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Sample records for coping job stress

  1. Job Satisfaction, Stress and Coping Strategies in the Teaching Profession-What Do Teachers Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    This study explored job satisfaction, work-related stress, consequences of stress, and coping strategies among Norwegian teachers. The study is based on qualitative interviews with 30 working teachers and four retired teachers. The respondents reported high job satisfaction but also severe stress and exhaustion. Teachers of different ages or at…

  2. Occupation Stress and Coping Mechanism to Increase Job Satisfaction Amount Supervisors at Karachi Pharmaceuticals

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    Mohammad Ahmed Khan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the extent of stress and coping mechanism, in pharmaceuticals based in Korangi and other industrial areas in Karachi. The research is based on a previous study conducted by MA Khan (2006. The findings substantiate the view that coping mechanism increases job satisfaction of supervisors in the sampled firms. The design of the research is based on the measurement of the Organizational Stress Index. The data collected and analyzed is both from national and multinational pharmaceutical companies.Major causes of job stress have been identified as task demand, role demand and organizational structure. In Korangi area there is no significant difference in overall stress and job satisfaction levels between national and multinational pharmas. In the non Korangi sample job satisfaction is higher and job stress level in the multinationals is lower than in national pharmas.

  3. Job Stress, Coping Strategies, and Burnout among Abuse-Specific Counselors

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    Wallace, Sam Loc; Lee, Jayoung; Lee, Sang Min

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether effective coping strategies play an important role to reduce burnout levels among sexual or substance abuse counselors. The authors examined whether coping strategies mediated or moderated relations between job stress and burnout in a sample of 232 abuse-specific counselors. Results indicated…

  4. Job Stress and Coping Mechanisms among Nursing Staff in Public Health Services

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    Loo-See Beh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to investigate the prominent causes and effects of job stress and coping mechanism among nurses in public health services. The research methodology included qualitative and quantitative survey. The results indicated that the major contributor of job stress among nurses is the job itself. Heavy workload, repetitive work, and poor working environment were among the stressors identified in the category of job itself. Respondents identified that inconsiderate and inequitable superior/matron, lack of recognition, and conflict within and between groups were the stressors. Respondents also view social support as a buffer against the dysfunctional consequences of stress emanating from the workplace and established network of friends, family, superior, peers, and colleagues to seek emotional support when faced with job-related stress in the workplace. Further, respondents adopt more than one coping mechanisms to combat job stress based on scenarios, situations, and level of job stress. This study is limited only to the investigation of job stress and coping mechanism among nurses in a public hospital. Other non-medical and medical staffs such as administrators and doctors were not included in this study. Suggestions for future research are also mentioned.

  5. The relationships of character strengths with coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction.

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    Harzer, Claudia; Ruch, Willibald

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits have often been highlighted to relate to how people cope with stressful events. The present paper focuses on character strengths as positive personality traits and examines two basic assumptions that were derived from a core characteristic of character strengths (i.e., to determine how individuals deal with adversities): (1) character strengths correlate with coping and (2) buffer the effects of work-related stress on job satisfaction. Two different samples (i.e., a mixed sample representing various occupations [N = 214] and a nurses sample [N = 175]) filled in measures for character strengths, coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction. As expected, intellectual, emotional, and interpersonal strengths were related to coping. Interpersonal strengths played a greater role for coping among nurses, as interactions with others are an essential part of their workday. Furthermore, intellectual strengths partially mediated the negative effect of work-related stress on job satisfaction. These findings open a new field for research on the role of personality in coping with work-related stress. Character strengths are trainable personal characteristics, and therefore valuable resources to improve coping with work-related stress and to decrease the negative effects of stress. Further research is needed to investigate this assumed causality.

  6. The relationships of character strengths with coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eHarzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Personality traits have often been highlighted to relate to how people cope with stressful events. The present paper focuses on character strengths as positive personality traits and examines two basic assumptions that were derived from a core characteristic of character strengths (i.e., to determine how individuals deal with adversities: (1 Character strengths correlate with coping and (2 buffer the effects of work-related stress on job satisfaction. Two different samples (i.e., a mixed sample representing various occupations [N = 214] and a nurses sample [N = 175] filled in measures for character strengths, coping, work-related stress, and job satisfaction. As expected, intellectual, emotional, and interpersonal strengths were related to coping. Interpersonal strengths played a greater role for coping among nurses, as interactions with others are an essential part of their workday. Furthermore, intellectual strengths partially mediated the negative effect of work-related stress on job satisfaction. These findings open a new field for research on the role of personality in coping with work-related stress. Character strengths are trainable personal characteristics, and therefore valuable resources to improve coping with work-related stress and to decrease the negative effects of stress. Further research is needed to investigate this assumed causality.

  7. The association of the reporting of somatic symptoms with job stress and active coping among Japanese white-collar workers.

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    Nomura, Kyoko; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Sato, Mikiya; Ishikawa, Hirono; Yano, Eiji

    2007-09-01

    To assess the associations between job stress and somatic symptoms and to investigate the effect of individual coping on these associations. In July 2006, a cross-sectional study was conducted during a periodic health check-up of 185 Japanese male office workers (21-66 yr old) at a Japanese company. Job stress was measured by job demand, control, and strain (=job demand/control) based on the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Major somatic symptoms studied were headache, dizziness, shoulder stiffness, back pain, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, general fatigue, sleep disturbance, and skin itching. Five kinds of coping were measured using the Job Stress Scale: active coping, escape, support seeking, reconciliation, and emotional suppression. Comorbidities of hypertension, diabetes, obesity, depression, and anxiety were also evaluated. The most frequently cited somatic symptom was general fatigue (66%), followed by shoulder stiffness (63%) and sleep disturbance (53%). Of the five kinds of coping, only "active coping" was significantly and negatively associated with the number of somatic symptoms. The generalized linear models showed that the number of somatic symptoms increased as job strain index (p=0.001) and job demand (p=0.001) became higher, and decreased as active coping (p=0.018) increased, after adjusting for age and comorbidities. There was no statistical interaction among active coping, the number of somatic symptoms, and the three JCQ scales. Reporting somatic symptoms may be a simple indicator of job stress, and active coping could be used to alleviate somatization induced by job stress.

  8. Job stress, satisfaction, and coping strategies among medical interns in a South Indian tertiary hospital

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    Susmita Chandramouleeswaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has previously been demonstrated that there is a significant drop in all domains of quality of life among interns during internship. Aims: A modified version of the health consultant′s job stress and satisfaction questionnaire (HCJSSQ was used to assess and quantify aspects of internship that were perceived as stressful and satisfying. Methods used to cope with work place stress were explored. Settings and Design: A prospective cohort study was undertaken among 93 medical interns doing a rotating internship at the Christian Medical College and Hospital, a tertiary-care hospital in southern India. Materials and Methods: After completion of 6 months of internship, the modified version of the HCJSSQ was administered to all participants. Statistical Analysis: The data were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Version 9 by double data entry technique. Percentages of interns reporting high levels of stress, satisfaction were calculated. Results: While 63.4% of interns reported high levels of satisfaction, 45.2% of the interns experienced high levels of stress, 17.6% coped with work stress by using alcohol and nicotine, and 37% coped through unhealthy eating habits. Conclusion: More people found internship satisfying than stressful. However, a high proportion found it stressful, and many reported unhealthy coping mechanisms.

  9. Profiling nurses' job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities: A cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong-Shian; Lee, Alice; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Chan, Moon Fai

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine whether definable profiles existed in a cohort of nursing staff with regard to demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities. A survey was conducted in one hospital in Singapore from June to July 2012, and 814 full-time staff nurses completed a self-report questionnaire (89% response rate). Demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, perceived stress, cultural values, ways of coping and intention to leave current workplace were assessed as outcomes. The two-step cluster analysis revealed three clusters. Nurses in cluster 1 (n = 222) had lower acculturation scores than nurses in cluster 3. Cluster 2 (n = 362) was a group of younger nurses who reported higher intention to leave (22.4%), stress level and job dissatisfaction than the other two clusters. Nurses in cluster 3 (n = 230) were mostly Singaporean and reported the lowest intention to leave (13.0%). Resources should be allocated to specifically address the needs of younger nurses and hopefully retain them in the profession. Management should focus their retention strategies on junior nurses and provide a work environment that helps to strengthen their intention to remain in nursing by increasing their job satisfaction.

  10. Coping, Stress, and Job Satisfaction as Predictors of Advanced Placement Statistics Teachers' Intention to Leave the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Christopher J.; Lambert, Richard G.; Crowe, Elizabeth W.; McCarthy, Colleen J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of teachers' perceptions of coping resources and demands to job satisfaction factors. Participants were 158 Advanced Placement Statistics high school teachers who completed measures of personal resources for stress prevention, classroom demands and resources, job satisfaction, and intention to leave the field…

  11. An Empirical Study on Ways of Coping with Job-related Stress among National College and University Librarian in Taiwan

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    Chen Su-may Sheih

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress is not a naturedly bad thing - it may be stimulating, motivating and provide excitement to individuals. However, when it exceeds individuals’ ability to cope it becomes harmful both to library and staff. Adequate coping strategies keep the librarians in a state of good health and high job performance. The purpose of this study is trying to explore librarians’ ways of coping with job-related stress in the library settings of national colleges and universities in Taiwan. The study indicates that librarians’ ways of coping are both problem-focused and emotion-focused. And as the stress getting greater, librarians are inclined to cope with emotion-focused ways.[Article content in Chinese

  12. Effects of occupational stress, job characteristics, coping, and attributional style on the mental health and job satisfaction of university employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, George; Smith, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Well-being at work has been shown to be influenced by job characteristics and individual differences in coping styles. This study investigated the relationships between job demands, control, social support, efforts, rewards, coping, and attributional style in predicting anxiety, depression, and job satisfaction in a sample of 307 university employees from the UK. Results were compared to those from a sample of 120 members of the general population. Workplace demands, intrinsic and extrinsic effort, and negative coping and attributional behaviors were associated with high levels of depression and anxiety and low job satisfaction in university employees. Rewards, social support, job control, and positive coping and attributional behaviors were associated with lower levels of depression and anxiety and high job satisfaction. The study adds to the growing research on university samples by showing that a transactional approach should be adopted. This has implications for interventions and suggests that rather than just trying to change job characteristics one should identify at-risk individuals in this population and help them adopt appropriate positive coping styles.

  13. Coping proactively with economic stress: career adaptability in the face of job insecurity, job loss, unemployment, and underemployment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klehe, U.-C.; Zikic, J.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; Koen, J.; Buyken, M.; Perrewé, P.L; Halbesleben, J.R.B.; Rosen, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Economic stressors such as job insecurity, job loss, unemployment, and underemployment cause severe difficulties for the workers affected, their families, organizations, and societies overall. Consequently, most past research has taken a thoroughly negative perspective on economic stress, addressing

  14. Moderating effects of coping on work stress and job performance for nurses in tertiary hospitals: a cross-sectional survey in China.

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    Li, Li; Ai, Hua; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Hao; Liu, Xinyan; Zhang, Zhong; Sun, Tao; Fan, Lihua

    2017-06-12

    Work stress is a major problem for nurses and it can negatively influence job performance. Therefore, it is critical to explore variables that can reduce or buffer the negative effects of work stress. This study explores the moderating effects of coping strategies on the relationship between work stress and job performance for nurses in China. A cross-sectional survey of 852 nurses from four tertiary hospitals in Heilongjiang Province, China, was conducted in 2013. Descriptive statistics were reported for socioeconomic status and demographic characteristics, level of work stress, coping strategies, and job performance. Regression analysis was conducted to test the interaction between work stress and coping strategies on job performance. Three subscales of work stress were negatively related to job performance. Positive coping strategies moderated Patient Care and job performance while negative coping strategies moderated Workload and Time and performance, and between Working Environment and Resources and performance. Positive coping strategies reduce or buffer the negative effects of work stress on job performance and negative coping strategies increased the negative effects.

  15. Job stress and coping strategies among nurses: results of a self report survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAbee, R

    1994-10-01

    1. Many employers do not have the resources for sophisticated investigation, development, and implementation of stress reduction programs for employee health. This does not eliminate the need for such programs. 2. Occupational health nurses can develop stress reduction programs building on individual coping strategies used by workers. A simple survey of workers could provide baseline information for the development of these programs. 3. Exercise, open atmosphere for discussion, relaxation, and taking a break were the top four coping strategies reported by nurses and non-nurse female employees. Employers could easily support stress reduction programs built on these strategies.

  16. Survey and coping strategies for job stress of new nurses in pharmacy intravenous admixture service: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Shuang; Jin, Ou; Feng, Hua; Wang, Feng-Hua; Ren, Chun-Hui

    2015-01-01

    To survey the nurse stress and analyze stressors in new nurses from pharmacy intravenous admixture service (PIAS). A questionnaire survey referring to the revised stressor scale was carried out on 52 new nurses of PIAS in four hospitals in Harbin. The average stress score for all participants was 2.43±0.63, as medium level of stress. The stressors were classified into 6 categories: ensuring up-to-date knowledge of professional nursing skills, increased workload and work-time, interpersonal relationship, ensuring knowledge of equipments, attending educational programs, and decreased occupational demand. The most important stressors included fear of medical accident occurrence, fear of failure in performance assessment, fear of occupational injuries, feeling fatigue and lack of sleep. Considering the various kinds of stressors in the working places, it was necessary for managers' to use appropriate strategies to cope with the job stress in new nurses of PIAS.

  17. Nursing and Coping With Stress

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    Marjan Laal

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress could be defined simply as the rate of wear and tear on the body systems caused by life. Stress at work is a big problem. Working in the profession of nursing is a demanding and often stressful occupation. Thus, nurses’ health could be affected by stress dangerous consequences. Coping strategies are key elements of nurses' stress reactions. Coping strategy as a stabilizing factor may be as important as the stressful event itself. Purpose: To determine how and how much nursing staff cope with the stressful events and to find out the relationships between job coping and health outcomes in the study population. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study included one hundred nursing staff working in two hospitals (Tohid and Besat of Sanandaj City (Kurdistan, Iran. They completed the questionnaires containing coping strategies based on the Adolescent Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences (A-COPE, in the year of 2006. We examined the relationships between age, gender, position, tenure state, marriage state, job experience, work shift and place (environment to application of coping methods. Analysis was done using SPSS 18. Statistical significance was set at P ≤0.05.Results: Out of one hundred nurses of all grades included in this study, fifty-seven were female (57%, 60(% were between 30-39 years old and 50(% were single. There was no significant difference between junior and senior staff in applying positive methods (p=0.666 or negative responses to cope with stress (p=0.195.The majority of nurses 55(% had job experience of 5-10 years, 40(% worked in the evening and night shift and 54(% were in Tohid hospital. Generally in our study, the rate of application positive methods of coping was good 19%, medium 51% and weak 30%. Negative responses to stress were high 49%, medium 29% and low 22%. There were significant associations between: age, tenure state, work place and job experience with positive coping as follow; (p

  18. [Mediator effect analysis of the trait coping style on job stress and fatigue of the military personnel stationed in plateau and high cold region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J J; Jia, J M; Tao, N; Song, Z X; Ge, H; Jiang, Y; Tian, H; Qiu, E C; Tang, J H; Liu, J W

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To investigate the fatigue status of military personnel stationed in plateau and high cold region, and to analyze the mediator effect of trait coping style on job stress and fatigue. Methods: In October 2010, with the method of cluster random sampling survey, 531 military personnel stationed in plateau and high cold region were chosen as subject. The fatigue status were evaluated by the Chinese version multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) , job stress were evaluated by the Job Stress Survey (JSS) , and trait coping style were evaluated by the Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) . Results: According to the information of different population characteristics, mean rank of physical fatigue about the urban (town) group were higher than that of rural group (Z=-2.200, Pmilitary officers, sergeancy and soldier group (F=18.965, Pmilitary officers, sergeancy and soldier group (F=14.711, P<0.05) . The score of negative coping style were positively correlated with the score of physical fatigue (r(s)=0.129) , reduced activity (r(s)=0.123) , reduced motivation (r(s)=0.149) and general fatigue (r(s)=0.174) respectively, the score of organizational support lack strength were positively correlated with the score of physical fatigue (r(s)=0.090) , reduced activity (r(s)=0.098) , reduced motivation (r(s)=0.099) and general fatigue (r(s)=0.130) respectively. The mediator effect of negative coping style on the job stress and fatigue was 0.013 (P<0.01) . Conclusion: The fatigue statuses of the urban (town) group and the up or equal 20-years old age group are poor, and the negative coping style plays mediator effect on the job stress and fatigue.

  19. Overcoming job stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or not advancing in your career. How Job Stress Affects Your Health Like any kind of stress, job stress that continues for a long time can affect your health. Job stress may increase your risk for health problems such ...

  20. Investigating the Relationship between Job Stress and its Coping Strategies with Marital and Job Satisfaction among Female Employees of Islamic Azad University, Kazeroon Branch

    OpenAIRE

    MOTAHARI, Seyedeh Soraya; AIBAGHI ESFAHANI, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigated the relationship between job stress and marital satisfaction of women in Islamic Azad University, Kazeroon Brach. Two job stress questionnaires of Philip L. Rice (1992) and marital satisfaction questionnaire of Enrich (1997) were completed and examined by female employees of the Islamic Azad University, Kazeroon Brach, who were selected randomly. The results showed that women have job stress. The results showed that there is a negative correlation coefficient...

  1. Stress Management: Job Stress

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    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Job stress can be all-consuming — but it doesn't have to be. Address your triggers, keep perspective and ... stress triggers, it's often helpful to improve time management skills — especially if you tend to feel overwhelmed ...

  2. PERSTEMPO in the Canadian Forces: The Role of Coping and Cohesion in the Relationship between Job Stress and Morale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Moderating effects of supervisor support. Personnel Psychology, 41, 125-139. [22] Folkman , S., & Lazarus , R. S. (1980). An analysis of coping in a...middle-aged community sample. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 21, 219-239. [23] Folkman , S., & Moskowitz, J. T. (2004). Coping: pitfalls and...stress and blue collar work, 225-239. Chichester, England: John Wiley & Sons. [25] Lazarus , R. (1995). Psychological stress in the workplace. In

  3. Coping with College Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160792.html Coping With College Stress Parents can help make the transition easier for ... 5, 2016 MONDAY, Sept. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stress and anxiety are common among new college students, ...

  4. The Impact of Coping Strategies upon Work Stress, Burnout, and Job Satisfcation in School Counselors

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    Harnois, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Role theory states that when expected behaviors are confusing, conflicting, and inconsistent, the individual will experience stress, feel dissatisfied, and perform less effectively. School counselors experience high levels of workplace stress as a result of role incongruity, role conflict, role ambiguity which often results in occupational burnout…

  5. The Impact of Coping Strategies upon Work Stress, Burnout, and Job Satisfcation in School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnois, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Role theory states that when expected behaviors are confusing, conflicting, and inconsistent, the individual will experience stress, feel dissatisfied, and perform less effectively. School counselors experience high levels of workplace stress as a result of role incongruity, role conflict, role ambiguity which often results in occupational burnout…

  6. Use Stress to Improve Your Job Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Anthony; Kavina, George

    1982-01-01

    On-the-job stress can be constructive (eustress) or destructive (distress). A survey of 276 school superintendents in 13 western states identified their 10 most distressful situations, the frequency of job-related illnesses, their habits and personality types, and their methods of coping with stress. (RW)

  7. The effect of coping on job performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    Frontline workers, such as teachers and social workers, often experience stress, for instance because of high workloads. To deal with this, they use coping strategies. However, it is still unclear how coping strategies influence performance at work. The first goal of this article is therefore to

  8. 大学生就业压力和应对方式与心理健康的关系研究%Relationship among job-hunting stress, coping style and mental health of college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟勇; 张磊; 张慧

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship among job-hunting stress,coping style and mental health of college students. Methods Four hundred and ninety undergraduate from three university were investigated by using self-prepared undergraduate job-hunting stress questionnaire, simple coping style questionnaire, center for epidemiologic studies depression scale,state-trait anxiety inventory,self-rating symptom scale,and the correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis were taken to investigate the interrelation among job-hunting stress,coping style and their mental health. Results There were correlation among job-hunting stress,coping style and mental health(P<0.05). The job-hunting stress,active coping style and inactive coping style played a role of good prediction for undergraduate's mental health (P <0.01). The coping style played a role of partly mesomeric effect between undergraduate's job-hunting stress and mental health. Conclusion The undergraduate's job-hunting stress and their coping style has prediction function to mental health.%目的 探讨大学生就业压力、应对方式与心理健康的关系.方法 运用自编的大学生就业压力问卷、简易应对方式问卷、流调中心用抑郁量表、状态-特质焦虑问卷及症状自评量表对3所大学490名大学生进行调查.采用相关分析和多元回归分析探讨大学生就业压力、应对方式与心理健康的相互关系.结果 大学生就业压力、应对方式与心理健康之间两两相关(P<0.05);就业压力、积极应对方式与消极应对方式对大学生心理健康有较好的预测作用(P<0.01);应对方式在大学生就业压力与心理健康之间有部分中介效应作用.结论 大学生就业压力及其应对方式对心理健康有预测作用.

  9. PERAN RELIGIOUS COPING SEBAGAI MODERATOR DARI JOB INSECURITY TERHADAP STRES KERJA PADA STAF AKADEMIK

    OpenAIRE

    Triantoro Safaria

    2012-01-01

    Job stress is a main problem for modern organization. It has negativeeffect on employee, organization and productivity. Previous study foundthat job stress could create several problems and difficulties either on workperformance or employee’s health status. This study aims to examinerelationship between job insecurity and religious coping as moderatorvariable with job stress among university academic staffs. Moderatedregression analysis was used to analyze the data. One hundred and fifty-five...

  10. Coping with Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines Marques

    is to provide insights into the ecological role of soil microbes living in a community and its capabilities to cope with short- and long-term stresses. In the introduction, the problem of using RNA based approaches in soil ecology is presented in parallel with the importance of soil microbes for the ecosystem...... research directions is presented. This PhD-thesis resulted in four draft-manuscripts where RNA sequencing techniques were used to answer different research questions related to the response of soil microorganisms to different types of stress: MANUSCRIPT 1 explores the effect of soil sieving...... towards microwaving-heat were detected and corresponded to traits conserved at high taxonomical level. Moreover, using the detected tolerance ranges, it was possible to point nitrification as “at risk” in systems exposed to rapid heat stress, even though some functional redundancy may have occurred...

  11. Coping with Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines Marques

    is to provide insights into the ecological role of soil microbes living in a community and its capabilities to cope with short- and long-term stresses. In the introduction, the problem of using RNA based approaches in soil ecology is presented in parallel with the importance of soil microbes for the ecosystem...... research directions is presented. This PhD-thesis resulted in four draft-manuscripts where RNA sequencing techniques were used to answer different research questions related to the response of soil microorganisms to different types of stress: MANUSCRIPT 1 explores the effect of soil sieving......, where microcosms and field sampling were applied. Sieved agriculture soil microcosms were used in MANUSCRIPT 2 to test the effects of unpredictable temperature increase on the structure of soil bacterial communities, by using different doses of microwaving. Bacterial groups with different tolerance...

  12. Determinants of job related stress experienced by nursing staff.

    OpenAIRE

    Veer, A. de; Francke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Stress levels of Dutch nurses have been found to increase since 2005. There is evidence that personal resources such as coping style and social support influence job related stress. However when formulating policy to reduce such stress, specific jobrelated factors must also be considered. The aim of the study was to gain insight into such job-related factors determining job related stress. Methods and Materials: The study population was made up of members from a nationally repre...

  13. PERAN RELIGIOUS COPING SEBAGAI MODERATOR DARI JOB INSECURITY TERHADAP STRES KERJA PADA STAF AKADEMIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantoro Safaria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Job stress is a main problem for modern organization. It has negativeeffect on employee, organization and productivity. Previous study foundthat job stress could create several problems and difficulties either on workperformance or employee’s health status. This study aims to examinerelationship between job insecurity and religious coping as moderatorvariable with job stress among university academic staffs. Moderatedregression analysis was used to analyze the data. One hundred and fifty-five academic staffs participated in this study. The result showed that jobinsecurity has significant effect on job stress. Meanwhile, religious copinghas significant effect on job stress by moderating the effect of job insecurity.Further discussion will be explained in this paper.

  14. 手术室护士工作压力源与应对方式的相关分析%Correlation Analysis about job stress of operating room nurse and coping style

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    底会娟; 郭淑芸; 焦俊敏; 尹维宁; 吴爱须

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析手术室护士工作压力源现状及其与应对方式的相关性.方法 采用中国护士工作压力源量表及简易应对方式量表,以无记名问卷调查的形式对245名手术室护士的工作压力源和应对方式进行调查和相关分析.结果 手术室护士工作压力源中占首位的是担心工作中出现差错事故.手术室护士总工作压力程度较高,工作量及时间分配给手术室护士带来的压力最大.积极应对方式与工作量及时间分配、护理专业及工作方面相关性有显著意义(P<0.05);工作压力源与消极应对方式相关性有显著意义(P<0.01).结论 建议关注手术室护士工作压力源的主要影响因素,加强护士的专业知识培训,提高手术室护士的应对技巧.%Objective To analyze the relativity about job stress of operating room nurse and coping style. Methods The relativity of job stress of 245 operating room nurses and coping style were investigated and correlatively analyzed by the use of nurse job stress scale and simple coping questionnaire and the form of anonymous questionnaire. Results The top operating room nurse job stress is worried about an accident of errors at work. Total working stress levels of operating room nurses was at a high level. Workload and time allocation brings the greatest pressure to the operating room nurses. Them was significant correlation between work stress and negative coping style ( P < 0.01 ). There was significant correlation between active coping style, workload, time allocation, the nursing profession and work ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion The main factors about working pressure of the operating room nurses were should be concerned. Professional training of nurses and coping skills of operating room nurses should be improved.

  15. Coping with economic stress: introduction to the special issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klehe, U.-C.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; Zikic, J.

    2012-01-01

    This special issue presents five papers, four empirical and one conceptual, on how people deal with different forms and stages of economic stress. Three manuscripts address coping with job insecurity in one's regular job or in the context of self-employment. These papers focus on the multidimensiona

  16. Employee adjustment to stress: The role of coping resources, situational factors, and coping responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, D J; Tonge, L; Callan, V J

    1995-01-01

    Abstract The present study was designed to examine further the stress-adjustment relationship in employees. Specifically, the relations among employees' coping resources (self-esteem, generalized control beliefs, neuroticism, and social support), their appraisals of a recent stressful event experienced at work (appraised stress, self-efficacy, and situational control beliefs), the coping strategies (problem- and emotion-focused coping) used to deal with the event, and levels of employee adjustment (psychological well-being and job satisfaction) were examined. Data were collected from 153 male and female employees in a public sector department, employed in a range of middle-management administrative activities. The data provided support for a modified version of a model that proposed that both situational appraisals and coping strategies are mediating processes in the stress-adjustment relationship. There was evidence that employees' coping responses to the recent stressful event experienced at work were related to concurrent levels of adjustment. As predicted, the use of problem-focused coping, in general, had positive relationships with the measures of adjustment, whereas the effects of emotion-focused coping were generally negative (there was, however, some evidence that the effects of coping were dependent on event controllability). There was also evidence that coping resources had both direct and indirect effects (via coping and via situational appraisals) on employee adjustment. The latter effects were most marked for generalized control beliefs and self-esteem. Situational appraisals (in particular, efficacy expectancies) also had indirect effects on employee adjustment, through their effects on coping responses.

  17. Stress and Job Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela-Mihaela Dogaru; Irina Donciu

    2014-01-01

    Solving problems irrational and poor health status of employees, has symptoms of excessive stimulation, boredom and depression has while symptoms of insufficient stimulation. Work analysis is of particular importance both in human resource management and organizational stress management, representing a systematic process for determining the skills, responsibilities and knowledge required for a particular job working in year organization, i.e. the provision of certain activities within organiz...

  18. [Occupational stress, coping styles and eating habits among Polish employees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocka, Adrianna; Mościcka, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze potential relations between occupational stress, coping styles and ing habits. Questionnaires administered to 160 public administration employees allowed for assessing eating habits, occupational stress and coping styles. The eating habits correlated with work stress (ro-Spearman's = 0.17-0.29). More unhealthy eating patterns were observed in employees characterized by a higher level of stress. Such stressors as overload, lack of control over work and inappropriate work organization were especially related to poorer eating habits. Among the analyzed coping styles, focusing on emotions (ro-S = 0.19) and searching for emotional support most significantly correlated with poorer eating behaviors (ro-S = 0.16). There were statistically significant differences in eating habits, depending on the level of job stress (U = 1583.50, p eating more than those with a medium level of job stress. The relationship between subjective assessment of job stress, coping and eating habits has been confirmed. Taking into account the role of stress and coping, as the potential determinants of eating patterns in humans, more attention should be paid to education and promotion of knowledge about the relationship between stress and human eating behaviors to prevent obesity and eating disorders.

  19. Occupational stress, mental health and coping among information technology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jakkula V; Chandraiah, K

    2012-01-01

    Experience of occupational stress is inevitably involved in the execution of any type of work. Stress has an adaptive value. It motivates the individual to attend to the task and get rid of the tension or demand the unattended task produced. The study was planned to investigate the differences between executives and shop floor workers on occupational stress, mental health, job satisfaction and coping. A random sample of 200 executives and shop floor employees collected from Nuclear Fuel Complex of Hyderabad City. A well developed sub-scales of Occupational Stress indicator like Mental Health, and Coping behavior were used in the present study. The shop floor workers experiencing more job stress and lower mental health. But these two groups did not differ in their coping behaviour. The executives are better with work home balance.

  20. The associations of humorous coping styles, affective states, job demands and job control with the frequency of upper respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibe Doosje

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: There is some evidence that job demands and job resources such as job control and humorous coping may contribute to the risk of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI.Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a model including these variables as well as job-related affect, in order to explore their role in the explanation of the frequency of upper respiratory tract infection.Motivation of the study: This study has been conducted in order to extend our understanding of the role of traditional variables like job demands and job control with humorous coping styles and affective variables with regard to the explanation of the frequency of URTI.Research design, approach and method: A sample of 2094 employees filled out questionnaires assessing job demands, job control, generic (MSHS-C, antecedent-focused and responsefocused humorous coping (QOHC and job-related affect (JAWS.Main findings: Job demands were indirectly related to the frequency of upper respiratory tract infections, mediated by their relationships with job control and negative job-related affect. Generic and response-focused humorous coping were less relevant for the explanation of the frequency of upper respiratory tract infections than the presumably ‘healthy’ antecedentfocused humorous coping style. The latter showed a negative association with negative jobrelated affect. The frequency of upper respiratory tract infections was better predicted by job control and negative job-related affect than by humorous coping, in the expected directions.Practical/managerial implication: These findings may have practical relevance for the improvement of stress management interventions in organisations.Contribution/value-add: Although it was shown that healthy humorous coping does contribute to decreases in upper respiratory tract infection, job demands, job resources and negative affective state seem the most important predictors.

  1. Determinants of job related stress experienced by nursing staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A. de; Francke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Stress levels of Dutch nurses have been found to increase since 2005. There is evidence that personal resources such as coping style and social support influence job related stress. However when formulating policy to reduce such stress, specific jobrelated factors must also be consider

  2. Determinants of job related stress experienced by nursing staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A. de; Francke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Stress levels of Dutch nurses have been found to increase since 2005. There is evidence that personal resources such as coping style and social support influence job related stress. However when formulating policy to reduce such stress, specific jobrelated factors must also be consider

  3. Job characteristics: their relationship to job satisfaction, stress and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Steyn, Renier; Vawda, Naseema

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influences of job characteristics on job satisfaction, stress and depression among South African white collar workers. Participants were managers in full-time employment with large organisations. They completed the Job Diagnostic Survey, the Perceived Stress Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory. A regression approach was used to predict job satisfaction, stress and depression from job characteristics. Job characteristics (skill variety, task identity, task signi...

  4. Job Stressors and Coping Strategies amongst Nigerian Ophthalmologists: an Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwole C Omolase

    2014-02-01

    CONCLUSION: The leading job stressor was no time for leisure followed by overwork and financial constraint. Most respondents drew inspiration from religious belief to cope with stress. There is need for creation of recreational facilities in the hospitals and improvement in the welfare package of medical practitioners [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(1.000: 13-18

  5. Work-related stress and well-being: the roles of direct action coping and palliative coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes-Ferreira, Lina; Peiró, José M; González-Morales, M Gloria; Martín, Isabel

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of the present study is to analyze the roles of direct action coping and palliative coping in the relationship between work stressors and psychological well-being, as well as their possible interactions, in a sample of 464 bank employees. Hierarchical regression analyses showed main effects of direct action coping on well-being. Palliative coping predicts higher levels of psychological distress. Contrary to what was expected, the interactions between work stressors and direct action coping were not significant. Palliative coping interacted with work stressors when predicting psychosomatic complaints. The interaction between the two types of coping was significant on psychosomatic complaints and psychological distress, but not on job satisfaction. The paper discusses theoretical and practical implications of these results, in order to design intervention strategies to prevent and manage job stress.

  6. Organisational change stressors and nursing job satisfaction: the mediating effect of coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Stephen T T; Pick, David; Newton, Cameron J; Yeung, Melissa E; Chang, Esther

    2013-09-01

    To examine the mediating effect of coping strategies on the consequences of nursing and non-nursing (administrative) stressors on the job satisfaction of nurses during change management. Organisational change can result in an increase in nursing and non-nursing-related stressors, which can have a negative impact on the job satisfaction of nurses employed in health-care organisations. Matched data were collected in 2009 via an online survey at two time-points (six months apart). Partial least squares path analysis revealed a significant causal relationship between Time 1 administrative and role stressors and an increase in nursing-specific stressors in Time 2. A significant relationship was also identified between job-specific nursing stressors and the adoption of effective coping strategies to deal with increased levels of change-induced stress and strain and the likelihood of reporting higher levels of job satisfaction in Time 2. The effectiveness of coping strategies is critical in helping nurses to deal with the negative consequences of organisational change. This study shows that there is a causal relationship between change, non-nursing stressors and job satisfaction. Senior management should implement strategies aimed at reducing nursing and non-nursing stress during change in order to enhance the job satisfaction of nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Help your teen cope with stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolescents - stress; Anxiety - cope with stress ... Common sources of stress in teens include: Worrying about schoolwork or grades Juggling responsibilities, such as school and work or sports Having problems ...

  8. Occupational stress and constructive thinking: health and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R; Tróccoli, Bartholomeu Torres

    2004-06-01

    Occupational stress is associated with specific situations, characteristics of the work environment, and individual perceptions and reactions in the context of the workplace, but many nursing studies of occupational stress have tended to analyse aspects related to the job itself. In Brazil nursing is acknowledged as a stressful occupation whose stresses are generally associated with the job itself, while the effects of personal characteristics on an individual's response to occupational stress are dismissed. The aim of this paper is to describe: (1) occupational stress, job satisfaction and state of health in Brazilian nurses, and (2) the relationship of these variables to a constructive thinking coping style. A correlational study was performed during 1999 with 461 nurses recruited from the public health and education system in the Federal District of Brazil. Instruments used were the Nursing Stress Inventory, Constructive Thinking Inventory, subscales of the Occupational Stress Indicator, and a researcher-designed questionnaire. Normal distributions were found for occupational stress, state of health (physical and psychological), and job satisfaction. Results suggest that nurses have fewer psychological health problems and similar job satisfaction compared with other Brazilian government white-collar workers. Occupational stress was directly associated with state of health, and inversely associated with global constructive thinking and job satisfaction. Brazilian nurses in this study seem to have adapted satisfactorily to their profession, but the finding that constructive thinking was significantly related to psychological ill-health, occupational stress and physical ill-health highlights a need to value individual coping styles in the work environment.

  9. Relationship between occupational coping self-efficacy, job stress and core competence of nurses%护士职业应对自我效能与职业压力源和核心能力的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈香芝; 刘擎国; 孟凡杰; 介小霞; 张彩玲

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨护士职业应对自我效能现状及其与职业压力源及核心能力的相关性。方法采用中国护士职业压力源量表、护士职业应对自我效能量表、中国注册护士核心能力量表对493名执业护士进行调查。护士职业应对自我效能与职业压力源和核心能力的相关性采用Pearson相关分析。结果护士职业应对自我效能总分(31.94±6.39)分,职业压力总分(90.29±17.41)分,核心能力总分(159.93±34.31)分。护士职业应对自我效能与职业压力源呈负相关(r=-0.267, P<0.01);与核心能力呈正相关(r=0.355, P<0.01)。结论通过成功体验、言语说服、积极反馈以提高护士自我效能,从而提高护士的核心能力和降低护士压力,进而提高护理质量。%Objective To investigate the relationships between occupational coping self-efficacy, job stress and core competence of nurses. Methods A total of 493 registered nurses were recruited in the survey with the Chinese nurse job stressors scale, occupational coping self-efficacy scale for nurses and competency inventory for registered nurse (CIRN). The correlations were analyzed using Pearson correlation analysis. Results The total scores on occupational coping self-efficacy, job stress of nurses and core competence of nurses were (31.94 ± 6.39), (90.29 ± 17.41) and (159.93 ± 34.31), respectively. Nurses′occupational coping self-efficacy negatively correlated with (r=-0.267, P<0.01) and positively correlated with the core competence of nurses (r=0.355, P<0.01). Conclusions The occupational coping self-efficacy of the nurses can be improved by successful experiencing, verbal persuasion and positive feedback. In this way, nurses core competence can be enhanced and their job stress can be relieved and consequently the quality of nursing can be enhanced.

  10. Cope with Stress in Manager Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Botek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with stress mainly in managerial positions. Stress is much extended in all aspects of our life and employment is an important factor which increases the level of stress. Managers have specific place between other occupations. At first the paper describes the most frequent stressors generally and kinds of coping stress methods. Then there are introduced some groups of stressors which are more frequent in managerial positions. The paper is closed by preventive methods of coping stress.

  11. Healthy eating at different risk levels for job stress: testing a moderated mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Daniel P; Antoni, Conny H; Wiedemann, Amelie U; Burkert, Silke

    2014-04-01

    Health behavior, like fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC), is affected by unfavorable job conditions. However, there is little research to date that combines job stress models and health-behavior change models. This longitudinal study examined the contribution of risk factors associated with job stress to the intention-planning-FVC relationship. In the context of the Health Action Process Approach, action planning (when-where-how plans) and coping planning (plans to overcome anticipated barriers) have been shown to be successful mediators in the translation of health-related intentions into action. Risk factors for job stress are operationalized as the interaction of job demands and job resources in line with the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model. Two hundred seventy-two employees (mean age 41.2 years, 73.9% female) from different jobs completed measures of intention at baseline (t1), action planning and coping planning 2 weeks later (t2), and FVC another 2 weeks later (t3). Job demands and job resources were assessed at t1 and t2. A moderated mediation analysis indicated that risk factors for job stress moderate the translation of intention into action planning (B = -0.23, p job stress was found. However, coping planning directly predicted FVC (B = 0.36, p job demands exceed job resources. For increasing FVC, coping planning appears most beneficial.

  12. Childhood Stress : Stressors, Coping, and Factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Burnout is a matter of imbalance in life very often (Nijboer, 2006). In order to know more about imbalance and exhaustion in children, stress and coping in children will be investigated in this literature study. The goal is to identify common childhood stressors, the ways children cope with stress,

  13. Coping Intelligence: Efficient Life Stress Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Coping Intelligence is defined as efficient individual ways of managing life stress. This paper presents a new assessment instrument named Coping IQ (CIQ; Coping Intelligence Questionnaire). A measure is based on the Multidimensional Positive Coping Model, which includes three cross-cutting parameters that characterize coping strategy as efficient or inefficient, emotional, cognitive or behavioral, and active or passive. Results of the factor analysis verified a basic two-factor structure of the Coping Intelligence with the alternative solutions for efficient and inefficient coping strategies characterized via three basic modalities. The validity of the Coping IQ instrument showed an internal consistency ranging from 0.72 to 0.81. The unified methodology that underlies the new concept of Coping Intelligence, as well as Coping IQ assessment, is applicable for studying both clinical and general populations. CIQ parameters might serve as useful feedback while assessing changes in individual coping repertoire, for CIQ measures strategies that can be modified as a result of life experiences or educational training. Based on the study findings, Coping Intelligence is further defined by a broad repertoire of life skills required to solve successfully everyday stress and life adversities in order to achieve desired goals and maintain physical, mental, and social well-being.

  14. Job stress, ill health and job satisfaction among health service employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, D W; Cooper, C L

    1994-11-01

    The study examined the effects of occupational stressors, perceived locus of control, Type A behaviour pattern and use of coping strategies on well-being and job satisfaction of 1,176 health service employees. Several stressors were identified as having a negative impact on health and job satisfaction although these differed between the various occupational groups included in the study. The interactionist model of stress used in the study, and the diagnostic tool used (the Occupational Stress Indicator) proved to be useful in suggesting means of intervening to reduce ill health and increase job satisfaction among health service employees.

  15. Job strain and psychological distress among employed pregnant Thai women: role of social support and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguanklin, Natthananporn; McFarlin, Barbara L; Finnegan, Lorna; Park, Chang Gi; Giurgescu, Carmen; White-Traut, Rosemary; Engstrom, Janet L

    2014-08-01

    Most Thai women continue to work throughout their pregnancy; however, little is known about job strain and its relation to psychological distress. This study aimed to examine: (1) the direct effects of job strain, perceived workplace support, perceived family support, and coping strategies on psychological distress and (2) the moderating effect of perceived workplace support, perceived family support, and coping strategies on the relationship between job strain and psychological distress. Lazarus and Folkman's transactional model of stress and coping guided this cross-sectional study. Full-time employed pregnant women (N = 300) were recruited from three antenatal clinics in Thailand. Thai versions of the following instruments were used: the State-Anxiety Inventory and Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (psychological distress), the Job Content Questionnaire (job strain and perceived workplace support), the Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey (perceived family support), and the Ways of Coping Checklist-Revised (coping strategies). Job strain with other predictors explained 54% of the variance in psychological distress. In the separate hierarchical multiple linear regression models, two types of coping strategies, seeking social support and wishful thinking, moderated the effects of job strain on psychological distress. Perceived family support had a direct effect in reducing psychological distress. Job strain is a significant contributor to psychological distress. The average levels of seeking social support and wishful thinking were most beneficial in moderating the negative impact of job strain on psychological distress. Since perceived workplace and family support did not have moderating effects, stress management programs for decreasing the levels of job strain should be developed.

  16. [Coping resources of nurses' occupational stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan-mei

    2008-09-01

    To study the effects of coping resources on nurses' strain. Coping resources (recreation, self-care, social support, and rational coping) and strain (vocational strain, psychological strain, interpersonal strain, and physical strain) were measured on 387 nurses with personal resources questionnaire (PRQ) and personal strain questionnaire (PSQ). The higher the nurses' coping resources were, the lower their strain was (Psocial support was closest related with nurses' strain. In the items of social support, those related to feeling support had more remission on strain. In the items of rational coping, those related to keeping good mind had more remission on strain, while doing more than one job at one time could raise nurses' strain (Psupport, keeping good mind, sufficient sleeping and rest, are the important measures for the remission of nurses' strain.

  17. Stress in College Athletics: Causes, Consequences, Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, James H.; Yow, Deborah A.; Bowden, William W.

    This book addresses the causes and consequences of stress in college sports and offers effective coping mechanisms to help individuals understand and control stressors and emotions in their environment. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Stress"; (2) "Perceptions of Stress in College Athletics"; (3) "Stress among College Athletes"; (4) "Stress…

  18. Mindfulness, Stress, and Coping among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Angele; Rodger, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 135 first-year university students living in residence completed questionnaires that measured individual differences in mindfulness, coping styles, and perceived stress. Findings revealed significant positive relationships between mindfulness and rational coping, and significant negative relationships with emotional and avoidant coping…

  19. Can the Internet cope with stress?

    CERN Document Server

    Lisewski, Andreas Martin

    2007-01-01

    When will the Internet become aware of itself? In this note the problem is approached by asking an alternative question: Can the Internet cope with stress? By extrapolating the psychological difference between coping and defense mechanisms a distributed software experiment is outlined which could reject the hypothesis that the Internet is not a conscious entity.

  20. A Model of Stress and Coping and Their Influence on Individual and Organizational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Nancy G.; Lewin, Jeffrey E.; Sager, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    A model of coping with stress is proposed in which coping mediates the relationship among organizational stressors and personal characteristics, and job-related strains and organizational outcomes. Study results, based on a sample of professional salespeople, provide overall support for most of the hypothesized relationships among work-related…

  1. Stress and coping with discrimination and stigmatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjot, Sophie; Gillet, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to briefly review the literature on stigmatization and more generally identity threats, to focus more specifically of the way people appraise and cope with those threatening situations. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping of Lazarus and Folkman (1984), we propose a model of coping with identity threats that takes into accounts the principle characteristic of stigma, its devaluing aspect. We present a model with specific antecedents, a refined appraisal phase and a new classification of coping strategies based on the motives that may be elicited by the threatening situation, those of protecting and/or enhancing the personal and/or social identity.

  2. Research progress on job stress and coping style of emergency nurses%急诊护士工作压力及应对方式的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田晓岚; 王芳

    2011-01-01

    综述了急诊护士压力感受水平、压力源类型、应对方式以及压力和应对方式对护士健康的影响,提出急诊护士有效应对压力的策略.%It reviewed level of stress perception,type of pressure source,coping styles of emergency nurses and influence of stress and coping styles on health of nurses. It put forward some strategies for nurses to cope with stress effectively.

  3. Age differences in stress and coping processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkman, S; Lazarus, R S; Pimley, S; Novacek, J

    1987-06-01

    The dramatic increase in the numbers of people who are living into old age has been accompanied by a growing interest among psychologists and health care professionals in their sources of stress and how they cope with them. Despite this interest, little is known about normative stress and coping patterns and the ways in which these patterns differ in older and younger people. This study, which draws on stress and coping theory, compares younger and older community-dwelling adults in daily hassles and eight kinds of coping. Two interpretations of age differences are evaluated: a developmental interpretation, which says that there are inherent, stage-related changes in the ways people cope as they age, and a contextual interpretation, which says that age differences in coping result from changes in what people must cope with. The findings indicate that there are clear age differences in hassles and coping. Overall, the findings tend to support the developmental interpretation, although the contextual interpretation also applies.

  4. Effects of acceptance-based coping on task performance and subjective stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishita, Naoko; Shimada, Hironori

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines the interactive effects of acceptance-based coping and job control on task performance, subjective stress, and perceived control. Forty-eight undergraduate and graduate students first participated in brief educational programs based on either acceptance or control coping strategies. They then participated in a 30-min high workload task under either high or low job control conditions. The results demonstrated a significant interactive effect of acceptance-based coping and job control on perceived control and task performance. No such effect was found for subjective stress. We conclude that to improve employees' perceived control and job performance, there should be an increase not only in job control through work redesign, but also in psychological acceptance.

  5. Coping Flexibility: Influencing Appraisals of Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-25

    have helped subjects focus their coping efforts and minimize the stress caused by the film (Speisman et al, 1964). Alternatively the soundtracks 12... film . various types of coping could be elicited (Speisman et al, 1964; Lazarus & Alfert , 1964). The film depicted a set of primitive manhood rites...harmless, and the third described the rites in an overly intellectualized way. The greatest stress response was seen to the film with the

  6. Stress and coping among cardiovascular nurses: a survey in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Estela Regina Ferraz

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular nurses are frequently involved in critical patient care, providing support to patients and their families. The goals of this study were to survey a representative sample of cardiovascular nurses, describe ways of coping, and identify sources of stress in the hospital setting. A descriptive and correlational survey design was used. A self-completed questionnaire was distributed to 76 nurses from a cardiovascular hospital in São Paulo City, Brazil. The measures were the Nursing Stress Evaluation Questionnaire (NSEQ) by Bianchi and Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCOQ) by Folkman and Lazarus. A high response rate of 76.3% was achieved. The results identified work conditions as the major source of stress for nurses and use of positive reappraisal, self-controlling skills, and social support to cope with job stress. Nurses are using coping strategies based on personal resources but the use of organizational strategies is encouraged to improve life quality. Mental health nurses could play an essential role in preventive stress management programs for hospital nurses.

  7. Occupational Stress and Coping Behaviours Among Dentists in Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouradeli, Shiva; Shahravan, Arash; Eskandarizdeh, Ali; Rafie, Forozan; Hashemipour, Maryam A

    2016-08-01

    Recognising causes of stress can help prevent associated adverse effects. This study aimed to investigate causes of occupational stress and coping behaviours among general dentists in Iran. This cross-sectional study was carried out from April to December 2014. A modified version of the Occupational Stress Indicator questionnaire was used to assess causes of stress and coping behaviours among 142 general dentists in Kerman, Iran. A total of 93 dentists participated in the study (response rate: 65.5%). Of these, 58.9% reported often being stressed. The mean general stress score was 63.33 ± 19.99. The most common causes of stress were maintaining high levels of concentration while working (65.6%), time pressures (64.5%), concern over their ability to deliver dental services in future (60.2%) and rising costs (59.1%). No significant relationships between stress and gender, age, workplace or working hours per week were noted (P >0.05). However, there was a significant correlation between general stress scores and years of job experience (P = 0.05) and number of patients treated daily (P = 0.03). The most common methods for coping with stress were resting (71.0%), sports (45.2%) and entertainment (43.0%). Most dentists felt that stress management courses could help to reduce stress (89.7%). General dentists in Kerman were subject to many sources of stress in their workplaces, with significant relationships between stress scores and years of work experience and number of patients treated daily. Dentists should be encouraged to participate in stress management courses to help alleviate stress.

