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Sample records for cooling tower biocides

  1. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  2. Performance assessment of oxidants as a biocide for biofouling control in industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-10-14

    Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of seawater cooling towers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone (O3) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2)) comparing with commonly being used chlorine in biofouling control. Effects of cycle of concentration, temperature and oxidant dosage along with residual decay and kinetics were studied. Even at lower oxidant dosage (total residual oxidant equivalent=0.1mg/L Cl2), ClO2 showed a better disinfection effect compared to chlorine and O3. Results of bench-scale studies will be helpful in the selection of appropriate oxidant for seawater cooling tower operation.

  3. Cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, E.; Dittrich, H.; Ernst, G.; Roller, W.

    1975-01-01

    The task on which the invention is based is to design a cooling tower in such a way that the negative influences of the wind, in particular strong side winds (wind velocities of over 10 m/s), on the functioning of the cooling tower are reduced or eliminated altogether. (orig./TK) [de

  4. Enhanced Biocide Treatments with D-amino Acid Mixtures against a Biofilm Consortium from a Water Cooling Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Jia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Different species of microbes form mixed-culture biofilms in cooling water systems. They cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC and biofouling, leading to increased operational and maintenance costs. In this work, two D-amino acid mixtures were found to enhance two non-oxidizing biocides [tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfate (THPS and NALCO 7330 (isothiazoline derivatives] and one oxidizing biocide [bleach (NaClO] against a biofilm consortium from a water cooling tower in lab tests. Fifty ppm (w/w of an equimass mixture of D-methionine, D-leucine, D-tyrosine, D-tryptophan, D-serine, D-threonine, D-phenylalanine, and D-valine (D8 enhanced 15 ppm THPS and 15 ppm NALCO 7330 with similar efficacies achieved by the 30 ppm THPS alone treatment and the 30 ppm NALCO 7330 alone treatment, respectively in the single-batch 3-h biofilm removal test. A sequential treatment method was used to enhance bleach because D-amino acids react with bleach. After a 4-h biofilm removal test, the sequential treatment of 5 ppm bleach followed by 50 ppm D8 achieved extra 1-log reduction in sessile cell counts of acid producing bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, and general heterotrophic bacteria compared with the 5 ppm bleach alone treatment. The 10 ppm bleach alone treatment showed a similar efficacy with the sequential treatment of 5 ppm bleach followed by 50 ppm D8. The efficacy of D8 was found better than that of D4 (an equimass mixture of D-methionine, D-leucine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan in the enhancement of the three individual biocides against the biofilm consortium.

  5. Cooling tower waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

    1998-05-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

  6. Cooling tower calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonkova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the dynamic calculation of cooling towers with forced and natural air draft. The quantities and relations are given characterizing the simultaneous exchange of momentum, heat and mass in evaporative water cooling by atmospheric air in the packings of cooling towers. The method of solution is clarified in the calculation of evaporation criteria and thermal characteristics of countercurrent and cross current cooling systems. The procedure is demonstrated of the calculation of cooling towers, and correction curves and the effect assessed of the operating mode at constant air number or constant outlet air volume flow on their course in ventilator cooling towers. In cooling towers with the natural air draft the flow unevenness is assessed of water and air relative to its effect on the resulting cooling efficiency of the towers. The calculation is demonstrated of thermal and resistance response curves and cooling curves of hydraulically unevenly loaded towers owing to the water flow rate parameter graded radially by 20% along the cross-section of the packing. Flow rate unevenness of air due to wind impact on the outlet air flow from the tower significantly affects the temperatures of cooled water in natural air draft cooling towers of a design with lower demands on aerodynamics, as early as at wind velocity of 2 m.s -1 as was demonstrated on a concrete example. (author). 11 figs., 10 refs

  7. Cooling towers: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, M.O.

    1981-02-01

    This bibliography cites 300 selected references containing information on various aspects of large cooling tower technology, including design, construction, operation, performance, economics, and environmental effects. The towers considered include natural-draft and mechanical-draft types employing wet, dry, or combination wet-dry cooling. A few references deal with alternative cooling methods, principally ponds or spray canals. The citations were compiled for the DOE Energy Information Data Base (EDB) covering the period January to December 1980. The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators

  8. Ozonation system for treatment of cooling tower water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, T.; Horton, A.; Kaplan, B.

    1994-11-10

    An improved system for treatment of cooling tower water using ozone as a biocide. A self-contained unit is supplied with compressed air which is introduced to ozone generating electrodes at a constant flowrate. The ozone is mixed with tower water and then returned to the cooling tower. A sampling probe allows for constant monitoring of the ozone content of water coming from the tower. The volume of ozone mixing with the tower water is accordingly constantly adjusted. The system also includes safety control features to monitor system operation and provide shutoff in the event of malfunction. (author).

  9. Biofouling control of industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Albloushi, Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    The use of seawater in cooling towers for industrial applications has much merit in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries due to the scarcity and availability of fresh water. Seawater make-up in cooling towers is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in coastal areas. Such latent-heat removal with seawater in cooling towers is several folds more efficient than sensible heat extraction via heat exchangers. Operational challenges such as scaling, corrosion, and biofouling are a major challenge in conventional cooling towers, where the latter is also a major issue in seawater cooling towers. Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of cooling towers. The most popular methods used in cooling treatment to control biofouling are disinfection by chlorination. However, the disadvantages of chlorination are formation of harmful disinfection byproducts in the presence of high organic loading and safety concerns in the storage of chlorine gas. In this study, the research focuses on biofouling control in seawater cooling towers by investigating two different approaches. The first strategy addresses the use of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone micro-bubbles and chlorine dioxide) in treatment of cooling towers. The second strategy investigates removing nutrients in seawater using granular activated carbon filter column and ultrafiltration to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Laboratory bench-scale tests in terms of temperature, cycle of concentration, dosage, etc. indicated that, at lower oxidant dosages (total residual oxidant (TRO) equivalent = 0.1 mg/l Cl2), chlorine dioxide had a better disinfection effect than chlorine and ozone. The performance of oxidizing biocides at pilot scale, operating at assorted conditions, showed that for the disinfectants tested, ozone could remove 95 % bioactivity of total number of bacteria and algae followed by chlorine dioxide at 85%, while conventional chlorine dosing only gave 60% reduction in bioactivities

  10. Cooling towers principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, G B; Osborn, Peter D

    1990-01-01

    Cooling Towers: Principles and Practice, Third Edition, aims to provide the reader with a better understanding of the theory and practice, so that installations are correctly designed and operated. As with all branches of engineering, new technology calls for a level of technical knowledge which becomes progressively higher; this new edition seeks to ensure that the principles and practice of cooling towers are set against a background of up-to-date technology. The book is organized into three sections. Section A on cooling tower practice covers topics such as the design and operation of c

  11. Evaluation Of Cooling Tower Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djunaidi

    2001-01-01

    Cooling tower degradation has been evaluated for the last 10 years. Its heat transfer capacity has been decreasing after several years of operation due to aging. Evaluation is carried out by calculating the degradation rate, namely the annual increase of outlet temperatures of the cooling tower. Data was randomly taken daily at 15 MW reactor power. Data was taken after the reactor operation of ± 8 hours. Evaluation since 1990 shows that the degradation rate is nearly one degree per year. This degradation can be by minimized, replacement of damaged components, non-excessive operation and design modification of the cooling tower namely by extending the period of contract between water and air

  12. Comparison of biocides for disinfection treatment of open recirculating cooling circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soreau, Sylvie; Prisset, Frederic; Carvajal, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    Open recirculating cooling circuits of nuclear power plants are likely to face pathogenic proliferations like Legionella and amoebae (Naegleria fowleri). To reduce such risks, biocide treatments are usually implemented. However, the selection of a treatment is never easy due to the large size of the cooling circuits. Indeed, the range of treatment options is limited due to potential health or environmental impacts of chemicals in case of chemical treatments or because of the technical difficulties to implement treatment units appropriate to the size of the cooling circuits in case of physical treatments. In the aim of finding the best compromise between efficacy, nature and quantity of chemical releases and industrial feasibility, several biocide treatments were compared at lab and pilot scale using semi-industrial pilot plants simulating recirculating cooling circuit of a nuclear power plant. These pilots were fed with river water or pre-treated water (lime softening or clari-flocculation). They were equipped with materials and surfaces representative of those found on a full-scale plant. These pilots operated at summer temperatures favoring microbial growth. Three industrial biocides were compared: chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide. The results indicate that the transit in the cooling system strongly affects the consumption of biocides and therefore their efficacy, the quantity of biocide needed and chemical releases so that the ranking of treatments defined on the basis of laboratory tests can be strongly modified. The results show different areas of consumption along the process line depending on biocides and highlight the significant role of the cooling tower. The behavior of biocides in the different compartments of the circuit (cooling tower, condenser, basins) is described and the consequences on pathogenic micro-organisms removal in bio-films and on chemical releases are considered as function of the studied biocide. Moreover, the influence of

  13. Cooling tower modification for intermittent operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midkiff, W.S.

    1975-03-01

    One of the cooling towers at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is being operated intermittently. The cooling tower has been modified to restrict air flow and to keep the tower from drying out. The modifications are relatively inexpensive, simple to operate, and have proved effective. (U.S.)

  14. Plumes from one and two cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannberg, L.D.; Onishi, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Use of mechanical- and natural-draft cooling towers is expanding in the United States in response to pressures for better resource allocation and preservation. Specifically, increasing public and regulatory concern over the effects of the intake and discharge of large volumes of cooling water has encouraged electric utilities to accept cooling towers as the primary method of removing condenser waste heat even though once-through cooling is considerably less expensive. Other factors encouraging the use of cooling towers include small water supply and consumption rates, reduction in land requirements (compared to cooling ponds or lakes), and operational flexibility. The growing demand for electric energy should also add to the increase of cooling tower use. The experimental program and its comparison to model prediction suggest that optimal siting of cooling towers, particularly multiple towers, is a task requiring knowledge of ambient wind history, plume dynamics, and tower operating conditions. Based on the tower wake effects and on the results for interaction of plumes from two cooling towers, site terrain may be a very significant factor in plume dynamics and interaction

  15. Solar tower enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiqiang; Xu, Yan; Acosta-Iborra, Alberto; Santana, Domingo

    2017-06-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants are located in desert areas where the Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) value is very high. Since water resource is scarcely available, mechanical draft cooing technology is commonly used, with power consumption of mechanical fans being approximately 2% of the total power generated. Today, there is only one solar power plant (Khi Solar One in South Africa) uses a condenser installed in a Natural Draft Cooling (NDC) tower that avoids the windage loss of water occurring in wet cooling towers. Although, Khi Solar One is a cavity receiver power tower, the receivers can be hung onto the NDC tower. This paper looks at a novel integration of a NDC tower into an external molten salt receiver of a solar power plant, which is one of a largest commercial molten salt tower in China, with 100MWe power capacity. In this configuration study, the NDC tower surrounds the concrete tower of the receiver concentrically. In this way, the receiver concrete tower is the central support of the NDC tower, which consists of cable networks that are fixed to the concrete tower and suspended at a certain height over the floor. The cable networks support the shell of the NDC tower. To perform a preliminary analysis of the behavior of this novel configuration, two cases of numerical simulation in three dimensional (3D) models have been solved using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, ANSYS Fluent 6.3. The results show that the integration of the NDC tower into an external central receiver tower is feasible. Additionally, the total heat transfer rate is not reduced but slightly increases when the molten salt receiver is in operation because of the additional natural draft induced by the high temperature of the receiver.

  16. Performance characteristics of a shower cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Xiaoni; Liu Zhenyan; Li Dandan

    2007-01-01

    This study was prompted by the need to design towers for applications in which, due to salt deposition on the packing and subsequent blockage, the use of tower packing is not practical. In contrast to conventional cooling towers, the cooling tower analyzed in this study is void of fill. By means of efficient atomization nozzles, a shower cooling tower (SCT) is possible to be applied in industry, which, in terms of water cooling, energy saving and equipment investing, is better than conventional packed cooling towers. However, no systematic thermodynamic numerical method could be found in the literature up to now. Based on the kinetic model and mass and heat transfer model, this paper has developed a one dimensional model for studying the motional process and evaporative cooling process occurring at the water droplet level in the SCT. The finite difference approach is used for three motional processes to obtain relative parameters in each different stage, and the possibility of the droplets being entrained outside the tower is fully analyzed. The accuracy of this model is checked by practical operational results from a full scale prototype in real conditions, and some exclusive factors that affect the cooling characteristics for the SCT are analyzed in detail. This study provides the theoretical foundation for practical application of the SCT in industry

  17. The Schmehausen cable net cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaich, J.; Mayr, G.; Weber, P.; Jasch, E.

    1976-01-01

    The prototype of a large cable net shell as a natural-draught cooling tower for the THTR-300 is presented. Results of wind tunnel tests and calculations are given, and the capacity is discussed. Design features of the main components are presented in illustrations and are described with regard to the construction process of the cooling tower. Finally, it is shown that the cable net cooling tower is a suitable construction for large dimensions and caving-in or seismic areas. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Asbestos in cooling-tower waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.A.G.

    1977-12-01

    Fill material in natural- or mechanical-draft cooling towers can be manufactured from a variety of materials, including asbestos cement or asbestos paper. To aid in the environmental impact assessment of cooling towers containing these asbestos types of fill, information on these materials was obtained from cooling-tower vendors and users. Samples of makeup, basin, and blowdown waters at a number of operating cooling towers were obtained, and identification and enumeration of asbestos in the samples were performed by transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Asbestos fibers were detected in cooling-tower water at 10 of the 18 sites sampled in the study. At all but three sites, the fibers were detected in cooling-tower basin or blowdown samples, with no fibers detected in the makeup water. The fibers were identified as chrysotile at all sites except one. Concentrations were on the order of 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 8/ fibers/liter of water, with mass concentrations between <0.1 ..mu..g/liter to 37 ..mu..g/liter. The maximum concentrations of asbestos fibers in air near ground due to drift from cooling towers were estimated (using models) to be on the order of asbestos concentrations reported for ambient air up to distances of 4 km downwind of the towers. The human health hazard due to abestos in drinking-water supplies is not clear. Based on current information, the concentrations of asbestos in natural waters after mixing with cooling-tower blowdown containing 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 8/ fibers/liter will pose little health risk. These conclusions may need to be revised if future epidemiological studies so indicate.

  19. Cooling tower water ozonation at Southern University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.C.; Knecht, A.T.; Trahan, D.B.; Yaghi, H.M.; Jackson, G.H.; Coppenger, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    Cooling-tower water is a critical utility for many industries. In the past, inexpensive water coupled with moderate regulation of discharge water led to the neglect of the cooling tower as an energy resource. Now, with the increased cost of chemical treatment and tough EPA rules and regulations, this situation is rapidly changing. The operator of the DOE Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge as well as many other industries are forced to develop an alternate method of water treatment. The cooling tower is one of the major elements in large energy systems. The savings accrued from a well engineered cooling tower can be a significant part of the overall energy conservation plan. During a short-term ozonation study between 1987-1988, the Y-12 Plant has been successful in eliminating the need for cooling tower treatment chemicals. However, the long-term impact was not available. Since April 1988, the ozone cooling water treatment study at the Y-12 Plant has been moved to the site at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The purpose of this continued study is to determine whether the use of ozonation on cooling towers is practical from an economic, technical and environmental standpoint. This paper discusses system design, operating parameter and performance testing of the ozonation system at Southern University

  20. Design and operation of hybrid cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alt, W.

    1987-01-01

    The first hybrid cooling tower at a coal-fired power station with a waste heat output of 550 MW has been in operation since the middle of 1985. Experience during the construction stage and the initial period of operation has confirmed the correctness of the design standards and of the design itself and, of course, also offers a wealth of knowledge to be observed on future construction projects. A second cooling tower of similar design is being erected at the present time. This cooling tower serves a power station unit with 2500 MW of waste heat output. The programme for this cooling tower offers the possibility for all the accumulated and evaluated experience to be of influence both on the design and also on the method of operation. This paper reports on the details. (orig.) [de

  1. Structure of natural draft cooling towers, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishioka, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Yukichi; Tsurusaki, Mamoru; Koshizawa, Koichi; Chiba, Toshio

    1976-01-01

    Thousands of natural draft cooling towers have been utilized, in Europe and America, as cooling systems of power plants or as countermeasures against thermal polution. Recently in Japan, demands for cooling tower systems have been increasing remarkably with the construction of large power plants and the legislation of environmental regulations. In view of the severe natural conditions in Japan such as strong wind and seismic loadings, etc., the establishment of the optimum design and construction method is essential for the building of safe and economical towers. In order to establish a comprehensive plan of a power plant cooling system of the appropriate structural type, the authors have made researches and experiments on design conditions, static and dynamic analyses, and comparative studies of various structural types such as reinforced concrete thin-shell structures, steel framed structures and composite shell segment structures, based on the investigation results of towers in Europe and America. These results are presented in three reports, the 1st of which concerns cooling tower shells as are hereinafter described. (auth.)

  2. Cooling towers and legionella; Koeltorens en legionella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalekamp, J.D. [Afdeling Medische Milieukunde, Gemeentelijke Gezondheidsdienst voor Rotterdam en omstreken, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    A brief description is given of the principle of cooling towers, the prevention of legionella in cooling towers, and related regulations. Also the intermediate results of a survey on open cooling towers in the Rotterdam area are presented. Finally, attention is paid to the procedure to handle cases in which legionella has been detected. [Dutch] Jaarlijks vinden er op de wereld epidemieen van legionellose plaats, veroorzaakt door open koeltorens. in dit artikel wordt achtereenvolgens een korte beschrijving gegeven van het werkingsprincipe van koeltorens; de relatie tussen koeltorenbeheer en legionella in open koeltorens; en de huidige stand van zaken op het gebied van regelgeving. Daarnaast worden tussentijdse resultaten van een in Rotterdam gestarte inventarisatie van open koeltorens gegeven. Tenslotte wordt de procedure uiteengezet van de aanpak bij ziektegevallen waarbij legionellose wordt geconstateerd.

  3. The shape of natural draft cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    The shape of cooling towers is more often designed empirically. There, it is considered from a theoretical point of view. The analysis of dynamic of natural draft and of the air flow in a cooling tower shell is presented. It is shown, that although it is convergent, a tower works like a diffuser for pressure recovery. And it is turbulence that produces a transfer of kinetic energy and allows a good operation of the diffusor. The equations permit to define a shell profile which depends upon the operating conditions of the cooling tower. In the same way, a stability criteria for natural draft depending upon operating conditions is established. A heating model of one meter diameter has been built in a thermal similitude. The turbulence rate has been measured with a hot wire anemometer at the tower exit and visualizations have also been made. Natural draft stability has been studied by these means for four different shell shapes and a wide range of operating conditions. Experimental and theoretical results agree satisfactorily and experiments can be considered as a validation of theory

  4. Frost protection for atmospheric cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, G.

    1987-01-01

    When the atmospheric temperature is near or lower than zero it is necessary to reduce the air flow entering in a cooling tower. A wire netting mounted on the air inlet is sprinkled with cold water. The level of the ice curtain and consequently the air flow is regulated by aspersion by hot water [fr

  5. Ozonation system for treatment of water in cooling towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, T.G.; Horton, A.J. Jr.; Kaplan, B.E.

    1993-08-17

    An apparatus is described for controlling the condition of cooling tower system water, comprising one or more ozone generator electrodes having inner and outer concentric electrode tubes, a concentric dielectric tube there between creating an annular space between said dielectric tube and outer electrode tube for the passage of oxygen-containing air for conversion of a portion of said oxygen to ozone and first and second opposed end caps for supporting said electrode tubes and dielectric tube in a concentric orientation and for the entry of air into and exit of ozone-containing air from said annular space; means for providing dry, filtered input air at a depressed dewpoint and at constant flow rate to the first end caps of said electrodes; sensor means for determining the oxidation-reduction potential of a water sample obtained from the system; means coupled to said sensor means and to said ozone generator electrodes for maintaining the oxidation-reduction potential of said cooling tower system water at a target level in the range of about 550 to 6,750 mv by comparing the determined oxidation-reduction potential with said target value and controlling the production of ozone in response thereto to allow the generation and maintenance of containment oxidation by-product secondary biocides at an elevated level; means for combining the ozone produced by said electrodes with a portion of said cooling tower system water for return of resulting ozonated water to the system for introduction of the ozone thereto; and means for monitoring the flow of said input air and the output of said electrodes whereby an alarm condition is indicated if said flow or output depart from established parameters.

  6. Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-01

    Cooling towers are an integral component of many refrigeration systems, providing comfort or process cooling across a broad range of applications. Cooling towers represent the point in a cooling system where heat is dissipated to the atmosphere through evaporation. Cooling towers are commonly used in industrial applications and in large commercial buildings to release waste heat extracted from a process or building system through evaporation of water.

  7. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  8. Modeling of Direct Contact Wet Cooling Tower in ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khatib, H.H.; Ismail, A.L.; ElRefaie, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    The Egyptian Testing and Research Reactor no.2 (ETRR-2) was commissioned at 1997 with maximum power 22 MW for research purposes; an induced draft wet cooling tower (counter flow type) was putted in operation in 2003 instead of the first one. Investigations are achieved to evaluate cooling tower performance to guarantee that the cooling tower capable to dissipate heat generated in reactor core. Merkel and Poppe analysis was applied to simulate this cooling tower packing. Merkel analysis was applied to predict water outlet temperature from cooling tower and also to show the effect of ambient conditions on this temperature. Poppe analysis was applied to predict Merkel number which evaluate cooling tower. The Runge-Kutta numerical method was applied to solve the differential equations in this model and an engineering equation solver (EES) is the language used to model the cooling tower. This research illustrates that the cooling tower achieves good performance in various sever ambient condition at maximum operating condition of reactor power. The results show that at severe summer condition of wet bulb temperature equals 24 degree c and tower inlet temperature equals 37 degree c, the outlet water temperature equals 30.4 degree c from cooling tower, while the Merkel number is be found 1.253

  9. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hospital cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, M; Goh, K T

    1986-01-01

    Water from twenty cooling towers from three major hospitals (A, B, C) were screened for the presence of Legionella pneumophila. Three of the water specimens were found to be positive for the organism. Serogroup 1 was isolated from the two cooling towers in Hospital A, while serogroup 4 was isolated from one of the cooling towers in Hospital B, this being the first time L. pneumophila has been isolated in Singapore.

  10. Hybrid cooling tower Neckarwestheim 2 cooling function, emission, plume dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeuning, G.; Ernst, G.; Maeule, R.; Necker, P.

    1990-01-01

    The fan-assisted hybrid cooling tower of the 1300 MW power plant Gemeinschafts-Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim 2 was designed and constructed based on results from theoretical and experimental studies and experiences from a smaller prototype. The wet part acts in counterflow. The dry part is arranged above the wet part. Each part contains 44 fans. Special attention was payed to the ducts which mix the dry into the wet plume. The cooling function and state, mass flow and contents of the emission were measured. The dispersion of the plume in the atmosphere was observed. The central results are presented in this paper. The cooling function corresponds to the predictions. The content of drifted cooling water in the plume is extremely low. The high velocity of the plume in the exit causes an undisturbed flow into the atmosphere. The hybrid operation reduces visible plumes strongly, especially in warmer and drier ambient air

  11. Measurements at cooling tower plumes. Part 3. Three-dimensional measurements at cooling tower plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortak, H.

    An extended field experiment is described in which cooling tower plumes were studied by means of three-dimensional in situ measurements. The goal was to obtain input data for numerical models of cooling tower plumes. Of special interest were data for testing or developing assumptions for sub-grid parametrizations. Utilizing modern systems for high-resolution aerology and small aircraft, four measuring campaigns were conducted: two campaigns (1974) at the cooling towers of the RWE power station Neurath and also two (1975) at the single cooling tower of the RWE power station Meppen. Because of the broad spectrum of weather situations it can be assumed that the results are representative with regard to the interrelationship between structure of cooling tower plume and large-scale meteorological situation. A large number of flights with a powered glider crossing the plumes on orthogonal tracks was performed. All flights showed that the plume could be identified up to large downwind distances by discontinuous jumps of temperature and vapor pressure. Therefore, a definite geometry of the plume could always be defined. In all cross sections a vertical circulation could be observed. At the boundary, which could be defined by the mentioned jumps of temperature and vapor pressure, a maximum of downward vertical motion could be observed in most cases. Entrainment along the boundary of a cross section seems to be very small, except at the lower part of the plume. There, the mass entrainment is maximum and is responsible for plume rise as well as for enlargement of the cross section. The visible part of the plume (cloud) was only a small fraction of the whole plume. High-resolution aerology is necessary in order to explain the structure and behavior of such plumes. This is especially the case in investigations regarding the dynamic break-through of temperature inversions. Such cases were observed frequently under various meteorological conditions and are described

  12. On synthesis and optimization of cooling water systems with multiple cooling towers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling water systems are generally designed with a set of heat exchangers arranged in parallel. This arrangement results in higher cooling water flow rate and low cooling water return temperature, thus reducing cooling tower efficiency. Previous...

  13. Cooling Tower (Evaporative Cooling System) Measurement and Verification Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Boyd, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stoughton, Kate M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lewis, Taylor [Colorado Energy Office, Denver, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    This measurement and verification (M and V) protocol provides procedures for energy service companies (ESCOs) and water efficiency service companies (WESCOs) to determine water savings resulting from water conservation measures (WCMs) in energy performance contracts associated with cooling tower efficiency projects. The water savings are determined by comparing the baseline water use to the water use after the WCM has been implemented. This protocol outlines the basic structure of the M and V plan, and details the procedures to use to determine water savings.

