs and/or in biotechnological approaches to improve crop yields.

  16. The earliest seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, W.H.; Rothwell, G.W.; Scheckler, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Lagenostomalean-type seeds in bifurcating cupule systems have been discovered in the late Devonian Hampshire Formation of Randolph County, West Virginia, USA (Fig. 1). The associated megaflora, plants from coal balls, and vertebrate and invertebrate faunas demonstrate that the material is Famennian; the microflora indicates a more specific Fa2c age. Consequently, these seeds predate Archaeosperma arnoldii1 from the Fa2d of northeastern Pennsylvania, the oldest previously reported seed. By applying precision fracture, transfer, de??gagement, and thin-section techniques to selected cupules from the more than 100 specimens on hand, we have determined the three-dimensional morphology and histology of the seeds (Fig. 2a-h, k) and cupule systems. A comparison with known late Devonian to early Carboniferous seeds reveals that ours are more primitively organized than all except Genomosperma2,3. ?? 1981 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Clinical characteristics, management, and control of permanent vs. nonpermanent atrial fibrillation: insights from the RealiseAF survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation can be categorized into nonpermanent and permanent atrial fibrillation. There is less information on permanent than on nonpermanent atrial fibrillation patients. This analysis aimed to describe the characteristics and current management, including the proportion of patients with successful atrial fibrillation control, of these atrial fibrillation subsets in a large, geographically diverse contemporary sample.

  18. Left Atrial Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternik, Leonid; Schaff, Hartzel V.; Luria, David; Glikson, Michael; Kogan, Alexander; Malachy, Ateret; First, Maya; Raanani, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    The maze procedure is the gold standard for the ablation of atrial fibrillation, and the “box lesion” around the pulmonary veins is the most important part of this procedure. We have created this lesion with a bipolar radiofrequency ablator, abandoning the usual use of this device (to achieve bilateral epicardial isolation of the pulmonary veins). From March 2004 through the end of May 2010, we performed surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in 240 patients. Of this number, 205 underwent operation by a hybrid maze technique and the remaining 35 (our study cohort) underwent the creation of a box lesion around the pulmonary veins by means of a bipolar radiofrequency device. Ablation lines were created by connecting the left atriotomy to the amputated left atrial appendage, with 2 ablation lines made with a bipolar radiofrequency device above and below the pulmonary veins. Lesions were made along the transverse and oblique sinuses by epicardial and endocardial application of a bipolar device. The left atrial isthmus was ablated by bipolar radiofrequency and cryoprobe. No complications were associated with the box lesion: 90% and 89% of patients were in sinus rhythm at 3 and 6 months of follow-up, respectively. By creating a box lesion around the pulmonary veins, we expect to improve transmurality by means of epicardial and endocardial ablation of 1 rather than 2 layers of atrial wall, as in epicardial pulmonary vein isolation. Isolation of the entire posterior wall of the left atrium is better electrophysiologically and renders dissection around the pulmonary veins unnecessary. PMID:21494518

  19. Minimally invasive surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Michael O; Suwalski, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) remains the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting nearly 2% of the general population worldwide. Minimally invasive surgical ablation remains one of the most dynamically evolving fields of modern cardiac surgery. While there are more than a dozen issues driving this development, two seem to play the most important role: first, there is lack of evidence supporting percutaneous catheter based approach to treat patients with persistent and long-standing persistent AF. Paucity of this data offers surgical community unparalleled opportunity to challenge guidelines and change indications for surgical intervention. Large, multicenter prospective clinical studies are therefore of utmost importance, as well as honest, clear data reporting. Second, a collaborative methodology started a long-awaited debate on a Heart Team approach to AF, similar to the debate on coronary artery disease and transcatheter valves. Appropriate patient selection and tailored treatment options will most certainly result in better outcomes and patient satisfaction, coupled with appropriate use of always-limited institutional resources. The aim of this review, unlike other reviews of minimally invasive surgical ablation, is to present medical professionals with two distinctly different, approaches. The first one is purely surgical, Standalone surgical isolation of the pulmonary veins using bipolar energy source with concomitant amputation of the left atrial appendage-a method of choice in one of the most important clinical trials on AF-The Atrial Fibrillation Catheter Ablation Versus Surgical Ablation Treatment (FAST) Trial. The second one represents the most complex approach to this problem: a multidisciplinary, combined effort of a cardiac surgeon and electrophysiologist. The Convergent Procedure, which includes both endocardial and epicardial unipolar ablation bonds together minimally invasive endoscopic surgery with electroanatomical mapping, to deliver best of the

  20. Radiofrequency ablation for treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Nasser; Montazerghaem, Hossein; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Alizadehasl, Azin; Alikhah, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia which represents a major public health problem. The main purpose of this research is to evaluate the Radiofrequency (RF) ablation effects in the patients with chronic AF scheduled for cardiac surgery because of different heart diseases. The descriptive and prospective study was conducted on 60 patients with AF scheduled for surgery along with RF ablation. The data were collected by questionnaire and included: patients' age, sex, NYHA class, operation type, past medical history, type and cause of valvular heart disease, preoperative ECG (electrocardiogram), duration of surgery, clamping time, cardiopulmonary bypass, and RF ablation time. RF ablation was followed by the main operation. The follow up examination, ECG, and echocardiography were performed 3 and 6 months after operation. The mean age of patients was 48±10 years (18-71 years). Forty one patients had permanent AF and 19 had the persistent AF. The left ventricular ejection fraction was 48.27±9.75 percent before operation, and reached to 56.27±7.87 percent after the surgery (P<0.001). The mean NYHA class before the surgery was 2.83±0.68 which decreased to 1.34±0.46 6 months after the surgery with RF ablation (P<0.001). One patient (1.6%) died after surgery. Complete relief and freedom from AF recurrence was observed in 70% of patients in the mean follow up in 7 months after the surgery. The sinus rhythm with efficient atrial contraction was established in 100% of discharged patients. RF ablation is an effective procedure to cure atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries.

  1. Dronedarone in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Camm, A John; Halperin, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Dronedarone restores sinus rhythm and reduces hospitalization or death in intermittent atrial fibrillation. It also lowers heart rate and blood pressure and has antiadrenergic and potential ventricular antiarrhythmic effects. We hypothesized that dronedarone would reduce major vascular events in ...

  2. Analysis of amyloid fibrils in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Joakim; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Une, Yumi; Sun, Xuguo; Misumi, Shogo; Shoji, Shozo; Ando, Yukio

    2006-06-01

    Recently, a high prevalence of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis has been documented among captive cheetahs worldwide. Biochemical analysis of amyloid fibrils extracted from the liver of a Japanese captive cheetah unequivocally showed that protein AA was the main fibril constituent. Further characterization of the AA fibril components by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis revealed three main protein AA bands with approximate molecular weights of 8, 10 and 12 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 12-kDa component observed in SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the molecular weight of a 12,381-Da peak. Our finding of a 12-kDa protein AA component provides evidence that the cheetah SAA sequence is longer than the previously reported 90 amino acid residues (approximately 10 kDa), and hence SAA is part of the amyloid fibril.

  3. Dabigatran use in Danish atrial fibrillation patients in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dabigatran was recently approved for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF); data regarding real-world use, comparative effectiveness and safety are sparse. Design: Pharmacoepidemiological cohort study. Methods/settings: From nationwide registers, we identified...

  4. Pharmacological Management of Atrial Fibrillation: One, None, One Hundred Thousand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Lucà

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the available evidence regarding the efficacy of medications used for acute management of AF, rhythm and ventricular rate control, and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and focuses on the current pharmacological agents.

  5. [New oral anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: a neurologist's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, E.J. van; Koudstaal, P.J.; Roos, Y.B.; Brouwers, P.J.; Kappelle, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    - Recent randomized controlled trials have shown that new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban en apixaban) in patients with atrial fibrillation are equally or more effective in preventing cerebral infarction than vitamin K antagonists (VKA).- New oral anticoagulants cause significant less i

  6. Imaging of Ventricular Fibrillation and Defibrillation: The Virtual Electrode Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukens, Bastiaan J; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is the major underlying cause of sudden cardiac death. Understanding the complex activation patterns that give rise to ventricular fibrillation requires high resolution mapping of localized activation. The use of multi-electrode mapping unraveled re-entrant activation patterns that underlie ventricular fibrillation. However, optical mapping contributed critically to understanding the mechanism of defibrillation, where multi-electrode recordings could not measure activation patterns during and immediately after a shock. In addition, optical mapping visualizes the virtual electrodes that are generated during stimulation and defibrillation pulses, which contributed to the formulation of the virtual electrode hypothesis. The generation of virtual electrode induced phase singularities during defibrillation is arrhythmogenic and may lead to the induction of fibrillation subsequent to defibrillation. Defibrillating with low energy may circumvent this problem. Therefore, the current challenge is to use the knowledge provided by optical mapping to develop a low energy approach of defibrillation, which may lead to more successful defibrillation.

  7. Atrioverter : An implantable device for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellens, HJJ; Lau, CP; Luderitz, B; Akhtar, M; Waldo, AL; Camm, AJ; Timmermans, C; Tse, HF; Jung, W; Jordaens, L; Ayers, G

    1998-01-01

    Background-During atrial fibrillation, electrophysiological changes occur in atrial tissue that favor the maintenance of the arrhythmia and facilitate recurrence after conversion to sinus rhythm. An implantable defibrillator connected to right atrial and coronary sinus defibrillation leads allows pr

  8. He I Vector Magnetometry of Field Aligned Superpenumbral Fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Schad, T A; Lin, Haosheng

    2013-01-01

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 angstroms in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) are paired with high-resolution observations of the Halpha 6563 angstroms and Ca II 8542 angstroms spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the "Hanle and Zeeman Light" (HAZEL) modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred ...

  9. Effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on collagen fibril formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cuicui; Zhang, Min; Tian, Huilin; Li, Guoying

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were mixed to obtain blends and the effect of HPMC on collagen self-assembly was studied. As deduced from atomic force microscopy (AFM), the amount of nuclei in collagen-HPMC solutions was changed with the addition of HPMC. Under physiological conditions, the kinetics curves of fibril formation showed that the turbidity of blends at 313 nm was higher than that of native collagen. More HPMC was involved in the hydrogel network for blends with higher HPMC/collagen. However, both the thermal stability and the storage moduli of hydrogels, which was evaluated by UV and rheological measurements respectively, reached the maximum just when HPMC/collagen=0.25. Furthermore, it was showed by AFM that denser fibrils with smaller diameter would be obtained as HPMC/collagen0.25) would bring about fibrils with larger diameter. However, HPMC did not significantly affect the characteristic D-periods of the fibrils for all blends.

  10. Women Sex Importance in Stroke Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemile Handan Mısırlı

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was shown the differences in age, risk factors and treatment between women and men in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation METHODS: The stroke patients with atrial fibrillation who were hospitalized in our department at the last 2 years were seperated into 2 groups of aged above 75 and below 75, investigated with CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASc scores and looked at the sex differences of women and men. RESULTS: Stroke ratio according to sex was statistically meaningful especially in women above the age of 75. Risc factors also were founded in elderly women and CHA2DS2VASc scores were higher in women than men so more anticoagulan treatment were begun. No differences were shown between sexes at lone atrial fibrillation and no treatment were begun. CONCLUSION: Women with atrial fibrillation had more risk factors, higher stroke rate and higher anticoagulation treatment.

  11. Is umbilical cord milking always an advantage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicdag, Hasan; Gulcan, Hande; Hanta, Deniz; Torer, Birgin; Gokmen, Zeynel; Ozdemir, Sonay Incesoy; Antmen, Bulent Ali

    2016-01-01

    The role of cord milking as an alternative to delayed cord clamping is an area that requires more research. Purpose of this clinical trial was to investigate the impact of umbilical cord milking on the absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) and the neutropenia frequency of preterm infants. Fifty-eight pregnant women were randomly assigned to one of the umbilical cord milking and control groups. A total of 54 preterm infants (gestational age ≤ 32 weeks) were enrolled into the study. The umbilical cords of 25 infants were clamped immediately after birth, and in 29 infants, umbilical cord milking was performed first. The ANCs were statistically significantly lower in the cord milking group compared with the control group on days 1, 3 and 7. The frequency of neutropenia was higher in the cord milking group compared with the control group. In our study, ANCs were lower in the cord milking group and the frequency of neutropenia was higher. Umbilical cord milking plays a role on the ANCs of preterm infants.

  12. Collagenous fibril texture of the human knee joint menisci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, W; Tillmann, B

    1998-04-01

    Anatomical and clinical literature describes the arrangement of collagen fibrils in the human meniscus as being "arcade-like". The "arcade-like" orientation, mainly running in a radial direction in the internal circumference and in a circular direction in the external circumference, was found in polarization light microscopic studies. This, however, does not provide a mechanical explanation for the direction of meniscus tears. In view of this contradiction collagen fibrils in the menisci of adults aged from 18 to 85 years were exposed layer-by-layer to study their arrangement by scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained by this procedure were compared to the path of the split lines. Scanning electron microscopy reveals three distinct layers in the meniscus cross section: (1) The tibial and femoral sides of the meniscus surfaces are covered by a meshwork of thin fibrils with a diameter of approximately 30 nm. (2) Beneath the superficial network there is a layer of lamellalike collagen fibril bundles on the tibial and femoral surface. In the area of the external circumference of the anterior and posterior segments the bundles of collagen fibrils are arranged in a radial direction. In all other parts the collagen fibril bundles intersect at various angles. (3) The main portion of the meniscus collagen fibrils are located in the central region between the femoral and the tibial surface layers. Everywhere in the central main portion of the meniscus the bundles of collagen fibrils are orientated in a circular manner. The split lines in the region of the internal circumference of the menisci are arranged in a circular manner, generally running in a radial direction in the portions adjacent to the base. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the direction of the split lines depends on the orientation of the collagen fibrils in the superficial lamellar layer. The arcade-like path of the collagen fibrils described in the literature can not be confirmed either by

  13. Echocardiographic quantification of systolic function during atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Javier; Jørgensen, Peter Godsk; Dons, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    It is often difficult to provide an exact echocardiographic measure of left ventricular systolic function in patients with atrial fibrillation, partly because of the varying cycle length affecting pre and afterload and partly because of the increased heart rate often accompanying this arrhythmia....... We sought to elucidate two points: whether it would be possible to correct for the cyclic variance in systolic output, and if global longitudinal strain is preferable to the left ventricular ejection fraction at evaluating systolic function during atrial fibrillation....