  8. Occupational Stress and Coping Behaviours Among Dentists in Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Pouradeli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Recognising causes of stress can help prevent associated adverse effects. This study aimed to investigate causes of occupational stress and coping behaviours among general dentists in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out from April to December 2014. A modified version of the Occupational Stress Indicator questionnaire was used to assess causes of stress and coping behaviours among 142 general dentists in Kerman, Iran. Results: A total of 93 dentists participated in the study (response rate: 65.5%. Of these, 58.9% reported often being stressed. The mean general stress score was 63.33 ± 19.99. The most common causes of stress were maintaining high levels of concentration while working (65.6%, time pressures (64.5%, concern over their ability to deliver dental services in future (60.2% and rising costs (59.1%. No significant relationships between stress and gender, age, workplace or working hours per week were noted (P >0.05. However, there was a significant correlation between general stress scores and years of job experience (P = 0.05 and number of patients treated daily (P = 0.03. The most common methods for coping with stress were resting (71.0%, sports (45.2% and entertainment (43.0%. Most dentists felt that stress management courses could help to reduce stress (89.7%. Conclusion: General dentists in Kerman were subject to many sources of stress in their workplaces, with significant relationships between stress scores and years of work experience and number of patients treated daily. Dentists should be encouraged to participate in stress management courses to help alleviate stress.

  9. Adolescent stress and coping: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groër, M W; Thomas, S P; Shoffner, D

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal panel study was to investigate developmental and gender influences on stress and coping in adolescents attending a suburban high school in Tennessee. Data were collected from the same 167 subjects during the freshman year and again during the senior year. Life events stress was measured through the Adolescent Life Change Event Scale (ALCES) and ways of coping were categorized from data gathered from an open-ended questionnaire. Girls reported more life events stress at both testings than boys. Life events stress was greater at senior testing for both girls and boys, but girls' scores increased more. The "gender intensification" phenomenon may account for the greater disparity in types of stress reported by boys and girls as seniors. Girls generally reported more life events associated with interpersonal and family relationships. Both girls and boys reported coping with stress mostly through active distraction techniques such as exercise. However, girls' use of active distraction decreased over time, while passive distraction increased. Self-destructive and aggressive coping behaviors increased for boys. There were no relationships between amounts or types of life events stress and ways of coping for subjects at either time.

  10. Stress coping strategies in hearing-impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Akbari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The majority of people experience problems and stressors, such as job layoffs and illnesses during their lives. However, the way people cope with stress varies. According to previous research, use of effective coping strategies can significantly reduce stress and tension. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of stress coping strategies on hearing-impaired students.Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study with pre-test, post-test, and control group. The sample consisted of 40 hearing-impaired male students of guidance and high schools of the city of Sari, Iran, in the years 2010 and 2011. They were randomly selected and assigned to two experimental and control groups (n=20. The data collection tool was the General Health Questionnaire-28. The experimental group was administered eight sessions of stress coping strategies based on cognitive-behavioral techniques two hours weekly. Data were analyzed using statistical indices including mean, standard deviation, and two-way analysis of variance.Results: There was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test scores in the subscales of somatic symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, depression, and social function (p<0.05. Moreover, after the eight sessions the rate of general health of the experimental group was higher than the control group.Conclusion: Stress coping strategies based on cognitive-behavioral techniques increased the general health of hearing-impaired people. Therefore, stress management training should be developed and expanded as an appropriate intervention.

  11. 武警基层干部工作压力、应对方式与工作倦怠的关系%Relationships among Work Stress,Coping Styles and Job Burnout of the Grass-root Officers in an Armed Police Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚雨玲

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨武警基层干部工作压力、应对方式与工作倦怠的关系.方法:采用军人职业压力量表、应对方式量表和基层军官工作倦怠问卷对226名基层干部进行了问卷调查.结果:工作压力各因素与工作倦怠及其情感衰竭和低成就感维度存在显著正相关,工作压力中的军旅生活、工作负荷和领导能力能显著正向预测工作倦怠,解决问题和求助与工作倦怠及各维度存在显著负相关,自责、退避、幻想和合理化与工作倦怠及各维度存在显著正相关,解决问题能显著负向预测工作倦怠,合理化则显著正向预测工作倦怠,消极不成熟型的应对方式对工作压力和工作倦怠起着部分中介作用.结论:工作压力和应对方式都与工作倦怠存在显著相关,消极不成熟型的应对方式在工作压力和工作倦怠关系中起着部分中介作用.%Objective: Explore the relationships among work stress, coping styles and job burnout of the grass-root officers.Methods: The occupational stress scale for military personnel, the job burnout questionnaire for the grass-root officers and the coping styles scale were used to survey 226 grass-root officers.Results: There is significant positive correlation among the different dimensions of work stress, job burnout, emotional exhaustion and diminished personal accomplishment of the grass-root officers.Besides, workload, military life and leadership can significantly and positively forecast job burnout.There is significant negative correlation between problem solving as well as recourse and job burnout as well as all its dimensions.In addition, there is remarkable positive correlation between the coping styles of remorse, resignation,fantasy as well as rationalization and job burnout as well as all its dimensions.Problem solving can make significant and negative prediction about job burnout while rationalization can remarkably and positively predict it.Finally, negative

  12. Coping with interpersonal stress and psychological distress at work: comparison of hospital nursing staff and salespeople

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tsukasa Kato Department of Social Psychology, Toyo University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Hospital nurses frequently experience relationships with patients as stressors in the workplace. Nurses’ coping behavior is one potential buffering factor that can reduce the effects of job stress on their psychological functioning and well-being. In this study, the association between nurses' strategies for coping with interpersonal stress from patients and their psychological distress was examined. Participants included 204 hospital nurses and 142 salespeople, who were used as a comparison group. Participants completed measures of coping with interpersonal stress and psychological distress. Hospital nurses reported more psychological distress than did salespeople. Moreover, distancing coping was correlated with high psychological distress in both nurses and salespeople, and reassessing coping was correlated with low psychological distress in nurses. For nurses only, constructive coping appeared to be an effective strategy for reducing psychological distress. It is important for nurses to understand the role of constructive coping in nurse–patient communication and interaction. Keywords: nurse, relationships with patients, interpersonal stress, coping behavior, job stress

  13. Stress and coping with discrimination and stigmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eBerjot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to briefly review the literature on stigmatization and more generally identity threats, to focus more specifically of the way people appraise and cope with those threatening situations. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984, we propose a model of coping with identity threats that takes into accounts the principle characteristic of stigma, its devaluing aspect. We present a model with specific antecedents, a refined appraisal phase and a new classification of coping strategies based on the motives that may be elicited by the threatening situation, those of protecting and/or enhancing the personal and/or social identity.

  14. Coping with Workplace Stress: A Multiple-Group Comparison of Female Managers and Clerical Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bonita C.

    1998-01-01

    A causal model of workplace stress was refined and cross-validated. Multivariate analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were used to investigate the effects of social roles on patterns of coping with workplace stress and job satisfaction. Differences found between managers (n=249) and clerical workers (n=214) suggest power and…

  15. Helping Children Cope with Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Samarzija, Joanne; Myers-Walls, Judith A.

    1985-01-01

    Stress is a response to change or conflict. It is usually considered to be negative and damaging. However, not all forms or levels of stress are bad. Competing in sports and achieving in school or at work are examples of positive stressors. Stress becomes negative when the pressures surrounding these and other situations become too great or when several small stressors occur at once, and one can no longer adjust. It is becoming evident that this type of stress overload is taking its toll on c...

  16. College Students Coping with Interpersonal Stress: Examining a Control-Based Model of Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiro, Mary Jo; Bettis, Alexandra H.; Compas, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The ways that college students cope with stress, particularly interpersonal stress, may be a critical factor in determining which students are at risk for impairing mental health disorders. Using a control-based model of coping, the present study examined associations between interpersonal stress, coping strategies, and symptoms.…

  17. Analysis and Coping Strategies of Operating Room Nurses Job Stress%手术室护士工作压力源分析与应对策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨在玲; 曹秀红

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the main sources of stress of nurses in operation room and harm, the correct understanding and try to reduce the work pressure, improve work ef iciency and work quality.%了解手术室护士的主要压力源及危害,正确认识工作压力并设法减少,提高工作效率及工作质量。

  18. EFFECT OF WORKPLACE STRESS ON JOB PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the relationship between workplace stress and job performance. A survey method was employed to gather self-administered questionnaires from executive and non-executive employees of a leading private investment bank in Peninsular Malaysia. The outcomes of SmartPLS path model analysis of the data showed two important findings: firstly, physiological stress was positively and significantly correlated with job performance. Secondly, psychological stress was positively and significantly correlated with job performance. This finding reveals that physiological and psychological stresses act as important predictors of job performance in the studied organization. The paper provides discussion, implications and conclusion.

  19. [Prediction of perceived health status on job stress and family stress with middle school teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung Sook; Jeong, Seong Hee; Park, Kyung Yeon

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship among job stress, family stress and perceived health status of middle school teachers and to present basic information about promoting health and coping with stress. Participants(N=547) was recruited in B city from November 2005 to December 2005. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation and multiple regression. The degree of job stress of the middle school teachers was 54.47 out of a total score of 88; that of family stress was 46.57 out of a total score of 96; and that of perceived health status was 78.59 out of the perfect score 100. There was a significantly negative relationship between job stress and perceived health status (r=-.274, pfamily stress and perceived health status(r=-.408, pfamily stress(r=.298, pFamily stress, gender, charging subject, job stress, charging grade and number of family member was 27.1% of the variance in perceived health status of middle school teachers. Family stress has the most important impact on perceived health status with middle school teachers. Based on the finding, we could conclude that both job stress and family stress management should be required to improve perceived health status.

  20. Mastication as a Stress-Coping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Kin-ya; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Chen, Huayue

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress induces various physical and mental effects that may ultimately lead to disease. Stress-related disease has become a global health problem. Mastication (chewing) is an effective behavior for coping with stress, likely due to the alterations chewing causes in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system. Mastication under stressful conditions attenuates stress-induced increases in plasma corticosterone and catecholamines, as well as the expression of stress-related substances, such as neurotrophic factors and nitric oxide. Further, chewing reduces stress-induced changes in central nervous system morphology, especially in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. In rodents, chewing or biting on wooden sticks during exposure to various stressors reduces stress-induced gastric ulcer formation and attenuates spatial cognitive dysfunction, anxiety-like behavior, and bone loss. In humans, some studies demonstrate that chewing gum during exposure to stress decreases plasma and salivary cortisol levels and reduces mental stress, although other studies report no such effect. Here, we discuss the neuronal mechanisms that underline the interactions between masticatory function and stress-coping behaviors in animals and humans.

  1. Mastication as a Stress-Coping Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin-ya Kubo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic stress induces various physical and mental effects that may ultimately lead to disease. Stress-related disease has become a global health problem. Mastication (chewing is an effective behavior for coping with stress, likely due to the alterations chewing causes in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system. Mastication under stressful conditions attenuates stress-induced increases in plasma corticosterone and catecholamines, as well as the expression of stress-related substances, such as neurotrophic factors and nitric oxide. Further, chewing reduces stress-induced changes in central nervous system morphology, especially in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. In rodents, chewing or biting on wooden sticks during exposure to various stressors reduces stress-induced gastric ulcer formation and attenuates spatial cognitive dysfunction, anxiety-like behavior, and bone loss. In humans, some studies demonstrate that chewing gum during exposure to stress decreases plasma and salivary cortisol levels and reduces mental stress, although other studies report no such effect. Here, we discuss the neuronal mechanisms that underline the interactions between masticatory function and stress-coping behaviors in animals and humans.

  2. Coping With Pain: Studies in Stress Inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, John J.; And Others

    The stress-inoculation paradigm for helping clients deal with pain consists of education about the psychological dimensions of pain, training in a number of coping skills relevant to each dimension, and practice in applying these skills to the noxious stimulus. Presented are two studies, the first of which represents a component analysis of stress…

  3. Coping with stress in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Janine D. Oosthuizen; Burger van Lill

    2008-01-01

    The researchers investigated a simplified process model, a so-called salutogenic approach, of coping with stress in the workplace. Two constructs of salutogenic functioning, namely sense of coherence and locus of control (three dimensions: internal, external locus and autonomy), as well as the stress levels of 240 employees from a parastatal organisation were measured. As expected, individuals with a stronger sense of coherence and a stronger internal locus of control experienced lower levels...

  4. Coping with stress in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine D. Oosthuizen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The researchers investigated a simplified process model, a so-called salutogenic approach, of coping with stress in the workplace. Two constructs of salutogenic functioning, namely sense of coherence and locus of control (three dimensions: internal, external locus and autonomy, as well as the stress levels of 240 employees from a parastatal organisation were measured. As expected, individuals with a stronger sense of coherence and a stronger internal locus of control experienced lower levels of stress and vice versa. Nevertheless, in a regression analysis only the sense of coherence and external locus of control variables contributed significantly to variance in the criterion variable stress.

  5. Personality and methods of coping with stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Cieślik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Good health and well-being are the natural desires of every human being. However, people have to cope with various kinds of stress in everyday life. Most people are under stress due to: the situation in the world, unemployment, traffic jam, their manager’s opinion, illness, divorce, etc. The level of stress increases particularly in situ ations when people sense danger of physical, social or psychological risks. This phenomenon is very common, and many people have come to think that this is something normal in modern life. Stress can cause depression and frustration, and it does not help in achieving goals and being successful. Ordinary people have a negative concept of stress, but stress response also helps one to rise to meet challenges. Some level of stress is recommended because it helps people to solve problems. While under stress one can function better and work faster, it sharpens concentration and increases brain efficiency. At the beginning of the third millennium, stress has become the people’s enemy, so they should learn how to cope with it. It is common knowledge that one cannot avoid stress, so it is important to learn how to control and deal with it.

  6. Academics Job Satisfaction and Job Stress across Countries in the Changing Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined job satisfaction and job stress across 19 higher education systems. We classified the 19 countries according to their job satisfaction and job stress and applied regression analysis to test whether new public management has impacts on either or both job satisfaction and job stress. According to this study, strong market driven…

  7. Academics Job Satisfaction and Job Stress across Countries in the Changing Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined job satisfaction and job stress across 19 higher education systems. We classified the 19 countries according to their job satisfaction and job stress and applied regression analysis to test whether new public management has impacts on either or both job satisfaction and job stress. According to this study, strong market driven…

  8. The Effects of Heat Stress on Job Satisfaction, Job Performance and Occupational Stress in Casting Workers

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    Dehghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Job satisfaction, job performance, job stress and heat stress affect the productivity of workers. Objectives This research aimed to study the relationship between heat stress indices with job satisfaction, job performance and job stress in casting workers. Patients and Methods This descriptive-analytical cross sectional survey was performed during summer 2013 on one hundred casting workers. Data were collected by questionnaires of occupational stress, job satisfaction and job performance. Heat stress was measured by the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT and Heat Strain Score Index (HSSI questionnaire. The data were analyzed using correlation coefficient by the SPSS16 software. Results The results showed that job satisfaction had a negative correlation with WBGT index (R = -0.42, P < 0.001 and HSSI (R = -0.49, P < 0.001. Also, there was no statistical correlation among occupational stress and job performance with heat stress indices. Conclusions The present study showed that heat stress had a negative effect on job satisfaction; also there were no significant effects on job stress and job performance.

  9. Job satisfaction and Job stress among various employees of tertiary care level hospital in central Uttar Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Yadav

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job satisfaction defined as the end state of feeling, the feeling that is experienced after a task is accomplished. Job stress can be defined as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or need of the worker. Objectives: To study the relationship between job satisfaction and job stress among various employees of tertiary care level hospital and to find the co-relates of job stress and job satisfaction. Materials & Methods: A cross sectional study carried out for a period of 2 month among various employees working in Uttar Pradesh University of Medical Sciences, Saifai, Etawah, Uttar Pradesh, a tertiary care level hospital. A total 225 Participants 75 from each medical, paramedical and office staff were selected by purposive sampling technique. The study was conducted using pretested structured questionnaire regarding socio-demographic profile, job satisfaction and job stress. Data was analyzed using chi square test. Result: A total of 225 participants,75 from each medical, paramedical and office staff were interviewed. On doing analysis of questionnaire regarding job satisfaction and job stress it was found that majority believe that their job was well recognized and working in a good institute and were not satisfied with the management and salary and were coping well with their job stress and were having average level of satisfaction. Conclusion: The present study conclude that majority of the participants felt they are well recognized with their job, working in a good institute but not satisfied with the management and salary.

  10. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  11. Original article Coping with stress among Polish immigrants

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    Michał Ziarko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Opening the Western labour markets for Poles, a result of Poland’s accession to the European Union, led to mass economic emigration of thousands of Poles. Immigrants chose mostly the following English-speaking countries: Ireland, England and Scotland. Moving house and changing job is a challenge that needs to be dealt with. PARTICIPANTS AND PROCEDURE This study involved 239 people who emigrated to England, Scotland and Ireland. It was aimed at answering the following question: Do Polish immigrants in various countries experience varied stress levels and use varied strategies to cope with stress? RESULTS The conducted study showed differences in stress levels, depending on immigrants’ target country. There were also significant differences between strategies used to handle stress. Additionally, the study indentified factors influencing stress levels. Immigrants’ high stress levels were accompanied by stress management strategies focused on stressor avoidance, blaming as well as sense of one’s ineffectuality. CONCLUSIONS European English-speaking countries presents various challenges to immigrants. Observed dissimilarities in stress levels might stem from difference in size of cultural gap between the target and home country. Seeing that, cultural factors may significantly influence stress level perceived by immigrants, thus a question for further studies arises: what are specific cultural features significant in experiencing stress among immigrants? Answering to that question will give an unprecedented insights to demands of emigration and may lay a basis for future community support programs.

  12. Coping, stress and burnout in the South African police service in Kwazulu-natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wiese

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the relationship between coping, stress and burnout in the South African Police Service. A survey design was used. The study population (N = 257 consisted of police personnel in Kwazulu-Natal. The COPE, Police Stress Inventory and Maslach Burnout Inventory – General Survey (MBI-GS, were used as measuring instruments. Structural equation analysis showed that job demands (as stressors are associated with exhaustion. Passive coping strategies contributed to exhaustion and cynicism, while seeking emotional support led to lower exhaustion. Exhaustion contributed to cynicism. Stress because of a lack of resources, active coping strategies and not coping passively seem to impact on professional efficacy. Opsomming Die doelstelling van hierdie navorsing was om die verband tussen coping, stres en uitbranding binne die Suid-Afrikaanse Polisiediens te ondersoek. ’n Opname-ontwerp is gebruik. Die studiepopulasie (N = 257 het bestaan uit polisiepersoneel in Kwazulu-Natal. Die COPE, die Polisiestres-Opname en die Maslach-uitbrandingsvraelys – Algemene Opname (MBI-GS is as meetinstrumente gebruik. Strukturele vergelykingsmodellering het aangetoon dat werkseise (as stressore geassosieer word met uitputting. Passiewe coping- strategieë het bygedra tot uitputting en sinisme, terwyl die soeke na emosionele ondersteuning tot laer uitputting gelei het. Uitputting het tot sinisme bygedra. Stres a.g.v. ’n tekort aan hulpbronne (invers, aktiewe coping-strategieë en passiewe coping-strategieë (invers blyk ’n uitwerking op professionele doeltreffendheid te hê.

  13. The effects of perceived stress and ways of coping in a sample of Portuguese health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Carlos A

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this study is to clarify the association between perceived stress in work and the types of coping strategies used by Portuguese nurses. The healthcare work environment as a source of overwork and stress has been implicated in today's nursing shortage. Staff nurses play a pivotal role in creating work environments, but little is known about the nature of Portuguese nurses' work. A descriptive correlational design and a cross-sectional approach were used for this study. A total of 102 registered nurses, in three Portuguese hospitals, were selected. The Perceived Stress Scale and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire were used to measure job stress and coping strategies, respectively. High levels of stress were reported by 52·2% of respondents. The results showed that the main stressful factors for nurses are patient death and dying (32·8%), followed by emergency situations (22·8%) and low supportive relationships (18·0%). The most frequently used coping strategy was self-controlling, followed by planful problem-solving and seeking social support. Pearson's correlation tests indicated that the total score of the Perceived Stress Scale significantly negatively correlated with the subscales of the use of coping strategies of seeking social support, self-controlling, planful problem-solving, distancing and escape-avoidance, indicating that those who were more distressed showed lower levels in mentioned coping subscales. Stress in nursing can be best reduced through the application of the control cycle approach and risk assessment/risk management techniques. Stress management of nurses may improve their productivity and quality of life. A change in leadership styles from the managerial level and reallocation of personnel may help reduce job stress. It is important for clinical practitioners to understand theoretical research concerning human stress responses, appraisal and coping to apply knowledge in practice when dealing with a client who has experienced a

  14. Relationship between job stress, temperament and depressive symptoms in female nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kikuchi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A casual relationship between temperament, job stress and depressive symptoms has not been established yet. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between job stress, temperament and depressive symptoms in female nurses at a Japanese general hospital. Material and Methods: A self-report survey was conducted among 706 nurses. We measured job stress, temperament, and depressive symptoms using the Brief-Job Stress Questionnaire, the TEMPS-A and a screening scale of items from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. In order to examine the causal relationship between the measures the stepwise multiple regression and path analyses were used. Results: Depressive symptoms were modestly correlated with job stress (γ = -0.23-0.30. Except for hyperthymic temperament measures, the correlations between depressive symptoms and temperament types were significant and moderate (γ = 0.36-0.50. Overtime, job control as well as depressive and cyclothymic types of temperament were significantly correlated with depressive symptoms (β = 0.15, p < 0.05; β = 0.19, p < 0.01; β = 0.26, p < 0.001; β = 0.32, p < 0.001, respectively. Path-analysis revealed that depressive and cyclothymic types of temperament influenced depressive symptoms both directly (β = 0.67, p < 0.001 and indirectly via job stress (β = 0.35, p < 0.001 from temperament to job stress; β = 0.20, p < 0.05 from job stress to depressive symptoms. Irritable and anxious types of temperament and quantitative job overload did not contri­bute to the path-analytic model. Conclusions: Health care professionals should consider temperament, especially depressive and cyclothymic types, in order to help employees cope better with job stress factors. We need further research about the effective intervention to help employees better cope with their job stress.

  15. Causal Model of Stress and Coping: Women in Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bonita C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Tested model of managerial women's (n=249) stress. Model was developed from Lazarus's theoretical framework of stress/coping and incorporated causal antecedent constructs (demographics, sex role attitudes, agentic traits), mediating constructs (environment, appraisals, engagement coping, disengagement coping), and outcomes (work performance,…

  16. Coping with coping strategies: how distributed teams and their members deal with the stress of distance, time zones and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Niina

    2011-04-01

    The changing world of work is increasing demands on workers through greater need for flexibility in global collaboration. This multiple-case study uses a qualitative research approach to study context-specific job stressors and coping in ten geographically distributed work teams. Results demonstrate the complex and dynamic nature of the stress-coping process and how coping strategies, adapted to manage stress-evoking uncertainty and ambiguity in distributed work, created secondary sources of psychological strain to individuals. The main strategies for managing the uncertainty and ambiguity in the studied teams were extensive emailing, travelling to face-to-face meetings and extending workdays to collaborate simultaneously across time zones. Continuously used, these coping strategies created work overload and strain. Experienced workers, who had good self-management skills, succeeded in coping with these secondary sources of strain by prioritizing and setting clear limits for workload. Less-experienced workers were overloaded and needed more social support from their leaders and teammates. The study proposes that distributed team members rely heavily on individual coping resources, because spatial and temporal distance hinders or even precludes the mobilization of social resources related to emotional, instrumental and informational social support.

  17. Coping with Workplace Interpersonal Stress among Japanese Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tsukasa

    2015-12-01

    The current study examined the relationship between coping with workplace interpersonal stress (WIS) and psychological dysfunction (i.e. depressive symptoms, burnout, general distress and daytime sleepiness). Three hundred twenty-four Japanese full-time workers completed measures assessing coping strategies with WIS and psychological dysfunction. Three strategies of coping with WIS were measured: distancing coping, reassessing coping and constructive coping. Multiple regression analyses revealed that distancing coping, which reflects strategies to actively damage, disrupt and dissolve a stressful relationship, was related to high levels of depressive symptoms, burnout, general distress and daytime sleepiness. Reassessing coping, which incorporates efforts to patiently wait for an appropriate opportunity to act, such as a change or improvement in the situation, was related to low levels of depressive symptoms, burnout, general distress and daytime sleepiness. Constructive coping was not significantly associated with psychological dysfunction. Implications for workplace stress are discussed.

  18. Job stress in the nursing profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelsema, Tanya Irene

    2007-01-01

    The central issue in this thesis is the work related causes and consequences of job stress among nurses. The relationships between a wide range of work characteristics and characteristics of the organization and environment on the one hand, and different outcomes (such as job satisfaction and emotio

  19. Occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J. van der Colff

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population consisted of 818 registered nurses. The Nursing Stress Inventory, the Orientation to Life Questionnaire, the COPE, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were administered. The results show that the experience of depletion of emotional resources and feelings of depersonalisation by registered nurses were associated with stress due to job demands and a lack of organisational support, focus on and ventilation of emotions as a coping strategy, and a weak sense of coherence. Work engagement was predicted by a strong sense of coherence and approach-coping strategies.

  20. Therapist stress, coping, career sustaining behavior and the working alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Denise Broholm; Munley, Patrick H

    2008-10-01

    Relations were examined among therapist stress, coping styles, career sustaining behaviors and therapist working alliance. 160 therapists completed a demographic questionnaire, a rating of stress experienced in work as a psychotherapist, a rating of stress experienced in work with an individual client, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Career Sustaining Behavior Questionnaire, the COPE, and the Working Alliance Inventory. After controlling for demographic and therapists' stress variables, and alternating entry of Career Sustaining Behavior and COPE scores in the regression model, Career Sustaining Behavior contributed significant variance to predicting working alliance, and COPE scores accounted for significant variance in working alliance with active coping a significant predictor. Career Sustaining Behavior and COPE scores entered together accounted for significant unique variance in Working Alliance with career sustaining behavior and avoidant coping identified as significant predictors.

  1. Comparison of exposure to stress and analysis of ways of coping with stress among freight transport and public transport drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Urbańska

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fast progress in a lot of economic sectors has greatly contributed to a growing role of road transportation systems, including freight transport and passenger transport. The job of professional drivers is regarded as extremely hard and dangerous, it is associated with high risk of health loss and even life loss. This profession is also associated with mental burden, the main cause of the absence at work and alarming number of road accidents. The aim of study was to compare exposure to stress, check the level of stress and ways to cope with stress in 2 groups of drivers (N = 187. Material and Methods: The study was carried out among public transport drivers and freight transport drivers. The authors’ own questionnaire and 2 psychological tests: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10 and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and Inventory to Measure Coping Strategies with Stress (Mini-COPE were used as the study tools. Results: The level of stress is high in both groups, mostly due to a similar type of work. Both groups practice similar ways to cope with stress, but active ways predominate. Conclusions: The work of a professional driver is considered as extremely stressful. The level of stress among professional drivers should be under continuous control. Employers should introduce preventive programs and educate employees about some professional ways to cope with stress. Med Pr 2016;67(4:455–466

  2. Stress among UK academics : identifying who copes best?

    OpenAIRE

    Darabi, Mitra; Macaskill, Ann; Reidy, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper examined the levels of stress and coping strategies among UK academics. Adopting a positive psychology approach, the influence of the character strengths of hope, optimism, gratitude and self-efficacy, on stress, subjective well-being (SWB), and mental health (GHQ) was examined in 216 academics in a UK university. The study explored the relationship between coping styles and work-coping variables of sense of coherence and work locus of control and stress. No significant differences...

  3. The Impact of Job Stress and Job Satisfaction on Workforce Productivity in an Iranian Petrochemical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Naser Hoboubi; Alireza Choobineh; Fatemeh Kamari Ghanavati; Sareh Keshavarzi; Ali Akbar Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    Background: Job stress and job satisfaction are important factors affecting workforce productivity. This study was carried out to investigate the job stress, job satisfaction, and workforce productivity levels, to examine the effects of job stress and job satisfaction on workforce productivity, and to identify factors associated with productivity decrement among employees of an Iranian petrochemical industry. Methods: In this study, 125 randomly selected employees of an Iranian petrochemic...

  4. Towards Comprehensive Job Stress Models of Reservists

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Integrating findings from the general stress literature into occupational stress research the present dissertation aimed at developing comprehensive job stress models that include additionally valuable antecedents and moderators on the link between workplace stress and psychological health problems. Therefore, this work made use of McEwen’s (1998) Allostatic Load Model to analyze the influence of chronic as well as acute stressors on the employees’ (i.e., Reservists) long-term psychological h...

  5. Gender Differences in Coping with Involuntary White Collar Job Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T.; Buch, Kimberly

    Corporate restructuring has resulted in involuntary job loss for a significant number of white collar workers. This study investigated gender differences in reaction to involuntary job loss and tested a model of career gorwth through job loss. Former clients, 456 males and 62 females, of a nationwide outplacement firm completed a questionnaire…

  6. Work stressors, Chinese coping strategies, and job performance in Greater China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luo; Kao, Shu-Fang; Siu, Oi-Ling; Lu, Chang-Qin

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this research was to jointly test effects of work stressors and coping strategies on job performance among employees in the Greater China region. A self-administered survey was conducted to collect data from three major cities in the region, namely Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei (N = 380). Four important work stressors were assessed: heavy workload, organizational constraints, lack of work autonomy, and interpersonal conflict. We used a four-factor model of Chinese coping strategies composed of hobbies/relaxation, active action, seeking social support, and passive adaptation. Job performance was indicated by both task performance (quantity of work, quality of work, job knowledge) and contextual performance (attendance, getting along with others). We found that: (1) work stressors were related to job performance. Specifically, workload had a positive relation with quantity of work, whereas organizational constraints had negative relations with quantity of work and attendance. In addition, interpersonal conflict had a negative relation with getting along with others. (2) Chinese positive coping strategies were positively related to job performance. Specifically, seeking social support had positive relations with quantity of work and getting along with others, whereas active action had positive relations with attendance and job knowledge. (3) Chinese passive adaptation coping behaviors were negatively related to job performance. Specifically, passive adaptation had negative relations with quantity of work, quality of work, and getting along with others. The present study thus found joint effects of work stressors and coping behaviors among Chinese employees in the Greater China region, encompassing three sub-societies of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Differential effects of Chinese positive and passive coping strategies were also noted. Most importantly, all these effects were demonstrated on multiple indicators of job performance, a rarely studied

  7. Correlation between stress, stress-coping and current sleep bruxism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Stress is discussed as a potential factor in the development of sleep bruxism (SB). The aim of this study was to investigate whether specific stress-factors correlate with SB-activity. Methods Sixty-nine subjects, of which 48 were SB-patients, completed three German questionnaires assessing different stress-parameters and stress-coping-strategies: Short questionnaire for recognition of stress-factors (Kurzer Fragebogen zur Erfassung von Belastungen, KFB), Questionnaire for recuperation and strain (Erholungs-Belastungs-Fragebogen, EBF-24 A/3) and the stress-coping questionnaire (Stressverarbeitungsfragebogen-78, SVF-78). The diagnosis of SB was based on the clinical criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). The degree of SB-activity was measured by the Bruxcore-Bruxism-Monitoring-Device (BBMD, Bruxcore, Boston, USA), worn for five consecutive nights and analyzed using a computer-based method. Non-parametric Spearman correlation coefficients, rho, were calculated between the psychometric data and the amount of SB-activity measured by a pixel score of the BBMD. Results Significant correlations were found for 'daily problems' (r = 0.461, p < 0.01), 'trouble at work' (r = 0.293), 'fatigue' (r = 0.288), 'physical problems' (r = 0.288) and the coping-strategy 'escape' (r = 0.295) (all p < 0.05). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study it could be shown that subjects with high SB-activity tend to feel more stressed at work and in their daily life, which in turn might influence their physical state. These subjects also seem to deal with stress in a negative way. However, due to the rather low to almost moderate correlation coefficients and the descriptive character of the study, further investigations are necessary to examine a possible causal relationship. PMID:20205705

  8. The Impact of Job Stress and Job Satisfaction on Workforce Productivity in an Iranian Petrochemical Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoboubi, Naser; Choobineh, Alireza; Kamari Ghanavati, Fatemeh; Keshavarzi, Sareh; Akbar Hosseini, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Job stress and job satisfaction are important factors affecting workforce productivity. This study was carried out to investigate the job stress, job satisfaction, and workforce productivity levels, to examine the effects of job stress and job satisfaction on workforce productivity, and to identify factors associated with productivity decrement among employees of an Iranian petrochemical industry. In this study, 125 randomly selected employees of an Iranian petrochemical company participated. The data were collected using the demographic questionnaire, Osipow occupational stress questionnaire to investigate the level of job stress, Job Descriptive Index to examine job satisfaction, and Hersey and Goldsmith questionnaire to investigate productivity in the study population. The levels of employees' perceived job stress and job satisfaction were moderate-high and moderate, respectively. Also, their productivity was evaluated as moderate. Although the relationship between job stress and productivity indices was not statistically significant, the positive correlation between job satisfaction and productivity indices was statistically significant. The regression modeling demonstrated that productivity was significantly associated with shift schedule, the second and the third dimensions of job stress (role insufficiency and role ambiguity), and the second dimension of job satisfaction (supervision). Corrective measures are necessary to improve the shift work system. "Role insufficiency" and "role ambiguity" should be improved and supervisor support must be increased to reduce job stress and increase job satisfaction and productivity.

  9. Gambaran Coping Stress pada Wanita Madya dalam Menghadapi Pramenopause

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The research is the descriptive research aim to see how is the description of women in the middle age of coping stress to face premenopause. Lazarus & Folkman (1986) were definited that coping as all effort to decrease stress that is a manage process (external and internal) demand that evaluate overlooked burden for someone. Lazarus & Folkman (1986) identified all kind of coping strategies, in problem-focused or emotion-focused, such as: (1) Planful problem solving, (2) Conf...

  10. Effects of stress on auditors' organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and job performance

    OpenAIRE

    Abolghasem Masihabadi; Alireza Rajaei; Amir Shams Koloukhi; Hossein Parsian

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the effects of job stress on organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and job performance. A total of 170 questionnaires were distributed among auditors in the audit institutions in Tehran and Mashhad. To test the hypotheses, path analysis and structural equation and regression were employed. The results showed that the job stress had a negative effect on organizational commitment and job satisfaction and there was not a negative correlation between job...

  11. A Stress and Coping Approach to Intervention with Abused Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bonnie E.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an ecological model of intervention for physical abuse based on the Lazarus and Folkman conceptualization of stress and coping. Claims that the model identifies the stages that abused women may experience in their appraisal of the abuse experience. Focuses on barriers to ending abuse, stress and coping, and effective interventions. (RJM)

  12. Stress, Coping and Suicide Ideation in Chinese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Wang, Haiping; Xia, Yan; Liu, Xiaohong; Jung, Eunju

    2012-01-01

    The study was to examine 1) whether stress and coping styles could significantly predict the probability of suicide ideation; 2) and whether coping styles were mediators or moderators on the association between life stress and suicide ideation. The survey was conducted in a sample of 671 Chinese college students. Approximately twenty percent…

  13. Health Education Strategies for Coping with Academic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the significance of health education strategies for coping with academic stress. Comprehensive health education strategies for coping with academic stress can help students obtain the greatest benefits from education and become healthy and productive adults .One child out of four has an emotional, social,…

  14. Occupational Stress and Coping Behaviours Among Dentists in Kerman, Iran

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pouradeli, Shiva; Shahravan, Arash; Eskandarizdeh, Ali; Rafie, Forozan; Hashemipour, Maryam A

    2016-01-01

    .... This cross-sectional study was carried out from April to December 2014. A modified version of the Occupational Stress Indicator questionnaire was used to assess causes of stress and coping behaviours among 142 general dentists in Kerman, Iran...

  15. Job Stress among Iranian Prison Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Akbari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to job stress causes deleterious effects on physical and mental health of employees and productivity of organizations.Objective: To study work-related stressors among employees of prisons of Ilam, western Iran.Methods: In a cross-sectional study conducted from July to October 2013, 177 employees of Ilam prisons and security-corrective measures organization were enrolled in this study. The UK Health and Safety Executive Organization 35-item questionnaire for assessment of occupational stress was used to determine job stress among the studied employees.Results: Job stress was highest among employees of “correction and rehabilitation center” of Ilam province followed by “Dalab vocational training center.” There was no significant relationship between occupational stress and age, work experience, level of education, marital status, sex of employees, and obesity.Conclusion: Employees of prisons, for their nature of job and work environment, are exposed to high level of occupational stress.

  16. Insomnia management for ageing employees with job stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roja I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Latvia, the number of aging employees suffering from sleep disorders caused by job stress and poor sleep hygiene is increasing. The non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment is prescribed for these employees in the sleep management. The aim of this research is to clarify the efficiency of using psychotherapy with learning and observing sleep hygiene, combined with the melatonergic drug during a six-week treatment course applied to 25 both male and female intellectual workers over 65 years suffering from insomnia caused by job stress. For the patients representing Group “A” cognitive hypnotherapy, intervention for improving coping with job stress and usage of the melatonergic drug was prescribed, while Group “B” patients received six weeks only drug. The severity of depressive episodes in employees was measured by Montgomery- Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, the level of anxiety was assessed by use Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The results of the research show that insomnia patterns disappeared for 75% of women and 80% of men employees in Group A, but in Group B individuals, – only for 20% of women employees. The results acquired let concluding that the six-week treatment – cognitive hypnotherapy combined with melatonergic drug – is an effective treatment for aging workers suffering from sleep disorders.

  17. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R. Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-01-01

    We live in a time of increasing terror, stress, and trauma, and yet humans show a remarkable ability to cope under high stress states. How the brain supports such active resilient coping is not well-understood. Findings showed high stress levels are accompanied by dynamic brain signals in circuits representing the stress reaction, adaptation, and behavioral control responses. In addition, a ventromedial prefrontal cortical region showed initial decreases in brain activation, but then mobilize...

  18. Relationship between Organizational Climate, Job Stress and Job Performance Officer at State Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suandi, Turiman; Ismail, Ismi Arif; Othman, Zulfadli

    2014-01-01

    This research aims at finding out the relationship between Organizational Climate, job stress and job performance among State Education Department (JPN) officers . The focus of the research is to determine the job performance of state education department officers, level of job stress among the officers, level of connection between organizational…

  19. Teachers' Collective Efficacy, Job Satisfaction, and Job Stress in Cross-Cultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Usher, Ellen L.; Bong, Mimi

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how teachers' collective efficacy (TCE), job stress, and the cultural dimension of collectivism are associated with job satisfaction for 500 teachers from Canada, Korea (South Korea or Republic of Korea), and the United States. Multigroup path analysis revealed that TCE predicted job satisfaction across settings. Job stress was…

  20. Elementary Resource Room Teachers' Job Stress and Job Satisfaction in Taoyuan County, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-Wen; Ren, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    Background: Job satisfaction and job stress have been shown to be consistently related in a range of school education studies. The purpose of this research was to investigate how well the job satisfaction of resource room teachers in Taiwan may be predicted through an understanding of their job stress and demographic characteristics. Method: A…

  1. Effects of a stress management program for hospital staffs on their coping strategies and interpersonal behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Taniguchi, Toshiyo; Tsuchiya, Masao; Kawakami, Norito

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined effects of a 3-h stress management program for Japanese hospital staffs that included relaxation and assertion training. Twenty-seven hospital staffs (mean age: 29.4 yr) in a stress management group and 28 hospital staffs (mean age: 29.5 yr) in a wait-list group answered evaluation surveys at both pre- and post-intervention. Self-administered questionnaires including items on job stress, coping strategies, and interpersonal behaviors were evaluated. The stress management program was given six different participant groups: 3 groups were the stress management group and 3 groups were the wait-list group. The program increased active coping and decreased dependent behavior scores significantly in the stress management group, while decreasing assertive behavior scores in the wait-list group. A comparison of the education sub-groups showed that the first group had significantly increased assertiveness and decreased dependency scores. The second group had significantly decreased depression-anxiety scores. The data analyzed for men and women separately showed the stress management intervention significantly improved active coping and assertive behavior in men and dependent behavior in women. A brief one-time stress management program can be effective in improving active coping and assertive behaviors as well as reducing dependent behavior in hospital staffs. Sex differences were noteworthy.

  2. Correlation between stress, stress-coping and current sleep bruxism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raab Wolfgang HM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress is discussed as a potential factor in the development of sleep bruxism (SB. The aim of this study was to investigate whether specific stress-factors correlate with SB-activity. Methods Sixty-nine subjects, of which 48 were SB-patients, completed three German questionnaires assessing different stress-parameters and stress-coping-strategies: Short questionnaire for recognition of stress-factors (Kurzer Fragebogen zur Erfassung von Belastungen, KFB, Questionnaire for recuperation and strain (Erholungs-Belastungs-Fragebogen, EBF-24 A/3 and the stress-coping questionnaire (Stressverarbeitungsfragebogen-78, SVF-78. The diagnosis of SB was based on the clinical criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM. The degree of SB-activity was measured by the Bruxcore-Bruxism-Monitoring-Device (BBMD, Bruxcore, Boston, USA, worn for five consecutive nights and analyzed using a computer-based method. Non-parametric Spearman correlation coefficients, rho, were calculated between the psychometric data and the amount of SB-activity measured by a pixel score of the BBMD. Results Significant correlations were found for 'daily problems' (r = 0.461, p Conclusions Within the limitations of this study it could be shown that subjects with high SB-activity tend to feel more stressed at work and in their daily life, which in turn might influence their physical state. These subjects also seem to deal with stress in a negative way. However, due to the rather low to almost moderate correlation coefficients and the descriptive character of the study, further investigations are necessary to examine a possible causal relationship.

  3. Stressors and coping mechanisms associated with perceived stress in Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Sasha M; Gavin, Jennifer K; Diaz, Vanessa A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between causes of perceived stress and the coping mechanisms used by Latino adults with perceived stress. This cross-sectional survey was conducted on a convenience sample of 200 Latino adults (aged ≥18 years). They were recruited from clinics, migrant camps, community events, and churches located in Charleston, S.C. This survey included questions regarding causes of perceived stress, perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale 10), coping mechanisms (Brief COPE), and depression (Perceived Health Questionnaire 9). High perceived stress (PSS ≥15) was the primary outcome measure. Coping mechanisms and stressors were secondary outcomes. Most (92%) of the sample was born outside the United States, and 66% reported high perceived stress. Stressors associated with high perceived stress included discrimination (P=.0010), lack of insurance (P=.0193), health problems (P=.0058), and lack of money (P=.0015). The most frequently utilized coping mechanisms were self-distraction (54.77%), active coping (69.85%), positive reframing (56.78%), planning (63.82%), acceptance (57.87%), and religion (57.79%). Latinos with higher perceived stress were more likely to report discrimination (OR: 3.401; 95%CI 1.285-9.004) and health problems (OR: 2.782; 95%CI 1.088-7.111) as stressors, and to use denial as a coping mechanism (OR: 2.904; 95%CI 1.280-6.589). An increased prevalence of perceived stress among the Latinos evaluated in this study was associated with using denial as a coping mechanism, and encountering discrimination and health problems as sources of perceived stress. Most individuals responded to stressors by utilizing a variety of both adaptive and maladaptive coping mechanisms.

  4. Job Stress and Job Satisfaction among Health-Care Workers of Endoscopy Units in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seung-Joo; Chun, Hoon Jai; Moon, Jeong Seop; Park, Sung Chul; Hwang, Young-Jae; Yoo, In Kyung; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-05-01

    The management of job-related stress among health-care workers is critical for the improvement of healthcare services; however, there is no existing research on endoscopy unit workers as a team. Korea has a unique health-care system for endoscopy unit workers. In this study, we aimed to estimate job stress and job satisfaction among health-care providers in endoscopy units in Korea. We performed a cross-sectional survey of health-care providers in the endoscopy units of three university-affiliated hospitals in Korea. We analyzed the job stress levels by using the Korean occupational stress scale, contributing factors, and job satisfaction. Fifty-nine workers completed the self-administered questionnaires. The job stress scores for the endoscopy unit workers (46.39±7.81) were relatively lower compared to those of the national sample of Korean workers (51.23±8.83). Job stress differed across job positions, with nurses showing significantly higher levels of stress (48.92±7.97) compared to doctors (42.59±6.37). Job stress and job satisfaction were negatively correlated with each other (R (2) =0.340, pstress and job satisfaction significantly differ according to job positions. Job demand, insufficient job control, and job insecurity are the most important stressors in the endoscopy unit.

  5. Stressing factors and coping strategies used by oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Andrea Bezerra; Chaves, Eliane Corrêa

    2008-01-01

    In the oncology specialty, many factors can result in occupational stress in nursing professionals. As an attempt to controlling this situation, individuals may use coping strategies. Coping is a cognitive and behavioral effort one uses to face a stressful situation. The aims of this study were to identify the stressful factors regarding oncology nurses, and to verify what coping strategies they use. Two questionnaires were used: a demographic data inventory, designed by the researcher, and the Folkman and Lazarus coping strategies inventory. The results showed that the main stressful factors for oncology nurses are patient death (28.6%), emergency situations (16.9%), relationship issues with the nursing team (15.5%), and work-process situations (15.5%). In the studied population, the main coping strategy used was positive reappraisal.

  6. Job satisfaction and Job stress among various employees of tertiary care level hospital in central Uttar Pradesh, India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruchi Yadav; Dhiraj Kumar Srivastava; Sanjeev Yadav; Sandip Kumar; Pankaj Kumar Jain; Sachin Gupta

    2017-01-01

    ...: To study the relationship between job satisfaction and job stress among various employees of tertiary care level hospital and to find the co-relates of job stress and job satisfaction. Materials & Methods...

  7. [Coping with stress and pain in migraine patients.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornmann, M; Schneeberg-Kirchner, S; Weber, H

    1989-12-01

    During a semi-structured interview 82 migraine patients were asked biographical and illnessrelated questions. They completed psychological instruments on coping behavior (Stressverarbeitungsfragebogen), self-concept (Frankfurter Selbstkonzeptskalen), attributional style (IE-SV-F), illness behavior, and illness-related attributions (Tübinger Attributions-fragebogen). The theoretical background of this research is a cognitive model of coping with stress and illness. The results support the interrelations between coping with stress and coping with illness assumed in the model. They justify considering coping with illness to be scopespecific coping behavior. Furthermore, the results emphasize the importance of cognitive processes for stress-coping in general, as well as for illness-related coping behavior. With regard to personality variables, migraineurs, as compared with healthy persons, show to a larger extent coping strategies that are apt to maintain rather than to reduce stress, such as resignation, withdrawal, and avoidance behavior. They also have a more unfavorable selfconcept of achievement, emotional stability and selfassertiveness, lower self-esteem and a more external pattern of causal attributions. Some of the pain behavior strategies could be identified as being focused on illness (guarding behavior, avoidance and social withdrawal, resignation and complaint); only the attempt to relax is regarded as being focused on health. Migraine patients show a preference neither for medical nor psychological causal attributions of their illness but score significantly higher on medical than psychological control attributions. The results have implications for psychological therapy.

  8. Current Perspectives on Job-Stress Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnentag, S.E.; Ganster, D.C.; Perrewe, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    For decades, researchers have examined the job stressors and their outcomes for individuals and organizations. However, until now we know only little about the processes that reduce and reverse the effects of the stress process. This volume aims at filling this gap in the literature by focusing on p

  9. Current Perspectives on Job-Stress Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnentag, S.E.; Ganster, D.C.; Perrewe, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    For decades, researchers have examined the job stressors and their outcomes for individuals and organizations. However, until now we know only little about the processes that reduce and reverse the effects of the stress process. This volume aims at filling this gap in the literature by focusing on

  10. Coping With Stress Strategies in HIV-infected Iranian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Maryam; Dehdari, Tahereh; Shojaeezadeh, Davoud; Abbasian, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Stress has significant adverse impacts on health outcomes of HIV-infected patients. Our study explored coping with stress strategies by HIV-infected Iranian patients. A qualitative content analysis study was conducted at the Consultation Clinic of HIV at the Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran in 2012. Twenty-six semi-structured in-depth interviews were done. Participants were asked about coping strategies for stress. After the first interview, continuous analysis of data was started and continued up to data saturation. Results showed that participants used two categories of strategies (emotion-based coping and problem-based coping) to cope with stress. Emotion-based coping had two sub-themes: adaptive and maladaptive. The problem-based coping category had three sub-themes: participation in education sessions, adherence to medication, and efforts to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Explanations of different strategies available to HIV-infected patients to cope with stress may help develop tailored interventions to improve the psychological conditions of people living with HIV.

  11. Coping, stress and suicide ideation in the South African Police Services in the Eastern Cape / René Meyer

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, René

    2002-01-01

    The suicide rate in the South African Police Services is relatively high compared with other suicide statistics. The objective of this study was to investigate relationships between coping, stress and suicide ideation within the SAPS in the Eastern Cape. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population consisted of 307 uniformed police members from the job level of constable to that of senior superintendent in the Eastern Cape. The COPE Questionnaire, Police Stres...

  12. Exploring Stress and Coping Among Urban African American Adolescents: The Shifting the Lens Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Chandra, DrPH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Stress can have a significant effect on an adolescent's long-term physical and mental well-being. An understanding of the role of unmanaged stress during early adolescence is critical for the prevention of chronic diseases such as depression. The purpose of the Shifting the Lens study was to explore perceptions of stress, sources of social support, and use of coping strategies among urban African American ninth graders. Methods A youth-driven, mixed-method approach was used to assess teens’ perceptions of stress. During the 2001–2002 school year, teen participants (N = 26 from East Baltimore, Md, completed questionnaires, audio journals, pile-sort activities, and personal social support network maps. Results In contrast with existing literature that emphasizes the influence of violence and neighborhood factors on stress among teens, teens prioritized other sources of stress, particularly from school, friends, and family. For support, they relied on different individuals, depending on the source of the stress — friends for romantic relationship stress and family for job, school, and family stress. Sex differences in the coping styles of the participating teens were found. Girls reported more frequent use of support-seeking and active coping strategies than boys. Conclusion The use of multiple data collection strategies to explore stress uniquely contributes to our understanding of how one group of teens perceives and copes with stress. Future research should explore stress from the youth perspective in communities that are similar to East Baltimore, Md. In addition, programmatic recommendations include the need for sex-specific stress management activities and education about youth stress for adults. Community participatory translation interventions based on study findings, such as a youth-produced video and a resource guide for youth service providers, were implemented.