  14. Improving performance and reducing costs of cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartz, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Cooling towers represent a significant capital investment at a steam electric power station. In addition, deficiencies in thermal performance can result in major operating penalties of fuel cost, replacement energy, and capacity addition. This paper summarizes two recent EPRI research projects aimed at reducing thermal performance deficiencies and decreasing installed costs of evaporative cooling towers. First, EPRI Research Project 2113, Cooling Tower Performance Prediction and Improvement, is summarized. This project has resulted in published data sets on the measured thermal performance characteristics of a variety of cooling tower packings, computer codes to predict tower performance, and computer code validation through large-scale tower performance measurements. Principal results are contained in an EPRIGEMS software module, Cooling Tower Advisor. This PC- based software contains a tutorial plus codes to predict tower thermal performance, arranged in a user-friendly format. The second EPRI effort, Research Project 2819-10/11, Fabric Structures for Power Plant Applications, has resulted in designs and costs of large structures with shells constructed of recently-developed fabrics. Primary power plant applications for such structures are the shells of natural draft cooling towers and coal-pile covers. Fabric structures offer low initial cost, acceptable life, and seismic superiority, among other advantages. Detailed conceptual designs and installed cost data are reviewed. 8 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Kaiseraugst nuclear power station: meteorological effects of the cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Considerations of water conservation persuaded the German Government in 1971 not to allow the use of the Aar and Rhine for direct cooling of nuclear power stations. The criticism is often made that the Kaiseraugst cooling towers were built without full consideration of the resulting meteorological effects. The criticism is considered unjustified because the Federal Cooling Tower Commission considered all the relevant aspects before making its recommendations in 1972. Test results and other considerations show that the effect of the kaiseraugst cooling towers on meteorological and climatic conditions is indeed minimal and details are given. (P.G.R.)

  16. Contrastive analysis of cooling performance between a high-level water collecting cooling tower and a typical cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jiajin; Shi, Cheng

    2018-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model is established and validated for cooling performance optimization between a high-level water collecting natural draft wet cooling tower (HNDWCT) and a usual natural draft wet cooling tower (UNDWCT) under the actual operation condition at Wanzhou power plant, Chongqing, China. User defined functions (UDFs) of source terms are composed and loaded into the spray, fill and rain zones. Considering the conditions of impact on three kinds of corrugated fills (Double-oblique wave, Two-way wave and S wave) and four kinds of fill height (1.25 m, 1.5 m, 1.75 m and 2 m), numerical simulation of cooling performance are analysed. The results demonstrate that the S wave has the highest cooling efficiency in three fills for both towers, indicating that fill characteristics are crucial to cooling performance. Moreover, the cooling performance of the HNDWCT is far superior to that of the UNDWCT with fill height increases of 1.75 m and above, because the air mass flow rate in the fill zone of the HNDWCT improves more than that in the UNDWCT, as a result of the rain zone resistance declining sharply for the HNDWCT. In addition, the mass and heat transfer capacity of the HNDWCT is better in the tower centre zone than in the outer zone near the tower wall under a uniform fill layout. This behaviour is inverted for the UNDWCT, perhaps because the high-level collection devices play the role of flow guiding in the inner zone. Therefore, when non-uniform fill layout optimization is applied to the HNDWCT, the inner zone increases in height from 1.75 m to 2 m, the outer zone reduces in height from 1.75 m to 1.5 m, and the outlet water temperature declines approximately 0.4 K compared to that of the uniform layout.

  17. The study on the evaporation cooling efficiency and effectiveness of cooling tower of film type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yingjian; You Xinkui; Qiu Qi; Li Jiezhi

    2011-01-01

    Based on heat and mass transport mechanism of film type cooling, which was combined with an on-site test on counter flow film type cooling tower, a mathematical model on the evaporation and cooling efficiency and effectiveness has been developed. Under typical climatic conditions, air conditioning load and the operating condition, the mass and heat balances have been calculated for the air and the cooling water including the volume of evaporative cooling water. Changing rule has been measured and calculated between coefficient of performance (COP) and chiller load. The influences of air and cooling water parameters on the evaporative cooling efficiency were analyzed in cooling tower restrained by latent heat evaporative cooling, and detailed derivation and computation revealed that both the evaporative cooling efficiency and effectiveness of cooling tower are the same characteristics parameters of the thermal performance of a cooling tower under identical assumptions.

  18. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant

  19. Performance characteristics of counter flow wet cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Jameel-Ur-Rehman; Yaqub, M.; Zubair, Syed M.

    2003-01-01

    Cooling towers are one of the biggest heat and mass transfer devices that are in widespread use. In this paper, we use a detailed model of counter flow wet cooling towers in investigating the performance characteristics. The validity of the model is checked by experimental data reported in the literature. The thermal performance of the cooling towers is clearly explained in terms of varying air and water temperatures, as well as the driving potential for convection and evaporation heat transfer, along the height of the tower. The relative contribution of each mode of heat transfer rate to the total heat transfer rate in the cooling tower is established. It is demonstrated with an example problem that the predominant mode of heat transfer is evaporation. For example, evaporation contributes about 62.5% of the total rate of heat transfer at the bottom of the tower and almost 90% at the top of the tower. The variation of air and water temperatures along the height of the tower (process line) is explained on psychometric charts

  20. Lower parts of Temelin nuclear power plant cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebek, J.

    1988-01-01

    The progress of work is described in detail on the foundations and lower parts of the cooling towers of the Temelin nuclear power plant. The cooling tower is placed on a reinforced concrete footing of a circular layout. Support pillars are erected on the reinforced concrete continuous footing. They consists of oblique shell stanchions. Inside, the footing joins up to monolithic wall and slab structures of the cooling tower tub. The tub bottom forms a foundation plate supporting prefab structures of the cooling tower inner structural systems. The framed support of the chimney shell consists of 56 pairs of prefabricated oblique stanchions. Following their erection into the final position and anchoring in the continuous footing, the concreting of the casing can start of the reinforced conrete chimney. (Z.M.). 3 figs

  1. Final Rule for Industrial Process Cooling Towers: Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheet concerning a final rule to reduce air toxics emissions from industrial process cooling towers. Air toxics are those pollutants known or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health effects.

  2. Natural-draught cooling tower of the Philippsburg-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, G.; Wurz, D.

    1983-01-01

    In spring 1980 a comprehensive research programm was carried out on the natural-draught cooling tower of the Philippsburg-1 reactor. The study was meant to synchronously acquire all parameters necessary for the evaluation of plant operation and cooling tower emissions. The study is subdivided into 8 sub-projects. Parts 1 to 7 that are included in this progress-of-work report describe experimental work and discuss the results. A critical analysis of measuring results proves that the values for operational behaviour and cooling tower emissions were duly anticipated. Even a very critical judgment of the results can exclude direct or indirect hazards for humans, animals and plants owing to cooling tower emissions. Sub-project 8 compares results from diffusion calculations (24 models) to results gained from experiments. The results of sub-project 8 will be published in a progress report to come. (orig.) [de

  3. Performance evaluations of steam power plants with dry cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunato, B.; Magi, V.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented to design dry cooling tower systems and to evaluate their off-design performances. The influence of the more important design parameters on the tower dimensions is shown. A preliminary ''optimum'' size is predicted by means of a computer code using a simplified cost model. Moreover the influence of the designed cooling system on the performance of thermoelectric and/or nuclear power plants is analysed

  4. Asbestos in cooling-tower waters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.A.G.

    1979-03-01

    Water discharges from cooling towers constructed with asbestos fill were found to contain chrysotile--asbestos fibers at concentrations as high as 10 8 fibers/liter. The major source of these fibers, appears to be the components of the towers rather than the air drawn through the towers or the makeup water taken into the towers. Suggested mechanisms for the release of chrysotile fibers from cooling-tower fill include freeze-thaw cycles and dissolution of the cement due to acidic components of the circulating water. Ash- or other material-settling ponds were found to reduce asbestos-fiber concentrations in cooling-tower effluent. The literature reviewed did not support the case for a causal relationship between adverse human health effects and drinking water containing on the order of 10 6 chrysotile--asbestos fibers/liter; for this and other reasons, it is not presently suggested that the use of asbestos fill be discontinued. However, caution and surveillance are dictated by the uncertainties in the epidemiological studies, the absence of evidence for a safe threshold concentration in water, and the conclusive evidence for adverse effects from occupational exposure. It is recommended that monitoring programs be carried out at sites where asbestos fill is used; data from such programs can be used to determine whether any mitigative measures should be taken. On the basis of estimates made in this study, monitoring for asbestos in drift from cooling towers does not appear to be warranted

  5. Alternative geometry for cylindrical natural draft cooling tower with higher cooling efficiency under crosswind condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarzi, M.; Ramezanpour, R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Alternative cross sections for natural draft cooling tower were proposed. • Numerical solution was applied to study thermal and hydraulic performances. • Thermal and hydraulic performances were assessed by comparative parameters. • Cooling tower with elliptical cross section had better thermal performance under crosswind. • It could successfully used at the regions with invariant wind direction. - Abstract: Cooling efficiency of a natural draft dry cooling tower may significantly decrease under crosswind condition. Therefore, many researchers attempted to improve the cooling efficiency under this condition by using structural or mechanical facilities. In this article, alternative shell geometry with elliptical cross section is proposed for this type of cooling tower instead of usual shell geometry with circular cross section. Thermal performance and cooling efficiency of the two types of cooling towers are numerically investigated. Numerical simulations show that cooling tower with elliptical cross section improves the cooling efficiency compared to the usual type with circular cross section under high-speed wind moving normal to the longitudinal diameter of the elliptical cooling tower

  6. Atmospheric wet-type cooling tower with antifreeze system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coic, P.

    1985-01-01

    The cooling tower has air inlets at its base, a network of pipes which distributes the air to be cooled above the packing, and valves to isolate a part of the network. It includes also a bypass circuit, provided with means to control the flow rate fraction which is by-passed [fr

  7. Energy and exergy analysis of counter flow wet cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Mani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling tower is an open system direct contact heat exchanger, where it cools water by both convection and evaporation. In this paper, a mathematical model based on heat and mass transfer principle is developed to find the outlet condition of water and air. The model is solved using iterative method. Energy and exergy analysis infers that inlet air wet bulb temperature is found to be the most important parameter than inlet water temperature and also variation in dead state properties does not affect the performance of wet cooling tower. .

  8. Dry cooling tower operating experience in the LOFT reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A dry cooling tower has been uniquely utilized to dissipate heat generated in a small experimental pressurized water nuclear reactor. Operational experience revealed that dry cooling towers can be intermittently operated with minimal wind susceptibility and water hammer occurrences by cooling potential steam sources after a reactor scram, by isolating idle tubes from the external atmosphere, and by operating at relatively high pressures. Operating experience has also revealed that tube freezing can be minimized by incorporating the proper heating and heat loss prevention features

  9. Membrane distillation of industrial cooling tower blowdown water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.E. Koeman-Stein

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of membrane distillation for desalination of cooling tower blowdown water (CTBD is investigated. Technical feasibility is tested on laboratory and pilot scale using real cooling tower blowdown water from Dow Benelux in Terneuzen (Netherlands. Two types of membranes, polytetrafluorethylene and polyethylene showed good performance regarding distillate quality and fouling behavior. Concentrating CTBD by a factor 4.5 while maintaining a flux of around 2 l/m2*h was possible with a water recovery of 78% available for reuse. Higher concentration factors lead to severe decrease in flux which was caused by scaling. Membrane distillation could use the thermal energy that would otherwise be discharged of in a cooling tower and function as a heat exchanger. This reduces the need for cooling capacity and could lead to a total reduction of 37% water intake for make-up water, as well as reduced energy and chemicals demands and greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. Improvement of coal focus and cooling towers of COFRENTES NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, I.; Bogh, P.

    1998-01-01

    Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant is performing a improving program of its cooling towers based on the filling revamping and cooling water circuit improvement. Furthermore, and as consequence of the acquired experience on cooling towers due to the mentioned program, Cofrentes NPP has decided to follow up with this project from a different point of view based on the thermal-hydraulic optimization of the cooling process inside the towers. This program, which is going to be carried out by Cofrentes NPP, Iberinco and Energy Planning and Power Generation (EPPG) provides an improvement on the thermal profile and of the draught inside the cooling towers by improving the water distribution in the towers active area. In order to perform such a program is needed to fulfill a test program to assure a guaranteed performance gain. In this way, Iberinco is developing a test procedure which improves the results which are obtained with the present standards used commonly by the industry. As a consequence of this program, Cofrentes is expecting to obtain a gain of 5 to 8 MWe with a revenue period of 4 to 5 months, results validated in another foreigner Plant which have developed a similar program. (Author)

  11. Legionella safety in cooling towers; Legionellaveiligheid in koeltorens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordes, B. [Kordes Advies, (Netherlands); De Bok, F. [KBBL Wijhe, (Netherlands); De Zeeuw, L. [Holland Environment Group, (Netherlands); Settels, P. [Safety, Health Services and Ergonomics, ING, (Netherlands); Oesterholt, F.; Wullings, B. [KWR Watercycle Research Institute, (Netherlands); Guiot, P. [Tevan, Gorinchem (Netherlands); Brands, R. [Cumulus Nederland, Cuijk (Netherlands); Nuijten, O. [Kennisinstituut ISSO, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wijne, R. [Beer advocaten, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    In 9 articles attention is paid to several aspects with regard to Legionella in cooling towers: representative sampling, the use of copper and silver ionization or hydrogen peroxide to prevent Legionella growth and biofilms, the use of a zero-tolerance model to control a cooling tower installation, detection of DNA of Legionella Pneumophila, legionella safety in air conditioners, the model Legionella risk analysis and control of cooling tower installations, legislation and regulations for the control of cooling tower installations with regard to the Dutch Occupational Health and Safety Act ('Arbo-wet'), and an article about a lawsuit for victims of a Legionella outbreak, caused by careless owners of a cooling tower in Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Dutch] In 9 artikelen wordt in deze aflevering aandacht besteed aan verschillende aspecten m.b.t. Legionella in koeltorens: representatieve monstername, de toepassing van koper en zilver-ionisatie of waterstofperoxide om de groei van Legionella en biofilms te voorkomen, het gebruik van een zero-tolerance model om een koeltoren installatie te controleren, detectie van DNA van Legionella Pneumophila, Legionella veiligheid in luchtbehandelingsinstallaties, het model Legionella risicoanalyse en beheersplan voor koeltoreninstallaties, de rol van de Arbo-wet, en een artikel over een rechtszaak voor slachtoffers van Legionella door onzorgvuldig beheer van een koeltoren in Amsterdam.

  12. Modeling of hydronic radiant cooling of a thermally homeostatic building using a parametric cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Peizheng; Wang, Lin-Shu; Guo, Nianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigated cooling of thermally homeostatic buildings in 7 U.S. cities by modeling. • Natural energy is harnessed by cooling tower to extract heat for building cooling. • Systematically studied possibility and conditions of using cooling tower in buildings. • Diurnal ambient temperature amplitude is taken into account in cooling tower cooling. • Homeostatic building cooling is possible in locations with large ambient T amplitude. - Abstract: A case is made that while it is important to mitigate dissipative losses associated with heat dissipation and mechanical/electrical resistance for engineering efficiency gain, the “architect” of energy efficiency is the conception of best heat extraction frameworks—which determine the realm of possible efficiency. This precept is applied to building energy efficiency here. Following a proposed process assumption-based design method, which was used for determining the required thermal qualities of building thermal autonomy, this paper continues this line of investigation and applies heat extraction approach investigating the extent of building partial homeostasis and the possibility of full homeostasis by using cooling tower in one summer in seven selected U.S. cities. Cooling tower heat extraction is applied parametrically to hydronically activated radiant-surfaces model-buildings. Instead of sizing equipment as a function of design peak hourly temperature as it is done in heat balance design-approach of selecting HVAC equipment, it is shown that the conditions of using cooling tower depend on both “design-peak” daily-mean temperature and the distribution of diurnal range in hourly temperature (i.e., diurnal temperature amplitude). Our study indicates that homeostatic building with natural cooling (by cooling tower alone) is possible only in locations of special meso-scale climatic condition such as Sacramento, CA. In other locations the use of cooling tower alone can only achieve homeostasis

  13. Calculation of cooling tower plumes for high pressure wintry situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassmann, F.; Tinguely, M.; Haschke, D.

    1982-12-01

    The diffusion of the plumes of the projected nuclear power plants at Kaiseraugst and Schwoerstadt, during high pressure wintry conditions, has been examined using a mathematical model to simulate the plumes. For these calculations, microaerological measurements were made in the proximity of Kaiseraugst and Schwoerstadt. These give a typical image of the weather during high pressure wintry conditions, which is normally associated with an inversion, sometimes strong, at a low height. Dry cooling towers with natural draught, which offer an alternative solution to the wet cooling towers proposed for Kasieraugst, are examined equally. (Auth./G.T.H.)

  14. EDF's ageing management program for cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roure, T.; Crolet, Y.

    2015-01-01

    EDF operates a large fleet of cooling towers for its thermal and nuclear plants. Proactive maintenance strategies require ranking the towers according to the risk of failure and the observed damage. The ranking includes monitoring data such as: foundation settlements, material properties, quantified crack patterns, shell deformation, meteorological data, and corrosion. The numerical tool suite includes a finite element analysis of each tower under thermal and mechanical loadings and a corrosion predicting tool, based on carbonation. The first module computes the behavior of cooling towers under five types of loading: soil differential settlement, self-weight, moisture transport, temperature and wind. By comparison with the ultimate resisting capacity of the reinforced concrete cross section, a risk index map is produced for each tower. This risk index is used to rank the cooling towers and then to identify which structures should be monitored more closely or reinforced - if needed - first in the case of an extended operating life. The second module aims to anticipate the corrosion depth of reinforcement steel of the towers in the future. Examination of the existing carbonation is currently done for each structure and evolution of the carbonation depth is computed so as to predict with reasonable assurance when carbonation reaches the rebars. A prediction of the eventual cross-section loss of rebars is then made for long term analysis (i.e. up to 60 years of operating life). When corrosion is predicted the first module takes into account this loss and computes the behavior of the predicted corrosion damaged structure under the same loadings. (authors)

  15. Advanced wet--dry cooling tower concept performance prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.; Bentley, J.; Giebler, M.; Glicksman, L.R.; Rohsenow, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this year's work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity and flow measurement and performance has been measured under a variety of operating conditions. Tower Tests showed approximately 40 to 50% of the total energy transfer as taking place due to evaporation. This can be compared to approximately 80 to 85% for a conventional wet cooling tower. Comparison of the model tower test results with those of a computer simulation has demonstrated the validity of that simulation and its use as a design tool. Computer predictions have been made for a full-size tower system operating at several locations. Experience with this counterflow model tower has suggested that several design problems may be avoided by blowing the cooling air horizontally through the packing section. This crossflow concept was built from the previous counterflow apparatus and included the design and fabrication of new packing plates. Instrumentation and testing of the counterflow model produced data with an average experimental error of 10%. These results were compared to the predictions of a computer model written for the crossflow configuration. In 14 test runs the predicted total heat transfer differed from the measured total heat transfer by no more than 8% with most runs coming well within 5%. With the computer analogy's validity established, it may now be used to help predict the performance of fullscale wet-dry towers.

  16. Natural-draught dry cooling tower for steam power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasser, G.E.D.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of making natural-draught cooling towers for large steam power plants as simple, compact, and economical as possible can be solved by a combination of well-known structural features: The condenser elements, which are designed as stacks of plates with corrugated surfaces, are arranged in the form of a truncated pyramid enlarged at the top. In the cooling air flow, there are openings for feeding in superheated gas from the lower part of the cupola. (HP) [de

  17. Indiana State University Graduates to Advanced Plastic Cooling Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps more than many other industries, today's universities and colleges are beset by dramatically rising costs on every front. One of the areas where overhead can be contained or reduced is in the operation of the chilled water systems that support air conditioning throughout college campuses, specifically the cooling towers. Like many…

  18. Interception and retention of simulated cooling tower drift by vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.G. Jr.; Parr, P.D.

    1978-01-01

    A key issue concerning environmental impacts from cooling tower operation is the interception of drift by vegetation and the efficiency of plants in retaining the residue scavenged from the atmosphere. Chromated drift water, typical of the cooling towers of the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was prepared using radio-labelled chromium. A portable aerosol generator was used to produce a spectrum of droplets with diameters (100 to 1300 μ) characteristic of cooling towers using state-of-the-art drift eliminators. Efficiency of interception by foliage varied according to leaf morphology with yellow poplar seedlings intercepting 72% of the deposition mass in contrast to 45% by loblolly pine and 24% by fescue grass. Retention patterns of intercepted deposition consisted of a short-time component (0 to 3 days) and a long-time component (3 to 63 days). Retention times, estimated from the regression equation of the long component, indicated that drift contamination from any deposition event may persist from between 8 and 12 weeks. In field situations adjacent to cooling towers, the average annual concentration of drift on vegetation at any distance remains relatively constant, with losses from weathering being compensated by chronic deposition

  19. Optimization design of solar enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Zheng; Guan, Zhiqiang; Gurgenci, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a cost model for solar enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower. • We proposed an optimization scheme for this new cooling system. • We optimally designed one for a 50 MW EGS geothermal plant as a demonstration. • Results proved its economic advantages for EGS geothermal application. - Abstract: This paper proposed an optimization scheme for solar enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower design, in which a detailed cost model was proposed including capital, labour, maintenance and operation costs of each component. Based on the developed cost model, the optimal design option can be identified in terms of the relatively lower annual cost and the relatively higher total extra income over the Solar Enhanced Natural Draft Dry Cooling Tower (SENDDCT) lifetime. As a case study, a SENDDCT was optimally designed to meet the cooling demand for a 50 MW geothermal power plant with Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) technology. The results showed that the optimized SENDDCT not only has better cooling performance during the daytime but also is a cost effective option for EGS geothermal power plants

  20. Towards Cooling Tower Efficiency-An Energy Audit Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Su Weng Alwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the power generation trends from national grid and gas for a period of 4 years. Energy audit of critical systems like this is needful for optimal energy utilization. An energy audit was carried outon 6 industrial cooloing towers and their annual operating cost calculated. Variable speed drive suggested was installed and corresponding annual energy savings of 114,900 kWh/year cost saving of RM30,000 was achieved at a case study plant located in Malaysia. Cooling towers with smart systems was recommended for higher energy savings.

  1. THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF COOLING RECYCLED WATER IN A COOLING TOWER WITH MECHANICAL TRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Bitiukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Analyzed the process of cooling recycled water in the block of cooling towers with forced draft as a control object. Established that for a given construction of the cooling tower its work determined by the ratio of mass flows of water and air. Spending hot water in tower on cooling and rotation speed of shafts of fans are control actions in the waterblock. Controlled perturbation - temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, air temperature and pressure hot water. Uncontrolled disturbance - change of total heat transfer coefficients in the cooling towers, wind speed and direction, formation of ice on the input windows. Mathematical model of cooling process describes the joint heat-and-mass transfer in cooling tower, current water film, the deposition of water droplets, the consumption of electric energy by fan unit allows to optimize the process of cooling through minimizing the total value of active electric power consumed by all cooling towers. It is based on the modified equation of Merkel, equations of Klauzir-Clapeyron, Navier-Stokes. Model is valid under the assumption that the temperature of the water at the interface is equal to the weight average temperature of water, with the air at the interface is saturated. Accepted that the heat flow from the water to the air along the normal to the boundary surface depends on the difference of enthalpy of these environments at the edge of the boundary surfacesection and the weight average enthalpy, water and air are distributed evenly over the crosssectional area of the sprinkler. Development takes into account peculiarities of fluid motion in the sprinkler and allows to determine the adiabatic saturation temperature of the air by the method of "wet" thermometer without its direct measurement. The model is applicable to control the cooling process in real-time.

  2. Short-term pilot cooling tower tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suciu, D.F.; Miller, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two major problems are associated with the use of cooled geothermal water as coolant for the 5 MW(e) pilot plant at Raft River. They are: (1) a scaling potential owing to the chemical species present in solution, and (2) the corrosive nature of the geothermal water. Tests were conducted to obtain data so that methods can be devised to either reduce or eliminate effects from these problems. Data show that scaling can be prevented, but only by using a high concentration of dispersant. Pitting data, however, are not as conclusive and seem to indicate that pitting control cannot be realized, but this result cannot be substantiated without additional experimentation. Results also demonstrate that chromate can be removed by using either chemical destruction or ion exchange. Whichever method is used, EPA discharge limits for both chromate and zinc can be achieved. A preliminary economic analysis is presented.

  3. Further investigation on the performance of a shower cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Xiaoni; Liu Zhenyan

    2008-01-01

    This study was prompted by the need to design towers for applications in which, due to salt deposition on the packing and subsequent blockage, the use of tower packing is not practical. In the previous model we presented [Qi Xiaoni, Liu Zhenyan, Li Dandan. Performance characteristics of a shower cooling tower. Energy Convers Manage 2007;48(1):193-203.], three critical assumptions were made to reduce the complexity and computational time, which can also reduce the models' accuracy. Accurate modelling of the operating process is a determining factor both for designing the shower cooling tower (SCT) and for optimising its operation. In this paper, we derive a new model without applying the three assumptions. According to the condition of the outlet air, the governing equations consider two cases, including the supersaturated and unsaturated states. This model is used to predict the performance of a full scale SCT located in China with different conditions for validation. The differences in the heat and mass transfer analyses of the two models are described at different atmospheric conditions

  4. Comparative study on thermal performance of natural draft cooling towers with finned shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, Mohsen [Bu-Ali Sina Univ., Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-10-15

    The cooling efficiency of natural draft cooling towers under crosswind condition should be improved. In the present research work three different externally finned shells were considered for a typical natural draft cooling tower to investigate the cooling improvement. They were numerically simulated under normal and crosswind conditions. Numerical results show that twisting four fin plates over the tower shell along the 45 peripheral angle, could improve the cooling efficiency up to 6.5 %. Because of the periodic shape of the fin plates, the cooling efficiency of the cooling tower with finned shell is less sensitive to the change of wind.

  5. The optimal operation of cooling tower systems with variable-frequency control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong; Huang, Liqing; Cui, Zhiguo; Liu, Jing

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the energy performance of chiller and cooling tower systems integrated with variable-frequency control for cooling tower fans and condenser water pumps. With regard to an example chiller system serving an office building, Chiller and cooling towers models were developed to assess how different variable-frequency control methods of cooling towers fans and condenser water pumps influence the trade-off between the chiller power, pump power and fan power under various operating conditions. The matching relationship between the cooling tower fans frequency and condenser water pumps frequency at optimal energy consumption of the system is introduced to achieve optimum system performance.