  14. Methods for structural characterization of prefibrillar intermediates and amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Vestergaard, Bente

    2009-01-01

    Protein fibrillation is first and foremost a structural phenomenon. Adequate structural investigation of the central conformational individuals of the fibrillation process is however exceedingly difficult. This is due to the nature of the process, which may be described as a dynamically evolving...... equilibrium between a large number of structural species. These are furthermore of highly diverging sizes and present in very uneven amounts and timeframes. Different structural methods have different strengths and limitations. These, and in particular recent advances within solution analysis...

  15. Antiarrhythmic Effect Of Antioxidants In Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Khabchabov PhD, Rustam; RG PhD, Khabchabov; ER PhD, Makhmudova

    2016-01-01

    Resume In accordance with modern concepts, one of the leading roles in the development of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and flutter, belongs - the restructuring of the myocardium, in second place - sick sinus syndrome and in third place - the presence of accessory pathways and hormonal disorders. The development of atrial fibrillation and flutter in the structural pathology, primarily begins with of drugs if it does not work, we have to carry out ablation. Providing proper, effective and imp...

  16. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  17. Nanomechanical mapping of hydrated rat tail tendon collagen I fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Quigley, Andrew S; Clegg, Charlotte; Kreplak, Laurent

    2014-10-21

    Collagen fibrils play an important role in the human body, providing tensile strength to connective tissues. These fibrils are characterized by a banding pattern with a D-period of 67 nm. The proposed origin of the D-period is the internal staggering of tropocollagen molecules within the fibril, leading to gap and overlap regions and a corresponding periodic density fluctuation. Using an atomic force microscope high-resolution modulus maps of collagen fibril segments, up to 80 μm in length, were acquired at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s. The maps revealed a periodic modulation corresponding to the D-period as well as previously undocumented micrometer scale fluctuations. Further analysis revealed a 4/5, gap/overlap, ratio in the measured modulus providing further support for the quarter-staggered model of collagen fibril axial structure. The modulus values obtained at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s are significantly larger than those previously reported. Probing the effect of indentation speed over four decades reveals two distinct logarithmic regimes of the measured modulus and point to the existence of a characteristic molecular relaxation time around 0.1 ms. Furthermore, collagen fibrils exposed to temperatures between 50 and 62°C and cooled back to room temperature show a sharp decrease in modulus and a sharp increase in fibril diameter. This is also associated with a disappearance of the D-period and the appearance of twisted subfibrils with a pitch in the micrometer range. Based on all these data and a similar behavior observed for cross-linked polymer networks below the glass transition temperature, we propose that collagen I fibrils may be in a glassy state while hydrated.

  18. Magnetic stimulation of marigold seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, I.; Mukhtar, K.; Qasim, M.; Basra, S. M. A.; Shahid, M.; Haq, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds on germination, early seedling growth and biochemical changes of seedlings were studied under controlled conditions. For this purpose, seeds were exposed to five different magnetic seed treatments for 3 min each. Most of seed treatments resulted in improved germination speed and spread, root and shoot length, seed soluble sugars and a-amylase activity. Magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT maximally improved germination, seedling vigour and starch metabolism as compared to control and other seed treatments. In emergence experiment, higher emergence percentage (4-fold), emergence index (5-fold) and vigorous seedling growth were obtained in seeds treated with 100 mT. Overall, the enhancement of marigold seeds by magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT could be related to enhanced starch metabolism. The results suggest that magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds have the potential to enhance germination, early growth and biochemical parameters of seedlings.

  19. Templated agarose scaffolds for the support of motor axon regeneration into sites of complete spinal cord transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingyong; Lu, Paul; Bednark, Bridget; Lynam, Dan; Conner, James M; Sakamoto, Jeff; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2013-02-01

    Bioengineered scaffolds have the potential to support and guide injured axons after spinal cord injury, contributing to neural repair. In previous studies we have reported that templated agarose scaffolds can be fabricated into precise linear arrays and implanted into the partially injured spinal cord, organizing growth and enhancing the distance over which local spinal cord axons and ascending sensory axons extend into a lesion site. However, most human injuries are severe, sparing only thin rims of spinal cord tissue in the margins of a lesion site. Accordingly, in the present study we examined whether template agarose scaffolds seeded with bone marrow stromal cells secreting Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) would support regeneration into severe, complete spinal cord transection sites. Moreover, we tested responses of motor axon populations originating from the brainstem. We find that templated agarose scaffolds support motor axon regeneration into a severe spinal cord injury model and organize axons into fascicles of highly linear configuration. BDNF significantly enhances axonal growth. Collectively, these findings support the feasibility of scaffold implantation for enhancing central regeneration after even severe central nervous system injury.

  20. Supersaturation-limited amyloid fibrillation of insulin revealed by ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Hiroya; Lee, Young-Ho; Kardos, József; Lin, Yuxi; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2014-06-27

    Amyloid fibrils form in supersaturated solutions via a nucleation and growth mechanism. We proposed that ultrasonication may be an effective agitation to trigger nucleation that would otherwise not occur under the persistent metastability of supersaturation. However, the roles of supersaturation and effects of ultrasonication have not been elucidated in detail except for limited cases. Insulin is an amyloidogenic protein that is useful for investigating the mechanisms underlying amyloid fibrillation with biological relevance. We studied the alcohol-induced amyloid fibrillation of insulin using various concentrations of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol at pH 2.0 and 4.8. Ultrasonic irradiation effectively triggered fibrillation under conditions in which insulin retained persistent supersaturation. Structural analyses by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the dominant structures of fibrils varied between parallel and antiparallel β-sheets depending on the solvent conditions. pH and alcohol concentration-dependent phase diagrams showed a marked difference before and after the ultrasonic treatment, which indicated that the persistent metastability of supersaturation determined the conformations of insulin. These results indicate the importance of an alternative view of amyloid fibrils as supersaturation-limited crystal-like aggregates formed above the solubility limit. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Supersaturation-limited Amyloid Fibrillation of Insulin Revealed by Ultrasonication*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Hiroya; Lee, Young-Ho; Kardos, József; Lin, Yuxi; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils form in supersaturated solutions via a nucleation and growth mechanism. We proposed that ultrasonication may be an effective agitation to trigger nucleation that would otherwise not occur under the persistent metastability of supersaturation. However, the roles of supersaturation and effects of ultrasonication have not been elucidated in detail except for limited cases. Insulin is an amyloidogenic protein that is useful for investigating the mechanisms underlying amyloid fibrillation with biological relevance. We studied the alcohol-induced amyloid fibrillation of insulin using various concentrations of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol at pH 2.0 and 4.8. Ultrasonic irradiation effectively triggered fibrillation under conditions in which insulin retained persistent supersaturation. Structural analyses by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy revealed that the dominant structures of fibrils varied between parallel and antiparallel β-sheets depending on the solvent conditions. pH and alcohol concentration-dependent phase diagrams showed a marked difference before and after the ultrasonic treatment, which indicated that the persistent metastability of supersaturation determined the conformations of insulin. These results indicate the importance of an alternative view of amyloid fibrils as supersaturation-limited crystal-like aggregates formed above the solubility limit. PMID:24847058

  2. Inhibition of insulin fibrillation by osmolytes: Mechanistic Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sinjan; Kishore, Nand; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2015-11-01

    We have studied here using a number of biophysical tools the effects of osmolytes, betaine, citrulline, proline and sorbitol which differ significantly in terms of their physical characteristics such as, charge distribution, polarity, H-bonding abilities etc, on the fibrillation of insulin. Among these, betaine, citrulline, and proline are very effective in decreasing the extent of fibrillation. Proline also causes a substantial delay in the onset of fibrillation in the concentration range (50-250 mM) whereas such an effect is seen for citrulline only at 250 mM, and in case of betaine this effect is not seen at all in the whole concentration range. The enthalpies of interaction at various stages of fibrillation process have suggested that the preferential exclusion of the osmolyte and its polar interaction with the protein are important in inhibition. The results indicate that the osmolytes are most effective when added prior to the elongation stage of fibrillation. These observations have significant biological implications, since insulin fibrillation is known to cause injection amyloidosis and our data may help in designing lead drug molecules and development of potential therapeutic strategies.

  3. Dual chamber pacemaker in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađen Goran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cardiac dysrhythmia. The aim of this study was to show the role and the efficacy of a dual chamber pacemaker with the algorithm of atrial dynamic overdrive, in the suppression of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Case report. A woman with a classical bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, and frequent attacks of atrial fibrillation, underwent the implantation of a single chamber permanent pacemaker (VVI. Pacemaker successfully treated the episodes of symptomatic bradycardia, but the patient had frequent attacks of atrial fibrillation, despite the use of different antiarrhythmic drugs, which she did not tolerate well. The decision was made to reimplant a permanent dual chamber pacemaker with the algorithm of atrial dynamic overdrive. The pacemaker was programmed to the basic rate of 75/min, while rate at rest was 55/min. In addition, sotalol was administered. After three months, the patient became asymptomatic with only 4 short − term episodes of atrial fibrillation, and a high level of atrial pacing (99%. Conclusion. In selected patients with bradycardia−tachycardia syndrome, atrial-based pacing seemed to be very effective in reducing the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  4. Stabilization and anomalous hydration of collagen fibril under heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasun G Gevorkian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: When heating a native fibril sample, its Young's modulus decreases in temperature range 20-58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58-75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58-75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen.

  5. Physalis peruviana seed storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia L. M. de Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Physalis peruviana belongs to Solanaceae family and has a high nutritional and nutraceutical potential. The production is intended for fruit consumption and the propagation is mainly by seeds. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of priming on the kinetics of germination of P. peruviana seeds stored at different temperatures. The seeds were stored at 5 and 25 °C in a chamber saturated with zinc chloride solution and in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C. Every 4 months, the seeds were removed from storage for evaluation of germination and moisture content in the laboratory and emergence and development of seedlings in greenhouse. During the last evaluation at 16 months, the seeds under the same conditions were subjected to salt stress. The moisture content varied during the storage period, but was always higher for seeds kept at -196 ºC. These seeds kept high germination percentage in water until 16 months, regardless of the tested temperature; however, in salt solution the germination percentage was significantly reduced.

  6. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  7. Lean Umbilical Cord - a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippinger, N; Elsässer, M; Sinn, P; Sohn, C; Fluhr, H

    2016-11-01

    The "lean" umbilical cord (also known as thin-cord syndrome) is a comparatively rare anomaly of the umbilical cord, which has seldom been described in the medical literature. We report on a 35-year-old women who presented to us at 29 + 4 weeks gestation with vaginal bleeding and cervical incompetence subsequently complicated not only by premature rupture of membranes but also acute placental insufficiency requiring emergency caesarean section under general anaesthesia at 31 + 2 weeks gestation. At surgery no obvious cause for the acute placental insufficiency - such as placental abruption, cord prolapse or true knot of the umbilical cord - was found. Other possible causes such as vasa praevia or placenta praevia had previously been excluded sonographically on admission for vaginal bleeding. The only notable intraoperative finding was a macroscopically extremely thin umbilical cord.

  8. Umbilical Cord Care in the Newborn Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Dan; Benitz, William

    2016-09-01

    Postpartum infections remain a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. A high percentage of these infections may stem from bacterial colonization of the umbilicus, because cord care practices vary in reflection of cultural traditions within communities and disparities in health care practices globally. After birth, the devitalized umbilical cord often proves to be an ideal substrate for bacterial growth and also provides direct access to the bloodstream of the neonate. Bacterial colonization of the cord not infrequently leads to omphalitis and associated thrombophlebitis, cellulitis, or necrotizing fasciitis. Various topical substances continue to be used for cord care around the world to mitigate the risk of serious infection. More recently, particularly in high-resource countries, the treatment paradigm has shifted toward dry umbilical cord care. This clinical report reviews the evidence underlying recommendations for care of the umbilical cord in different clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Distinct Presentations of Hernia of Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Bilal; Ali, Waqas

    2016-01-01

    Hernia of umbilical cord is a well-known entity which presents with herniation of small bowel into the proximal part of umbilical cord. It has very good prognosis after surgical repair. Occasionally, it can have distinct presentations and varied malformations at the umbilicus which have bearing on the course of treatment and final outcome. Herein, we describe various presentations and malformations associated with hernia of umbilical cord. Embryological extrapolation is attempted for the malformations at umbilicus. PMID:27896161

  10. NEW TRENDS IN STEEL CORD DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vedeneev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of directions of metal cord constructions developments depending on the place of application in tires of different function is carried out. the requirements to metal cord, which are necessary to be taken into account at development of its new type, are given. the peculiarities of perspective types of reinforcing agents for tires, and also advantages of new types of metal cord over the existing ones are shown.

  11. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  12. Healthy food trends -- chia seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia seeds are tiny, brown, black or white seeds. They are almost as small as poppy seeds. They come from a plant in the mint ... minerals. Chia seeds are also rich in essential fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6. Essential fatty ...

  13. Is Nuchal Cord a Perfect Scapegoat: A Retrospective Analysis from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mubeen

    Background: Entanglement of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck (nuchal cord) is quite a common finding at delivery. ... needed to be clamped and cut before delivery of the baby) group. ..... The natural history of antenatal nuchal cords.

  14. Evaluation of the expansion of umbilical cord blood derived from CD133+ cells on biocompatible microwells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Soufizomorrod

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a therapeutic approach for treatment of hematological malignancies and incompatibility of Bone marrow. Umbilical cord blood (UCB has known as an alternative for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPSC in allogeneic transplantation. The low volume of collected samples is the main hindrance in application of HPSC derived from umbilical cord blood. So, ex vivo expansion of HPSCs is the useful approach to overcome this restriction. The goal of using this system is to produce appropriate amount of hematopoietic stem cells, which have the ability of transplantation and long term haematopoiesis. Material & Methods: In current study CD133+ cells were isolated from cord blood (CB. Isolated cells were seeded on microwells. Then expanded cells proliferation rate and ability in colony formation were assessed and finally were compared with 2 Dimensional (2D culture systems. Results: Our findings demonstrated that CD133+ cells derived from UCB which were cultivated on microwells had significantly higher rate of proliferation in compared with routine cell culture systems. Conclusion: In Current study, it was shown that CD133+ cells’ proliferations which were seeded on PDMS microwells coated with collagen significantly increased. We hope that 3 dimensional (3D microenvironment which mimics the 3D structure of bone marrow can solve the problem of using UCB as an alternative source of bone marrow.