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF JOB STRESS AND COMPENSATION TO JOB SATISFACTION AT PT. TRI MEGAH MAKMUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut R Sudiarditha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research are: 1 To know description and how picture level job stress, compensation and job satisfaction at PT Tri Megah Makmur. 2 To know the influence of job stress tojob satisfaction at PT Tri Megah Makmur. 3 To know the influence of compensation to job satisfaction at PT Tri Megah Makmur. 4 To know empirically the influence of job stress and compensation tojob satisfaction at PT Tri Megah Makmur. 5 To know how far the contribution of job stress and compensation to job satisfaction at PT Tri Megah Makmur. This research is using descriptive and explanatory survey analysis. This research is taken to 70 sales employees at PT Tri Megah Makmur, While the data collection technique was carried out by spreading kuisioner, which are then processed using SPSS versi 21.00.The analysis shows that: 1 level of compensation and job satisfaction are on a lower level, while the job stress are high. 2Job stress have negative effects and significantly on job satisfaction. 3 compensation have positive effect and significantly on job satisfaction. 4 job stress and compensation significantly influence on job satisfaction.

  14. Influence of health on job-search behavior and re-employment: the role of job-search cognitions and coping resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, B E; Schuring, M; van Lenthe, F J; Burdorf, A

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the influence of poor health on job-search behavior and re-employment, and the mediating role of job-search cognitions and coping resources. A prospective study was conducted among unemployed persons receiving social security benefits in the Netherlands (n = 510). Self-rated health, self-esteem, mastery, job-search cognitions, and the intention to search for a job were measured at baseline. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate determinants of job-search behavior during a follow-up period of 6 months. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to investigate the influence of health, job-search cognitions and coping resources on re-employment during a mean follow-up period of 23 months. Persons with poor health were less likely to search for paid employment (OR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.39-0.85) and were also less likely to find paid employment (HR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.39-0.89). Persons with a positive attitude toward job-search, high perceived social pressure to look for a job, high job-search self-efficacy and high job-search intention were more likely to search actively and also to actually find paid employment. Adjustment for job-search cognitions and coping reduced the influence of health on active search behavior by 50 % and on re-employment by 33 %. Health-related differences in job-search behavior and re-employment can be partly explained by differences in coping, job-search attitude, self-efficacy, and subjective norms towards job-search behavior. Measures to reduce the negative impact of poor health on re-employment should address the interplay of health with job-search cognitions and coping resources.

  15. Stress coping style does not determine social status, but influences the consequences of social subordination stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Gretha J; Smeltzer, Michael D; Scott, Karen A; Scheurink, Anton J; Tamashiro, Kellie L; Sakai, Randall R

    2017-01-06

    Chronic stress exposure may have negative consequences for health. One of the most common sources of chronic stress is stress associated with social interaction. In rodents, the effects of social stress can be studied in a naturalistic way using the visual burrow system (VBS). The way an individual copes with stress, their "stress coping style", may influence the consequences of social stress. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that stress coping style may modulate social status and influence the consequences of having a lower social status. We formed 7 VBS colonies, with 1 proactive coping male, 1 passive coping male, and 4 female rats per colony to assess whether a rat's coping style prior to colony formation could predict whether that individual is more likely to become socially dominant. The rats remained in their respective colonies for 14days and the physiological and behavioral consequences of social stress were assessed. Our study shows that stress coping style does not predict social status. However, stress coping style may influence the consequences of having a lower social status. Subordinate passive and proactive rats had distinctly different wound patterns; proactive rats had more wounds on the front of their bodies. Behavioral analysis confirmed that proactive subordinate rats engaged in more offensive interactions. Furthermore, subordinate rats with a proactive stress coping style had larger adrenals, and increased stress responsivity to a novel acute stressor (restraint stress) compared to passive subordinate rats or dominant rats, suggesting that the allostatic load may have been larger in this group.

  16. Psychological stress and coping in recently discharged postsurgical cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Taniguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cancer patients and survivors need to cope with various stressful situations and problems even after treatment. In this study, we sought to investigate psychological stress and coping in recently discharged postsurgical cancer patients. Methods: A mail-in questionnaire survey about stress response, perceived illness-related demands, and coping strategies and styles was administered to postsurgical Japanese cancer patients. The questionnaires were returned a week after the patients′ discharge from the hospital. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical analyses were used. Results: Forty-two patients completed the questionnaire; their average age was 58.1 years, and 61.9% were female. The stress response scale-18 (SRS-18 score was lower than that reported among the general population. The proportion of patients who were concentrating coping on social support or positive reappraisal was high. The scores for problem- and emotion-focused coping were nearly identical. SRS-18 scores were weakly correlated with those for emotion-focused coping (r = 0.38, P = 0.014. The demographic data were not significantly associated with any of the stress or coping variables. However, SRS-18 scores for patients who had adjuvant therapy and physical, functional disorders were significantly higher than those for patients who did not (P = 0.004 and P = 0.008, respectively. Conclusions: Most of the patients had a low-stress response and used appropriate coping strategies. However, the findings suggest that attention must be paid to stress-coping in patients who have a physical, functional disorder as well as in those receiving adjuvant therapy.

  17. Coping with occupational stress: the role of optimism and coping flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed DJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Reed Department of Psychology, Sheffield Hallam University, Collegiate Campus, Sheffield, UK Abstract: The current study aimed at measuring whether coping flexibility is a reliable and valid construct in a UK sample and subsequently investigating the association between coping flexibility, optimism, and psychological health – measured by perceived stress and life satisfaction. A UK university undergraduate student sample (N=95 completed an online questionnaire. The study is among the first to examine the validity and reliability of the English version of a scale measuring coping flexibility in a Western population and is also the first to investigate the association between optimism and coping flexibility. The results revealed that the scale had good reliability overall; however, factor analysis revealed no support for the existing two-factor structure of the scale. Coping flexibility and optimism were found to be strongly correlated, and hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the interaction between them predicted a large proportion of the variance in both perceived stress and life satisfaction. In addition, structural equation modeling revealed that optimism completely mediated the relationship between coping flexibility and both perceived stress and life satisfaction. The findings add to the occupational stress literature to further our understanding of how optimism is important in psychological health. Furthermore, given that optimism is a personality trait, and consequently relatively stable, the study also provides preliminary support for the potential of targeting coping flexibility to improve psychological health in Western populations. These findings must be replicated, and further analyses of the English version of the Coping Flexibility Scale are needed. Keywords: stress management, psychological health, student stress, life satisfaction, organizations

  18. Stress and Coping Mechanisms Among Breast Cancer Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stress and Coping Mechanisms Among Breast Cancer Patients and Family ... It is also the leading cause of cancer mortality, representing 14.1%. ... to cancer and the last 4 on experiences of family members on care of the terminally ill.

  19. Tips for Coping: The Music Educator and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radocy, Rudolf E.; Heller, George N.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses sources of stress for music teachers and offers tips for coping with it. Relaxation exercises, physical exercise, and a change of environment are recommended. Teachers should realistically assess their abilities and career prospects. (AM)

  20. EFL Foreign Teacher Stress in Korea: Causes and Coping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Gregory C.

    2007-01-01

    Survey study of 53 foreign EFL teachers in Jeonju City, South Korea looks at causes of teacher stress and coping mechanisms between the years of 2004 and 2006. Results show foreign EFL teachers report moderate levels of stress and attribute stresses in roughly equal measures to student misbehavior and school director/administrative sources. Survey…

  1. Job stress and mental health among nonregular workers in Korea: What dimensions of job stress are associated with mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Kyung; Rhee, Min-Kyoung; Barak, Michàlle Mor

    2016-01-01

    Although nonregular workers experience higher job stress, poorer mental health, and different job stress dimensions relative to regular workers, little is known about which job stress dimensions are associated with poor mental health among nonregular workers. This study investigated the association between job stress dimensions and mental health among Korean nonregular workers. Data were collected from 333 nonregular workers in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province, and logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results of the study indicated that high job insecurity and lack of rewards had stronger associations with poor mental health than other dimensions of job stress when controlling for sociodemographic and psychosocial variables. It is important for the government and organizations to improve job security and reward systems to reduce job stress among nonregular workers and ultimately alleviate their mental health issues.

  2. Psychotherapeutic Methods of Coping with Stress in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol TURAN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress is an inevitable part of life. Knowing the ways of coping with stress are necessary to preserve our mental and physical health and to maintain good social and/or occupational func-tioning in daily life activities. Different ways of coping with stress have been developed throughout history. Various type of therapies offer quite effective remedies for coping with stress in everyday life. Among psychotherapeutic treatments cognitive behavioral therapy which involves teaching stressful individuals to develop coping strategies have yielded very promising results. It is helpful to determine first whether stress source can be changed, several therapeutic approaches may then be used. Lazarus and Folkman have identified two major approaches for coping with stress so-called “problem-focused” and “emotion-focused”. In “problem-focused” approaches targets are acquiring time management, self-monitoring, prob-lem-solving skills, while in “emotion-focused” approaches, through ways of accepting or re-jecting of stress associated negative emotions, or reconciling with these emotions, the target is learning how to keep emotions under control. “Problem-focused” and “emotion-focused” approaches may independently be used effectively in appropriate cases, their simultaneous practice may increase chances of successful treatment. Apart from these methods, psychody-namic therapy may be indicated in some cases

  3. Newcomers in organisational entry coping with early job experiences

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    L. D. Breackell

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available In making sense of a new situation, individuals rely on a number of inputs. The present study investigates two such inputs: the role that past experience plays in helping the newcomer to cope with current situations, and the extent to which more general personal characteristics play a role in the sense-making process. The relationship between personality and situational variables and coping resources was studied in a large financial organisation. A group of new employees was studied during their first six months with the organisation. Theoretical material is presented which indicates that processes occur by which individuals detect and interpret surprises. Opsomming Om sin uit te maak in 'n nuwe situasie vertrou mense dikwels op 'n aantal insette. In die studie wat hier gerapporteer word, word twee suike insette ondersoek: die rol wat vorige ondervinding speel om die nuweling te help in die hantering van bestaande situasies, en die mate waartoe algemeen persoonlike eienskappe 'n rol speel in die sinmakende proses. Die verwantskap tussen persoonlikheid en situasieveranderlikes met aanpassingshulpbronne is in 'n groot finansiele organisasie ondersoek. 'n Groep nuwe werknemers is gedurende die eerste ses maande na hul diensaanvaarding waargeneem. Die resultate dui aan dat daar prosesse bestaan waarmee individuele verassings opgespoor en geinterpreteer word.

  4. Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus Montero-Marin; Javier Prado-Abril; Marcelo Marcos Piva Demarzo; Santiago Gascon; Javier García-Campayo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burnout occurs when professionals use ineffective coping strategies to try to protect themselves from work-related stress. The dimensions of 'overload', 'lack of development' and 'neglect', belonging to the 'frenetic', 'under-challenged' and 'worn-out' subtypes, respectively, comprise a brief typological definition of burnout. The aim of the present study was to estimate the explanatory power of the different coping strategies on the development of burnout subtypes. METHODS: This ...

  5. Association among Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders, Job Stress, and Job Attitude of Occupational Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the associations among work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), job stress, and job attitude of occupational therapists in South Korea. Self-reporting questionnaires were distributed to 150 occupational therapists. Of the 128 occupational therapists who responded, 110 (85.9%) reported WMSDs affecting at least one body site. The most affected WMSDs site was the low back (26.8%), and the most reported number of body site affected by WMSDs was one (53.9%). As a result, there were significant differences in job stress and job attitude depending on the age, work experience, working hour, presence or absence of WMSDs, and number of site of pain. Factors influencing job attitude included job stress, the presence or absence of WMSDs and duration of pain. The results showed that the occurrence of WMSDs in occupational therapists was associated with increased job stress and negative job attitude.

  6. Job stress and satisfaction among clinical radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, J.; Ramirez, A.J.; Field, S.; Richards, M.A

    2000-03-01

    AIMS: Consultant radiologists appear to be at greater risk of burnout than consultants working in other specialties. The aim of this study was to examine sources of stress and satisfaction at work for radiologists and hospital consultants in other specialties in order to try to understand this difference. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A postal questionnaire survey of psychiatric morbidity (12-item General Health Questionnaire), burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and sources of job stress and satisfaction (study-specific questionnaires) was carried out among a random sample of 882 hospital consultants working in radiology and three other specialties (surgery, gastroenterology and oncology). RESULTS: The most stressful aspect of work for radiologists was work overload. Inadequacies in current staffing and facilities and concerns about funding were also major sources of stress, as were impositions made on radiologists by other clinicians. The most important sources of satisfaction for radiologists were their relationships with patients and being perceived to do their job well by colleagues. Importantly, radiologists reported less satisfaction than the other specialists from many of the aspects of work measured. A greater proportion of radiologists than other specialists felt insufficiently trained in communication skills [80% (n = 168) vs 47% (n = 310);P < 0.001] and management skills [84% (n = 179) vs 76% (n = 506);P < 0.05]. CONCLUSION: These data highlight aspects of radiologists' work which need to be tackled in order to reduce their stress and increase their satisfaction, and thereby their risk of burnout. Graham, J. (2000)

  7. Primary School Principals' Job Satisfaction and Occupational Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmody, Merike; Smyth, Emer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors associated with occupational stress and job satisfaction among Irish primary school principals. A principal's job has become increasingly demanding and complex in recent decades. However, there is little current research into their levels of stress and job satisfaction, particularly…

  8. Primary School Principals' Job Satisfaction and Occupational Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmody, Merike; Smyth, Emer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors associated with occupational stress and job satisfaction among Irish primary school principals. A principal's job has become increasingly demanding and complex in recent decades. However, there is little current research into their levels of stress and job satisfaction, particularly…

  9. Occupational Stress and Burnouts as Predictors of Job Satisfaction Amongst Lawyers in District Sangli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Kriti A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practice of law is a high prestige, high skill, high income and high stress profession. The present study was conducted to find out the role of stressors on mental well being of the lawyers. Objectives: To study the occupational stress amongst the lawyers and to examine the correlates of job satisfaction in them, and to study the gender difference (if any of stress and job satisfaction. Also to study the association between levels of stress and substance abuse disorders. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in Dist. Court Sangli, which involved collection of data using predesigned proforma. By using Systematic Random sampling technique, out of total 240 lawyers 120(76 males and 44 females were interviewed. Presumptive Stress Life Event Scale (PSLES was used as a validated screening tool to calculate their Mental Stress Score. The level of Job Satisfaction was scored by 3 point scaling system taking 10 independent variables as the predictors of job satisfaction. Data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Results: 88.3% lawyers had experienced stress. The female lawyers had high Mean Mental Stress Score. 81.8% female lawyers had high Job satisfaction Score i.e. low Job satisfaction. 52.8% of the male lawyers having stress reported substance abuse disorders. Conclusion: The female lawyers experience significantly greater stress and burnouts as compared to males. Job satisfaction is significantly and negatively correlated with stress. The need of the hour is to make an effort in coping with stress amongst lawyers. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(2.000: 141-144

  10. The web of coping resources and pathways to reemployment following a job loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Amiram D; Schul, Yaacov

    2002-01-01

    Structural equation modeling analyses of data from 2 longitudinal community studies of recently laid-off workers examined the interrelationships and pathways from personal coping resources to job-search intensity and the extent and quality of reemployment at 2 follow-ups (at 6 months and at 12 or 24 months). In both studies, the proposed models for predicting reemployment and reemployment quality provided a good fit to the data with the same pattern of results, which demonstrated that job-search motivation increased reemployment at all follow-ups but did not affect reemployment quality. At both the 6- and 12-month follow-ups, level of depressive symptoms decreased the extent and quality of reemployment. The results also highlighted the dual role of financial strain, which on the one hand facilitates reemployment by increasing job-search motivation and job-search intensity and on the other hand inhibits it by increasing depressive symptoms.

  11. Relationship Between Organizational Climate, Job Stress And Job Performance Officer At State Education Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turiman Suandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at finding out the relationship between Organizational Climate, job stress and job performance among State Education Department (JPN officers . The focus of the research is to determeane the job performance of state education department officers, level of job stress among the officers, level of connection between organizational climate with job stress of State Education Department officers, looking at the difference in level of performance according to demographic factors and looking at the influence of organizational climate and job stress towards job performance . Research findings pertaining level of job performance showed that 75.8% of the respondents are at a high level, 23.7% respondents are at a moderate level while 0.5% respondents are at a low level. For organizational climate, findings show that 79.0% respondents are in the moderate level, 1.6 % respondents are at a highlevel and 19.4% respondents are at a low level. Findings on overall level of job stress found that as many as 92.5% respondents are at a normal job stress. Only about 7.5% respondents are at a moderate level of job stress. There is not even one respondent who are facing a high level of job stress.  In terms of the relationship between independent variables (organizational climate, job stress and dependent variable (job performance, the research findings show that there is a moderate level of positive relationship which is quite significant between organizational climate and job performance of the State Education Department officers at α = 0.01 (p < 0.01; r = 0.396.

  12. Investigating the effect of job stress and emotional intelligence on job performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Rafiee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and scholars of management and behavioral sciences have tried to determine effective factors, which influence on efficiency and effectiveness in order to increase organization performance and they have tried to identify factors, which create job stress. In this research, we investigate the effect of job stress on job performance through emotional, organizational and moral intelligence. The study is a descriptive-analytic one, which is based on correlation, uses survey method to gather data and they are analyzed using structural equation modeling. The population of this research includes all the personnel of Registry Organization in Arak city. The results suggest that job stress influences on job performance through organizational intelligence and moral intelligence, but job stress does not influence on job performance through emotional intelligence. Regarding research hypotheses, results and findings after analyzing obtained data suggest that job stress influences on emotional, organizational and moral intelligence, but job stress does not influence on job performance. In addition, the results show that organizational and moral intelligence influence on job performance but emotional intelligence does not influence on job performance.

  13. Coping with Daily Stress: The Role of Conscientiousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Carrie E.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined how specific coping strategies mediate the relationship between Conscientiousness (C) and positive affect (PA) in a large, multiethnic sample. Using an internet-based daily diary approach, 366 participants (37.6% Caucasian, 30.6% Asian American, 20.7% Hispanic, 9.1% African American) completed measures that assessed daily stressors, coping strategies used to deal with those stressors, and PA over the course of five days. In addition, participants completed a measure of the Five-Factor Model of Personality. Problem-Focused coping partially mediated the relationship between C and PA. Individuals higher in C used more problem-focused coping, which, in turn, was associated with higher PA. The findings of the current study suggest C serves as a protective factor from stress through its influence on coping strategy selection. Other possible mediators in the C-PA relationship are discussed. PMID:21076634

  14. Emotional Intelligence, Physical Activity and Coping with Stress in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Aziz Dawood A L S U D A N I

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Participation in physical activity seems to be connected with better coping with stress and higher level emotional intelligence. The aim of the study is to check if there are any significant correlations between emotional intelligence, physical activity and style focused on the task in coping with stress. The sample was made by 90 adolesc ents, aged from 19 - 21 from Psychology department at University of Szczecin. To check the level of emotional inteligence was used polish version of Emotional Intelligence Questionaire. To check te level of physical activity was used s hort form of Internati onal Physical Activity Questionaire. To find out what kind of style is used by adolescents with coping with stress was used Polish version of Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. There were signifficant correlations between physical activity an d task oriented coping, avoidance, social diversion, emotional intelligence (p<0.05. Regression analyses showed that task oriented coping and social diversion are predictors of physical activity. Results of one way Anova showed that the task - oriented copi ng, social diversion, walking, moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity, physical actrivity (in MET/min, emotional intelligence, identifying emotions and using emotions in practice of the high PA group were significantly higher (p<0.05 than in t he low PA group.

  15. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-08-02

    Active coping underlies a healthy stress response, but neural processes supporting such resilient coping are not well-known. Using a brief, sustained exposure paradigm contrasting highly stressful, threatening, and violent stimuli versus nonaversive neutral visual stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we show significant subjective, physiologic, and endocrine increases and temporally related dynamically distinct patterns of neural activation in brain circuits underlying the stress response. First, stress-specific sustained increases in the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, midbrain, right insula, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions supported the stress processing and reactivity circuit. Second, dynamic neural activation during stress versus neutral runs, showing early increases followed by later reduced activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), left DLPFC, hippocampus, and left insula, suggested a stress adaptation response network. Finally, dynamic stress-specific mobilization of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC), marked by initial hypoactivity followed by increased VmPFC activation, pointed to the VmPFC as a key locus of the emotional and behavioral control network. Consistent with this finding, greater neural flexibility signals in the VmPFC during stress correlated with active coping ratings whereas lower dynamic activity in the VmPFC also predicted a higher level of maladaptive coping behaviors in real life, including binge alcohol intake, emotional eating, and frequency of arguments and fights. These findings demonstrate acute functional neuroplasticity during stress, with distinct and separable brain networks that underlie critical components of the stress response, and a specific role for VmPFC neuroflexibility in stress-resilient coping.

  16. Effects of Hospital Workers' Friendship Networks on Job Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung Yae; Lee, Sang Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This study attempted to identify the sources of job stress according to job position and investigate how friendship networks affect job stress. Questionnaires based on The Health Professions Stress Inventory (HPSI) developed by Wolfgang experienced by healthcare providers were collected from 420 nurses, doctors and radiological technologists in two general hospitals in Korea by a multistage cluster sampling method. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effects of friendship networks on job stress after controlling for other factors. The severity of job stress differed according to level of job demands (p = .006); radiologic technologists experienced the least stress (45.4), nurses experienced moderate stress (52.4), and doctors experienced the most stress (53.6). Those with long-term friendships characterized by strong connections reported lower levels of stress than did those with weak ties to friends among nurses (1.3, p stress experienced by nurses (8.2, p stress (9.2, p stress. The strength and density of such friendship networks were related to job stress. Life information support from their friendship network was the primary positive contributor to control of job stress.

  17. Precompetitive achievement goals, stress appraisals, emotions, and coping among athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Adam R; Perry, John L; Calmeiro, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Grounded in Lazarus's (1991, 1999, 2000) cognitive-motivational-relational theory of emotions, we tested a model of achievement goals, stress appraisals, emotions, and coping. We predicted that precompetitive achievement goals would be associated with appraisals, appraisals with emotions, and emotions with coping in our model. The mediating effects of emotions among the overall sample of 827 athletes and two stratified random subsamples were also explored. The results of this study support our proposed model in the overall sample and the stratified subsamples. Further, emotion mediated the relationship between appraisal and coping. Mediation analyses revealed that there were indirect effects of pleasant and unpleasant emotions, which indicates the importance of examining multiple emotions to reveal a more accurate representation of the overall stress process. Our findings indicate that both appraisals and emotions are just as important in shaping coping.

  18. Cancer, acute stress disorder, and repressive coping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Zachariae, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Reaction Questionnaire, and repressive coping was assessed by a combination of scores from the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, and the Bendig version of the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale. Significantly fewer patients classified as "repressors" were diagnosed with ASD compared to patients...

  19. Exploring School Stress in Middle Childhood: Interpretations, Experiences, and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotardi, Valerie A.

    2017-01-01

    With increased academic and social challenges at school, middle childhood can be a particularly stressful time. The present study explored how a sample of children from a supportive learning environment interpreted, experienced and reported coping with everyday stress at school. Using a phenomenological approach, third graders attending an…

  20. Stress among UK Academics: Identifying Who Copes Best

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Mitra; Macaskill, Ann; Reidy, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    This article examined levels of stress and associated coping strategies among UK academics. Adopting a positive psychology approach, the influence of the character strengths of hope, optimism, gratitude and self-efficacy on stress, subjective well-being (SWB), and mental health was examined in 216 academics in a UK university. The study explored…

  1. Nursing Stress and Coping Patterns in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Beatrice K. M.; Lee, Peter W. H.

    The role of nurses in providing patient care is both instrumental and expressive. Fulfillment of these dual roles depends on the psychosocial and physical well-being of nurses. This study examined the stress experience of nurses in Hong Kong. Various factors affecting the experience of stress and the coping strategies adopted were also…

  2. Stress, Coping, and Internet Use of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatherage, Scott; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Aksoz, Idil

    2014-01-01

    College students experience stressful life events and little research exists on the role the Internet may play in students' coping. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine associations among perceived stress, time spent on the Internet, underlying motives for utilizing the Internet, problematic Internet use, and traditional…

  3. Exploring School Stress in Middle Childhood: Interpretations, Experiences, and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotardi, Valerie A.

    2017-01-01

    With increased academic and social challenges at school, middle childhood can be a particularly stressful time. The present study explored how a sample of children from a supportive learning environment interpreted, experienced and reported coping with everyday stress at school. Using a phenomenological approach, third graders attending an…

  4. Stress coping mechanisms in patients with chronic dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korabel, Hanna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The results of numerous studies of today confirm that persons suffering from psychosomatic disorders are not able to effectively cope with stress. The experience of stress is also frequently combined with the occurrence or aggravation of various skin diseases. The goal of our study was to identify the predominantways of coping with stress in the group of patients with chronic dermatoses.Methods. The group under study included patients receiving treatment in the Dermatology Clinic of Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University. They were either hospitalized patients or those who came for control examinations at the Outpatient Clinic. Evaluation of the forms of coping with stress was conducted with the help of the Endler and Parker Questionnaire – CISS.Results. They significantly more often apply the style of coping focused on avoiding (p-value= 0.0056. It also turned out that the patients in the dermatological groups manifested a constant tendency to get involved in vicarious activities (p-value=0.0247.Discussion. The results of the presented study indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the patients with dermatological disorders and those in the control group as regards their ways of coping with stress.Conclusion. The results obtained in the discussed study may be a starting point for designing a complex support for the patients with skin diseases. The therapeutic technique that may prove helpful for this group of patients is the cognitive-behavioral therapy (CTB.

  5. Temperament and stress coping styles in bronchial asthma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Piotr; Witusik, Andrzej; Wujcik, Radosław; Antczak, Adam; Pietras, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Temperament, defined as the formal characteristics of behavior, is a personality trait which can influence the clinical presentation and course of bronchial asthma. It determines susceptibility to stress as well as stress coping styles. Aim The aim of the study was to assess whether healthy subjects differ from bronchial asthma patients with regard to temperamental variables and stress coping styles, and whether these factors may also differentiate patients with severe asthma from those with the milder form. The study also assesses whether the results of flow volume curve analysis correlate with temperamental traits and stress coping styles. Material and methods The study was conducted in a group of 65 asthma patients and 62 healthy controls. All underwent flow volume curve examination and psychological tests: Formal Characteristics of Behavior – Temperament Inventory (FCB-TI) and Coping in Stress Situations (CISS) questionnaire. Results Bronchial asthma patients were characterized by a lower level of briskness (“agility”) than healthy subjects (13.35 ±4.48 vs. 14.97 ±3.98, p = 0.031). The remaining temperamental traits and stress coping styles did not differ between the groups. Additionally, the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) value was found to correlate negatively with the intensity of the emotion-oriented stress coping style, whereas FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) were found to positively correlate with briskness, emotional reactivity and endurance, while a negative correlation was found with activity. Conclusions Briskness differentiates healthy subjects from bronchial asthma patients. The values obtained in FEV1 and FVC pulmonary function tests were also found to correlate with some temperamental variables. PMID:28035226

  6. Job Stress and Burnout among Industrial and Technical Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ernest W.; McMahan, Jama

    2003-01-01

    This study examined job stress and burnout among a random sample of 133 industrial and technical teacher educators. The Job Stress Survey (JSS) developed by Spielberger and Vagg (1999) measured stress; the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) developed by Maslach and Jackson (1996) measured burnout. Stepwise multiple…

  7. The Maugeri Stress Index – reduced form: a questionnaire for job stress assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massidda, Davide; Giorgi, Ines; Vidotto, Giulio; Tringali, Salvatore; Imbriani, Marcello; Baiardi, Paola; Bertolotti, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction and objectives A multidimensional self-report questionnaire to evaluate job-related stress factors is presented. The questionnaire, called Maugeri Stress Index – reduced form (MASI-R), aims to assess the impact of job strain on a team or on a single worker by considering four domains: wellness, resilience, perception of social support, and reactions to stressful situations. Material and methods The reliability of a first longer version (47 items) of the questionnaire was evaluated by an internal consistency analysis and a confirmatory factor analysis. An item reduction procedure was implemented to obtain a short form of the instrument, and the psychometric properties of the resulting instrument were evaluated using the Rasch measurement model. Results A total of 14 items from the initial pool were deleted because they were not productive for measurement. The analysis of internal consistency led to the exclusion of eight items, while the analysis performed using structural equation models led to the exclusion of another six items. According to the Rasch model, item properties and the reliability of the instruments appear good, especially for the scales for wellness and resilience. In contrast, the scales for perception of social support and negative coping styles show a lower internal consistency. Conclusions The Maugeri Stress Index – reduced form provides a reliable and valid measure, useful for early identification of stress levels in workers or in a team along the eustress–vadistress continuum.

  8. Effects of Hospital Workers' Friendship Networks on Job Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Yae Shin

    Full Text Available This study attempted to identify the sources of job stress according to job position and investigate how friendship networks affect job stress.Questionnaires based on The Health Professions Stress Inventory (HPSI developed by Wolfgang experienced by healthcare providers were collected from 420 nurses, doctors and radiological technologists in two general hospitals in Korea by a multistage cluster sampling method. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effects of friendship networks on job stress after controlling for other factors.The severity of job stress differed according to level of job demands (p = .006; radiologic technologists experienced the least stress (45.4, nurses experienced moderate stress (52.4, and doctors experienced the most stress (53.6. Those with long-term friendships characterized by strong connections reported lower levels of stress than did those with weak ties to friends among nurses (1.3, p < .05 and radiological technologists (11.4, p < .01. The degree of cohesion among friends had a positive impact on the level of job stress experienced by nurses (8.2, p < .001 and radiological technologists (14.6, p < .1. Doctors who participated in workplace alumni meetings scored higher than those who did not. However, those who participated in alumni meetings outside the workplace showed the opposite tendency, scoring 9.4 (p < .05 lower than those who did not. The resources from their friendship network include both information and instrumental support. As most radiological technologists were male, their instrumental support positively affected their job stress (9.2, p < .05. Life information support was the primary positive contributor to control of nurses' (4.1, p < .05, radiological technologists' (8.0, p < .05 job stress.The strength and density of such friendship networks were related to job stress. Life information support from their friendship network was the primary positive contributor to control of job

  9. Personal and Job Related Predictors of Teacher Stress and Job Performance among School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Hanif

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to find out role of personal and job related variables in teacher stress and job performance of school teachers. Furthermore, levels and sources of stress and their relationship with job performance among teachers were also explored. The measures used in this study were indigenously developed i.e., Teacher Stress Inventory (TSI-Urdu, Teachers Job Performance Scale and personal and job related Information sheet. Two independent samples were selected from Government and Private Schools of Islamabad (Pakistan. Sample I was comprised of 400 teachers (men and women from Primary and secondary schools. For the evaluation of teachers’ job performance another sample of 1200 students from the classes of teachers of sample I was selected. Three students were randomly selected from each teacher’s class. The students were requested to evaluate their respective teachers’ job performance. The findings revealed that negative significant relationship exists between teachers stress and job performance. The step-wise regression analysis revealed school system, gender, job experience, number of family members, and number of students as significant predictors of teacher stress and gender, school system, family members, job experience and age as significant predictors of teachers’ job performance.

  10. The Coexistence of Coping Resources and Specific Coping Styles in Stress: Evidence from Full Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng; Wu, Qing; Zhu, Xia; Miao, Danmin; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Xi; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge of coping styles is useful in clinical diagnosis and suggesting specific therapeutic interventions. However, the latent structures and relationships between different aspects of coping styles have not been fully clarified. A full information item bifactor model will be beneficial to future research. Objective One goal of this study is identification of the best fit statistical model of coping styles. A second goal is entails extended analyses of latent relationships among different coping styles. In general, such research should offer greater understanding of the mechanisms of coping styles and provide insights into coping with stress. Methods Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ) and Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) were administrated to officers suffering from military stress. Confirmatory Factor Analyses was performed to indentify the best fit model. A hierarchical item response model (bifactor model) was adopted to analyze the data. Additionally, correlations among coping styles and self-efficacy were compared using both original and bifactor models. Results Results showed a bifactor model best fit the data. Item loadings on general and specific factors varied among different coping styles. All items loaded significantly on the general factor, and most items also had moderate to large loadings on specific factors. The correlation between coping styles and self-efficacy and the correlation among different coping styles changed significantly after extracting the general factor of coping stress using bifactor analysis. This was seen in changes from positive (r = 0.714, pstyles have a bifactor structure. They also provide direct evidence of coexisting coping resources and styles. This further clarifies that dimensions of coping styles should include coping resources and specific coping styles. This finding has implications for measurement of coping mechanisms, health maintenance, and stress reduction. PMID:24787952

  11. Stress and coping in Singaporean nurses: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joanne; Bogossian, Fiona; Ahern, Kathy

    2010-06-01

    Stress is ubiquitous in the nursing profession and is also prevalent in Asian countries, particularly the "four tigers of Asia": Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea. Based on the theoretical framework of Lazarus and Folkman (1984), the present review of the nursing literature aims to identify sources and effects of stress in Singaporean nurses and the coping strategies they use. Nurses reported major stressors including shortage of staff, high work demands and conflict at work. Common coping strategies included problem orientation, social support and relaxation techniques. Several studies reported nurses' intent to leave the profession. Recommendations to minimize the impact of stress include in-service programs to facilitate a problem-solving approach to resolving work-related issues such as conflict. Relaxation therapy and debriefing sessions may also help in reducing negative effects of work stressors. Finally, nurses' emotional coping can be enhanced by strengthening sources of social support, particularly from family.

  12. Coping with stress in adults with speech fluency disorders

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    Magdalena Pietraszek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Stuttering is a developmental speech disorder that affects the fluency of speech. Persons who stutter perceive speaking situations and social interactions as threatening. Participants and procedure Nineteen (47.50% adults with speech fluency disorders (SFD and 21 (52.50% without participated in the study. All participants completed the following measures individually: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS, and an informational survey. Results Our study confirmed that persons with SFD experience more stressful situations in life and feel greater anxiety, both as a trait and as a state, which influences their daily life. The negative affect experienced contributed to their preferred use of Emotion-Oriented Coping strategies, at the expense of more proactive Task-Oriented Coping. Experienced stress and anxiety influenced and consolidated their habitual stress coping styles, devoted mainly to dealing with negative emotions. Conclusions Stuttering affects daily activities, interpersonal relationships, and the quality of life. Therefore, professional support should include adaptive, task-oriented coping.

  13. A Daily Diary Study of Coping in the Context of the Job Demands-Control-Support Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Kevin; Harris, Claire

    2005-01-01

    We examined one of the processes thought to underpin Karasek and Theorell's job demands-control-support model (1990). This is that control and support accentuate better well-being by fostering problem-focused coping with work demands. We also examined whether other forms of coping implemented through control and support are related to indicators…

  14. Relationships between Job Stress and Worker Perceived Responsibilities and Job Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Jacobs

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have examined the relationship between perceived responsibilities by workers and job characteristics and experiences of stress.Objective: To examine the relationship between job stress and work responsibilities and job characteristics.Methods: We analyzed data from 2737 adults who were labor force participants in the province of Alberta, Canada. A logistic regression model was employed to examine factors associated with high job stress.Results: About 18% of the studied workers considered their job as being “highly stressful.” Workers who were male, did not consider their job a career or who were highly satisfied with their jobs were significantly less likely to identify their jobs as “highly stressful.” The probability of describing a job as “highly stressful” significantly increased as workers perceived their actions have an affect on those around them or when their jobs required additional or variable hours.Conclusion: A number of factors are associated with experiencing high work stress including being more engaged with work. This is an important finding for employers, offering insight into where interventions may be targeted.

  15. Spiritual stress and coping model of divorce: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrei, Elizabeth J; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2011-12-01

    This study represents the first longitudinal effort to use a spiritual stress and coping model to predict adults' psychosocial adjustment following divorce. A community sample of 89 participants completed measures at the time of their divorce and 1 year later. Though the sample endorsed slightly lower levels of religiosity than the general U.S. population, most reported spiritual appraisals and positive and negative religious coping tied to divorce. Hierarchical regression analyses controlling general religiousness and nonreligious forms of coping indicated that (a) appraising divorce as a sacred loss or desecration at the time it occurred predicted more depressive symptoms and dysfunctional conflict tactics with the ex-spouse 1 year later; (b) positive religious coping reported about the year following divorce predicted greater posttraumatic growth 1 year after divorce; and (c) negative religious coping reported about the year following divorce predicted more depressive symptoms 1 year after the divorce. Bootstrapping mediation analyses indicated that negative religious coping fully mediated links between appraising the divorce as a sacred loss or desecration at the time it occurred and depressive symptoms 1 year later. In addition, moderation analyses revealed that negative religious coping is more strongly associated with depressive symptoms among those who form high versus low appraisals of their divorce as a sacred loss or desecration. These findings are relevant to divorce education and intervention provided by professionals in legal, family, mental health, and clerical roles. Implications are discussed for clinical and counseling psychology and religious communities.

  16. Stressful situations and coping strategies in relation to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richaud de Minzi, María Cristina; Sacchi, Carla

    2005-10-01

    Whether people cope differently with negative events at different ages was assessed by relation to age by type of situation perceived as potentially stressful and by type of coping strategy used, and also whether the kind of coping strategy used to reduce the potential stressor was related to type of stressor. To do this the factor structure of the Spanish version of the Ways of Coping Checklist of Lazarus and Folkman was examined in an Argentine sample of 153. The factor analysis of checklist scores identified five factors: Cognitive redefinition, Problem focus, Seeking social support, Wishful thinking, and Avoidance. For two groups, ages 20 to 24 and 40 to 45 years, analysis indicated a significant association of type of situation perceived as potentially stressful with age. The middle-age group (40-45 yr.) chose a way of coping in problem solution but the young adult group (20-24 yr.) seemed more often to elude problems. It appears that the type of stressor influences type of coping.

  17. Employee stress management: An examination of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies on employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, M Kim; Barry, Adam E; Chaney, J Don

    2015-01-01

    Employees commonly report feeling stressed at work. Examine how employees cope with work and personal stress, whether their coping strategies are adaptive (protective to health) or maladaptive (detrimental to health), and if the manner in which employees cope with stress influences perceived stress management. In this cross-sectional study, a random sample of 2,500 full-time university non-student employees (i.e. faculty, salaried professionals, and hourly non-professionals) were surveyed on health related behaviors including stress and coping. Approximately 1,277 completed the survey (51% ). Hierarchical logistic regression was used to assess the ability of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies to predict self-reported stress management, while controlling for multiple demographic variables. Over half of employees surveyed reported effective stress management. Most frequently used adaptive coping strategies were communication with friend/family member and exercise, while most frequently used maladaptive coping strategies were drinking alcohol and eating more than usual. Both adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies made significant (p employee's perceived stress management. Only adaptive coping strategies (B = 0.265) predicted whether someone would self-identify as effectively managing stress. Use of maladaptive coping strategies decreased likelihood of self-reporting effective stress management. Actual coping strategies employed may influence employees' perceived stress management. Adaptive coping strategies may be more influential than maladaptive coping strategies on perceived stress management. Results illustrate themes for effective workplace stress management programs. Stress management programs focused on increasing use of adaptive coping may have a greater impact on employee stress management than those focused on decreasing use of maladaptive coping. Coping is not only a reaction to stressful experiences but also a consequence of coping resources

  18. Burnout, psychological morbidity, job stress, and job satisfaction in Chinese neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyu; Pu, Juncai; Zhong, Xiaoni; Zhu, Dan; Yin, Dinghong; Yang, Lining; Zhang, Yuqing; Fu, Yuying; Wang, Haiyang; Xie, Peng

    2017-05-02

    To investigate the prevalence of and personal and professional characteristics associated with burnout, psychological morbidity, job stress, and job satisfaction in Chinese neurologists. The China Neurologist Association conducted a national cross-sectional study from September 2014 to March 2015. A questionnaire including the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Consultants' Mental Health Questionnaire, and questions assessing personal and professional characteristics, career satisfaction, and current doctor-patient relationships was administered. A total of 693 directors of neurology departments and 6,111 neurologists in 30 Chinese provinces returned surveys. Overall, 53.2% of responding neurologists experienced burnout, 37.8% had psychological morbidity, 50.7% had high levels of job stress, 25.7% had low levels of job satisfaction, 76.9% had poor doctor-patient relationships, and 58.1% regretted becoming a doctor. Factors independently associated with burnout were lower income, more hours worked per week, more nights on call per month, working in public hospitals, psychological morbidity, high levels of job stress, low levels of job satisfaction, and poor doctor-patient relationships. Factors independently associated with psychological morbidity included lower income, more nights on call per month, working in enterprise-owned hospitals, burnout, high levels of job stress, and low levels of job satisfaction. Burnout and psychological morbidity are common in Chinese neurologists. Burnout is the single greatest predictor of neurologists' psychological morbidity, high job stress, and low job satisfaction. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Investigating the effect of job stress and emotional intelligence on job performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Rafiee; Hojat Kazemi; Mustafa Alimiri

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and scholars of management and behavioral sciences have tried to determine effective factors, which influence on efficiency and effectiveness in order to increase organization performance and they have tried to identify factors, which create job stress. In this research, we investigate the effect of job stress on job performance through emotional, organizational and moral intelligence. The study is a descriptive-analytic one, which is based on correlation, uses survey method to ga...

  20. The analysis of stress reactions ana coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Dong Han; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Gil Yong; Son, Mi Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Bundang CHA General Hospital, College of Medicine, Pochon CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    This study is performed to encourage cancer patients to identify, relieve and effectively overcome the stress caused by radiotherapy, by analyzing stress reactions and coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress due to radiotherapy. The study group was composed of 85 cancer patients of the age 20 or higher who were undergoing radiotherapy in four hospitals located in Seoul and Kyonggi-do. The survey questionnaire was used, which had 161 questions inquiring respondents of general status, perceived stress, stress reactions and coping patterns. The surveyed data were analyzed by a SAS program, which employed descriptive statistics. Pearson Correlation Coefficient, t-test, ANOVA and Stepwised Multiple Regression. The stress perception and reaction rates were low in cancer patients comparing to patients of the other study. In the coping patterns. the problem-focused coping patterns were significantly higher than emotion-focused coping patterns. The statistically meaningful differences were observed in the stress perception and reactions depending on the time of diagnosis and perceived health level. As for the problem-focused coping patterns, significant differences were found depending on age, marital status, education, income and the number of family members as well as perceived health level of patients. The level of perceived stress and that of stress reactions was found to have positively significant correlation(r=.764, p<.001) while the perceived stress and the problem-focused coping patterns was correlated negatively (r=-.288, p<.01). The stress reactions and the problem-focused coping patterns was found to have negatively significant correlation(r=-.289, p<.01). The problem-focused coping behavior, which cooperated with doctors, technologists, nurses and families of cancer patients, is advisable for the cancer patients to overcome uncertainty and uneasiness by effectively release the stress.

  1. STRESS & COPING STRATEGIES IN FAMILIES OF MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Families with mentally retarded children experience a great physical and psychosocial stress which demands various psychosocial strategies for effective coping. METHODOLOGY : This study was conducted in the department of Psychiatry , Government Medical College , Kota (Raj. in 2006 - 07 with the objectives of finding out the stress & coping strategies and the factors influencing these strategies in the families with mentally retarded children. Fifty mentally reta rded children were divided into two groups - Group A comprising children with IQ more or equal to 50 (n=28 and Group B comprising children having IQ less than 50 (n=22 . Parents of selected mentally retarded children were interviewed by using semi structur ed Performa containing – personnel identification data , Family Interview for Stress and Coping in Mental Retardation (FISC - MR , NIMH – Family Efficacy Scale (NIMH - FES , Problem Behavior Check List. Obtained data was analyzed by using unpaired t test , Pearson`s correlation coefficient & z - score. RESULTS : In various dimensions of perceived stress , families with mentally retarded children with IQ ˂50 (Group B experienced significantly higher daily care stress , emotional stress , social stress and total pe rceived stress than the families with mentally retarded children with IQ≥50 (Group A . Families in both groups used similar coping strategies (i.e. , awareness about mental retardation , attitude and expectation , rearing practices and social support except global support strategy which was used significantly higher by the families of children with IQ<5o. Having a female mentally retarded child and nuclear family were the factors associated with higher stress in families.

  2. Identifying Job Stress in a Human Service Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Eileen Berlin

    1983-01-01

    Studied job stress, from a communication perspective, in nurses from a children's hospital. Found, among other results, that stress variables not only combine in different ways but are perceived differently depending on a person's burnout level. (PD)

  3. Stress: causes, consequences, and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, H R; Schlacter, J; Edwards, M R

    1982-01-01

    Because of the negative effect stress has on employee health and productivity, ways to manage stress should be of particular concern to human resources managers. Recognizing this, authors Heather R. Sailer, territorial sales representative for American Medical Systems, a division of American Hospital Supply Corporation, John Schlacter, professor of marketing, and Mark Edwards, assistant professor of agriculture--the latter two at Arizona State University--created a model for applying stress-management strategies. Their model integrates seven categories of strategies--two of which are physical maintenance and outside assistance. The model shows at which stage of stress--before, during, or after the stressful event--each strategy can most effectively be used, and in which are of management--self-management, systems management, or organizational management--it is most appropriate.

  4. Coping Strategies for Managing Acculturative Stress among Asian International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Young-An; Trusty, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effects of specific coping strategies on managing acculturative stress and acculturation of Asian international students, based on a sample of 220 Asian international students in the U.S. The data were analyzed with hierarchical multiple regression using Baron and Kenny's (1986) mediation procedure. The results supported…

  5. Mapping Nondominant Voices into Understanding Stress-Coping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Bartlett, Judith; MacKay, Kelly; Mactavish, Jennifer; Ristock, Janice

    2008-01-01

    This study reports key findings from a research project, which examined the stress and coping mechanisms of several nondominant groups of individuals. The groups were based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada and included (a) Aboriginal individuals with diabetes, (b) individuals with disabilities, and (c) gays and lesbians. Our analyses of personal…

  6. Coaching Strategies for Helping Adolescent Athletes Cope with Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jenelle N.; Gilbert, Wade; Morawski, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the various sources of athlete stress and the strategies that coaches can use to help young athletes cope with it. The information is based on a study with a competitive adolescent soccer team and its two coaches, and a review of the coaching and sport psychology literature. The suggested coaching strategies can help to…

  7. Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions and Stress Coping Strategies of Laate Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Aysel Esen

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Adolescence is a stage of major growth and development in terms of significant cognitive, behavioral, psychological, and physiological changes. For adolescents, these developmental changes could be accompanied by stressful situations. Adolescents need to cope with these stressors successfully, yet the developmental period of…

  8. On Everyday Stress and Coping Strategies among Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotardi, Valerie A.

    2013-01-01

    Elementary school students are confronted with a variety of everyday challenges ranging from comprehension obstacles to interpersonal conflict. Learning to cope effectively with moments of tension is an important part of a child's education because adaptation to stress is likely to influence academic and developmental success. However,…

  9. Job stress, mentoring, psychological empowerment, and job satisfaction among nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Catherine E; Kowalski, Susan

    2012-07-01

    The National League for Nursing endorses mentoring throughout nursing faculty's careers as the method to recruit nurses into academia and improve retention of nursing faculty within the academy. A nationwide sample of 959 full-time nursing faculty completed a descriptive survey comprising a researcher-created demographic questionnaire plus Dreher's mentoring scale, Gmelch's faculty stress index, Spreitzer's psychological empowerment scale, and the National Survey for Postsecondary Faculty's job satisfaction scale. Results showed that 40% of the sample had a current work mentor. Variables showed significant relationships to job satisfaction (p < 0.01): mentoring quality (0.229), job stress (-0.568), and psychological empowerment (0.482). Multiple regression results indicated job satisfaction was significantly influenced (p < 0.01) by the presence of a mentoring relationship, salary, tenure status, psychological empowerment, and job stress. The regression model explained 47% of the variance in job satisfaction for the sample.

  10. Strategies for coping with stress as predictors of mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamile Bahar Aydın

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: According to the relevant literature, strategies for coping with stress affect adolescent’s mental and physical health, school attendance and adaptation, academic achievement. If strategies for coping with stress suggested by Csikszentmihalyi are taught to adolescents, a more effective use of psychic energy and thus an increase in subjective experience quality can be achieved.Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study is to examine whether strategies coping with stress based on the Flow Theory predict adolescents’ mental health to a significant level.Method: The study was conducted on a total of 119 ninth grade students (61 females and 58 males aged 14-17 in a public high school in Ankara (in 2005-2006. The predictor variables of the study, the subscales of the Strategies for Coping with Stress Scale (SCSS, were struggle (S, personal control (PC, and active/effective contact with the environment (ACE. SCSS was developed based on Csikszentmihalyi’s flow theory. The predicted variables of the study were the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI whose subscales of Turkish form were anxiety, depression, negative self, hostility and somatization. In the study, multiple linear regression analysis was used.Findings and Results: There were correlations ranging from ? =-.65 p<.001, R2 =.39 to ?=.30 P<.05, R2 =.07 between the subscales of SCSS and the subscales of BSI. Most correlation coefficients were negative as expected. Moreover, the regression models established between predicted and predictor variables were significant at p<.001 level excluding somatization. The most powerful predictor of mental health is the ACE strategy of coping with stress. The findings especially about ACE support the strategy of “focusing attention on the world”, which Csikszentmihalyi suggests as an effective strategy.Conclusions and Recommendations: The results depict that as the levels of adolescents’ stress coping strategies decrease, their

  11. Strategies for coping with stress as predictors of mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamile Bahar Aydın

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: According to the relevant literature, strategies for coping with stress affect adolescent’s mental and physical health, school attendance and adaptation, academic achievement. If strategies for coping with stress suggested by Csikszentmihalyi are taught to adolescents, a more effective use of psychic energy and thus an increase in subjective experience quality can be achieved.Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study is to examine whether strategies coping with stress based on the Flow Theory predict adolescents’ mental health to a significant level.Method:  The study was conducted on a total of 119 ninth grade students (61 females and 58 males aged 14-17 in a public high school in Ankara (in 2005-2006. The predictor variables of the study, the subscales of the Strategies for Coping with Stress Scale (SCSS, were struggle (S, personal control (PC, and active/effective contact with the environment (ACE. SCSS was developed based on Csikszentmihalyi’s flow theory. The predicted variables of the study were the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI whose subscales of Turkish form were anxiety, depression, negative self, hostility and somatization. In the study, multiple linear regression analysis was used.Findings and Results: There were correlations ranging from ? =-.65 p<.001, R2 =.39  to ?=.30 P<.05, R2 =.07 between the subscales of SCSS and the subscales of BSI. Most correlation coefficients were negative as expected. Moreover, the regression models established between predicted and predictor variables were significant at p<.001 level excluding somatization. The most powerful predictor of mental health is the ACE strategy of coping with stress. The findings especially about ACE support the strategy of “focusing attention on the world”, which Csikszentmihalyi suggests as an effective strategy.Conclusions and Recommendations: The results depict that as the levels of adolescents’ stress coping strategies decrease, their

  12. Occupational Stress and Coping among Portuguese Military Police Officers

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the professional experience of military police officers from the Portuguese Republican National Guard (N = 95). We focused on the main sources and consequences of stress and the coping strategies used to deal with stress. The evaluation protocol included one closed-ended question and four open-ended questions. Data analysis of meaningful text segments was conceptually based and data categorization followed deductive content analysis. Results allowed the identification of ...