  6. Calculating the evaporated water flow in a wet cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, J.L.

    1994-04-01

    On a cooling tower, it is necessary to determine the evaporated water flow in order to estimate the water consumption with a good accuracy according to the atmospheric conditions, and in order to know the characteristics of the plume. The evaporated flow is small compared to the circulating flow. A direct measurement is very inaccurate and cannot be used. Only calculation can give a satisfactory valuation. The two usable theories are the Merkel's one in which there are some simplifying assumptions, and the Poppe's one which is more exact. Both theories are used in the numerical code TEFERI which has been developed and is run by Electricite de France. The results obtained by each method are compared and validated by measurements made in the hot air of a cooling tower. The consequences of each hypothesis of Merkel's theory are discussed. This theory does not give the liquid water content in the plume and it under-estimates the evaporated flow all the lower the ambient temperature is. On the other hand, the Poppe's method agrees very closely with the measurements as well for the evaporated flow than for the liquid water concentration. This method is used to establish the specific consumption curves of the great nuclear plants cooling towers as well as to calculate the emission of liquid water drops in the plumes. (author). 11 refs., 9 figs

  7. Optimal scheduling of biocide dosing for seawater-cooled power and desalination plants

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Abdullah Bin

    2011-02-13

    Thermal desalination systems are typically integrated with power plants to exploit the excess heat resulting from the power-generation units. Using seawater in cooling the power plant and the desalination system is a common practice in many parts of the world where there is a shortage of freshwater. Biofouling is one of the major problems associated with the usage of seawater in cooling systems. Because of the dynamic variation in the power and water demands as well as the changes in the characteristics of seawater and the process, there is a need to develop an optimal policy for scheduling biocide usage and cleaning maintenance of the heat exchangers. The objective of this article is to introduce a systematic procedure for the optimization of scheduling the dosing of biocide and dechlorination chemicals as well as cleaning maintenance for a power production/thermal desalination plant. A multi-period optimization formulation is developed and solved to determine: the optimal levels of dosing and dechlorination chemicals; the timing of maintenance to clean the heat-exchange surfaces; and the dynamic dependence of the biofilm growth on the applied doses, the seawater-biocide chemistry, the process conditions, and seawater characteristics for each time period. The technical, economic, and environmental considerations of the system are accounted for. A case study is solved to elucidate the applicability of the developed optimization approach. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  8. A systems integration approach to the optimum operation and scheduling of biocide usage and discharge for seawater cooling systems

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Abdullah Bin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a systematic approach to the optimal design and integration of seawater cooling systems in industrial facilities along with the usage and discharge of biocides. Specifically, the paper will address the following tasks: 1 identification of the reaction pathways for the biocide from the mixing basin to the discharge points 2 kinetic modelling of the biocide and by-products throughout the process 3 a process integration framework to provide a holistic approach to optimising the design and operation of the seawater cooling systems, along with the dosage and discharge systems. A hierarchical procedure is developed to first identify design modifications for heat integration and energy efficiency. Then, a multi-period, multi-segment optimisation formulation is developed and solved to identify the optimal operation and scheduling of biocide usage and discharge. A case study is solved to illustrate the applicability of the devised approach.

  9. Origin and prevention of infection with Legionella pneumophila through cooling towers and evaporative cooling towers; Entstehung und Vermeidung von Legionelleninfektionen durch Kuehltuerme und Rueckkuehlwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze-Roebbecke, R. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Hygiene-Institut; Richter, M. [Staatshochbauamt, Bonn (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    Evaporative cooling towers and industrial ventilator cooling towers have repeatedly been described as the origin of Legionnaires` disease. This article describes the design and function of cooling towers and evaporative cooling towers, sums up knowledge on the colonization of such systems with Legionella pneumophila, and describes conditions permitting the transmission of Legionella. Furthermore, design, maintenance, cleaning and disinfection measures are indicated which are believed to reduce the risk of infection through industrial and evaporative cooling towers. (orig.) [Deutsch] Rueckkuehlwerke klimatechnischer Anlagen und industrielle Ventilator-Kuehltuerme sind mehrfach als Ausgangspunkt von Legionellose-Epidemien beschrieben worden. In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden Aufbau und Funktion von Kuehltuermen und Rueckkuehlwerken erlaeutert, Erkenntnisse ueber die Besiedlung dieser Anlagen mit Legionellen zusammengefassten und die Situationen geschildert, in denen es zur Uebertragung von Legionellen kam. Darueber hinaus werden Konstruktions-, Wartungs-, Reinigungs-, und Desinfektionsmassnahmen aufgefuehrt, die zur Verminderung des Infektionsrisikos durch Kuehltuerme und Rueckkuehlwerke als wirksam angesehen werden. (orig.)

  10. Device for noise-abatement in a cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, E.; Dittrich, H.; Ernst, G.; Roller, W.; Wurz, D.

    1977-01-01

    This device attenuates the noise of cooling water droplets falling out of trickling plates below a spray facility. In this manner expensive noise-attenuating cranks or embankments around the cooling tower become unnecessary. Noise attenuation is achieved by a catching device closely above the water reservoir. Instead of falling vertically on the water surface, the droplets hit the inclined surfaces of a horizontal grid. A number of such plane or slightly curved surfaces are placed together with little inclination against the vertical (25 0 to 30 0 , with a maximum of 45 0 ) at such a distance that no drop can hit the water surface directly, i.e. unattenuated. In a second type of design also the capacity of the cooling water pumps and with it the investment and operating cost is reduced. For instance, about 2000 kW are saved by higher arrangement of the catching device, closely below the trickling components. (RW) [de

  11. Operational cooling tower model (CTTOOL V1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); LocalDomainServers, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garrett, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT’s) are widely used to remove waste heat from industrial processes, including suspected proliferators of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The temperature of the air being exhausted from the MDCT is proportional to the amount of thermal energy being removed from the process cooling water, although ambient weather conditions and cooling water flow rate must be known or estimated to calculate the rate of thermal energy dissipation (Q). It is theoretically possible to derive MDCT air exhaust temperatures from thermal images taken from a remote sensor. A numerical model of a MDCT is required to translate the air exhaust temperature to a Q. This report describes the MDCT model developed by the Problem Centered Integrated Analysis (PCIA) program that was designed to perform those computational tasks. The PCIA program is a collaborative effort between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Northrop-Grumman Corporation (NG) and the Aerospace Corporation (AERO).

  12. Effect of organic on chemical oxidation for biofouling control in pilot-scale seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-09-14

    Due to the scarcity of potable water in many regions of the world, the demand for seawater as an alternative evaporative cooling medium in cooling towers (CTs) has increased significantly in recent years. Seawater make-up in CTs is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in the coastal areas of Gulf and Red Sea. However, the seawater CTs have higher challenges greatly mitigating their performances because it is an open system where biofouling and bio-corrosion occurring within the fillers and piping of recirculation systems. Their pilot-scale CTs were constructed to assess the performance of three types of oxidizing biocides or oxidants, namely chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and ozone, for biofouling control. The test results showed that the addition of organic (5mg/L of methanol (MeOH)) increased the bacterial growth in CT basin. All oxidants were effective in keeping the microbial growth to the minimum. Oxidation increased the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level from 270 to 600mV. Total residual oxidant (TRO) was increased with oxidation but it was slightly increased with organic addition. Other parameters including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity levels were not changed. However, higher formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was detected with chlorination and ozonation. This indicates the organic level should be limited in the oxidation for biofouling control in seawater CTs.

  13. Factors Stimulating Propagation of Legionellae in Cooling Tower Water

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Minoru; Kusunoki, Shinji; Ezaki, Takayuki; Ikedo, Masanari; Yabuuchi, Eiko

    1992-01-01

    Our survey of cooling tower water demonstrated that the highest density of legionellae, ≥104 CFU/100 ml, appeared in water containing protozoa, ≥102 MPN/100 ml, and heterotrophic bacteria, ≥106 CFU/100 ml, at water temperatures between 25 and 35°C. Viable counts of legionellae were detected even in the winter samples, and propagation, up to 105 CFU/100 ml, occurs in summer. The counts of legionellae correlated positively with increases in water temperature, pH, and protozoan counts, but not w...

  14. A method to estimate the ageing of a cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnel, Nathalie; Courtois, Alexis; Ilie, Petre-Lazar

    2006-09-01

    This paper deals with cooling towers ageing. Our contribution is a method to determine which part of on site measured strain we are able to predict by means of simulations. As a result, we map a gap indicator on the structure. Calculations have been performed in three configurations. Comparing the values obtained in the three cases helps to determine which researches are worth to be done. Indeed, gap indicator reveals that: - THM can not be considered as the main and only ageing mechanism, so long as tower older than 10 years are examined. At least creep has to be taken into account too; - Gap indicator is sensitive to initial hydration conditions. Drying process before bringing into service should be estimated properly, taking into account the different construction steps; - Comparing different thermal conditions reveals that meteorological conditions have a significant influence on results. So, it will be interesting to differentiate the sunny and the shaded part of the tower when the measurements are done; - A large part of the values obtained can be explicated by construction defects. A study on this particular problematic seems to be essential. The four items mentioned must be considered as perspectives to improve the present method of simulations. (authors)

  15. High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic (∼47%), wood (∼38%) and asbestos transite (∼14%). The remaining ∼1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste, except for the

  16. Industrial Process Cooling Towers: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standards limiting discharge of chromium compound air emissions from industrial process cooling towers (IPCT's). Includes rule history, Federal Registry citations, implementation information and additional resources.

  17. Hudson River cooling tower proceeding: Interface between science and law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergen, G.S.P.

    1988-01-01

    As the Hudson River power plant case proceeded, the regulatory ground shifted under the utility companies. At first, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) contended that the utilities should build expensive closed-cycle cooling towers at three plants to minimize the plants' discharge of heated effluents to the river. When the formal hearing began, however, EPA claimed that cooling towers were needed to minimize the number of organisms impinged at and entrained through the plants. The Hudson River proceeding became a policy dispute over what the appropriate standard of environmental conduct should be, instead of a determination of whether a standard had been met or not. Such policy issues, which arise when legal precedent has yet to be developed for new laws like the Clean Water Act, are better addressed by a rule-making proceeding than by the adjudicatory hearing format used in the Hudson case. A rule-making proceeding would have markedly shortened the Hudson deliberations, probably without substantive change in the final settlement, and is recommended for future cases in which ambiguity in legislation or the lack of precedent has left policy matters unresolved. 2 refs

  18. Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

    2010-02-01

    The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

  19. The investigation of cooling tower packing in various arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golshayshi, H.R.; Missenden, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of form with corrugated packing on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in atmospheric cooling towers has been studied experimentally. The results showed that the heat transfer coefficient decreased with increase in packing pitch and increase in the ratio of rib pitch to rib height. Friction factors were expressed by a dimensional equation which included pitch and distance between the packings, for both smooth and rough surface. From these results, the relationship between packing heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop was deduced. The correlations were verified with additional experimental data taken with 1.1,P/D p /e 5 . This provides a useful semi experimental relation, in the area generally lacking in design and performance data. (author)

  20. Heat Transfer Enhancement of the Air-Cooling Tower with Rotating Wind Deflectors under Crosswind Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Du

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of wind deflectors on air flow and heat transfer performance of an air-cooling tower under crosswind conditions, an experimental system based on a surface condenser aluminum exchanger-type indirect air-cooling tower is established at a 1:100 proportional reduction. A 3-D computational fluid dynamics simulation model is built to study the air flow and temperature fields. The air flow rate into the cooling tower and the heat transfer rate of the radiators are used to evaluate cooling performance. Rotating wind deflectors are adopted to reduce the influence of crosswind on the cooling tower performance. The effects of the rotating wind deflectors on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the air-cooling tower under different environmental crosswind speeds are studied. Results indicate that the wind direction in the tower reverses as the rotating speed of the wind deflectors increases. The thermal performance of an air-cooling tower under crosswind conditions can be improved by using rotating wind deflectors. The heat transfer rate of a cooling tower with eight wind deflectors begins to increase when the rotating speed exceeds 2 r/min.

  1. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-10-01

    Thermal plumes or convection columns associated with large fires are compared to thermal plumes from cooling towers and proposed energy centers to evaluate the fire analog concept. Energy release rates of mass fires are generally larger than for single or small groups of cooling towers but are comparable to proposed large energy centers. However, significant physical differences exist between cooling tower plumes and fire plumes. Cooling tower plumes are generally dominated by ambient wind, stability and turbulence conditions. Fire plumes, depending on burning rates and other factors, can transform into convective columns which may cause the fire behavior to become more violent. This transformation can cause strong inflow winds and updrafts, turbulence and concentrated vortices. Intense convective columns may interact with ambient winds to create significant downwind effects such as wakes and Karman vortex streets. These characteristics have not been observed with cooling tower plumes to date. The differences in physical characteristics between cooling tower and fire plumes makes the fire analog concept very questionable even though the approximate energy requirements appear to be satisfied in case of large energy centers. Additional research is suggested in studying the upper-level plume characteristics of small experimental fires so this information can be correlated with similar data from cooling towers. Numerical simulation of fires and proposed multiple cooling tower systems could also provide comparative data.

  2. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hospital cooling towers in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Samad, B H; Suhaili, M R; Baba, N; Rajasekaran, G

    2004-08-01

    Water-based cooling towers and their water supply at two hospitals in Johor were surveyed for the presence Legionella pneumophila. L. pneumophila were grown from 19 (76%) out of 25 collected water samples. One hospital cooling tower was contaminated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1.

  3. Equipment to separate liquid droplets from the cooling air stream of a liquid cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.E.; Schwinn, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to separate off liquid droplets from the air stream of a cooling tower, one uses separator blades that are secured to the supporting construction. An improvement on this is proposed to make the repairs easier. According to the invention, the separator blades should be fabricated from springy material with self-supporting strength and can be fitted onto the supporting construction by means of slits and notches. (RW) [de

  4. Ecological impact of chloro-organics produced by chlorination of cooling tower waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R L; Cumming, R B; Pitt, W W; Taylor, F G; Thompson, J E; Hartmann, S J

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results of the initial assessment of chlorine-containing compounds in the blowdown from cooling towers and the possible mutagenic activity of these compounds are reported. High-resolution liquid chromatographic separations were made on concentrates of the blowdown from the cooling tower at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and from the recirculating water system for the cooling towers at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The chromatograms of chlorinated cooling waters contained numerous uv-absorbing and cerate-oxidizable constituents that are now being processed through a multicomponent identification procedure. Concentrates of the chlorinated waters are also being examined for mutagenic activity.

  5. Hydroaerothermal investigations conducted in the USSR to justify the construction of large cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The multi-purpose task of improving water cooling systems of thermal and nuclear power plants is aimed at the development of efficient designs of cooling towers and other types of industrial coolers which call for comprehensive scientific justification. Cooling towers of 60-70 thou m 3 /h capacity with a chimney height of 130 m and those of 80-100 thou m 3 /h capacity with a chimney height of 150 m were developed. For circulating water systems of large power plants the design of a counterflow chimney cooling tower of 180 thou m 3 /h capacity has been recently developed. At present the work is being conducted on developing a new three-cell cooling tower featuring high reliability, operational flexibility and cost-effectiveness of the design. This cooling tower, besides having higher operating reliability than the conventional one of circular shape, can ensure the commissioning, current repairs and overhauls of water cooling arrangements in a cell-wise sequence, i.e. without shutting down the power generating units. Laboratory and field investigations of the spray-type cooling towers having no packing (fill), studies on heat and mass exchanges processes, aerodynamics of droplet flows and new designs of sprayers made it possible to come to a conclusion that their cooling capacity can be substantially increased and brought up to the level of the cooling towers with film packings. The pilot cooling towers were designed according to the counterflow, crossflow and cross-counterflow schemes. The basic investigation method remains to be the experimental one. On the test rigs and aerodynamic models the heat and mass transfer and aerodynamic resistance coefficients are determined. These studies and subsequent calculations are based on the heat balance equation

  6. Cooling tower and plume modeling for satellite remote sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    It is often useful in nonproliferation studies to be able to remotely estimate the power generated by a power plant. Such information is indirectly available through an examination of the power dissipated by the plant. Power dissipation is generally accomplished either by transferring the excess heat generated into the atmosphere or into bodies of water. It is the former method with which we are exclusively concerned in this report. We discuss in this report the difficulties associated with such a task. In particular, we primarily address the remote detection of the temperature associated with the condensed water plume emitted from the cooling tower. We find that the effective emissivity of the plume is of fundamental importance for this task. Having examined the dependence of the plume emissivity in several IR bands and with varying liquid water content and droplet size distributions, we conclude that the plume emissivity, and consequently the plume brightness temperature, is dependent upon not only the liquid water content and band, but also upon the droplet size distribution. Finally, we discuss models dependent upon a detailed point-by-point description of the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the plume dynamics and those based upon spatially integrated models. We describe in detail a new integral model, the LANL Plume Model, which accounts for the evolution of the droplet size distribution. Some typical results obtained from this model are discussed.

  7. Structural inspection and wind analysis of redwood cooling towers at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, T.; Solack, T.; Hortel, J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the plant upgrade program, structural analyses and field inspections were performed on four redwood cooling towers at the DOE Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant located in Piketon, Ohio. The cooling towers are categorized as important hazard facilities. The loadings are derived from UCRL-15910 according to the pertinent hazard category. In addition to the seismic and wind loadings, the wood cooling towers are constantly subject to adverse environmental effects such as elevated temperature, chemical attack, icing and snow load, and motor vibrations. A thorough structural evaluation for all load combinations was performed for each of the cooling towers based on the structural code requirements of the Cooling Tower Institute and National Forest Products Association. Most stress criteria are unique for the redwood material. This evaluation was performed using finite element techniques on the global structural integrity and supplemented by hand calculations on the individual connection joints. Overloaded wood structural members and joints are identified by the analysis. The rectangular tower structure sits on a concrete basin that span across 60 ft by 200 ft. A major part of the cooling towers upgrading program involved field inspections of the individual cells of each tower. The primary purpose of these inspections was to identify any existing structural damage or deficiencies such as failed members, degraded wood, and deficiencies resulting from poor construction practice. Inspection of 40 cells identified some generic deficiencies that mostly are consistent with the analytical finding. Based on the analysis, some effective but inexpensive upgrading techniques were developed and recommended to bring the cooling towers into compliance with current DOE requirements

  8. Observed and predicted cooling tower plume rise at the John E. Amos Power Plant, West Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    There is much current interest in cooling tower plume rise because of its importance in determining the environmental impact of cooling towers at planned power plants and industrial facilities. Some of the possible environmental problems related to heat and water emissions from cooling towers are drift deposition, ground level fog, cloud formation, and precipitation enhancement. An important factor in all of these problems is the calculation of the plume trajectory, which is often complicated by the presence of multiple sources and water phase changes in the plume. The latent heat does not strongly influence plume rise if there is no cloud present at the top of the plume. A one dimensional plume and cloud growth model was developed to study these effects. In this paper, the predictions of the model are compared with observations of cooling tower plume rise at the John E. Amos, W. Va. fossil-fuel power plant

  9. Legionnaires' Disease Outbreaks and Cooling Towers, New York City, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzhenry, Robert; Weiss, Don; Cimini, Dan; Balter, Sharon; Boyd, Christopher; Alleyne, Lisa; Stewart, Renee; McIntosh, Natasha; Econome, Andrea; Lin, Ying; Rubinstein, Inessa; Passaretti, Teresa; Kidney, Anna; Lapierre, Pascal; Kass, Daniel; Varma, Jay K

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of Legionnaires' disease in the United States has been increasing since 2000. Outbreaks and clusters are associated with decorative, recreational, domestic, and industrial water systems, with the largest outbreaks being caused by cooling towers. Since 2006, 6 community-associated Legionnaires' disease outbreaks have occurred in New York City, resulting in 213 cases and 18 deaths. Three outbreaks occurred in 2015, including the largest on record (138 cases). Three outbreaks were linked to cooling towers by molecular comparison of human and environmental Legionella isolates, and the sources for the other 3 outbreaks were undetermined. The evolution of investigation methods and lessons learned from these outbreaks prompted enactment of a new comprehensive law governing the operation and maintenance of New York City cooling towers. Ongoing surveillance and program evaluation will determine if enforcement of the new cooling tower law reduces Legionnaires' disease incidence in New York City.

  10. Operating experience with cooling towers in French nuclear power stations: hydrobiology - aquatic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprosi, G.; Bidard, F.; Nepveu de Villemarceau, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the difficulties encountered because of biological contaminants polluting the cooling towers of nuclear power stations. Then one describes the measures planned to reduce these phenomena [fr

  11. On the optimum performance of forced draft counter flow cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeylemez, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    A thermo-hydraulic performance optimization analysis is presented, yielding simple algebraic formula for estimating the optimum performance point of counter current mechanical draft wet cooling towers. The effectiveness-Ntu method is used in the present study, together with the derivation of psychometric properties of moist air based on a numerical approximation method, for thermal performance analysis of wet cooling towers of the counter flow type

  12. Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, G.T.

    1982-03-01

    During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

  13. Heat transfer enhancement in a natural draft dry cooling tower under crosswind operation with heterogeneous water distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarzi, Mohsen; Amooie, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Crosswind significantly decreases cooling efficiency of a natural draft dry cooling tower. The possibility of improving cooling efficiency with heterogeneous water distribution within the cooling tower radiators under crosswind condition is analysed. A CFD approach was used to model the flow field and heat transfer phenomena within the cooling tower and airflow surrounding the cooling tower. A mathematical model was developed from various CFD results. Having used a trained Genetic Algorithm with the result of mathematical model, the best water distribution was found among the others. Remodeling the best water distribution with the CFD approach showed that the highest enhancement of the heat transfer compared to the usual uniform water distribution.

  14. Strategy for the Operation of Cooling Towers with variable Speed Fans

    CERN Document Server

    Iñigo-Golfín, J

    2001-01-01

    Within the SPS Cooling Water Project at CERN aimed at the reduction of water consumption, this primary open cooling loop will be closed and all the primary cooling circuit components will be upgraded to the new required duty and brought to the necessary safety and operability standards. In particular the tower fans will be fitted with variable frequency drives to replace the existing two speed motors. This paper presents a study to optimize the operation of SPS cooling towers taking into account outdoor conditions (wet and dry bulb temperatures) and the entirety of the primary circuit in which they will operate.

  15. Water vapour rises from the cooling towers for the ATLAS detector at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    Electronics on the ATLAS detector produce heat when the experiment is running. An elaborate cooling system keeps the detector from overheating. On the surface, the warm water vapour that rises from the detector 100metres underground is clearly visible from the ATLAS cooling towers on the CERN Meyrin site in Switzerland.

  16. Performance Analysis of an Updraft Tower System for Dry Cooling in Large-Scale Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haotian Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An updraft tower cooling system is assessed for elimination of water use associated with power plant heat rejection. Heat rejected from the power plant condenser is used to warm the air at the base of an updraft tower; buoyancy-driven air flows through a recuperative turbine inside the tower. The secondary loop, which couples the power plant condenser to a heat exchanger at the tower base, can be configured either as a constant-pressure pump cycle or a vapor compression cycle. The novel use of a compressor can elevate the air temperature in the tower base to increases the turbine power recovery and decrease the power plant condensing temperature. The system feasibility is evaluated by comparing the net power needed to operate the system versus alternative dry cooling schemes. A thermodynamic model coupling all system components is developed for parametric studies and system performance evaluation. The model predicts that constant-pressure pump cycle consumes less power than using a compressor; the extra compression power required for temperature lift is much larger than the gain in turbine power output. The updraft tower system with a pumped secondary loop can allow dry cooling with less power plant efficiency penalty compared to air-cooled condensers.

  17. Development of a new CARD-FISH protocol for quantification of Legionella pneumophila and its application in two hospital cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, A K T; Rameder, A; Schrammel, B; Indra, A; Farnleitner, A H; Sommer, R

    2012-06-01

    Open cooling towers are frequent sources of infections with Legionella pneumophila. The gold standard for the detection of Leg. pneumophila is based on cultivation lasting up to 10 days and detecting only culturable cells. Alternative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocols have been proposed, but they result in faint fluorescence signals and lack specificity because of cross-hybridization with other Legionella species. Our aim was thus to develop a new FISH protocol for rapid and specific detection of Leg. pneumophila in water samples. A novel catalysed reporter deposition FISH (CARD-FISH) protocol for the detection of Leg. pneumophila was developed, which significantly enhanced signal intensity as well as specificity of the probe through the use of a novel competitor probe. The developed protocol was compared with the culture method for monitoring the seasonal development of culturable and nonculturable Leg. pneumophila in two hospital cooling tower systems. Seasonal fluctuations of Leg. pneumophila concentrations detected via CARD-FISH were related to the development of the total bacterial community in both cooling towers, with temperature and biocide as the main factors controlling this development. Our results clearly showed that the majority of the Leg. pneumophila cells were in a nonculturable state. Thus, detection of Leg. pneumophila with culture methods may underestimate the total numbers of Leg. pneumophila present. Rapid, sensitive and specific detection and quantification of Leg. pneumophila in water systems is prerequisite for reliable risk estimation. The new protocol significantly improves current methodology and can be used to monitor and screen for Leg. pneumophila concentrations in cooling towers or other water systems. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. The analysis of the process in the cooling tower with the low efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badriev, A. I.; Sharifullin, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    We put quite a difficult task maintaining a temperature drop to 11-12 degrees at thermal power plants to ensure the required depth of cooling of vacuum in the condenser, cooling towers. This requirement is achieved with the reducing of the hydraulic load with the low efficiency of the apparatus. The task analysis process in this unit and identify the causes of his poor performance was put in the work. One of the possible reasons may be the heterogeneity of the process in the volume of the apparatus. Therefore, it was decided to investigate experimentally the distribution of the irrigation water and the air flow in the cross section of industrial cooling towers. As a result, we found a significant uneven distribution of flows of water and air in the volume of the apparatus. We have shown theoretically that the uneven distribution of irrigation leads to a significant decrease in the efficiency of evaporation in the cooling tower. The velocity distribution of the air as the tower sections, and inside sections are interesting. The obtained experimental data allowed to establish the internal communication: the effects of the distributions of the density of irrigation in sections of the apparatus for the distribution of changes of the temperature and the air velocity. The obtained results allowed to formulate a methodology for determining process problems and to develop actions on increase of the efficiency of the cooling tower.