  15. Cord blood stem cell banking and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhot, P S; Nair, V; Swarup, D; Sirohi, D; Ganguli, P

    2003-12-01

    Stem cells have the ability to divide for indefinite periods in culture and to give rise to specialized cells. Cord blood as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has several advantages as it is easily available, involves non-invasive collection procedure and is better tolerated across the HLA barrier. Since the first cord blood transplant in 1988, over 2500 cord blood HSC transplants have been done world wide. Since then, the advantages of cord blood as a source of hematopietic stem cells for transplantation have become clear. Firstly, the proliferative capacity of HSC in cord blood is superior to that of cells in bone marrow or blood from adults. A 100 ml unit of cord blood contains 1/10th the number of nucleated cells and progenitor cells (CD34+ cells) present in 1000 ml of bone marrow, but because they proliferate rapidly, the stem cell in a single unit of cord blood can reconstitute the entire haematopoietic system. Secondly, the use of cord blood reduces the risk of graft vs host disease. Cord Blood Stem Cell banks have been established in Europe and United States to supply HSC for related and unrelated donors. Currently, more than 65,000 units are available and more than 2500 patients have received transplants of cord blood. Results in children have clearly shown that the number of nucleated cells in the infused cord blood influences the speed of recovery of neutrophils and platelets after myeloablative chemotherapy. The optimal dose is about 2 x 10(7) nucleated cells/kg of body weight. The present study was carried out for collection, separation, enumeration and cryopreservation of cord blood HSC and establishing a Cord Blood HSC Bank. 172 samples of cord blood HSC were collected after delivery of infant prior to expulsion of placenta. The average cord blood volume collected was 101.20 ml. Mononuclear cell count ranged from 7.36 to 25.6 x 10(7)/ml. Viability count of mononuclear cells was 98.1%. After 1 year of cryopreservation, the viability count on

  16. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  17. Seed collection notes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains tables, lists, and notes related to tallgrass prairie seed collection on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in 1992.

  18. on oil palm seeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    germinating seeds in improper sealed/ broken storage polyethylene bags attracted adult flies which gained ... an alcoholic beverage or processed into various types of ... MATERIALS AND METHODS. The study ..... The life history of Megaselia.

  19. Tomato seeds for LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Tomato seeds are prepared for their launch aboard the Langley's Long Duration Exposure Facility. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 119), by James Schultz.

  20. Prescribed seed plantings

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains memos, notes, and tables related to tallgrass prairie seed harvesting on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in 1995.

  1. How can we best detect atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, K; Edwards, D; Mant, J

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an arrhythmia of increasing prevalence associated with a reducible risk of stroke. We conducted a systematic review to address five questions relating to how we can best detect AF: 1. Are there useful screening tests to determine who should have a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG)? Potential screening tests, all with acceptable sensitivity, include pulse palpation, single-lead ECG and newer technologies such as modified sphygmomanometers or a finger probe device. Pulse palpation has a high number of false positives, but is the cheapest method. 2. Is it more effective to offer 12-lead ECGs to the whole population (or specific sub-groups) or only to those who screen positive for AF? The cost-effectiveness of new devices, such as a modified blood pressure monitor, needs to be assessed. It is more cost-effective to opportunistically screen people rather than to offer a 12-lead ECG to everybody. 3. How accurate are different healthcare professionals and interpretative software at diagnosing AF on ECG? Definitive diagnosis of AF should be by 12-lead ECG, interpreted by someone with appropriate expertise. Computer software is not currently sensitive enough to be used alone to diagnose AF on ECG. Primary care practitioners may not accurately detect AF on ECG, but consistently high accuracy can be achieved by healthcare professionals with adequate training. 4. How best can we diagnose paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF)? In patients in whom PAF is suspected, longer periods of monitoring will detect more cases of PAF. 5. What is the impact of the use of different ECG monitoring strategies (e.g. Holter monitoring, serial ECGs, continuous ECG) on AF detection rates post-stroke? In patients post-stroke, a single ECG will miss cases of PAF which can be detected by longer duration monitoring such as Holter monitoring, cardiac event recorders and serial ECGs. Further research into the cost-effectiveness of these methods, the duration of monitoring

  2. The Relation of Atrial Fibrillation and Inflammation Do Inflammation Imply the Pathogenesis of Atrial Fibrillation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruibin Fu; Pingsheng Wu; Shulin Wu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation (AF),the most commonly encountered arrhythmia in clinical practice,is associated with a 2-fold increase in total cardiovascular mortality[1],as well as the potential for substantial morbidity,including stroke,congestive heart failure,and cardiomyopathy.Its incidence and prevalence are increasing,and it represents a growing clinical and economic burden.Owing to relative inefficacy and side effects of current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy for AF,it remains a great challenge to improve primary and secondary AF prevention strategies to reduce this potentially enormous health burden.

  3. Family history of atrial fibrillation is associated with earlier-onset and more symptomatic atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Kim, Sunghee

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We addressed whether patients with a family history of atrial fibrillation (AF) were diagnosed as having AF earlier in life, were more symptomatic, and had worse outcomes compared with those without a family history of AF. METHODS: Using the ORBIT-AF, we compared symptoms and disease ......, and had more severe AF-related symptoms. No differences were found between the 2 groups in the risk of AF progression (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.98, 95% CI 0.85-1.14), stroke, non-central nervous system embolism, or transient ischemic attack (adjusted HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.67-1.34), all...

  4. Seed dispersal in fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  5. Storage of sunflower seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise de Castro Lima

    Full Text Available The sunflower is among the top five crops in the world for the production of edible vegetable oil. The species displays rustic behavior, with an excellent edaphic and climatic adaptability index, being able to be cultivated throughout Brazil. Seed quality is the key to increasing production and productivity in the sunflower. The objective of this work was to monitor the viability of sunflower seeds with a view to their conservation when stored in different environments and packaging. The seeds were packed in paper bags, multilayered paper, black polyethylene and PET bottles; and stored for a period of twelve months in the following environments: dry cold room (10 ºC and 55% RH, the ambient conditions of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil (30-32 ºC and 75% RH, refrigerator (4 ºC and 38-43% RH and freezer (-20 ºC. Every three months, the water content of the seeds was determined and germination, accelerated ageing, speed of emergence index, and seedling dry weight were evaluated. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a scheme of split-lots, with four replications. It can be concluded that the natural environment is not suitable for the storage of sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds remain viable for 12 months when stored in a dry cold room, refrigerator or freezer, irrespective of the type of packaging used.

  6. Morphological and electrophysiological evidence for regeneration of transected spinal cord fibers and restoration of motor functions in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    After 2/3 transection of the right ninth thoracic spinal cord of an adult rat, a chitosan tube seeded with L-poly-lysine was implanted between the rostral and caudal end of the lesioned cord. Twelve months after the operation, regeneration of myelinated and non-myelinated axons and new blood vessels were observed along the wall of the chitosan tube implanted under an electron microscope. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) could be consistently recorded from the left somatosensory cortex following electrical stimulation of the right hind limb, while transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left motor cortex could also evoke motor activity from the right hind limb. The present result suggests that implanted chitosan tube might be useful in regeneration of injured nerve fibers of the spinal cord resulting in a long-term restoration of motor functions.

  7. Self-organization and the dynamical nature of ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalife, José; Gray, Richard A.; Morley, Gregory E.; Davidenko, Jorge M.

    1998-03-01

    This article reviews recent data supporting the conjecture that, in the structurally and electrophysiologically normal heart, cardiac fibrillation is not a totally random phenomenon. Experimental and numerical studies based on the theory of excitable media suggest that fibrillation in the mammalian ventricles is the result of self-organized three-dimensional (3-D) electrical rotors giving rise to scroll waves that move continuously (i.e., drift) throughout the heart at varying speeds. A brief review of studies on the dynamics of rotors in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D excitable media is presented with emphasis on the experimental demonstration of such dynamics in cardiac muscle of various species. The discussion is centered on rotor dynamics in the presence and the absence of structural heterogeneities, and in the phenomena of drifting and anchoring, which in the electrocardiogram (ECG) may manifest as life-threatening cardiac rhythm disturbances. For instance, in the rabbit heart, a single electrical rotor that drifts rapidly throughout the ventricles gives rise to complex patterns of excitation. In the ECG such patterns are indistinguishable from ventricular fibrillation. On the other hand, a rotor that anchors to a discontinuity or defect in the muscle (e.g., a scar, a large artery or a bundle of connective tissue) may result in stationary rotating activity, which in the ECG is manifested as a form of so-called "monomorphic" ventricular tachycardia. More recent data show that ventricular fibrillation occurs in mammals irrespective of size or species. While in small hearts, such as those of mice and rabbits, a single drifting or meandering rotor can result in fibrillation, in larger hearts, such as the sheep and possibly the human, fibrillation occurs in the form of a relatively small number of coexisting but short-lived rotors. Overall, the work discussed here has paved the way for a better understanding of the mechanisms of fibrillation in the normal, as well

  8. Wool fibril sponges with perspective biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrucco, A., E-mail: a.patrucco@bi.ismac.cnr.it [CNR-ISMAC, Italian National Research Council, Institute for Macromolecular Studies, Corso G. Pella 16, 13900, Biella (Italy); Cristofaro, F., E-mail: francesco.cristofaro01@universitadipavia.it [Department of Molecular Medicine, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 3/B, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Simionati, M., E-mail: m.simionati@bi.ismac.cnr.it [CNR-ISMAC, Italian National Research Council, Institute for Macromolecular Studies, Corso G. Pella 16, 13900, Biella (Italy); Zoccola, M., E-mail: m.zoccola@bi.ismac.cnr.it [CNR-ISMAC, Italian National Research Council, Institute for Macromolecular Studies, Corso G. Pella 16, 13900, Biella (Italy); Bruni, G., E-mail: giovanna.bruni@unipv.it [Department of Chemistry, — Physical-Chemistry Section, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 16, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Fassina, L., E-mail: lorenzo.fassina@unipv.it [Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Visai, L., E-mail: livia.visai@unipv.it [Department of Molecular Medicine, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, Viale Taramelli 3/B, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicology and Environmental Risks, S. Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Via S. Boezio, 28, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Magenes, G., E-mail: giovanni.magenes@unipv.it [Centre for Health Technologies (CHT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100, Pavia (Italy); and others

    2016-04-01

    Sheep's wool was used as a natural source to prepare keratin microfibril sponges for scaffolding, by disruption of the histological structure of the fibres through mild alkali treatment, followed by ultrasonication, casting and salt-leaching. The wool sponges showed highly interconnected porosity (93%) and contain intrinsic sites of cellular recognition that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). They displayed good thermal and water stability due to the conversion of disulphide cystine bonds into shorter monosulphide lanthionine intermolecular bonds, but significantly swelled in water, because of the high hydrophilicity and porosity, with a volume increasing up to 38%. Nevertheless, sponges were stable in water without structural changes, with a neutral pH in aqueous media, and showed excellent resilience to repeated compression stresses. According to in vitro biocompatibility assays, wool fibril sponges showed a good cell adhesion and proliferation as proved by MTT, FDA assays and SEM observations. The unique structure of the cortical cell network made by wool keratin proteins with controlled-size macro-porosity suitable for cell guesting, and nutrient feeding, provides an excellent scaffold for future tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Scaffolds were prepared from wool exploiting the fibres' histology structure. • The scaffold showed high interconnected micro- and macro-porosity. • The microscopic structure is very similar to the extracellular bone matrix. • Scaffolds reversibly swell in water with high resilience to repeated compression. • Composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of SAOS-2 cell line.

  9. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimovic, Ruzica [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Dill, Thorsten [Kerckhoff-Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M. [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia)

    2006-11-15

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  10. Atrial Fibrillation Predictors: Importance of the Electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, David M; Kabir, Muammar M; Dewland, Thomas A; Henrikson, Charles A; Tereshchenko, Larisa G

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in adults and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Substantial interest has developed in the primary prevention of AF, and thus the identification of individuals at risk for developing AF. The electrocardiogram (ECG) provides a wealth of information, which is of value in predicting incident AF. The PR interval and P wave indices (including P wave duration, P wave terminal force, P wave axis, and other measures of P wave morphology) are discussed with regard to their ability to predict and characterize AF risk in the general population. The predictive value of the QT interval, ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy, and findings of atrial and ventricular ectopy are also discussed. Efforts are underway to develop models that predict AF incidence in the general population; however, at present, little information from the ECG is included in these models. The ECG provides a great deal of information on AF risk and has the potential to contribute substantially to AF risk estimation, but more research is needed.

  11. Atrial fibrillation: effects beyond the atrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Casadei, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained clinical arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity, mostly secondary to heart failure and stroke, and an estimated two-fold increase in premature death. Efforts to increase our understanding of AF and its complications have focused on unravelling the mechanisms of electrical and structural remodelling of the atrial myocardium. Yet, it is increasingly recognized that AF is more than an atrial disease, being associated with systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and adverse effects on the structure and function of the left ventricular myocardium that may be prognostically important. Here, we review the molecular and in vivo evidence that underpins current knowledge regarding the effects of human or experimental AF on the ventricular myocardium. Potential mechanisms are explored including diffuse ventricular fibrosis, focal myocardial scarring, and impaired myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve. The complex relationship between AF, systemic inflammation, as well as endothelial/microvascular dysfunction and the effects of AF on ventricular calcium handling and oxidative stress are also addressed. Finally, consideration is given to the clinical implications of these observations and concepts, with particular reference to rate vs. rhythm control.