  13. Stress, Depression and Coping among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that one in four migrant farmworkers experienced an episode of one or more mental health disorders such as stress, depression, or anxiety in their lifetime. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore experiences and perceptions related to stress and depression among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs), and to identify their coping behaviors for dealing with these mental health conditions. Using a mixed methods research approach, three focus group intervi...

  14. Depression and coping styles of stress in patients with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Barreda S., Dennys; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    The stroke is defined as the sudden interruption of blood flow in vessels in any area of the brain. The presence of depression is given with great regularity in those affected. Also, people with more stress are potential candidates for developing stroke. For this reason, this research describe the relationship between depression and stress coping styles, in a sample of 50 stroke patients treated at the outpatient service of neurology at Daniel Alcides Carrion Hospital . For this purpose used ...

  15. Occupational coping self-efficacy explains distress and well-being in nurses beyond psychosocial job characteristics

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    Renato ePisanti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The main purpose of the present study was to extend the Job Demand Control Support (JDCS model analyzing the direct and interactive role of occupational coping self-efficacy (OCSE beliefs. Background: OCSE concern an individual's beliefs about one's ability to cope with occupational stressors. The interplay between occupational stressors, job resources and self-efficacy beliefs is poorly investigated. The present research attempts to address this gap.Design: Cross-sectional survey.Method: Questionnaire data from 1479 nurses (65% response were analyzed. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the direct and moderating role of OCSE in conjunction with job demands (i.e., time pressure, and two job resources: job control (i.e., decision latitude and skill discretion and social support (i.e., supervisor support and coworker support in predicting psychological distress and well-being.Results: Our findings indicated that high demands, low job control and low social support additively predicted the distress/well-being outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, psychological distress, and somatic complaints. Beyond the main effects, no significant interactive effects of demands, control, and support were found. Occupational coping self-efficacy (OCSE accounted for an additional 1% to 4% of the variance in the outcomes, after controlling for the JDCS variables. In addition, the results indicate that occupational coping self-efficacy buffers the association between low job control and the distress dimensions emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and psychological distress. Low control was detrimental only for nurses with low occupational coping self-efficacy.Conclusion: Our results suggest expanding the JDCS model incorporating individual characteristics such as occupational coping self-efficacy beliefs, for predicting psychological distress and well-being. Limitations of the study and practical implications

  16. Coping with Trauma and Stressful Events As a Patient with an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Page Coping With Trauma and Stressful Events as a Patient With an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Jessica Ford , ... plan for developing effective coping responses. Is There a Difference Between a Stressful Event and a Traumatic ...

  17. Stressors, Stress and Coping in Dual-Demand Environments: The Case of Working 'Back to Schoolers'

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kariv, Dafna; Heiman, Tali

    2005-01-01

    ...) coping strategies are related to an array of perceived stresses; and (3) perceived academic stress has a significant influence on coping strategies even after academic load, workload, social support and demographics are taken into account...

  18. Coping With Stress as an LGBTQ+ Health Care Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Michele J; Streed, Carl; Henne, Michael

    2017-05-24

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other sexual/gender minority (LGBTQ+) health care providers face both general work-related stresses and working in heteronormative settings with ill-informed or hostile coworkers and patients, yet there has been little study of whether the coping strategies are specific to LGBTQ+ stress. We analyzed qualitative data from 277 health care professionals. Sources of stress included religiously and politically conservative coworkers, coworker/patient lack of knowledge, stresses of being closeted, and concerns about being out to patients. Consequences of being out as LGBTQ+ included lack of promotions, gossip, refusals of tenure, and anti-LGBTQ+ comments and behaviors in the workplace. Respondents showed mostly positive coping strategies to deal with stress, including becoming educators/advocates and self-care activities. Self-care options were common in rural areas with few LGBTQ+ social resources. Negative coping strategies were reported by 18% of respondents. The study highlights the extra burden of stress on LGBTQ+ health care providers.

  19. Level of occupational stress of court probation officers and style of coping with stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Wirkus

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The relationship between a court probation officer and their ward is a specific one and is frequently connected with enormous individuals costs. This fact is connected with the character of the job, and with the conditions determining its character. Psychosocial threats may influence both mental and somatic health, directly or indirectly, by means of the influence exerted by stress. Participants and procedure The main study was conducted at the offices of the teams of the Court Probation Service. The teams of the Court Probation Service are part of the structure of the following 9, randomly selected, district courts (DCs: DC Wrocław, DC Bydgoszcz, DC Szczecin, DC Poznań, DC Łódź, DC Lublin, DC Kraków, DC Katowice and DC Białystok. Participation in the research was voluntary and anonymous; the tools were arranged in sets, and the sequence of those sets was random. The sets of research tools were received by 1,000 individuals altogether. Results The conducted research confirmed the need to verify the significance of the feeling of occupational stress of court probation officers at the workplace and the correlations between it and a number of variables. Below, I present statistical analyses concerning various aspects of occupational stress experienced in the studied group, including correlations between the general level of occupational stress and the dimensions of it, and organizational predictors. The objective of the research was to indicate the styles of coping with stress and the correlations of them with the stress felt by court probation officers. Conclusions The research confirms a significant influence exerted by organizational determinants upon the general level of felt occupational stress. Professional court probation officers experience a higher level of felt occupational stress; what is conducive to that is high encumbrance with occupational responsibilities, and also functioning directly in structures of the court of

  20. Stress with Parents and Peers: How Adolescents from Six Nations Cope with Relationship Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge; Persike, Malte; Karaman, Neslihan Guney; Cok, Figen; Herrera, Dora; Rohail, Iffat; Macek, Petr; Hyeyoun, Han

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how 2000 adolescents from middle-class families in six countries perceived and coped with parent-related and peer-related stress. Adolescents from Costa Rica, Korea, and Turkey perceived parent-related stress to be greater than peer-related stress, whereas stress levels in both relationship types were similar in the Czech…

  1. Stress with Parents and Peers: How Adolescents from Six Nations Cope with Relationship Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge; Persike, Malte; Karaman, Neslihan Guney; Cok, Figen; Herrera, Dora; Rohail, Iffat; Macek, Petr; Hyeyoun, Han

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how 2000 adolescents from middle-class families in six countries perceived and coped with parent-related and peer-related stress. Adolescents from Costa Rica, Korea, and Turkey perceived parent-related stress to be greater than peer-related stress, whereas stress levels in both relationship types were similar in the Czech…

  2. Genetic susceptibility testing from a stress and coping perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Holly C; Organista, Kurt; Burack, Jeffrey; Biesecker, Barbara Bowles

    2006-04-01

    Four theories of health behavior and of stress and coping are reviewed for their ability to illuminate interest in uptake and outcomes of genetic testing for adult-onset diseases. These theories are the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), the Common Sense Model of Self-regulation (CSM), and the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping (TMSC). Basic concepts of each theory are discussed, followed by evidence from the literature supporting the relevance of these concepts to the understanding of genetic testing for four adult-onset diseases: Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, and hereditary colorectal cancer. Emphasis is placed on the finding that a decision to undergo genetic testing may be considered as a way to cope with both the cognitive and affective concerns that arise from living at increased risk of developing a disease in the future. The potential value of genetic testing for reducing uncertainty about and gaining a sense of control over one's risk of developing a chronic disease is highlighted. We argue that theories which focus on stress and coping provide a useful framework for future studies of genetic testing decisions for adult-onset disease risk.

  3. Ventilation rates indicate stress-coping styles in Nile tilapia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rodrigo E Barreto; Gilson L Volpato

    2011-12-01

    Behavioural responses to stress can form distinct profiles in a wide range of animals: proactive and reactive profiles or coping styles. Stress responsiveness can also differentiate between the behavioural profiles. The tendency to regain feed intake following transfer to a novel social-isolation tank (the speed of acclimation) can discriminate between proactive or reactive profiles. Consequently, differential stress responsiveness can be linked to this feeding behaviour trait. This study shows that ventilation rates of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.), correlate with the rate of feeding resumption, following transfer to a novel social-isolation aquarium. Therefore, ventilation rate (VR) indicates coping styles; consequently, VR is a proxy for the way fish will deal with environmental challenges.

  4. Coping with Stress during Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you or someone you know shows signs of stress (see list at left) for several days or weeks, get help by accessing one of the resources at the end of this tip sheet. Contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline right away if you or someone ...

  5. Stress, Coping Styles, and Optimism: Are They Related to Meaning of Education in Students' Lives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krypel, Michelle N.; Henderson-King, Donna

    2010-01-01

    We explored the meanings that undergraduate students make of their education and how these meanings relate to students' perceived stress, styles of coping with stress, and optimism. Participants completed a meaning of education questionnaire, the Perceived Stress Scale, the COPE (a measure of coping styles), and the Life Orientation Test-Revised.…

  6. Stress, Coping Styles, and Optimism: Are They Related to Meaning of Education in Students' Lives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krypel, Michelle N.; Henderson-King, Donna

    2010-01-01

    We explored the meanings that undergraduate students make of their education and how these meanings relate to students' perceived stress, styles of coping with stress, and optimism. Participants completed a meaning of education questionnaire, the Perceived Stress Scale, the COPE (a measure of coping styles), and the Life Orientation Test-Revised.…

  7. Coping with stress and types of burnout: explanatory power of different coping strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Montero-Marin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burnout occurs when professionals use ineffective coping strategies to try to protect themselves from work-related stress. The dimensions of 'overload', 'lack of development' and 'neglect', belonging to the 'frenetic', 'under-challenged' and 'worn-out' subtypes, respectively, comprise a brief typological definition of burnout. The aim of the present study was to estimate the explanatory power of the different coping strategies on the development of burnout subtypes. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey with a random sample of university employees, stratified by occupation (n = 429. Multivariate linear regression models were constructed between the 'Burnout Clinical Subtypes Questionnaire', with its three dimensions -overload, lack of development and neglect- as dependent variables, and the 'Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences', with its fifteen dimensions, as independent variables. Adjusted multiple determination coefficients and beta coefficients were calculated to evaluate and compare the explanatory capacity of the different coping strategies. RESULTS: The 'Coping Orientation for Problem Experiences' subscales together explained 15% of the 'overload' (p<0.001, 9% of the 'lack of development' (p<0.001, and 21% of the 'neglect' (p<0.001. 'Overload' was mainly explained by 'venting of emotions' (Beta = 0.34; p<0.001; 'lack of development' by 'cognitive avoidance' (Beta = 0.21; p<0.001; and 'neglect' by 'behavioural disengagement' (Beta = 0.40; p<0.001. Other interesting associations were observed. CONCLUSIONS: These findings further our understanding of the way in which the effectiveness of interventions for burnout may be improved, by influencing new treatments and preventive programmes using features of the strategies for handling stress in the workplace.

  8. Black women talk about workplace stress and how they cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J Camille; Everett, Joyce E; Hamilton-Mason, Johnnie

    2012-01-01

    Black women face the same struggles as White women; however, they have to face issues of diversity on top of inequality. The purpose of this study was to explore work-related stressors that affect the lives of Black women and how they cope with them. Using an exploratory design with grounded-theory methods, five basic themes emerged that identify when racism and sexism are experienced as stressors for African American women in the workplace. The themes are: (1) being hired or promoted in the workplace, (2) defending one’s race and lack of mentorship, (3) shifting or code switching to overcome barriers to employment, (4) coping with racism and discrimination, and (5) being isolated and/or excluded. The results from this study indicate African American women use emotion- and problem-focused coping responses to manage stress (e.g., racism and sexism) in the workplace. The article concludes with a discussion of practice implications of these findings.

  9. Coping with Multiple Stresses in Rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire H. Quinn

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to investigate how local communities cope with and adapt to multiple stresses in rural semiarid South Africa. In semiarid regions water scarcity is one of a number of stresses that shape livelihood vulnerability. With climate change, it is predicted that rainfall in South Africa will become more uncertain and variable in the future, exposing more people to water insecurity. At the same time, the impacts of disease, a lack of institutional capacity, and limited livelihood opportunities can combine to limit adaptive capacity. Therefore, adaptation to changing climate should not be viewed in isolation but instead in the context of social, economic, and political conditions, all of which shape local community vulnerability and people's ability to cope with and adapt to change. This study uses a qualitative-quantitative-qualitative framework, including the use of a stated preference survey, to identify the drivers of agroecosystem change, to understand the capacity of households to cope with droughts, and to determine the ability of local institutions to respond to crises. The analysis suggests that the capacity of the agroecosystem to remain productive during droughts is decreasing, individual/household adaptive capacity remains low, and institutional capacity faces considerable barriers that prevent it from supporting households to adapt to multiple stresses. This research adds weight to the claim that vulnerability reflects multiple forces and processes, and that multiple stresses, that are agroecological, socioeconomic, and institutional in nature, need to be examined to understand vulnerability and to prevent maladaptation.

  10. Burnout, Job Stress and Job Satisfaction Among Southern Correctional Officers: Perceptions and Causal Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Charles A.; Whitehead, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Surveyed perceptions of burnout, job stress, and job satisfaction among a representative sample (N=241) of Alabama correctional officers. Examination of predictor variables revealed that social support; marital status; role conflict; age; correctional seniority; and extrinsic, organizational, and overload stressors significantly influenced…

  11. Cognitive impact of social stress and coping strategy throughout development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kevin P; Barry, Mark; Valentino, Rita J

    2015-01-01

    Stress experience during adolescence has been linked to the development of psychiatric disorders in adulthood, many of which are associated with impairments in prefrontal cortex function. The current study was designed to determine the immediate and enduring effects of repeated social stress on a prefrontal cortex-dependent cognitive task. Early adolescent (P28), mid-adolescent (P42), and adult (P70) rats were exposed to resident-intruder stress for 5 days and tested in an operant strategy-shifting task (OSST) during the following week or several weeks later during adulthood. Engagement of prefrontal cortical neurons during the task was assessed by expression of the immediate early gene, c-fos. Social stress during adolescence had no immediate effects on task performance, but impaired strategy-shifting in adulthood, whereas social stress that occurred during adulthood had no effect. The cognitive impairment produced by adolescent social stress was most pronounced in rats with a passive coping strategy. Notably, strategy-shifting performance was positively correlated with medial prefrontal cortical c-fos in adulthood but not in adolescence, suggesting that the task engages different brain regions in adolescents compared to adults. Adolescent social stress produces a protracted impairment in prefrontal cortex-mediated cognition that is related to coping strategy. This impairment may be selectively expressed in adulthood because prefrontal cortical activity is integral to task performance at this age but not during adolescence.

  12. An Investigation of Job Stress and Job Burnout in Iranian Clinical Pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armaghan Eslami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress is an important element of organization ineffectiveness and since it leads to sickness, eventually it reduces quality and quantity of health care, lead to expansion of it costs and low job satisfaction. Stress comes along with consequences, one of this reactions which comes along with horrible effects is job burnout. Health care are more exposed for job burnout. We examined the relationship between job stress and job burnout in Iranian clinical pharmacist.Methods: Sample was 50 of men and women of clinical pharmacist. Parker and De cotiis  scale (1983 and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, 1981 were used to asses clinical pharmacist stress and burnout. Data were analyzed by applying regression method.Results: Results indicated that there is strong relationship between stress and burnout and its three dimensions. The result also indicated that stress have the highest impact on emotional exhaustion and the least on the depersonalization.Conclusion: Burnout is a result of stress in human services career. Human service needs are vary from other professions since in these jobs in order to fulfill the clients’ needs, employees should use themselves as the required technology, and in return they do not receive gratitude or appreciation.

  13. Coping with traumatic stress in journalism: a critical ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Marla; Keats, Patrice

    2011-04-01

    Journalists who witness trauma and disaster events are at risk for physical, emotional, and psychological injury. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a critical ethnographic study among 31 Canadian journalists and photojournalists with regard to coping strategies used to buffer the effects of being exposed to trauma and disaster events and work-related stress. The findings are the result of in-depth individual interviews and six workplace observations with journalists across Canada. The most commonly reported coping strategies were: avoidance strategies at work, use of black humor, controlling one's emotions and memories, exercise and other physical activities, focusing on the technical aspects, and using substances. Recommendations for addressing the effects of work-related stress within this population are provided.

  14. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession.

  15. Are Different Coping Styles Mitigating Perceived Stress Associated With Depressive Symptoms Among Pregnant Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ying; Wang, Yuqiong; Kwong, Dennis Ho Keung; Wang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    To test the direct and moderating effects of different coping styles in mitigating perceived stress associated with antenatal depressive symptoms among 755 women. The Perceived Stress Scale, the Trait Coping Styles Questionnaire, and the Edinburgh Depressive Postnatal Scale were used to test different effects in multiple linear regression models. Direct effects of positive and negative coping styles were found. Positive coping styles have moderating effects on perceived stress but negative coping styles do not. Health services should dedicate resources to teach women positive coping styles to decrease their vulnerability to developing antenatal depressive symptoms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Stress and coping. A model for the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, D M

    2001-08-01

    Stress, both positive and negative, is a part of personal and work life. Some stressors in the work environment are so extreme they cause strain to all employees. Such conditions require immediate response by employers to change the work environment. However, understanding most workplace stress requires an approach examining the fit between the individual and the work. Only by holistically examining the relationships between the worker's characteristics and the job's characteristics can successful intervention strategies be planned and implemented. Once occupational and environmental health nurses have completed an occupational stress assessment they can plan primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions to meet the specific needs of the employees and the organization.

  17. Qualitative job stress and ego aptitude in male scientific researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, Yu

    2016-11-22

    Job environments have been fundamentally changed by globalization and modern technological innovation. Qualitative workload is expected to increase more than quantitative workload through this rapid technological innovation. Especially, in developed countries, qualitative workload is expected to become a primary job-related stress factor in the near future. Therefore, it is essential to clarify the characteristics of qualitative workload and to determine how to cope with it effectively. Since job stress level and ego aptitude are correlated and qualitative overload increases stress, we examined qualitative overload and ego aptitude among male Japanese cutting-edge science researchers. The Brief Job Stress Questionnaire and the Tokyo University Ego-gram New Version II were distributed to all workers at two Japanese academic institutions. Qualitative overload and adult ego aptitude, representing rationalism, were higher in male researchers than in the Japanese male general sample. In addition, adapted child aptitude, representing obedience, was lower in male researchers. Lack of supervisor support was positively associated with qualitative overload, and nurturing parent ego aptitude was negatively associated with it. Male researchers had higher levels of qualitative overload. Increasing supervisor support is essential in decreasing this qualitative overload. Furthermore, enhancement of nurturing parent ego aptitude (i.e., careful consideration for others) is also important for qualitative overload management.

  18. Evaluation of stressors and coping strategies for stress in Indian anaesthesiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Shidhaye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have been done to assess job satisfaction and quantify effects of stressors on anaesthesiologists in different regions and countries.Studies related to stress in Indian anaesthesiologists are very limited, which prompted us to design this study not only to identify the stressors but also to find out how anaesthesiologists react to stress and devise means to minimize it to increase their job satisfaction levels. A set of questions was handed over personally to 200 anaesthesiologists at the national- and state-level anaesthesiology conferences and continuing medical educations with a request to return them duly filled in, with an assurance that confidentiality and anonymity would bemaintained.Main outcome measures were demographics, factors causing stress, how the responding anaesthesiologists and their colleagues react to it and methods they adopt to reduce stress at their workplace. Response rate was 96%. The total number of respondents was 192 (54% males and 46% females; juniors, 76%; and seniors, 24%. Identified stressors were as follows: time constraints (34%, medicolegal concerns (24%, interference with home life (22%, clinical problems (20% and communication problems (9%. Different strategies for coping with stress were identified. This survey is just a beginning. Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists is requested to look into the matter and take it further on a larger scale by multicentric studies to lay down standards related to number of working hours, number of night-call duties per week, proper assistance, medicolegal protection, etc., which would not only reduce occupational stress but also improve efficiency and job satisfaction among anaesthesiologists.

  19. Determinants of job stress and job satisfaction among supervisory and non-supervisory employees in a large Canadian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J A; Woodward, C A; Shannon, H S; Cunningham, C E; Lendrum, B; McIntosh, J; Rosenbloom, D

    1999-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which hospital workers at a large teaching hospital at different managerial/supervisory levels (designated and non-designated supervisors, and non-supervisory staff), experienced job stress and job satisfaction prior to the re-engineering of hospital services. For all groups, increased levels of job demands were associated with higher levels of stress. Lower levels of decision latitude were associated with increased job stress for designated supervisors. Increasing levels of decision latitude were associated with both job stress and satisfaction for the other two groups. Co-worker support and teamwork contributed to increased job satisfaction for all groups.

  20. Does aging make employees more resilient to job stress? Age as a moderator in the job stressor-well-being relationship in three Finnish occupational samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauno, Saija; Ruokolainen, Mervi; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether an employee's age moderates the relationships between job stressors (i.e. job insecurity, workload, work-family conflict) and self-rated well-being (i.e. work-family enrichment, life satisfaction, job satisfaction, vigor at work). Analysis of covariance and moderated hierarchical regression analysis were used to examine the cross-sectional Finnish data collected among service sector employees (N = 1037), nurses (N = 1719), and academic employees (N = 945). In a situation of high job insecurity, the younger nurses reported higher work-family enrichment, job satisfaction, and vigor compared to their older colleagues. A similar result was also found among the service sector workers in relation to vigor at work. Thus, young age buffered against negative outcomes related to job insecurity. Moreover, older age buffered against the negative effect of high workload on job satisfaction among the service sector and against high work-family conflict on life satisfaction among the academic employees. More attention should be paid to the ability of younger employees to manage problems related to work-family imbalance and high workload, and to older employees' ability to cope with job insecurity. The findings of this study recommend different stress management interventions for older and younger employees.

  1. Job Stress and Job Satisfaction among Health-Care Workers of Endoscopy Units in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Seung-Joo; Chun, Hoon Jai; Moon, Jeong Seop; Park, Sung Chul; Hwang, Young-Jae; Yoo, In Kyung; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The management of job-related stress among health-care workers is critical for the improvement of healthcare services; however, there is no existing research on endoscopy unit workers as a team. Korea has a unique health-care system for endoscopy unit workers. In this study, we aimed to estimate job stress and job satisfaction among health-care providers in endoscopy units in Korea. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey of health-care providers in the endoscopy units...

  2. A Comparison of Workers Employed in Hazardous Jobs in Terms of Job Satisfaction, Perceived Job Risk and Stress: Turkish Jean Sandblasting Workers, Dock Workers, Factory Workers and Miners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunal, Ayda Buyuksahin; Sunal, Onur; Yasin, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare job satisfaction, perception of job risk, stress symptoms and vulnerability to stress of miners, dock workers, jean sandblasting workers and factory workers. A job satisfaction scale and stress audit scale were applied to 220 workers. Results revealed that dock and jean sandblasting workers perceived their…

  3. A Comparison of Workers Employed in Hazardous Jobs in Terms of Job Satisfaction, Perceived Job Risk and Stress: Turkish Jean Sandblasting Workers, Dock Workers, Factory Workers and Miners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunal, Ayda Buyuksahin; Sunal, Onur; Yasin, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare job satisfaction, perception of job risk, stress symptoms and vulnerability to stress of miners, dock workers, jean sandblasting workers and factory workers. A job satisfaction scale and stress audit scale were applied to 220 workers. Results revealed that dock and jean sandblasting workers perceived their…

  4. Sources of job stress, work engagement and career orientations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research has indicated the following as the most common sources of job stress ...... for lower-level employees in the manufacturing and retailing industries', SA ... Research Paper Series: 00-13, College of Business and Accountancy, Virac, ...

  5. Stress-coping strategies among medical residents in Saudi Arabia: A cross-sectional national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Almufleh, Auroabah; Kazim, Sana; Aladwani, Bandar

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive stress-coping strategies have been linked to reduced quality of life, psychiatric disorders, and reduced work performance among residents or physicians. This study aimed to examine stress-coping strategies among medical residents in Saudi Arabia and their association with stress levels and important personal characteristics. This cross-sectional study was conducted between May and October 2012. Residents of different specialties were recruited from a national database. Stress-coping strategies were assessed using the 28-item brief coping scale (BCS), while stress was assessed using the perceived stress scale (PSS). Nine hundred seventeen residents completed both BCS and PSS assessments. Almost 55% of participants were males, 88% were Saudi, 58% were married, and 15% had positive history of psychiatric disorders. The adaptive stress-coping strategy with the highest score was religion, followed by planning, acceptance, and active coping. The maladaptive stress-coping strategy with the highest score was self-blame, followed by self-distraction, and venting. Maladaptive stress-coping strategies were associated with high stress level, female gender, and history of psychiatric disorders. Stress-coping strategies were not correlated/associated with age, presence of major medical illnesses, or stress management education/training. Adaptive stress-coping strategies were more frequently used among a sample of residents in Saudi Arabia than maladaptive stress-coping strategies, with higher use of religion in coping than previously reported. To avoid potential negative impact on resident well-being, future studies among residents should aim to identify the type of stress management program that most positively impacts stress-coping skills.

  6. Effects of Humor on Teacher Stress, Affect, and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Jacqueline Dena

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are at high risk for stress, negative emotion, and job dissatisfaction, which has been linked with health problems and early attrition. Humor has been found to relieve various forms of stress. However, there is a gap in the literature regarding humor effects on teacher stress and its related consequences. The purpose of this quantitative,…

  7. Effects of Humor on Teacher Stress, Affect, and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Jacqueline Dena

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are at high risk for stress, negative emotion, and job dissatisfaction, which has been linked with health problems and early attrition. Humor has been found to relieve various forms of stress. However, there is a gap in the literature regarding humor effects on teacher stress and its related consequences. The purpose of this quantitative,…

  8. Stress, depression and coping among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Sloane Burke; Chaney, Elizabeth H; Bethel, Jeffrey W

    2013-05-03

    Research shows that one in four migrant farmworkers experienced an episode of one or more mental health disorders such as stress, depression, or anxiety in their lifetime. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore experiences and perceptions related to stress and depression among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs), and to identify their coping behaviors for dealing with these mental health conditions. Using a mixed methods research approach, three focus group interviews of a sample of Latino MSFWs (N = 29) were conducted and a quantitative survey was implemented (N = 57) at community sites in eastern North Carolina. Four major themes emerged from the focus group data: (1) physical stress related to working conditions; (2) mental stress related to family situations, work environment, documentation status, and lack of resources; (3) depression related to separation from family and the lack of resources; and (4) use of positive and negative mechanisms for coping with stress and depression. A discussion of these themes, results from the survey findings, implications for intervention and outreach programs, along with recommendations for further research, are provided.

  9. Stress, Depression and Coping among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Bethel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that one in four migrant farmworkers experienced an episode of one or more mental health disorders such as stress, depression, or anxiety in their lifetime. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore experiences and perceptions related to stress and depression among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs, and to identify their coping behaviors for dealing with these mental health conditions. Using a mixed methods research approach, three focus group interviews of a sample of Latino MSFWs (N = 29 were conducted and a quantitative survey was implemented (N = 57 at community sites in eastern North Carolina. Four major themes emerged from the focus group data: (1 physical stress related to working conditions; (2 mental stress related to family situations, work environment, documentation status, and lack of resources; (3 depression related to separation from family and the lack of resources; and (4 use of positive and negative mechanisms for coping with stress and depression. A discussion of these themes, results from the survey findings, implications for intervention and outreach programs, along with recommendations for further research, are provided.

  10. Occupational status and job stress in relation to cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Ohira, Tetsuya; Nagayoshi, Mako; Kajiura, Mitsugu; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of occupational status and job stress factors on cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers. In this baseline assessment between 2001 and 2009 in Osaka, Japan, we examined 928 healthy Japanese employees (330 men, 598 women) from two occupational statuses: managers/professionals and general workers. A brief job stress questionnaire was used to evaluate job stress levels. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate, heart rate variability (high-frequency [HF], low-frequency [LF], LF/HF], and peripheral blood flow were measured at rest and during two stressful tasks. Changes in stress reactivity were calculated as the difference between the measured variables during the tasks and the rest period. Men showed inverse associations between quantitative job overload and DBP, heart rate, and LF/HF, between physical demands and blood pressure (SBP, DBP), and between a poor physical environment and HF. Men also had positive associations between qualitative job overload and heart rate, and between physical demands and peripheral blood flow (all p job overload and SBP, and showed positive associations between qualitative job overload and peripheral blood flow, and between a poor physical environment and SBP (all p job stress and changes in stress reactivity were observed in male managers/professionals and female general workers (p Job stress levels are associated with changes in cardiovascular stress reactivity in men and women. Occupational status may modify these associations.

  11. Stress and coping strategies of patients with cancer. A Korean study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Seung; Yeom, Hye-A; Seo, Young-Sun; Kim, Nam-Cho; Yoo, Yang-Suk

    2002-12-01

    Cancer is a potential life-threatening illness that engenders considerable psychologic distress, requiring persistent coping for the treatment procedures. In this cross-sectional descriptive study stress levels and coping strategies of 257 cancer patients residing in South Korea are addressed. Lazarus and Folkman's theory of stress and coping was used as the theoretical framework. The data were collected from November 1999 to March 2000 by face-to-face interviews. Study participants were primarily male (62.6%) and married (91.4%). Cancer of the gastrointestinal system was the most prevalent type of cancer (31.3%). Women and the patients in the third-stage of cancer showed higher stress but less coping than other groups. Stress was negatively correlated with both problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping. Korean patients with cancer used emotion-focused coping strategies more than problem-focused coping strategies.

  12. Investigation of Elite Taekwondo Athletes’ Coping Styles with Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehmus ASLAN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to examine elite - level male and female taekwondo athletes’ coping styles with stress . A total of 111 taekwondo athletes in a Taekwondo Championships in Turkey ( 55 female and 56 male; Mean age = 21. 09 ± SD = 2.709 participated voluntarily in the study . As a data collection tool, " Ways of Coping Inventory (SCI " which was developed by Folkman and Lazarus and adapted to Turkish by Sahin and Durak (1995 was used. This is a 30 - item scale. There are five sub - dimensions of the scale. While the sub - dimensions of the "self - confident ", " optimistic " and " social support" is regarded as the most efficient ways of coping with stress , " helpless " and " submissive" is considered to be ineffective ways . For data analysis, the Mann - W hitney test analysis was used . Result of the study shows that there are statistically significant differences between men and women elite taekwondo athletes' "self - confident" (z = - 3,355, p = .001 "optimistic approach" (z = - 4,077, p = .000 . On the other hand , no statistically significant differences were found in the sub - dimension " social support " ( z = - 1.887 , p = .059 , " helpless" (z = - .920, p=.358 and " submissive" (z = - .006, p = .995

  13. Children’s coping after psychological stress: choices among food, physical activity, and television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children’s stress-coping behaviors and their determinants have not been widely studied. Some children eat more after stress and dietary restraint moderates stress eating in youth, but eating has been studied in isolation of other coping behaviors. Children may not choose to eat when stressed if othe...

  14. Predicting levels of Latino depression: acculturation, acculturative stress, and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas

    2010-04-01

    Past research has noted that aspects of living in the United States place Latinos at risk for experiencing psychological problems. However, the specific features of the adaptation process that contribute to depression remain unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of acculturation, acculturative stress, and coping to predict membership into low, medium, and high groups of depression among Latinos. Within a group of 148 Latino adults from the community, a multinomial logistic regression revealed that an Anglo orientation, English competency pressures, and active coping differentiated high from low depression and that a Latino orientation and, to some extent, the pressure to acculturate distinguished medium from low depression. These results highlight a pattern of characteristics that function as risk and protective factors in relation to level of symptom severity. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for Latino mental health, including considerations for intervention and prevention.

  15. Genetic Counseling-Stress, Coping, and the Empowerment Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkie-Rosell, A; Sullivan, J A

    1999-12-01

    Historically one of the basic foundations of the genetic counseling process has been nondirectiveness; however, its definition and utility continues to be in question. There remains a need to develop genetic counseling interventions in order to qualify, quantify, measure, and enhance the genetic counseling process as well as to delineate the complex interactions of education and counseling that occur. We propose a framework for genetic counseling interventions utilizing an empowerment perspective and Lazarus and Folkman's adaptation of the theory of stress and coping. This model frames the genetic counseling process as one that promotes the autonomy of the individual by providing the individual with the tools required to make their own decisions and enhances coping and adjustment to the outcome of those decisions through control and mastery.

  16. [Coping with chronic somatic disease according to the concept of psychological stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniszewska, Joanna; Chodkiewicz, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the problem of coping with chronic disease according to the concept of psychological stress. The Lazarus and Folkman theory in which stress is regarded as a relational concept, the importance of cognitive assessment and functions of coping with disease are described. The attention is paid to the illness perception and its impact on the behavioral and emotional processes. The most known tools for stress assessment and coping with stress and current research directions are shown.

  17. South Asian adolescents' experiences of acculturative stress and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala-Narra, Pratyusha; Deshpande, Anita; Kaur, Jasleen

    2016-03-01

    Despite the significant growth in the South Asian population in the United States over the past 2 decades, the experiences of South Asian adolescents have remained largely invisible. Guided by a socioecological perspective (American Psychological Association, 2012; García Coll & Marks, 2012), this study examined South Asian adolescents' experiences of acculturative stress and approaches to coping with this stress across home and school contexts. A semistructured interview was completed by 16 participants (9 girls, 7 boys; ages 14-18 years) from different South Asian backgrounds, attending an urban public high school in the Northeastern part of the United States. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the interview data, and revealed 4 broad categories or domains related to participants' experiences as young South Asians in the U.S. These domains include the following: (a) Connection to family, community, and heritage; (b) Challenges to acculturation; (c) Stress accompanying the navigation across cultural contexts; and (d) Coping and resilience. Participants' narratives reflect acculturative stress experienced in home and school contexts which can inhibit psychological well-being and bicultural identity development. The findings have important implications for culturally informed research, intervention, and policy. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Investigating The Effect Of Job Stress On Performance Of Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyungerel Altangerel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study is conducted to investigate the effect of job stress on job performance. A random sampling technique is used to collect primary data of 120 employees of four telecommunication companies of Mongolia i.e. Mobicom Unitel Skytel and G-mobile. A well-structured questionnaire is utilized to collect relevant data descriptive and logistic analysis is used to estimate and describe the findings of results. It is found that work overload is major reason of stress among employees and majority of employees reduce their productivity and loss of interest in job due to stress. As for concern health issue eyes strain dizziness and disorder in sleep are due to job stress. According to results of logit model parameters of education experience and salary per month are statistically significant and have positive impact on employees performance but age family size no relaxation time giving to employees during working hours and work overload are statistically significant and have negative impact on employees job performance. For suggestions companies should increase salaries of employees and give reward to employees those have work overload. Workload of employees should reduce by proper work redesign and efficient management by proper allocation of job. It is also found that stress also becomes reason of several illnesses and majority of employees dont have medical facilities first aid at working place therefore it is suggested that companies should also provide medical facilities first aid for employees at work place.

  19. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  20. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  1. Job stress in the staff of a tire factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marzieh torshizi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Occupational stress is a major problem in industrial societies. Its relationship with various diseases is increasing ,but it probably has vast socio-economic consequences manifested in the form of absenteeism, labour turnover, loss of productivity and disability pension costs. The present study aimed at determining stress in the staff of a tyre factory.   Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was done on 196 members of staff from various sections of a tire factory in 2008 through proportional classification and randomized sampling .Data was collected by means of Coudron two questionnaires "demographic" and "standardized job stress" . The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS software (v: 11.5, chi-square test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient (P ≤ 0.05.   Results: It was found that 49.5% of the staff had severe job stress .Severe job stress was 55.8% in the production unit (No. =53, 50% in the administrative unit (No. =16 and 40.6% supporting the backing unit (No=28.   There was a significant relationship between variables income and adequate sleep on one hand and level of job stress on the other (P < 0.001.However, no significant relationship was observed between job stress and age, marital status, education, working record ,and exercise.   Conclusion: Based on the results of the current study, more than half of the employees suffered from job stress. Compared with employees in other industrialized countries, Iranian employees appeared to have much higher prevalence of stress. Therefore, more studies are required in order to reduce the amount of stress and its consequences.

  2. Dynamics of a stressful encounter: cognitive appraisal, coping, and encounter outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkman, S; Lazarus, R S; Dunkel-Schetter, C; DeLongis, A; Gruen, R J

    1986-05-01

    Despite the importance that is attributed to coping as a factor in psychological and somatic health outcomes, little is known about actual coping processes, the variables that influence them, and their relation to the outcomes of the stressful encounters people experience in their day-to-day lives. This study uses an intraindividual analysis of the interrelations among primary appraisal (what was at stake in the encounter), secondary appraisal (coping options), eight forms of problem- and emotion-focused coping, and encounter outcomes in a sample of community-residing adults. Coping was strongly related to cognitive appraisal; the forms of coping that were used varied depending on what was at stake and the options for coping. Coping was also differentially related to satisfactory and unsatisfactory encounter outcomes. The findings clarify the functional relations among appraisal and coping variables and the outcomes of stressful encounters.

  3. Organizational role stress and job satisfaction among nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job satisfaction and organizational stress among employees are two important key components of any successful organization. It is important to maintain a balance between the level of job satisfaction and perceived stress among nurses for rendering quality care in the health sector. Materials and Methods: A correlational study design was adopted for the study. A simple random sampling technique was used to recruit 100 staff nurses working at a tertiary care hospital. Job satisfaction scale (JSS and the organizational role stress (ORS scale were used to collect data related to job satisfaction and ORS among nurses. Results: Study results showed that majority (92% of staff nurses were ambivalent regarding their job satisfaction. There was a significant negative relationship between ORS and job satisfaction (r = −0.289, P < 0. 01 among staff nurses. Discussion: The study revealed that many factors influenced job satisfaction and ORS among nurses. Nurse managers and administrators must be alert to suggest the suitable interventions timely to ensure the staff nurses satisfied and get a hassle-free working atmosphere.

  4. Stresses on women physicians: consequences and coping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gail Erlick

    2003-01-01

    We review current data on types of stressors acting on women physicians, the consequences of these stressors and methods of coping with them. We undertook a systematic review of original articles published in the last 15 years and registered mainly on Medline and on the internet websites focusing on these issues. In addition to the pressures acting on all physicians, women physicians face specific stressors related to discrimination, lack of role models and support, role strain, and overload. The depression rate in women physicians does not vary from that of the general public but the rates of successful suicide and divorce are much higher. Women in academic settings are promoted more slowly, have lower salaries, receive fewer resources, and suffer from a range of micro-inequities. They often lack mentors to provide advice and guidance. They must cope with the pressures of choosing when to have a child and conflicts between being a wife and mother and having a career. Despite these pressures, they report a high degree of career satisfaction. Although women physicians suffer from a variety of stressors that can lead to career impediments, stress reactions, and psychiatric problems, generally they are satisfied with their careers. Personal coping techniques can help women deal with these stressors. Pressures will continue until attitudes and practices change in institutional settings. Some institutions are initiating changes to end discrimination against women faculty.

  5. Job stress models for predicting burnout syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, the Council Directive 89/391 for improvement of workers' safety and health has emphasized the importance of addressing all occupational risk factors, and hence also psychosocial and organizational risk factors. Nevertheless, the construct of "work-related stress" elaborated from EU-OSHA is not totally corresponding with the "psychosocial" risk, that is a broader category of risk, comprising various and different psychosocial risk factors. The term "burnout", without any binding definition, tries to integrate symptoms as well as cause of the burnout process. In Europe, the most important methods developed for the work related stress risk assessment are based on the Cox's transactional model of job stress. Nevertheless, there are more specific models for predicting burnout syndrome. This literature review provides an overview of job burnout, highlighting the most important models of job burnout, such as the Job Strain, the Effort/Reward Imbalance and the Job Demands-Resources models. The difference between these models and the Cox's model of job stress is explored.

  6. Novelty-seeking and avoidant coping strategies are associated with academic stress in Korean medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hoyoung; Chung, Seockhoon; Park, Jangho; Kim, Seong-Yoon; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2012-12-30

    High levels of stress and depression in medical students is raising concern. In this study, we sought to identify coping strategies and other factors influencing academic stress in medical students. We enrolled 157 students from the University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Korea, in November, 2010. We used the Medical Stress Scale, Temperament and Character Inventory, Hamilton Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Coping Response Inventory to assess psychological parameters. We used Pearson's correlation and linear regression analyses to analyze the data. Novelty-seeking, self-directedness, cooperativeness, coping strategy, and depression scale scores all correlated significantly with stress level. Linear regression analysis indicated that students who are novelty-seeking, likely to use avoidant coping strategies, and unlikely to use active-cognitive and active-behavioral strategies tend to have higher stress levels. Reduction of stress in medical students may be achieved through evaluation of coping strategies and personality features and use of interventions to promote active coping strategies.

  7. The Maugeri Stress Index – reduced form: a questionnaire for job stress assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massidda D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Davide Massidda,1 Ines Giorgi,2 Giulio Vidotto,3 Salvatore Tringali,4 Marcello Imbriani,4,5 Paola Baiardi,6 Giorgio Bertolotti7 1Giunti O.S. Organizzazioni Speciali, Firenze, Italy; 2Psychology Unit, ICS Maugeri, IRCCS, Pavia, Italy; 3Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 4ICS Maugeri, IRCCS, UOOML, Pavia, Italy; 5Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 6Scientific Direction, ICS Maugeri, IRCCS, Pavia, Italy; 7Psychology Unit, ICS Maugeri, IRCCS, Tradate, Italy Introduction and objectives: A multidimensional self-report questionnaire to evaluate job-related stress factors is presented. The questionnaire, called Maugeri Stress Index – reduced form (MASI-R, aims to assess the impact of job strain on a team or on a single worker by considering four domains: wellness, resilience, perception of social support, and reactions to stressful situations. Material and methods: The reliability of a first longer version (47 items of the questionnaire was evaluated by an internal consistency analysis and a confirmatory factor analysis. An item reduction procedure was implemented to obtain a short form of the instrument, and the psychometric properties of the resulting instrument were evaluated using the Rasch measurement model. Results: A total of 14 items from the initial pool were deleted because they were not productive for measurement. The analysis of internal consistency led to the exclusion of eight items, while the analysis performed using structural equation models led to the exclusion of another six items. According to the Rasch model, item properties and the reliability of the instruments appear good, especially for the scales for wellness and resilience. In contrast, the scales for perception of social support and negative coping styles show a lower internal consistency. Conclusions: The Maugeri Stress Index – reduced form provides a reliable and valid

  8. Conforming and nonconforming personality and stress coping styles in combat athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacka, Ryszarda Ewa; Sawicki, Bogusław; Mazurek-Kusiak, Anna; Hawlena, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate whether the personality dimension of conformism/nonconformism was a predictor of stress coping styles in athletes training combat sports, and to present the characteristics of this personality dimension in the context of the competitors' adaptive/innovative sport performance. Scores of 346 males practising combat sports such as kick boxing, MMA, thai boxing, boxing and wrestling were analyzed. The participants completed the Creative Behaviour Questionnaire (KANH III) measuring the conformity/nonconformity personality dimension and the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) measuring stress coping styles. The comparative analyses were conducted only for the groups of conformists and nonconformists. Differences in stress coping styles between conformists and nonconformists training combat sports were found as nonconformists tended to prefer the task-oriented coping style. Conclusively, a higher rate of nonconformity was associated with increasingly frequent occurrence of task-oriented coping and decreasingly frequent emotion-oriented coping.

  9. Coping with negative emotions: connections with adolescents' academic performance and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenio, William F; Loria, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The authors assessed connections among adolescents' emotional dispositions, negative academic affect, coping strategies, academic stress, and overall grade point average (GPA). A total of 119 ninth through 12th-grade students completed assessments for (a) overall positive and negative moods, (b) GPA, and (c) academically related variables involving stress, negative emotions, and engaged and disengaged coping strategies. Greater negative academic affect and disengaged coping were related to lower GPAs, and disengaged coping mediated the connection between negative academic affect and GPA. By contrast, higher academic stress was related to students' overall moods, negative academic affect, and disengaged coping; disengaged coping mediated the connection between academic stress and negative overall moods. Discussion focused on the especially problematic nature of disengaged academic coping.

  10. Conforming and nonconforming personality and stress coping styles in combat athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernacka Ryszarda Ewa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to investigate whether the personality dimension of conformism/nonconformism was a predictor of stress coping styles in athletes training combat sports, and to present the characteristics of this personality dimension in the context of the competitors’ adaptive/innovative sport performance. Scores of 346 males practising combat sports such as kick boxing, MMA, thai boxing, boxing and wrestling were analyzed. The participants completed the Creative Behaviour Questionnaire (KANH III measuring the conformity/nonconformity personality dimension and the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS measuring stress coping styles. The comparative analyses were conducted only for the groups of conformists and nonconformists. Differences in stress coping styles between conformists and nonconformists training combat sports were found as nonconformists tended to prefer the task-oriented coping style. Conclusively, a higher rate of nonconformity was associated with increasingly frequent occurrence of task-oriented coping and decreasingly frequent emotion-oriented coping.

  11. Unemployment among women with multiple sclerosis: the role of coping and perceived stress and support in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, L B; Arnett, P A

    2015-10-12

    Unemployment is high among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Certain disease variables and demographics have been found to distinguish employed and unemployed individuals. However, these variables only account for 14-20% of the variance. Other factors, such as coping, perceived stress and social support, in the workforce have been proposed, but not yet fully examined. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the role of known factors associated with unemployment in MS, as well as coping and perceived work stress and social support. Sixty-eight women with MS were asked about their employment status and reasons for leaving. They completed a comprehensive assessment including measures of cognition, disease symptoms, psychological functioning, coping and stress. Consistent with previous findings, certain disease and demographic variables were associated with being unemployed. In particular, women who left work due to their MS were found to be older, had a longer disease duration and progressive course, reported greater disability and fatigue, and performed worse on a cognitive measure. However, we also found that coping style distinguished those who were employed from those who left work due to their MS. In particular, those who left work reported utilizing maladaptive coping mechanisms such as behavioral disengagement and substance use. With regard to perceived work stress and support, individuals who were employed reported that job security and fellow co-workers were more of an uplift than a hassle in their lives, suggesting some benefit in employment. These findings suggest that further consideration be given to role of coping and perception of the benefit of employment among individuals with MS when making recommendations regarding work decisions.

  12. Job Stress and Coping in Army Casualty Operations Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-14

    organizations in the United States, including policemen ( Maslach and Jackson , 1979), general human services (Cherniss, 1980), child protective workers...Harrison, 1980), public service -workers ( Maslach , 1982), doctors (Mawardi, 1983), public contact workers ( Maslach and Jackson , 1984), female human...Hall. Maslach , C. & Jackson , S.E. (1979). Burned-out cops and their families. Psychology T y, 1Z, 59-62. ----------------------- (1984, Fall). Patterns

  13. Understanding the Function of Emotional Eating: Does it Buffer the Stress Response and Help Us Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-09

    Stress, Appraisal and Coping. New York: Springer. Levenson, R. W., & Ekman , P. (2002). Difficulty does not account for emotion -specific heart rate...Function of Emotional Eating: Does it Buffer the Stress Response and Help Us Cope?" Name of Candidate: Robyn Osborn Doctor of Philosophy Degree 9...Member Date Date S-/Q/08 Date Date Understanding the function of emotional eating: Does it buffer the stress response and help us cope

  14. Stress, Burnout and Coping Strategies in Preclinical Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Jawad; Al Tabosh, Hayat; Saadeddin, Zein; El Mouhayyar, Christopher; Aridi, Hussam

    2016-01-01

    It is acknowledged that physicians do not seek the same expert aid for themselves as they would offer their patients. In their preclinical years, medical students appear to espouse comparable behavior. To many, medicine is described as a never-ending path that places the student under heavy stress and burnout from the beginning, leaving him/her vulnerable and with insufficient coping methods. Hence, the objective of this study is to 1) explore the prevalence of stress and burnout among preclinical medical students, and 2) propose solutions to decrease stress and burnout and improve medical education in the preclinical years. A detailed scholarly research strategy using Google Scholar, Scopus, Embase, MEDLINE and PubMed was implemented to highlight key themes that are relevant to preclinical medical students’ stress and burnout. Stress varied among different samples of medical students and ranged between 20.9% and 90%. Conversely, burnout ranged between 27% and 75%. Methods that help in reducing the incidence of stress and burnout by promoting strategies that focus on personal engagement, extracurricular activities, positive reinterpretation and expression of emotion, student-led mentorship programs, evaluation systems, career counseling and life coaching should be adopted. PMID:27042604

  15. Stress, Burnout and Coping Strategies in Preclinical Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Jawad; Al Tabosh, Hayat; Saadeddin, Zein; El Mouhayyar, Christopher; Aridi, Hussam

    2016-02-01

    It is acknowledged that physicians do not seek the same expert aid for themselves as they would offer their patients. In their preclinical years, medical students appear to espouse comparable behavior. To many, medicine is described as a never-ending path that places the student under heavy stress and burnout from the beginning, leaving him/her vulnerable and with insufficient coping methods. Hence, the objective of this study is to 1) explore the prevalence of stress and burnout among preclinical medical students, and 2) propose solutions to decrease stress and burnout and improve medical education in the preclinical years. A detailed scholarly research strategy using Google Scholar, Scopus, Embase, MEDLINE and PubMed was implemented to highlight key themes that are relevant to preclinical medical students' stress and burnout. Stress varied among different samples of medical students and ranged between 20.9% and 90%. Conversely, burnout ranged between 27% and 75%. Methods that help in reducing the incidence of stress and burnout by promoting strategies that focus on personal engagement, extracurricular activities, positive reinterpretation and expression of emotion, student-led mentorship programs, evaluation systems, career counseling and life coaching should be adopted.