  19. Wind tunnel experimental study on effect of inland nuclear power plant cooling tower on air flow and dispersion of pollutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Qingdang; Yao Rentai; Guo Zhanjie; Wang Ruiying; Fan Dan; Guo Dongping; Hou Xiaofei; Wen Yunchao

    2011-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment for the effect of the cooling tower at Taohuajiang nuclear power plant on air flow and dispersion of pollutant was introduced in paper. Measurements of air mean flow and turbulence structure in different directions of cooling tower and other buildings were made by using an X-array hot wire probe. The effects of the cooling tower and its drift on dispersion of pollutant from the stack were investigated through tracer experiments. The results show that the effect of cooling tower on flow and dispersion obviously depends on the relative position of stack to cooling towers, especially significant for the cooling tower parallel to stack along wind direction. The variation law of normalized maximum velocity deficit and perturbations in longitudinal turbulent intensity in cooling tower wake was highly in accordance with the result of isolated mountain measured by Arya and Gadiyaram. Dispersion of pollutant in near field is significantly enhanced and plume trajectory is changed due to the cooling towers and its drift. Meanwhile, the effect of cooling tower on dispersion of pollutant depends on the height of release. (authors)

  20. An alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Towner, S G; Wolford, R S; Stephenson, T E; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1987-08-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggests that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat.

  1. Alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    States, S.J.; Conley, L.F.; Towner, S.G.; Wolford, R.S.; Stephenson, T.E.; McNamara, M.; Wadowsky, R.M.; Yee, R.B.

    1987-08-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggest that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat.

  2. Study of the comparative costs of five wet/dry cooling tower concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.; Allemann, R.T.; Faletti, D.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Parry, H.L.; Smith, G.C.; Tokarz, R.D.; Walter, R.A.

    1976-09-01

    The projected cost of five alternative dry/wet power plant heat rejection concepts was studied under conditions imposed by hypothetical use in association with the San Juan Plant Unit 3, a 550-MWe facility currently under construction near the ''Four Corners'' area of New Mexico. The five alternative concepts were: integrated dry/wet tower; separate dry and wet towers; metal fin-tube induced draft tower with deluge water augmentation; plastic heat exchanger tower with deluge water augmentation, and metal fin-tube/deluge augmentation tower with an intermediate ammonia evaporation-condensation condenser and the cooling tower. The integrated dry/wet tower concept, already chosen for service at San Juan Unit 3, was included for reference purposes. All concepts were conceptually designed and estimated using the same bases and employing uniform practices. Each concept was assumed to use all water allocated for consumptive use in Unit 3. The cost estimates obtained showed the following descending order of ''comparable capital cost'': separate dry/wet; metal fin-tube/deluge; integrated dry/wet; plastic tube/deluge; and metal fin-tube/deluge/ammonia. The results indicate that two of the advanced concepts considered, i.e., the plastic tube/deluge concept and the metal fin tube/deluge/ammonia concept, can possibly reduce the overall costs of dry/wet cooling under conditions imposed by the site considered. It was recommended that these two concepts receive additional attention by the ERDA Dry Cooling Tower Program and industry to further quantify their potential benefits and demonstrate their performance and reliability.

  3. Combined cycle power plant with indirect dry cooling tower forecasting using artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Dehghani Samani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN in modeling of combined cycle power plant (CCPP with dry cooling tower (Heller tower has been investigated in this paper. Prediction of power plant output (megawatt under different working conditions was made using multi-layer feed-forward ANN and training was performed with operational data using back-propagation. Two ANN network was constructed for the steam turbine (ST and the main cooling system(MCS. Results indicate that the ANN model is effective in predicting the power plant output with good accuracy.

  4. Startup of Pumping Units in Process Water Supplies with Cooling Towers at Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, V. V., E-mail: vberlin@rinet.ru; Murav’ev, O. A., E-mail: muraviov1954@mail.ru; Golubev, A. V., E-mail: electronik@inbox.ru [National Research University “Moscow State University of Civil Engineering,” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Aspects of the startup of pumping units in the cooling and process water supply systems for thermal and nuclear power plants with cooling towers, the startup stages, and the limits imposed on the extreme parameters during transients are discussed.

  5. The results of the measurements of mass- and heat-transfer in the wet cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabjan, Lj.; Gaspersic, B.

    1979-01-01

    These are the results of our investigations carried out on a packing inside a wet cooling tower for the purpose of studying the mass and heat transfer at the counterflow of water and humid air. The measurements on the experimental tower of the corresponding mathematical model reflect the average coefficient of mass and heat transfer for the unity of the active volume. Further the measurements of pressure drop at the air flow were carried out and thus the coefficient of aerodynamic losses were obtained. The results of measurements are given in the corresponding equations with the dimensionless numbers and diagrams. They will be of great use for the planning of new cooling towers. (author)

  6. Wind dependence on the flow rate in a natural draught cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, E.; Ernst, G.; Wurz, D.

    1981-01-01

    The efficiency of a natural draught cooling tower depends, among other things, on the effect of the wind on the flow in the tower stack. Determinations were made on a natural draught wet cooling tower 100 metres high, for the purpose of studying this effects. As characteristic quantity, a typical height was determined, the values of which were worked out from the results of the measurements. The efficiency of the stack is affected the most in the case of average wind velocities (when the velocity of the wind is about equal to the mean velocity of the plume). This effect diminishes when the velocity of the wind increases. In the case of average wind velocities, the direction of the wind has an effect, owing to the neighbouring buildings; for slightly greater wind velocities, no effect could be found [fr

  7. Natural draft dry-type cooling tower for steam power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasser, G.

    1976-01-01

    The task to build natural-draught dry cooling towers for large steam power plants as simple, compact, and economical as possible may be achieved by a combination of known features with the aid of the present application: the condenser elements built as piles of corrugated plates are arranged in the form of a truncated pyramid widened towards the top. For the cooling-air flow inlet openings for hot gas supplied from the lower part of the dome are provided. (UWI) [de

  8. SIMULATION OF COOLING TOWER AND INFLUENCE OF AERODYNAMIC ELEMENTS ON ITS WORK UNDER CONDITIONS OF WIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Cooling Towers (CT may utilize different aerodynamic elements (deflectors, windbreak walls etc. aimed to improvement of its heat performance especially at the windy conditions. In this paper the effect of flow rotation in overshower zone of CT and windbreak walls on a capacity of tower evaporating unit in the windy condition is studied numerically. Geometry of the model corresponds to real Woo-Jin Power station, China. Analogy of heat and mass transfer was used that allowed to consider aerodynamic of one-dimension flow and carried out detailed 3D calculations applying modern PC. Heat transfer coefficient of irrigator and its hydrodynamic resistance were established according to experimental data on total air rate in cooling tower. Numerical model is tested and verified with experimental data.Nonlinear dependence of CT thermal performance on wind velocity is demonstrated with the minimum (critical wind velocity at ucr ~ 8 m/s for simulated system. Application of windbreak walls does not change the value of the critical wind velocity, but may improves performance of cooling unit at moderate and strong wind conditions. Simultaneous usage of windbreak walls and overshower deflectors may increase efficiency up to 20–30 % for the deflectors angle a = 60o. Simulation let one analyze aerodynamic patterns, induced inside cooling tower and homogeneity of velocities’ field in irrigator’s area.Presented results may be helpful for the CT aerodynamic design optimization, particularly, for perspective hybrid type CTs.

  9. 2D study of wind forces around multiple cooling towers using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comprehensive numerical study for the determination of wind pressure coefficients on multiple cooling towers by simulating turbulence using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations (RANS) models of Computational Fluid Dynamics techniques (CFD) such as, Standard k −ε , RNG k −ε , Realizable k −ε and Reynolds ...

  10. Transition to a new generation of large natural-draught cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biller, H.; Boslau, C.; Heyde, K.; Kockelke, W.

    1985-01-01

    A concept of a new generation of natural-draught cooling towers for large nuclear power plant units is presented considering optimization and calculation methods, safety philosophy, dimension criteria, constructional measures, building materials, construction surveying, climbing formwork, and climbing cranes. The first installation will be available by 1990, with a unit 250 m in diameter by 150 m high

  11. Phototrophic biofilms on the interior walls of concrete Iterson-type cooling towers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hauer, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2010), s. 733-736 ISSN 0921-8971 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0318 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : cyanobacteria * algae * cooling towers Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.792, year: 2010

  12. A simplified modeling of mechanical cooling tower for control and optimization of HVAC systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Guang-Yu; Cai, Wen-Jian; Lu Lu; Lee, Eng Lock; Chiang, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a new, simple, yet accurate mechanical cooling tower model for the purpose of energy conservation and management. On the basis of Merkel's theory and effectiveness-NTU method, the model is developed by energy balance and heat, mass transfer analysis. Commissioning information is then used to identified, only three model parameters by Levenberg-Marquardt method. Compared with the existing models, the proposed model has simple characteristic parameters to be determined and without requiring iterative computation when the operating point changes. The model is validated by real operating data from the cooling towers of a heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system of a commercial hotel. The testing results show that the performance of the cooling tower varies from time to time due to different operating conditions and the proposed model is able to reflect these changes by tuning its parameters. With this feature, the proposed model can be simply used and accurately predict the performance of the real-time operating cooling tower

  13. Coupling model and solving approach for performance evaluation of natural draft counter-flow wet cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When searching for the optimum condenser cooling water flow in a thermal power plant with natural draft cooling towers, it is essential to evaluate the outlet water temperature of cooling towers when the cooling water flow and inlet water temperature change. However, the air outlet temperature and tower draft or inlet air velocity are strongly coupled for natural draft cooling towers. Traditional methods, such as trial and error method, graphic method and iterative methods are not simple and efficient enough to be used for plant practice. In this paper, we combine Merkel equation with draft equation, and develop the coupled description for performance evaluation of natural draft cooling towers. This model contains two inputs: the cooling water flow, the inlet cooling water temperature and two outputs: the outlet water temperature, the inlet air velocity, equivalent to tower draft. In this model, we furthermore put forward a soft-sensing algorithm to calculate the total drag coefficient instead of empirical correlations. Finally, we design an iterative approach to solve this coupling model, and illustrate three cases to prove that the coupling model and solving approach proposed in our paper are effective for cooling tower performance evaluation.

  14. Computer optimization of dry and wet/dry cooling tower systems for large fossil and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1979-02-01

    This study determined the cost of dry cooling compared to the conventional cooling methods. Also, the savings by using wet/dry instead of all-dry cooling were determined. A total optimization was performed for power plants with dry cooling tower systems using metal-finned-tube heat exchangers and surface condensers. The optimization minimizes the power production cost. The program optimizes the design of the heat exchanger and its air and water flow rates. In the base case study, the method of replacing lost capacity assumes the use of gas turbines. As a result of using dry cooling towers in an 800 MWe fossil plant, the incremental costs with the use of high back pressure turbine and conventional turbine over all-wet cooling are 11 and 15%, respectively. For a 1200 MWe nuclear plant, these are 22 and 25%, respectively. Since the method of making up lost capacity depends on the situation of a utility, considerable effort has been placed on testing the effects of using different methods of replacing lost capacity at high ambient temperatures by purchased energy. The results indicate that the optimization is very sensitive to the method of making up lost capacity. It is, therefore, important to do an accurate representation of all possible methods of making up capacity loss when optimizating power plants with dry cooling towers. A solution for the problem of losing generation capability by a power plant due to the use of a dry cooling tower is to supplement the dry tower during the hours of peak ambient temperatures by a wet tower. A separate wet/dry cooling tower system with series tower arrangement was considered in this study, and proved to be an economic choice over all-dry cooling where some water is available but supplies are insufficient for a totally evaporative cooling tower

  15. Mathematical model of drift deposition from a bifurcated cooling tower plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Jung, L.

    1978-01-01

    Cooling tower drift deposition modeling has been extended by including centrifugal force induced through plume bifurcation in a crosswind as a mechanism for drift droplet removal from the plume. The model, in its current state of development, is capable of predicting the trajectory of a single droplet from the stage of strong interaction with the vortex field soon after droplet emission at the tower top through the stage of droplet evaporation in an unsaturated atmosphere after droplet breakaway from the plume. The computer program developed from the mathematical formulation has been used to explore the dependency of the droplet trajectory on droplet size, vortex strength, point of droplet emission, drag coefficient, droplet efflux speed, and ambient conditions. A specific application to drift from a mechanical-draft cooling tower (for a wind speed twice the efflux speed, a relative humidity of 70 per cent, and an initial droplet radius of 100 μm) showed the droplet to follow a helical trajectory within the plume, with breakaway occurring at 2.5 tower diameters downwind and ground impact of the droplet (reduced through evaporation to 55 μm radius) at 11 tower diameters

  16. Modeling and Optimization of a CoolingTower-Assisted Heat Pump System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Wei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To minimize the total energy consumption of a cooling tower-assisted heat pump (CTAHP system in cooling mode, a model-based control strategy with hybrid optimization algorithm for the system is presented in this paper. An existing experimental device, which mainly contains a closed wet cooling tower with counter flow construction, a condenser water loop and a water-to-water heat pump unit, is selected as the study object. Theoretical and empirical models of the related components and their interactions are developed. The four variables, viz. desired cooling load, ambient wet-bulb temperature, temperature and flow rate of chilled water at the inlet of evaporator, are set to independent variables. The system power consumption can be minimized by optimizing input powers of cooling tower fan, spray water pump, condenser water pump and compressor. The optimal input power of spray water pump is determined experimentally. Implemented on MATLAB, a hybrid optimization algorithm, which combines the Limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS algorithm with the greedy diffusion search (GDS algorithm, is incorporated to solve the minimization problem of energy consumption and predict the system’s optimal set-points under quasi-steady-state conditions. The integrated simulation tool is validated against experimental data. The results obtained demonstrate the proposed operation strategy is reliable, and can save energy by 20.8% as compared to an uncontrolled system under certain testing conditions.

  17. Distribution of chromium in vegetation and small mammals adjacent to cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.G. Jr.; Parr, P.D.; Dahlman, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Surface contamination of vegetation by aerosol pollutants and subsequent ingestion by grazing vertebrates is a pathway for incorporation of toxic elements into food chains. Small mammals (herbivores) were live-trapped in a fescue-dominated field adjacent to large, mechanical draft cooling towers comparable to those utilized by power generation facilities. Cooling waters of the towers contain a chromate, zinc-phosphate compound to inhibit corrosion and fouling within the cooling system. A fraction of the cooling water becomes entrained within the exit air flow and is deposited as drift on the landscape. Resident mammals are chronically subjected to increased chromium exposures through both ingestion and inhalation pathways. Concentrations in vegetation ranged from 342 to 15 ppM at 15 and 130 meters down wind. Concentration levels in litter exceeded those of live plant materials by a factor of 5. Chromium distribution in mammals adjacent to the cooling towers is compared by organ analyses to corresponding organs and tissues of mammals collected remote from drift. Concentrations of chromium in pelt, hair, and bone of animals trapped near the cooling towers were significantly higher (P is less than 0.01) than tissues from control animals. Air concentrations ranged from 15 to 8 μg/m 3 at 15 and 100 meters, and thus provided a potential pathway for increased chromium levels through inhalation. Biological accumulation and retention following ingestion are discussed in a subsequent paper in this symposium (Van Hook et al.). Elevated levels of hexavalent chromium in air have been identified as a potential health hazard. Pathological studies of lung tissues were performed and were negative for lesions. (U.S.)

  18. Determination of fan flow and water rate adjustment for off-design cooling tower tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    The determination of the performance of a mechanical draft cooling tower requires that the air mass flow through the tower be known. Since this flow is not measured, it has been customary to use the manufacturer's design air flow and adjust it by the one-third power of the ratio of the design to test fan horsepower. The most nearly correct approximation of air flow through a tower can be obtained by incrementally moving through the tower from air inlet to outlet while calculating mass flows, energy balances, and pressure drops for each increment and then utilizing fan curves to determine volumetric and mass flows. This procedure would account for changes in air humidity and density through the tower, evaporation of water, effect of water rate on air pressure drop, and changes in fan characteristics. These type calculations may be within the capabilities of all in the near future, but for the interim, it is recommended that a more elementary approach be used which can be handled with a good calculator and without any proprietary data. This approach depends on certain assumptions which are acceptable if the tower test is conducted within CTI code requirements. The fan must be considered a constant suction volume blower for a given blade pitch. The total pressure at the fan, a function of volumetric flow and wet air density, must be assumed to be unaffected by other considerations, and the fan horsepower must be assumed to change only as volumetric flow and wet air density changes. Given these assumptions, along with design information normally provided with a tower, the determination of air flow through a tower in a test can be made from CTI test data. The air flow, and consequently the water rate adjustment and corrected water to air ratio, are derived and found to be direct functions of horsepower and density and an inverse function of wet air humidities

  19. Solving the heat transfer in the cold rain of a cross flow cooling tower. N3S code - cooling tower release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, J.L.

    1996-09-01

    A simplified model for heat and mass transfer in the lower rainfall of a counter-flow cooling toward had to be implemented in the N3S code-cooling tower release It is built from an old code: ZOPLU. The air velocity field is calculated by N3S. The air and water temperature fields are solved by a Runge-Kutta method on a mesh in an adequate number of vertical plans. Heat exchange and drags correlations are given. And all the necessary parameters are specified. All the subroutines are described. They are taken from ZOPLU and modified in order to adapt their abilities to the N3S requirements. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs., 3 appends

  20. Numerical simulation of shower cooling tower based on artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Xiaoni; Liu Zhenyan; Li Dandan

    2008-01-01

    This study was prompted by the need to design towers for applications in which, due to salt deposition on the packing and subsequent blockage, the use of tower packing is not practical. The cooling tower analyzed in this study is void of fill, named shower cooling tower (SCT). However, the present study focuses mostly on experimental investigation of the SCT, and no systematic numerical method is available. In this paper, we first developed a one dimensional model and analyzed the heat and mass transfer processes of the SCT; then we used the concept of artificial neural network (ANN) to propose a computer design tool that can help the designer evaluate the outlet water temperature from a given set of experimentally obtained data. For comparison purposes and accurate evaluation of the predictions, part of the experimental data was used to train the neural network and the remainder to test the model. The results predicted by the ANN model were compared with those of the standard model and the experimental data. The ANN model predicted the outlet water temperature with a MAE (mean absolute error) of 1.31%, whereas the standard one dimensional model showed a MAE of 9.42%

  1. Experience with the construction of the cable net cooling tower at Schmehausen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdmann, W.

    1977-01-01

    The static system of the cooling tower consists of a concrete column 181 metres high from which a 145 meter high cable with a base diameter of 141 metres is suspended and tensioned. The cable net is covered on the inside with aluminium sheeting. Banks of tubes, which constitute the actual coding system, are arranged in the form of rings around the column in a self-supporting structure. Of the very wide range of problems which occurred in the construction of this cooling tower, the following are discussed in the paper: 1) Stressing of the concrete column during the construction period. 2) Stiffening the net using separation rings. 3) Net connection points on the ring foundation. 4) Control of the cable forces and the cable net geometry. 5) Start of sheeting erection. (orig.) [de

  2. Cementitious stabilization of chromium, arsenic, and selenium in a cooling tower sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Bleier, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting studies and treatment method development under the treatability exclusion of RCRA for those mixed wastes for which treatment methods and capabilities have yet to be defined. One of these wastes is a radioactive cooling tower sludge. This paper presents some results of a treatability study of the stabilization of this cooling tower sludge in cementitious waste forms. The sample of the cooling tower sludge obtained for this study was found to be not characteristically hazardous in regard to arsenic, barium, chromium, lead, and selenium, despite the waste codes associated with this waste. However, the scope of this study included spiking three RCRA metals to two orders of magnitude above the initial concentration to test the limits of cementitious stabilization. Chromium and arsenic were spiked at concentrations of 200, 2,000, and 20,000 mg/kg, and selenium was spiked at 100, 1,000, and 10,000 mg/kg (concentrations based on the metal in the sludge solids). Portland cement, Class F fly ash, and slag were selected as stabilizing agents in the present study. Perlite, a fine, porous volcanic rock commonly used as a filter aid, was used as a water-sorptive agent in this study in order to control bleed water for high water contents. The highly porous perlite dust absorbs large amounts of water by capillary action and does not present the handling and processing problems exhibited by clays used for bleed water control

  3. Investigation of Heterotrophic Bacteria, Legionella and Free-Living Amoeba in Cooling Tower Samples by FISH and Culture Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Zeybek, Zuhal; Dogruoz Gungor, Nihal; Turetgen, Irfan

    2018-01-01

    Themicroorganisms living in the cooling towers water can affect both human healththrough inhalation of aerosolized water as well as industrial processes. Inorder to analyse such man-made water systems, microbiological tests that cangive results in a short time are needed. In this study, the presence ofheterotrophic bacteria, Legionella bacteria and free - living amoeba, FLA,including Acanthamoeba, in cooling-tower water and biofilm samples wereinvestigated using two different methods, fluores...

  4. Comprehensive study of drift from mechanical draft cooling towers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulainen, N.S.; Webb, R.O.; Wilber, K.R.; Ulanski, S.L.

    1979-09-01

    Drift from mechanical draft cooling towers was studied to establish a data base for use in drift deposition model validation. This objective was met by the simultaneous measurement of cooling tower source emission parameters, meteorological variables and drift deposition patterns during seven of eight test runs. Results from six of these test runs are presented and discussed. Source characterization measurements were made of cooling tower emission parameters such as updraft velocity and temperature profiles, liquid and mineral mass drift emission rates, and drift droplet size distributions. The meteorological measurements included wet- and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed and direction at various heights to provide information on the vertical structure of temperature, moisture and mass transport. Surface deposition measurements included both droplet and bulk mineral mass deposition rates. Substantial variation in drift emissions were noticed. Large day-to-day variations for a given cell and large cell-to-cell variations were observed. The problem of deriving a total droplet emission spectrum and rate from one or two towers is complicated and the modeler must decide on the amount of detail he needs to satisfactorily predict downwind deposition patterns. Meteorological conditions during the drift study were characterized by relatively high winds, warm temperatures and moderate humidities. The relatively high winds increased the uncertainty in the measured deposition patterns. In spite of the large (factor of 2 or 3) uncertainty in the measured deposition rates, preliminary calculations of drift deposition rates are in agreement with each other for test run 1. Although the present study did not meet all the requirements for complete validation of various drift models, it has contributed a unique set of data for that purpose.

  5. Optimizing cooling tower performance refrigeration systems, chemical plants, and power plants all have a resource quietly awaiting exploitation - cold water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, R.

    1993-01-01

    The cooling towers are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings when properly engineered and maintained. In many cases, the limiting factor of production is the quality and quantity of cold water coming off the cooling tower. The savings accrued in energy conservation and additional product manufactured can be an important factor on the operator's company's profit and loss sheet (7). Energy management analysis is a very important consideration in today's escalating climate of costs of energy. It is advisable to consider a thorough engineering inspection and evaluation of the entire plant to leave no stone unturned iii the search to reduce energy consumption (8). The cooling tower plays the major role on waste heat removal and should be given a thorough engineering inspection and evaluation by a specialist in this field. This can be performed at nominal cost and a formal report submitted with recommendations, budget costs, and evaluation of the thermal, structural, and mechanical condition of the equipment. This feasibility study will assist in determining the extent of efficiency improvement available with costs and projected savings. It can be stated that practically all cooling towers can be upgraded to perform at higher levels of efficiency which can provide a rapid, cost-effective payback. However, while all cooling tower systems might not provide such a dramatic cost payback as these case histories, the return of a customer's investment in upgrading his cooling tower can be a surprising factor of operation and should not be neglected

  6. Effect of diesel leakage in circulating cooling water system on preponderant bacteria diversity and bactericidal effect of biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huiyun; Liu, Fang; Lu, Jinjin; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Chaocheng

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum products leakage results in adverse effect on the normal operation of a circulating cooling water system. However, relatively little research has been done to explore the effect of petroleum products leakage on circulating cooling water quality and biofilm preponderant bacteria diversity. Also, normal biocides application modes cannot fulfil the need for biofilm control. In this study, diesel oil was used as the experimental subject representing leaking petroleum products; the effect of diesel addition on biofilm preponderant bacteria diversity and the bactericidal effect of chlorine dioxide and tetradecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (1427) was investigated. Bacterial community structures were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and PCR cloning of 16S rDNA genes. Except for 100 mg/L diesel, increasing diesel concentration enhanced the biofilm detachment ratio compared with the control test. The microstructure of biofilm samples with 0, 300 and 900 mg/L diesel addition was observed. The species of preponderant bacteria in the biofilm sample with 300 mg/L diesel addition were more and the bacterial distribution was more uniform than those in the biofilm sample with 900 mg/L diesel addition. With ClO2 and 1427 addition, chemical oxygen demand increased, lipid phosphorus and bacterial count first decreased and then remained stable, and the bactericidal ratio first increased and then remained stable. Diesel addition variation has more obvious effect on ClO2 than 1427.

  7. The development of natural-draught cooling towers of prestressed wire-rope network construction of aerodynamic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, R.; Jasch, E.

    1975-01-01

    Natural-draught cooling towers carried to a height of up to 200 m will be required for the dissipation of the residual heat from the thermal processes of large-capacity power stations to be erected in future. The structural problems involved in such large-size towers can be overcome by using prestressed wire-rope network construction. A structural concept is discussed which proposes to use a cooling tower shell constructed of a prestressed, planked wire-rope network of circular hyperbolic form carried by a spacer ring attached to the central mast. Comments are given on the ensuing problems of aerodynamics, stress-strength assessment, and erection. (orig.) [de

  8. EFFECT OF THE FILL VENTILATION WINDOW ON PERFORMANCE OF A NATURAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER SUBJECTED TO CROSS-WINDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various aerodynamic design elements and technics (wind deflectors, wind walls, etc. are utilized for improvement of the thermal efficiency of the natural draft cooling towers, particularly in conditions of cross wind. One of the technical methods, proposed by engineers of Belarus Academy of Sciences, is installation of the ventilation window in the center of the fill. This method is substantiated by the fact that the flow of cooling gas obtains maximum temperature and humidity near the center of the under-fill space of cooling tower and, as a consequence, performs minimal heat exchange. The influence of the fill ventilation window and wind deflectors in the inlet windows of the cooling tower on its thermal performance in condition of cross-wind is investigated in the paper numerically. The cooling tower of the “Woo-Jin” power plant (China 150 m of the height and 114 m of the base diameter was taken as a prototype. The analogy (equivalence between the heat and mass transfer was taken into consideration, which enabled us to consider single-phase flow and perform complicated 3D simulation by using modern personal computers. Heat transfer coefficient for the fill and its hydrodynamic resistance were defined by using actual data on total flow rate in the cooling tower. The numerical model and computational methods were tested and verified in numerous previous works. The non-linear dependence of the thermal performance of the cooling tower on wind velocity (with the minimum in vicinity of Ucr ~ 8 m/s for the simulated system was demonstrated. Calculations show that in the condition of the average wind speed the fill ventilation window doesn’t improve, but slightly decrease (by 3–7 % performance of the cooling tower. Situation changes in the condition of strong winds Ucw > 12 m/s, which are not typical for Belarus. Utilization of airflow deflectors at the inlet windows of cooling tower, conversely, increases thermal performance of the

  9. The quantity of algae colonizing the inside face of cooling towers and the consequences for wear of the shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprosi, G.; Chauvel, D.