  12. Ventricular Fibrillation in Mammalian Hearts: Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Flavio H.

    2002-03-01

    The computational approach to understanding the initiation and evolution of cardiac arrhythmias forms a necessary link between experiment and theory. Numerical simulations combine useful mathematical models and complex geometry while offering clean and comprehensive data acquisition, reproducible results that can be compared to experiments, and the flexibility of exploring parameter space systematically. However, because cardiac dynamics occurs on many scales (on the order of 10^9 cells of size 10-100 microns with more than 40 ionic currents and time scales as fast as 0.01ms), roughly 10^17 operations are required to simulate just one second of real time. These intense computational requirements lead to significant implementation challenges even on existing supercomputers. Nevertheless, progress over the last decade in understanding the effects of some spatial scales and spatio-temporal dynamics on cardiac cell and tissue behavior justifies the use of certain simplifications which, along with improved models for cellular dynamics and detailed digital models of cardiac anatomy, are allowing simulation studies of full-size ventricles and atria. We describe this simulation problem from a combined numerical, physical and biological point of view, with an emphasis on the dynamics and stability of scroll waves of electrical activity in mammalian hearts and their relation to tachycardia, fibrillation and sudden death. Detailed simulations of electrical activity in ventricles including complex anatomy, anisotropic fiber structure, and electrophysiological effects of two drugs (DAM and CytoD) are presented and compared with experimental results.

  13. Short dynamic fibrils in sunspot chromospheres

    CERN Document Server

    van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2013-01-01

    Sunspot chromospheres display vigorous oscillatory signature when observed in chromospheric diagnostics like the strong Ca II lines and H-alpha. New high-resolution sunspot observations from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope show the ubiquitous presence of small-scale periodic jet-like features that move up and down. This phenomenon has not been described before. Their typical width is about 0.3 arcsec and they display clear parabolic trajectories in space-time diagrams. The maximum extension of the top of the jets is lowest in the umbra, a few 100 km, and progressively longer further away from the umbra in the penumbra, with the longest more than 1000 km. These jets resemble dynamic fibrils found in plage regions but at smaller extensions. LTE inversion of spectro-polarimetric Ca II 8542 observations enabled for a comparison of the magnetic field inclination and the properties of these short jets. We find that the most extended of these jets also have longer periods and tend to be located in regions with more ...

  14. The mechanisms of atrial fibrillation in hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielecka-Dabrowa Agata

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF is a complex condition with several possible contributing factors. The rapid and irregular heartbeat produced by AF increases the risk of blood clot formation inside the heart. These clots may eventually become dislodged, causing embolism, stroke and other disorders. AF occurs in up to 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism compared to 4% of people in the general population and is more common in men and in patients with triiodothyronine (T3 toxicosis. The incidence of AF increases with advancing age. Also, subclinical hyperthyroidism is a risk factor associated with a 3-fold increase in development of AF. Thyrotoxicosis exerts marked influences on electrical impulse generation (chronotropic effect and conduction (dromotropic effect. Several potential mechanisms could be invoked for the effect of thyroid hormones on AF risk, including elevation of left atrial pressure secondary to increased left ventricular mass and impaired ventricular relaxation, ischemia resulting from increased resting heart rate, and increased atrial eopic activity. Reentry has been postulated as one of the main mechanisms leading to AF. AF is more likely if effective refractory periods are short and conduction is slow. Hyperthyroidism is associated with shortening of action potential duration which may also contribute to AF.

  15. Defibrillation for Ventricular Fibrillation: A Shocking Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Graham; Sayre, Michael R; Guerra, Federico; Poole, Jeanne

    2017-09-19

    Cardiac arrest is defined as the termination of cardiac activity associated with loss of consciousness, of spontaneous breathing, and of circulation. Sudden cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are terms often used interchangeably. Most patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have shown coronary artery disease or symptoms during the hour before the event. Cardiac arrest is potentially reversible by cardiopulmonary resuscitation, defibrillation, cardioversion, cardiac pacing, or treatments targeted at the underlying disease (e.g., acute coronary occlusion). We restrict SCD hereafter to cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation, including rhythms shockable by an automatic external defibrillator (AED), implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), or wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD). We summarize the state of the art related to defibrillation in treating SCD, including a brief history of the evolution of defibrillation, technical characteristics of modern AEDs, strategies to improve AED access and increase survival, ancillary treatments, and use of ICDs or WCDs. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Wool fibril sponges with perspective biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrucco, A; Cristofaro, F; Simionati, M; Zoccola, M; Bruni, G; Fassina, L; Visai, L; Magenes, G; Mossotti, R; Montarsolo, A; Tonin, C

    2016-04-01

    Sheep's wool was used as a natural source to prepare keratin microfibril sponges for scaffolding, by disruption of the histological structure of the fibres through mild alkali treatment, followed by ultrasonication, casting and salt-leaching. The wool sponges showed highly interconnected porosity (93%) and contain intrinsic sites of cellular recognition that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). They displayed good thermal and water stability due to the conversion of disulphide cystine bonds into shorter monosulphide lanthionine intermolecular bonds, but significantly swelled in water, because of the high hydrophilicity and porosity, with a volume increasing up to 38%. Nevertheless, sponges were stable in water without structural changes, with a neutral pH in aqueous media, and showed excellent resilience to repeated compression stresses. According to in vitro biocompatibility assays, wool fibril sponges showed a good cell adhesion and proliferation as proved by MTT, FDA assays and SEM observations. The unique structure of the cortical cell network made by wool keratin proteins with controlled-size macro-porosity suitable for cell guesting, and nutrient feeding, provides an excellent scaffold for future tissue engineering applications.

  17. [Metabolic syndrome and chronic persistent atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchina, E L; Solov'ev, O V; Mochalova, O V; Kononov, S K; Onuchin, S G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate specific features of chronic recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) and disturbed carbohydrate metabolism compared with AF patients without MS. It enrolled 145 patients aged 44-83 years: 117 with abdominal obesity (BMI >30 kg/m2, waist circumference >80 and 94 cm in women and men respectively) including 30 without metabolic disturbances; 35 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 52 with type 2 DM, and 28 controls without MS. Parameters measured included frequency and severity of AF, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, albuminurea, C-reactive peptide level, quality of AH control, results of echocardiography and 24 hour ECG monitoring (sinus rhythm), and insulin resistance index (HOMA IRindex). Groups of AF and MS patients were dominated by women. The frequency and severity of AF relapses in MS patients were higher than in controls (especially in the presence of IGT and DM). IGT and DM2 associated with structural changes in myocardium (left atrial dilatation, prevalence of LV concentric hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction) coupled to higher systolic AH and marked metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, IR, elevated microalbuminurea and C-reactive protein level, dyslipidemia). These conditions contribute to the frequency and severity of AF relapses. Development of AF in MS is a multifactor problem necessitating strict control of AH, dyslipidemia, DM2 and IGT, reduction of body weight and abdominal obesity.

  18. Ventricular fibrillation time constant for swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Nimunkar, Amit J; Sun, Hongyu; O'Rourke, Ann; Huebner, Shane; Will, James A; Webster, John G

    2008-10-01

    The strength-duration curve for cardiac excitation can be modeled by a parallel resistor-capacitor circuit that has a time constant. Experiments on six pigs were performed by delivering current from the X26 Taser dart at a distance from the heart to cause ventricular fibrillation (VF). The X26 Taser is an electromuscular incapacitation device (EMD), which generates about 50 kV and delivers a pulse train of about 15-19 pulses s(-1) with a pulse duration of about 150 micros and peak current about 2 A. Similarly a continuous 60 Hz alternating current of the amplitude required to cause VF was delivered from the same distance. The average current and duration of the current pulse were estimated in both sets of experiments. The strength-duration equation was solved to yield an average time constant of 2.87 ms +/- 1.90 (SD). Results obtained may help in the development of safety standards for future electromuscular incapacitation devices (EMDs) without requiring additional animal tests.

  19. Atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Gerds, Thomas A; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    /TE/TIA) in the presence of concomitant stroke risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: From nationwide registries, all persons who turned 50, 60, 70, or 80 from 1997 to 2011 were identified. Persons receiving warfarin were excluded. The absolute risk of stroke/TE/TIA was reported for a 5-year period, as was the absolute risk......AIM: Although the relation between stroke risk factors and stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has been extensively examined, only few studies have explored the association of AF and the risk of ischaemic stroke/systemic thromboembolism/transient ischaemic attack (stroke...... ratios for AF vs. no AF according to prior stroke and the number of additional risk factors. The study cohort comprised of 3 076 355 persons without AF and 48 189 with AF. For men aged 50 years, with no risk factors, the 5-year risk of stroke was 1.1% (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.1); with AF alone 2...

  20. Muskmelon seed priming in relation to seed vigor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento Warley Marcos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of important factors may affect seed priming response, including seed quality. Effects of seed vigor on seed priming response were investigated using seed lots of two muskmelon (Cucumis melo L. cultivars. Seeds of muskmelon, cvs. Mission and Top Net SR were artificially aged at 43°C for 0, 20 and 40 hours. Seeds were primed for six days in darkness at 25°C in KNO3 (0.35 mol L-1 aerated solution. Aged seeds germinated poorly at 17°C. Priming increased germination rate at 17 and 25°C and germination percentage at 17°C. An interaction effect on germination performance between vigor and priming was observed, especially at low temperature. Priming increased germination performance in seeds of low vigor, and the response was cultivar dependent.

  1. Seed coat color and seed weight contribute differential responses of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwook; Hwang, Young-Sun; Kim, Sun Tae; Yoon, Won-Byong; Han, Won Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and variation of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds are affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used 192 soybean germplasm accessions collected from two provinces of Korea to elucidate the effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight on the metabolic variation and responses of targeted metabolites. The effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight were present in sucrose, total oligosaccharides, total carbohydrates and all measured fatty acids. The targeted metabolites were clustered within three groups. These metabolites were not only differently related to seeds dry weight, but also responded differentially to seed coat color. The inter-relationship between the targeted metabolites was highly present in the result of correlation analysis. Overall, results revealed that the targeted metabolites were diverged in relation to seed coat color and seeds dry weight within locally collected soybean seed germplasm accessions.

  2. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  3. Alginic acid sodium hydrogel co-transplantation with Schwann cells for rat spinal cord repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibao; Liu, Chibo; Ma, Xueqiang

    2012-07-04

    The aim of the study was investigating the influence of Schwann cells-alginic acid sodium hydrogel co-transplantation on a rat model of spinal cord injury. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control, injury, injury with Schwann cell transplantation, and injury with Schwann cells-alginic acid sodium hydrogel co-transplantation. Gelatin sponge blocks containing a Schwann cell suspension were transplanted into the injury site in the Schwann cell group; Schwann cells seeded in alginic acid sodium hydrogel were transplanted into the injury site in the Schwann cells-alginic acid sodium hydrogel group. At 12 h, 1, 3, 7, and 21 days after surgery, animals were assessed on the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and then were sacrificed. In the injury group, Bcl-2 immunoreactive cells peaked at 3 days after surgery, and the expression level returned to normal level at 14 days. In the co-transplantation group, Bcl-2 immunoreactive cells in the spinal cord-transected segments were significantly increased until 7 days (p alginic acid sodium hydrogel transplantation group than in the simple injury and Schwann cell groups (p alginic acid sodium hydrogel co-transplantation could inhibit cellular apoptosis and enhance Bcl-2 expression in the spinal cord-transected segments, and thereby promote the recovery of locomotor function after spinal cord injury, although it did not reach full rehabilitation.

  4. Patient preferences at ten years following initial diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: the Belgrade Atrial Fibrillation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potpara TS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tatjana S Potpara,1,2 Marija M Polovina,2 Nebojsa M Mujovic,1,2 Aleksandar M Kocijancic,2 Gregory YH Lip3 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 2Cardiology Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia; 3University of Birmingham Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, UK Background: Many atrial fibrillation (AF patients have a poor understanding of the management of this condition. We investigated patient attitudes towards AF and a potential invasive treatment following an average 10-year period of prospective rhythm control in a cohort of newly diagnosed AF patients. Methods: This was a prospective registry-based study. At the regular annual visit in 2007, patients were asked at random to answer several AF-related questions. Results: Of 390 patients, 277 (71.0% reported symptom reduction over time, but only 45 (11.5% reported that they had "got used" to AF; 201 patients (51.5% stated they would always prefer sinus rhythm, and 280 (71.2% would accept an invasive AF treatment. Independent predictors for choosing an invasive procedure were younger age, impaired career/working capacity, and male gender (all P < 0.05. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that most AF patients prefer sinus rhythm and would readily accept an invasive procedure if it offered the possibility of a cure for their AF. Keywords: atrial fibrillation, catheter ablation, treatment, symptoms, patient preferences

  5. Avoiding medical error during electrical cardioversion of atrial fibrillation: prevention of unsynchronized shock delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Amara H; Pariaut, Romain; Moïse, N Sydney

    2009-12-01

    Electrical cardioversion of atrial fibrillation is now commonly performed in veterinary medicine. Successful timing of the delivery of energy is important in order to avoid ventricular fibrillation. This brief communication describes how to ensure that proper energy delivery is performed.

  6. 78 FR 11207 - Clinical Study Designs for Surgical Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability... Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation.'' This guidance provides FDA's recommendations on clinical trial designs for surgical ablation devices intended for the treatment of atrial...

  7. Continuous vs episodic prophylactic treatment with amiodarone for the prevention of atrial fibrillation : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sheba; Rienstra, Michiel; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Links, Thera P.; Wiesfeld, Ans C. P.; Hillege, Hans L.; Bosker, Hans A.; Lok, Dirk J. A.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    2008-01-01

    Context Amiodarone effectively suppresses atrial fibrillation but causes many adverse events. Objective To compare major events in patients randomized to receive episodic amiodarone treatment with those who received continuous amiodarone treatment while still aiming to prevent atrial fibrillation. D

  8. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order...

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of atrial fibrillation in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骄

    2013-01-01

    Objective Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained tachyarrhythmia in the general population.AF and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) share several common risk factors.We investigated the association between chronic kidney disease and risk of atrial fibrillation

  10. Risk of atrial fibrillation as a function of the electrocardiographic PR interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Bille; Pietersen, Adrian; Graff, Claus;

    2013-01-01

    Prolongation of the PR interval has been associated with an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation (AF).......Prolongation of the PR interval has been associated with an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation (AF)....