  16. Stress, burnout and coping strategies in preclinical medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawad Fares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that physicians do not seek the same expert aid for themselves as they would offer their patients. In their preclinical years, medical students appear to espouse comparable behavior. To many, medicine is described as a never-ending path that places the student under heavy stress and burnout from the beginning, leaving him/her vulnerable and with insufficient coping methods. Hence, the objective of this study is to 1 explore the prevalence of stress and burnout among preclinical medical students, and 2 propose solutions to decrease stress and burnout and improve medical education in the preclinical years. A detailed scholarly research strategy using Google Scholar, Scopus, Embase, MEDLINE and PubMed was implemented to highlight key themes that are relevant to preclinical medical students′ stress and burnout. Stress varied among different samples of medical students and ranged between 20.9% and 90%. Conversely, burnout ranged between 27% and 75%. Methods that help in reducing the incidence of stress and burnout by promoting strategies that focus on personal engagement, extracurricular activities, positive reinterpretation and expression of emotion, student-led mentorship programs, evaluation systems, career counseling and life coaching should be adopted.

  17. Cumulative psychosocial stress, coping resources, and preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sheila W; Kingston, Dawn; Bayrampour, Hamideh; Dolan, Siobhan M; Tough, Suzanne C

    2014-12-01

    Preterm birth constitutes a significant international public health issue, with implications for child and family well-being. High levels of psychosocial stress and negative affect before and during pregnancy are contributing factors to shortened gestation and preterm birth. We developed a cumulative psychosocial stress variable and examined its association with early delivery controlling for known preterm birth risk factors and confounding environmental variables. We further examined this association among subgroups of women with different levels of coping resources. Utilizing the All Our Babies (AOB) study, an ongoing prospective pregnancy cohort study in Alberta, Canada (n = 3,021), multinomial logistic regression was adopted to examine the independent effect of cumulative psychosocial stress and preterm birth subgroups compared to term births. Stratified analyses according to categories of perceived social support and optimism were undertaken to examine differential effects among subgroups of women. Cumulative psychosocial stress was a statistically significant risk factor for late preterm birth (OR = 1.73; 95 % CI = 1.07, 2.81), but not for early preterm birth (OR = 2.44; 95 % CI = 0.95, 6.32), controlling for income, history of preterm birth, pregnancy complications, reproductive history, and smoking in pregnancy. Stratified analyses showed that cumulative psychosocial stress was a significant risk factor for preterm birth at psychosocial stress on the risk for early delivery.

  18. Understanding Student Stress and Coping in Elementary School: A Mixed-Method, Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotardi, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method, longitudinal study examined daily school stress and coping strategies of elementary schoolchildren in the United States. Students (n = 65) between the ages of 7 and 11 years reported daily school stress measures for 8 weeks and completed individual stress and coping interviews. Results highlight critical relations between…

  19. Understanding Student Stress and Coping in Elementary School: A Mixed-Method, Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotardi, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method, longitudinal study examined daily school stress and coping strategies of elementary schoolchildren in the United States. Students (n = 65) between the ages of 7 and 11 years reported daily school stress measures for 8 weeks and completed individual stress and coping interviews. Results highlight critical relations between…

  20. Competence in Coping with Stress in Adolescents from Three Regions of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persike, Malte; Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

    2012-01-01

    The ways adolescents develop and use strategies to cope with stress vary according to cultural scripts and values. This cross-sectional study tested the impact of region and gender on adolescents' stress perceptions and coping styles. A total sample of 10,941 adolescents (51.3% female) from 20 countries completed questionnaires on stress and…

  1. Coping with stress and quality of life in women with stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Adamczuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI involves uncontrolled leakage of urine through the urethra as a result of damage to its sphincter muscle and a disturbed function of the urogenital diaphragm within the pelvis minor. The symptoms of UI radically impair psychological, somatic, and social functioning. The aim of each disease stress coping process is to reduce the impact of harmful agents as well as the acquisition of necessary preventive measures in order to combat the disorder. Aim of the study was to assess the relationship between coping styles used when dealing with stress associated with disease and the quality of life. Material and methods: The study was carried out at an outpatients’ clinic located in the Lublin Province (eastern Poland, covering 150 women with diagnosed stress urinary incontinence, aged between 32 and 79. The following methods were used: (a Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (Endler, Parker to assess coping styles, (b CASP-19 scale (Higgins, Hyde, Wiggins, Blade to measure the overall quality of life, and (c Urinary Incontinence Life Quality Scale (Szymona-Pałkowska, Kraczkowski. Results : The preferred style in the studied group of women was Task-Oriented Coping. This style is associated with a low score on the Independence from Symptoms scale and low Control, being simultaneously correlated with Autonomy and Self-Realisation. Emotion-Oriented Coping is associated with low psychological, physical and social well-being, as well as with little independence from the disease symptoms, little pleasure and self-realisation, but it gives a sense of internal control. Avoidance-Oriented Coping does not significantly correlate with any of the Overall Quality of Life dimensions. Conclusions : Women suffering from UI tend to try to solve their problem by means of cognitive transformation. In their situation, clinging to the problem turns out to be a depressing factor and entails a lower quality of their life.

  2. Work environment, job satisfaction, stress and burnout among haemodialysis nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2015-07-01

    To examine the relationships among nurse and work characteristics, job satisfaction, stress, burnout and the work environment of haemodialysis nurses. Haemodialysis nursing is characterised by frequent and intense contact with patients in a complex and intense environment. A cross-sectional online survey of 417 haemodialysis nurses that included nurse and work characteristics, the Brisbane Practice Environment Measure, Index of Work Satisfaction, Nursing Stress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Haemodialysis nurses reported an acceptable level of job satisfaction and perceived their work environment positively, although high levels of burnout were found. Nurses who were older and had worked in haemodialysis the longest had higher satisfaction levels, experienced less stress and lower levels of burnout than younger nurses. The in-centre type of haemodialysis unit had greater levels of stress and burnout than home training units. Greater satisfaction with the work environment was strongly correlated with job satisfaction, lower job stress and emotional exhaustion. Haemodialysis nurses experienced high levels of burnout even though their work environment was favourable and they had acceptable levels of job satisfaction. Targeted strategies are required to retain and avoid burnout in younger and less experienced nurses in this highly specialised field of nursing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Employer support for innovative work and employees' job satisfaction and job-related stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykov, Milosh

    2014-01-01

    There are high levels of global and national underemployment, but limited information is available on the impact of this phenomenon on the quality of employees' working lives. This study examines the relations among perceived employer support for creative work, different forms of underemployment and employee quality of life, including job satisfaction, perceived job security and job satisfaction. The study was performed using cross-sectional data from the Canadian 2010 Work and Lifelong Learning Survey (WALL), which included 1,042 randomly selected currently employed participants between the ages of 18 and 64 years of age. The study found a significant inverse association between employer support for innovative work and different forms of underemployment. It also suggested a strong relationship between support for such work and participation in work-related informal learning. The results from this study confirmed the hypothesis that employer support for creative work is significantly associated with the quality of employees' working lives, as manifested through increased job security and job satisfaction. Employees experiencing greater support for workplace creativity report less job-related stress. The present study identified relatively low employer support for creative work and significant differences in the perception of support among managers and workers. The results of this study indicate that employer support for innovative work can mitigate significant underutilization of employee knowledge and skills. Such support can contribute to the reduction of job-related stress, increased job satisfaction and perceived job security. This kind of support can also improve the quality of life of employees and facilitate creativity and overall organizational and social development.

  4. Adjustment of Homeless Adolescents to a Crisis Shelter: Application of a Stress and Coping Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Melanie M.; Pakenham, Kenneth I.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the usefulness of a stress and coping model of adaptation to a homeless shelter among 78 homeless adolescents who were interviewed and completed measures at shelter entrance and discharge. After controlling for relevant background variables, measures of coping resources, appraisal, and coping strategies showed relations with measures of…

  5. Stress, Coping, and Well-Being among Third-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Thomas H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of stress, coping, depression, and somatic distress among students (n=69) in a University of Mississippi psychiatry clerkship found clinical levels of depression in almost one-fourth of the group and high levels of somatic distress in over one-half. Coping strategies appeared useful to students, and training in coping is recommended.…

  6. Behavioral and physiological indicators of stress coping styles in larval zebrafish.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tudorache, C.; Braake, A.D. ter; Tromp, M.; Slabbekoorn, H.; Schaaf, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Different individuals cope with stressors in different ways. Stress coping styles are defined as a coherent set of individual behavioral and physiological differences in the response to a stressor which remain consistent across time and context. In the present study, we have investigated coping styl

  7. Coping with workplace minority stress: Associations between dyadic coping and anxiety among women in same-sex relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ashley K; Totenhagen, Casey J; Walsh, Kelsey J; Adams, Caroline; Tao, Chun

    2017-01-02

    Sexual minorities are exposed to stressors in the workplace (workplace minority stress), which can be detrimental for well-being (e.g., levels of anxiety). The present study examined whether a particular set of relationship processes, dyadic coping, served to moderate the association between workplace minority stress and symptoms of anxiety. Using a dyadic sample of 64 female same-sex couples, we found that partner problem-focused supportive dyadic coping (DC) and emotion-focused supportive DC (marginally) buffered, whereas partner delegated DC and negative DC did not moderate, the association between workplace minority stress and symptoms of anxiety. Implications for relationship researchers and mental health practitioners are discussed.

  8. Criminal investigator stress: symptoms, syndromes, and practical coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Without the skill and dedication of criminal investigators, there could literally be no criminal justice system. This group of law enforcement professionals has its own special needs and requires its own special kind of support. The present article describes the special stresses and challenges of homicide and sex crime investigators, and the range of responses shown by these officers. Recommendations are provided for the proper selection and training of investigators, and the personal and professional characteristics of successful investigators are outlined. A variety of stress-coping strategies are then described, some developed by the officers themselves, others with the aid of mental health consultants. The importance of professionalism as a key feature of high-quality investigative work is highlighted, and the ways in which criminal investigators can best access the services of mental health clinicians for their own psychological well-being are discussed.

  9. Assessment of pharmacists' job satisfaction and job related stress in Amman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalidi, Doaa; Wazaify, Mayyada

    2013-10-01

    The myriad changes in pharmacy practice in Jordan have transformed the pharmacist's role to be more focused on the patient and his/her therapeutic needs than on just the traditional dispensing. This, in addition to other possible factors, is believed to have influenced pharmacists' job satisfaction and stress level in different practice settings in Jordan. This study aimed to determine the level of job satisfaction and job related stress among pharmacists in Amman. Moreover, the main causes of dissatisfaction and stress-related factors affecting pharmacists at their working positions were also explored. The study was conducted in four pharmacy practice settings: independent and chain community pharmacies as well as private and public hospital pharmacies. The study adopted the self-administered survey methodology technique using a pre-validated pre-piloted questionnaire. The questionnaire was adapted from one previously used in Northern Ireland. Data were entered into SAS database and analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi square and regression analysis. The significance level was set at P pharmacy practice settings (P = 0.038), pharmacists' registration year (P = 0.048) and marital status (P = 0.023). Moreover, job related stress situations like patient care responsibility have been associated significantly with the type of pharmacy practice settings (P = 0.043) and pharmacists' registration year (P = 0.013). Other job stressors like long working hours, lack of advancement, promotion opportunities and poor physician pharmacists' relationship have also been reported by participants. The study concluded that community pharmacists in Amman are found to be less satisfied with their jobs than their hospital counterparts. Pharmacists' job satisfaction should be enhanced to improve pharmacists' motivation and competence. Consequently, this will improve their productivity and provision of pharmaceutical care.

  10. Personal and situational factors that predict coping strategies for acute stress among basketball referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissidis-Rodafinos, A; Anshel, M H; Porter, A

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the ways in which coping style and situational appraisals are related to the consistency of using approach and avoidance coping strategies for skilled Australian basketball referees (n = 133) after three game-related stressful events. The events, 'making a mistake', 'aggressive reactions by coaches or players' and 'presence of important others', were determined from previous research on sources of acute stress among basketball officials. Our findings indicated that: referees exhibited consistent avoidance, but not approach, coping styles; they used more avoidance than approach strategies; and they perceived stress to be positively correlated with approach, and negatively associated with avoidance, coping strategies. These findings suggest that individual differences exist in perceptions of stress (i.e. situational appraisals), controllability and coping styles among moderately and highly skilled basketball referees. The implications for teaching cognitive and behavioural strategies for effective coping with acute stress in basketball officiating are discussed.

  11. Coping with burns: the role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected for demographics, the number of surgeries during initial admittance, trait coping styles, and changing levels of health-related quality of life. CSE during initial admission was by far the stronge...

  12. Workplace stress, burnout and coping: a qualitative study of the experiences of Australian disability support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Megan J; Dorozenko, Kate P; Breen, Lauren J

    2017-05-01

    Disability support workers (DSWs) are the backbone of contemporary disability support services and the interface through which disability philosophies and policies are translated into practical action. DSWs often experience workplace stress and burnout, resulting in a high turnover rate of employees within the non-professional disability service workforce. The full implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme in Australia is set to intensify the current challenges of attracting and retaining DSWs, as the role becomes characterised by greater demands, ambiguity and conflict. The aim of this study was to explore DSWs' perceptions of enjoyable and challenging aspects of disability support work, sources of stress and burnout and the strategies they use to cope when these issues arise. Twelve DSWs workers providing support for adults living with intellectual and physical disabilities were interviewed. Thematic analysis revealed a superordinate theme of 'Balance' comprising three sub-themes: 'Balancing Negatives and Positives', 'Periods of Imbalance', and 'Strategies to Reclaim Balance'. Participants spoke of the rewarding and uplifting times in their job such as watching a client learn new skills and being shown appreciation. These moments were contrasted by emotionally and physically draining aspects of their work, including challenging client behaviour, earning a low income, and having limited power to make decisions. Participants described periods of imbalance, wherein the negatives of their job outweighed the positives, resulting in stress and sometimes burnout. Participants often had to actively seek support and tended to rely on their own strategies to manage stress. Findings suggest that organisational support together with workplace interventions that support DSWs to perceive the positive aspects of their work, such as acceptance and mindfulness-based approaches, may help to limit experiences of stress and burnout. The further development and

  13. The effect of job stress and job motivation on employees’ performance through job satisfaction (A study at PT. Jasa Marga (Persero Tbk. Surabaya - Gempol branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noermijati Noermijati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Job stress and motivation has a critical role to enhance female employee performance. The research attempts to analyze the direct effect of job stress and motivation on employee performance, and indirect effect of job stress and motivation on employee performance through job satisfaction. This research involves 108 married female employees, with minimal one year working period, as the population and respondents (census sampling. Using Path analysis, it was found that job stress have significant negative effect on employee performance. Motivation has a significant positive effect on employee performance. Job stress does not have an effect on job satisfaction. Motivation significantly positive influences job satisfaction. Job satisfaction significantly influences employee performance. Job stress does not have indirect effect on employee performance through job satisfaction. Motivation has an indirect effect on employee performance through job satisfaction. Motivation has the most important role to enhance employee performance. As an implication, company must give more attention and enhance employee motivation, especially on fulfilling self actualization need.

  14. Locus of Control and Coping Style as Stress Moderators in Achievement Oriented Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-01

    helps individuals maintain psychosocial adaptation during stressful episodes ( Holahan , & Moos, 1987). This process is complex but it is directed toward...encounter. Subjects describe coping responses used and if they were successful. The trait approach to coping (Bolger, 1990; Holahan , & Moos, 1986...that coping strategies are either problem- focused (often called active coping) or emotion-focused. Although the latter can be active in nature, it is

  15. Swimmers’ experiences of organizational stress: Exploring the roles of cognitive appraisal and coping behaviours.

    OpenAIRE

    Didymus, FF; Fletcher, D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive appraisal and coping are central components of transactional stress theory. Sport psychology research to date has adopted a reductionist approach to the categorization of coping and appraisal-coping associations have yet to be explored in a sport organizational context.\\ud AIMS/OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to investigate sport performers’ micro- and macro-level coping behaviors in response to organizational stressors, to examine the utility of Skinner, E...

  16. Job demand-control and job stress at work: A cross-sectional study among prison staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Jafar; Akbari, Rouhollah; Shakerian, Mahnaz; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Job stress can impose significant costs to the workplaces and organizations due to some issues such as absenteeism, less productivity, and medical costs. Job overload and lack of decision latitude can lead to job stress. The current study aimed to investigate the job demands and control as predictor of job stress and its relationship, with some of the demographic characteristics of Iranian prison staff. This study was performed on 171 male employees working in four prisons located in Ilam, Iran. The sampling method was census and all four prisons' staff were selected to respond the Job Content Questionnaires. Finally, the data were analyzed using t-test or independent samples test as well as SPSS 20. The highest amount of job demand (mean = 21.28) and the lowest amount of job control on average (9.76) were reported by those staff working in Darehshahr prison. There was also a significant relationship between job post and job control among the prison staff (β = -0.375, P = 0.001). The level of job stress reported by prison staff was high in this study mainly caused by high job demand and low job control, especially in Darehshahr prison staff.

  17. Job satisfaction, stress and burnout in anaesthesia: relevant topics for anaesthesiologists and healthcare managers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama-Maceiras, Pablo; Parente, Suzana; Kranke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Job satisfaction is defined as an employee's positive reaction towards his/her work. Changes in health policies, which are seen as a threat to the autonomy of health workers, are associated with a decrease in satisfaction levels, increase burnout among physicians, and may impair the quality and safety of care. The work environment of anaesthesiologists include stressful areas such as the operating theatre, the ICU, and the emergency setting, and this has been linked to higher levels of stress and lower satisfaction. We frequently lack feedback from patients and even our colleagues despite usually working within a team. Nevertheless, job satisfaction and burnout rates in anaesthesia are similar to other specialties. The most relevant factors in job satisfaction are worker autonomy, control of the working environment, recognition of our value, professional relationships, leadership and organisational justice. Although these can be manipulated for good or otherwise, there are additional, less malleable factors such as personality, expectations and motivation of the employee, that play a part. Within organisations there needs to be the will to evaluate employees' satisfaction, to improve their work environment and to develop strategies and coping mechanisms for professional stress. Personal wellness should also be nurtured, as a satisfactory work-life balance and an adequate social support network might act as a buffer for dissatisfaction and burnout. Improvement in satisfaction might create a positive work climate that would benefit both the safety of our patients and our profession.

  18. Perceived Stress and Coping Styles among Malay Caregivers of Children with Learning Disabilities in Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Siti Nor Ismalina; Ishak, Ismarulyusda; Rahman, Azriani Ab; Saat, Nur Zakiah Mohd; Din, Normah Che; Lubis, Syarif Husin; Ismail, Muhammad Faiz Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Caregivers of children with learning disabilities have been shown to experience increased stress and greater negative caregiving consequences than those with typically developing children. There remains a lack of studies focusing on stress and coping mechanisms among caregivers of a wider age group and diagnosis of individuals with disabilities in Asian countries. The current study examines levels of perceived stress and associated child and caregiver factors among caregivers of children with learning disabilities in the Malaysian context. An additional aim was to determine whether caregiver coping styles may be predictors of perceived stress. The Malay version of the Perceived Stress Scale with 10 items and the Brief COPE Scale were administered to a sample of 190 Malay caregivers of children with learning disabilities registered with community-based rehabilitation centres in Kelantan, a state in Peninsular Malaysia. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to determine the predictors of perceived stress. The mean total perceived stress score of caregivers was 16.96 (SD = 4.66). The most frequently used coping styles found among caregivers included religion, acceptance and positive reframing, while substance use and behavioural disengagement were least frequently used. Higher perceived stress was significantly predicted among caregivers with fewer children, frequent use of instrumental support and behavioural disengagement coping, and lack of emotional support and religious coping. Findings indicate that the perceived stress levels among caregivers were significantly predicted by different coping styles. It is vital to help the caregivers improve their good coping styles in order to reduce their stress levels.

  19. Work related stress and well-being: the roles of direct action coping and palliative coping

    OpenAIRE

    Fortes-Ferreira, Lina; Peiró, José Maria; González-Morales, M. Glória; Martín, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to analyze the roles of direct action coping and palliative coping in the relationship between work stressors and psychological well-being, as well as their possible interactions, in a sample of 464 bank employees. Hierarchical regression analyses showed main effects of direct action coping on well-being. Palliative coping predicts higher levels of psychological distress. Contrary to what was expected, the interactions between work stressors and direct acti...

  20. Strategies employed by sexual minority adolescents to cope with minority stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbach, J T; Gibbs, J J

    2015-09-01

    Sexual minority adolescents (SMA) experience disparities in health and behavioral health outcomes, including high rates of depression, anxiety, self-harm, substance use, HIV risk behavior, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts. These outcomes are commonly attributed to minority stress. Stress experiences are different for SMA than their adult counterparts. For example, disclosing their sexual orientation may be more likely to result in homelessness because these youth more often live with parents or other family members. Although stress in this population has been explored in previous research, very little is known about how SMA cope. Relying upon an adolescent coping model, this study examined the coping strategies, responses, and resources of SMA related to stress. Forty-eight racially and ethnically diverse SMA (age 14-19) were recruited for 90-minute tape-recorded interviews. The semi-structured interviews were guided by a life history calendar. Recordings were transcribed verbatim and entered into QSR NVivo. All transcripts were coded by two members of the research team and went through a consensus process. Forty-three unique coping statements emerged that fit with the Compas model of adolescent coping. SMA cope with minority stress in similar ways to heterosexual youth coping with general stress, but findings suggest that SMA may also use different kinds of coping resources. Although further research is needed, the present study identified a variety of ways SMA cope with stress and can inform future research on the development interventions.

  1. Stress, coping, and well-being in military spouses during deployment separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padden, Diane L; Connors, Rebecca A; Agazio, Janice G

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the relationships between stress, coping, general well-being, and sociodemographic characteristics using Lazarus and Folkman's theory of stress and coping. A descriptive correlational design was used. The sample consisted of 105 female spouses of currently deployed active duty military members. Instruments included the Perceived Stress Scale, the Jalowiec Coping Scale, and the RAND-36. Perceived stress was the best predictor of both mental and physical well-being, accounting for 51.7% and 25.4% of the variance, respectively. Evasive and optimistic coping contributed an additional 1.9 % and 4.3%, respectively, to the variance in mental well-being. Differences in coping use were found among rank groups, those who grew up in a military family, and those with a previous deployment separation. Nurses are in an ideal position to identify military spouses at risk and provide education on effective coping behaviors shown to positively affect well-being during deployment separation.

  2. Role of Outsourcing in Stress and Job Satisfaction of Information Technology Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Janell R.

    2016-01-01

    Information technology (IT) outsourcing poses a potential job loss threat to IT professionals, which can decrease job security, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. The problem that this study addressed was the perceived role of IT outsourcing in the job stress, job dissatisfaction, and turnover intention of IT professionals. The…

  3. Role of Outsourcing in Stress and Job Satisfaction of Information Technology Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Janell R.

    2016-01-01

    Information technology (IT) outsourcing poses a potential job loss threat to IT professionals, which can decrease job security, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. The problem that this study addressed was the perceived role of IT outsourcing in the job stress, job dissatisfaction, and turnover intention of IT professionals. The…

  4. STRESS, COPING AND SOCIAL SUPPORTS IN THE ADOLESCENT YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Hashimah Mohd. Hashim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper results from a study that was conducted on 209 Form Fourstudents from two schools in Penang. In this study, a semi-structuredinterview covering questions on demographics, a 12-item measure ofself-esteem, and a 20-item measure of well-being was conducted.Students were also asked to report their Penilaian Menengah Rendah(PMR results as an indicator of their academic performance. To assess stress, coping and social supports, respondents were given a list of possible stressors (e.g., problems with relationships at home and school and were asked to indicate whether or not they were bothered by these stressors, the type of coping that they had used in dealing with these stressors, and the type of social supports that they had received in relation to these stressors. A higher proportion of respondents (77% identified issues related to academics and lessons as a problem compared to other issues (relationships at home, 34%, and relationships at school, 31%. The number of stressors related to everyday life was significantly related to well-being, but not to self-esteem or academic performance. Respondents reported a variety of problem-specificcoping. Supports received were also problem-specific in nature. Thefindings have both applied and theoretical implications.

  5. Occupational status and job stress in relation to cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumi Hirokawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of occupational status and job stress factors on cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers. In this baseline assessment between 2001 and 2009 in Osaka, Japan, we examined 928 healthy Japanese employees (330 men, 598 women from two occupational statuses: managers/professionals and general workers. A brief job stress questionnaire was used to evaluate job stress levels. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP, heart rate, heart rate variability (high-frequency [HF], low-frequency [LF], LF/HF], and peripheral blood flow were measured at rest and during two stressful tasks. Changes in stress reactivity were calculated as the difference between the measured variables during the tasks and the rest period. Men showed inverse associations between quantitative job overload and DBP, heart rate, and LF/HF, between physical demands and blood pressure (SBP, DBP, and between a poor physical environment and HF. Men also had positive associations between qualitative job overload and heart rate, and between physical demands and peripheral blood flow (all p < 0.05. Women showed inverse associations between qualitative job overload and SBP, and showed positive associations between qualitative job overload and peripheral blood flow, and between a poor physical environment and SBP (all p < 0.05. When stratified by occupational status, significant associations between job stress and changes in stress reactivity were observed in male managers/professionals and female general workers (p < 0.05. Job stress levels are associated with changes in cardiovascular stress reactivity in men and women. Occupational status may modify these associations.

  6. Sense of responsibility in health workers source of job stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedić Olesja

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Job stress is a great problem in developed countries of the world, but in Yugoslavia, it is increased due to additional reasons associated with economic crisis in the society. Health services and health workers are in particulary difficult conditions. The aim of this paper was to examine sources and causes of job stress in health workers. Material and methods The research was undertaken among health workers treated at Health Centre "Hospital" in Novi Sad. The study group included health workers - doctors nurses and laboratory workers, and the control group included the rest of non-medical staff. Adapted Siegrist questionnaire was used. Three factors were examined: extrinsic efforts (disturbances at work, sense of great job responsibility and the need for overtime work; intrinsic efforts (major criticism, thinking about the job from the early morning, getting nervous because of minor problems, discontentment because of unsolved problems at work, relaxation at home and so on, and low reward (respect from the superiors and colleagues, support and security at workplace. Answers were scored indicating intensity (high, moderate, low, not at alt. Statistic analysis included testing the level of significance in health workers in relation to non-medical staff (t test and Fisher's exact test. Results Applying the scoring system it has been established that health workers are exposed to greater job stress, great sense of very high job responsibility and frequent overtime work (p<0,001 than the control group. In regard to answers from the second group - intrinsic effort and low reward, there was no statistical significance between the study and control group. Generally high level of risk factors was established, especially presence of one or more risk factors. Discussion Job stress increases absenteeism, reduces work productivity, causes higher expenses of medical treatment, rehabilitation and staff retraining. It is of great importance to identify factors

  7. Stressed Out: How Stress Develops and How to Cope with it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortillaro Marcello

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our experience of stress depends on how we evaluate the circumstances impacting our individual well-being. In principle, any event can be a stressor. Certain events can produce complex emotional states, such as a mixture of anger and worry. If such states are prolonged, they can lead to stress. Stress can be identified by means of such expressive components as facial expression and signs of stress in the voice. Indeed, the voice is particularly sensitive to stress and is frequently used to measure stress levels. Coping strategies differ from person to person and are not mutually exclusive. Often, people use multiple strategies at the same time. Not all of these strategies are good for individual well-being or favor a cooperation-based work culture. To avoid employee burnout, companies should keep an eye on the stress load of their employees and develop trainings to increase emotional competences and improve constructive stress management.

  8. Beyond the job demand control (-support) model : explaining stress reactions in nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisanti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Nurses have been identified as having a risk of experiencing stress and burnout. The nature and organization of the job make nursing inherently difficult. Research highlights that occupational stress is largely dependent on psychosocial job characteristics, such as job demands and job resources. The

  9. Effects of Self-Statements and Coping Strategies on Adaptational Outcomes of Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Max R.; Plater, Sharon A.

    1989-01-01

    Examined effects of self-statements and coping strategies on adaptational outcomes of stress in female subjects (N=62). Results indicated self-statements did not discriminate significantly between individuals who effectively or ineffectively handled stressful encounters. Only information-seeking coping strategy showed a trend toward a significant…

  10. Relationships among Perceived Stress, Coping, and Grade Point Average in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kewallal, Rajendra David

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relationships among perceived stress, coping style, and academic performance in 210 students from a mid-sized public university and a small private college. Study participants were asked to complete the Perceived Stress Scale, the Brief COPE Questionnaire, and a demographic survey asking about their age, gender, grade point…

  11. Voices of Children, Parents and Teachers: How Children Cope with Stress during School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mun

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how children's perceptions of stress factors and coping strategies are constructed over time. Children were interviewed before and after they made the transition from preschool to primary school. This study also explores teachers' and parental strategies in helping children to cope with stress at school. The sample included 53…

  12. Does Self-Esteem Moderate the Relations among Perceived Stress, Coping, and Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbarth, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This study examined self-esteem as a moderator of the influence of perceived stress and coping on symptoms of depression in a sample of 713 college students. The results suggest that self-esteem may play an important role in the development of depressive symptoms in college students through interactions with perceived stress and coping. If an…

  13. Voices of Children, Parents and Teachers: How Children Cope with Stress during School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mun

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how children's perceptions of stress factors and coping strategies are constructed over time. Children were interviewed before and after they made the transition from preschool to primary school. This study also explores teachers' and parental strategies in helping children to cope with stress at school. The sample included 53…

  14. Learning Styles and Their Relationship to Stress and Coping in College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, L. M.; Hensley, B.; Baker, R. C.; Dearman, L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between specific learning styles and stress and coping in a sample of female college students (N = 246). Participants in the study were assessed on the three variables by completing several self-report instruments measuring learning styles, life stress level, and coping skills. There were significant…

  15. Does Self-Esteem Moderate the Relations among Perceived Stress, Coping, and Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbarth, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This study examined self-esteem as a moderator of the influence of perceived stress and coping on symptoms of depression in a sample of 713 college students. The results suggest that self-esteem may play an important role in the development of depressive symptoms in college students through interactions with perceived stress and coping. If an…

  16. Spiritual Practices as a Means of Coping with and Ameliorating Stress to Reduce Teacher Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwick, James M. M.; Kang, Shin Ji

    2013-01-01

    Teacher attrition has been a serious problem in maintaining quality education in the United States. Although the research produced extensive documentation on teachers' stress and attrition, little attention has been paid to their spiritual stress coping strategies. This article documents various spiritual practices as a means of coping with…

  17. The Impact of Perceived Stress and Coping Adequacy on the Health of Nurses: A Pilot Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress and coping abilities influence the health and work performance of nurses. However, little is known about the combined influence of stress perception and perceived coping adequacy and its impact on the health of nurses. This study examined the relationship between stress, coping, and the combined influences of perceived stress and coping abilities on health and work performance. A valid and reliable questionnaire was completed by 120 nurses in a Midwestern hospital in the USA. In general, the nurses were not healthy: 92% had moderate-to-very high stress levels; 78% slept less than 8 hours of sleep per night; 69% did not exercise regularly; 63% consumed less than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day; and 22% were classified as binge drinkers. When confronted with workplace stress, 70% of nurses reported that they consumed more junk food and 63% reported that they consumed more food than usual as a way of coping. Nurses in the “high stress/poor coping” group had the poorest health outcomes and highest health risk behaviors compared to those in other groups. The combined variables of perceived stress and perceived coping adequacy influenced the health of nurses. Therefore, worksite health promotion programs for nurses should focus equally on stress reduction, stress management, and the development of healthy coping skills.

  18. Job Stress and Organizational Commitment among Mentoring Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Orly; Court, Deborah; Petal, Pnina

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the impact of job stress on the organizational commitment of a random, representative sample of coordinators in the Israeli educational mentoring organization PMP. Organizational commitment, including affective, continuance and normative commitment, refers to worker relations in the organization, and how…

  19. Using analytic hierarchy process to identify the nurses with high stress-coping capability: model and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    F C Pan, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Nurses have long been relied as the major labor force in hospitals. Featured with complicated and highly labor-intensive job requirement, multiple pressures from different sources was inevitable. Success in identifying stresses and accordingly coping with such stresses is important for job performance of nurses, and service quality of a hospital. Purpose of this research is to identify the determinants of nurses' capabilities. A modified Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was adopted. Overall, 105 nurses from several randomly selected hospitals in southern Taiwan were investigated to generate factors. Ten experienced practitioners were included as the expert in the AHP to produce weights of each criterion. Six nurses from two regional hospitals were then selected to test the model. Four factors are then identified as the second level of hierarchy. The study result shows that the family factor is the most important factor, and followed by the personal attributes. Top three sub-criteria that attribute to the nurse's stress-coping capability are children's education, good career plan, and healthy family. The practical simulation provided evidence for the usefulness of this model. The study suggested including these key determinants into the practice of human-resource management, and restructuring the hospital's organization, creating an employee-support system as well as a family-friendly working climate. The research provided evidence that supports the usefulness of AHP in identifying the key factors that help stabilizing a nursing team.

  20. Using analytic hierarchy process to identify the nurses with high stress-coping capability: model and application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank F C Pan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have long been relied as the major labor force in hospitals. Featured with complicated and highly labor-intensive job requirement, multiple pressures from different sources was inevitable. Success in identifying stresses and accordingly coping with such stresses is important for job performance of nurses, and service quality of a hospital. Purpose of this research is to identify the determinants of nurses' capabilities.A modified Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP was adopted. Overall, 105 nurses from several randomly selected hospitals in southern Taiwan were investigated to generate factors. Ten experienced practitioners were included as the expert in the AHP to produce weights of each criterion. Six nurses from two regional hospitals were then selected to test the model.Four factors are then identified as the second level of hierarchy. The study result shows that the family factor is the most important factor, and followed by the personal attributes. Top three sub-criteria that attribute to the nurse's stress-coping capability are children's education, good career plan, and healthy family. The practical simulation provided evidence for the usefulness of this model.The study suggested including these key determinants into the practice of human-resource management, and restructuring the hospital's organization, creating an employee-support system as well as a family-friendly working climate. The research provided evidence that supports the usefulness of AHP in identifying the key factors that help stabilizing a nursing team.

  1. Job-Related Stress among Business- and Professional-Writing Faculty Members: Findings and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccio, Joseph F.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the nature and extent of job-related stress among collegiate business- and professional-writing faculty. Finds that job-related stress is associated with faculty members' rank, type of institution, and sex. (KEH)

  2. Assessment of nursing students' stress levels and coping strategies in operating room practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz Findik, Ummu; Ozbas, Ayfer; Cavdar, Ikbal; Yildizeli Topcu, Sacide; Onler, Ebru

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress levels and stress coping strategies of nursing students in their first operating room experience. This descriptive study was done with 126 nursing students who were having an experience in an operating room for the first time. Data were collected by using Personal Information Form, Clinical Stress Questionnaire, and Styles of Coping Inventory. The nursing students mostly had low clinical stress levels (M = 27.56, SD = 10.76) and adopted a self-confident approach in coping with stress (M = 14.3, SD = 3.58). The nursing students generally employed a helpless/self-accusatory approach among passive patterns as their clinical stress levels increased, used a self-confident and optimistic approach among active patterns as their average age increased, and those who had never been to an operating room previously used a submissive approach among passive patterns. The results showed that low levels of stress caused the nursing students to use active patterns in coping with stress, whereas increasing levels of stress resulted in employing passive patterns in stress coping. The nursing students should be ensured to maintain low levels of stress and use active patterns in stress coping.

  3. [Examination of role of personality and the effects of stress coping in stress process as within process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamoto, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    This study used daily diary methods to investigate if fear of interpersonal stress in daily affect could be explained by coping strategies, and if daily affect and coping would vary randomly across personality traits. Every day for one week, 103 undergraduates recorded their daily events, perceived interpersonal stress, cognitive appraisal, coping strategies, positive events, and positive and negative affect twice a day. A hierarchical linear model and multilevel structural equation modeling were used to examine the relationships between variables. Results, suggest that problem-focused coping was associated with within-level maladjustment, while positive reappraisal was associated with within-level adjustment. In addition, neuroticism appeared to moderate the relationship between coping and daily affect. Furthermore, there is evidence that higher fear of interpersonal stress predicts greater active coping, and positive affect.

  4. The study of Job Stress and Tension Management among Oncology Nurses of Ahvaz Hospitals in 2015

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    Mina abdali Bardeh

    2016-05-01

    of the hospital. Since among the four types of job stress, the colleague-related stress was the highest, to enhance the nurses’ health and improve relations between the colleagues, health officials and managers should plan so that by offering effective solutions in this area, the possible adverse consequences of job tension among the treatment team to be prevented. In addition, according to this research levels of tension relieve management were at average which can be maximized by holding teaching sessions with experienced psychologists to educate skills of coping stress among nurses. Since managing tension relieve in the area of positive attitude towards the profession achieved the highest mean, therefore, by teaching stress management skills particularly using a positive attitude towards the role of work, it seems that enhancement of spirituality and existence of psychological support systems for reducing stress levels of the nurses is necessary

  5. Type D personality, physical symptoms and subjective stress: the mediating effects of coping and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynn; Wingate, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Coping style and social support may represent mechanisms to explain the relationship between Type D personality and ill-health. This study investigated whether Type D is associated with physical symptoms and perceived stress in a non-cardiac population, and if these relationships are mediated by coping and social support. In a cross-sectional study, 304 participants (110 males, mean age 22.1 years) completed measures of Type D, physical symptoms, coping, perceived stress and social support. Results showed that Type D, the interaction of negative affectivity and social inhibition (NA × SI), was positively correlated with physical symptoms, perceived stress, and avoidant coping, and negatively correlated with social support, problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping. A series of bootstrapped multiple mediator tests showed that social support and avoidant coping fully mediated the relationship between Type D and physical symptoms. Furthermore, social support and emotion-focused coping partially mediated the relationship between Type D and perceived stress. These findings demonstrate for the first time that Type D personality is associated with physical symptoms in a non-cardiac population. Social support and coping style represent mechanisms that can, in part, explain the relationship between Type D and physical symptoms, and Type D and perceived stress.

  6. Occupational stress and coping resources in physiotherapists: a survey of physiotherapists in three general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M C; Barros, L; Carolino, E

    2010-12-01

    To identify occupational stressors and coping resources in a group of physiotherapists, and to analyse interactions between subjective levels of stress, efficacy in stress resolution and coping resources used by these professionals. A sample of 55 physiotherapists working in three general hospitals in Portugal completed the Coping Resources Inventory for Stress, the Occupational Stressors Inventory and two subjective scales for stress and stress resolution. Most physiotherapists perceived that they were moderately stressed (19/55, 35%) or stressed (20/55, 36%) due to work, and reported that their efficacy in stress resolution was moderate (25/54, 46%) or efficient (23/54, 42%). Issues related to lack of professional autonomy, lack of organisation in the hierarchical command chain, lack of professional and social recognition, disorganisation in task distribution and interpersonal conflicts with superiors were identified as the main sources of stress. The most frequently used coping resources were social support, stress monitoring, physical health and structuring. Perceived efficacy in stress resolution was inversely related to perceived level of occupational stress (r=-0.61, P<0.01). Significant correlations were found between several coping resources and the perceived level of stress and efficacy in stress resolution. Associations between problem solving, cognitive restructuring and stress monitoring and both low levels of perceived stress and high levels of perceived efficacy were particularly strong. The importance of identifying stressors and coping resources related to physiotherapists' occupational stress, and the need for the development of specific training programmes to cope with stress are supported. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Relationship of job stress with job burnout and quality of work life in workers for offshore oil platforms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X L; Wei, T D; Lan, Y J

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To evaluate the current status of job burnout and qual ity of work life (QWL) in workers for offshore oil platforms, and to analyze the relationship of job stress with job burnout and QWL and the direct and indirect effects of job stress on QWL. Methods: Cluster random sampling was used to select 382 work-ers for 8 oil platforms of China National Offshore Oil Corporation in October 2015. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect the individual characteristics of subjects. The Quality of Work Life Scale (QWL7-32) , Occupa-tional Stress Inventory-Revised Edition (OSI-R) , and Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) were used to investigate the QWL, job stress, and job burnout of subjects. Results: Among all the workers for offshore oil platforms, 87.2% had mild job burnout. The total QWL score was 116.01 ± 16.73; 8.3% of the workers had poor QWL, and 68.5% had moderate QWL. QWL was reduced with heavier task, vaguer task, and increasing mental stress and physical stress (P<0.05) , and increased with more social support (P<0.05) . Job stress had di-rect and indirect effects on QWL; stress reaction had the most effect on QWL (total effect size -0.509) , followed by social support (total effect size 0.444) . Conclusion: Most workers for offshore oil platforms have mild job burn-out and moderate QWL. Job stress is associated with job burnout and QWL, and stress reaction and social support have relatively high influence on QWL.

  8. Stress and Coping in Primary Caregivers of Children with a Disability: A Qualitative Study Using the Lazarus and Folkman Process Model of Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Tara; French, Davina; Fernandez, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-six primary caregivers of children with a disability took part in focus groups or interviews to discuss their perceptions of stress and the coping process. Research was framed within the Process Model of Stress and Coping (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984). Findings provided a snapshot of the common stresses encountered by caregivers and indicate…

  9. Vulnerabilidade ao stress, estratégias de coping e autoeficácia em professores portugueses Vulnerability to stress, coping strategies and self-efficiency among Portuguese teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Pocinho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, apresentamos uma investigação realizada com professores, no qual se procura determinar a vulnerabilidade ao stress; identificar as principais fontes de stress; estabelecer as principais estratégias de coping; analisar se as estratégias deste condicionam a presença de stress laboral; e reconhecer se a autoeficácia percebida é preditora desse tipo de stress. Trata-se duma investigação por questionário, do tipo correlacional, e a amostra é constituída por 54 professores do Ensino Básico público português. As respostas ao Questionário sociodemográfico e profissional; ao Questionário de Vulnerabilidade ao Stress - 23QVS (Serra, 2000; ao Questionário de Stress nos Professores - QSP (Gomes et al., 2006; Gomes, 2007; ao Coping Job Scale - CJS de Latack (adaptação de Jesus & Pereira, 1994; e à Escala de Avaliação de Autoeficácia Geral (Ribeiro, 1995 revelam que 20,4% dos docentes são vulneráveis ao stress; os comportamentos inadequados/indisciplina dos alunos são as principais fontes de stress; as estratégias de controlo são as mais utilizadas pelos participantes para enfrentar o stress, seguidas das de escape e das de gestão de sintomas. Os professores não vulneráveis ao stress utilizam principalmente estratégias de controlo e apresentam níveis mais elevados de eficácia perante a adversidade, bem como de iniciativa e persistência em relação aos professores vulneráveis ao stress.In this work we present a research carried out on teachers to determine their vulnerability to stress, to identify the main sources of stress, to recognize teachers' main coping strategies, to analyze whether such strategies condition the presence of stress at work, and to establish whether the self-efficiency perceived can be used to predict work stress. This is a correlational questionnaire-based research performed on a 54-teacher sample from Portugal's public basic education schools. The answers to the Social, Demographic

  10. Coping with burns : The role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Mark; Hofland, Helma; de jong, Alette; Van Loey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected

  11. Coping with burns : the role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Mark W G; Hofland, Helma W.; De Jong, Alette E.; Van Loey, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected

  12. Job Stress, Burnout and Job Satisfaction: An Intervention Study for Staff Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innstrand, Siw Tone; Espnes, Geir Arild; Mykletun, Reidar

    2004-01-01

    Background: The present paper reviews staff stress, burnout and job satisfaction. Methods: A longitudinal, quasi experimental study was carried out among staff working with people with intellectual disabilities in two municipalities in Norway. The purpose was to measure mean differences of stress, burnout and job satisfaction after different…

  13. The influence of uncertainty in illness, stress appraisal, and hope on coping in survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonghongkul, T; Moore, S M; Musil, C; Schneider, S; Deimling, G

    2000-12-01

    On the basis of Mishel's uncertainty in illness theory, Lazarus and Folkman's stress on appraisal and coping, and Herth's perspective of hope, this cross-sectional, correlational study was designed to examine the influence of uncertainty, stress appraisal, and hope on coping in 71 survivors of breast cancer. Uncertainty was measured by the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness: Community Scale, stress appraisal by the Stress Appraisal Index, hope by the Herth Hope Index, and coping by the Ways of Coping Questionnaires (WCQ).

  14. School Age Children's Coping with Sexual Abuse: Abuse Stresses and Symptoms Associated with Four Coping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Mark; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Coping strategies used by 84 sexually abused children ages 7-12 were evaluated along with related symptoms and factors. Avoidance behavior was associated with fewer behavioral problems but greater sexual anxiety. Internalization was associated with increased guilt, and active/social coping was associated with no symptoms or benefits. Expressive…

  15. Coping behaviours and post-traumatic stress in war-affected eastern Congolese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mels, Cindy; Derluyn, Ilse; Broekaert, Eric; García-Pérez, Coral

    2015-02-01

    This study explores coping strategies used by war-affected eastern Congolese adolescents across age and sex, and the association between post-traumatic stress symptoms and engagement and disengagement coping. Cross-sectional data were collected in 11 secondary schools across four areas in the Ituri province, Democratic Republic of Congo. A total of 952 pupils (45.3% girls, 54.7% boys) aged 13-21 years (M = 15.83, standard deviation = 1.81) participated in self-report assessment, using instruments that were either specifically developed (Adolescent Complex Emergency Exposure Scale, assessing traumatic exposure), validated (Impact of Event Scale Revised, assessing post-traumatic stress symptoms) or reviewed (Kidcope, assessing coping strategies) for the study population. Reported coping strategies varied with age, and boys more frequently reported problem solving and resignation as compared with girls. Disengagement coping was associated with lower symptom scores in younger adolescent girls, as was the interaction effect between engagement and disengagement coping. We conclude that disengagement coping is not necessarily a maladaptive reaction to stressful events in war-affected situations and that future research should aim to better understand the heterogeneous patterns of stress and coping responses, including the role of factors such as the nature and appraisal of stressors, available resources for coping and cultural preferences.

  16. The Role of Coping in the Relationship between Perceived Racism and Racism-Related Stress for Asian Americans: Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christopher T. H.; Alvarez, Alvin N.; Juang, Linda P.; Liang, Mandy X.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of stress and coping theory, the authors examined coping as a mediator of the relationship between perceptions of racism and racism-related stress with a sample of Asian American college students (N = 336). Results indicated that coping mediated the relationship between racism and racism-related stress differentially by gender. The…

  17. Stress and Coping Strategies of Students in a Medical Faculty in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Alshagga, Mustafa Ahmed; Rampal, Krishna Gopal

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stress may affect students’ health and their academic performance. Coping strategies are specific efforts that individuals employ to manage stress. This study aimed to assess the perception of stress among medical students and their coping strategies. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 376 medical and medical sciences undergraduates in Management and Science University in Malaysia. Stress was assessed by a global rating of stress. Sources of stress were assessed using a 17-item questionnaire. The validated Brief COPE inventory was used to assess coping strategies. Results: The majority of respondents were females (64.4%), aged 21 years or older (63.0%), and were Malays (68.9%). Forty-six percent felt stress. The most common stressor was worries of the future (71.0%), followed by financial difficulties (68.6%). Significant predictors of stress were smoking (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.3–6.8, P = 0.009), worries of the future (OR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.3–3.4, P = 0.005), self-blame (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.5, P = 0.001), lack of emotional support (OR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.7–0.9, P = 0.017), and lack of acceptance (OR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.6–0.9, P = 0.010). Students used active coping, religious coping reframing, planning, and acceptance to cope with stress. Conclusion: Stressors reported by the students were mainly financial and academic issues. Students adopted active coping strategies rather than avoidance. Students should receive consultation on how to manage and cope with stress. PMID:22135602

  18. Family Stress and Coping From Hospitalization of Clients With Severe Alcohol Use Disorder in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gyu-Hee; Choi, Yun-Jung

    The rate of relapse and involuntary hospitalization among clients with alcohol use disorder exceeds 40% in South Korea. As a result, family members of clients experience considerable stress and require the assistance of professional services. This empirical study investigates levels of perceived stress and stress coping styles among family members of clients with severe alcohol use disorder and examines the correlations among these variables. Data were collected from three inpatient alcohol rehabilitation centers and five psychiatric hospitals in South Korea. Family stress levels and stress coping styles for 133 respondents were evaluated using the Hospital Stress Rating Scale for Family Members and the Stress Coping Style Checklist. There were significant differences in stress levels according to whether participants had attended a family educational program in the past or were doing so presently. Furthermore, significant differences in stress were observed among participants who were using the stress coping style of easing strained emotions during the client's hospitalization but who had never attended an educational program. Among the subcategories, stress levels had especially strong relationships with easing strained emotions, seeking advice, and solving problems. The results showed that families with severe alcohol use disorder experience stress from the client's hospitalization and seek advice from neighbors to deal with worries, privacy concerns, and economic problems. Family interventions are needed to provide family members with strategies to cope with stress, which can support recovery of clients with severe alcohol use disorder.

  19. Job stress and mortality in older age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Tobiasz-Adamczyk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper aims to assess the relationship between the determinants of the psychosocial work environment, as expressed in terms of JDC or ERI models, and all-cause mortality in older individuals. Materials and Methods: The baseline study was conducted on a cohort comprising a random sample of 65-year-old community-dwelling citizens of Kraków, Poland. All of the 727 participants (410 women, 317 men were interviewed in their households in the period between 2001 and 2003; a structured questionnaire was used regarding their occupational activity history, which included indexes measuring particular dimensions of their psychosocial work environment based on Karasek's Job Demand-Control model and Siegrist's Effort-Reward Imbalance model, as well as health-related quality of life and demographic data. Mortality was ascertained by monitoring City Vital Records for 7 years. Analyses were conducted separately for men and women, with the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: During a 7-year follow-up period, 59 participants (8.1% died, including 21 women (5.1% of total women and 38 men (12% (p < 0.05. Significant differences in the number of deaths occurred regarding disproportion between physical demands and control in men: those with low physical demands and low control died three times more often than those with high control, regardless of the level of demands. The multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed that significantly higher risk of death was observed only in men with low physical demands and low control, compared to those with low physical demands and high control (Exp(B = 4.65, 95% CI: 1.64-13.2. Conclusions: Observed differences in mortality patterns are similar to the patterns of relationships observed in health-related quality of life (HRQoL level at the beginning of old age; however, the relationship between efforts and rewards or demands and control and mortality was not fully confirmed.