    1990-01-01

    These studies are part of the interdirectorate working group's mandate relating to lifespan project on cooling towers. Involving the collaboration of several divisions of Electricity de France: the Construction Division (SEPTEN). The Generation and Transmission Division (SPT) and the Research and Development Division (EAA). Among the biological colonies which proliferate in the cooling circuits of power stations, algae are broadly represented in the form of wall coatings which cover the inside face of cooling towers: shell algae. They can also grow at other points in the cooling circuit; in the cold water basin, in the fill, and, in some cooling towers, in the hot water basin. These plant organisms hamper the operation of power stations by clogging the grids located in the pipe from the cold water basin to the condenser. In addition, when algae come free of the shell, they remove micro-fragments of the concrete, which could accelerate wear. This paper presents the findings of studies conducted by the Aquatic and Atmospheric Department on the infestation of cooling towers by algae. In particular, the results of studies to evaluate the quantity of algae on the inside face of the shell of cooling towers. Many scenarios will be proposed, linked to the operation of the plant and to the local meteorological conditions

  10. Nuclear cooling tower submitted to shrinkage; behaviour under weight and wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witasse, R.; Georgin, J.F.; Reynouard, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical formulation to analyse nuclear cooling tower submitted to creep and shrinkage of concrete is presented in this paper. Both humidity effects and non-linear mechanical behaviour of the constitutive materials are taken into account. Moisture migration is described using a single diffusion equation in which the relative humidity is the driving force and delayed strains are obtained in a phenomenological way. To capture the time-dependent behaviour, an extension of a continuum plasticity model which incorporates viscous behaviour, has been developed and its main parameters are obtained from experimental results. The effects produced by internal stresses that result from time-dependent deformations are finally presented for nuclear tower under services loading

  11. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.G.; Hanna, S.R.; Parr, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified at the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment facility at Paducah, Kentucky. Chromium concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreased with increasing distance from the cooing tower, ranging from 251 +- 19 ppM at 15 meters to 0.52 +- 0.07 ppM at 1500 meters. The site of drift contamination, size characteristics, and elemental content of drift particles were determined using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis capabilities. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. A laboratory study simulating throughfall from 1 to 6 inches of rain suggested that there are more exchange sites associated with litter than live foliage. Leachate from each one inch throughfall simulant removed 3% of the drift mass from litter compared to 7 to 9% from live foliage. Results suggest that differences in retention are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil--water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Samples from two depths following rainstorms revealed the absence of vertical or horizontal movement with maximum concentrations of 0.13 ppb at 50 meters from the tower. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to depositionmeasurements. Isopleths of the predicted deposition are useful to identify areas of maximum drift transport in the environs of the gaseous diffusion plant

  12. Successful implementation of ageing management exemplified at the cooling tower of Emsland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Alexander; Dueweling, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the successful implementation of the restoration of water-distribution channels at the cooling tower of the Emsland nuclear power plant under the aspect of ageing management. The main challenge of aging management is the determination of potential aging mechanism and to avoid systematically and effectively their damaging influences. In the course of the annual site inspections abnormalities at the lower side of the water-distribution channels of the cooling tower were detected, analysed, and repaired. The extraordinary high chlorine equivalent of the cooling water was identified as main reason of the damages located. Due to extensive infiltration into the concrete structure, chloride-induced corrosion generates a volume expansion of the reinforcement and thereby to a blast off of the concrete covering. According to the restoration concept, the damaged concrete was removed by maximum pressure water jet blasting; where necessary the reinforcement was retrofitted and a layered concrete substitution was applied by synthetic cement mortar. The realised procedures conserve the load bearing reinforcement only for a certain period, because the permanent chloride infiltration could not be stopped. Therefore, the structure has to be monitored permanently. (orig.)

  13. A case study on Simulation and Design optimization to improve Productivity in cooling tower manufacturing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranav Nithin, R.; Gopikrishnan, S.; Sumesh, A.

    2018-02-01

    Cooling towers are the heat transfer devices commonly found in industries which are used to extract the high temperature from the coolants and make it reusable in various plants. Basically, the cooling towers has Fills made of PVC sheets stacked together to increase the surface area exposure of the cooling liquid flowing through it. This paper focuses on the study in such a manufacturing plant where fills are being manufactured. The productivity using the current manufacturing method was only 6 to 8 fills per day, where the ideal capacity was of 14 fills per day. In this plant manual labor was employed in the manufacturing process. A change in the process modification designed and implemented will help the industry to increase the productivity to 14. In this paper, initially the simulation study was done using ARENA the simulation package and later the new design was done using CAD Package and validated using Ansys Mechanical APDL. It’s found that, by the implementation of the safe design the productivity can be increased to 196 Units.

  14. Estimation the remaining service-lifetime of wooden structure of geothermal cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effendi Tri Bahtiar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Similar with other construction materials, wood strength is decreasing when applied by long term loading. Wooden cooling tower structure at Star Energy Geothermal (Wayang Windu Ltd was built in 1998 and it should be evaluated to avoid sudden structural failure. Evaluation conducted through several steps: wood species identification, the physical and mechanical properties testing, and estimation for remaining service-lifetime by generating mathematical models derived from creep test and reduction of cross sectional area of the wood. Identification result that the wood are redwood (Sequoia sempervirens and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii. The wood density value has degraded from the surface until 0.25 cm depth. Strength characteristics of the wood have considerably decreased, but the allowable stress for bending, tension parallel to grain, and shear were still higher than NDS2005 requirements. The allowable stress for compression parallel to grain was slightly lower than NDS, while compression perpendicular to grain was much lower. Average modulus of elasticity reduces become lower than the value stated by the code, but the minimum value of modulus of elasticity (Emin of redwood was still higher than the code value, while Emin of Douglas fir is slightly lower. Then, in accordance with those findings, the construction would not failure yet but the deformation and vibration will occur in higher rate than design planning. This research develops mathematical models for estimating the remaining service-lifetime of the wooden cooling tower structure in geothermal power plant based on the wood performance in resisting long term loading and its deterioration rate. The deterioration rate of wood member of cooling tower structure at Star Energy Geothermal (Wayang Windu Ltd is 0.0147 cm depth per year, so equation for the residual service life estimation is σlaterσtoday=bh2(b−0.0147T(h−0.0147T2, and σlater must be lower than allowable stress.

  15. Study plan for conducting a section 316(a) demonstration: K-Reactor cooling tower, Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paller, M.H.

    1991-02-01

    The K Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began operation in 1954. The K-Reactor pumped secondary cooling water from the Savannah River and discharged directly to the Indian Grave Branch, a tributary of Pen Branch which flows to the Savannah River. During earlier operations, the temperature and discharge rates of cooling water from the K-reactor were up to approximately 70 degree C and 400 cfs, substantially altering the thermal and flow regimes of this stream. These discharges resulted in adverse impacts to the receiving stream and wetlands along the receiving stream. As a component of a Consent Order (84-4-W as amended) with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated the alternatives for cooling thermal effluents from K Reactor and concluded that a natural draft recirculating cooling tower should be constructed. The cooling tower will mitigate thermal and flow factors that resulted in the previous impacts to the Indian Grave/Pen Branch ecosystem. The purpose of the proposed biological monitoring program is to provide information that will support a Section 316(a) Demonstration for Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch when K-Reactor is operated with the recirculating cooling tower. The data will be used to determine that Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch support Balanced Indigenous Communities when K-Reactor is operated with a recirculating cooling tower. 4 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab

  16. Study of a Mathematical Model of Biocide Effect on a Biofilm Isolated from a Cooling System Using the Microtiter Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Shakeri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization on metal surfaces and their metabolic activities lead to biocorrosion. In fact, any agent removing the biofilm or decreasing its thickness is capable of preventing biocorrosion. Biocides make up one such agent. These agents can control bacterial biofilms, remove these structures, or kill cells within them. The object of this research is to study the thermodynamic model of biocide penetration into the biofilm using the microtiter plate test. First, the biofilm bacteria were isolated to form a mix- bacterial biofilm. The biocide effect on the mix-biofilm was then determined using the microtiter plate test. Results from this test were compared with those from a thermodynamic model and it was revealed that the effects of oxidizing biocides such as sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide are in good agreement with the results from the model. The results indicated that increased biocide concentration leads to the removal of the biofilm or to the kill-off of the cells within it. However, in the case of non-oxidizing biocides such as sulfathiazol, glutaraldehyde, and alkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, the efficiency results did not agree well with the results from the thermodynamic model such that increased biocide concentration did not remove the biofilm nor did it kill off the cells within it

  17. Methodology for evaluation of cooling tower performance - Part 1: Description of the methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrekar, J.; Kustrin, I.; Oman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → New methodology for evaluation of CT performance is presented. → It enables to study impacts of local irregularities in CT on plant's power output. → Poppe model for applications on the local basis of CTs is presented. → Empirical model connecting cooling water temperature with power output is derived. → Study is based on measured data from a plant and natural draft CT. - Abstract: A methodology for the evaluation of a natural draft cooling tower (CT) that is a part of a power plant is proposed. In this work the connection between CT performance and power output is established. The methodology consists of three subparts, i.e. Cooling Tower Profiler (CTP) method, CT model and model of a power plant. In the first part of the paper the three subparts of the methodology are described. Focus is given to the empirical model of the plant and a new application of the Poppe model. The simple empirical model enables accurate prediction of the power increase as a function of cooling water temperature and load to the plant. On the other hand, Poppe governing equations were derived for application on the local basis of CT. Moreover, the constraints and assumptions of CT analysis are discussed. The methodology is presented on real data from the power plant and CT. This is the base for application of the methodology presented in the second part of the paper where the focus is given on minimizing the error of the methodology. A small area with irregularities is analyzed and results are reported. Furthermore, a simplified computational approach to solving the Poppe equations is proposed yielding faster calculation with preserved accuracy.

  18. Model calculations of the space and time distribution of cooling tower clouds on the basis of aerological data delivered by the German Weather Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolf, B.

    1983-01-01

    Based on a large amount of aerological data, the simulation model for cooling tower cloud propagation Smoka has been used to allow for a statistical evaluation of the influence of cooling towers. In addition to local differences, the annual and daily variations in the formation of clouds can be obtained together with the dependence on the cloud coverage conditions and the cooling tower characteristics. With these model calculations of the cooling tower clouds, the respective decrease in sunshine duration can be evaluated. (orig.) [de

  19. Integrity of reinforced concrete cooling towers under extreme loads: Wind and earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louhi, Amine

    2015-01-01

    The authorities have planned to increase the lifetime of currently operating nuclear power plants. The ageing of reinforced concrete structures such as cooling towers should be evaluated and its impact on the bearing capacity calculated. In the case of significant damage, the strengthening must be considered to ensure the sustainability of these towers facing the risk of storms and earthquakes becoming more and more frequent. This work aims to quantify the adverse effects that can generate concrete cracks and rebar section loss induced by corrosion, especially on the bearing capacity of nuclear power plant cooling towers under monotonic or cyclic extreme load conditions (wind and earthquake). These loads are certainly the most severe, since they take the structure into the nonlinear domain and can induce or amplify cracking damage. Numerical simulations are proposed to determine the quasi-static or dynamic response of the structure, taking into account appearance of concrete cracks and their evolution via an appropriate material concrete law and rebar's yielding. In the case of a seismic load, the responses are evaluated by three different methods; the nonlinear response history analysis (NLRHA), the response spectrum analysis and the modal response history analysis (MRHA) in order to compare the earthquake modeling approaches and to evaluate the robustness of the results. Parametric studies on damping, load combinations and structural configurations, are also performed. In the case of a wind load, the strengthening technique using composite materials, such as carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) is modeled. The behavior of the damaged structure with an advanced corrosion rate is estimated in the pre- and post-cracking regime, compared to the undamaged structure. The drop of bearing capacity is quantified, a reinforcement designed is proposed to restore the integrity and thus increase the lifetime of the structure. (author)

  20. Mixed Oxidant Process for Control of Biological Growth in Cooling Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Generation Process • Electrolysis of salt to generate chlorine biocides • Small-scale electrolytic cell generates biocide on site, on demand from a...Laboratory US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research & Development Center Construction Engineering Research Laboratory Brine and Oxidant Tanks

  1. A novel approach for energy and water conservation in wet cooling towers by using MWNTs and nanoporous graphene nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askari, S.; Lotfi, R.; Seifkordi, A.; Rashidi, A.M.; Koolivand, H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Stable MWNTs and graphene nanofluids were used in a mechanical wet cooling tower. • Thermal and rheological properties of nanofluids were investigated. • Nanofluids enhanced the efficiency, cooling range and tower characteristic. • Water consumption reduced significantly for both MWNTs and graphene nanofluids. - Abstract: This study deals with an experimental investigation on the thermal performance of a mechanical wet cooling tower with counter flow arrangement by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and nanoporous graphene nanofluids. Stable nanofluids were prepared through two-step procedure by using water with properties taken from a working cooling tower in the South of Iran. Zeta potential revealed suitable stability of MWNTs and nanoporous graphene nanofluids. Thermal and rheological properties of the nanofluids were investigated. It was found that thermal conductivity increases by 20% and 16% at 45 °C for MWNTs and nanoporous graphene nanofluids, respectively. The increase in density and viscosity, particularly in low concentrations of nanoparticles, was insignificant enough for industrial applications. Moreover, it was found that by using nanofluids, efficiency, cooling range and tower characteristic (KaV/L) are enhanced in comparison to water. For instance, at inlet water temperature of 45 °C and water/air (L/G) flow ratio of 1.37, the cooling range increases by 40% and 67% for MWNTs and nanoporous graphene nanofluids (0.1 wt.%), respectively. On the other hand water consumption is reduces by 10% and 19% at inlet water temperature of 45 °C for MWNTs and nanoporous graphene nanofluids, respectively.

  2. Cost and performance optimization of natural draft dry cooling towers using genetic algorithm. Paper no. IGEC-1-002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokuhmand, H.; Ghaempanah, B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the cost - performance optimization of natural draft dry cooling towers with specific kind of heat exchangers, known as Forgo T60 has been investigated. These cooling towers are used in combined and steam cycle power plants. The optimization has been done using genetic algorithm. The objective function has two parts, which are minimizing the cost and maximizing the performance. In the first part the geometrical and operating parameters are defined and for the next part the performance of the designed tower for different ambient temperatures during a year is calculated considering the characteristic curve of the turbine. The applied genetic algorithm has been tuned up using the data of some working power cycles. The results show it is possible to find an optimum for all design parameters; however it is very dependent on how exact the cost analysis is. (author)

  3. Prevention of strong stench for stocked radioisotope sewerage using total water treatment agent for small-sized cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Katsumi; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Furuse, Yuko; Shinozuka, Akiko

    1996-01-01

    In general, the sewerage at radioisotope laboratories has very strong stench. We treated the sewerage with a total water treatment agent (Tachileslegi, Nippon Nouyaku Co., Ltd. ) that is widely used for prevention of slime, scale, corrosion in cooling towers. As the result, the stench was decreased to about two thirds to that of control estimated by odor-test. (author)

  4. Hydraulic design of a low-specific speed Francis runner for a hydraulic cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Liao, W. L.; Zhao, Y. P.

    2012-11-01

    The air blower in a cooling tower is normally driven by an electromotor, and the electric energy consumed by the electromotor is tremendous. The remaining energy at the outlet of the cooling cycle is considerable. This energy can be utilized to drive a hydraulic turbine and consequently to rotate the air blower. The purpose of this project is to recycle energy, lower energy consumption and reduce pollutant discharge. Firstly, a two-order polynomial is proposed to describe the blade setting angle distribution law along the meridional streamline in the streamline equation. The runner is designed by the point-to-point integration method with a specific blade setting angle distribution. Three different ultra-low-specificspeed Francis runners with different wrap angles are obtained in this method. Secondly, based on CFD numerical simulations, the effects of blade setting angle distribution on pressure coefficient distribution and relative efficiency have been analyzed. Finally, blade angles of inlet and outlet and control coefficients of blade setting angle distribution law are optimal variables, efficiency and minimum pressure are objective functions, adopting NSGA-II algorithm, a multi-objective optimization for ultra-low-specific speed Francis runner is carried out. The obtained results show that the optimal runner has higher efficiency and better cavitation performance.

  5. Analisa Penyusutan Produk Plastik di Proses Injection Molding Menggunakan Media Pendingin Cooling Tower dan Udara dengan Material Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ilmar Ramadhan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage merupakan suatu cacat berupa perubahan dimensi produk hasil proses injection molding. Pendinginan mold merupakan salah satu faktor yang mempengaruhi cacat produk shrinkage. Pendinginan pada mold dapat dilakukan dengan media pendinginan udara ( air cooling atau fluida (water cooling. Pemanfaatannya tergantung dari efektivitas pendinginan yang perlu dicapai sehingga produk cepat berada pada batas temperatur sentak yang diijinkan sesuai material plastik, fasilitas yang tersedia dan konstruksi pendinginan yang mendukung. Pengujian dilakukan menggunakan material polypropylene dengan parameter yang konstan seperti waktu injeksi 1 detik, tekanan injeksi 650 bar, kecepatan injeksi 25 mm/s dan temperatur leleh 230°C - 240°C, serta variabel backpressure yang digunakan pada masing – masing zat pendinginan yaitu 15 kgf/cm2, 25 kgf/cm2, dan 35 kgf/cm2. Pada pengujian pendinginan cooling tower dengan menggunakan settingan temperatur leleh 230°C - 240°C dengan waktu injeksi 1 detik dan backpressure 15 kgf/cm2 nilai shrinkage-nya adalah 1,65%, dan backpressure 25 kgf/cm2 nilai shrinkage-nya 1,57 % serta pada backpressure 35 kgf/cm2 nilai shrinkage-nya adalah 1,49 %. Pada pengujian menggunakan pendinginan udara dengan menggunakan settingan yang sama seperti pada pendinginan cooling tower didapat nilai shrinkage pada backpressure 15 kgf/cm2 adalah 1,78 %, dan backpressure 25 kgf/cm2 nilai shrinkage sebesar 1,7 %, serta pada backpressure 35 kgf/cm2 nilai shrinkage-nya adalah 1,61 %. Berdasarkan hasil pengujian, shrinkage pada pengujian injection molding dengan pendinginan cooling tower lebih kecil dibandingkan pada pengujian injection molding dengan pendinginan udara. Hal ini disebabkan karena laju perpindahan panas konveksi maupun konduksi yang terjadi pada pendinginan cooling tower lebih baik dibandingkan dengan menggunakan pendinginan udara, sehingga pemerataan panas pada mold akan lebih merata dan akan memiliki temperatur yang konstan.

  6. Artificial neural network analysis based on genetic algorithm to predict the performance characteristics of a cross flow cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiasheng; Cao, Lin; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2018-02-01

    Cooling tower of air conditioning has been widely used as cooling equipment, and there will be broad application prospect if it can be reversibly used as heat source under heat pump heating operation condition. In view of the complex non-linear relationship of each parameter in the process of heat and mass transfer inside tower, In this paper, the BP neural network model based on genetic algorithm optimization (GABP neural network model) is established for the reverse use of cross flow cooling tower. The model adopts the structure of 6 inputs, 13 hidden nodes and 8 outputs. With this model, the outlet air dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, water temperature, heat, sensible heat ratio and heat absorbing efficiency, Lewis number, a total of 8 the proportion of main performance parameters were predicted. Furthermore, the established network model is used to predict the water temperature and heat absorption of the tower at different inlet temperatures. The mean relative error MRE between BP predicted value and experimental value are 4.47%, 3.63%, 2.38%, 3.71%, 6.35%,3.14%, 13.95% and 6.80% respectively; the mean relative error MRE between GABP predicted value and experimental value are 2.66%, 3.04%, 2.27%, 3.02%, 6.89%, 3.17%, 11.50% and 6.57% respectively. The results show that the prediction results of GABP network model are better than that of BP network model; the simulation results are basically consistent with the actual situation. The GABP network model can well predict the heat and mass transfer performance of the cross flow cooling tower.

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF SYSTEMS OF TECHNICAL WATER SUPPLY WITH COOLING TOWERS FOR HEAT POWER PLANTS TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC INDICATORS PERFECTION. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Zenovich-Leshkevich-Olpinskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of calculation of economic efficiency that can be universal and is suitable for feasibility study of modernization of irrigation and water distribution system of cooling towers has been developed. The method takes into account the effect of lower pressure exhaust steam in the condenser by lowering the temperature of the cooling water outlet of a cooling tower that aims at improvement of technical and economic indicators of heat power plants. The practical results of the modernization of irrigation and water distribution system of a cooling tower are presented. As a result, the application of new irrigation and water distribution systems of cooling towers will make it possible to increase the cooling efficiency by more than 4 оС and, therefore, to obtain the fuel savings by improving the vacuum in the turbine condensers. In addition, the available capacity of CHP in the summer period is increased. The results of the work, the experience of modernization of irrigation and water distribution systems of the Gomel CHP-2 cooling towers system, as well as the and methods of calculating of its efficiency can be disseminated for upgrading similar facilities at the power plants of the Belarusian energy system. Some measures are prosed to improve recycling systems, cooling towers and their structures; such measures might significantly improve the reliability and efficiency of technical water supply systems of heat power plants.

  8. AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

    2011-10-10

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

  9. Cooling tower, construction method method therefor and precast prestressed concrete building units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.Y.; Yang, Y.C.

    1978-01-01

    A large, thin-shell cooling tower, a method for its erection, and novel precast units are described. Upon a foundation a series of angularly-extending columns is erected, and the columns are joined at their upper ends by a lower ring. Then a ribbed, waffle-like reinforced concrete wall is constructed to extend up from the lower ring and to provide a shell with a shape such as a hyperbolic paraboloid. The ribbed outer (or inner) surface strengthens the structure while enabling the thickness of the portions in between the ribs to be relatively thin. A series of vertically-spaced horizontal circumferential reinforcing bars or post-tensioning cables and a series of horizontally-spaced vertical or inclined bars or cables are included in the wall. The wall is preferably made up from a series of precast units that are of novel structure in themselves. At the top of the wall is an upper ring joining the various elements together

  10. Cracked reinforced concrete walls of chimneys, silos and cooling towers as result of using formworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Marek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There are presented in this paper some problems connected with reinforced concrete shell objects operation in the aggressive environment and built in method of formworks. Reinforced concrete chimneys, cooling towers, silos and other shells were built for decades. Durability of cracked shells are one of the most important parameters during process of designing, construction and exploitation of shells. Some reasons of appearance of horizontal and vertical cracks as temperature, pressure of stored material, live loads e.g. dynamic character of wind, moisture, influence of construction joints, thermal insulation, chemistry active environmental etc. reduce the carrying capacity of the walls. Formworks, as is occurred recently, are the reason for technological joints with leaking connection, imperfections of flexible formworks slabs and as result can initiate cracks. Cracked surface of this constructions causes decreasing capacity and lower the state of reliability. Horizontal, vertical cracks can caused corrosion of concrete and steel bars, decreasing stiffness of contraction, increasing of deflection and carbonation of concrete cover. Local and global imperfactions of concrete shells are increasing according to greater number of cracks...

  11. Health risks from exposure to Legionella in reclaimed water aerosols: Toilet flushing, spray irrigation, and cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kerry A; Hamilton, Mark T; Johnson, William; Jjemba, Patrick; Bukhari, Zia; LeChevallier, Mark; Haas, Charles N

    2018-05-01

    The use of reclaimed water brings new challenges for the water industry in terms of maintaining water quality while increasing sustainability. Increased attention has been devoted to opportunistic pathogens, especially Legionella pneumophila, due to its growing importance as a portion of the waterborne disease burden in the United States. Infection occurs when a person inhales a mist containing Legionella bacteria. The top three uses for reclaimed water (cooling towers, spray irrigation, and toilet flushing) that generate aerosols were evaluated for Legionella health risks in reclaimed water using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). Risks are compared using data from nineteen United States reclaimed water utilities measured with culture-based methods, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and ethidium-monoazide-qPCR. Median toilet flushing annual infection risks exceeded 10 -4 considering multiple toilet types, while median clinical severity infection risks did not exceed this value. Sprinkler and cooling tower risks varied depending on meteorological conditions and operational characteristics such as drift eliminator performance. However, the greatest differences between risk scenarios were due to 1) the dose response model used (infection or clinical severity infection) 2) population at risk considered (residential or occupational) and 3) differences in laboratory analytical method. Theoretical setback distances necessary to achieve a median annual infection risk level of 10 -4 are proposed for spray irrigation and cooling towers. In both cooling tower and sprinkler cases, Legionella infection risks were non-trivial at potentially large setback distances, and indicate other simultaneous management practices could be needed to manage risks. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the most influential factors for variability in risks were the concentration of Legionella and aerosol partitioning and/or efficiency across all models, highlighting the importance of

  12. Theoretical assessment of evaporation rate of isolated water drop under the conditions of cooling tower of thermal power plant

    OpenAIRE

    Shevelev Sergey

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the work is numerical modelling of heat and mass transfer at evaporation of water drops under the conditions which are typical for a modern chimney-type cooling tower of a thermal power plant. The dual task of heat and mass transfer with movable boundary at convective cooling and evaporation for a ‘drop–humid air’ system in a spherical coordinate system has been solved. It has been shown that there is a rapid decline of water evaporation rate at the initial stage of the process...