  11. Characterizing Structural Stability of Amyloid Motif Fibrils Mediated by Water Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunsung; Chang, Hyun Joon; Lee, Myeongsang; Na, Sungsoo

    2017-02-04

    In biological systems, structural confinements of amyloid fibrils can be mediated by the role of water molecules. However, the underlying effect of the dynamic behavior of water molecules on structural stabilities of amyloid fibrils is still unclear. By performing molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the dynamic features and the effect of interior water molecules on conformations and mechanical characteristics of various amyloid fibrils. We find that a specific mechanism induced by the dynamic properties of interior water molecules can affect diffusion of water molecules inside amyloid fibrils, inducing their different structural stabilities. The conformation of amyloid fibrils induced by interior water molecules show the fibrils' different mechanical features. We elucidate the role of confined and movable interior water molecules in structural stabilities of various amyloid fibrils. Our results offer insights not only in further understanding of mechanical features of amyloids as mediated by water molecules, but also in the fine-tuning of the functional abilities of amyloid fibrils for applications.

  12. Impaired autonomic function predicts dizziness at onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; Hassink, RJ; Tuinenburg, AE; Lefrandt, JD; de Kam, PJ; Crijns, HJGM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is associated with various symptoms, including dizziness, which presumably reflects hemodynamic deterioration. Given the importance of the autonomic nervous system in mitigating the hemodynamic effect of atrial fibrillation, we hypothesized that autonomic f

  13. Determination of collagen fibril structure and orientation in connective tissues by X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, S. J.; Hukins, D. W. L.

    1999-08-01

    Elastic scattering of X-rays can provide the following information on the fibrous protein collagen: its molecular structure, the axial arrangement of rod-like collagen molecules in a fibril, the lateral arrangement of molecules within a fibril, and the orientation of fibrils within a biological tissue. The first part of the paper reviews the principles involved in deducing this information. The second part describes a new computer program for measuring the equatorial intensity distribution, that provides information on the lateral arrangement of molecules within a fibril, and the angular distribution of the equatorial peaks that provides information on the orientation of fibrils. Orientation of fibrils within a tissue is quantified by the orientation distribution function, g( φ), which represents the probability of finding a fibril oriented between φ and φ+ δφ. The application of the program is illustrated by measurement of g( φ) for the collagen fibrils in demineralised cortical bone from cow tibia.

  14. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields.

  15. Amyloid fibrils composed of hexameric peptides attenuate neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Adams, Chris M; Sobel, Raymond A; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-04-03

    The amyloid-forming proteins tau, αB crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein αB crystallin (HspB5) and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, we showed a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P, and insulin B chain, to be anti-inflammatory and capable of reducing serological levels of interleukin-6 and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of tau 623-628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders.

  16. Measurement of the Mechanical Properties of Intact Collagen Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercedes, H.; Heim, A.; Matthews, W. G.; Koob, T.

    2006-03-01

    Motivated by the genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), in which proper collagen synthesis is interrupted, we are investigating the structural and mechanical properties of collagen fibrils. The fibrous glycoprotein collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and plays a key role in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue, the properties of which are altered in EDS. We have selected as our model system the collagen fibrils of the sea cucumber dermis, a naturally mutable tissue. This system allows us to work with native fibrils which have their proteoglycan complement intact, something that is not possible with reconstituted mammalian collagen fibrils. Using atomic force microscopy, we measure, as a function of the concentration of divalent cations, the fibril diameter, its response to force loading, and the changes in its rigidity. Through these experiments, we will shed light on the mechanisms which control the properties of the sea cucumber dermis and hope to help explain the altered connective tissue extracellular matrix properties associated with EDS.

  17. De novo designed peptide-based amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López De La Paz, Manuela; Goldie, Kenneth; Zurdo, Jesús; Lacroix, Emmanuel; Dobson, Christopher M; Hoenger, Andreas; Serrano, Luis

    2002-12-10

    Identification of therapeutic strategies to prevent or cure diseases associated with amyloid fibril deposition in tissue (Alzheimer's disease, spongiform encephalopathies, etc.) requires a rational understanding of the driving forces involved in the formation of these organized assemblies rich in beta-sheet structure. To this end, we used a computer-designed algorithm to search for hexapeptide sequences with a high propensity to form homopolymeric beta-sheets. Sequences predicted to be highly favorable on this basis were found experimentally to self-associate efficiently into beta-sheets, whereas point mutations predicted to be unfavorable for this structure inhibited polymerization. However, the property to form polymeric beta-sheets is not a sufficient requirement for fibril formation because, under the conditions used here, preformed beta-sheets from these peptides with charged residues form well defined fibrils only if the total net charge of the molecule is +/-1. This finding illustrates the delicate balance of interactions involved in the formation of fibrils relative to more disordered aggregates. The present results, in conjunction with x-ray fiber diffraction, electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared measurements, have allowed us to propose a detailed structural model of the fibrils.

  18. Umbilical Cord Milking Versus Delayed Cord Clamping in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katheria, Anup C; Truong, Giang; Cousins, Larry; Oshiro, Bryan; Finer, Neil N

    2015-07-01

    Delayed cord clamping (DCC) is recommended for premature infants to improve blood volume. Most preterm infants are born by cesarean delivery (CD), and placental transfusion may be less effective than in vaginal delivery (VD). We sought to determine whether infants umbilical cord milking (UCM) have higher measures of systemic blood flow than infants who undergo DCC. This was a 2-center trial. Infants delivered by CD were randomly assigned to undergo UCM or DCC. Infants delivered by VD were also randomly assigned separately. UCM (4 strippings) or DCC (45-60 seconds) were performed. Continuous hemodynamic measurements and echocardiography were done at site 1. A total of 197 infants were enrolled (mean gestational age 28 ± 2 weeks). Of the 154 infants delivered by CD, 75 were assigned to UCM and 79 to DCC. Of the infants delivered by CD, neonates randomly assigned to UCM had higher superior vena cava flow and right ventricular output in the first 12 hours of life. Neonates undergoing UCM also had higher hemoglobin, delivery room temperature, blood pressure over the first 15 hours, and urine output in the first 24 hours of life. There were no differences for the 43 infants delivered by VD. This is the first randomized controlled trial demonstrating higher systemic blood flow with UCM in preterm neonates compared with DCC. UCM may be a more efficient technique to improve blood volume in premature infants delivered by CD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  20. Pulmonary mucormycosis presenting with vocal cord paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri Devi, H. J.; Mohan Rao, K.N.; K M Prathima; Moideen, Riyaz

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is a relatively uncommon infection. It can present in various forms. Very few cases of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis have been described in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis in an uncontrolled diabetic patient.

  1. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  2. Blast characterization of det-cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, J.B.W.; Pett, A.; Vantomme, J.; van der Stoel, Almer

    2012-01-01

    Det-cord, short for detonating cord, is thin flexible plastic tube with a core of PETN, with a diameter of 5 mm and lengths of 30m per spool. It is commonly used to connect multiple charges, either in military or in civil (mining) operations, but this use has been extended to cutting trees,

  3. Diagnosis of true umbilical cord knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzikowski, Wojciech; Kowalczyk, Dariusz; Więcek, Jacek

    2014-02-24

    Many abnormalities are observed in the morphology and pathology of the umbilical cord. The aim of the study was to assess the role of 3D sonography in pathology of true umbilical cord knots. In our materials we observed 10 cases of true umbilical cord knots in a population of 2,864 deliveries. The 2-dimensional transverse scan of the umbilical cord was shown in 3- and 4-dimensional volume scan in order to get a precise image. Four knots were diagnosed prenatally, 3 knots were not diagnosed before the delivery and in the 3 remaining cases ultrasound examinations were not undertaken because the patients were in the course of delivery. In the pregnant subjects with diagnosed true umbilical cord knot once a week the Doppler blood flow indices were examined in the umbilical cord sections before and after the knot. In the three shown cases there were no signs of constriction or tightening of the knot. Four newborns were delivered spontaneously and five by caesarean section. In none of the cases was a pathological FHR trace an indication for emergency delivery. Four-dimensional and Color Doppler examination is very important to diagnose a true umbilical cord. To make a precise diagnosis a longer observation of the abnormality is necessary and its repeated confirmation by color Doppler and power Doppler. This diagnosis requires strict monitoring of fetal wellbeing during pregnancy and the delivery. Perfection of true umbilical cord knot diagnoses may reduce sudden and unforeseen fetal distress.

  4. Ambulation and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-05-01

    Walking is possible for many patients with a spinal cord injury. Avenues enabling walking include braces, robotics and FES. Among the benefits are improved musculoskeletal and mental health, however unrealistic expectations may lead to negative changes in quality of life. Use rigorous assessment standards to gauge the improvement of walking during the rehabilitation process, but also yearly. Continued walking after discharge may be limited by challenges, such as lack of accessibility in and outside the home, and complications, such as shoulder pain or injuries from falls. It is critical to determine the risks and benefits of walking for each patient.

  5. Recognising serious umbilical cord anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrew S J; Jayapal, Sathiya S K; Whitburn, Jessica A S; Akinbiyi, Bolutito A; Willetts, Ian E

    2013-11-27

    Umbilical vessel catheterisation is a common intervention in neonatal care. Many complications are recognised, some of which are life-threatening. We report the case of a term neonate who was compromised at birth following antepartum haemorrhage with evidence of multiorgan ischaemic injury. Following resuscitation and umbilical vessel catheterisation, she developed pneumoperitoneum. At laparotomy, a patent vitellointestinal duct was identified and resected. Intestinal perforation was found in the duct wall, most plausibly explained by the unintentional catheterisation of the duct via the umbilicus. Learning to recognise umbilical cord anomalies, such as patent vitellointestinal duct, can be simple and could prevent potentially serious complications.

  6. Reversible heat-induced dissociation of β2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, József; Micsonai, András; Pál-Gábor, Henriett; Petrik, Éva; Gráf, László; Kovács, János; Lee, Young-Ho; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2011-04-19

    Recent progress in the field of amyloid research indicates that the classical view of amyloid fibrils, being irreversibly formed highly stable structures resistant to perturbating conditions and proteolytic digestion, is getting more complex. We studied the thermal stability and heat-induced depolymerization of amyloid fibrils of β(2)-microglobulin (β2m), a protein responsible for dialysis-related amyloidosis. We found that freshly polymerized β2m fibrils at 0.1-0.3 mg/mL concentration completely dissociated to monomers upon 10 min incubation at 99 °C. Fibril depolymerization was followed by thioflavin-T fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy at various temperatures. Dissociation of β2m fibrils was found to be a reversible and dynamic process reaching equilibrium between fibrils and monomers within minutes. Repolymerization experiments revealed that the number of extendable fibril ends increased significantly upon incubation at elevated temperatures suggesting that the mechanism of fibril unfolding involves two distinct processes: (1) dissociation of monomers from the fibril ends and (2) the breakage of fibrils. The breakage of fibrils may be an important in vivo factor multiplying the number of fibril nuclei and thus affecting the onset and progress of disease. We investigated the effects of some additives and different factors on the stability of amyloid fibrils. Sample aging increased the thermal stability of β2m fibril solution. 0.5 mM SDS completely prevented β2m fibrils from dissociation up to the applied highest temperature of 99 °C. The generality of our findings was proved on fibrils of K3 peptide and α-synuclein. Our simple method may also be beneficial for screening and developing amyloid-active compounds for therapeutic purposes.

  7. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly: Is ablation ready for prime time?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Allen J. Solomon

    2005-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and results in significant morbidity, especially in the elderly. The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases dramatically with advancing age to almost 6% in individuals older than 65 years. In fact, 84% of people with atrial fibrillation are over 65 years of age.1 Additionally, the risk of stroke increases with advancing age, such that one-third of strokes in patients over the age of 65 are caused by atrial fibrillation.

  8. Excessive supraventricular ectopic activity and increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binici, Zeynep; Intzilakis, Theodoros; Wendelboe Nielsen, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Prediction of stroke and atrial fibrillation in healthy individuals is challenging. We examined whether excessive supraventricular ectopic activity (ESVEA) correlates with risk of stroke, death, and atrial fibrillation in subjects without previous stroke or heart disease.......Prediction of stroke and atrial fibrillation in healthy individuals is challenging. We examined whether excessive supraventricular ectopic activity (ESVEA) correlates with risk of stroke, death, and atrial fibrillation in subjects without previous stroke or heart disease....

  9. Spinal cord ischemia secondary to hypovolemic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jacob Yl; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy Km; Yang, Eugene Wr; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-12-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable.

  10. Time to implement delayed cord clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2014-03-01

    Immediate umbilical cord clamping after delivery is routine in the United States despite little evidence to support this practice. Numerous trials in both term and preterm neonates have demonstrated the safety and benefit of delayed cord clamping. In premature neonates, delayed cord clamping has been shown to stabilize transitional circulation, lessening needs for inotropic medications and reducing blood transfusions, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intraventricular hemorrhage. In term neonates, delayed cord clamping has been associated with decreased iron-deficient anemia and increased iron stores with potential valuable effects that extend beyond the newborn period, including improvements in long-term neurodevelopment. The failure to more broadly implement delayed cord clamping in neonates ignores published benefits of increased placental blood transfusion at birth and may represent an unnecessary harm for vulnerable neonates.

  11. Stem Cells in the Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mark L.; Troyer, Deryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the next frontier in medicine. Stem cells are thought to have great therapeutic and biotechnological potential. This will not only to replace damaged or dysfunctional cells, but also rescue them and/or deliver therapeutic proteins after they have been engineered to do so. Currently, ethical and scientific issues surround both embryonic and fetal stem cells and hinder their widespread implementation. In contrast, stem cells recovered postnatally from the umbilical cord, including the umbilical cord blood cells, amnion/placenta, umbilical cord vein, or umbilical cord matrix cells, are a readily available and inexpensive source of cells that are capable of forming many different cell types (i.e., they are “multipotent”). This review will focus on the umbilical cord-derived stem cells and compare those cells with adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:17237554

  12. Galactorrhea: a complication of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarkony, G M; Novick, A K; Roth, E J; Kirschner, K L; Rayner, S; Betts, H B

    1992-09-01

    Galactorrhea, a secretion of milk or milk-like products from the breast in the absence of parturition, has been reported to occur in women with spinal cord injuries in association with amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Four cases of galactorrhea in association with spinal cord injury are reported. Galactorrhea developed in four spinal cord injured women who had thoracic paraplegia. The onset of galactorrhea was from one month to five months after injury. Although the onset of galactorrhea may have been related to prescribed medications in all four cases, insufficient data exist to draw conclusions. The three women whose galactorrhea persisted declined treatment and galactorrhea continuing for more than two years in one instance. We conclude that galactorrhea with or without amenorrhea may develop after a spinal cord injury and that spinal cord injured women may have an enhanced sensitivity to medication-induced galactorrhea.