  20. The Relationship Between Stress and Coping in Table Tennis

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    Kurimay Dora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cognitive competitive anxiety intensity and coping strategies in table tennis players. One hundred and two (102 US competitive table tennis players of age range from 10 to 60 filled out a Revised Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2R, Cox et al., 2003 at least 30 minutes before the start of their tournament match and a Modified Cope questionnaire (MCOPE; Crocker and Graham, 1995 15 minutes after they finished their match. Our study found significant differences between low and high cognitive competitive anxiety groups with regard to the use of coping strategies. The high cognitive competitive anxiety intensity group used significantly more behavioral disengagement (avoidance coping, p ≤ 0.05, denial coping strategies (emotion focused coping, p ≤ 0.01 compared to the low cognitive anxiety intensity group. Our results suggest that there is some connection between anxiety intensity and coping strategies. If the cognitive anxiety intensity (for example, intensity from worrying is very high, an athlete might be more likely to use avoidance coping (such as behavioral disengagement and emotion-focused coping (such as denial and venting of emotions compared to athletes who have low cognitive competitive anxiety. Furthermore, gender differences in cognitive anxiety and direction were found. Confidence management techniques such as positive self-talk, breathing techniques and visualization should be taught to athletes to assist them in coping with their competitive anxiety better and to enhance their performance.

  1. The Relationship Between Personality Traits, Stress and Job Satisfaction of Employees of Iran Telecom Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zamanian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Job satisfaction is affected by several factors including personality characteristics and job stress. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between personality traits, job satisfaction, and stress-related. Materials and Methods: This analytical study was performed among the telecommunications industry workers. 254 persons were randomly selected as the population of the study . Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and job satisfaction and stress questionnaires were applied to gather the required data. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. Results: There was an inverse relationship between job satisfaction and job stress. The results of job stress questionnaires showed that 176, 37, and 8 employees were under high, moderate, and low stress, respectively. Overall job satisfaction scores were 14.25 + 10.95. The relationship between job stress and scale E showed a significant positive correlation between two variables so that as the level of introspection increases, people will feel more jop stress. The two scale N and L have meaningful relationship with job satisfaction so that the more stable the character, the higher the job satisfaction . Conclusion: It can be concluded that in order for promoting the job satisfaction and reducing the job stress, self-confidence enhancing skills should be trained to the employees.

  2. Relationship between depressive state, job stress, and sense of coherence among female nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with a strong sense of coherence (SOC have a high ability to cope with stress and maintain good physical and mental health. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive state, job stress, and SOC among nurses in a Japanese general hospital. Materials and Methods: A self-reporting survey was conducted among 348 female nurses in a general hospital. Job stress was measured using the Japanese version of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI scale. Depressive state was assessed by the K6 scale. SOC was assessed with the SOC scale, which includes 29 items. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was conducted to examine factors that significantly affect depressive state. Results: SOC, over-commitment, effort-esteem ratio, and age were significantly correlated with the depressive state (β = −0.46, P < 0.001; β = 0.27, P < 0.001; β = 0.16, P < 0.001; β = −0.10, P < 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: SOC may have a major influence on the depressive state among female nurses in a Japanese general hospital. From a practical perspective, health care professionals should try to enhance the SOC of nurses.

  3. A study on work stress, stress coping strategies and health promoting lifestyle among district hospital nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Lun; Tsai, Shieunt-Han; Tsai, Chao-Wen; Lee, Chia-Ying

    2011-01-01

    To determine work stress, and stress-coping strategies, and to analyze their the relationships in order to improve health-promoting lifestyle of nurses in Taiwan. Three hundred eighty-five nurses who had work experience for more than 6 mo, were selected from four district hospitals in Kaohsiung and Ping Tung. We used a stratified cluster random sampling method for the selection. The nurses answered a self-report questionnaire, which was categorized into four sections: personal background data, work stress, stress-coping strategies, and health-promoting lifestyle. The findings indicate work stress and the health promoting lifestyle of nurses are at a higher level, with stress-coping strategies being at a medium level. Work stress and stress-coping strategies were significantly and positively correlated. Professional relationships, managerial role, personal responsibility, and recognition of work stress and the responsibilities of a health-promoting lifestyle were negatively correlated. Managerial role, personal responsibility, and organizational atmosphere of work stress as well as realization, an item of health-promoting lifestyle, were negatively correlated. Recognition of work stress and stress management, items of health-promoting lifestyle, were negatively correlated. Health responsibility, and self-actualization, items of health-promoting lifestyle, as well as stress-coping strategies were negatively correlated. Nutrition, an item of health-promoting lifestyle, and the support stress-coping strategy was negatively correlated. Nurses have greater work pressure and better work stress-coping strategies, but worse health responsibility and realization of a health-promoting lifestyle. We suggest hospitals build good relationships and appropriately increase employment of nurses through a good work atmosphere to achieve nurses' realization of a health-promoting lifestyle.

  4. Stress Generation, Avoidance Coping, and Depressive Symptoms: A 10-Year Model

    OpenAIRE

    Holahan, Charles J.; Moos, Rudolf H.; Holahan, Carole K.; Brennan, Penny L.; Schutte, Kathleen K.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined (a) the role of avoidance coping in prospectively generating both chronic and acute life stressors and (b) the stress-generating role of avoidance coping as a prospective link to future depressive symptoms. Participants were 1,211 late-middle-aged individuals (500 women and 711 men) assessed 3 times over a 10-year period. As predicted, baseline avoidance coping was prospectively associated with both more chronic and more acute life stressors 4 years later. Furthermore, as ...

  5. Stress and Coping in the Lives of Recent Immigrants and Refugees: Considerations for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana; Watson, Megan; Thompson, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Recent immigrants and refugees experience great amounts of stress. Literature on immigration and stress has focused primarily on the stressors directly related to immigrants' adjustment to a new culture (i.e., acculturation stress). This manuscript discusses stress and coping in the lives of recent immigrants and refugees within a framework of…

  6. Stress and Coping in the Lives of Recent Immigrants and Refugees: Considerations for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana; Watson, Megan; Thompson, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Recent immigrants and refugees experience great amounts of stress. Literature on immigration and stress has focused primarily on the stressors directly related to immigrants' adjustment to a new culture (i.e., acculturation stress). This manuscript discusses stress and coping in the lives of recent immigrants and refugees within a framework of…

  7. Occupational stress and coping strategies among emergency department nurses of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong-Mei; Sun, Ning; Hong, Su; Fan, Yu-ying; Kong, Fan-ying; Li, Qiu-jie

    2015-08-01

    Emergency department(ED) nurses work in a rapidly changing environment with patients that have wide variety of conditions. Occupational stress in emergency department nurses is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between coping strategies and occupational stress among ED nurses in China. A correlational, cross-sectional design was adopted. Two questionnaires were given to a random sample of 127 ED nurses registered at the Heilongjiang Nurses' Association. Data were collected from the nurses that worked in the ED of five general hospitals in Harbin China. Occupational stress and coping strategies were measured by two questionnaires. A multiple regression model was applied to analyze the relationship between stress and coping strategies. The stressors of ED nurses mainly come from the ED specialty of nursing (2.97±0.55), workload and time distribution (2.97±0.58). The mean score of positive coping strategies was 2.19±0.35, higher than the norm (1.78±0.52). The mean score of negative coping strategies was 1.20±0.61, lower than the norm (1.59±0.66), both had significant statistical difference (Pprofessional were the influence factors about occupational stress to positive coping styles. Too much documents work, and medical insurance for ED nurses were the influential factors on occupational stress to negative coping styles. This study identified several factors associated with occupational stress in ED nurses. These results could be used to guide nurse managers of ED nurses to reduce work stress. The managers could pay more attention to the ED nurse's coping strategies which can further influence their health state and quality of nursing care. Reducing occupational stress and enhancing coping strategies are vital not only for encouraging nurses but also for the future of nursing development.

  8. Workplace stress, job satisfaction, job performance, and turnover intention of health care workers in rural Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming-Che; Jou, Rong-Chang; Liao, Cing-Chu; Kuo, Chung-Wei

    2015-03-01

    Workplace stress (WS) has been found to affect job satisfaction (JS), performance, and turnover intentions (TIs) in developed countries, but there is little evidence from other countries and especially rural areas. In rural Taiwan, especially, there is an insufficient health care workforce, and the situation is getting worse. To demonstrate the relationship, we used a cross-sectional structured questionnaire, and data from 344 licensed professionals in 1 rural regional hospital were analyzed using the structural equation model. The results showed that WS had a positive effect on both TI and job performance (JP) but a negative effect on satisfaction. JS did improve performance. For the staff with an external locus of control, stress affected JP and satisfaction significantly. For the staff with lower perceived job characteristics, JS affected performance significantly. The strategies to decrease stress relating to work load, role conflict, family factors, and working environment should be focused and implemented urgently to lower the turnover rate of health care workers in rural Taiwan.

  9. Neural plasticity is affected by stress and heritable variation in stress coping style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, I.B.; Sørensen, C.; Sandvik, G.K.;

    2012-01-01

    Here we use a comparative model to investigate how behavioral and physiological traits correlate with neural plasticity. Selection for divergent post-stress cortisol levels in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) has yielded low- (LR) and high responsive (HR) lines. Recent reports show low...... different stress paradigms: short-term confinement (STC) and long-term social (LTS) stress. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) and doublecortin (DCX) was generally higher in HR compared to LR fish. STC stress led to increased expression...... of PCNA and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in both lines, whereas LTS stress generally suppressed PCNA and NeuroD expression while leaving BDNF expression unaltered. These results indicate that the transcription of neuroplasticity-related genes is associated with variation in coping style, while...

  10. Post-Retirement Adjustment: Effective Coping with the Stresses of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Carole K.

    A study was conducted to examine the role of positive and negative life circumstances and individual coping factors in the psychological adjustment of older individuals. Interviews were conducted with 32 men and 32 women between the ages of 65 and 75 who were retired from mid-level or managerial jobs at the University of Texas. Most of the…

  11. Positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and coping with stress by attachment styles in Turkish students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, M Engin; Işik, Erkan

    2010-10-01

    The purpose was to investigate positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and coping with stress in relation to attachment styles. Undergraduate students (N=421) completed the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, and the Coping with Stress Scale. Results indicated that secure attachment style was the unique predictor of positive affect while fearful and preoccupied attachment styles significantly predicted negative affect. Regarding life satisfaction, a positive correlation with secure attachment style and a negative correlation with fearful and preoccupied styles were seen. However, the unique predictor of life satisfaction was preoccupied attachment style. In terms of coping with stress, there was no significant association between attachment variables and avoidance coping style, but significant links were observed between problem-focused coping and dismissing, and fearful and preoccupied attachment styles.

  12. Stress appraisal, coping, and work engagement among police recruits: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiseler, Mariana; Queirós, Cristina; Passos, Fernando; Sousa, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of stress appraisal and coping on work engagement levels (Absorption, Vigour, and Dedication) of police recruits. Participants were 387 men, ages 20 to 33 yr. (M = 24.1, SD = 2.4), in their last month of academy training before becoming police officers. Partially in support of predictions, work engagement was associated with Stressor control perceived, but not Stress intensity experienced over a self-selected stressor. Although the three dimensions of work engagement were explained by Stressor control and coping, Absorption was the dimension better explained by these variables. Police recruits reporting higher Absorption, Vigour, and Dedication reported using more Active coping and less Behavioural disengagement. Results showed that stress appraisal and coping are important variables influencing work engagement among police recruits. Findings suggested that future applied interventions fostering work engagement among police recruits should reinforce perceptions of control over a stressor as well as Active coping strategies.

  13. The relations of parental expressivity and support to children's coping with daily stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Fabes, Richard A; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L

    2004-03-01

    The relations of parents' emotional expressivity, mothers' support, and children's daily stress to children's constructive coping were examined in a sample of ninety-four 7- to 12-year-old children. For 2 weeks, children, together with their mothers, completed daily diaries of their stressful events. Mothers and fathers reported on their expression of positive, negative submissive, and negative dominant emotion. Although fathers' expressivity was not related to children's constructive coping, mothers' expression of negative emotion, particularly negative dominant emotion, was negatively related to children's constructive coping. Children's stress was negatively related to their constructive coping, and this relation was stronger for children exposed to low levels of parents' positive emotion and mothers' expression of negative submissive emotion. Children's constructive coping was positively related to mothers' supportive strategies.

  14. Acculturative stress, social support, and coping: relations to psychological adjustment among Mexican American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Lisa J; Iturbide, Maria I; Torres Stone, Rosalie A; McGinley, Meredith; Raffaelli, Marcela; Carlo, Gustavo

    2007-10-01

    This study examined the relations between acculturative stress and psychological functioning, as well as the protective role of social support and coping style, in a sample of 148 Mexican American college students (67% female, 33% male; mean age = 23.05 years, SD = 3.33). In bivariate analyses, acculturative stress was associated with higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Moreover, active coping was associated with better adjustment (lower depression), whereas avoidant coping predicted poorer adjustment (higher levels of depression and anxiety). Tests of interaction effects indicated that parental support and active coping buffered the effects of high acculturative stress on anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms. In addition, peer support moderated the relation between acculturative stress and anxiety symptoms. Implications for reducing the effects of acculturative stress among Mexican American college students are discussed.

  15. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Job Satisfaction and Counterproductive Work Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia D. Pitariu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present economical challenges increase the level of demand and pressure on people in their workplaces, eventually affecting the efficiency of organizations. Given the relationship between job strain and individual and organizational outcomes (Robertson, 2009, the present context places an even higher importance on understanding and dealing correctly with these issues. The research at hand examines the predictive value of different occupational sources of pressure on job satisfaction and counterproductive work behaviour, using an occupational sample in the financial services field. The participants were asked to complete two questionnaires: OSI-90 (Cooper, Sloan & Williams, 1996 and Workplace Deviance Scale (Bennett & Robinson, 2000. The results indicate that stressors related to the organizational climate, the work relationships, organizational hassles and workload predict counterproductive work behaviour. Furthermore, job satisfaction was positively related to the high quality of the work relationship and low levels of tension in the organizational climate and hassles, while the level of satisfaction with the organization was associated with the work-family balance and the organizational climate. Implications for developing programs that help employees effectively cope with these sources of stress as well as recommendations for developing healthier organizations are discussed.

  16. Staff stress and job satisfaction at a children's hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, H; Stein, A; Forrest, G C; Baum, J D

    1989-01-01

    A study of staff stress and job satisfaction was undertaken in a children's hospice. In addition factors were investigated which might be stressful or which helped staff to manage in difficult circumstances. Three quarters were under comparatively little stress and in general showed very few psychological symptoms but a distinct subgroup were under a great deal of stress. A number of factors, notably recent personal bereavement and unresolved grief about a death that had occurred before they came to work at the hospice, distinguished this small group. Job satisfaction was generally high. The main sources of stress were: the sense of impotence staff felt when they were unable to relieve perceived needs or distress; dealing with negative responses in families, and conflicts within the staff group. The most important mitigating factors were: the informal support that staff provided for each other in this small cohesive working unit, the homelike atmosphere of the hospice, and the diversity of professional and personal skills among the staff group. The implications of these findings for reducing stress among staff dealing with dying people are discussed; this includes not only staff on paediatric wards, intensive care and neonatal units, but also community paediatric nurses.

  17. Prenatal stress perception and coping strategies: Insights from a longitudinal prospective pregnancy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletzke, J; Kocalevent, R-D; Hansen, G; Rose, M; Becher, H; Hecher, K; Arck, P C; Diemert, A

    2017-11-01

    Prenatal distress has been linked to pregnancy complications and poor offspring's health, despite the fact that longitudinal assessments of various stress dimensions are still lacking. Hence, we aimed to assess perceived stress over the course of pregnancy. Moreover, we examined whether social support and coping styles are linked to prenatal stress trajectories. Data from 543 women participating in the PRINCE (Prenatal Identification of Children Health) study, a prospective population-based cohort study, was used for the present analyses. Once per trimester the women completed questionnaires regarding different psychometric measures, including the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Linear mixed regression models were used to examine perceived stress development longitudinally and to relate social support and coping styles to stress trajectories during pregnancy. A significant decrease of perceived stress was observed over the course of pregnancy. Stratifying the study sample according to parity, women delivering their first child had continuously lower perceived stress scores compared to women having already one or more children, and a significant decrease during pregnancy was exclusively observed in primiparous women. Both, positive coping strategies and higher perceived and received social support were independently associated with lower perceived stress, while evasive coping strategies were associated with higher levels of perceived stress. Our study reveals stress perception trajectories during pregnancies in primi- and multiparous women. Our findings underscore the need for intervention strategies aiming to improve social support and positive coping strategies especially in multiparous women in order to reduce the risks for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Appraisal and Coping: Moderators or Mediators of Stress in Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Carmen Louis

    2003-01-01

    This study focused on one question: Do caregiver responses--emotion-focused coping, problem-focused coping, appraisal of burden, and appraisal of satisfaction--mediate or moderate the effects of caregiving stress on psychological well-being? Findings indicate that development of interventions that focus on how caregivers appraise their situation,…

  19. Appraisal and Coping: Moderators or Mediators of Stress in Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Carmen Louis

    2003-01-01

    This study focused on one question: Do caregiver responses--emotion-focused coping, problem-focused coping, appraisal of burden, and appraisal of satisfaction--mediate or moderate the effects of caregiving stress on psychological well-being? Findings indicate that development of interventions that focus on how caregivers appraise their situation,…

  20. Coping with Interpersonal Stress and Psychosocial Health among Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Angela T.

    2006-01-01

    This meta-analysis examines the relationship between active coping and psychosocial health among youth. Results from 40 studies of coping with interpersonal stress were synthesized using a random-effects model. Four areas of psychosocial functioning were examined: externalizing and internalizing behavior problems, social competence, and academic…

  1. Personal characteristics and forms of religiosity involved in coping with stress. Empirical studies of policeman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Franczak

    2012-12-01

    associations with the methods of coping with stress measured by Folkman and Lazarus WCQ Questionnaire. However, in the case of how to deal with difficult situations diagnosed by Questionnaire WCQ religious dimensions play a role only in three cases: the confrontation, avoidance and positive revaluation. This ways of coping are supported by prayer and worship.

  2. Stress Generation, Avoidance Coping, and Depressive Symptoms: A 10-Year Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Charles J.; Moos, Rudolf H.; Holahan, Carole K.; Brennan, Penny L.; Schutte, Kathleen K.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined (a) the role of avoidance coping in prospectively generating both chronic and acute life stressors and (b) the stress-generating role of avoidance coping as a prospective link to future depressive symptoms. Participants were 1,211 late-middle-aged individuals (500 women and 711 men) assessed 3 times over a 10-year period. As…

  3. EXPLORATORY STUDY: STRESS, COPING AND SUPPORT AMONG PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meri NOLCHEVA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Each year more families are confronted with unique challenges related to raising a child with ASD. Parenting stress is a significant aspect of fulfilling the role as a parent, and having a child with ASD greatly influences the experienced stress. The literature review indicates that parenting stress is inversely proportional to family support and coping mechanisms. Aim:Appraising the stress level among parents of children with ASD, the coping mechanisms and the level of family support, in comparison with parents of children diagnosed with ID. Method:A group of parents of children with ASD (N=35 and a second group of children with ID (N=35 completed four questionnnaires: PSI-SF, Brief COPE, FSS and demographic questionnaire. The data was analyzed using t-test for comparison, Chi-square test for comparing frequency distributions and Pearson coefficient for correlation, with pstress did not differ between the two groups. The coping mechanisms used by the parents of children with ASD showed that increased usage of distraction (r=0.469 and disengagement (r=0.567 increased the level of parenting stress. Family support (r=-0.415 is a key buffer and coping mechanism for managing the stress in parents of children with ASD. Conclusion:There are no differences in the level of stress, coping mechanisms and the level of support comparing parents of children with ASD and ID.

  4. Perceived Stress and Coping Styles among Malay Caregivers of Children with Learning Disabilities in Kelantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Siti Nor Ismalina; Ishak, Ismarulyusda; Rahman, Azriani Ab; Saat, Nur Zakiah Mohd; Din, Normah Che; Lubis, Syarif Husin; Ismail, Muhammad Faiz Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Background Caregivers of children with learning disabilities have been shown to experience increased stress and greater negative caregiving consequences than those with typically developing children. There remains a lack of studies focusing on stress and coping mechanisms among caregivers of a wider age group and diagnosis of individuals with disabilities in Asian countries. The current study examines levels of perceived stress and associated child and caregiver factors among caregivers of children with learning disabilities in the Malaysian context. An additional aim was to determine whether caregiver coping styles may be predictors of perceived stress. Methods The Malay version of the Perceived Stress Scale with 10 items and the Brief COPE Scale were administered to a sample of 190 Malay caregivers of children with learning disabilities registered with community-based rehabilitation centres in Kelantan, a state in Peninsular Malaysia. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to determine the predictors of perceived stress. Results The mean total perceived stress score of caregivers was 16.96 (SD = 4.66). The most frequently used coping styles found among caregivers included religion, acceptance and positive reframing, while substance use and behavioural disengagement were least frequently used. Higher perceived stress was significantly predicted among caregivers with fewer children, frequent use of instrumental support and behavioural disengagement coping, and lack of emotional support and religious coping. Conclusion Findings indicate that the perceived stress levels among caregivers were significantly predicted by different coping styles. It is vital to help the caregivers improve their good coping styles in order to reduce their stress levels. PMID:28381931

  5. Jobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Review of the movie Jobs (Joshua Michael Stern, 2013), a drama about Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple.......Review of the movie Jobs (Joshua Michael Stern, 2013), a drama about Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple....

  6. Jobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Review of the movie Jobs (Joshua Michael Stern, 2013), a drama about Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple.......Review of the movie Jobs (Joshua Michael Stern, 2013), a drama about Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple....

  7. Stress Management in Physical Education Class: An Experiential Approach to Improve Coping Skills and Reduce Stress Perceptions in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Christin; Feldmeth, Anna Karina; Brand, Serge; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In most physical education (PE) syllabuses, promoting life skills constitutes an important educational objective. The aim of this study was to implement a coping training program (EPHECT) within regular PE and to evaluate its effects on coping and stress among vocational students. Eight classes from a vocational school were selected for study;…

  8. Stress Management in Physical Education Class: An Experiential Approach to Improve Coping Skills and Reduce Stress Perceptions in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Christin; Feldmeth, Anna Karina; Brand, Serge; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Gerber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In most physical education (PE) syllabuses, promoting life skills constitutes an important educational objective. The aim of this study was to implement a coping training program (EPHECT) within regular PE and to evaluate its effects on coping and stress among vocational students. Eight classes from a vocational school were selected for study;…

  9. Association of stress coping strategies with Internet addiction in college students: The moderating effect of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wei-Po; Ko, Chih-Hung; Kaufman, Erin A; Crowell, Sheila E; Hsiao, Ray C; Wang, Peng-Wei; Lin, Jin-Jia; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the association between stress-related coping strategies and Internet addiction and the moderating effect of depression in a sample of Taiwanese college students. A total of 500 college students (238 men and 262 women) participated in this study. Internet addiction was assessed using the Chen Internet Addiction Scale. Participants' stress coping strategies and depressive symptoms were measured using the Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced and the Beck Depression Inventory-II, respectively. We used t and chi-square tests to examine differences in demographic characteristics, depression, and stress coping strategies between participants with and without Internet addiction. Significant variables were used in a logistic regression model to examine the association between stress coping strategies and Internet addiction and the moderating effect of depression on the association. Results indicated that use of restraint coping was negatively associated with Internet addiction (odds ratio [OR]=0.886, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.802-0.977), whereas denial (OR=1.177, 95% CI: 1.029-1.346) and mental disengagement (OR=2.673, 95% CI: 1.499-4.767) were positively associated with Internet addiction. Depression had a moderating effect on the association between denial and Internet addiction (OR=0.701, 95% CI: 0.530-0.927). Stress coping strategies and depression are important factors to evaluate when developing intervention programs targeting college undergraduate students with Internet addiction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The relationship among young adult college students' depression, anxiety, stress, demographics, life satisfaction, and coping styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Jihan Saber Raja; Staten, Ruth; Hall, Lynne A; Lennie, Terry A

    2012-03-01

    Recent research indicates that young adult college students experience increased levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. It is less clear what strategies college health care providers might use to assist students in decreasing these mental health concerns. In this paper, we examine the relative importance of coping style, life satisfaction, and selected demographics in predicting undergraduates' depression, anxiety, and stress. A total of 508 full-time undergraduate students aged 18-24 years completed the study measures and a short demographics information questionnaire. Coping strategies and life satisfaction were assessed using the Brief COPE Inventory and an adapted version of the Brief Students' Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale. Depression, anxiety, and stress were measured using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21). Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relative influence of each of the independent variables on depression, anxiety, and stress. Maladaptive coping was the main predictor of depression, anxiety, and stress. Adaptive coping was not a significant predictor of any of the three outcome variables. Reducing maladaptive coping behaviors may have the most positive impact on reducing depression, anxiety, and stress in this population.

  11. The Relationship between Occupational Stress and Job Satisfaction: The Case of Pakistani Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Abdul Qayyum

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to find out the relationship between occupational stress and job satisfaction based on age, gender, nature of job, cadre, work experience of university teachers, and sector of university. The Pearson correlation indicates: no significant relationship found between job satisfaction and overall occupational stress; inverse…

  12. The Effects of Occupational Stress, Work-Centrality, Self-Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction on Intent to Quit Among Long-Term Care Workers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongkyu; Yoon, Seokwon; Moon, Sung Seek; Lee, Kyoung Hag; Park, Jueun

    2017-01-01

    A large and growing population of elderly Koreans with chronic conditions necessitates an increase in long-term care. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of occupational stress, work-centrality, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction on intent to leave among long-term care workers in Korea. We tested the hypothesized structural equation model predicting the intention to quit among long-term care workers in Korea. Survey data were collected from 532 long-term care workers in Seoul, Korea. Results showed that occupational stress was positively associated with intention to leave the job. The study also identified several possible mediators (self-efficacy, work-centrality, job satisfaction) in the relationship between stress and intent to quit. Evidence-based stress management interventions are suggested to help the workers better cope with stressors. Mentoring programs should also be considered for new workers.

  13. The association of personality traits and coping styles according to stress level

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some personality traits and coping styles could be as risk factors in stressful situations. This study aimed to investigate the association of personality traits and coping styles according to the stress level. Meterials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in 2011. A total of 4628 individuals over 20 years were selected by random sampling from nonacademic employees that working in 50 different centers across Isfahan province. Data were collected using 12-item Gen...

  14. Alcohol craving in relation to coping with stress and satisfaction with life in the addicted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Gąsior

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The present study aimed at finding any relation between alcohol craving and strategies of coping with stress and satisfaction with life in the addicted. Until now, studies have shown that generalized deficits in coping with stress, and the dominance of avoidance strategies, are significantly related to the increase of the risk of addiction and the course of this disease. This relation, which could link strategies of coping with stress and quality of life with experiencing alcohol craving, has only been explained to a small extent. Also, the role of gender in explaining these relations is ambiguous. Participants and procedure The study was conducted in a group of 550 addicted subjects in out-patient or in-patient treatment (396 men and 114 women. In the present study the following instruments were used: the Craving Typology Questionnaire by Marinotti et al., the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale by Modell et al., the Mini-Cope by Carver et al., SADD by Reistrick et al., and the Satisfaction with Life Scale by Diener et al. Statistical correlational analysis and structural equations were applied, namely partial least squares path modelling (PLS-PM. Results There are two types of links between craving and strategies of coping with stress among the addicted. The first dominating type is pointing at casual link between ineffective strategies of coping with stress and craving. The other weaker type indicates the diminishing influence of effective strategies of coping with stress on alcohol craving. Life satisfaction lowers alcohol craving. Conclusions Effective strategies of reacting to stress, together with life satisfaction, protect against increase of alcohol craving. Severity of dependence is an important factor which moderates the influence of strategies of coping with stress on alcohol craving.

  15. Student perceptions of stress, coping, relationships, and academic civility: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia M; Nguyen, Danh T; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina

    2014-01-01

    Academic incivility can increase student stress, jeopardize learning, damage relationships, and negatively impact the academic environment. This 3-year longitudinal study measured a cohort of prelicensure nursing students' progressive perceptions of stress, coping, student-student and faculty-student relationships, and levels of academic civility. While civility scores remained mild to moderately high overall, there was a slightly declining trend over the 3-year period. Perceived stressors and coping strategies and ways to improve academic civility are identified and discussed.

  16. Perception of control, coping and psychological stress of infertile women undergoing IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gourounti, Kleanthi; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Potamianos, Grigoris

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to examine: (i) the association between perception of infertility controllability and coping strategies; and (ii) the association between perception of infertility controllability and coping strategies to psychological distress, applying multivariate statistical techniques...... and coping strategies. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated between all study variables, followed by hierarchical multiple linear regression. Low perception of personal and treatment controllability was associated with frequent use of avoidance coping and high perception of treatment...... was negatively and significantly associated with fertility-related stress and depressive symptomatology scores. The findings of this study merit the understanding of the role of control perception and coping in psychological stress of infertile women to identify beforehand those women who might be at risk...

  17. Examining the relation of parenting to children's coping with everyday stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, D F; Power, T G; Jaedicke, S

    1993-12-01

    The relation between parenting and the coping styles of children in response to everyday stress was investigated. 60 children, 9-10 years old, and their mothers participated. Children and mothers described how they responded to stressful episodes the child had experienced within the past 2 months. Mothers completed questionnaires that assessed a variety of parenting dimensions (e.g., nurturance, directiveness, organization). Results indicated that (a) the aspects of child coping studied (e.g., perceived effectiveness, variety of coping strategies) were relatively independent, (b) children from families with high levels of maternal support and relatively low levels of family structure used the greatest variety of coping strategies, (c) children of supportive mothers used the greatest number of avoidant strategies (but only in uncontrollable situations), and (d) children from families with high levels of parental structure used fewer aggressive coping strategies.

  18. Stress Generation, Avoidance Coping, and Depressive Symptoms: A 10-Year Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Charles J.; Moos, Rudolf H.; Holahan, Carole K.; Brennan, Penny L.; Schutte, Kathleen K.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined (a) the role of avoidance coping in prospectively generating both chronic and acute life stressors and (b) the stress-generating role of avoidance coping as a prospective link to future depressive symptoms. Participants were 1,211 late-middle-aged individuals (500 women and 711 men) assessed 3 times over a 10-year period. As predicted, baseline avoidance coping was prospectively associated with both more chronic and more acute life stressors 4 years later. Furthermore, as predicted, these intervening life stressors linked baseline avoidance coping and depressive symptoms 10 years later, controlling for the influence of initial depressive symptoms. These findings broaden knowledge about the stress-generation process and elucidate a key mechanism through which avoidance coping is linked to depressive symptoms. PMID:16173853

  19. Coping, stress and suicide ideation in the South African Police Service in the Eastern Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Meyer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between coping and stress on the one hand and suicide ideation among police members on the other. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population (N = 307 consisted of uniformed police members in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. The COPE, Police Stress Inventory, Adult Suicide Ideation Questionnaire and a Biographical Questionnaire were used as measuring instruments. The results showed that passive coping strategies are related to suicide ideation. A discriminant analysis showed that suicide attempt, passive coping strategies, medical conditions, use of alcohol, problem-focused coping strategies and police-specific demands correctly classified 64.29 per cent of participants who scored high on suicide ideation.

  20. The impact of environmental factors on nursing stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Diane; Fowler, Susan; Fiedler, Nancy; Osinubi, Omowunmi; Robson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental factors of odor, noise, light, and color and perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. The physical work environment may positively or negatively influence nurses' stress, and stress may negatively impact their job satisfaction and intention to change jobs. The research questions were answered using a descriptive, correlational design. The sample (n = 116) consisted of medical-surgical nurses working in acute-care settings. A 36-item questionnaire addressed odor, noise, light, color, perceived stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Significant relationships were found between noise and perceived stress, perceived stress and job satisfaction, job satisfaction and turnover intention, and perceived stress and turnover intention. Nurses tend to overlook their physical environment and "do their job." Common environmental stressors in the work environment can be stressful to staff and influence job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs. Mitigating or eliminating these environmental factors has the potential to improve staff satisfaction and retention. Stress influences nursing job satisfaction and, ultimately, intention to change jobs.

  1. Helping Children Cope with Fears and Stress. Part I: Discussion and Activities. Part II: Facilitator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Edward H.; And Others

    How fears, phobias, anxiety and stress develop in elementary school students and how these students can be assisted in coping with fears and stress are discussed in this book. Part 1, "Discussion and Activities," contains six sections. Section 1 presents an overview of fears, and stress in children. Section 2 presents 12 fear-specific activities…

  2. PTSD Symptoms Mediate Academic Stress and Drinking to Cope in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolman, Erin O.; Becker, Madelyn M.; Klanecky, Alicia K.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened perceptions of academic stress may increase college alcohol use behaviors, namely problem drinking and drinking to cope. Leading from prior research, the current study examined posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms as a mediator between academic stress and alcohol use behaviors. Undergraduate participants (N?=?200) completed an online…

  3. Managing Perceived Stress among College Students: The Roles of Social Support and Dysfunctional Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2012-01-01

    The author examined the conditions (i.e., social support and dysfunctional coping) under which perceived stress predicted psychological well-being in 459 college students. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated a significant 2-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social Support) and a significant 3-way interaction (Perceived Stress x Social…

  4. PTSD Symptoms Mediate Academic Stress and Drinking to Cope in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolman, Erin O.; Becker, Madelyn M.; Klanecky, Alicia K.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened perceptions of academic stress may increase college alcohol use behaviors, namely problem drinking and drinking to cope. Leading from prior research, the current study examined posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms as a mediator between academic stress and alcohol use behaviors. Undergraduate participants (N?=?200) completed an online…

  5. Does psychosocial competency training for junior physicians working in pediatric medicine improve individual skills and perceived job stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernburg, Monika; Baresi, Lisa; Groneberg, David; Mache, Stefanie

    2016-12-01

    Pediatricians' job performance, work engagement, and job satisfaction are essential for both the individual physician and quality of care for their little patients and parents. Therefore, it is important to maintain or possibly augment pediatricians' individual and professional competencies. In this study, we developed and implemented a psychosocial competency training (PCT) teaching different psychosocial competencies and stress coping techniques. We investigated (1) the influence of the PCT on work-related characteristics: stress perception, work engagement, job satisfaction and (2) explored pediatricians' outcomes and satisfaction with PCT. Fifty-four junior physicians working in pediatric hospital departments participated in the training and were randomized in an intervention (n = 26) or a control group (n = 28). In the beginning, at follow-up 1 and 2, both groups answered a self-rated questionnaire on perceived training outcomes and work-related factors. The intervention group showed that their job satisfaction significantly increased while perceived stress scores decreased after taking part in the PCT. No substantial changes were observed with regard to pediatricians' work engagement. Participating physicians evaluated PCT with high scores for training design, content, received outcome, and overall satisfaction with the training.

  6. Organizational Stressors and Job Stress Among Malaysian Managers: The Moderating Role of Personality Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaresan V. Sathasivam; Mohd Dahlan Hj. A. Malek; Ahmad Faris Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Job stress is vastly present in today¡¯s organizations, and the costs of these phenomena cut across all levels of society. In recent years, researchers considering job stress in the workplace have made great strides in understanding several aspects of the stress phenomenon in the field of organizational behavior. Thus, it becomes more important that the individual variables of these job stresses are well explored and directly linked to individuals experiencing this situation, in order to ensu...

  7. Relationships among stress coping styles and pregnancy complications among women exposed to Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Olurinde; Harville, Emily; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between maternal stress exposure, stress coping styles, and pregnancy complications. Quantitative, cross-sectional, and prospective study. Tulane-Lakeside Hospital, New Orleans, LA and Women's Hospital, Baton Rouge, LA. The study included 146 women (122 from New Orleans and 24 from Baton Rouge), who were pregnant during or immediately after Hurricane Katrina. Participants were interviewed regarding their hurricane experiences and perceived stress, and coping styles were assessed using the Brief COPE. Medical charts were also reviewed to obtain information about pregnancy outcomes. Logistic regression was performed to determine possible associations. Hurricane exposure was significantly associated with induction of labor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.03, 1.86], P = .03) and current perceived stress (aOR = 1.50, CI [1.34, 1.99], P Stress perception significantly predisposed to pregnancy-induced hypertension (aOR = 1.16, CI [1.05, 1.30], P pregnancy complications (P stress may complicate pregnancy, whereas some coping styles may mitigate its effects. Further research should explore how coping styles may mitigate or exacerbate the effect of major stressors and how positive coping styles can be encouraged or augmented. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  8. Forbearance coping, identification with heritage culture, acculturative stress, and psychological distress among Chinese international students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meifen; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Heppner, Puncky Paul; Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien; Ku, Tsun-Yao

    2012-01-01

    Based on Berry's (1997) theoretical framework for acculturation, our goal in this study was to examine whether the use of a culturally relevant coping strategy (i.e., forbearance coping, a predictor) would be associated with a lower level of psychological distress (a psychological outcome), for whom (i.e., those with weaker vs. stronger identification with heritage culture, a moderator), and under what situations (i.e., lower vs. higher acculturative stress, a moderator). A total of 188 Chinese international students completed an online survey. Results from a hierarchical regression indicated a significant 3-way interaction of forbearance coping, identification with heritage culture, and acculturative stress on psychological distress. For those with a weaker identification with their heritage culture, when acculturative stress was higher, the use of forbearance coping was positively associated with psychological distress. However, this was not the case when acculturative stress was lower. In other words, the use of forbearance coping was not significantly associated with psychological distress when acculturative stress was lower. Moreover, for those with a stronger cultural heritage identification, the use of forbearance coping was not significantly associated with psychological distress regardless of whether acculturative stress was high or low. Future research and implications are discussed.

  9. Coping, stress, and personality in Spanish nursing students: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornés-Vives, Joana; Garcia-Banda, Gloria; Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Rosales-Viladrich, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dominant stress coping style in nursing students, its relationships with stressful life events and personality traits, and the students' changes during their academic training. A non-experimental two-wave longitudinal design was carried out in 199 nursing students recruited from three Spanish nursing schools. The Stressful Life Events Scale, NEO-FFI, and COPE questionnaire were administered at the beginning (T1) and end (T2) of their nursing studies. Descriptive statistics, Anova(s), NPar tests, and Pearson correlations were carried out. Results show that nursing students' dominant coping style was emotion-focused coping, both at T1 and T2. Highly significant correlations between emotional coping and the neuroticism trait were found. Coping, stress, and personality changed positively during the training program. At T2, the use of problem-focused strategies increased, and participants became more extroverted, agreeable, and conscientious. Coping and personality changes experienced by nursing students throughout their degree program seem to mirror the professional competences needed by future licensed nurses.

  10. LIPID PEROXIDATION AND JOB STRESS IN DENTAL HEALTHCARE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Melnikova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study devoted to the lipid peroxidation indices in dentists target group as a marker of psycho-emotional state. We revealed increase in the level of TBA-active products in female and male dentists during job stress. There was strong decrease in level of TBA-active products in control group of dentist that study during the lectures. Activation of lipid peroxidation in dentists during dentist examination can be considered as non-specific component of reactions towards the stressors of professional activities. We also revealed that the initial level of TBA-active products in female and male dentists before the outpatient dental reception was higher than that of dentists that study before lectures. This is indicates the mobilization of sympathetic nervous system before beginning of the working day. The contents of the level of TBA-active products in the oral fluid of female and male dentists after dental examination significantly increased, whereas these indices decreased in the group of dentists that study after the lectures. The increasing of TBA-active products in dentists after outpatient dental reception was by 42.5 % and 77 % higher compared with a group of dentists that study in the lecture classes. The results of correlation analysis suggest the influence of lipid peroxidation processes on the cardiovascular and blood system of dentists during job stress. Activation of lipid peroxidation in dentists during dental examination can be considered as non-specific component of the body's response to stressors influence in professional activities. Key words: dentists, activation of lipid peroxidation, psychoemotional stress, job stress.

  11. The association of personality traits and coping styles according to stress level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Afshar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some personality traits and coping styles could be as risk factors in stressful situations. This study aimed to investigate the association of personality traits and coping styles according to the stress level. Meterials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in 2011. A total of 4628 individuals over 20 years were selected by random sampling from nonacademic employees that working in 50 different centers across Isfahan province. Data were collected using 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Big Five Personality Inventory Short Form and coping strategies scale, and individuals were divided into high and low-stress groups in term of GHQ-12. To analyze the data, a binary logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results: Mean age of participants was 36.3 ± 7.91 years and 56.26% (2604 of them were female. Neuroticism with adjusting covariates of demographic characteristics and the rest of personality traits was a risk factor for stress level with odds ratios (OR OR:1.24; but other personality traits were protective. Also, active coping styles were protective factors for OR of stress level with adjusting covariates of demographic characteristics and the rest of coping styles, and positive reinterpretation and growth was the most effective of coping style with OR:0.84. Conclusion: Some personality traits are associated with passive copings and cause high-stress level. So, it could be concluded that improve and strengthen effective coping strategies in individual with maladaptive traits should be considered as a crucial component of prevention and control programs of stress.

  12. The association of personality traits and coping styles according to stress level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Hamid; Roohafza, Hamid Reza; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Mazaheri, Mina; Feizi, Awat; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some personality traits and coping styles could be as risk factors in stressful situations. This study aimed to investigate the association of personality traits and coping styles according to the stress level. Meterials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in 2011. A total of 4628 individuals over 20 years were selected by random sampling from nonacademic employees that working in 50 different centers across Isfahan province. Data were collected using 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Big Five Personality Inventory Short Form and coping strategies scale, and individuals were divided into high and low-stress groups in term of GHQ-12. To analyze the data, a binary logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results: Mean age of participants was 36.3 ± 7.91 years and 56.26% (2604) of them were female. Neuroticism with adjusting covariates of demographic characteristics and the rest of personality traits was a risk factor for stress level with odds ratios (OR) OR:1.24; but other personality traits were protective. Also, active coping styles were protective factors for OR of stress level with adjusting covariates of demographic characteristics and the rest of coping styles, and positive reinterpretation and growth was the most effective of coping style with OR:0.84. Conclusion: Some personality traits are associated with passive copings and cause high-stress level. So, it could be concluded that improve and strengthen effective coping strategies in individual with maladaptive traits should be considered as a crucial component of prevention and control programs of stress. PMID:26109990

  13. Associations of stressful life events with coping strategies of 12-15-year-old Norwegian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Anne Mari; Sund, Anne Mari

    2017-08-01

    Successful adaptation to the environment requires strategies to cope with stressful situations. The aim of this study was to examine the role of stressful life events in coping strategies during early adolescence. A representative sample of 2464 adolescents in Norway were assessed at two time-points, one year apart (i.e., at T1, mean age 13.7 years, and at T2, mean age 14.9 years), with identical questionnaires. The participation rate was 88.3% at T1. Stressful life events and daily hassles were measured by questionnaires constructed for this study. Coping with stress was measured by a modified version of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), which measures three coping dimensions: emotional, task and avoidance coping. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ). Standard multiple linear regression methods were applied. Different domains of stressful life events were associated with the coping strategies, and these relationships differed at various time-points by gender. In sum, school stress and stressful life events in one's network (network stress) was associated with coping strategies more strongly among girls, while family and miscellaneous stress showed a stronger association among boys. These relationships were partly mediated by depressive symptom levels, more strongly in cross-sectional than in longitudinal analyses. However, daily hassles seemed to represent smaller events of no importance in coping strategies. In preventive work, reducing stressful events, treating depression and teaching healthier coping strategies are important.

  14. Collective and individualistic coping with stress at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Tuija; Torkelson, Eva

    2008-04-01

    In the present study, coping was viewed as both an individualistic and a collective phenomenon, and the investigation assessed how use of collective and individualistic coping strategies was related to sex of respondent and organizational level. These strategies were measured by responses to Swedish versions of the Strategic Approach to Coping Scale and the COPE Inventory. Data were collected by means of an Internet-based questionnaire completed by 950 female (n = 502) and male (n = 448) employees at both the managerial (n = 171) and nonmanagerial (n = 764) levels, working in customer service in a Swedish telecom company. The mean age of the participants was 47 yr. (SD = 9.7). Analysis showed women more often used collective strategies, but so also did both women and men managers. Men did not use problem-focused individualistic coping strategies more often than women. No interactions between sex and organizational level were found. Separate analyses for women and men indicated that coping was more related to organizational level than to sex.

  15. A Stress Coping App for Hospitalized Pregnant Women at Risk for Preterm Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallo, Nancy; Thacker, Leroy R; Menzies, Victoria; Stojanovic, Predrag; Svikis, Dace S

    Pregnant women hospitalized with preterm labor (PTL) complications experience increased stress. Prior researchers have attempted to provide stress management strategies with use of various media players to deliver stress coping interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of a mobile device delivered stress coping app designed to reduce stress in a sample of high-risk pregnant women hospitalized with complications of PTL. A descriptive study using a prospective mixed methods one-group pre/posttest design. Fifteen pregnant women used the mobile device app for 8 consecutive days. The app included study measures, educational overview of concepts, four guided imagery audio files to be listened to daily, and a stress self-assessment scale to be used before and after each use. Measures included: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Visual Analog Stress Scale (VASS), Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES), and semistructured interviews. There was a significant drop in VASS scores when comparing scores before and after listening to the app (p app and provided suggestions for improvement. The intervention reduced immediate stress and provided a respite from the stress response in this population. Maternal child nurses may consider incorporating stress coping interventions as standard care practice.

  16. Stressful events, avoidance coping, and unprotected anal sex among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James I; Alessi, Edward J

    2010-07-01

    This study examined associations among stressful life events, avoidance coping, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) in a convenience sample of 297 men obtained through the Internet and who either reported having sex with men or self-identified as gay or bisexual. Participants completed an Internet-hosted self-administered questionnaire that included measures of victimization experiences and other stressful life events, and avoidance coping. More than half of the sample reported engaging in UAS during the previous 6 months. Victimization predicted UAS regardless of partner type; victimization, HIV-positive serostatus, and avoidance coping predicted UAS with nonprimary partners. The findings provide evidence that American gay and bisexual men may experience a variety of stressful life events, including a surprising amount of victimization, and that at least some episodes of UAS may be associated with attempts to cope with distress associated with such events.

  17. Stress and Coping in Patients with Clinical Manifestations of Human Papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitanović, Hrvoje; Šitum, Mirna; Meštrović-Štefekov, Jelena; Lugović-Mihić, Liborija

    2017-04-01

    Stressful life events in response to a psychosocial trigger have been reported to negatively affect the course of infections. This study was based on patients with clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and a control group of patients with psoriasis who were admitted over a period of one year to the Dermatology Department of Karlovac General Hospital. A total of 122 patients participated in the study, either with a confirmed diagnosis of clinical manifestations of HPV infection (n=66) or in a psoriasis control group (n=56). The aim of this study was to determine which coping strategies are used in patients with clinical manifestations of HPV infection. We used the Recent Life Changes Questionnaire and Brief COPE test for stress evaluation. There were no statically significant differences between adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies comparing patients with HPV and a control group. The difference in specific coping strategies between HPV and control groups showed that self-blame and planning strategies were statistically significantly more common in the HPV group. Patients with HPV with genital warts used maladaptive coping statistically significantly more than patients with non-genital localization of HPV. Patients with HPV who had a higher score of life stress events used maladaptive coping statistically significantly more than patients with a lower life stress events score. The results point to the need for patients with HPV with genital localization and high numbers of stress events to learn how to cope with stress, enabling them to take action and change their ways of coping. There is also a need to integrate psychological intervention into standard care protocols of dermatologic diseases.

  18. Relationship between Stress Coping Styles and Pregnancy Complications among Women Exposed to Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Olurinde; Harville, Emily; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between maternal stress exposure, stress coping styles, and pregnancy complications. Design Quantitative, cross-sectional, and prospective study. Setting Tulane-Lakeside Hospital, New Orleans, LA and Women's Hospital, Baton Rouge, LA. Participants The study included 146 women (122 from New Orleans and 24 from Baton Rouge), who were pregnant during or immediately after Hurricane Katrina. Methods Participants were interviewed regarding their hurricane experiences and perceived stress, and coping styles were assessed using the Brief COPE. Medical charts were also reviewed to obtain information about pregnancy outcomes. Logistic regression was performed to determine possible associations. Results Hurricane exposure was significantly associated with induction of labor (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) =1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.03, 1.86; P=0.03) and current perceived stress (aOR=1.50; CI=1.34, 1.99; P<0.01). Stress perception significantly predisposed to pregnancy-induced hypertension (aOR=1.16; CI=1.05, 1.30; P<0.01) and gestational diabetes (aOR=1.13; CI=1.02, 1.25; P=0.03). Use of planning, acceptance, humor, instrumental support, and venting coping styles were associated with a significantly reduced occurrence of pregnancy complications (P<0.05). Higher rates for gestational diabetes was found among women using the denial coping style (aOR=2.25; CI=1.14, 4.45; P=0.02). Conclusion Exposure to disaster-related stress may complicate pregnancy, while some coping styles may mitigate its effects. Further research should explore how coping styles may mitigate or exacerbate the effect of major stressors and how positive coping styles can be encouraged or augmented. PMID:25712783

  19. Chronic stress and coping among cardiac surgeons: a single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Spiliopoulos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac surgeons stress may impair their quality of life and professional practice. Objective: To assess perceived chronic stress and coping strategies among cardiac surgeons. Methods: Twenty-two cardiac surgeons answered two self-assessment questionnaires, the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress and the German SGV for coping strategies. Results: Participants mean age was 40±14.1 years and 13 were male; eight were senior physicians and 14 were residents. Mean values for the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress were within the normal range. Unexperienced physicians had significantly higher levels of dissatisfaction at work, lack of social recognition, and isolation (P<0.05. Coping strategies such as play down, distraction from situation, and substitutional satisfaction were also significantly more frequent among unexperienced surgeons. "Negative" stress-coping strategies occur more often in experienced than in younger colleagues (P=0.029. Female surgeons felt more exposed to overwork (P=0.04 and social stress (P=0.03. Conclusion: Cardiac surgeons show a tendency to high perception of chronic stress phenomena and vulnerability for negative coping strategies.