  13. Guidelines for selecting weak-base versus strong-base anion-exchange resins for the recovery of chromate from cooling tower blowdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, J.; Reed, L.W.

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines for selecting weak-base versus strong-base anion-exchange resins for the recovery of chromate from cooling tower blowdown are given, together with actual operating data on large-scale industrial systems based on strong-base anion-exchange resins, data from a similar pilot system based on weak-base anion resin, and the chemical costs for operating both systems for a cooling tower blowdown containing 2500 ppm total dissolved solids and 20 ppm chromata.

  14. Present knowledge on physical relations in drift ejection from wet cooling towers and hitherto applied measuring methods to determine the droplet size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodicka, V.

    1977-01-01

    Modern cooling towers are equipped with drift eliminators. Besides the knowledge of the spray loss ejection rate, the drift spectrum of the spray loss is also of interest. Possibilities of improving the degree of separation of the drift eliminators are shown by means of theories. These considerations are confirmed by measurements. Furthermore, measuring methods of the drift ejection rate and the droplet size determination are given. Finally, drift spectra of various drift eliminator and cooling tower constructions are given. (orig.) [de

  15. Technology to Facilitate the Use of Impaired Waters in Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colborn, Robert [General Electric Company, NIskayuna, NY (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The project goal was to develop an effective silica removal technology and couple that with existing electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) technology to achieve a cost effective treatment for impaired waters to allow for their use in the cooling towers of coal fired power plants. A quantitative target of the program was a 50% reduction in the fresh water withdrawal at a levelized cost of water of $3.90/Kgal. Over the course of the program, a new molybdenum-modified alumina was developed that significantly outperforms existing alumina materials in silica removal both kinetically and thermodynamically. The Langmuir capacity is 0.11g silica/g adsorbent. Moreover, a low cost recycle/regeneration process was discovered to allow for multiple recycles with minimal loss in activity. On the lab scale, five runs were carried out with no drop in performance between the second and fifth run in ability to absorb the silica from water. The Mo-modified alumina was successfully prepared on a multiple kilogram scale and a bench scale model column was used to remove 100 ppm of silica from 400 liters of simulated impaired water. Significant water savings would result from such a process and the regeneration process could be further optimized to reduce water requirements. Current barriers to implementation are the base cost of the adsorbent material and the fine powder form that would lead to back pressure on a large column. If mesoporous materials become more commonly used in other areas and the price drops from volume and process improvements, then our material would also lower in price because the amount of molybdenum needed is low and no additional processing is required. There may well be engineering solutions to the fine powder issue; in a simple concept experiment, we were able to pelletize our material with Boehmite, but lost performance due to a dramatic decrease in surface area.

  16. Cross-winds effect on the performance of natural draft wet cooling towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Waked, R. [Dhofar Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., College of Engineering, Sultanate of Oman (Oman)

    2010-01-15

    Effects of cross-winds on the thermal performance of natural draft wet cooling towers (NDWCTs) have been investigated. A three-dimensional CFD model has been used to determine the effect of cross-winds on NDWCTs performance surrounded by power plant building structures. The three-dimensional CFD model has utilized the standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model as the turbulence closure. Two cases have been investigated: a stand-alone NDWCT and two NDWCTs within a proposed power plant structures (PPS). It has been found that regardless of the cross-winds direction, an increase of 1.3 k or more could be predicted at cross-winds speeds greater than 4 m/s. Furthermore, the performance of NDWCTs under cross-winds has been found to be dependent on the three major factors: the structure of the approaching cross-winds and whether it is disturbed or undisturbed, the location of the NDWCT in the wake of the other NDWCT, and the location of the NDWCT in front of/in the wake of the PPS. When comparing results from the stand-alone and from the NDWCTs within PPS simulations, differences in {delta}T{sub wo} were found to be less than 1 K for the whole span of cross-winds speeds and could be decreased to 0.7 K for speeds less than 8 m/s. Finally, results obtained from the simulation of a stand-alone NDWCT could be used instead of those from NDWCTs within PPS at a certain cross-winds direction for qualitative comparisons. (authors)

  17. Cross-winds effect on the performance of natural draft wet cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Waked, R.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of cross-winds on the thermal performance of natural draft wet cooling towers (NDWCTs) have been investigated. A three-dimensional CFD model has been used to determine the effect of cross-winds on NDWCTs performance surrounded by power plant building structures. The three-dimensional CFD model has utilized the standard k-ε turbulence model as the turbulence closure. Two cases have been investigated: a stand-alone NDWCT and two NDWCTs within a proposed power plant structures (PPS). It has been found that regardless of the cross-winds direction, an increase of 1.3 k or more could be predicted at cross-winds speeds greater than 4 m/s. Furthermore, the performance of NDWCTs under cross-winds has been found to be dependent on the three major factors: the structure of the approaching cross-winds and whether it is disturbed or undisturbed, the location of the NDWCT in the wake of the other NDWCT, and the location of the NDWCT in front of/in the wake of the PPS. When comparing results from the stand-alone and from the NDWCTs within PPS simulations, differences in ΔT wo were found to be less than 1 K for the whole span of cross-winds speeds and could be decreased to 0.7 K for speeds less than 8 m/s. Finally, results obtained from the simulation of a stand-alone NDWCT could be used instead of those from NDWCTs within PPS at a certain cross-winds direction for qualitative comparisons. (authors)

  18. Experimental study of the application of two trickle media for inlet air pre-cooling of natural draft dry cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Suoying; Guan, Zhiqiang; Gurgenci, Hal; Hooman, Kamel; Lu, Yuanshen; Alkhedhair, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two trickle media were experimentally studied in a low-speed wind tunnel. • Correlations for cooling efficiency and pressure drop were developed. • Both trickle media were proven to have relatively low pressure drops. • Both trickle media had severe water entrainment at large air velocities. - Abstract: This paper is part two of a broader investigation into pre-cooling the air that enters natural draft dry cooling towers. Evaporative cooling of air is to some extent different from evaporative cooling of water. Two trickle media (Trickle125 and Trickle100) originally designed for evaporative cooling of water were studied in an open-circuit wind tunnel for evaporative cooling of air. Three medium thicknesses (200, 300 and 450 mm) and two water flow rates (10 and 5 l/min per m 2 horizontally exposed surface area) were used in the tests. The air velocities ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 m/s. The cooling efficiency and the pressure drop of the two media were curve fitted to yield a set of correlations. The pressure drop ranges for Trickle125 and Trickle100 were 0.7–50 Pa and 0.6–41.6 Pa, respectively. The cooling efficiencies of Trickle125 and Trickle100 fell within 15.7–55.1% and 11–44.4%, respectively. Generally, media with large effective surfaces provide high cooling efficiencies and high pressure drops; there is a trade-off between cooling efficiency and pressure drop when selecting a particular medium for a specific application. The water entrainment off the media was detected with water-sensitive papers, and both media had severe water entrainment at large air velocities

  19. IMPROVEMENT OF SYSTEMS OF TECHNICAL WATER SUPPLY WITH COOLING TOWERS FOR STEAM POWER PLANTS TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC INDICATORS PERFECTION. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Zenovich-Leshkevich-Olpinskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the temperature of cooling water and increase the efficiency of use of power resources the main directions of modernization of systems of technical water supply with cooling towers at steam power plants are presented. The problems of operation of irrigation systems and water distribution systems of cooling towers are reviewed. The design of heat and mass transfer devices, their shortcomings and the impact on the cooling ability of the cooling tower are also under analysis. The use of droplet heat and mass transfer device based on the lattice polypropylene virtually eliminates the shortcomings of the film and droplet-film heat and mass transfer devices of the cooling tower, increasing lifetime, and improving the reliability and efficiency of the operation of the main equipment of thermal power plants. The design of the water distribution devices of cooling towers is also considered. It is noted that the most effective are water-spattering low-pressure nozzles made of polypropylene that provides uniform dispersion of water and are of a high reliability and durability.

  20. Corrosion of reinforced concrete in nuclear plants: application of Bayesian networks to the risk management of cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capra, B.; Le Drogo, J.; Wolff, V.

    2006-01-01

    Degradation modelling of concrete structures uses uncertain variables and leads, using reliability assessment, to time dependant evolution of failure probabilities. However, only few data are generally available to feed models leading to two types of uncertainties: an intrinsic one depending on the modelled phenomena and one related to the precision of the measurements. Each new data available is a piece of information which allows updating the initial prediction. In this article, an example of updating process, based on a Bayesian network, is presented and applied on the corrosion risk of a cooling tower in a nuclear plant. (authors)

  1. Low energy cooling of the White Tower, functioning as a contemporary museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, A.M.; Avgelis, A.; Anastaselos, D. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-07-01

    Historical buildings are of significance not only because they preserve the cultural heritage of nations but also because of their representative character. However, as buildings they not necessarily provide satisfactory comfort and health conditions, despite the fact that they can be high-energy consumers. The Museum of Byzantine Culture in Thessaloniki has decided to convert the White Tower, a six-floor fortress dating back to the 15th century, into a contemporary city museum with means of audiovisual, virtual and information technologies. A study has been carried out in 2005-2006 to determine the possibilities, given the restrictions applying, to implement measures in order to establish and maintain satisfactory thermal comfort and indoor air quality conditions in the White Tower, whilst ensuring its unobstructed function as a contemporary city museum. The measurements and simulations carried out, together with the resulting suggested interventions are discussed in this paper. (author)

  2. Wastewater reuse in a cascade based system of a petrochemical industry for the replacement of losses in cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Everton; Rodrigues, Marco Antônio Siqueira; Aquim, Patrice Monteiro de

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the mapping of opportunities for the water reuse in a cascade based system in a petrochemical industry in southern Brazil. This industrial sector has a large demand for water for its operation. In the studied industry, for example, approximately 24 million cubic meters of water were collected directly from the source in 2014. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of the reuse of water in cascade in a petrochemical industry, focusing on the reuse of aqueous streams to replenish losses in the cooling towers. This is an industrial scale case study with real data collected during the years 2014 and 2015. Water reuse was performed using heuristic approach based on the exploitation of knowledge acquired during the search process. The methodology of work consisted of the construction of a process map identifying the stages of production and water consumption, as well as the characterization of the aqueous streams involved in the process. For the application of the industrial water reuse as cooling water, mass balances were carried out considering the maximum concentration levels of turbidity, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, calcium hardness, chlorides, sulfates, silica, chemical oxygen demand and suspended solids as parameters turbidity, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, calcium hardness, chlorides, sulfates, silica, chemical oxygen demand and suspended solids as parameters. The adopted guideline was the fulfillment of the water quality criteria for each application in the industrial process. The study showed the feasibility for the reuse of internal streams as makeup water in cooling towers, and the implementation of the reuse presented in this paper totaled savings of 385,440 m(3)/year of water, which means a sufficient volume to supply 6350 inhabitants for a period of one year, considering the average water consumption per capita in Brazil; in addition to 201,480 m(3)/year of wastewater that would no longer be generated

  3. Proposal for an alternative operative method for determination of polarisation resistance for the quantitative evaluation of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete cooling towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitzithra, M.E., E-mail: me.mitzithra@gmail.com [EDF R& D, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou Cedex (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, 135, Avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Deby, F.; Balayssac, J.P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, 135, Avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Salin, J. [EDF R& D, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou Cedex (France)

    2015-07-15

    This paper summarises the results obtained from numerical simulations of an operational measurement mode of polarisation resistance adapted for evaluating corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete on cooling towers. A simple operational measurement mode of R{sub p} is proposed, adapted for cooling towers prone to corrosion due to carbonation. By means of numerical experimentations, calculation diagrams and semi-empirical equations are built involving the different influencing parameters: concrete cover to steel reinforcement, concrete resistivity and current intensity injected from the counter electrode. Finally, a first application of the proposed procedure for calculating the real value of R{sub p} in laboratory conditions is presented.

  4. Comparison of wet and dry heat transfer and pressure drop tests of smooth and rough corrugated PVC packing in cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goshayeshi, H.R.; Missenden, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the performance of a cooling tower with PVC packing. The following were examined; the effect of surface roughness, the effect of the angle of roughness and the effect of packing spacing. The investigation was divided into two parts: comparison of film heat transfer with air pressure drop, without water circulation and comparison of enthalpy change and pressure drop in the model cooling tower, with circulation of water. Seven commercial packing were investigated, covering a size range of 1.1< P/D<1.70 and 1≤p/e≤5 and a discussion of the dimensionless correlation resulting is given

  5. An experimental investigation on air-side performances of finned tube heat exchangers for indirect air-cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Xueping

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A tremendous quantity of water can be saved if the air cooling system is used, comparing with the ordinary water-cooling technology. In this study, two kinds of finned tube heat exchangers in an indirect air-cooling tower are experimentally studied, which are a plain finned oval-tube heat exchanger and a wavy-finned flat-tube heat exchanger in a cross flow of air. Four different air inlet angles (90°, 60 °, 45°, and 30° are tested separately to obtain the heat transfer and resistance performance. Then the air-side experimental correlations of the Nusselt number and friction factor are acquired. The comprehensive heat transfer performances for two finned tube heat exchangers under four air inlet angles are compared. For the plain finned oval-tube heat exchanger, the vertical angle (90° has the worst performance while 45° and 30° has the best performance at small ReDc and at large ReDc, respectively. For the wavy-finned flat-tube heat exchanger, the worst performance occurred at 60°, while the best performance occurred at 45° and 90° at small ReDc and at large ReDc, respectively. From the comparative results, it can be found that the air inlet angle has completely different effects on the comprehensive heat transfer performance for the heat exchangers with different structures.

  6. Tridimensional statistic analysis of cooling tower plumes. Methods and results relating to power effect and disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabaton, M.; Viollet, P.L.; Darles, A.; Gland, H.

    1980-07-01

    The PANACH three dimensional calculation code developed from tests on a small scale model and validated from full scale measurement campaigns, was used to estimate a three dimensional statistic of plumes. As it is not possible with the calculation times to make a calculation for each radio sondage, a classification method was adopted. This method developed by the French National Meteorological Office is based on a double classification comprising basic classes in which the plumes are assumed to be dynamically similar and a sub-classification to take better account of the true moisture profiles. This statistical method was then applied to the case of 2 or 4 1300 MWe units fitted with natural draught cooling towers of the wet, dry or wet-dry types [fr

  7. Quasi One-Dimensional Model of Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the development of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer. The moist air flow is described by the system of conservation laws along with additional equations. Moist air is assumed to be homogeneous mixture of dry air and water vapour. Liquid phase in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations. Boundary value problem for the system of conservation laws is discretized in space using Kurganov-Tadmor central scheme and in time using strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. Initial value problems in the fill zone is solved by using standard fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme. The interaction between liquid water and moist air is done by source terms in governing equations.

  8. Treatment of auxiliary cooling tower water - influence on drainage canals and deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutsch, K.

    1977-01-01

    The increasingly performed turning to re-cooled power plants, as a result of the waste heat problem, in connection with the water protection, required that the technical world has to do something about the problems of preliminary stresses of the surface waters, and the cooling water quality, necessary for the operation of power plants. The thickening of the cooling water in the circulation, connected with the wet re-cooling, as a result of evaporation, requires treatment of the water, taken for cooling purposes under several quality points of view. The water treatment procedures, practical according to the latest state of todays technology, show different influences on the returned cooling water, and on the residues occuring during the treatment (in accordance with the substances separated from the receiving canal). Therefore, depending on location the individual influence factors shall be determined and valuated during the selection of the treatment procedure. Make-up water quantity, raw water quality, quality of the returned water from the receiving canal (cleaning effect for the flow). Composition and storage ability of the residues from the water treatment. (orig.) [de

  9. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance: Best Management Practice Case Study #10: Cooling Towers (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-02-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  10. Numerical simulation of heat transfer process in solar enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower with radiation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiuhuan; Zhu, Jialing; Lu, Xinli

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A 3-D numerical model integrated with a discrete ordinate (DO) solar radiation model (considering solar radiation effect in the room of solar collector) was developed to investigate the influence of solar radiation intensity and ambient pressure on the efficiency and thermal characteristics of the SENDDCT. Our study shows that introducing such a radiation model can more accurately simulate the heat transfer process in the SENDDCT. Calculation results indicate that previous simulations overestimated solar energy obtained by the solar collector and underestimated the heat loss. The cooling performance is improved when the solar radiation intensity or ambient pressure is high. Air temperature and velocity increase with the increase of solar radiation intensity. But ambient pressure has inverse effects on the changes of air temperature and velocity. Under a condition that the solar load increases but the ambient pressure decreases, the increased rate of heat transferred in the heat exchanger is not obvious. Thus the performance of the SENDDCT not only depends on the solar radiation intensity but also depends on the ambient pressure. - Highlights: • A radiation model has been introduced to accurately simulate heat transfer process. • Heat transfer rate would be overestimated if the radiation model was not introduced. • The heat transfer rate is approximately proportional to solar radiation intensity. • The higher the solar radiation or ambient pressure, the better SENDDCT performance. - Abstract: Solar enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower (SENDDCT) is more efficient than natural draft dry cooling tower by utilizing solar radiation in arid region. A three-dimensional numerical model considering solar radiation effect was developed to investigate the influence of solar radiation intensity and ambient pressure on the efficiency and thermal characteristics of SENDDCT. The numerical simulation outcomes reveal that a model with consideration of

  11. Horizontal cooling towers: riverine ecosystem services and the fate of thermoelectric heat in the contemporary Northeast US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Robert J; Wollheim, Wilfred M; Lammers, Richard B; Miara, Ariel; Vörösmarty, Charles J; Fekete, Balazs; Rosenzweig, Bernice

    2013-01-01

    The electricity sector is dependent on rivers to provide ecosystem services that help regulate excess heat, either through provision of water for evaporative cooling or by conveying, diluting and attenuating waste heat inputs. Reliance on these ecosystem services alters flow and temperature regimes, which impact fish habitat and other aquatic ecosystem services. We demonstrate the contemporary (2000–2010) dependence of the electricity sector on riverine ecosystem services and associated aquatic impacts in the Northeast US, a region with a high density of thermoelectric power plants. We quantify these dynamics using a spatially distributed hydrology and water temperature model (the framework for aquatic modeling in the Earth system), coupled with the thermoelectric power and thermal pollution model. We find that 28.4% of thermoelectric heat production is transferred to rivers, whereas 25.9% is directed to vertical cooling towers. Regionally, only 11.3% of heat transferred to rivers is dissipated to the atmosphere and the rest is delivered to coasts, in part due to the distribution of power plants within the river system. Impacts to the flow regime are minimal, while impacts to the thermal regime include increased river lengths of unsuitable habitats for fish with maximum thermal tolerances of 24.0, 29.0, and 34.0 ° C in segments downstream of plants by 0.6%, 9.8%, and 53.9%, respectively. Our analysis highlights the interactions among electricity production, cooling technologies, aquatic impacts, and ecosystem services, and can be used to assess the full costs and tradeoffs of electricity production at regional scales. (letter)

  12. Effect of cold inflow on chimney height of natural draft cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Chi-Ming; Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Kumaresan, Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Natural convection data were obtained from an air-cooled heat exchanger model. ► The extent of cold inflow was quantified to relate to the decrease in effective chimney height. ► Installation of wire mesh screen on chimney outlet blocked off cold inflow to improve the chimney efficiency. ► Evidence of existence of effective plume-chimney for when cold inflow was blocked off warrants further work. - Abstract: Temperature and pressure drop data obtained from an air-cooled heat exchanger model with cross-sectional flow areas of 0.56 m 2 , 1.00 m 2 and 2.25 m 2 operating under natural convection are presented that indicate significant cold inflow, resulting in the reduction of effective chimney height. Cold inflows encountered in actual applications where the Froude number is typically 0.2, may not be as severe as described in this paper, which was of the order of 10 −6 –10 −4 . Additional tests on smaller scale models appeared to favor the explanation that the occurrence of cold inflow in the air-cooled heat exchanger model was primarily due to the relative ease in either drawing cold air from inlet or from outlet, and to a lesser extent the Froude number of the chimney or the critical velocity estimated by formula. A CFD study will bring much understanding of the phenomenon for the different situations.

  13. First application of MOL {sup registered} CLEAN - process in a cooling tower of an oil refinery; Erstmalige Anwendung des MOL {sup registered} CLEAN - Verfahrens in einem Kuehlkreislauf einer Erdoelraffinerie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernhofer, R.; Karl, G.; Wentzlau, F. [BAYERNOIL Raffineriegesellschaft mbH, Ingolstadt (Germany); Koppe, J.; Lausch, H. [MOL Katalysatortechnik GmbH, Merseburg (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Biological loads of cooling cycles in oil refineries can cause efficiency losses. The key components of biological loads are bio layers. With the help of the MOL {sup registered} CLEAN process, these bio layers are sustainably eliminated. This technique was installed in a cooling tower battery of the BAYERNOIL Raffineriegesellschaft mbH in Neustadt on the Danube river in October 2004. After installation, all bio layers were eliminated from the sprinkled packages of cooling tower and from the heat exchangers surfaces without any unwelcome side effects. In this way, the performance of the cooling cycle was enhanced with positive consequences on the global refinery efficiency. (orig.)

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300

  15. Rapid quantification of viable Legionella in nuclear cooling tower waters using filter cultivation, fluorescent in situ hybridization and solid-phase cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudart, J; Guillaume, C; Mercier, A; Lebaron, P; Binet, M

    2015-05-01

    To develop a rapid and sensitive method to quantify viable Legionella spp. in cooling tower water samples. A rapid, culture-based method capable of quantifying as few as 600 Legionella microcolonies per litre within 2 days in industrial waters was developed. The method combines a short cultivation step of microcolonies on GVPC agar plate, specific detection of Legionella cells by a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) approach, and a sensitive enumeration using a solid-phase cytometer. Following optimization of the cultivation conditions, the qualitative and quantitative performance of the method was assessed and the method was applied to 262 nuclear power plant cooling water samples. The performance of this method was in accordance with the culture method (NF-T 90-431) for Legionella enumeration. The rapid detection of viable Legionella in water is a major concern to the effective monitoring of this pathogenic bacterium in the main water sources involved in the transmission of legionellosis infection (Legionnaires' disease). The new method proposed here appears to be a robust, efficient and innovative means for rapidly quantifying cultivable Legionella in cooling tower water samples within 48 h. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Sensitivity study of a method for updating a finite element model of a nuclear power station cooling tower; Recalage d`un modele de refrigerant atmospherique: etude de sensibilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, L.

    1994-12-31

    The Research and Development Division of Electricite de France is developing a surveillance method of cooling towers involving on-site wind-induced measurements. The method is supposed to detect structural damage in the tower. The damage is identified by tuning a finite element model of the tower on experimental mode shapes and eigenfrequencies. The sensitivity of the method was evaluated through numerical tests. First, the dynamic response of a damaged tower was simulated by varying the stiffness of some area of the model shell (from 1 % to 24 % of the total shell area). Second, the structural parameters of the undamaged cooling tower model were updated in order to make the output of the undamaged model as close as possible to the synthetic experimental data. The updating method, based on the minimization of the differences between experimental modal energies and modal energies calculated by the model, did not detect a stiffness change over less than 3 % of the shell area. Such a sensitivity is thought to be insufficient to detect tower cracks which behave like highly localized defaults. (author). 8 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Implementation of a micro-physical scheme for warm clouds in the meteorological model 'MERCURE': Application to cooling tower plumes and to orographic precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzereau, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    A two-moment semi-spectral warm micro-physical scheme has been implemented inside the meteorological model 'MERCURE'. A new formulation of the buoyancy flux () is proposed, which is coherent with the corrigendum of Mellor (1977) but differs from Bougeault (1981). The non-precipitating cloud microphysics is validated by comparing the numerical simulations of fifteen cases of cooling tower plumes with data from a measurement campaign in Bugey in 1980. Satisfactory results are obtained on the plumes shape, on the temperature and vertical velocity fields and on the droplets spectrums, although the liquid water contents tend to be overestimated. The precipitating cloud microphysics is tested by reproducing the academical cases of orographic precipitation of Chaumerliac et al. (1987) and Richard and Chaumerliac (1989). The simulations allow a check of the action of different micro-physical terms. (author) [fr

  18. A study of a desuperheater heat recovery system complete with a reversibly used water cooling tower (RUWCT) for hot water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kunxiong

    Recovering heat rejected from the condenser in a refrigeration system to generate service hot water for buildings is commonly seen in both tropics and subtropics. This study included a critical literature review on heat recovery from air-conditioning/refrigeration systems, with particular emphasis on the direct condenser heat recovery and its related mathematical simulation models. The review identified many applications of desuperheaters to small-scaled residential air-conditioning or heat pump units. The heat and mass transfer characteristics of a RUWCT have been studied in detail, which is based on the theory of direct contact heat and mass transfer between moist air and water. The thesis reports on the differences in the heat and mass transfer process that takes place in a RUWCT, a standard water cooling tower and a spray room. A corrective factor that accounts for the change of chilled water mass flow rate is incorporated into the theoretical analysis of a RUWCT. The algorithms developed from the theoretical analysis are capable of predicting the heat exchange capacity of a RUWCT at any operating conditions. This theoretical analysis is the first of its kind. Extensive field experimental work on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of a RUWCT has been carried out in a hotel building in Haikou, Hainan province of China, where the RUWCT is installed. Results from the experimental work indicate that the theoretical analysis can represent the heat and mass transfer characteristics in a RUWCT with an acceptable accuracy. A numerical analysis for a RUWCT is undertaken to determine both air and water states at intermediate horizontal sections along the tower height. Field experimental data confirm that the predicted air and water conditions at the tower inlet and outlet are of acceptable accuracy. A steady-state mathematical model is developed to simulate the operational performance of a water chiller plant complete with a desuperheater heat recovery system and

  19. Water tower

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1970-01-01

    The water tower, being built on the highest point of the site, 460.5 m above the sea level. The tank will hold 750 m3 of water, and the tower will be topped by a knob which can serve as a geological survey reference mark.