  13. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, T.Y.; Chin, C.J.; Lu, S.C.; Yiacoumi, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [and others

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration consists of two steps: heterogeneous particle flocculation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a stirred tank and high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic-seeding filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic seeding filtration are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A trajectory model that includes hydrodynamic resistance, van der Waals, and electrostatic forces is developed to calculate the flocculation frequency in a turbulent-shear regime. Fractal dimension is introduced to simulate the open structure of aggregates. A magnetic-filtration model that consists of trajectory analysis, a particle build-up model, a breakthrough model, and a bivariate population-balance model is developed to predict the breakthrough curve of magnetic-seeding filtration. A good agreement between modeling results and experimental data is obtained. The results show that the model developed in this study can be used to predict the performance of magnetic-seeding filtration without using empirical coefficients or fitting parameters. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Endocytosed 2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibrils Induce Necrosis and Apoptosis of Rabbit Synovial Fibroblasts by Disrupting Endosomal/Lysosomal Membranes: A Novel Mechanism on the Cytotoxicity of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadakazu Okoshi

    Full Text Available Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a major complication in long-term hemodialysis patients. In dialysis-related amyloidosis, β2-microglobulin (β2-m amyloid fibrils deposit in the osteoarticular tissue, leading to carpal tunnel syndrome and destructive arthropathy with cystic bone lesions, but the mechanism by which these amyloid fibrils destruct bone and joint tissue is not fully understood. In this study, we assessed the cytotoxic effect of β2-m amyloid fibrils on the cultured rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Under light microscopy, the cells treated with amyloid fibrils exhibited both necrotic and apoptotic changes, while the cells treated with β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer exhibited no morphological changes. As compared to β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer, β2-m amyloid fibrils significantly reduced cellular viability as measured by the lactate dehydrogenase release assay and the 3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay and significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells as measured by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. β2-m amyloid fibrils added to the medium adhered to cell surfaces, but did not disrupt artificial plasma membranes as measured by the liposome dye release assay. Interestingly, when the cells were incubated with amyloid fibrils for several hours, many endosomes/lysosomes filled with amyloid fibrils were observed under confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy, Moreover, some endosomal/lysosomal membranes were disrupted by intravesicular fibrils, leading to the leakage of the fibrils into the cytosol and adjacent to mitochondria. Inhibition of actin-dependent endocytosis by cytochalasin D attenuated the toxicity of amyloid fibrils. These results suggest that endocytosed β2-m amyloid fibrils induce necrosis and apoptosis by disrupting endosomal/lysosomal membranes, and this novel mechanism on the cytotoxicity of amyloid

  15. 77 FR 11121 - Scientific Information Request on Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Atrial Fibrillation AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Request for... scientific information submissions from manufacturers of atrial fibrillation medical devices. Scientific... effectiveness review of the evidence for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. The EHC Program is dedicated...

  16. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, M. D.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Mamdouh, W.;

    2008-01-01

    of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders...

  17. Causes of deaths and influencing factors in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauchier, Laurent; Villejoubert, Olivier; Clementy, Nicolas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is associated with a higher mortality, but causes of death of atrial fibrillation patients and their specific predictors have been less well defined. We aimed to identify the causes of death among atrial fibrillation patients and secondly, clinical predictors for t...

  18. Meta-analysis identifies six new susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellinor, Patrick T; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Albert, Christine M; Glazer, Nicole L; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Lubitz, Steven A; Bis, Joshua C; Chung, Mina K; Dörr, Marcus; Ozaki, Kouichi; Roberts, Jason D; Smith, J Gustav; Pfeufer, Arne; Sinner, Moritz F; Lohman, Kurt; Ding, Jingzhong; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Jonathan D; Rienstra, Michiel; Rice, Kenneth M; Van Wagoner, David R; Magnani, Jared W; Wakili, Reza; Clauss, Sebastian; Rotter, Jerome I; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Launer, Lenore J; Davies, Robert W; Borkovich, Matthew; Harris, Tamara B; Lin, Honghuang; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Milan, David J; Hofman, Albert; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chen, Lin Y; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Voight, Benjamin F; Li, Guo; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kubo, Michiaki; Tedrow, Usha B; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Conen, David; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Xu, Siyan; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Levy, Daniel; Nakamura, Yusuke; Parvez, Babar; Mahida, Saagar; Furie, Karen L; Rosand, Jonathan; Muhammad, Raafia; Psaty, Bruce M; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Wichmann, H-Erich; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Kao, W H Linda; Kathiresan, Sekar; Roden, Dan M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McKnight, Barbara; Sjögren, Marketa; Newman, Anne B; Liu, Yongmei; Gollob, Michael H; Melander, Olle; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Felix, Stephan B; Alonso, Alvaro; Darbar, Dawood; Barnard, John; Chasman, Daniel I; Heckbert, Susan R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kääb, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and death. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry, including 6,707 with and 52,426 without atrial fibrillation. Six new atrial fibrillation suscepti

  19. Dronedarone: an emerging therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Salvetti, Massimo

    2010-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia, with a prevalence ranging from 0.1% to 9.0% at different ages, and is associated with increased cardiovascular events and mortality. A significant increase in the prevalence of the disease is expected to occur in the coming years as a consequence of the aging of the population and advances in the management of coronary artery disease and heart failure. Effective rhythm control may be difficult to obtain in a significant proportion of patients with AF. The limited efficacy and the possible adverse effects of antiarrhythmic drugs has led researchers to focus their attention on new molecules, in a search of compounds with antiarrhythmic efficacy and a more favourable safety profile. Among several new drugs developed for the management of AF, dronedarone, a benzofuran derivative that shares many of the antiarrhythmic properties of amiodarone, but with a more favourable safety profile, seems particularly promising. The drug is noniodinated, has less lipophilicity, reaches therapeutic concentrations over a shorter period of time and has lower tissue accumulation. Dronedarone, similarly to amiodarone, exhibits electrophysiologic characteristics of all 4 Vaughan Williams classes. Clinical studies have shown that dronedarone effectively reduces ventricular rate, may prevent or delay the recurrence of AF, and may reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with AF or atrial flutter. The drug has an overall good safety profile, in particular with low pulmonary and thyroid toxicity. An important exception is represented by patients with unstable haemodynamic conditions, in which the use of dronedarone has been found to be associated with an increase in mortality. Dronedarone has been recently approved for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration and by the European Medicines Agency. Further results from trials and clinical use will better define the efficacy and safety profile of dronedarone in AF compared

  20. The atrial fibrillation conundrum in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vriese, An S; Caluwé, Rogier; Raggi, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The burden of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the risk of stroke are high in dialysis patients. The decision to use anticoagulation rests heavily on effective risk stratification. Because both the pathophysiology of the disease and the response to therapy differ in dialysis, data from the general population cannot be extrapolated. The effect of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) on the risk of stroke in dialysis patients with AF has not been studied in randomized trials. The available observational data provide contradictory results, reflecting differences in the degree of residual confounding, quality of international normalized ratio control, and stroke characterization. Dialysis patients have a high baseline bleeding risk. It remains unclear to what extent VKAs affect the overall bleeding propensity, but they may significantly increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Vascular calcifications are extremely prevalent in dialysis patients and independently associated with an adverse outcome. Vitamin K antagonists inhibit the activity of key anticalcifying proteins and may thus compound the risk of vascular calcification progression in dialysis. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines for anticoagulation in dialysis patients with AF, we provide recommendations to assist clinicians in individualized risk stratification. We further propose that new oral anticoagulants may have a better benefit-risk profile in dialysis patients than VKA, provided appropriate dose reductions are made. New oral anticoagulant may yield more on-target anticoagulation, reduce the risk of intracerebral bleeding, and not interfere with vascular calcification biology. Clinical trials with new oral anticoagulant in dialysis patients are eagerly awaited, to reveal whether these assumptions can be confirmed.

  1. An Integrated Management Approach to Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lindsey; Gardner, Martin; Magee, Kirk; Fearon, Ann; Morgulis, Inna; Doucette, Steve; Sapp, John L; Gray, Chris; Abdelwahab, Amir; Parkash, Ratika

    2016-01-25

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia resulting in mortality and morbidity. Gaps in oral anticoagulation and education of patients regarding AF have been identified as areas that require improvement. A before-and-after study of 433 patients with newly diagnosed AF in the 3 emergency departments in Nova Scotia from January 1, 2011 until January 31, 2014 was performed. The "before" phase underwent the usual-care pathway for AF management; the "after" phase was enrolled in a nurse-run, physician-supervised AF clinic. The primary outcome was a composite of death, cardiovascular hospitalization, and AF-related emergency department visits. A propensity analysis was performed to account for differences in baseline characteristics. A total of 185 patients were enrolled into the usual-care group, and 228 patients were enrolled in the AF clinic group. The mean age was 64±15 years and 44% were women. In a propensity-matched analysis, the primary outcome occurred in 44 (26.2%) patients in the usual-care group and 29 (17.3%) patients in the AF clinic group (odds ratio 0.71; 95% CI [0.59, 1]; P=0.049) at 12 months. Prescription of oral anticoagulation was increased in the CHADS2 ≥2 group (88.4% in the AF clinic versus 58.5% in the usual-care group, Pmanagement approach for the burgeoning population of AF may provide an overall benefit to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  2. Impaired endothelial function in lone atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired endothelial function has been previously documented in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and underlying comorbidities or older patients with idiopathic AF. The aim of this study was to evaluate systemic endothelial function in younger AF patients (less than 7 days lone AF. The second group comprised of 28 healthy controls in sinus rhythm (the mean age 43 ± 13, 53% male, matched by age, gender and atherosclerotic risk factors. All the participants underwent physical examination, laboratory analysis [including determination of C-reactive protein (CRP], standard echocardiography and exercise-stress testing. Brachial artery FMD and endothelium independent dilation (NMD were assessed with a high-resolution ultrasound probe and arterial diameters taken from 5 consecutive cardiac cycles were averaged for each measurement to accommodate to beat-to-beat flow variations in AF. Results. There were no differences between the 2 groups regarding age, gender and most clinical, laboratory and echocardiographic characteristics (all p > 0.05, apart from the increased heart rate (p = 0.018, body mass index (p = 0.027, CRP levels (p = 0.007 and left atrial anteroposterior dimension (p 0.05. In the multivariate analysis, the independent FMD determinants in our study population were the presence of AF, smoking and total cholesterol levels (all p < 0.001. In patients with AF, the strongest independent FMD determinant was arrhythmia duration (p < 0.001, followed by smoking (p = 0.013 and total cholesterol levels (p = 0.045. Conclusions. Our findings confirm that sustained AF is associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction even in relatively young patients with no cardiovascular disorders or risk factors. AF is an independent contributor to lower FMD and a prolonged arrhythmia duration may confer the risk for more profound endothelial damage.

  3. A quantitative measurement of spatial order in ventricular fibrillation

    CERN Document Server

    Bayly, P V; Wolf, P D; Greenside, H S; Smith, W M; Ideker, R E

    1993-01-01

    As an objective measurement of spatial order in ventricular fibrillation (VF), spatial correlation functions and their characteristic lengths were estimated from epicardial electrograms of pigs in VF. The correlation length of the VF in pigs was found to be approximately 4-10 mm, varying as fibrillation progressed. The degree of correlation decreased in the first 4 seconds after fibrillation then increased over the next minute. The correlation length is much smaller than the scale of the heart, suggesting that many independent regions of activity exist on the epicardium at any one time. On the other hand, the correlation length is 4 to 10 times the interelectrode spacing, indicating that some coherence is present. These results imply that the heart behaves during VF as a high-dimensional, but not random, system involving many spatial degrees of freedom, which may explain the lack of convergence of fractal dimension estimates reported in the literature. Changes in the correlation length also suggest that VF re...

  4. Molecular packing in bone collagen fibrils prior to mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Benjamin; Zhou, Hong-Wen; Burger, Christian; Chu, Benjamin; Glimcher, Melvin J.

    2012-02-01

    The three-dimensional packing of collagen molecules in bone collagen fibrils has been largely unknown because even in moderately mineralized bone tissues, the organic matrix structure is severely perturbed by the deposition of mineral crystals. During the past decades, the structure of tendon collagen (e.g. rat tail) --- a tissue that cannot mineralize in vivo, has been assumed to be representative for bone collagen fibrils. Small-angle X-ray diffraction analysis of the native, uncalcified intramuscular fish bone has revealed a new molecular packing scheme, significantly different from the quasi-hexagonal arrangement often found in tendons. The deduced structure in bone collagen fibrils indicates the presence of spatially discrete microfibrils, and an arrangement of intrafibrillar space to form ``channels'', which could accommodate crystals with dimensions typically found in bone apatite.