  20. Effects of maternal stress coping style on offspring characteristics in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åberg Andersson, Madelene; Silva, P.I.M.; Steffensen, J.F.;

    2011-01-01

    and used to define the proactive and reactive stress coping styles. Although stress coping styles have been identified in a number of animal groups, little is known about the coupling between stress coping style and offspring characteristics. In the present study, plasma cortisol levels in ovulated mothers...... and cortisol levels in non-fertilized eggs from two rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) strains selected for high (HR) and low (LR) post-stress plasma cortisol levels were compared. Offspring characteristics such as egg size, larval growth, and energy reserves also were compared between the two strains......Maternal size, age, and allostatic load influence offspring size, development, and survival. Some of these effects have been attributed to the release of glucocorticoids, and individual variation in these stress hormones is related to a number of traits. Correlated traits are often clustered...

  1. Coping with burns: the role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Mark W G; Hofland, Helma W; De Jong, Alette E; Van Loey, Nancy E

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected for demographics, the number of surgeries during initial admittance, trait coping styles, and changing levels of health-related quality of life. CSE during initial admission was by far the strongest predictor of both initial PTSD symptoms and degree of symptom change with higher CSE levels associated with lower initial symptoms and a steeper decline of symptoms over time. Of the other variables only avoidant coping was associated with higher initial symptom levels, and only emotional expression associated with greater rate of recovery. Current findings suggest that CSE plays a pivotal role in recovery from posttraumatic stress after a burn injury, even when the role of burn-related impairments is taken into consideration. Implications of findings are discussed.

  2. Coping with Stress and Body Image in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARISOY, Gökhan; DURMUŞ, Dilek; BÖKE, Ömer; CANTÜRK, Ferhan; ŞAHİN, Ahmet Rıfat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine coping with stress and body image in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to investigate the correlation between these two characteristics together and also between them and disease activity/functional capacity. Method Fourty healthy controls and 40 patients with AS who were diagnosed on the basis of Modified New York Criteria were included in the study. The exclusion criteria were another medical disease or comorbid psychiatric disorder. All participants were administered the Coping Orientations to Problems Experienced (COPE) questionnaire in order to evaluate attitudes to coping with stress and the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ) to evaluate body image. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) were used to evaluate AS patients’ disease activities and functional capacities. Results There was no difference between the two groups in terms of COPE scores. The MBSRQ ‘health evaluation’ subscale scores were lower and the ‘fitness orientation’ scores higher in the AS group. The COPE active coping subscale had a weak, positive correlation with MBSRQ total score and a weak, negative correlation with BASFI score. MBRSQ total score had a moderate, negative correlation with BASFI score, and a weak, negative correlation with BASDAI score. Conclusion The attitudes to coping with stress in AS patients with no accompanying medical disease or psychiatric disorder may not differ from that in healthy controls. Negative health evaluation and fitness orientation must be characteristics considered in psychotherapeutic interventions applied to these patients. In addition, psychotherapeutic interventions directed toward coping with stress and body image may be especially useful in active stages of the disease and in patients with limited functional capacity. PMID:28360609

  3. Trauma-exposed firefighters: relationships among posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress, resource availability, coping and critical incident stress debriefing experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, David N; Boyd, Bill; Kirsch, Julie

    2014-12-01

    This project examines protective factors associated with resilience/posttraumatic growth and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress among firefighters exposed to critical incidents. The participants were 286 (257 men and 29 women) volunteer and paid firefighters in Whatcom County, Washington. Participants completed an anonymous survey asking about demographics, critical incident exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, resource availability, coping, occupational stress and critical incident stress debriefing experience. Most participants had significant critical incident exposure, and about half had attended critical incident stress debriefing sessions. Posttraumatic growth was associated with being female, critical incident exposure, critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic stress symptoms (negative association), occupational support, occupation satisfaction, occupational effort, problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping and personal characteristic resources. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with years of firefighting, burnout, occupational effort and disengagement coping and negatively associated with critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic growth, social support, internal locus of control, personal characteristic resources, energy resources and condition resources. The findings support conservation of resources stress theory and show that the maintenance and acquisition of resources can offset losses and facilitate resilience/posttraumatic growth. Implications of the findings for enhancing firefighter resources, facilitating resilience and minimizing occupational stressors are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Job stress, fatigue, and job dissatisfaction in Dutch lorry drivers: towards an occupation specific model of job demands and control

    OpenAIRE

    de Croon, E.M.; Blonk, R. W. B.; de Zwart, B.C.H.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.; Broersen, J.P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Building on Karasek's model of job demands and control (JD-C model), this study examined the effects of job control, quantitative workload, and two occupation specific job demands (physical demands and supervisor demands) on fatigue and job dissatisfaction in Dutch lorry drivers.

  5. Influence of type D personality on job stress and job satisfaction in clinical nurses: the mediating effects of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Hee; Kim, Sung Reul; Kim, Yeo Ok; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Hye Young

    2017-04-01

    To test a hypothetical path model evaluating the influence of type D personality on job stress and job satisfaction and to identify the mediating effects of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction among clinical nurses in South Korea. Personalities susceptible to stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout in clinical nurses have negative effects on the job stress and job satisfaction. A correlational, cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 875 clinical nurses was recruited between December 2014 - February 2015. The structured questionnaires included the Type D personality scale-14, Professional Quality of Life, job stress, job satisfaction, and general characteristics. To test the hypothetical path model, we performed a path analysis by using the AMOS 18·0 program. Based on the path model, type D personality was significantly associated with compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction in our study subjects. Type D personality was significantly associated with job stress and job satisfaction via the effect of burnout, compassion satisfaction, and job stress. Since type D personality is associated with job stress and job satisfaction, identifying personalities vulnerable to stress would help to address job stress and to enhance job satisfaction when nurses have a high level of compassion fatigue and burnout and a low level of compassion satisfaction. The development of interventions that can reduce negative affect and social inhibition of nurses with type D personality and investigation of methods to decrease their compassion fatigue and burnout and to increase compassion satisfaction should be encouraged. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. EFL Teachers' Stress and Job Satisfaction: What Contribution Can Teacher Education Make?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Karim; Sa'adatpourvahid, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to find out the level of job satisfaction and stress among Iranian EFL teachers. More precisely, an attempt was made to investigate the main sources of EFL teachers' stress, their level of satisfaction with the job and the relationship between occupational stress and instructors' age, marital status and tenure.…

  7. [Snacking behavior among elementary and junior high school students and its relationship to stress-coping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimai, S; Kawabata, T; Nishioka, N; Haruki, T

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate current problems of snacking behavior and their relationship to stress coping among 1,486 fourth through ninth grade students from 10 elementary schools and six junior high schools. An anonymous self-completed questionnaire was utilized which included items about 1) selection of snack foods, which were classified into healthy, popular, complementary and western-style snacks, 2) problems of snacking behavior, which included external and emotional eating scores, and 3) stress coping scale. The stress coping scale contained two sub-scales; problem-focused and emotion-focused coping. The results were as follows: 1) Students who frequently went without breakfast did not select healthy foods, i.e., fruits and dairy products, but popular snacks, i.e., potato chips, pop corn and sweet beverage. 2) Both external and emotional eating scores increased by age in girls but was not apparent in boys. 3) Students who preferred either western-style or popular snacks showed higher score of external and emotional eating. 4) The score of problem-focused coping was positively correlated with preference for health snacks, but emotion-focused coping was positively correlated with external and emotional eating scores. The close relationship between snack food selection and problematic aspects of eating behavior suggests that modification of eating behavior is necessary to develop healthy snack habits in early adolescents. Also, it is interesting that snacking behavior is closely related to stress coping, which suggested the behavioral intervention for healthy eating habit should be included in development of stress-coping skills against various kinds of demands in life.

  8. Mixed Expectations: Effects of Goal Ambivalence during Pregnancy on Maternal Well-Being, Stress, and Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletzko, Svenja H; La Marca-Ghaemmaghami, Pearl; Brandstätter, Veronika

    2015-11-01

    We hypothesised that experiencing ambivalence toward the childbearing goal would be related to indicators of well-being, stress, and coping among women with planned pregnancies. Study 1 (N = 208) tested cross-sectional associations between goal ambivalence and measures of well-being, stress, and coping. It also included a postpartum measurement point (N = 71) to examine prospective effects of goal ambivalence. Study 2 (N = 109) extended the investigation to within-person effects in a three-week daily diary assessment. In Study 1, goal ambivalence in pregnant women was positively associated with depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and pregnancy-specific avoidance-oriented coping, and negatively associated with coping self-efficacy. Goal ambivalence also predicted changes in life satisfaction, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and coping self-efficacy postpartum. Study 2 revealed within-person effects of daily fluctuations in goal ambivalence on day-to-day changes in positive emotions, negative activation, and avoidance-oriented coping. Ambivalence towards the childbearing goal is a source of significant distress to pregnant women with planned pregnancies and its effects seem to extend into the postpartum period. These findings may have important clinical implications for maternal and child well-being. Future studies should examine whether goal ambivalence during pregnancy affects the maternal-child relationship in the long term. © 2015 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  9. Gambaran Strategi Coping Stress Siswa Kelas XII Sman 42 Jakarta dalam Menghadapi Ujian Nasional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Nanang Suprayogi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study intended to know the description of stress coping strategies of 12th grade students of Jakarta 42 State Senior High School in facing National Exam. This study stems from the interest of researchers towards the number of cases of high school students who do not pass the National Exam. Researchers seek to impart knowledge to students on how to cope with their stress effectively and to the school and parents for providing the proper approach for students to face the National Exam. This study is a quantitative study using questionnaires as a measurement to know the description of stress coping strategies of Jakarta 42 State Senior High School students. Research instruments are compiled based on the theory developed by Lahey. In this research, obtained results that the class XII students of SMAN 42 Jakarta have a more predominant use of effective coping to cope with their stress in facing the National Exam. The most widely used strategy is removing stress and managing stress reaction  

  10. Parental bonding during childhood affects stress-coping ability and stress reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, Yuh; Ohi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Shun; Usami, Kazuya; Sasahara, Shinichiro; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo

    2017-07-01

    An online survey examined the effects of parental bonding during childhood on adult workers' stress-coping ability (Sense of Coherence) and stress reactions (General Health Questionnaire and Self-Rating Depression Scale). Participants who completed the questionnaire were grouped into optimal bonding and poor bonding groups. Analyses of covariance by gender with age as a covariate were conducted for the Sense of Coherence, General Health Questionnaire, and Self-Rating Depression Scale scores for 9525 participants. For both genders, the scores of the poor bonding group were significantly lower for the Sense of Coherence and significantly higher for the General Health Questionnaire and Self-Rating Depression Scale compared to those of the optimal bonding group.

  11. Coping styles and its association with sources of stress in undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Cherkil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The two ubiquitous factors that have been identified in medical courses to underlie mental health are stress and different coping styles adopted to combat stress. Aim: To find the association between coping styles and stress in undergraduate medical students. Settings and Design: A medical college in Central Kerala. A cross-sectional study design was adopted. Materials and Methods: Source and Severity of Stress Scale, Medical Student Version, was used to assess the source and nature of stress. Brief Cope was used to find out the coping styles adopted. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20 and SAS. Chi-square analysis was used to find the association between coping styles and stress domains and with the overall stress score. Results: There is a significant positive association between overall stress score and coping styles ( P=0.001 of ′Negative cope′, ′Blame′, and ′Humor′. ′Positive cope′ and ′Religion′ has significant positive association with ′Academics′ ( P=0.047 and ′Self Expectations′ ( P=0.009. ′Blame′ ( P<0.001 has very high significant positive association with ′Academics′, ′Self expectation′, and ′Relationships′. Very high significant positive association is further found between ′Humor′ ( P<0.001 and ′Self expectations′, ′Living conditions′, and ′Health and Value conflict′. ′Substance Use′ is positively associated in high significance to ′Health and Value conflict′ ( P<0.001. Conclusions: The outcome of the study emphasizes the need for stress management techniques in the medical school.

  12. How Do GPA, Psychological Adjustment and Coping Styles Contribute to the Reported Use of Substance as a Means of Coping with Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Robbie J.; Jo, Hanik; Murray, Darrick A.; Tovar, Maria A.; Johnson, Mykel L.

    In a study of African-American (n=119) urban high school students, coping with life stressors was positively and negatively associated with the use of substances. This study focused on how grade point average (GPA), psychological adjustment, and coping styles contribute to the reported use of substances as a way of dealing with stress. The results…

  13. A Comparative Study of Stressful Life Events and Stress Coping Strategies in Coronary Heart Disease Patients and Non-Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Heidari Pahlavian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Etiological researches suggest that biopsychosocial dimensions are responsible for coronary heart disease (CHD. The main goal of the present research was to compare stressful life events and stress coping strategies in coronary heart patients (Acute Myocardial Infarction and non-patients. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional research 102 patients (all males suffering from acute myocardial infarction and 162 non-patient individuals after matching were studied and compared with regard to psychosocial life events and stress coping strategies through coping response inventory (Moos, 1993 , scaling of life Events (paykel , 1971 and researcher made questionnaire. Results: The result established that myocardial infarction patients experienced more stress than the control group during one year before heart- attack and they used more inadequate stress coping strategies comparing with the control individuals. Conclusion: This study showed that stress and inadequate coping strategies are important variables for the development of coronary heart diseases. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2010;17(3:33-38

  14. Job Stress and Presenteeism among Chinese Healthcare Workers: The Mediating Effects of Affective Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianan; Guo, Yina; Ma, Mingxu; Li, Yaxin; Tian, Huilin; Deng, Jianwei

    2017-08-29

    Presenteeism affects the performance of healthcare workers. This study examined associations between job stress, affective commitment, and presenteeism among healthcare workers. To investigate the relationship between job stress, affective commitment, and presenteeism, structural equation modeling was used to analyze a sample of 1392 healthcare workers from 11 Class A tertiary hospitals in eastern, central, and western China. The mediating effect of affective commitment on the association between job stress and presenteeism was examined with the Sobel test. Job stress was high and the level of presenteeism was moderate among healthcare workers. Challenge stress and hindrance stress were strongly correlated (β = 0.62; p stress was significantly positively correlated with affective commitment (β = 0.15; p stress was significantly inversely correlated with affective commitment (β = -0.40; p workers. Presenteeism can be addressed by increasing affective commitment and challenge stress and by limiting hindrance stress among healthcare workers in China.

  15. Stress and coping research. Methodological challenges, theoretical advances, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerfield, M R; McCrae, R R

    2000-06-01

    Coping is among the most widely studied topics in contemporary psychology. However, the explosion of interest in coping has yielded little and the field is in crisis. This section offers a survey of the state of the art in theory and research on stress and adaptational processes. The four core articles in the section take up, respectively, problems in research design, the neglect of unconscious reactions to stress, the selection of adaptational outcomes, and the link between research on adaptational processes and clinical practice. The final article by Richard S. Lazarus offers a commentary. The present introduction provides the historical backdrop for the section. Then, after a brief overview of research on adaptational processes, the authors summarize the scope and yield of coping research and preview the four core articles in the section. The strengths and limits of individual coping efforts and the need for realistic expectations and redoubled efforts are discussed.

  16. Stress, emotions, and coping: a study of elderly women with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downe-Wamboldt, B

    1991-01-01

    My purpose in conducting this study was to identify and describe the illness-related stressors and emotions experienced by elderly women with osteoarthritis and the coping strategies they used to manage these situations. The theoretical framework for the investigation was based on a process theory of stress and coping developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1984). In a home interview, 90 women completed a demographic profile and identified concerns, feelings, and coping strategies used to manage problems associated with osteoarthritis. Descriptive statistics and content analysis of data indicated that the stress of osteoarthritis involved physical, social, and psychological aspects of life and evoked both positive and negative feelings. The women used a broad repertoire of coping behaviors, including problem- and emotion-focused strategies to manage the problems associated with osteoarthritis in their day-to-day life. This information has implications in both treatment and prevention areas for health professionals who provide services for this group of people.

  17. Relationship of chronic stress, social support, and coping style to health among Namibian refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shisana, O; Celentano, D D

    1987-01-01

    This study investigates how social support and coping style affect the relationship between a traumatic chronic stressor and health status. A population of 88 Namibian refugees living in an equatorial region of Africa participated in the study. The central hypothesis was that social support and coping style moderate the relationship between length of stay in exile (a proxy measure of chronic stress) and health status (symptoms of generalized anxiety disorders, self-reported physical health status and length of stay in hospital). The results show that when social support is high the relationship between length of stay in exile and all three health outcomes is substantially reduced. When social support is low, the relation between stress and poor health outcomes is high. Coping style moderates the relationship between length of stay in exile and period of hospitalization but has no effect on level of anxiety or perceived health status. When both social support and coping style are simultaneously considered, the best results emerge.

  18. RELATION BETWEEN STRESS COPING STYLE, LARVAL DEVELOPMENT AND TIME TO EMERGANCE IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2010-01-01

    behavior. In salmonids, differences in larval development have been related to these styles. In this study we investigated larval development and time to emergence in two strains of Rainbow trout selected for low (LR) and high (HR) post stress plasma cortisol levels. These strains have previously been......Åberg, Madelene, Uniza Kahn, John Fleng Steffensen, Øyvind Øverli, Hans Magnus Gjoen and Erik Höglund Abstract: Proactive and reactive stress coping styles is widespread amongst animal groups. Reactive individuals are generally shy and subordinate whereas proactive individuals show the opposite...... characterized with proactive and reactive stress coping, respectively. A line specific SNP was used to distinguish the emerging larvae and a clear link between stress coping style and emergence time was demonstrated by LR larvae emerging earlier than HR larvae. LR larvae also had more yolk reserves at the time...

  19. Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Danø, Anne Møller; Heinesen, Eskil

    2006-01-01

    We investigate whether job loss as the result of displacement causes hospitalization for stress-related diseases which are widely thought to be associated with unemployment. In doing this, we use much better data than any previous investigators. Our data are a random 10% sample of the male...... population of Denmark for the years 1981-1999 with full records on demographics, health and work status for each person, and with a link from every working person to a plant. We use the method of matching on observables to estimate the counter-factual of what would have happened to the health of a particular...... group of displaced workers if they had not in fact been displaced. Our results indicate unequivocally that being displaced in Denmark does not cause hospitalization for stress-related disease. An analysis of the power of our test suggests that even though we are looking for a relatively rare outcome...

  20. Stress and Coping Mechanisms Among Breast Cancer Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    ... patient and family: (a) seeking social support, (b) reliance on God, (c) ... relationships for the patient and family. For patients ... caregivers ought to employ certain coping ... duration, number and nature of concurrent stressors ... conducted in different parts of the world also .... cancer and their perceptions needs in a health-.

  1. Family Stress and Coping for Mexican Origin Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Freda F.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Fernandez, Aida Cristina; Millsap, Roger E.; Dumka, Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    Family-related stressors pose special challenges for adolescents of Mexican origin, given traditional cultural norms that compel youths to get involved with family problems despite their limited ability to effect change. The current study examines the prospective effects of coping strategies (i.e., active, distraction, avoidance, support-seeking,…

  2. Resilience, stress, and coping among Canadian medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behruz Rahimi

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Medical students are neither more resilient nor better equipped with coping skills than peers in the population.  Greater emphasis on self-care among medical trainees is recommended.  Emphasizing the importance of self-care during medical training, whether by formal incorporation into the curriculum or informal mentorship, deserves further study.

  3. [Coping with stress as a paradigm of the psychopathology in childhood and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, H G

    1985-10-01

    Stress coping can be valid for a paradigm of psychopathology of children and adolescents. This concept is supported by an extensive literature which shows the way of coping from a "footnote to stress theory" (Lazarus) to its central concept. Neither the "objective" stress (stimulus side) nor the specificity of stress reaction (adaptation syndrome) are the important factors, but rather the mediation between stress coping and the individual, the transaction in the sense of an exchange process. Above all, permanent personality attributes have been examined here, most intensively extraversion/introversion and neuroticism, and recently, more and more often coping processes. The research situation also confirms in its approach the concept of Lazarus (1981) in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry. According to Lazarus, stressors are less meaningful as a cause of psychiatric disturbances than cognitive-emotional reaction mediating coping processes. They should be examined preferably under natural conditions; a combination of standard research strategies with individual case analyses is recommended. Therapeutically, it is essential to help children and adolescents to achieve an adequate correlation between their own capabilities and limitations on the one hand, and of conflicts and stress situations on the other hand, whereby the adolescent (young) patient is interested in a quick solution to personal and interpersonal crises. He is not at all interested in its extension in the sense of a 'Sturm-und-Drang'-idea of adolescent age. Hence coping cannot be confined only to coping with a functional crisis; it must rather aspire to achieve a schematisation of the situation in accordance with the truth.

  4. A Comparison of American and Chinese Students' Perceived Stress, Coping Styles, and Health Promotion Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lindsey, Billie J.; Yin, Xiaoqin; Chen, William

    2012-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey utilized the Perceived Stress Scale, Brief COPE, and Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II to ascertain similarities and differences between American (n=319) and Chinese (n=335) college students and between higher and lower stressed students in both samples. The results suggested the existence of a country difference in…

  5. Acculturative Stress and Coping: Gender Differences among Korean and Korean American University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Diane Sookyoung; Padilla, Amado M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined acculturative stress and coping among 86 students of Korean heritage at an American university. Participants indicated their stress levels on 3 scales of cultural adaptation: discrimination, language and cultural ties, and social distance. Findings show that self-identified Korean students displayed higher levels of…

  6. Coping with Stress: An Investigation of Novice Teachers' Stressors in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Sue A.; Paquette, Kelli R.; Chen, Yijie

    2007-01-01

    Research supports teacher preparation programs to recognize stress factors and to assist students and new teachers with effective coping mechanisms. Twenty-five to fifty percent of beginning teachers resign during their first three years of teaching (Fleener, 2001; Roulston, Legette, & Womack, 2005). Among all the causes, stress from teaching is…

  7. Differential Effectiveness of Coping in Managing Stress and Burnout in Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, James B., Jr.; Zevon, Michael A.

    High levels of stress experienced by primary care oncology nursing staff, and the competency impairment which results from such stress, has become a matter of much concern in health care settings. This study was conducted to identify the coping strategies employed by oncology nurses, and to relate these strategies to differential indices of stress…

  8. Under Stress: Social Coping Mechanisms for Survival among the Working Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Coral Barboza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The nature of work of professionals and their family life may very often expose them to high level of stress which has the potential of affecting their productive and earning capacity. Coping strategies have been the subject of many studies and various suggestions have been made regarding the most appropriate way to categorise them in terms of function and efficacy (Amble, 2006; Buys et al., 2010. The goal of the current study was to examine how social coping mechanisms are helpful to employees in reducing stress and the stressful situations for their behavioural and emotional well-being. In achieving this goal, the researcher collected the data from the field through a structured questionnaire consisting of three phases- the demographic details, the stressors at workplace, social coping mechanisms adopted by them. Findings from the study show the existence of high level of stress among the working professionals. The sources of stress among the working professionals range from their nature of their work to work-family imbalance. In terms of coping strategies of stress, it was revealed that the respondents indulge in setting their goals, relaxing, exercising, diet, using sedatives and various others strategies suiting their needs. The need for appropriate mechanisms to be put in place by the managements of these organisations to address the stress needs of employees is essential to help reduce their stress levels

  9. Acculturative Stress and Coping: Gender Differences among Korean and Korean American University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Diane Sookyoung; Padilla, Amado M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined acculturative stress and coping among 86 students of Korean heritage at an American university. Participants indicated their stress levels on 3 scales of cultural adaptation: discrimination, language and cultural ties, and social distance. Findings show that self-identified Korean students displayed higher levels of…

  10. Uncontrollable Stress, Coping, and Subjective Well-Being in Urban Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Laura D.; Vera, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether uncontrollable stress related to levels of subjective well-being (SWB) in a group of ethnically diverse urban adolescents. Additionally, the researchers examined what types of coping skills were utilized in the face of high levels of uncontrollable stress. Finally, a moderation model was proposed,…

  11. A model linking sources of stress to approach and avoidance coping styles of Turkish basketball referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Mark Howard; Sutarso, Toto; Ekmekci, Ridvan; Saraswati, Intan W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to externally validate and test a conceptual transient model involving six paths that linked sources of acute stress to avoidance and approach coping styles among Turkish basketball referees. The sample consisted of 125 Turkish basketball referees ranging in age from 18 to 36 years (mean = 25.58. σ = 3.69). The path analysis tested the relationships simultaneously from stressors, in consecutive order, distractions, subpar performance and verbal abuse, to coping styles, first both avoidance-cognitive and approach-cognitive, and then approach-behaviour. Results indicated that the model achieved a good fit and that all paths tested simultaneously were significant. The distractions stressor was positively related to subpar performance, which, in turn, was positively related to verbal abuse. Verbal abuse was negatively associated with an avoidance-cognitive coping style and positively related to the approach-cognitive coping style. The results also supported a crossover effect of both avoidance-cognitive and approach-cognitive on approach-behaviour. One implication of this study is that coping should be studied in naturally occurring stages, a process-oriented approach. Another implication is that approach and avoidance coping styles, each sub-divided into cognitive and behavioural categories, provide a meaningful framework which provides sports officials a coherent structure for learning and improving ways to cope with acute stress experienced during the contest.

  12. Gender as a factor in differentiating strategies of coping with stress used by physical education students

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Guszkowska; Adriana Zagórska-Pachucka; Anna Kuk; Katarzyna Skwarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Students are exposed to numerous stressors associated with their integration into their university education, their relationships with friends, and anxiety about the future. Given that stress may be related to university students’ academic performance, understanding the coping strategies used by students may be important in facilitating a positive transition to a university setting. The aim of this study was to determine the gender-based variation of strategies for coping with...

  13. Engaging In Rather than Disengaging From Stress: Effective Coping and Perceived Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T.M. Dijkstra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Being able to cope effectively with stress can help people to avoid negative consequences for their psychological well-being. The purpose of this study was to find out why some coping strategies are effective in reducing the negative effect of stressors on well-being and some are not. We argue that the degree to which such coping strategies engage or disengage people from stressful incidents is related to their perceived control of the situation that, in turn, is positively associated with their psychological well-being. We thus propose that the relationship between coping and psychological well-being is mediated by the extent of perceived sense of control. We collected cross-sectional data from a large heterogeneous sample (N = 543 in the Netherlands. We assessed seven different coping strategies, perceived control, and psychological well-being. Our results indeed revealed that strategies reflecting more engaged coping such as active confronting and reassuring thoughts, were associated with more sense of control and therefore to psychological well-being. In contrast, strategies reflecting disengagement coping, such as passive reaction pattern, palliative reaction, and avoidance, were associated with less perceived control, which in turn was negatively associated with psychological well-being. Results regarding the coping strategies expressing emotions and seeking social support were less straightforward, with the former being negatively associated with perceived control and psychological well-being, even though this strategy has stress engaging elements, and the latter only showing a positive indirect effect on psychological well-being via perceived control, but no positive main effect on well-being. These findings are discussed from the perspective of stress being an environment-perception-response process.

  14. An Examination of Individual Level Factors in Stress and Coping Processes: Perspectives of Chinese International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2011-01-01

    No empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the stress and coping processes of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the individual-level variables that affect the stress-coping process of Chinese international students and how they conceptualize and adapt to their stress at an…

  15. An Examination of Individual Level Factors in Stress and Coping Processes: Perspectives of Chinese International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2011-01-01

    No empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the stress and coping processes of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the individual-level variables that affect the stress-coping process of Chinese international students and how they conceptualize and adapt to their stress at an…

  16. Secondary traumatic stress among Internet Crimes Against Children task force personnel: impact, risk factors, and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Michael L; Craun, Sarah W

    2014-12-01

    Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force personnel face various forms of child exploitation on a daily basis; their jobs require them to view child pornography, participate in undercover chats, interact with offenders in person, and interview abuse survivors. Although exposure to child exploitation and sexual violence has been shown to cause secondary traumatic stress (STS) in certain professions, this is the first large-scale study to investigate risk for STS among ICAC personnel. We circulated an Internet-based survey to ICAC personnel throughout the country and more than 600 individuals responded. Results provide insight into how STS impacts personal and professional well-being. In addition, they highlight which coping mechanisms were inversely related to STS scores. Implications and limitations of the results are discussed.

  17. Life events and stress: do older men and women in Malaysia cope differently as consumers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Fon Sim; Phillips, David R; Chai, Sen Tyng

    2013-06-01

    The study of major life events and their effects on well-being has considerable relevance for scientific disciplines and policy making in understanding the consumer behaviour of older people. There is evidence of differences in reactions to and coping with stress between males and females but relatively little knowledge about such gender differences amongst older people, especially in middle-income countries. This study of older Malaysians looked at both coping strategies and gender differences in reactions to stress when people are confronted with certain life events. Seventeen major life events were used in interviews with 645 respondents aged 50 years or older in five major urban areas in Peninsular Malaysia. The analysis showed older women tended to experience higher levels of chronic stress than older men. They also had more health problems, had lower levels of self-esteem and were less satisfied with life. Whilst the results showed little support for gender differences in coping behaviours, stress had a significant influence on the way older men and women change store preferences. A hypothesis that older women would use more emotion-focused coping strategies was not supported. Knowledge of how older Malaysians cope with life events and stress and especially in this instance with regard to consumption behaviour, is likely to be of considerable academic and policy related interest.

  18. Psychological morbidity, sources of stress and coping strategies among undergraduate medical students of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Chiranjoy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years there has been a growing appreciation of the issues of quality of life and stresses involved medical training as this may affect their learning and academic performance. However, such studies are lacking in medical schools of Nepal. Therefore, we carried out this study to assess the prevalence of psychological morbidity, sources and severity of stress and coping strategies among medical students in our integrated problem-stimulated undergraduate medical curriculum. Methods A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was carried out among the undergraduate medical students of Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Nepal during the time period August, 2005 to December, 2006. The psychological morbidity was assessed using General Health Questionnaire. A 24-item questionnaire was used to assess sources of stress and their severity. Coping strategies adopted was assessed using brief COPE inventory. Results The overall response rate was 75.8% (407 out of 525 students. The overall prevalence of psychological morbidity was 20.9% and was higher among students of basic sciences, Indian nationality and whose parents were medical doctors. By logistic regression analysis, GHQ-caseness was associated with occurrence of academic and health-related stressors. The most common sources of stress were related to academic and psychosocial concerns. The most important and severe sources of stress were staying in hostel, high parental expectations, vastness of syllabus, tests/exams, lack of time and facilities for entertainment. The students generally used active coping strategies and alcohol/drug was a least used coping strategy. The coping strategies commonly used by students in our institution were positive reframing, planning, acceptance, active coping, self-distraction and emotional support. The coping strategies showed variation by GHQ-caseness, year of study, gender and parents' occupation. Conclusion The higher

  19. Sources of stress and coping in American college students who have been diagnosed with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aselton, Pamela

    2012-08-01

    The study aims to explore the sources of stress in American college students who had been treated for depression and to discern their coping mechanisms. A phenomenological approach using Seidman's guide to in-depth qualitative interviews using a three-part approach was used in the study. Online in-depth interviews utilizing e-mail with asynchronous communication were used. Sources of stress included roommate issues, academic problems, financial and career concerns, and pressure from family. Exercise, talking to friends, self-talk, deep breathing, journaling, marijuana use, and listening to music were common coping mechanisms. College students who have been treated for depression are under increasing stress today from a variety of sources. Nonmedical methods of coping were often cited as more effective than medication therapy. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Transactional stress and coping theory in accounting for psychological states measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buško

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines a relative predictive value of some stable individual attributes and the processes of cognitive appraisals and coping with stress in accounting for specific components of anxiety state measures. Self-report instruments for the measurement of selected psychological constructs, i.e. perceived incompetence, externality, stress intensity and duration, situation-specific coping strategies, and the two anxiety state components, were taken in a sample of 449 male military basics trainees, ranging in age from 18-27. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that the set of predictors employed could account for statistically, as well as theoretically and practically a significant part of variance in cognitive anxiety component (45,5%, and in visceral-emotional component (32,2% of the anxiety state. The extent of anxiety reactions assessed by both scales could primarily be explained by general perception of personal incompetence, as a relatively stable dimension of general self-concept. Of the ways of coping examined, reinterpretation of stressful events was the only strategy contributing to low level, whereas passivization, wishful thinking, and seeking social support contributed to higher levels of anxiety measured by both scales. The results give partial support to the basic hypotheses on the mediating role of coping in the relationships among particular components of the stress and coping models.

  1. Undirected learning styles and academic risk: Analysis of the impact of stress, strain and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimatian, Stephen; Lloyd, Sara; Berger, Jeffrey; Steiner, Lorraine; McKay, Robert; Schwengal, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Learning style inventories used in conjunction with a measure of academic achievement consistently show an association of meaning directed learning patterns with academic success, but have failed to show a clear association of undirected learning styles with academic failure. Using survey methods with anesthesia residents, this study questioned whether additional assessment of factors related to stress, strain, and coping help to better define the association between undirected learning styles and academic risk. Pearson chi squared tests. 296 subjects were enrolled from eight institutions with 142 (48%) completing the study. American Board of Anesthesiologists In Training Examinations (ITE) percentiles (ITE%) were used as a measure of academic achievement. The Vermunt Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS) was used to identify four learning patterns and 20 strategies, and the Osipow Stress Inventory-Revised (OSI-R) was used as a measure of six scales of occupational stress, four of personal strain, and four coping resources. Two learning patterns had significant relationship with ITE scores. As seen in previous studies, Meaning Directed Learning was beneficial for academic achievement while Undirected Learning was the least beneficial. Higher scores on Meaning Directed Learning correlated positively with higher ITE scores while higher Undirected and lower Meaning Directed patterns related negatively to ITE%. OSI-R measures of stress, strain and coping indicated that residents with Undirected learning patterns had higher scores on three scales related to stress, and 4 related to strain, while displaying lower scores on two scales related to coping. Residents with higher Meaning Directed patterns scored lower on two scales of stress and two scales of strain, with higher scores on two scales for coping resources. Low Meaning Directed and high Undirected learning patterns correlated with lower ITE percentiles, higher scores for stress and strain, and lower coping resources

  2. 精神科护士工作倦怠与应对方式及工作压力源的研究%STUDY ON THE RELATIONS AMONG JOB BURNOUT, COPING STYLE AND JOB STRESSORS OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟勇; 曹健

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] To study the potential notable differences of job burnout levels among the nurses in the psychiatric and non- psychiatric departments through a comparative study. By exploring the relationship among job bumout, coping style and job stressors, to provide more theoretical foundation for promoting mental health of psychiatric nurses. [Methods] Investigated 143 psychiatric clinical nurses in the manner of Chinese Maslach burnout inventory, scale form on job stressors of nurses and simple coping style questionnaire. The database was set up in Foxpor 6.0 and the data were processed in SPSS 15.0. [Results] The five aspects of job stressors had a close relation with job bumout and also were major variables in the study of e-motional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Active coping style had a significant negative re-lation with the three dimensions of job burnout (P< 0.01), while passive coping style was positively related to it (P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that active coping and passive coping styles were two major affecting factors of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Coping style suggested in this paper as moderator and intervening variables had been partly tested. [Conclusion] The present job burnout of psychiatric nurses is quite serious, job stressors and coping style of psychiatric nurses are the significant influence factors of job burnout. The coping style has the remarkable moderator and intervening function in the job bumout and job stressors.%[目的]了解精神科护士工作倦怠、工作压力源及应对方式的现状,探讨三者之间的关系.[方法]采用中武工作倦怠问卷、护士工作压力源量表以及简易应对方式量表对143名精神科临床护士进行调查.用SPSS15.0进行数据处理.[结果]工作压力源的5个方面均与工作倦怠密切相关(P<0.01),且是影响精神科护士情感耗竭、人格解体及成

  3. Associations Between Academic Stressors, Reaction to Stress, Coping Strategies and Musculoskeletal Disorders Among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ekpenyong, Christopher E; Daniel, Nyebuk E; Aribo, Ekpe O

    2013-01-01

    Background The adverse health effects of stress are enormous, and vary among people, probably because of differences in how stress is appraised and the strategies individuals use to cope with it. This study assessed the association between academic stress and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among 1365 undergraduates. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a Nigerian university at the beginning of the 2010/2011 academic session with the same group of participants. The Life Stre...

  4. Occupational stress in men and women: a comparative study of coping resources

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    M.A. The ramifications of stress-related illnesses and disorders impact on the individual, the organization that the individual works for and the nation’s economic status as a whole. Coping with occupational stress has thus become the focus of occupational health specialists, organizations and industrial psychologists. South African managers and executives work under constant stress and pressure (Strumpfer, 1983). With the emergence of women into previously male dominated occupations, a gr...

  5. French College Students’ Sports Practice and Its Relations with Stress, Coping Strategies and Academic Success

    OpenAIRE

    Greg eDécamps; Emilie eBoujut; Camille eBrisset

    2012-01-01

    College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students’ sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular, or intensive) would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strate...

  6. Coping Style, Job Burnout and Mental Health of University Teachers of the Millennial Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Xiao-Rong; Du, Juan-Juan; Dong, Rui-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    At present, in social transition period of China, reform of higher education is in full swing, with workload, job difficulty of university teachers greatly increased than before. Plus unique values and personality characteristics of the Millennial Generation, mental health of university teachers of the Millennial Generation has aroused more and…

  7. The Relationship between Quality of Work Life, Job Stress, Job Satisfaction and Citizenship Behavior in Oshnaviyeh Hospital’s Staff

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    Kasraie Sh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB is an important variable in the study of organization management. It is partly hard to build relationships and performance within the organization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the quality of work life, job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior in Oshnaviyeh Hospital’s staff. Materials and Methods:To collect data, quality of work life by Walton, hospital job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior questionnaires were used. To determine the reliability of the questionnaires. To analyze data, Pearson Correlation Test,T test, Regression, Path analysis were used. Results: The results show that there is a significant positive relationship between the quality of work life, job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior. The quality of work life is the most important variable among the independent variables since it was able to identify approximately 18% of citizen behavior. Conclusion: Because OCB is completely voluntary, behaviors are more influenced by their interactions and organizational procedures. Hence, it  is  fair to organizations to know how to deal with employees' level of organizational citizenship behavior.

  8. Chronic fatigue and strategies of coping with occupational stress in police officers

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    Ewa Stępka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work as one of the most important activities in human life is related to stressful and difficult situations. Police officers make one of the many occupational groups that are particularly threatened by contact with a number of stressors. Therefore, their strategies of coping with stress are particularly important, because they play an important role in their functioning at work. The nature of the service as well as shift work and psychological costs incurred by police officers contribute to the emergence of chronic fatigue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of chronic fatigue in police officers and its relationship with the strategies of coping with occupational stress. Material and Methods: A group of 61 police officers was examined. The following research methods were used: 1 Latack Coping Scale examining stress coping strategies at work (positive thinking, direct action, avoidance/resignation, seeking help, alcohol or stimulants use; 2 Mood Assessment Questionnaire CIS-20R examining the level of chronic fatigue and its components (subjective feeling of fatigue, impaired attention and concentration, reduced motivation, reduced activity; 3 Personal questionnaire providing socio-demographic data. Results: It was found that the level of chronic fatigue in the group of the examined police officers was high (sten 8th. The most often used strategies of coping with stress were direct action and positive thinking, and the least often used strategy was the use of alcohol and stimulants. A significant negative correlation between the general level of chronic fatigue and the avoidance/ resignation strategy was found. Conclusions: The results indicate that chronic fatigue is a problem affecting police officers and it is related to the stress coping strategies used. Med Pr 2014;65(2:229–238

  9. Stress reactions and coping strategies among Bedouin Arab adolescents exposed to demolition of houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra; Al Said, Haled

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine emotional reactions and coping strategies of Bedouin adolescents against the backdrop of house demolitions in the unrecognized Bedouin villages in the Negev, Israel. We compared two groups of adolescents living in unrecognized Bedouin villages, teenagers whose houses had been destroyed (acute + chronic group) and their counterparts whose houses had not been destroyed (chronic group). Data were gathered during October to December 2010 from 465 Bedouin adolescents aged 13-18 years. Adolescents filled out self-report questionnaires, which included demographics, objective and subjective exposure to house demolition, state anxiety, state anger, psychological distress and Adolescent Coping Scale. Results show differences between the two groups in stress reactions as well as in objective exposure to house demolition with the acute + chronic group reporting more stress and more exposure. In addition, different variables explained stress reactions in the different groups. Whereas in the acute + chronic group, objective and subjective exposure were the most significant variables, in the chronic group, the coping strategies explained stress with more variance. Results are discussed in terms of differentiating between types of stress, chronic versus acute + chronic and in relation to the interactionist model of coping with stress.

  10. Ways of coping with stress and perceived social support in gynecologic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sema Dereli; Bal, Meltem Demirgöz; Beji, Nezihe Kzlkaya; Arvas, Macit

    2015-01-01

    Stress is commonly encountered among cancer patients and may be a challenge affecting immune system resistance. Social support may contribute positively to the health of cancer patients, playing a role in coping with stress. The aim of this study was to determine whether ways of coping are related to social support given to women with gynecologic cancer. The study was performed as a cross-sectional design in a university hospital in Istanbul, Turkey, with 221 women with gynecologic cancer; the data were collected via 3 questionnaires, the first with sociodemographic and clinical features, the second with multidimensional scale of perceived social support, and the third with the scale of ways of coping with stress. Women with gynecologic cancer who were employed and declared their incomes as balanced and reported more years of education were more likely to perceive higher social support and to use the ineffective coping ways with stress at a lower rate (P stress increase as perceived social support from family, friends, significant other, and total increases (P stress by women with gynecologic cancer. Nurses are indispensable in increasing social support required by women with gynecologic cancer. Well-trained clinical nurses via in-service programs should be experienced and aware of women diagnosed with gynecologic cancer in need of social support during hospital visits and provide necessary guidance.

  11. [Examination of work-related stress and coping strategies among ambulance- and air-ambulance workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiszler, Bence; Karamánné Pakai, Annamária; Szabó, Zoltán; Raposa, László Bence; Pónusz, Róbert; Radnai, Balázs; Endrei, Dóra

    2016-11-01

    Among Hungary's health sector workers the presence of a high level of stress is known, which can affect the individual. The aim of the authors was to uncover major risk factors causing work-related stress, as well as its extent, and positive and negative coping strategies among ground and aerial rescue workers. From June until October 2015, a national survey was conducted among Hungarian rescue workers. An own questionnaire and Rahe Stress and coping validated short questionnaire online form were used. A total of 141 persons took part in the survey. As compared to air-ambulance workers, ground rescue workers were exposed to higher work-related stress effects (p<0.01), resulting in a much larger variety of physical and psychological symptoms (p<0.05). Based on Global Stress and Coping Index effective coping mechanisms were observed among air rescue workers (p<0.01). It is important to perform regular professional theoretical and practical training. Human resource management should pay attention on occupational stress reduction. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(45), 1802-1808.

  12. Impacts of Job Stress and Cognitive Failure on Patient Safety Incidents among Hospital Nurses

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    Young-Mi Park

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Patient safety incidents were affected by shift work, cognitive failure, and job stress. Many countermeasures to reduce the incidents caused by shift work, and plans to reduce job stress to reduce the workers' cognitive failure are required. In addition, there is a necessity to reduce job instability and clearly define the scope and authority for duties that are directly related to the patient's safety.

  13. Life events, coping, and posttraumatic stress symptoms among Chinese adolescents exposed to 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, China.

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    Yuhong Zheng

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the relationship between negative life events, coping styles, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD among adolescent survivors exposed to 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, China. METHODS: A survey was conducted in a sample of 2250 adolescent students from two schools in Dujiangyan District, a seriously damaged area, 20 kilometers away from the epicenter, 6 months after the earthquake. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire including demographics, negative life events, coping styles, and PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: Academic pressure was the strongest predictor of adolescents' PTSD symptoms among all negative life events. Main effects of negative life events, positive coping and negative coping on PTSD symptoms were significant in both younger adolescents and older adolescents, while the moderator effects of two coping styles were found significant only within older adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Coping may play a role to moderate the relationship between post-earthquake negative life events and PTSD symptom, but the function seems to depend on the age of participants. Psychosocial coping skills training may be important in the prevention and intervention of mental health problems in adolescent survivors of traumatic earthquake.

  14. The Comparison of Hardiness and Coping Styles with Psychological Stress in Addicted and Normal People

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    Rahim Molazadeh, E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare the hardiness and coping styles with stress in addicted and normal people in the city of Rasht. Method: The method of this study was causal comparative research. In sampling one hundred addicts were selected by multistage cluster sampling and one hundred normal ones selected by available sampling, then the Kobasa personal views survey and Moos and Billings coping styles questionnaires were administered among both groups. The Pearson correlation coefficients, independent samples t-test and regression analysis were used for data analysis. Results: The results showed that there were significant differences between the mean scores of hardiness and emotion focused coping style in addicted and normal people, but there was no significant difference on problem focused coping style. Regression analysis also showed that hardiness can be a significant predictor for emotion focused coping style. Conclusion: The findings of this research show the important role of some of the personality characteristics such as hardiness and coping styles with stress that may correlate with the tendency to addiction and substance abuse in people.

  15. Job-Related Stress and Depression in Orphanage and Preschool Caregivers in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Maryna; Kotake, Chie; Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ebert, Marina; Miller, Laurie C.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional well-being of child care providers is important to the welfare of their young charges. Elevated depression and job-related stress may affect caregivers' ability to establish empathic connections with children. This study examined work conditions, job-related stress, and depression in 51 orphanage workers and 69 preschool teachers in…

  16. Job-Related Stress and Depression in Orphanage and Preschool Caregivers in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Maryna; Kotake, Chie; Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ebert, Marina; Miller, Laurie C.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional well-being of child care providers is important to the welfare of their young charges. Elevated depression and job-related stress may affect caregivers' ability to establish empathic connections with children. This study examined work conditions, job-related stress, and depression in 51 orphanage workers and 69 preschool teachers in…

  17. Predicting Secondary Agriculture Teachers' Job Stress from Selected Personal, Family, and Work-Related Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Robert M.; Lambert, Misty D.; Lawver, Rebecca G.

    2010-01-01

    The study sought to describe the characteristics and explain the current level of job stress among secondary agriculture teachers. The sample consisted of 370 secondary agriculture teachers. Data were collected using the Job Stress Survey (Spielberger & Vagg, 1999). From the findings it was concluded that the average secondary agriculture teacher…

  18. Perceived Social Support Mediating the Relationship between Perceived Stress and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sarwat; Rashid, Safia

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to examine the mediating effect of perceived social support between perceived stress and job satisfaction among employees. A conveniently selected sample of 280 employees provided the information on Perceived Social Support Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Job Satisfaction Survey. Employing Regression analyses,…

  19. Structural hippocampal alterations, perceived stress, and coping deficiencies in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Nathalie T; Koschutnig, Karl; Ebner, Franz; Freidl, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness that mainly affects young females. Studies have found a reduction of the hippocampus-amygdala formation in people with AN, a brain region that is especially vulnerable to stress. In addition, patients with AN were found to perceive higher stress levels and to have more coping deficiencies than healthy controls. No prior study has considered a connection between stress, coping, and the hippocampal volume in AN. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to analyze the volume of hippocampal substructures, and its relation to stress and coping. We tested 21 females currently affected by AN and 21 age-matched normal controls (NC). Demographic and behavioral data were assessed. A magnetic resonance (MR) scanner was used to collect data reflecting volume of cortical structures. We performed comparisons between groups and calculated correlations between the hippocampal volume and coping strategies or stress. The results showed a significant reduction of the hippocampal fimbria and a significant enlargement of the hippocampal fissure in patients with AN compared to the NC. In addition, patients with AN were found to report higher stress levels and to have more coping deficiencies than healthy controls. The hippocampal volume showed a trend-level association with stress in patients with AN. In sum, our study provides the first-available evidence that perceived stress in patients with AN could be related to hippocampal volume. Our results may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of AN and, therefore, help to improve the treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Coping with stress and cognitive interference in student teachers performance as important factors influencing their achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cirila Peklaj

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to investigate the relations between student teachers' strategies for coping with stressful situations, cognitive interference factors and successfulness of presentation of student teachers' seminar work. There were 135 student teachers participating in the study. At the beginning of the semester they filled in the Way of Coping Questionnaire (Folkman & Lazarus, 1988. After their presentation of seminar theme they reported about the cognitive interference factors during the presentation (distractive factors and intrusive thoughts. Different aspects of their performance were also evaluated by the teacher according to the well-known criteria. The analysis of the results showed significant correlations between certain ways of coping, cognitive interference factors and success of performance. Further statistical analysis showed significant differences in experiencing distractive factors and intrusive thoughts during presentation between students with low, medium and high performance success. The importance of successful strategies for coping with verbal presentation and the implications for student teacher education are discussed.

  1. Job stress and hypertension in younger software professionals in India

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    Giridhara R Babu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report the results of a moderately large study (1071 to study the prevalence of hypertension among software professionals in the Indian subcontinent employed at 27 different companies in Bangalore. The focus of our study is on the age gradient of hypertension prevalence and exploring the association of workplace psychosocial predictors of hypertension. Materials and Methods: We used mixed methods sampling strategy, the first stage of which involved stratified sampling to select the clusters of software companies in Bangalore and the second stage involved selecting individual companies through purposive sampling. Job stress questionnaire was self-administered to collect information on job stress and blood pressure classification is done based on 7 th report of Joint National Commission. Results: The prevalence of hypertension among Information Technology/Information Technology Enabled Services professionals was 31% and pre-hypertension was 45.7%. The prevalence of stage-1 hypertension in the age group of 19-25 years was 18% and 23% in 26-30 years group while the prevalence of stage-2 hypertension in the age group of 19-25 years was 5% and 3% in 26-30 years group. The results indicate that dimensions of workplace autonomy and workplace environment are associated with hypertension. Conclusions: Hypertension affects the young urban Indians a decade earlier compared to available evidence. Furthermore, there is an association of autonomy and work-environment with hypertension. This signifies further exploration of underlying endocrine mechanisms. Funding: The funding UCLA International Research and Training Program and the Public Health Foundation of India provided the funding for this study. Results: The study was supported through Fogarty/UCLA International Research and Training Program (Grant Number: D43 TW000013 and the Public Health Foundation of India

  2. French college students' sports practice and its relations with stress, coping strategies and academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, Greg; Boujut, Emilie; Brisset, Camille

    2012-01-01

    College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students' sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular, or intensive) would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strategies, and their academic success/failure. Three self-completion questionnaires were administered to 1071 French freshmen during their compulsory medical visit at the preventive medicine service of the university. Results indicated that students with intensive sport practice reported lower scores of general stress, academic stress, and emotion-focused coping strategies, and higher scores of self-efficacy than those with rare practice. However, the proportion of successful students did not differ significantly between the three groups of sports practice.