  20. Biocide runoff from building facades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollmann, Ulla E.; Fernandez Calviño, David; Brandt, Kristian Koefoed

    2017-01-01

    Biocides are common additives in building materials. In-can and film preservatives in polymer-resin render and paint, as well as wood preservatives are used to protect facade materials from microbial spoilage. Biocides leach from the facade material with driving rain, leading to highly polluted r...

  1. Virtueller Tower

    OpenAIRE

    Fürstenau, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Es wird ein Überblick über den Stand der Forschung und Entwicklung zum Remote Tower Experimentalsystem gegeben, des im Rahmen des DLR-Projekts RapTOr am Forschungsflughafen Braunschweig aufgebaut wird.

  2. Biocide patch tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Veien, Niels

    1985-01-01

    Routine patch testing with a series of 6 industrial biocides containing methylene-bis-thiocyanate (Cytox 3522), benzisothiazolin-3-one (BIT), chlorocresol (Preventol CMK), 2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (Kathon 893), polyhydroxymethylene monobenzylether (Preventol D2) or 1,3,5-tris (hydroxy......-ethyl) hexahydrotriazine (Grotan BK) was carried out in 6 Danish out-patient clinics to evaluate guinea pig allergy test results with the same compounds. A total of 1652 consecutive patients with dermatitis were tested. The usefulness of this patch test battery was limited. There were a few positive reactions to Cytox...... of male patients and atopics, but significant differences in the frequencies of occupational cases, hand eczemas, and leg ulcers/stasis dermatitis, indicating possible variations in referral patterns, use of patch tests, and/or environmental factors....

  3. The biocides market for nano actives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Brinch, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Information is emerging on which nanomaterials might be used in biocides, but new test methods are needed.......Information is emerging on which nanomaterials might be used in biocides, but new test methods are needed....

  4. Assessment of the effect of water source of health risk in a pilot project to promote the reuse of reclaimed water in cooling towers; Valoracion del efecto del origen del agua en el riesgo sanitario en una experiencia piloto para promover la reutilizacion de agua regenerada en torres de refrigeracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittipaldi, M.; Codony, F.; Puigdengoles, J. M.; Molist; Morato, J.

    2009-07-01

    Wastewater regeneration and reuse of regenerated water permits to increase the amount of water and guarantees the availability required, in terms of both quantity and quality. In this context, a research project on regenerated water reuse for cooling towers has been carried out by the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), the Water Catalan Agency (ACA) and the Council of Chambers of Commerce. The research consisted of two steps. A first objective was to verify the effect of water source in the colonization of cooling towers by Legionella. In order to achieve those objectives, effluents from different wastewater treatment plant stages were used. The second objective was to evaluate in situ the disinfection process in order to decrease the sanitary risk from water reuse for cooling towers. For the entire duration of the project, both conventional culture methods and new molecular techniques with real times PCR were performed to detect Legionella from water samples. (Author) 17 refs.

  5. Virtual Tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayne, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The primary responsibility of an intrusion detection system (IDS) operator is to monitor the system, assess alarms, and summon and coordinate the response team when a threat is acknowledged. The tools currently provided to the operator are somewhat limited: monitors must be switched, keystrokes must be entered to call up intrusion sensor data, and communication with the response force must be maintained. The Virtual tower is an operator interface assembled from low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and software; it enables large amounts of data to be displayed in a virtual manner that provides instant recognition for the operator and increases assessment accuracy in alarm annunciator and control systems. This is accomplished by correlating and fusing the data into a 360-degree visual representation that employs color, auxiliary attributes, video, and directional audio to prompt the operator. The Virtual Tower would be a valuable low-cost enhancement to existing systems

  6. Cooling water systems design using process integration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooling water systems are generally designed with a set of heat exchangers arranged in parallel. This arrangement results in higher cooling water flowrate and low cooling water return temperature thus reducing cooling tower efficiency. Previous...

  7. Biocide Usage in Plastic Products

    OpenAIRE

    Kavak, Nergizhan; Çakır, Ayşegül; Koltuk, Fatmagül; Uzun, Utku

    2015-01-01

    People’s demand of improving their life quality caused to the term of hygiene become popular and increased the tendency to use more reliable and healthy products. This tendency makes the continuous developments in the properties of the materials used in manufactured goods compulsory. It is possible to create anti-bacterial plastic products by adding biocidal additives to plastic materials which have a wide-range of application in the areas such as health (medicine), food and many other indust...

  8. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few μg/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 μg/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables

  9. TetrakisHydroxymethylPhosphonium Sulfate (THPS), a new industrial biocide with low environmental toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downward, B.L.; Talbot, R.E.; Haack, T.K.

    1997-01-01

    THPS is a new biocide active designed for use in a variety of environmentally sensitive applications such as industrial cooling systems and oilfield situations. EPA registration has recently been achieved thus permitting, for the first time, the use of THPS based biocides in the US. This paper reviews the chemistry of THPS and reports a variety of case histories where THPS has successfully been used for the control of bacteria, algae and fungi in industrial cooling systems in Western Europe. An extensive data package, including field applications and laboratory studies, is available for THPS providing many exciting opportunities for this product in the US. Case studies are presented for a cooling system in a fuel reprocessing plant, a process water system for a textile plant, and cooling systems for a chemical plant and a confectionary site

  10. Risks of Using Antifouling Biocides in Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Meseguer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biocides are chemical substances that can deter or kill the microorganisms responsible for biofouling. The rapid expansion of the aquaculture industry is having a significant impact on the marine ecosystems. As the industry expands, it requires the use of more drugs, disinfectants and antifoulant compounds (biocides to eliminate the microorganisms in the aquaculture facilities. The use of biocides in the aquatic environment, however, has proved to be harmful as it has toxic effects on the marine environment. Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to the organotin compounds found in antifouling products after restrictions were imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT. The replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. The biocides that are most commonly used in antifouling paints include chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, DCOIT (4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, Sea-nine 211®, Diuron, Irgarol 1051, TCMS pyridine (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl pyridine, zinc pyrithione and Zineb. There are two types of risks associated with the use of biocides in aquaculture: (i predators and humans may ingest the fish and shellfish that have accumulated in these contaminants and (ii the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. This paper provides an overview of the effects of antifouling (AF biocides on aquatic organisms. It also provides some insights into the effects and risks of these compounds on non-target organisms.

  11. Modelling biocide release based on coating properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erich, S.J.F.; Baukh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of micro-organisms on coated substrates is a common problem, since it reduces the performance of materials, in terms of durability as well as aesthetics. In order to prevent microbial growth biocides are frequently added to coatings. Unfortunately, early release of these biocides reduces the

  12. Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang Sun; Worley, S. Dave

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial textiles can be categorized into two groups, biocidal and biostatic materials, according to their functions. Biostatic functions refer to inhibiting growth of microorganisms on textiles and preventing the materials from biodegradation and biocidal materials are able to kill microorganisms, thus eliminating their growth, sterilizing…

  13. Photodegradation of three stormwater biocides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minelgaite, Greta; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Pedersen, Morten Lauge

    2017-01-01

    Photodegradation of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions under UV light and under natural sunlight. Demineralized water and two different waters from stormwater retention ponds were used. An observed decline in biocide concentration was related...... to the accumulated light energy during the degradation time. Diuron and terbutryn were degradable under UV light following 1st order degradation kinetics, while no significant decrease of carbendazim was observed throughout the duration of experiments. Photodegradation of diuron and terbutryn was slightly faster...... indicates that photodegradation is not a major process contributing to the removal of carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn in stormwater retention ponds....

  14. Desinfection of cooling towers and cooling water by UV-treatment on the example of a chemical company; Desinfektion von Kuehltuermen und Kuehlkreislaeufen durch UV-Behandlung am Beispiel eines Chemiebetriebs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuters, J.; Carbone, J. [Sadepan Chimica NV (Belgium); Daele, D. van (DVD Technology); Dams, S.; Weckenmann, J.; Soerensen, M. [a.c.k. aqua concept GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Using a Belgian adhesives manufacturer as example, it is shown how formation and growth of micro-organisms can adversely affect a modern manufacturing process. The problem lies not with the actual process solution, but in the cooling section. Installation of a suitably-configured UV reactor allowed long-term operation without any problems from micro-organisms. The outcome was a much more stable process at acceptable cost and with significantly lower volumes of solid waste. (orig.)

  15. Grohnde. Documentation of the police operation during the demonstration against the NPP Grohnde on 19.03.1977 and the evacuation of the occupied cooling tower site on 23.08.1977; Grohnde. Dokumentation der Polizeieinsaetze anlaesslich der Demonstration gegen das Kernkraftwerk Grohnde am 19.03.1977 und der Raeumung des besetzten Kuehlturmgelaendes am 23.08.1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stricker, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The documentation of the police operation during the demonstration against the NPP Grohnde on 16.03.1977 and the evacuation of the occupied cooling tower site on 23.08.1977 covers the following issues: involved action forces: police Niedersachsen, police Nordrhein-Westfalen, police Schleswig-Holstein, police Bremen and the Bundesgrenzschutz; concept of the police operation, provisions (lodging and board) for the police, operating resources, details of the operation sequence; post-processing of the operation; the Grohnde trials.

  16. Reuso de efluentes em torres de resfriamento - estudo conceitual: Aeroporto Internacional do Rio de Janeiro = Water reuse for cooling towers – conceptual study: Rio de Janeiro International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denize Dias de Carvalho

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available O reuso de água é ferramenta valiosa na gestão da água, que promove a otimização da utilização do recurso desta, que reduz e, muitas vezes, até elimina os impactos no meio ambiente. Neste trabalho foi investigada a composição do efluente secundário da estação de tratamento de efluentes (ETE APOIO do Aeroporto Internacional do Rio de Janeiro, com o objetivo de propor o processo adequado à reutilização deste efluente como água de reposição nas torres de resfriamento desse Aeroporto. Com base nas análises de cátions, ânions, DBO e DQO, verificou-se o parâmetro SDT - Cl- como crítico para processamento do efluente. Foi proposta uma sequência para reutilização do efluente que continha o tratamento de osmose inversa, o custo do m3 produzido por essa sequência foi estimado em R$ 2,90 m-3. Water reuse is an important tool in water management; it is a conceptthat promotes optimization of the water resource, reducing and often even eliminating environmental impacts. In this work, the composition of a secondary effluent (from the effluent treatment station (ETE APOIO at Rio de Janeiro International Airport was analyzed, with theaim of determining an adequate process for the reutilization of this effluent as replacement cooling water. Chemical analyses such as cation and anion analysis, BOD and COD were performed. Based on these analyses, it was found that TDS - Cl- was the critical parameter foreffluent processing. A treatment system was proposed for effluent reuse including reverse osmosis; the cost estimate per m3 produced by this system was R$ 2.90 m-3.

  17. Cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress on the thermal effects project is reported with regard to physiology and distribution of Corbicula; power plant effects studies on burrowing mayfly populations; comparative thermal responses of largemouth bass from northern and southern populations; temperature selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir; fish population studies; and predictive thermoregulation by fishes. Progress is also reported on the following; cause and ecological ramifications of threadfin shad impingement; entrainment project; aquaculture project; pathogenic amoeba project; and cooling tower drift project

  18. Silver Biocide Analysis & Control Device, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rapid, accurate measurement and process control of silver ion biocide concentrations in future space missions is needed. The purpose of the Phase I program is to...

  19. Silver Biocide Analysis & Control Device, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rapid, accurate measurement and process control of silver ion biocide concentrations in future space missions is needed. The purpose of the Phase II program is to...

  20. Biofilm Surface Density Determines Biocide Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High resistance of biofilms for chemical challenges is a serious industrial and medical problem. In this work a gradient of surface covered with biofilm has been produced and correlated to the effectiveness of different commercially available oxidative biocides. The results for thin Escherichia coli biofilms grown in rich media supplemented with glucose or lactose on glass or poly methyl methacrylate surfaces indicate that the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds is inversely proportional to the fraction of the surface covered with the biofilm. In areas where biofilm covered more than 90% of the available surface the biocide treatment was inefficient after 60 min of incubation. The combined effect of oxidant and surfactant increased the effectiveness of the biocide. On the other hand, the increased biofilm viscoelasticity reduced biocide effectiveness. The results emphasize differential biocide effectiveness depending on the fraction of the attached bacterial cells. The results suggest that biofilm biocide resistance is an acquired property that increases with biofilm maturation. The more dense sessile structures present lower log reductions compared to less dense ones.

  1. Development of bacterial resistance to biocides and antimicrobial agents as a consequence of biocide usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seier-Petersen, Maria Amalie

    to antimicrobial agents. So far, only few studies have investigated the susceptibility of livestock-associated isolates to biocides used in their environment. Pigs are increasingly recognised as a potential reservoir of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), especially clones...... of pathogenic bacteria more difficult. Furthermore, it has been suggested that use of biocides may contribute to the development of resistance in bacteria to antimicrobial agents used in human and animal therapy. So far, it is evident that cross- and co-resistance mechanisms to antimicrobials agents...... and biocides exist. However, much less is known about the potential effect of biocides on development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria by promoting the horizontal transfer of resistance genes or by inducing the mutation rate. Even though biocides are commonly used at working concentrations way above...

  2. Study on management policy of Biocides in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Kyu; Cho, Young Hee [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In the advanced countries, there are active studies on biocide, implying non-agricultural pesticides, at present with increasing interests on this. Among the advanced countries, Canada, Australia and New Zealand are managing biocides the most systematically and have very clear regulations and roles of relevant departments. In addition to efforts of each country, the international organizations are emphasizing the need of biocides management. EU already announced Biocidal Products Directive(BPD) in 1998 and is urging to implement regulations within a guidebook in member countries from 2000. Furthermore, OECD is well aware of biocides management trend of each member country and is planning to set up a specific management guide based on this. In this study, it recommends a biocides management policy in Korea with regulations, relevant departments, and regulation contents of biocides implemented in the advanced countries and regulation trend of biocides in Korea. 47 refs., 27 tabs.

  3. Measurements of cooling tower plumes. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortak, H.

    1976-05-01

    This publication containing mainly data presents selected measuring results from aeroplane campaigns in the form of primary data and data already processed. With the aid of this material it is already possible to carry out the verification and calibration of the simulation programme. Part 4 contains all the measurement flights and part of the data thus gained. A documentation covering all data was not possible on account of the mass of data acquired. However, those interested can be supplied with the data in the form of magnetic tapes with the corresponding computer software. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Experimental study of swirl flow patterns in Gas Conditioning Tower at various entry conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinov, Andrei A.; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    1999-01-01

    In a gas conditioning tower hot flue gas with relatively high dust loads is cooled by injecting water spray near the top. For satisfactory operation wet particles should be kept off walls and all water should have evaporated to yield a uniformly cooled flow before it reaches the bottom of the tower...

  5. Effect of biocides on biofilms of some multidrug resistant clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella aerogenes to form biofilms was most affected. There was little inhibition of biofilm formation by the biocides on Staphylococcus aureus. This study has shown a relationship between biocide and multidrug resistance. Keywords: Biocides, Multi drug resistance, sodium hypochlorite, ...

  6. Confusion at the Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Loretta F.

    2014-01-01

    This study will explore the omission of the Tower of Babel narrative from middle and secondary school world history, world studies, and world geography textbooks and will consider what might be learned from inclusion of the story in the curriculum. A total of 17 textbooks are analyzed. The Tower of Babel narrative is examined within the context of…

  7. Wind tower service lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  8. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11.

  9. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11

  10. Cooling methods for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspersic, B.; Fabjan, L.; Petelin, S.

    1977-01-01

    There are some results of measurements carried out on the wet cooling tower 275 MWe at TE Sostanj and on the experimental cooling tower at Jozef Stefan Institute, as well. They are including: the measurements of the output air conditions, the measurements of the cross current of water film and vapour-air flowing through two plates, and the distribution of velocity in boundary layer measured by anemometer

  11. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  12. Ejection Tower Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ejection Tower Facility's mission is to test and evaluate new ejection seat technology being researched and developed for future defense forces. The captive and...

  13. Biocides for the Battlefield - Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    additives in coatings was conducted using Hydrothane™ polyurethane resin, selected for its hydrophilicity and lack of pigments , fillers, and any other...such as the food industry . A specific example includes a clever introduction of essential oil extracts of oregano to an alginate-based film applied to...their anti- microbial activity in solution using a standard technique, which reports biocidal activity as MIC. The functional phenols were also

  14. Biocidal packaging for pharmaceuticals, foods, and other perishables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Alyssa M; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    Many consumer goods must be protected from bacterial and fungal colonization to ensure their integrity and safety. By making these items' packaging biocidal, the interior environment can be preserved from microbial spoilage without altering the products themselves. Herein we briefly review this concept, referred to as active packaging, and discuss existing methods for constructing active packaging systems. They are based on either packaging materials that release biocides or those that are themselves intrinsically biocidal (or biostatic), with numerous variations within each category.

  15. Environmental compatible cooling water treatment chemicals; Umweltvertraegliche Chemikalien in der Kuehlwasserkonditionierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartiser, S.; Urich, E.

    2002-02-01

    In Germany about 32 billion m{sup 3}/a cooling water are discharged from industrial plants and power industry. These are conditioned partly with biocides, scaling and corrosion inhibitors. Within the research project the significance of cooling water chemicals was evaluated, identifying the chemicals from product information, calculating their loads from consumption data of more than 180 cooling plants and investigating the basic data needed for an environmental hazard assessment. Additionally the effects of cooling water samples and products were determined in biological test systems. Batch tests were performed under defined conditions in order to measure the inactivation of cooling water biocides. (orig.)

  16. Reduction of Langelier index of cooling water by electrolytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LSI) of the cooling water from a cooling tower of a textile industry was investigated. Sacrificial anodes were employed which prevent obnoxious chlorine generation. A series of batch experiments using stainless steel electrodes were conducted ...

  17. Talking Towers, Making Withs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J. L.

    The notion of a linguistic "register" is useful in posing questions about how the ways language is used differ from one kind of human activity to another. This paper analyzes a videotaped segment of male grade 4/5 students (n=3) who are talking as they work to build a tower from plastic drinking straws and pins. Discussion of the…

  18. Cell Towers and Songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Michelle; Mesa, Jennifer; Milton, Katie

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how our common addiction to cell phones was used to launch a discussion about their use, impacts on the environment, and connections to issues of civic concern. By encouraging middle school science students to adopt the perspectives of special-interest groups debating communication tower restrictions designed to protect…

  19. TacTower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegaard; Jürgensen, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Learning from the multiplayer interaction in sports, we describe our project TacTower; a flexible system for professional elite handball players to train game perception and kinesthetic em- pathy. The design is founded in ideas of Collective Interaction and qualities that is inherent in sport...... and is based on consid- erations about paralanguage, kinesthetic emphatic interaction, physical positioning of players and collaborative interaction....

  20. Role and Importance of Safety Data Sheet for Biocidal Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Ötegen, Volkan Recai; Akbaba, Muhsin; Nazlıcan, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    Safety Data Sheet is legally required component for professional biocidal workers that enables exposure measures and hazard communication for the protection of the environment and human health. Reporting of biocidal exposure will also be beneficial for both short and long-term understanding of its effects.

  1. Progress in human exposure assessment for biocidal products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van

    2004-01-01

    An important shortcoming in our present knowledge required for risk assessment of biocidal products is the assessment of human exposure. This knowledge gap has been filled in a preliminary fashion with the TNsG on human exposure to biocidal products (available from the ECB website). Explicit User

  2. Good Towers of Function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassa, Alp; Beelen, Peter; Nguyen, Nhut

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we will give an overview of known and new techniques on how one can obtain explicit equations for candidates of good towers of function fields. The techniques are founded in modular theory (both the classical modular theory and the Drinfeld modular theory). In the classical modular...... setup, optimal towers can be obtained, while in the Drinfeld modular setup, good towers over any non-prime field may be found. We illustrate the theory with several examples, thus explaining some known towers as well as giving new examples of good explicitly defined towers of function fields....

  3. Assessment of requirements for dry towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D E; Sonnichsen, J C

    1976-09-01

    The regional limitations of surface water supplies in the U.S. were assessed with respect to the consumptive use requirements of wet cooling towers. The study simulated unit consumptive use factors by region, assessed regional water supplies, and examined electric load projections through 2000 A.D. to ascertain where and when water limitations may occur and, therefore, where dry cooling may be required. It was concluded that the cooling water supply situation in the United States through the year 2000 is adequate in most areas, but is uncertain over much of the Southwest. The uncertainty is related to increasing competition for the available supplies and to potential Federal and/or State policy decisions that may have a significant effect on power plant cooling. Limitations on coastal siting, seismic zone constraints, and state constraints on the purchase and transfer of water rights from other uses to cooling supply have the potential of bringing wet/dry or dry cooling into relatively common use in the 1990's. (LCL)

  4. TacTowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Martin; Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    The interactive training equipment, TacTower, is aimed at supporting multiple elite athletes, such as handball players in training their micro-tactical skills in close-contact situations. It focuses on psychomotor abilities and trains the skills involved in reading the opponents’ actions and anti...... for the elite athletic community, as this domain holds interesting challenges while also inspiring relevant, new forms of interaction design for other domains....

  5. Development and evaluation of a biocide release system for prolonged antifungal activity in finishing materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eversdijk, J.; Erich, S.J.F.; Hermanns, S.P.M.; Adan, O.C.G.; Bolle, M. de; Meyer, K. de; Bylemans, D.; Bekker, M.; Cate, A.T. ten

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of modified nano-clay particles as a controlled release system for biocides from building materials. Different (model) biocides were incorporated in a biocide/nano-clay composite and subsequently the release of the biocides was monitored under different environmental

  6. Biocide Selective TolC-Independent Efflux Pumps in Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipski, Carmine J; Zhanel, George G; Bay, Denice C

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to biocides used as antiseptics, dyes, and disinfectants is a growing concern in food preparation, agricultural, consumer manufacturing, and health care industries, particularly among Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae, some of the most common community and healthcare-acquired bacterial pathogens. Biocide resistance is frequently associated with antimicrobial cross-resistance leading to reduced activity and efficacy of both antimicrobials and antiseptics. Multidrug resistant efflux pumps represent an important biocide resistance mechanism in Enterobacteriaceae. An assortment of structurally diverse efflux pumps frequently co-exist in these species and confer both unique and overlapping biocide and antimicrobial selectivity. TolC-dependent multicomponent systems that span both the plasma and outer membranes have been shown to confer clinically significant resistance to most antimicrobials including many biocides, however, a growing number of single component TolC-independent multidrug resistant efflux pumps are specifically associated with biocide resistance: small multidrug resistance (SMR), major facilitator superfamily (MFS), multidrug and toxin extruder (MATE), cation diffusion facilitator (CDF), and proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) families. These efflux systems are a growing concern as they are rapidly spread between members of Enterobacteriaceae on conjugative plasmids and mobile genetic elements, emphasizing their importance to antimicrobial resistance. In this review, we will summarize the known biocide substrates of these efflux pumps, compare their structural relatedness, Enterobacteriaceae distribution, and significance. Knowledge gaps will be highlighted in an effort to unravel the role that these apparent "lone wolves" of the efflux-mediated resistome may offer.

  7. Biocides from facade coatings in urban surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Styszko, Katarzyna; Ou, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Leaching of biocides from façade coatings attracts more and more attention within recent years. In-can as well as film preserving biocides are added to polymer resin based renders and paints in order protect from microbial spoilage. However, several studies revealed that biocides leach from......-water partitioning constant in comparison to render-water distribution constants. This was done based on the hypothesis that the render-water distribution constant can be described as the sum of the partitioning to polyacrylate, carbonates, sand particles and other render ingredients....

  8. Evolution in the Lab: Biocide Resistance in E.coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welden, Charles W.; Hossler, Rex A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment on resistance to teach about evolution and issues of misuse of antimicrobial compounds. Investigates Escherichia coli's response to treatment of triclosan, a biocide used in consumer products. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  9. Partitioning of biocides between water and inorganic phases of render

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanczyk, Michal; Bollmann, Ulla E.; Bester, Kai

    , the partitioning of biocides between water and inorganic phases of render was studied. In this study the partitioning constants of benzoisothiazolinone, carbendazim, dichlorooctylisothiazolinone, diuron, iodocarb, isoproturon, irgarol, mecoprop, methylisothiazolinone, octylisothiazolinone, terbutryn...

  10. FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

  11. Electrical enhancement of biocide efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    OpenAIRE

    Blenkinsopp, S A; Khoury, A E; Costerton, J W

    1992-01-01

    When applied within a low-strength electric field (+/- 12 V/cm) with a low current density (+/- 2.1 mA/cm2), several industrial biocides exhibited enhanced killing action against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on stainless steel studs. Biocide concentrations lower than those necessary to kill planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa (1, 5, and 10 ppm of the active ingredients of kathon, glutaraldehyde, and quaternary ammonium compound, respectively) were bactericidal within 24 h when applied ...

  12. Methods for combating microorganisms in cooling water systems - a literature study and a market inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, D.