  5. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanczyc, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.hanczyc@chalmers.se

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Interactions of binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes with amyloid fibrils. • Dimer ruthenium(II) compounds are sensitive amyloid fibrils biomarkers. • Recognition of amyloid-chromophore adducts by two-photon excited emission. - Abstract: Metal–organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11′-bidppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  6. Imaging and 3D morphological analysis of collagen fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altendorf, H; Decencière, E; Jeulin, D; De sa Peixoto, P; Deniset-Besseau, A; Angelini, E; Mosser, G; Schanne-Klein, M-C

    2012-08-01

    The recent booming of multiphoton imaging of collagen fibrils by means of second harmonic generation microscopy generates the need for the development and automation of quantitative methods for image analysis. Standard approaches sequentially analyse two-dimensional (2D) slices to gain knowledge on the spatial arrangement and dimension of the fibrils, whereas the reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) image yields better information about these characteristics. In this work, a 3D analysis method is proposed for second harmonic generation images of collagen fibrils, based on a recently developed 3D fibre quantification method. This analysis uses operators from mathematical morphology. The fibril structure is scanned with a directional distance transform. Inertia moments of the directional distances yield the main fibre orientation, corresponding to the main inertia axis. The collaboration of directional distances and fibre orientation delivers a geometrical estimate of the fibre radius. The results include local maps as well as global distribution of orientation and radius of the fibrils over the 3D image. They also bring a segmentation of the image into foreground and background, as well as a classification of the foreground pixels into the preferred orientations. This accurate determination of the spatial arrangement of the fibrils within a 3D data set will be most relevant in biomedical applications. It brings the possibility to monitor remodelling of collagen tissues upon a variety of injuries and to guide tissues engineering because biomimetic 3D organizations and density are requested for better integration of implants. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Ventricular rate control of atrial fibrillation in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-10-01

    In the last few years, there has been a major shift in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the setting of hear failure (HF), from rhythm to ventricular rate control in most patients with both conditions. In this article, the authors focus on ventricular rate control and discuss the indications; the optimal ventricular rate-control target, including detailed results of the Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation: a Comparison Between Lenient versus Strict Rate Control II (RACE II) study; and the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options to control the ventricular rate during AF in the setting of HF.

  8. Antiarrhythmic Effect Of Antioxidants In Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabchabov PhD, Rustam; Rg PhD, Khabchabov; Er PhD, Makhmudova

    2016-01-01

    Resume In accordance with modern concepts, one of the leading roles in the development of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and flutter, belongs - the restructuring of the myocardium, in second place - sick sinus syndrome and in third place - the presence of accessory pathways and hormonal disorders. The development of atrial fibrillation and flutter in the structural pathology, primarily begins with of drugs if it does not work, we have to carry out ablation. Providing proper, effective and important combination therapy - is the main challenge in cardiology.

  9. Kink waves in an active region dynamic fibril

    CERN Document Server

    Pietarila, A; Hirzberger, J; Solanki, S K

    2011-01-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred Gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  10. Kink Waves in an Active Region Dynamic Fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietarila, A.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Hirzberger, J.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 Å observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  11. Macromolecular crowding for tailoring tissue-derived fibrillated matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Valentina; Friedrichs, Jens; Weber, Heather M; Prewitz, Marina C; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Werner, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials characteristics only. In this work, we demonstrate how macromolecular crowding (MMC) - the supplementation of matrix reconstitution media with synthetic or natural macromolecules in ways to create excluded volume effects (EVE) - can be employed for tailoring important structural and biophysical characteristics of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices. Porcine kidneys were decellularized, ground and the obtained extracellular matrix (ECM) preparations were reconstituted under varied MMC conditions. We show that MMC strongly influences the fibrillogenesis kinetics and impacts the architecture and the elastic modulus of the reconstituted matrices, with diameters and relative alignment of fibrils increasing at elevated concentrations of the crowding agent Ficoll400, a nonionic synthetic polymer of sucrose. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MMC modulates the distribution of key ECM molecules within the reconstituted matrix scaffolds. As a proof of concept, we compared different variants of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices in cell culture experiments referring to specific requirements of kidney tissue engineering approaches. The results revealed that MMC-tailored matrices support the morphogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) into capillary networks and of murine kidney stem cells (KSCs) into highly branched aggregates. The established methodology is concluded to provide generally applicable new options for tailoring tissue-specific multiphasic matrices in vitro. Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials

  12. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depaoli, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This task will investigate the capabilities of magnetic-seeding filtration for the enhanced removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic particulates from liquids. This technology appies to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatant. Magnetic-seeding filtration can be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal-size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes.

  13. Farmers, seeds and varieties : supporting informal seed supply in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, M.H.; Bishaw, Z.; Beshir, A.; Boef, de W.S.

    2008-01-01

    Ethiopia is characterized by an enormous diversity in agro-ecosystems, crops and varieties, with the informal seed systems dominant in seed supply for almost all crops. The book addresses strategies and approaches through which professionals can support informal seed supply, and links these with the

  14. Restoration seed reserves for assisted gene flow within seed orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.S. Echt; B.S. Crane

    2017-01-01

    Changing climate and declining forest populations imperil the future of certain forest tree species. To complement forest management and genetic conservation plans, we propose a new paradigm for seedling seed orchards: foster genetic mixing among a variety of seed sources to increase genetic diversity and adaptive potential of seed supplies used for forest restoration...

  15. Quantifying seed dispersal kernels from truncated seed-tracking data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Ben T.; Visser, Marco D.; Kays, Roland; Jansen, Patrick A.

    2012-01-01

    1. Seed dispersal is a key biological process that remains poorly documented because dispersing seeds are notoriously hard to track. While long-distance dispersal is thought to be particularly important, seed-tracking studies typically yield incomplete data sets that are biased against long-distance

  16. Seeds of confusion : the impact of policies on seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwaars, N.P.

    2007-01-01

    Seed is basic to crop production. Next to its importance in production, food security and rural development, seed is a key element in many debates about technology development and transfer, biodiversity, globalisation and equity. The sustainable availability of good quality seed is thus an important

  17. Seeds of confusion : the impact of policies on seed systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwaars, N.P.

    2007-01-01

    Seed is basic to crop production. Next to its importance in production, food security and rural development, seed is a key element in many debates about technology development and transfer, biodiversity, globalisation and equity. The sustainable availability of good quality seed is thus an important

  18. Quantifying seed dispersal kernels from truncated seed-tracking data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Ben T.; Visser, Marco D.; Kays, Roland; Jansen, Patrick A.

    1. Seed dispersal is a key biological process that remains poorly documented because dispersing seeds are notoriously hard to track. While long-distance dispersal is thought to be particularly important, seed-tracking studies typically yield incomplete data sets that are biased against long-distance

  19. Quantifying seed dispersal kernels from truncated seed-tracking data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, B.T.; Visser, M.D.; Kays, R.; Jansen, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    1. Seed dispersal is a key biological process that remains poorly documented because dispersing seeds are notoriously hard to track. While long-distance dispersal is thought to be particularly important, seed-tracking studies typically yield incomplete data sets that are biased against long-distance

  20. Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning equipment in cotton gins occurs, but the quantity of material lost, factors affecting fiber and seed loss, and the mechanisms that cause material loss are not well understood. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of different factors on...

  1. [Atrial fibrillation and regular tachycardia in two young patients--are both treated with atrial fibrillation ablation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bodman, G; Brömsen, J; Kopf, C; Füller, M; Block, M

    2014-04-17

    Two young patients with documented episodes of symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation have been referred for pulmonary vein isolation. Both patients had a history of concomitant regular tachycardia. in both cases pulmonaryvein isolation has not been performed but in each patient a supraventricular tachycardia (right focal atrial tachycardia/atrioventricular reentry tachycardia) could be induced and ablated instead. Concomitant supraventricular tachycardia acting as a trigger arrhythmia is frequent in young patients with atrial fibrillation without underlying cardiacdisease. In these patients a concomitant supra-ventricular tachycardia should beexcluded by electrophysiological study or ablated before pulmonary vein isolation or initiating an antiarrhythmic drug therapy. In most cases ablation of supraventricular tachycardia is safe and successful whereas the risks of ablative therapy of atrial fibrillation can not be neglected and success is moderate.

  2. Fibril morphology and tendon mechanical properties in patellar tendinopathy: effects of heavy slow resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsgaard, Mads; Qvortrup, Klaus; Larsen, Jytte; Aagaard, Per; Doessing, Simon; Hansen, Philip; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2010-04-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is characterized by pathologic abnormalities. Heavy slow resistance training (HSR) is effective in the management of patellar tendinopathy, but the underlying functional mechanisms remain elusive. To investigate fibril morphology and mechanical properties in patellar tendinopathy and the effect of HSR on these properties. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Eight male patients with patellar tendinopathy completed 12 weeks of HSR. Nine healthy subjects served as controls. Assessments were conducted at baseline and at 12 weeks. Patients assessed symptoms/function and maximal tendon pain during activity. Tendon biopsy samples were analyzed for fibril density, volume fraction, and mean fibril area. Tendon mechanical properties were assessed using force and ultrasonography samplings. Patients improved in symptoms/function (P = .02) and maximal tendon pain during activity (P = .008). Stiffness and modulus of control and tendinopathy tendons were similar at baseline. Stiffness remained unaffected in control tendons (3487 +/- 392 to 3157 +/- 327 N/mm, P = .57) but declined in tendinopathic tendons at 12 weeks (3185 +/- 187 to 2701 +/- 201 N/mm, P = .04). At baseline, fibril volume fraction was equal, fibril density smaller (P = .03), and mean fibril area tended to be higher in tendinopathy versus controls (P = .07). Fibril morphology remained unchanged in controls but fibril density increased (70% +/- 18%, P = .02) and fibril mean area decreased (-26% +/- 21%, P = .04) in tendinopathic tendons after HSR. Fibril morphology is abnormal in tendinopathy, but tendon mechanical properties are not. Clinical improvements after HSR were associated with changes in fibril morphology toward normal fibril density and mean fibril area. Heavy slow resistance training improved the clinical outcome of patellar tendinopathy, and these improvements were associated with normalization of fibril morphology, most likely due to a production of new fibrils.

  3. The importance of good seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2013-01-01

    The importance of seed to human culture and conservation of the natural world is briefly discussed. The effect of seed on seedling quality and cost is described through several examples and illustrations.

  4. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  5. Does in-hospital ventricular fibrillation affect prognosis after myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, G V; Torp-Pedersen, C; Hildebrandt, P

    1997-01-01

    -eight (12.4%) of the patients had ventricular fibrillation in hospital. The following risk factors were included in multivariate models to estimate their importance for 30-day and long-term (median 7 year) prognosis: age, gender, ventricular fibrillation, congestive heart failure, pulmonary oedema...... fibrillation secondary to heart failure compared to patients without ventricular fibrillation. For patients surviving more than 30 days, relative risk of death in those with ventricular fibrillation was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 0.93-1.34, P = 0.26). Logistic regression analysis of relative risk associated...

  6. Catheter ablation of a monofocal premature ventricular complex triggering idiopathic ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuki, S; Mitamura, H; Ogawa, S

    2001-07-01

    A 62 year old man was admitted for evaluation of recurrent episodes of syncope. A surface ECG showed frequent repetitive premature ventricular complexes of right ventricular outflow tract origin. Ventricular fibrillation was inducible by programmed electrical stimulation but otherwise cardiac evaluation was unremarkable. A diagnosis of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation was made and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was installed. However, spontaneous ventricular fibrillation recurred, requiring repeated ICD discharges. The ventricular fibrillation was reproducibly triggered by a single premature ventricular complex with a specific QRS morphology. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was carried out to eradicate this complex. No ventricular fibrillation has developed after this procedure, and the patient does not require drug treatment.

  7. Glucagon stop-go kinetics supports a monomer-trimer fibrillation model

    CERN Document Server

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Kyrsting, Anders; Otzen, Daniel E; Oddershede, Lene B; Jensen, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    We investigate in vitro fibrillation kinetics of the hormone peptide glucagon at various concentrations using confocal microscopy and determine the glucagon fibril persistence length $60 \\mu\\textrm{m}$. At all concentrations we observe that periods of individual fibril growth are interrupted by periods of stasis. The growth probability is large at high and low concentrations and is reduced for intermediate glucagon concentrations. To explain this behavior we propose a simple model, where fibrils come in two forms, one built entirely from glucagon monomers and one entirely from glucagon trimers. The opposite building blocks act as fibril growth blockers, and this generic model reproduces experimental behavior well.

  8. Genetics and Forest Seed Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars Holger

    2016-01-01

    High genetic quality seed is obtained from seed sources that match the planting site, have a good outcrossing rate, and are superior in some desirable characters. Non-degraded natural forests and plantations may be used as untested seed sources, which can sometimes be managed to promote outbreedi...

  9. Characterization of amaranth seed oils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamel, T.H.; Mesallam, A.S.; Damir, A.A.; Shekib, L.A.; Linssen, J.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    The oil fractions of Amaranthus caudatus L. and Amaranthus cruentus L. seeds were studied after different treatments of the seeds. The oil contents were 7.1 and 8.5% for raw A. caudatus L. and A. cruentus L. seeds, and consisted of 80.3¿82.3% of triacylglycerols (TAGs). Phospholipids represented 9.1

  10. Genetics of Forest Seed Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars Holger

    2016-01-01

    High genetic quality seed is obtained from seed sources that match the planting site, have a good outcrossing rate, and are superior in some desirable characters. Non-degraded natural forests and plantations may be used as untested seed sources, which can sometimes be managed to promote outbreeding...

  11. Characterization of amaranth seed oils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamel, T.H.; Mesallam, A.S.; Damir, A.A.; Shekib, L.A.; Linssen, J.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    The oil fractions of Amaranthus caudatus L. and Amaranthus cruentus L. seeds were studied after different treatments of the seeds. The oil contents were 7.1 and 8.5% for raw A. caudatus L. and A. cruentus L. seeds, and consisted of 80.3¿82.3% of triacylglycerols (TAGs). Phospholipids represented

  12. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  13. The SEED Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Committed to fulfilling the promise of the green economy, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) launched the Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative (www.theseedcenter.org) in October 2010. The project advances sustainability and clean energy workforce development practices at community colleges by…

  14. Asymmetrical dimethylarginine level in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife; Biberoğlu, Gursel; Hasanoğlu, Alev; Tavil, Yusuf; Tulmaç, Murat; Ozdemir, Murat

    2008-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is known to be related with increased risk of thromboembolic events. Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), which is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), can cause endothelial dysfunction by decreasing nitric oxide (NO) and lead to increased risk of thrombosis. In the present study our aim was to compare plasma levels of ADMA in patients with acute onset ( 1 year) to determine the risk of thrombosis. 17 patients with the first detected attack of AF within the first 24 hours of presentation (group 1), 25 patients who had permanent chronic AF lasting at least 1 year or more (group II) and 18 healthy persons as the control group (group III) were included in the study. For each patient the plasma ADMA, L-arginine, symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA) concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in venous blood samples collected before cardioversion. We compared the plasma ADMA, L-arginine and SDMA concentrations between the groups. Plasma L-arginine (78.18 +/- 28.29 vs. 73.14 +/- 14.11 vs. 71.03 +/- 21.31, P = 0.549) and plasma SDMA concentrations (0.38 +/-0.18 vs. 0.42 +/- 0.21 vs. 0.32 +/- 0.24, P = 0.224) were similar in all groups. There was a significant difference between plasma ADMA concentrations (0.76 +/- 0.27 vs. 0.50 +/- 0.26 vs. 0.36 +/- 0.20, P < 0.001) among the groups. When we compared plasma ADMA levels between the subgroups, we also found a significant difference (P = 0.002 when comparing group I and group II, P < 0.001 when comparing of group I and group III, P = 0.042 when compareng of group II and group III). ADMA levels in patients with acute onset AF were significantly increased when compared with patients with chronic AF and the healthy control group indicating the presence of endothelial dysfunction and a prothrombotic state even in a very early phase of AF.