  3. French college students’ sports practice and its relations with stress, coping strategies and academic success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg eDécamps

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students’ sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular or intensive would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strategies and their academic success/failure. Three self-completion questionnaires were administered to 1071 French freshmen during their compulsory medical visit at the preventive medicine service of the university. Results indicated that students with intensive sport practice reported lower scores of general stress, academic stress and emotion-focused coping strategies, and higher scores of self-efficacy than those with rare practice. However, the proportion of successful students did not differ significantly between the three groups of sports practice.

  4. Relationships of Stress and Coping Styles to Periodontal Disease: A Case-Control Study

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    Radafshar G.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The effects of individual variations in coping strategies have been debated in studies of the association between stress and chronic perio-dontitis, with conflicting results.Purpose: To investigate the associations between stress, coping styles and perio-dontal disease in a sample of Iranian population.Materials and Method: Forty patients with chronic periodontitis and forty control subjects with a healthy periodontium were enrolled in this study and matched for age and gender. Participants were patients undergoing periodontal treatment at the Department of Periodontics, Guilan University of Medical Sciences. A single examiner performed periodontal examination. Psychological assessments, including the Life Events Questionnaire and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire were done by a second examiner; both examiners were blind to the study. Bi-variate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to compare results for patients and control subjects.Results: Statistically significant differences in the problem-focused coping (p< 0.01, intensity of stress (p< 0.006, as well as escape-avoidance (p< 0.01, and accepting responsibility (p< 0.001 subscales were observed between the patient and control groups. Multivariate logistic regression identified a negative association between periodontitis and tooth-brushing frequency (OR= 3.3, 95% CI: 1.22- 8.69, as well as the accepting responsibility coping style (OR= 1.5, 95% CI: 1.14- 1.98, and a positive association with stress intensity (OR= 1.081, 95% CI: 1.023-1.143.Conclusion: The results suggest that psychological stress associated with various life events is a significant risk indicator for periodontal disease. Although statisti-cally small, there was a clinically important link between coping strategies and periodontal disease.

  5. Coping with the stress in the cardiac intensive care unit: Can mindfulness be the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfenshtein, Nadya; Deatrick, Janet A; Lisanty, Amy J; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara

    2017-08-11

    Mothers of infants with complex congenital heart disease are exposed to increased stress which has been associated with numerous adverse health outcomes. The coping mechanisms these mothers use critically effect the familial illness adaptation and most likely infant outcomes. Currently no data-based strategies have been developed for mothers to facilitate their coping, and proactively promote their adaptation in the critical care settings. A potential strategy is mindfulness which is currently used in other clinical settings with stress-reduction effects. (1) To investigate coping mechanisms of mothers whose infant with complex CHD is admitted in the CICU, and (2) to explore the acceptability and feasibility of mindfulness as a potential stress-reduction intervention for these mothers. A descriptive qualitative study obtained perspectives from 14 mothers during three focus groups. A qualitative conventional content analysis was performed using ATLAS.ti. In congruence with the Stress and Coping framework, themes identified mostly emotion-regulatory coping mechanisms including both active and passive strategies such as positive thinking, denial, distraction, relying on support systems, and focusing on baby. Mindfulness was an acceptable and feasible approach for most participants, however, practice unfamiliarity, time and space concerns, and personal preferences were identified as potential barriers for future dissemination. Mindfulness can potentially promote illness adaptation by utilization of active coping mechanisms. Early interventions can provide immediate, and potentially long-term stress relief. Intervention settings, format, and time-frame should be flexibly tailored to the trajectory of parental distress and familial adjustment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psycho-social risks at work: stress and coping strategies in oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Sandra da Fonte Sousa; Santos, Margarida Maria Magalhães Cabugueira Custódio dos; Carolino, Elisabete Teresa da Mata Almeida

    2013-01-01

    to identify sources of stress and coping strategies in nurses who work in three Head and Neck Surgery Oncology Services, in three central hospitals in Portugal. a cross-sectional descriptive-exploratory study, whose sample was made up of the 96 nurses from the three services. The following were used in the data collection: a socio-demographic questionnaire; the 12-item General Health Questionnaire; and the Occupational Stress Inventory; Brief COPE. reasonable levels of general health were ascertained. The most-mentioned stressors were: burden with work; low pay; the physical space where they work; emotionally-disturbing situations and lack of recognition of the profession. The most-used coping strategies were: planning; active coping; acceptance and self-distraction. the stressors identified are mainly related to organizational aspects and work conditions, and the coping strategies chosen are aimed at resolving problems and improving the nurses’ well-being. A significant percentage of the nurses presents high levels of pressure and depressed emotions. The results presented corroborate previous studies which warn of the importance of developing strategies for preventing these stress levels.

  7. Psycho-social risks at work: stress and coping strategies in oncology nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra da Fonte Sousa Gomes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify sources of stress and coping strategies in nurses who work in three Head and Neck Surgery Oncology Services, in three central hospitals in Portugal. METHOD: a cross-sectional descriptive-exploratory study, whose sample was made up of the 96 nurses from the three services. The following were used in the data collection: a socio-demographic questionnaire; the 12-item General Health Questionnaire; and the Occupational Stress Inventory; Brief COPE. RESULTS: reasonable levels of general health were ascertained. The most-mentioned stressors were: burden with work; low pay; the physical space where they work; emotionally-disturbing situations and lack of recognition of the profession. The most-used coping strategies were: planning; active coping; acceptance and self-distraction. CONCLUSION: the stressors identified are mainly related to organizational aspects and work conditions, and the coping strategies chosen are aimed at resolving problems and improving the nurses' well-being. A significant percentage of the nurses presents high levels of pressure and depressed emotions. The results presented corroborate previous studies which warn of the importance of developing strategies for preventing these stress levels.

  8. Type D personality, stress coping strategies and self-efficacy as predictors of Facebook intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Agata; Przepiorka, Aneta; Czuczwar, Stanisław Jerzy

    2017-03-14

    Recently, Facebook has become one of the most popular social networking sites. People use it more and more often. A number of studies have recently addressed the issue of excessive Facebook use, showing this phenomenon to be a spreading problem. The main aim of the present study was to examine whether Type D personality, self-efficacy and coping strategies are related to Facebook intrusion. The participants were 882 students of Polish universities, all of them Facebook users (72% women, mean age: 22.25 years, SD =2.06). We used the Facebook Intrusion Questionnaire, the Facebook Intensity Scale, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, and the Type D Scale. We applied the pen-and-paper procedure. Our results indicate that emotion-oriented and avoidance-oriented strategies of coping in stressful situations are predictors of Facebook intrusion and Facebook intensity. The relations between both Facebook intrusion and intensity and social inhibition are significant only when emotion-oriented coping strategy is controlled. The knowledge of whether coping strategies in stressful situations, such as focus on emotions or avoidance, are related to Facebook intrusion might be useful for clinical purposes.

  9. Association of burnout with stress, coping strategies and vocational satisfaction in Chilean clinical dental students.

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    Francisco Pérez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dental students are particularly affected by stress, which can lead to ‘burnout syndrome’ by association with other psychological factors. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of perceived stress, coping strategies, and vocational satisfaction on the severity of burnout in Chilean dental students in the clinical years. Method: The study population was comprised of clinical dental students of five Chilean dental schools. The following variables were considered: age, gender, year of study, burnout, coping strategies, perceived stress, and vocational satisfaction. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures, correlation tests, and stepwise multiple regression analysis. Results: The final sample included 244 students. Three (1.23% students did not have burnout in any of its factors and 38 (15.57% had severe levels in all three factors. There was a statistically significant greater ‘emotional exhaustion’ in 4th year students. There was a statistically significant correlation of the three factors of burnout with ‘social withdrawal’ coping strategy, high levels of perceived stress, and low levels of present and future vocational satisfaction. Conclusion: Most students presented moderate and high levels of burnout. This situation is associated with dysfunctional coping strategies, high levels of perceived stress, and low levels of present and future vocational satisfaction.

  10. Retrospective coping strategies during sexual identity formation and current biopsychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juster, Robert-Paul; Ouellet, Émilie; Lefebvre-Louis, Jean-Philippe; Sindi, Shireen; Johnson, Philip Jai; Smith, Nathan Grant; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    Lesbian, gay men, and bisexual individuals (LGBs) often experience distress related to the recognition, self-acceptance, and disclosure of their sexual orientation. Retrospectively reported coping strategies enacted during sexual identity formation among LGBs were assessed in relation to current stress indices measured using environmental (frequency of perceived daily hassles), psychological (perceived distress), and biological (allostatic load [AL] levels representing physiological dysregulations) perspectives. Forty-six healthy LGBs between the ages of 18 and 45 (M = 23.91, SE = .80) participated. Questionnaires included the Ways of Coping Checklist adapted to disclosure milestones, Daily Hassles Inventory, and Perceived Stress Scale. AL was calculated using 21 biomarkers of neuroendocrine, immune, cardiovascular, and metabolic functioning. Avoidance coping during sexual identity formation was positively associated with frequency of daily hassles (β = .598, p < .001), perceived stress (β = .361, p = .015), and AL (β = .405, p = .006). By contrast, seeking social support was negatively associated with perceived stress (β = -.598, p = .048). Emotion-focused coping strategies during LGB sexual identity development are associated with current indices of biopsychosocial stress.

  11. Path analysis of relationship among personality, perceived stress, coping, social support, and psychological outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohafza, Hamidreza; Feizi, Awat; Afshar, Hamid; Mazaheri, Mina; Behnamfar, Omid; Hassanzadeh-Keshteli, Ammar; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provide a structural model of the relationship between personality traits, perceived stress, coping strategies, social support, and psychological outcomes in the general population. METHODS: This is a cross sectional study in which the study group was selected using multistage cluster and convenience sampling among a population of 4 million. For data collection, a total of 4763 individuals were asked to complete a questionnaire on demographics, personality traits, life events, coping with stress, social support, and psychological outcomes such as anxiety and depression. To evaluate the comprehensive relationship between the variables, a path model was fitted. RESULTS: The standard electronic modules showed that personality traits and perceived stress are important determinants of psychological outcomes. Social support and coping strategies were demonstrated to reduce the increasing cumulative positive effects of neuroticism and perceived stress on the psychological outcomes and enhance the protective effect of extraversion through decreasing the positive effect of perceived stress on the psychological outcomes. CONCLUSION: Personal resources play an important role in reduction and prevention of anxiety and depression. In order to improve the psychological health, it is necessary to train and reinforce the adaptive coping strategies and social support, and thus, to moderate negative personality traits. PMID:27354968

  12. The Influence of Religious Coping on the Acculturative Stress of Recent Latino Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Mariana; Dillon, Frank; Ruffin, Beverly; De La Rosa, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Acculturative stress negatively impacts the physical and mental health of Latino immigrants. Little is known about the pre-immigration resources that may influence the acculturative stress of Latino immigrants. Religion plays a prominent role in Latino culture and may prove to be an influential resource during difficult life transitions, such as those experienced during the immigration process. The present study examines the association between religious coping resources prior to immigration and acculturative stress after immigration within a multiethnic sample of 527 adult Latinos who have lived in the United States for less than 1 year. Path analyses revealed that pre-immigration external religious coping was associated with high levels of post-immigration acculturative stress. Illegal immigrant status was associated with high levels of pre-immigration religious coping as well as post-immigration acculturative stress. These findings expand scientific understanding as to the function and effect of specific religious coping mechanisms among Latino immigrants. Furthermore, results underscore the need for future research, which could serve to inform culturally relevant prevention and treatment programs.

  13. Coping, stress and suicide ideation in the South African Police Service / Jacobus Pienaar

    OpenAIRE

    Pienaar, Jacobus

    2002-01-01

    A productive and healthy police force is important for the economic growth and stability and the development of a country. In South Africa, various potential stressors, such as a high crime level. organisational transformation and a lack of resources challenge members of the police services. Increased rates of illness, post-traumatic stress, burnout, alcohol abuse and suicides, as well as decreased levels of job satisfaction and job performance as compared to norms for the gene...

  14. Role stress and work engagement as antecedents of job satisfaction in Spanish workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Orgambídez-Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: According to the Job Demands-Resources (JDR model, engagement and job satisfaction may be produce by two types of working conditions: job demands (i.e. role stress and job resources (i.e. self-efficacy. This study examines the role of role stress and work engagement as antecedents of job satisfaction in a sample of Spanish workers. Design/methodology/approach: This study comprised a sample of 435 Spanish workers. A cross sectional study was used to examine the relationship between role stress, work engagement and job satisfaction. Data were gathered based on personal administered questionnaires. Findings and Originality/value: Hierarchical multiple regression models have revealed that job satisfaction was significantly predicted by role stress and work engagement. Results support JDR model by showing that positive outcomes, such as job satisfaction can be predicted by motivational process and job demands. Research limitations/implications: The cross-sectional design cannot evidence of causal relationships. This study relies on self-reports, which might increase the risk of common method variance. Practical implications: On a practical level, the JDR model provides a framework for understanding motivating workplaces and engaged and satisfied employees. Originality/value: The JDR model could be useful in designing strategies for which engaged employees may be advantageous to improving the quality of services, while at the same time increasing employees’ job satisfaction and well-being.

  15. Job Pressure and SES-contingent Buffering: Resource Reinforcement, Substitution, or the Stress of Higher Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, Jonathan; Schieman, Scott

    2015-06-01

    Analyses of the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce demonstrate that job pressure is associated with greater anxiety and job dissatisfaction. In this paper we ask, What conditions protect workers? The conventional buffering hypothesis in the Job-Demands Resource (JD-R) model predicts that job resources should attenuate the relationship. We test whether the conventional buffering hypothesis depends on socioeconomic status (SES). Support for conventional buffering is evident only for job dissatisfaction--and that generalizes across SES. When anxiety is assessed, however, we observe an SES contingency: Job resources attenuate the positive association between job pressure and anxiety among workers with lower SES, but exacerbate it among those with higher SES. We discuss the implications of this SES-contingent pattern for theoretical scenarios about "resource reinforcement," "resource substitution," and the "stress of higher status." Future research should consider SES indicators as potential contingencies in the relationship between job conditions and mental health.

  16. Reliability and Validity study of the NIOSH Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ among Firefighters in Tehran city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kazronian

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Considering that Validity and Reliability factors of the questionnaire were be appropriate, it can be recommended that NIOSH Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ can be used as a Valid and Reliable questionnaire for job stress evaluation in Iran.

  17. The mediating role of cultural coping behaviours on the relationships between academic stress and positive psychosocial well-being outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ben C H; Soucie, Kendall M; Huang, Siqi; Laith, Refa

    2017-03-10

    While culture's effect on the coping process has long been acknowledged in the stress-coping literature conceptually, empirical evidence and attempts to discern the specific relationship between culture and coping remain very scarce. Against this backdrop, the present study applied the Cultural Transactional Theory (Chun, Moos, & Cronkite, 2006) to examine the mediating role of cultural coping behaviours (Collective, Engagement and Avoidance Coping) on the relationship between academic stress (AS) and two positive psychosocial well-being outcome measures: Collective Self-esteem (CSE) and Subjective Well-being (SWB). Responses from a sample of undergraduate students in Canada (N = 328) were analysed to test a theory-driven, hypothesised model of coping using structural equation modelling (SEM). As hypothesised, the SEM results showed that: (a) the proposed cultural coping model fit the data well; (b) Engagement Coping and Collective Coping partially mediated the association between AS and the outcomes and (c) the path relationships among the constructs were in the hypothesised directions. A set of preliminary exploratory analyses indicated that Collective Coping was most strongly endorsed by the African/Black and the Middle Eastern cultural groups as compared to other ethnic groups. Implications of the study's findings for future research and practice concerning culture, stress, and coping are discussed.

  18. Sintomas de estresse e estratégias de coping em idosos saudáveis Síntomas de estrés y estrategias de coping en ancianos saludables Stress symptoms and coping strategies in healthy elderly subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Nery de Souza Talarico

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Idosos podem manifestar sintomas de estresse em decorrência das mudanças biopsicossociais do envelhecimento. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar sintomas de estresse em idosos e o estilo de coping utilizado por eles, verificando a relação entre estas variáveis. Foram aplicados a Lista de Sintomas de Stress (LSS e o Inventário de Coping de Jalowiec, em 41 idosos saudáveis. Os idosos apresentaram sintomas de estresse, com intensidade média de 42.8 pontos. Observou-se predomínio do coping focado no problema, porém não houve diferença significativa entre as médias dos escores do LSS entre os indivíduos que utilizaram coping focado no problema ou na emoção (p=0.737. Neste estudo, embora os idosos tendessem a eleger o coping focado no problema, a intensidade dos sintomas de estresse independeu do tipo de coping utilizado, evidenciando que tanto o coping focado no problema como o focado na emoção estão associados a níveis semelhantes de estresse.Los ancianos pueden manifestar síntomas de estrés como consecuencia de los cambios biopsicosociales del envejecimiento. El objetivo de este estudio fue identificar síntomas de estrés en ancianos y el estilo de coping utilizado por ellos, verificando la relación entre estas variables. Fueron aplicados la Lista de Síntomas de Estrés (LSS y el Inventario de Coping de Jalowiec, en 41 ancianos saludables. Los ancianos presentaron síntomas de estrés, con intensidad promedio de 42.8 pontos. Se observó el predominio del coping enfocado en el problema, sin embargo no hubo diferencia significativa entre los promedios de los puntajes del LSS entre los individuos que utilizaron el coping enfocado en el problema o en la emoción (p = 0.737. En este estudio, a pesar de que los ancianos tendieron a escoger el coping enfocado en el problema, la intensidad de los síntomas de estrés fue independiente del tipo de coping utilizado, evidenciando que tanto el coping enfocado en el problema como el

  19. Influence of stress and nursing leadership on job satisfaction of pediatric intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, M M; Broome, M; Kelber, S; Lostocco, L

    2000-09-01

    High levels of stress and the challenges of meeting the complex needs of critically ill children and their families can threaten job satisfaction and cause turnover in nurses. To explore the influences of nurses' attributes, unit characteristics, and elements of the work environment on the job satisfaction of nurses in pediatric critical care units and to determine stressors that are unique to nurses working in pediatric critical care. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The sample consisted of 1973 staff nurses in pediatric critical care units in 65 institutions in the United States and Canada. The following variables were measured: nurses' perceptions of group cohesion, job stress, nurse-physician collaboration, nursing leadership, professional job satisfaction, and organizational work satisfaction. Significant associations (r = -0.37 to r = -0.56) were found between job stress and group cohesion, professional job satisfaction, nurse-physician collaboration, nursing leadership behaviors, and organizational work satisfaction. Organizational work satisfaction was positively correlated (r = 0.35 to r = 0.56) with group cohesion, professional job satisfaction, nurse-physician collaboration, and nursing leadership behaviors. Job stress, group cohesion, job satisfaction, nurse-physician collaboration, and nursing leadership behaviors explained 52% of the variance in organizational work satisfaction. Dealing with patients' families was the most frequently cited job stressor. Job stress and nursing leadership are the most influential variables in the explanation of job satisfaction. Retention efforts targeted toward management strategies that empower staff to provide quality care along with focal interventions related to the diminishment of stress caused by nurse-family interactions are warranted.

  20. Stress and coping of parents caring for a child with mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Brenda A; Ward, Linda D; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Bindler, Ruth C

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial disease comprises a group of rare, genetic, life-limiting, neurodegenerative disorders known to affect children. Little is known about disease-related challenges, parental stress, and coping when caring for a child with a mitochondrial disease. This study explored disease-related characteristics and parental stressors and coping behaviors related to caring for a child with mitochondrial disease. Internet surveys were posted on known mitochondrial disease websites for parent completion. Surveys included demographic items and two questionnaires: Coping Inventory for Parents (CHIP) and Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP). Descriptive data were collected and correlations used to determine relationships between parenting stress, coping, and demographic variables. The majority of participants (n=231) were mothers (95%) of children with mitochondrial disease around the age of 10 years (M=9.85). On average, children had 6 organs involved (M=6.02) and saw 7 different specialists (M=7.49); 61% were hospitalized in the past year. Significant correlations (p<0.05) were found between parenting stress and parent age, parent income, parent education, child age, child age at diagnosis, presence of developmental delays, number of hospitalizations, number of medical visits, number of organs involved, and number of specialists seen. Significant correlations were also found between parenting stress and coping behaviors such as family integration, social support and understanding health care. The ability to identify disease-related challenges, stressors, and coping strategies in parents of children with mitochondrial disease is novel and can assist nurses to provide disease-sensitive, family-focused care and improve child health outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stress, coping and presenteeism in nurses assisting critical and potentially critical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Umann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective to verify the associations between stress, Coping and Presenteeism in nurses operating on direct assistance to critical and potentially critical patients. Method this is a descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study, conducted between March and April 2010 with 129 hospital nurses. The Inventory of stress in nurses, Occupational and Coping Questionnaire Range of Limitations at Work were used. For the analysis, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, correlation coefficient of Pearson and Spearman, Chi-square and T-test were applied. Results it was observed that 66.7% of the nurses showed low stress, 87.6% use control strategies for coping stress and 4.84% had decrease in productivity. Direct and meaningful relationships between stress and lost productivity were found. Conclusion stress interferes with the daily life of nurses and impacts on productivity. Although the inability to test associations, the control strategy can minimize the stress, which consequently contributes to better productivity of nurses in the care of critical patients and potentially critical.

  2. Workplace stress in nursing workers from an emergency hospital: Job Stress Scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; da Silva, Priscila Costa; Hoffmeister, Eveline; de Negri, Bianca Souza; da Costa, Bartira Ercília Pinheiro; Poli de Figueiredo, Carlos Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies workplace stress according to the Job Stress Scale and associates it with socio-demographic and occupational variables of nursing workers from an emergency hospital. This is a cross-sectional study and data were collected through a questionnaire applied to 388 nursing professionals. Descriptive statistics were applied; univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The results indicate there is a significant association with being a nursing technician or auxiliary, working in the position for more than 15 years, and having low social support, with 3.84, 2.25 and 4.79 times more chances of being placed in the 'high strain job' quadrant. The study reveals that aspects related to the workplace should be monitored by competent agencies in order to improve the quality of life of nursing workers.

  3. Burn and cut injuries related to job stress among kitchen workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Yasuo; Matsuzuki, Hiroe; Tomita, Shigeru; Muto, Takashi; Haratani, Takashi; Muto, Shigeki; Ito, Akiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the correlation between kitchen work-related burns and cuts and job stress, a self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted involving 991 kitchen workers among 126 kitchen facilities. The demographics, condition of burns and cuts, job stress with the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), health condition, and work-related and environmental factors were surveyed. Multiple logistic regression models and trend tests were used according to quartiles (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4) of each sub-scale BJSQ. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, burns/cuts were associated with a higher score category (Q4) of job demands (OR: 2.56, 95% CI: 1.10-6.02/OR: 2.72, 95% CI: 1.30-5.69), psychological stress (OR: 4.49, 95% CI: 2.05-9.81/OR: 3.52, 95% CI: 1.84-6.72), and physical stress (OR: 2.41, 95% CI: 1.20-4.98/OR 2.16, 95% CI: 1.16-4.01). The ORs of the burn/cut injures increased from Q1 to Q4 with job demands (p for trend = 0.045/0.003), psychological stress (p for trendkitchen work-related burns and cuts are more likely to be correlated with job stress, and the higher the job stress score, the higher the frequency of burns and cuts among kitchen workers.

  4. Avoidant Coping and Treatment Outcome in Rape-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Amy S.; Kearns, Megan C.; Jackson, Joan L.; Astin, Millie C.; Rothbaum, Barbara O.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the impact of avoidant coping on treatment outcome in rape-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Adult women with rape-related PTSD (N = 62) received 9 sessions of prolonged exposure (PE) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). The mean age for the sample was 34.7 years, and race…

  5. CRF2 receptor-deficiency eliminates opiate withdrawal distress without impairing stress coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingallinesi, M; Rouibi, K; Le Moine, C; Papaleo, F; Contarino, A

    2012-12-01

    The opiate withdrawal syndrome is a severe stressor that powerfully triggers addictive drug intake. However, no treatment yet exists that effectively relieves opiate withdrawal distress and spares stress-coping abilities. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system mediates the stress response, but its role in opiate withdrawal distress and bodily strategies aimed to cope with is unknown. CRF-like signaling is transmitted by two receptor pathways, termed CRF(1) and CRF(2). Here, we report that CRF(2) receptor-deficient (CRF(2)(-/-)) mice lack the dysphoria-like and the anhedonia-like states of opiate withdrawal. Moreover, in CRF(2)(-/-) mice opiate withdrawal does not increase the activity of brain dynorphin, CRF and periaqueductal gray circuitry, which are major substrates of opiate withdrawal distress. Nevertheless, CRF(2) receptor-deficiency does not impair brain, neuroendocrine and autonomic stress-coping responses to opiate withdrawal. The present findings point to the CRF(2) receptor pathway as a unique target to relieve opiate withdrawal distress without impairing stress-coping abilities.

  6. Subjective Well-Being in Urban, Ethnically Diverse Adolescents the Role of Stress and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Elizabeth M.; Vacek, Kimberly; Blackmon, Sha'kema; Coyle, Laura; Gomez, Kenia; Jorgenson, Katherine; Luginbuhl, Paula; Moallem, Isabel; Steele, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines stressors, general stress levels, coping strategies, and subjective well-being in a sample of 144 ethnically diverse, urban adolescents (mean age of 13). The most frequently reported stressors include the death of a family member, feeling socially isolated, family financial problems, injury of a family member, and parents…

  7. Evaluation of an Observer Form of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyunghee; Burns, Gary N.; Weed, Nathan C.; Hatchett, Gregory T.; Kurokawa, Nancy K. S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluates a prospective observer form of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) by comparing the two forms in terms of factor structure, mean differences, reliability, and examining correlations between self-report and peer ratings. A total of 163 pairs of friends complete the CISS and an observer form of the CISS.…

  8. Subclinical ADHD, Stress, and Coping in Romantic Relationships of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbey, Gail A.; Snell, William E., Jr.; Callis, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine how the subclinical symptoms of adult ADHD and those of oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) affect relationship satisfaction and stress and to determine whether different patterns of coping strategies emerge when undergraduates have symptoms of one or both disorders. Method: Participants (N = 497) complete self-report surveys…

  9. Perceived Stress and Coping Strategies among Newly Nurse Students in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Rasha; Alsahli, Haya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the stress level and coping strategies among students who were newly in Practicing the clinical training in different hospitals, at the Nursing College, Princess Nourah University. The study design was a descriptive analytical one. The study was conducted at the beginning of second semester in the academic year…

  10. Adjustment to College in Nonresidential First-Year Students: The Roles of Stress, Family, and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Dalia R.; Fish, Marian C.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored factors related to college adjustment in nonresidential first-year students. It was hypothesized that stress, family functioning, and coping strategies would predict academic, personal-emotional, and social adjustment in addition to institutional attachment. The sample comprised 167 first-year college students (ages 18-23)…

  11. The Relationships between Different Personality Characteristics and Styles of Coping with Stress in Elite Orienteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsheliaskova-Koynova, Zshivka

    1993-01-01

    Eighty orienteers, divided into three groups according to level of expertise in orienteering, completed questionnaires measuring extraversion, neuroticism, trait anxiety, social desirability, need for achievement, and locus of control. Subject interviews revealed individual styles of coping with precompetitive stress. A combination of high sport…

  12. Fatigue, Stress and Coping in Mothers of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Monique; Wood, Catherine; Giallo, Rebecca; Jellett, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Raising a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be exhausting, which has the potential to impact on parental health and wellbeing. The current study investigated the influence of maternal fatigue and coping on the relationship between children's problematic behaviours and maternal stress for 65 mothers of young children (aged…

  13. Stress and Coping in Higher Education: A Case Study of a Haitian American Woman Administrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Jeff Drayton; West-Olatunji, Cirecie A.; Overton, Jeanine; Shah, Bindi; Coral, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The authors applied Relational-Cultural Theory (RCT) to conduct a case study of an Afro-Caribbean woman administrator to explore her perceptions of stress and coping in higher education. While much has been written about the challenges facing Black faculty and students, this study focused on the experiences of a Black woman administrator in a…

  14. The Impact of Childhood Hearing Loss on the Family: Mothers' and Fathers' Stress and Coping Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Most, Tova; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Haddad-eid, Eliana; Brand, Devora

    2016-01-01

    Parenting children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) presents unique long-term challenges that can place the parents at a greater risk for elevated levels of parenting stress. Adaptation of families to the various challenges presented by childhood hearing loss is influenced by their personal and social coping resources available for managing…

  15. Stress and Coping Styles Are Associated with Severe Fatigue in Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Fukuda, Sanae; Mizuno, Kei; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Fatigue is a common complaint among medical students and researchers consider it to be related to poor academic outcomes. The authors' goal in the present study was to determine whether stress and coping strategies were associated with fatigue in medical students. The study group consisted of 73 second-year healthy students attending the Osaka…

  16. A Window into South Korean Culture: Stress and Coping in Female High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderGast, Tim S.; Foxx, Sejal Parikh; Flowers, Claudia; Rouse, Andrew Thomas; Decker, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to increase multicultural competence, professional counselors in the United States analyzed archival data from high school students from Seoul, South Korea. A sample of all female (N = 577) high school students responded to survey questions related to stress and coping. Results demonstrated statistical significance in levels of stress…

  17. Subjective Well-Being in Urban, Ethnically Diverse Adolescents the Role of Stress and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Elizabeth M.; Vacek, Kimberly; Blackmon, Sha'kema; Coyle, Laura; Gomez, Kenia; Jorgenson, Katherine; Luginbuhl, Paula; Moallem, Isabel; Steele, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines stressors, general stress levels, coping strategies, and subjective well-being in a sample of 144 ethnically diverse, urban adolescents (mean age of 13). The most frequently reported stressors include the death of a family member, feeling socially isolated, family financial problems, injury of a family member, and parents…

  18. Coping strategies predict post-traumatic stress in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall P; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Evidence suggests that patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, research is yet to examine predictors of PTSD symptoms in this patient group. The objective of this study was to investigate whether coping strategies at HNC diagnosis were related to outcomes of post-traumatic stress and health-related quality of life (HRQL) 6 months later. Sixty-five patients with HNC completed an assessment of coping, distress, and health-related quality of life at diagnosis and again 6 months later, and an assessment of post-traumatic stress at 6 months. Correlations and regression analyses were performed to examine relationships between coping and outcomes over time. Regression analyses showed that denial, behavioural disengagement and self-blame at diagnosis predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms. Self-blame at diagnosis also predicted poor HRQL. Results have implications for the development of psychological interventions that provide alternative coping strategies to potentially reduce PTSD symptoms and improve HRQL.

  19. Human Resource Management - Emotional Intelligence: Communication Effectiveness mediates the Relationship between Stress Management and Job Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Jorfi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress management remains a key topic of concern among managers and employees worldwide. The mostsignificant contribution of this research is the discovery the stress management related to communicationeffectiveness, and on the other hand, communication effectiveness related to job satisfaction withinorganizations of Iran. Communication effectiveness is a crucial factor for organization's performance andgrowth and plays an important role in stress management, and job satisfaction of today’s competitiveorganizations. According to literature on business area and logical arguments we proposed thatcommunication effectiveness can moderators the link between stress management with job satisfaction. Therespondents consist of 133 form educational administrations and Agriculture Bank of Iran. The method thatused to maintain the stress management, communication effectiveness and job satisfaction is Kendall’scoefficient of concordance. Results indicate stress management of emotional intelligence has a positiverelationship with communication effectiveness and also communication effectiveness plays a key role in jobsatisfaction.

  20. Work related stress and coping mechanisms among bankers in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatona, F A; Ezeobika, E N; Okafor, I P; Owoeye, O B A

    2014-03-01

    This study assessed knowledge, prevalence, associated factors and mechanisms of coping with stress among bankers in Lagos State. It was a descriptive cross sectional study. A two stage sampling technique was used to select two hundred and twenty seven (227) respondents. Data was collected using a structured self administered questionnaire. The analysis was done using Epi-info version 2002 software and Chi Square was used to determine association between variables at p value 0.05. Fischer's Exact test was used where Chi-square was not valid. The age range of respondents was between 20 and 49 years while the mean age was 31.3 +/- 5.0 years. Only 3.6% had good level of knowledge about stress, 42.2% had fair level while more than half of the respondents had poor level of knowledge about stress (54.3%). Majority (67.0%) of the respondents were moderately stressed while one quarter (24.7%) were highly stressed. Majority (92.4%) of the respondents used good coping mechanisms though 69.5% of the respondents also used bad coping mechanisms. A greater proportion of those who had poor knowledge about stress were stressed or highly stressed (p = 0.002). A statistically significant association was also found between the departments in the bank and level of stress of the respondents (p = 0.002). The prevalence of stress was high among the bank workers studied. It is recommended that effective stress management programmes are implemented to address the problem of stress among bank workers.

  1. Job Stress and Self-Efficacy among Psychiatric Nursing Working in Mental Health Hospitals at Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Rania. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nursing stress is considered a problem that affects the practice worldwide. Job stress is a harmful response physically and emotionally when the nurses' skills, resources, and needs could not fulfill the requirement of the job. This study was aimed to assess job stress and self-efficacy among psychiatric nursing working in mental health hospitals…

  2. The Influence of Time Management Practices on Job Stress Level among Beginning Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Misty D.; Torres, Robert M.; Tummons, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the stress of teachers continues to be important--particularly stress levels of beginning agriculture teachers. The study sought to describe the relationship between beginning teachers' perceived ability to manage their time and their level of stress. The Time Management Practices Inventory and the Job Stress Survey were used to measure…

  3. The caregiver's perception of behavioral disturbance in relatives with schizophrenia: a stress-coping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, H L; Fournier, J P; Perreault, M; Vezina, J

    2000-06-01

    This article suggests some theoretical orientations in studying behavioral disturbance from a stress-coping perspective. First, an overview of Lazarus and Folkman's cognitive theory of stress is presented. Secondly, some linkages are proposed between the rating scales used to measure behavioral disturbance and the concepts of this theory. Future research directions are then suggested to further explore the affective, cognitive and behavioral responses related to the management of disturbing behaviors.

  4. Occupational stress and job satisfaction of healthcare staff in rehabilitation units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiabane, Elena; Giorgi, Ines; Musian, D; Sguazzin, Cinzia; Argentero, P

    2012-01-01

    Occupational stress and job dissatisfaction are recognized risk factors for healthcare professionals and can lead to a decrease in work performance and in the quality of care offered, and to poorer health of workers. Research in the rehabilitation care setting is very limited and needs to be explored. To investigate occupational stress, job satisfaction and their relationships with organizational factors among healthcare staff in rehabilitation units. A cross-sectional study of healthcare staff working in two rehabilitation units was conducted. They were sent two self-administered questionnaires, the Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI) and the Areas of Work life Scale (AWS), in order to assess occupational stress and job satisfaction. One-way ANOVA was used to explore work stress among two groups of workers, characterized by high and low job satisfaction levels. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to assess the association between job satisfaction and organizational risk factors. A total of 90 questionnaires were returned (response rate 53%). The main sources of stress were unfairness, conflict between personal and organizational values, lack of reward and workload Workers with low job satisfaction significantly scored higher in work-related stress in regard to various aspects of work, and in lower job control. Regression analysis showed that the most important predictors of job satisfaction were fairness and workload. The results of this study showed that job dissatisfaction is strongly associated with work stress and certain organizational risk factors. This study suggests the importance of focusing on the psychosocial factors in the work environment and job satisfaction in order to improve the well-being of rehabilitation healthcare staff.

  5. The correlates of stress, coping styles and psychiatric morbidity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depression).1-8 Several factors (e.g., poor employment ... psychosocial/ personal issues in this cohort, academic demand was an additional source of psychological problems thereby ... studies have attributed medical students' stress to.

  6. Stress Coping Strategies among Agricultural Extension Agents in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Keywords: Extension agentswork stress, stressors and copying strategies. Introduction .... implies that majority (64.3%) of the extension agents were in their active age of less .... their memory, relaxing their nerves and provoke their attention.

  7. Human Resource Management - Emotional Intelligence: Communication Effectiveness mediates the Relationship between Stress Management and Job Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Jorfi; Hashim Fauzy Bin Yaccob; Ishak Md Shah

    2011-01-01

    Stress management remains a key topic of concern among managers and employees worldwide. The mostsignificant contribution of this research is the discovery the stress management related to communicationeffectiveness, and on the other hand, communication effectiveness related to job satisfaction withinorganizations of Iran. Communication effectiveness is a crucial factor for organization's performance andgrowth and plays an important role in stress management, and job satisfaction of today’s c...

  8. Stress, coping and burnout among Intensive Care Unit nursing staff: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolhe, Rafaela; Barbosa, Ricardo Luis; Oliveira, Elaine Machado de; Costa, Ana Lúcia Siqueira; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2015-02-01

    Objective To investigate emotional stress, coping and burnout among nursing staff and their association with biosocial factors and characteristics of work in Intensive Care Units (ICU). Method This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in eight ICUs at a teaching hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, in October 2012. Biosocial data and information about the professionals' work was gathered, and they were given the Scale of Occupational Stress, Scale of Occupational Coping, List of Signs and Symptoms of Stress and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results The study sample consisted of 287 subjects, predominately women, with partners and children. Most professionals presented moderate stress levels and control as a coping strategy (74.47% and 79.93%, respectively), and burnout was present among 12.54%. Factors associated with stress were related to working conditions. The most prevalent protective factors were having a partner, working in the clinical ICU and liking work, while adequate amount of sleep was a protective factor for burnout. Conclusion Control of the working environment and adequate sleep are decisive and protective factors in dealing with situations of occupational stress.

  9. An exploration of job stress and health in the Norwegian police service: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekeberg Øivind

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Police work is regarded as a high-stress occupation, but so far, no nationwide study has explored the associations between work stress and health. Aims To explore physical and mental health among Norwegian police and associations to job stress. Comparisons were made with a nationwide sample of Norwegian physicians and the general Norwegian population. Methods Comprehensive nationwide questionnaire survey of 3,272 Norwegian police at all hierarchical levels, including the Norwegian Police Stress Survey with two factors (serious operational tasks and work injuries, the Job Stress Survey with two factors (job pressure and lack of support, the Basic Character Inventory, the Subjective Health Complaint questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Paykel's Suicidal Feelings in the General Population. Results The frequency of job pressure and lack of support was mainly associated to physical and mental health problems. Females showed higher means on anxiety symptoms than males (4.2, SD 2.9 and 3.7, SD 2.9, respectively; p Conclusion This is the first nationwide study to explore job stress and physical and mental health in police. The results indicate that Norwegian police have high levels of musculoskeletal health problems mainly associated to the frequency of job pressure and lack of support. However, also frequent exposure to work injuries was associated to health problems. This may indicate that daily routine work as well as police operational duties must be taken into consideration in assessing job stress and police health.

  10. Job satisfaction, workplace stress, unhealthy lifestyle choices, and productivity among Canadian nurses: an empirical study

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    Karen J. Buhr

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nurses’ occupational stress and job satisfaction can have an affect on lifestyle choices and productivity. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to provide a detailed examination of the relationship between job satisfaction, job stress, unhealthy lifestyle choices, and productivity among Canadian nurses. METHODS: This study uses data from the confidential master data files of the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN. Ordinary least squares regressions and binary probit regression models were used to estimate the relationships between job satisfaction and job stress on productivity and unhealthy lifestyle choices. RESULTS: Workplace stress variables have a small effect on lifestyle choices. Job satisfaction has an effect on the probability of smoking, but not on drinking. Workplace stress and job satisfaction do not have statistically significant effects on productivity. DISCUSSION: The study found weak relationships among the work related stress variables and productivity. These findings can allow policy makers to consider efforts to reduce workplace stress which can be beneficial to productivity.

  11. Gender as a factor in differentiating strategies of coping with stress used by physical education students

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    Monika Guszkowska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Students are exposed to numerous stressors associated with their integration into their university education, their relationships with friends, and anxiety about the future. Given that stress may be related to university students’ academic performance, understanding the coping strategies used by students may be important in facilitating a positive transition to a university setting. The aim of this study was to determine the gender-based variation of strategies for coping with stress used by students, as well as to determine the correlation between these strategies and the students’ academic achievements. Participants and procedure The study design was cross sectional and included 376 first-year undergraduate students (227 men and 149 women enrolled in the physical education and sport programme at the University of Physical Education in Warsaw. The Polish adaptation of Carver, Scheier and Weintraub’s Multidimensional Inventory for Measuring Stress CopingCOPE and the mean grade from all first-year university courses (the indicator of academic achievements were used. Results Men definitely preferred task-oriented strategies, while women preferred to look for support (instrumental and emotional and placed higher importance on the focusing on and venting of emotions. Academic achievement correlated positively with task-oriented strategies and negatively with avoidance-oriented strategies. These relationships were partly confirmed by regression analyses. Conclusions The results of the study provide support for sex differences in the most frequently applied coping strategies. The results also suggest that avoidance-oriented strategies do not facilitate academic achievement, while active coping strategies correlate with greater success in studies.

  12. Gender as a factor in differentiating strategies of coping with stress used by physical education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Guszkowska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Students are exposed to numerous stressors associated with their integration into their university education, their relationships with friends, and anxiety about the future. Given that stress may be related to university students’ academic performance, understanding the coping strategies used by students may be important in facilitating a positive transition to a university setting. The aim of this study was to determine the gender-based variation of strategies for coping with stress used by students, as well as to determine the correlation between these strategies and the students’ academic achievements. Participants and procedure The study design was cross sectional and included 376 first-year undergraduate students (227 men and 149 women enrolled in the physical education and sport programme at the University of Physical Education in Warsaw. The Polish adaptation of Carver, Scheier and Weintraub’s Multidimensional Inventory for Measuring Stress CopingCOPE and the mean grade from all first-year university courses (the indicator of academic achievements were used. Results Men definitely preferred task-oriented strategies, while women preferred to look for support (instrumental and emotional and placed higher importance on the focusing on and venting of emotions. Academic achievement correlated positively with task-oriented strategies and negatively with avoidance-oriented strategies. These relationships were partly confirmed by regression analyses. Conclusions The results of the study provide support for sex differences in the most frequently applied coping strategies. The results also suggest that avoidance-oriented strategies do not facilitate academic achievement, while active coping strategies correlate with greater success in studies.

  13. [Longitudinal study of the situational specificity of coping strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafune, Kosuke; Kosugi, Shotaro

    2007-02-01

    This longitudinal study examines the situational specificity of coping strategies for 3 943 male employees of the research and development division of an industrial company. The Job Stress Scale-Revised version (JSS-R) was administered twice to the same subjects 40 months apart to assess chronic job stressors (qualitative and quantitative) and coping strategies (problem-solving, support-seeking, and problem-leaving). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine changes in coping strategies corresponding to changes in chronic job stressors. The results suggest a situational specificity of coping strategies. (a) With decreasing qualitative stressors, "problem-solving" coping increases and "problem-leaving" coping decreases. (b) With increasing qualitative stressors, "problem-leaving" coping increases and "problem-solving" coping decreases. (c) With increasing quantitative stressors, "support-seeking" coping increases. (d) With decreasing quantitative stressors, "problem-leaving" coping decreases. (e) There is no variance in "problem-leaving" coping attributable to the change in the quantitative stressors when the qualitative stressors decrease or increase. "Problem-leaving" coping is more strongly related to qualitative than quantitative stressors.

  14. The Styles of Coping with Stress in Team and Individual Athletes Based On Gender and Championship Level

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    Zahra Tasaddoghi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is Prioritization coping with stress styles in individual and team athletes with an emphasis on gender and the level of championship. The‌ population is 1092 athletes participate in‌ team sports (volleyball, basketball, footsall and handball and individual sports (ping pong, badminton, track & field, physical fitness, taekwondo and karate with at least one year championship background. The sampling was selected by considering the lost subject 380 person one by one. For data collection in this research, has been used a 32 items questionnaire of Coping Scale Korea Atletes (CSKA related to coping with stress styles. Questionnaires were distributed in pilot studies and their reliability was estimated α = 0.81. Data has been analyzed by using Mann Whitney‌ U and in the level of P ≤ 0.05. The results of this research indicated that problem focused‌ coping and emotional coping style were higher priority than avoidance coping style and intuitive coping style. Male use the avoidance coping more than female and individual athletes apply problem focused coping more than group athletes. There is significant difference among athletes with different levels of sport achievement only in avoidance coping. The athletes according to background, genus, and kind of sport, education and levels of sport achievement use different coping style which this subject should be considered by coaches.

  15. Psychoactive drugs, alcohol, and stress and coping processes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffine, C L; Folkman, S; Lazarus, R S

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented on a) the relationship between psychoactive substance use and personal characteristics, b) the relationship between psychoactive substance use and appraisal of and coping with stressful situations, and c) the use of psychoactive substances specifically to cope with stress among older people. Data were provided by 141 65-to-74-year-old retired Caucasians who were assessed repeatedly over 6 months. Compared to national samples, subjects were relatively heavy users of alcohol and average users of psychoactive drugs. Use of alcohol increased with income, and drug use was associated with several psychosocial characteristics as well as with psychological and somatic health. Psychoactive substance use did not relate to the ways subjects appraised and coped with stressful encounters. Further, only a small number of subjects used drugs or alcohol specifically to help them cope in these encounters. The findings about psychoactive drug users are compared with other findings about misusers of drugs, and the risks associated with each type of drug use are discussed.

  16. Characterization of stress coping style in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) juveniles and breeders for aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Zatarain, Z; Fatsini, E; Rey, S; Chereguini, O; Martin, I; Rasines, I; Alcaraz, C; Duncan, N

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize stress coping styles of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) juveniles and breeders and to select an operational behavioural screening test (OBST) that can be used by the aquaculture industry to classify and select between behavioural phenotypes in order to improve production indicators. A total of 61 juveniles and 59 breeders were subjected to five individual behavioural tests and two grouping tests. At the end of the individual tests, all animals were blood sampled in order to measure cortisol, glucose and lactate. Three tests (restraining, new environment and confinement) characterized the stress coping style behaviour of Senegalese sole juveniles and breeders and demonstrated inter-individual consistency. Further, the tests when incorporated into a principal components analysis (PCA) (i) identified two principal axes of personality traits: 'fearfulness-reactivity' and 'activity-exploration', (ii) were representative of the physiological axis of stress coping style, and (iii) were validated by established group tests. This study proposed for the first time three individual coping style tests that reliably represented proactive and reactive personalities of Senegalese sole juveniles and breeders. In addition, the three proposed tests met some basic operational criteria (rapid testing, no special equipment and easy to apply and interpret) that could prove attractive for fish farmers to identify fish with a specific behaviour that gives advantages in the culture system and that could be used to establish selection-based breeding programmes to improve domestication and production.

  17. Relationship between childhood abuse and self-compassion with stress-coping strategies in women

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    mehdi rostami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse is behavior in which child faces physical, sexual, negligence and emotional abuses. This study’s aimed to investigate relationship between childhood abuse and self-compassion with stress-coping strategies among women. Statistical population included all of married women in Tehran. The sample contains 182 participants who were selected by convenience sampling method entertainment centers, shopping centers, health centers and cultural centers. The data were collected by Mohammad Khani’s self-report questionnaire, Neff's self-compassion scale and coping strategies of Blings and Mous. The findings showed that emotional abuse with mean of 23.54 was the hisgest and physical abuse with mean of 7.87 was the lowest one. Results showed that there is negative relationship between the abuse’s total score and self-compassion’s total score. All physical abuse's subscales, emotional abuse and negligence can predict the self-compassion except sexual abuse. Also none of the abuse subscales can predict the stress-coping methods. The results have shown that the experience of abuse in childhood injury ,can be affected him in adulthood on self-concept and coping responces to stress and problems.

  18. Stress in Irish dentists: developing effective coping strategies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogers, Cathryn

    2012-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the need to recognise occupation-specific risk factors contributing to stress and burnout. As health professionals, it is important for dentists to recognise the symptoms and the effects of stress on physical, psychological and professional well being. This article reviews the relevant scientific evidence, and provides practical cognitive psychological measures to guide improved well-being for dentists. Any stigma-related factors need to be acknowledged and addressed for the wellbeing of dentists and their patients, and the dental profession is well placed to provide leadership on this issue. Peer support is central to meeting this challenge.

  19. [Personality and coping with stress in patients with functional dysphonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidl, W; Egger, J; Friedrich, G

    1989-08-01

    The study was done to prove the etiopathogenetical power of some personality traits, proceeding life events, and strain effects when exposed to an experimental work-stress. 20 functional dysphonics, 14 individuals suffering from organic voice disorders and a group of 20 control persons were examined. The results show that the group of functional dysphonics produced a significant more positive self-evaluation regarding their personality with a clear tendency to restraint. Compared to the control group they showed a higher level of state anxiety in situations causing stress. Furthermore the influence of proceeding life events for the etiopathogenesis of functional dysphonia has become clear.

  20. A Research of Stress over Medical Employees which is Caused by Job Conditions in Sivas

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    Cüneyt Tokmak

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress that almost everybody can experience in their lifetime is a state of discomfort which is caused by several components and which can influence the quality of life in a negative way. Especially the complications in the job conditions that are faced by the employees can be sources of stress. In this study, it is aimed to reveal whether the job conditions cause stress over health employees or not. It is also aimed to discover whether the effect of job conditions on employees alter depending on diverse criteria (gender, age, organization, income level, marital status. In this study, field survey method is used and a questionnaire is applied over a total of 456 people who work for private and public medical establishments in Sivas. As a result, it is revealed that job conditions cause a medium level stress and employees working for private medical establishments face less stress in comparison to the employees working for public establishments.