  15. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Fu-jiang; FENG Shi-qing

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review the recent studies about human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) and advances in the treatment of spinal cord injury, Data sources Published articles (1983-2007) about hUCMSCs and spinal cord injury were selected using Medline. Study selection Articles selected were relevant to development of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for transplantation in spinal cord injury therapy. Of 258 originally identifiied arises 51 were selected that specifically addressed the stated purpose. Results Recent work has revealed that hUCMSCs share most of the characteristics with MSCs derived from bone marrow and are more appropriate to transplantation for cell based therapies. Conclusions Human umbilical cord could be regarded as a source of MSCs for experimental and clinical needs. In addition, as a peculiar source of stem cells, hUCMSCs may play an important role in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  16. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  17. Tree Seed Technology Training Course: Student Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, F. T.; And Others

    This manual is intended primarily to train seed collectors, seed-plant managers, seed analysts, and nursery managers, but can serve as a resource for any training course in forest regeneration. It includes both temperate and tropical tree species of all intended uses and covers the following topics: seed biology, seed collection, seed handling,…

  18. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30 Hard seed. The label shall show the percentage of hard seed,...

  19. Incarcerated umbilical cord hernia containing the gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Kulungowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 16 day-old boy infant with an umbilical mass underwent operative exploration of the umbilicus. The mass proved to be a gallbladder incarcerated in a hernia of the umbilical cord. Distinguishing an omphalocele from an umbilical cord hernia is not obvious and can be arbitrary. Morphologically, the two terms both describe congenital abdominal wall defects covered by a membrane, typically containing abdominal organs. Subtle differences and clinical features between omphalocele and umbilical cord hernia are highlighted in this report.

  20. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F, E-mail: rchacon@unex.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escuela de IngenierIas Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Apartado Postal 382, E-06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  1. Vocal cord paralysis caused by stingray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Jin; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2013-11-01

    Foreign bodies in the oral cavity and pharynx are commonly encountered in the emergency room and outpatient departments, and the most frequently observed of these foreign bodies are fish bones. Among the possible complications resulting from a pharyngeal foreign body, vocal cord fixation is extremely rare, with only three cases previously reported in the English literature. The mechanisms of vocal cord fixation can be classified into mechanical articular fixation, direct injury of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, or recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis secondary to inflammation. The case discussed here is different from previous cases. We report a rare case of vocal cord paralysis caused by the venom of a stingray tail in the hypopharynx.

  2. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  3. Sonographic Assessment of the Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosselmann, S.; Mielke, G.

    2015-01-01

    The umbilical cord (UC) is a vital connection between fetus and placenta. It constitutes a stable connection to the fetomaternal interface, while allowing the fetal mobility that is of great importance for fetal development in general and fetal neuromotor development in particular. This combination of mechanical stability and flexibility is due to the architecture of the UC. There is however a range of umbilical cord complications that may be life threatening to the fetus and these too can be explained to a large extent by the cordʼs structural characteristics. This review article discusses clinically relevant aspects of UC ultrasound. PMID:26366000

  4. Vocal cord paralysis in a fighter pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturo, Stephen; Brennan, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    We present in this case report the return to flying duty of a pilot with vocal cord paralysis secondary to removal of a thymoma. We discuss the importance of glottic function as it pertains to the unique aviation environment. We also discuss the anatomy and physiology of the glottis, the evaluation for vocal cord paralysis, and surgical approaches for paralyzed vocal cords. Although the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis is low in the military aviation community, it is important to recognize that its sequelae can be managed so that the aviator may return to flight duties.

  5. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen Preben D; Heerkens Tammy; Koch Thomas G; Betts Dean H

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is lo...

  6. Molecular structures of quiescently grown and brain-derived polymorphic fibrils of the Alzheimer amyloid abeta9-40 peptide: a comparison to agitated fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of amyloid deposits consisting primarily of Amyloid-beta (Abeta fibril in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The morphologies of these fibrils are exquisitely sensitive to environmental conditions. Using molecular dynamics simulations combined with data from previously published solid-state NMR experiments, we propose the first atomically detailed structures of two asymmetric polymorphs of the Abeta(9-40 peptide fibril. The first corresponds to synthetic fibrils grown under quiescent conditions and the second to fibrils derived from AD patients' brain-extracts. Our core structure in both fibril structures consists of a layered structure in which three cross-beta subunits are arranged in six tightly stacked beta-sheet layers with an antiparallel hydrophobic-hydrophobic and an antiparallel polar-polar interface. The synthetic and brain-derived structures differ primarily in the side-chain orientation of one beta-strand. The presence of a large and continually exposed hydrophobic surface (buried in the symmetric agitated Abeta fibrils may account for the higher toxicity of the asymmetric fibrils. Our model explains the effects of external perturbations on the fibril lateral architecture as well as the fibrillogenesis inhibiting action of amphiphilic molecules.

  7. Engineering scale development of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process for the production of silicon carbide fibrils and linear fibril assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenhover, M.; Biernacki, J. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Schatz, K.; Ko, F. [Advanced Product Development, Inc., Bristol, PA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    In order to exploit the superior thermomechanical properties of the VLS fibril, the feasibility of scaled-up production of the SiC fibril is demonstrated in this study. Through time series study and computer simulation, the parameters affecting the growth process and properties of the fibrils were examined. To facilitate translation of the superior mechanical properties into higher level preform structures, conventional and unconventional processing methods were evaluated. As revealed by scanning electron microscopic examination and X-ray diffractometry, high level alignment of the fibrils was achieved by the wet-laid process.

  8. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles...... from individuals with chronic SCI show less resistance to fatigue, and the speed-related contractile properties change, becoming faster. These findings are also present in animals. Future studies should longitudinally examine changes in muscles from early SCI until steady state is reached in order...

  9. THE THREE-STRANDED CORD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Redmond

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Schoolmen did much of their most interesting and original philosophizing in theology. An example is the dilemma in Renaissance Scholasticism on free will: how can we act freely if God causes and knows our actions? Basic issues are involved here: the antinomy between freedom and determination, modal semantics, tense logic, the logical status of counterfacts. Mexican Jesuits Matías Blanco (d. 1734 and Antonio Peralta (d. 1736 wrote books on the subject. We describe here the “disjunctive” solution that Blanco advanced in his Funiculus triplex (The Three-Stranded Cord, published posthumously in Mexico in 1746. When someone is faced with choosing between B and C, conjectures Blanco, God does not actualize either, but rather their disjunction B-or-C. Blanco calls for a truce in the “war” among the contending schools so that they may consider his solution–for he thinks it may indeed be acceptable to all.

  10. Spinal Cord Monitoring Data in Pediatric Spinal Deformity Patients With Spinal Cord Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Alexander W; Thuet, Earl D; Padberg, Anne M; Wallendorf, Michael; Luhmann, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Retrospective. The purpose of this study is to review the efficacy of monitoring data and outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology. The incidence of spinal cord pathology in pediatric patients with scoliosis has been reported between 3% and 20%. Previous studies demonstrated that intraoperative spinal cord monitoring (IOM) during scoliosis surgery can be reliable despite underlying pathology. A single-center retrospective review of 119 spinal surgery procedures in 82 patients with spinal cord pathology was performed. Diagnoses included Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, myelomeningocele, spinal cord tumor, tethered cord, and diastematomyelia. Baseline neurologic function and history of prior neurosurgical intervention were identified. Outcome measures included ability to obtain reliable monitoring data during surgery and presence of postoperative neurologic deficits. Results were compared for 82 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Usable IOM data were obtained in 82% of cases (97/119). Twenty-two cases (18%) had no lower extremity data. Patients with Arnold-Chiari malformation or syringomyelia pathologies, in isolation or together, had a significantly higher rate of reliable data compared to other pathologies (p < .0001). Among study group cases with usable data, there were 1 false negative (1%) and 4 true positive (4%) outcomes. There were no permanent neurologic deficits. The spinal cord pathology group demonstrated 80% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Spinal cord monitoring is a valuable tool in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology undergoing spinal deformity surgeries. When obtained, data allow to detect changes in spinal cord function. Patients with a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari or syringomyelia have monitoring data similar to those patients with AIS. Patients with other spinal cord pathologies have less reliable data, and surgeons should have a lower threshold for performing wake-up tests to assess spinal cord

  11. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of terminal syringomyelia within spinal cord combined with tethered cord syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-cheng XIE; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and experience of surgical treatment of spinal cord terminal syringomyelia with tethered cord syndrome (TCS).  Methods and Results Clinical data of 10 patients with spinal cord syringomyelia combined with TCS surgically treated under microscope from January 1999 to March 2014 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 3 males and 7 females with average age of 15.06 years old (ranged from 2 to 35 y...

  12. Distinguishing the cross-beta spine arrangements in amyloid fibrils using FRET analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2008-06-01

    The recently published microcrystal structures of amyloid fibrils from small peptides greatly enhanced our understanding of the atomic-level structure of the amyloid fibril. However, only a few amyloid fibrils can form microcrystals. The dansyl-tryptophan fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair was shown to be able to detect the inter-peptide arrangement of the Transthyretin (105-115) amyloid fibril. In this study, we combined the known microcrystal structures with the corresponding FRET efficiencies to build a model for amyloid fibril structure classification. We found that fibrils with an antiparallel structural arrangement gave the largest FRET signal, those with a parallel arrangement gave the lowest FRET signal, and those with a mixed arrangement gave a moderate FRET signal. This confirms that the amyloid fibril structure patterns can be classified based on the FRET efficiency.

  13. Multi-scale finite element analyses for stress and strain evaluations of braid fibril artificial blood vessel and smooth muscle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Uchida, Takahiro; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed a multi-scale finite element (FE) analysis code to obtain the stress and strain that occurred in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) at micro-scale, which was seeded in the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel. This FE code can predict the dynamic response of stress under the blood pressure loading. We try to establish a computer-aided engineering (CAE)-driven scaffold design technique for the blood vessel regeneration. Until now, there occurred the great progresses for the endothelial cell activation and intima layer regeneration in the blood vessel regeneration study. However, there remains the difficulty of the SMC activation and media layer regeneration. Therefore, many researchers are now studying to elucidate the fundamental mechanism of SMC activation and media layer regeneration by using the biomechanical technique. As the numerical tool, we used the dynamic-explicit FE code PAM-CRASH, ESI Ltd. For the material models, the nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive law was adapted for the human blood vessel, SMC and the extra-cellular matrix, and the elastic law for the polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber. Through macro-FE and micro-FE analyses of fabricated braid fibril tubes by using PGA fiber under the combined conditions of the orientation angle and the pitch of fiber, we searched an appropriate structure for the stress stimulation for SMC functionalization. Objectives of this study are indicated as follows: 1. to analyze the stress and strain of the human blood vessel and SMC, and 2. to calculate stress and strain of the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel and SMC to search an appropriate PGA fiber structure under combined conditions of PGA fiber numbers, 12 and 24, and the helical orientation angles of fiber, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 degrees. Finally, we found a braid fibril tube, which has an angle of 15 degree and 12 PGA fibers, as a most appropriate artificial blood vessel for SMC functionalization.

  14. Molecular adaptations in human atrial fibrillation : mechanisms of protein remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brundel, Bianca Johanna Josephina Maria

    2000-01-01

    The main goal was to study the molecular remodeling in human atrial fibrillation. We focussed on gene expression of proteins wich influence the calcium homeostasis and action potential duration in human AF. The impact of modulation sysems like the natriuretic peptide system and the endothelin system

  15. Occlusion of left atrial appendage in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Н. Ганеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews a new method of prophylaxis of thromboembolitic complications, specifically occlusion of left atrial appendage, in patients with atrial fibrillation. Indications and contraindications for the procedure, as well as a step-by-step process of the intervention itself are described. Special emphasis is placed on the up-to-date evidence and the review of clinical trials.

  16. Ventricular rate control of atrial fibrillation in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a major shift in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the setting of hear failure (HF), from rhythm to ventricular rate control in most patients with both conditions. In this article, the authors focus on ventricular rate control and discuss the indicati

  17. Plasma YKL-40, a new biomarker for atrial fibrillation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kristoffer Mads; Therkelsen, Susette Krohn; Johansen, Julia Sidenius;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine changes in a new potential biomarker plasma YKL-40 in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) before and after electrical cardioversion (CV). METHODS AND RESULTS: Plasma concentrations of YKL-40 were measured in 56 patients (mean age 65 years, range 34-...

  18. Fibril Formation from Pea Protein and Sesequent Gel Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munialo, C.D.; Martin, A.H.; Linden, van der E.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize fibrillar aggregates made using pea proteins, to assemble formed fibrils into protein-based gels, and to study the rheological behavior of these gels. Micrometer-long fibrillar aggregates were observed after pea protein solutions had been heated for 20

  19. Pattern of atrial fibrillation and risk of outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Taillandier, Sophie; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risk of stroke and thromboembolism (TE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is categorised in stroke risk stratification scores. The role of pattern of NVAF in risk prediction is unclear in contemporary 'real world' cohorts. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with NVAF...

  20. Hospitalisation patterns change over time in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup Qvist, Janne; Høgh Sørensen, Pernille; Dixen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a cardiac epidemic. In this study, we aimed to describe the causes of hospital-isation in an AF population over time and to study how different AF treatment strategies affected hospitalization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was an observational study in which...