    1989-01-01

    One of the greatest current problems in both closed and open cooling water systems is that of micro- and macro-organisms. In view of the environmental effects associated with the discharge of chemicals, the range of biocides and alternative methods for combating micro-organisms has increased during recent years. This report presents a brief description of the organisms which contribute to corrosion problems and the mechanisms associated with microbial corrosion. Thereafter descriptions are given of 15 different biocides which are used in both open and closed cooling systems. In each case, details are given of their chemical compositions and mode of action and of their effects on metals and on the environment. Finally, alternative methods of combating micro-organisms in cooling water systems are briefly described. The report also includes a survey of the biocides for cooling water systems which are available on the Swedish market. (author)

  13. Biofouling control using microparticles carrying a biocide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C; Rosmaninho, R; Simoes, M; Pereira, M C; Bastos, M M S M; Nunes, O C; Coelho, M; Melo, L F

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a new technological approach to minimize the use of antimicrobial (AMB) agents and their deleterious effects, based on the principle of drug-delivery systems whereby the AMB chemicals are transported on microparticles. The efficacy of microparticles carrying the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), benzyldimethyldodecyl ammonium chloride (BDMDAC), was assessed against Pseudomonas fluorescens in both the planktonic and the biofilm state. The microparticles were prepared using a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique. Oppositely charged molecules of polyethyleneimine (PEI), sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), and BDMDAC were assembled on polystyrene (PS) cores. BDMDAC-coated particles were observed by CryoSEM and their composition analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. Zeta potential measurements indicated that changes in surface charge were compatible with a BDMDAC/particle interaction. This biocidal carrier structure had significant stability, verified by the release of only 15% of the BDMDAC when immersed in water for 18 months. Biocidal carrier activity was evaluated by determining the survival ratio of P. fluorescens planktonic and biofilm cells after different exposure periods to BDMDAC-coated particles. Tests with biofilm cells were also performed with the free QAC. An efficient AMB effect (minimum bactericidal concentration) against suspended cells was found for a concentration of 9.2 mg l(-1) of BDMDAC on coated particles after incubation for 30 min and 6.5 mg l(-1) of BDMDAC on coated particles after 60 min. Exposure of biofilms to PS-PEI/PSS/BDMDAC (0.87 mg l(-1)) resulted in a decrease in viability of 60.5% and 66.5% of the total biofilm population for 30 and 60 min exposure times, respectively. Exposure for 60 min to 6.33 mg l(-1) and 11.75 mg l(-1) of BDMDAC in PS-PEI/PSS/BDMDAC particles promoted inactivation of 80.6% and 87.2% of the total population, respectively. The AMB effects obtained with the application of free BDMDAC were

  14. Predicted concentrations of biocides from antifouling paints in Visakhapatnam Harbour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A; Rao, K V Mohan; Ramesh, U S

    2009-02-01

    The concentrations of biocides leached from antifouling coatings are monitored in most of the developed countries. However, in India and many other developing countries, there is very little data available on the concentrations of biocides in ports and harbours. The first step was to obtain the order of magnitude levels of concentrations of biocides in the marine environment of the Visakhapatnam Harbour, and the MAM-PEC (Marine Antifoulant Model to Predict Environmental Concentrations) model was used to predict these values. The Visakhapatnam Port lies on the eastern coast of India, roughly halfway between Chennai and Kolkata, and is the largest port in India. This port is a natural harbour; the long and narrow outlet to the open sea makes it a 'poorly flushed' harbour. Predicted concentrations of tributyltin (TBT), copper, dichlofluanid, seanine, irgarol, diuron, tolylfluanid, and zinc pyrithione were computed. The results of the computations indicate that the levels of these biocides are comparable to those in many western countries. This gives credence to the fact that persistence of TBT and some other biocides is a global problem that cannot be ignored.

  15. FROM THE PACKED TOWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valderi D. Leite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available About 245 thousand tones of municipal solid w aste are collected daily in Brazil. Nearly 32 thousand tones of the collected amount are treated in sanitary landfill, which generates biogas and leachate as byproduct. The leachate resulting from sanitary landfill contains high concentration of carbonaceous and nitrogenized material. The crucial question is that the biodegradation of the carbonaceous material is difficult as long as the nitrogenized material is presen t in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen (NH 4 + , which compromises performance of biological tr eatment process. Therefore, a physical and chemical treatment of the leachate should be done before its biological treatment, especially for reduction of ammoniacal nitr ogen concentration and for propitiating the realization of application of biological treatment. The treatment of leachate requires specific consideration, which is not needed fo r other types of waste. In the specific case in this study, where ammoniacal nitrogen concentration was about 2,200 mgN L -1 and the BOD 5 /COD ratio was 0.3, the study of ammonia stripping process was performed. Ammonia stripping process was studied in pack ed towers of 35 L capacity each and the parameters investigated were pH, ratio of contact area/leach volume and the aeration time. One of the parameters that influenced most in efficiency of ammonia stripping process was pH of the leachate since it contributes in conversion of ammoniacal nitrogen from NH 4 + to NH 3 .

  16. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  17. The Millennium Tower in Magdeburg

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Grabert; Svetlana Seredenkina

    2004-01-01

    The Millenium Tower in Magdeburg, Germany, was built in 1999. It is possibly the biggest wooden tower of the world. The dissymetric «slanting» tower is 60 meters high, the foundation is 70 meters by 50 meters, and the size is 61000 cubic meters. The panelling is made of glass fabric. On the whole 5500 cubic meters of timber was used. On its 8030 square meters the tower houses a big exhibition about the history of mankind and scientific development.

  18. The Millennium Tower in Magdeburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Grabert

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The Millenium Tower in Magdeburg, Germany, was built in 1999. It is possibly the biggest wooden tower of the world. The dissymetric «slanting» tower is 60 meters high, the foundation is 70 meters by 50 meters, and the size is 61000 cubic meters. The panelling is made of glass fabric. On the whole 5500 cubic meters of timber was used. On its 8030 square meters the tower houses a big exhibition about the history of mankind and scientific development.

  19. Allegheny County Cell Tower Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays cell tower locations as points in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on outbuilding codes in the Property Assessment Parcel Database used...

  20. The Design of Akhmat Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Sara; Stochetti, Alejandro; Cerone, Marc

    2018-03-01

    Akhmat Tower is a 435m supertall building designed by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture. It is currently under construction in the city of Grozny, in the Chechen Republic, in the North Caucasus region of Russia. The design of the tower was done during a collaborative process by a multi-disciplinary architectural and engineering team, based primarily in the United States and Russia. During this process, the designers considered many factors including, most primarily, the cultural and historical context, the structural requirements given the high seismicity of the region, and the client's programmatic needs. The resulting crystalline-shaped tower is both an aesthetic statement and a performative architectural solution which will be a new landmark for Chechnya. "The Design of Akhmat Tower" describes in detail the design process including structural considerations, exterior wall design, building program, interior design, the tuned mass damper, and the use of building information modeling.

  1. The Physics of Shot Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscombe, Trevor C.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    In the late 18th and throughout the 19th century, lead shot for muskets was prepared by use of a shot tower. Molten lead was poured from the top of a tower and, during its fall, the drops became spherical under the action of surface tension. In this article, we ask and answer the question: "How does the size of the lead shot depend on the height…

  2. Biocide by-products in aquatic environments. Annual report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.R.; Bean, R.M.; Gibson, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    The Biocide By-Products in Aquatic Environments Program is composed of analytical chemistry and biological phases with freshwater and marine biological subdivisions. The objectives of the analytical studies are: to identify those chloroorganic chemical compounds that result from the addition of chlorine to fresh or saltwater; to develop methods for detecting chlorinated organics in the effluents discharged to receiving water bodies from nuclear stations; and to verify laboratory findings through analysis for chlorination by-products in water and biota samples from cooling water bodies of nuclear power stations. The objectives of the biological studies are: to investigate the immediate toxicity of specific chlorination by-products (chloroform in freshwater and bromoform in marine waters); to evaluate the chronic toxicity of chlorination by-products; to follow their pathways of action; and to analyze for bioaccumulation or biomagnification of halogenated hydrocarbons on selected aquatic or marine biota

  3. Chapter 14: Evaluating the Leaching of Biocides from Preservative-Treated Wood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Leaching of biocides is an important consideration in the long term durability and any potential for environmental impact of treated wood products. This chapter discusses factors affecting biocide leaching, as well as methods of evaluating rate and quantity of biocide released. The extent of leaching is a function of preservative formulation, treatment methods, wood...

  4. Tower Temperature and Humidity Sensors (TWR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, DR

    2010-02-01

    Three tall towers are installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility: a 60-meter triangular tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF), a 21-meter walkup scaffolding tower at the SGP Okmulgee forest site (E21), and a 40-meter triangular tower at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. The towers are used for meteorological, radiological, and other measurements.

  5. Assessment on urban soil pollution by biocides from building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollmann, Ulla E.; Vollertsen, Jes; Bester, Kai

    2015-01-01

    . Based on a monitoring study of stormwater runoff from a residential catchment as well as direct façade runoff analysis, the present study was assessing the pollution of urban soil to biocides from building material. The stormwater runoff of a residential catchment in Silkeborg (Denmark) was monitored...... from a freshly painted or rendered house, it is obvious that a huge part is actually draining directly to the soil and not to the sewer system. Consequently, the soil in urban areas is exposed to stormwater highly polluted by biocides which might affect the microbial community there....

  6. Development of solar tower observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  7. Integration of Small Solar Tower Systems Into Distributed Power Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Marcos, M. J.; Tellez, F. M.; Blanco, M.; Fernandez, V.; Baonza, F.; Berger, S.

    1999-01-01

    One of the short-term priorities for renewable energies in Europe is their integration for local power supply into communities and energy islands (blocks of buildings, new neighborhoods in residential areas, shopping centers, hospitals, recreational areas, eco-parks, small rural areas or isolated ones such as islands or mountain communities). Following this strategy, the integration of small tower fields into so-called MIUS (Modular Integrated Utility Systems) is proposed. This application strongly influences field concepts leading to modular multi-tower systems able to more closely track demand, meet reliability requirements with fewer megawatts of installed power and spread construction costs over time after output has begun. In addition, integration into single-cycle high-efficiency gas turbines plus waste-heat applications clearly increments the solar share. The chief questions are whether solar towers can be redesigned for such distributed markets and the keys to their feasibility. This paper includes the design and performance analysis of a 1.36-MW plant and integration in the MIUS system, as well as the expected cost of electricity and a sensitivity analysis of the small tower plant's performance with design parameters like heliostats configuration and tower height. A practical application is analyzed for a shopping center with 85% power demand during day-time by using a hybrid solar tower and a gas turbine producing electricity and waste heat for hot water and heating and cooling of spaces. The operation mode proposed is covering night demand with power from the grid and solar-gas power island mode during 14 hours daytime with a maximum power production of 1.36 MW. (Author) 26 refs

  8. Integration of Small Solar tower Systems into Distributed Power Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, M.; Marcos, M. J.; Tellez, F. M.; Blanco, M.; Fernandez, V.; Baonza, F.; Berger, S. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    One of the short-term priorities for renewable energies in Europe is their integration for local power supply into communities and energy islands (blocks of buildings, new neighborhoods in residential areas, shopping centers, hospitals, recreational areas, eco-paks, small rural areas or isolated ones such as islands or mountain communities). Following this strategy, the integration of small tower fields into so-called MIUS (Modular Integrated Utility Systems) is proposed. This application strongly influences field concepts leadings to modular multi-tower systems able to more closely track demand, meet reliability requirements with fewer megawatts of installed power and spread construction costs over time after output has begum. In addition, integration into single-cycle high-efficiency gas turbines plus waste-heat applications clearly increments the solar share. The chief questions are whether solar towers can be redesigned for such distributed markets and the keys to their feasibility. This paper includes the design and performance analysis of a 1.36-MW plant and integration in the MIUS system, as well as the expected cost of electricity and a sensitivity analysis of the small tower plant's performance with design parameters like heliostat configuration and tower height. A practical application is analyzed for a shopping center with 85% power demand during day-time by using a hybrid solar tower and a gas turbine producing electricity and waste heat for hot water and heating and cooling of spaces. The operation mode proposed is covering night demand with power from the grid and solar-gas power island mode during 14 hours daytime with a maximum power production of 1.36 MW. (Author) 26 refs.

  9. Efficacy of biocides used in the modern food industry to control salmonella enterica, and links between biocide tolerance and resistance to clinically relevant antimicrobial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condell, Orla; Iversen, Carol; Cooney, Shane; Power, Karen A; Walsh, Ciara; Burgess, Catherine; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-05-01

    Biocides play an essential role in limiting the spread of infectious disease. The food industry is dependent on these agents, and their increasing use is a matter for concern. Specifically, the emergence of bacteria demonstrating increased tolerance to biocides, coupled with the potential for the development of a phenotype of cross-resistance to clinically important antimicrobial compounds, needs to be assessed. In this study, we investigated the tolerance of a collection of susceptible and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica strains to a panel of seven commercially available food-grade biocide formulations. We explored their abilities to adapt to these formulations and their active biocidal agents, i.e., triclosan, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, and benzalkonium chloride, after sequential rounds of in vitro selection. Finally, cross-tolerance of different categories of biocidal formulations, their active agents, and the potential for coselection of resistance to clinically important antibiotics were investigated. Six of seven food-grade biocide formulations were bactericidal at their recommended working concentrations. All showed a reduced activity against both surface-dried and biofilm cultures. A stable phenotype of tolerance to biocide formulations could not be selected. Upon exposure of Salmonella strains to an active biocidal compound, a high-level of tolerance was selected for a number of Salmonella serotypes. No cross-tolerance to the different biocidal agents or food-grade biocide formulations was observed. Most tolerant isolates displayed changes in their patterns of susceptibility to antimicrobial compounds. Food industry biocides are effective against planktonic Salmonella. When exposed to sublethal concentrations of individual active biocidal agents, tolerant isolates may emerge. This emergence was associated with changes in antimicrobial susceptibilities.

  10. Biocides in the Yangtze River of China: Spatiotemporal distribution, mass load and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wang-Rong; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, You-Sheng; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Nineteen biocides were investigated in the Yangtze River to understand their spatiotemporal distribution, mass loads and ecological risks. Fourteen biocides were detected, with the highest concentrations up to 166 ng/L for DEET in surface water, and 54.3 ng/g dry weight (dw) for triclocarban in sediment. The dominant biocides were DEET and methylparaben, with their detection frequencies of 100% in both phases. An estimate of 152 t/y of 14 biocides was carried by the Yangtze River to the East China Sea. The distribution of biocides in the aquatic environments was significantly correlated to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN), suggesting dominant input sources from domestic wastewater of the cities along the river. Risk assessment showed high ecological risks posed by carbendazim in both phases and by triclosan in sediment. Therefore, proper measures should be taken to reduce the input of biocides into the river systems. - Highlights: • Biocides were ubiquitous in the surface water and sediment of the Yangtze River. • The dominant biocides in the Yangtze River were DEET and methylparaben. • Annual flux of biocides was 152 tons from the Yangtze River to the East China Sea. • Domestic wastewater was the main source of the biocides. • Carbendazim and triclosan posed high ecological risks. - Biocides showed wide presence in the Yangtze River and some of them could pose high ecological risks to aquatic organisms

  11. Biocidal potential of clove oils against Aedes albopictus – A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first phase of the study involved evaluation of leaf and bud oils of clove, Syzygium aromaticum for their biocidal (i.e. ovicidal and larvicidal) activity against Aedes albopictus. Eggs and fourth instar larvae were exposed to different concentrations of the oils to investigate their comparative efficacy against the target ...

  12. Research and applications of N-halamine biocidal materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KANG Zhenzhen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available N-halamines,a new class of biocides,overcome some of the disadvantages caused by the traditional biocides in practical applications.They are environmentally friendly germicides due to their fast and efficient sterilization,storage stability,and regeneration.Earlier studies on N-halamines mainly focused on the syntheses and applications of small molecular organic N-halamines such as fivemembered and six-membered heterocyclic N-halamine compounds.Compared to traditional inorganic halogen-containing disinfectants such as chlorine gas,sodium hypochlorite,chlorine dioxide,these heterocyclic N-halamines can maintain disinfection capacity in the water for longer time due to their better stability.Since the late 20th century,non-leaching biocial N-halamine materials have received much attention.Some novel N-halmine precursors with binding groups have been covalently bounded to various materials such as cellulose fiber,silica gel,polystyrene,polyethylene,and polyurethane to produce nonleaching biocidal materials.Specially,the successful development of macroporous cross-linked N-halamine polymer resin materials (Halopure and related technologies created a new era for the applications of N-halamine materials in the disinfection of drinking water.In this review paper,the antibacterial mechanism and synthetic methods of N-halamine biocidal materials and their application prospects in various fields of daily life were introduced.Their development prospects were also made.

  13. Technical Protocol. Transformation of biocides in liquid manures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzig, Robert; Schlag, Patrick; Teigeler, Jennifer; Hartmann, Constanze; Cvetkovi, Benjamin [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie und Abfallanalytik

    2010-07-15

    The Reference Manure Concept, already developed for laboratory tests on fate and behavior of veterinary medicinal products in liquid manures and manured soils, was successfully applied for biocides used for disinfection purposes and control of insects in animal houses. Since the representative and reproducible sampling of manures from high-volume tanks has been considered impossible, excrement samples of cattle and pigs individually kept at an experimental animal house were taken. These samples were thoroughly matrix characterized. Then, tap water was added to prepare reference manures of definite dry substance contents. Subsequently, the long-term transformation of the biocides imazalil and cyanamide applied as {sup 14}C-labeled radiotracers was investigated in these manure samples. On the basis of the transformation tests, test manures with 7-day aged biocide residues were prepared and applied in laboratory tests on transformation and sorption in manured soil. By means of this experimental approach, the impacts of aging processes during manure storage and of the manure matrix on the fate of biocides in soils can be assessed already under laboratory conditions. These laboratory tests have been directed as closely as possible to agricultural practice as well as to analytical practicability and quality assurance. Finally, the methodological aspects have been compiled in a Technical Protocol (Draft version). (orig.)

  14. Silver Ion Biocide Delivery System for Water Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Benjamin M.; Salley, Edward; Carr, Daniel; Kimble, Michael C.; Adam, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    U.S. space exploration missions have long considered returning to the Moon and exploration of Mars that challenge life support systems. For these long duration missions, there is interest in replacing the iodine water treatment system with ionic silver, a proven biocide. For long duration exploration missions, it is imperative that an effective biocide be used that prevents microbial growth, biofilm formation, and microbially induced corrosion in the water storage and distribution systems while minimizing logistical supply requirements associated with the biocide delivery system. Two biocide delivery systems have been developed that electrochemically produce silver ions for disinfecting water throughout the water storage and distribution system. One system uses a newly developed hybrid micro-filtration and ion-exchange membrane to produce an abundance of silver ions at the 1000 ppb level upstream in the water distribution system to prevent biofilm growth. This is followed by a downstream collection module that electrochemically removes these silver ions before the water is discharged. Another approach uses a membraneless reactor to produce a 1000 ppb silver ion concentration level that also has a mechanically driven electrode cleaning mechanism that removes oxide films ensuring long life operation. By maintaining a sufficiently high level of silver ions throughout the water storage and distribution system, biofilm formation is suppressed. This approach overcomes present concerns where spurious silver deposition occurs on the container and flow line surfaces thus lowering the silver ion concentration to unsatisfactory disinfection levels.

  15. Water driven leaching of biocides from paints and renders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bester, Kai; Vollertsen, Jes; Bollmann, Ulla E

    ) were so high, that rather professional urban gardening (flower and greenhouses) than handling of biocides from construction materials seem to be able to explain the findings. While the use in agriculture is restricted, the use in greenhouses is currently considered legal in Denmark. Leaching...

  16. Biocidal spectrum of a rice field cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. | Jaiswal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fractionation of the extracts showed six spots on silica-gel-coated plates. Hexane extract was the most potent biocide, showing marked (35-42%) reduction in the growth of fungi, but no negative influences on seed germination or seedling growth of wheat, rice and mung bean, emphasizing its suitability for use in agriculture.

  17. Characterization Of Biocides Resistant Isolates From Dental Unit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines is thought to be the result of biofilm formation within the small-bore tubing used for these conduits. Our objectives were to characterize biocides resistant isolates from dental unit water line biofilm (DUWL) using the standard laboratory approaches. Growth curves of isolates ...

  18. Reaction Dynamics and Dispersion of Energetic Biocides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    exterior of the aerosol particle due to surface tension forces. As the particles cool down, the molten KClO4 re-crystallizes to form a solid core that...shown in Figure 5. EDS analysis indicates that the two components form a homogeneous hollow -shell. In this case both components are behaving similar to...conditions seen for spray pyrolysis in which solvent evaporation from the droplet leads to a hollow structure. In our case the two solutes has

  19. The Design of Akhmat Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beardsley Sara

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Akhmat Tower is a 435m supertall building designed by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture. It is currently under construction in the city of Grozny, in the Chechen Republic, in the North Caucasus region of Russia. The design of the tower was done during a collaborative process by a multi-disciplinary architectural and engineering team, based primarily in the United States and Russia. During this process, the designers considered many factors including, most primarily, the cultural and historical context, the structural requirements given the high seismicity of the region, and the client’s programmatic needs. The resulting crystalline-shaped tower is both an aesthetic statement and a performative architectural solution which will be a new landmark for Chechnya. “The Design of Akhmat Tower” describes in detail the design process including structural considerations, exterior wall design, building program, interior design, the tuned mass damper, and the use of building information modeling.

  20. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  1. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports

  2. User's manual for the BNW-I optimization code for dry-cooled power plants. Volume III. [PLCIRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.J.; Daniel, D.J.; De Mier, W.V.; Faletti, D.W.; Wiles, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    This appendix to User's Manual for the BNW-1 Optimization Code for Dry-Cooled Power Plants provides a listing of the BNW-I optimization code for determining, for a particular size power plant, the optimum dry cooling tower design using a plastic tube cooling surface and circular tower arrangement of the tube bundles. (LCL)

  3. [Effect of some biocides on non-tuberculous mycobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Clara Inés; Pardo, Yenny Patricia; Ramírez, Claudia Ximena

    2002-06-01

    The incidence of disease and nosocomial infections produced by non tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) has increased in immunocompetent patients, but also and more frequently, in immunosuppressed patients. Several studies have disclosed that mycobacteria are more resistant to biocides than non-sporulating bacteria; in addition, some species are particularly resistant. The biocide action of sodium hypochloride and glutaraldehyde on Mycobacterium aviumintracellulare, Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae was studied, using a modified Kelsey Maurer test. For the different species, both the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal action time were determined. Effectiveness of sodium hypochloride and glutaraldehyde against the different mycobacterial species varied. The same was true for different isolates of the same species. Sodium hypochloride effective MIC and exposure time (killing of 99.99% of all NTM) were 0.2% and 5 minutes, respectively. In order to achieve 100% killing, 0.5% MIC and 15 minute exposure were needed. In the case of glutaraldehyde, 99.99% of the bacteria were killed with 1% MIC and a 15 minute exposure. An effectiveness of 100% was achieved with a 2% MIC of glutaraldehyde and a 15 minute exposure. Sodium hypochloride and glutaraldehyde are effective biocides for mycobacteria. The first biocide is cheap and effective at low concentrations, but its corrosive and oxidant nature makes it impossible for use in hospitals or with laboratory equipment. Glutaraldehyde (neither corrosive nor oxidant) is a safe alternative for disinfection of this type of equipment. However, it is important to bear in mind that these pathogens may develop resistance to biocides.

  4. Choice of optimal biocide combination to control flies (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavran, Mihaela; Zgomba, Marija F; Ignjatovic-Ćupina, Aleksandra M; Lazić, Sanja D; Petrić, Dušan V

    2015-01-01

    Flies - by feeding on decaying matter, human waste and food - have been implicated in the spread of numerous animal and human diseases. Excessive fly populations are generally associated with livestock units and domestic waste due to decaying organic matter. A large number of flies cause extreme disturbance in the behavior of the host, resulting in skin irritation, lesions, wounds, and secondary infections are likely to appear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of combined applications of larvicide (cyromazine) and adulticides (acetamiprid in formulation with pheromone and thiamethoxam) on the suppression of fly populations. The study was conducted on a pig farm. The piglet farms are one of the most favorable places for fly breeding. Three units were used for biocide applications and a fourth unit as the control where biocides were not applied. The monitoring of pre- and post-treatment of adult fly populations was carried out by glued cardboards. The cards were hung on metal rods above piglet's cage. This monitoring method served as a parameter for the estimation of biological effectiveness. The highest degree of fly control (88.4% mortality 8 days after treatment) was achieved when a combination of cyromazine and thiamethoxam was used. A biocide based on sex pheromone (Z)-9-tricosene + acetamiprid was the most effective on flies 3 days after biocide application, with a mortality rate of 69.1 %. Thiamethoxam achieved the highest reduction of flies 6 days after treatment, with 78.19% obtained mortality. Biological efficacy of the applied biocides in combination ciromazine + thiamethoxam and thiamethoxam alone was justified.

  5. Windfarms and telecommunications towers (Scotland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, Hector; Kellett-Bowman, Elaine; Harris, David

    1996-01-01

    A debate in the United Kingdom House of Commons on the environmental impact of windfarms and telecommunications towers in Scotland is reported. Concern was expressed over the adverse visual impact of such structures in rural areas which are often of considerable natural beauty. Counter arguments were based on the positive effects of new technology. The need to reconcile environmental protection with technological innovation was expressed. A Government spokesman described the comprehensive planning policy framework which has been put in place to secure sound planning decisions on renewable energy developments and the conditions on amenity protection in the regulations governing the erection of telecommunications towers. (UK)

  6. Windfarms and telecommunications towers (Scotland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, Hector; Kellett-Bowman, Elaine; Harris, David [and others

    1996-10-30

    A debate in the United Kingdom House of Commons on the environmental impact of windfarms and telecommunications towers in Scotland is reported. Concern was expressed over the adverse visual impact of such structures in rural areas which are often of considerable natural beauty. Counter arguments were based on the positive effects of new technology. The need to reconcile environmental protection with technological innovation was expressed. A Government spokesman described the comprehensive planning policy framework which has been put in place to secure sound planning decisions on renewable energy developments and the conditions on amenity protection in the regulations governing the erection of telecommunications towers. (UK)

  7. Beam cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Danared, H

    2006-01-01

    Beam cooling is the technique of reducing the momentum spread and increasing the phase-space density of stored particle beams. This paper gives an introduction to beam cooling and Liouville’s theorem, and then it describes the three methods of active beam cooling that have been proven to work so far, namely electron cooling, stochastic cooling, and laser cooling. Ionization cooling is also mentioned briefly.

  8. Chemical Interactions of Hydraulic Fracturing Biocides with Natural Pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolazio, Nizette A.

    In conjunction with horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing or fracking has enabled the recovery of natural gas from low permeable shale formations. In addition to water, these fracking fluids employ proppants and up to 38 different chemical additives to improve the efficiency of the process. One important class of additives used in hydraulic fracturing is biocides. When applied appropriately, they limit the growth of harmful microorganisms within the well, saving energy producers 4.5 billion dollars each year. However, biocides or their harmful daughter products may return to the surface in produced water, which must then be appropriately stored, treated and disposed of. Little is known about the effect of mineral-fluid interactions on the fate of the biocides employed in hydraulic fracturing. In this study, we employed laboratory experiments to determine changes in the persistence and products of these biocides under controlled environments. While many minerals are present in shale formations, pyrite, FeS2(s) is particularly interesting because of its prevalence and reactivity. The FeII groups on the face of pyrite may be oxidized to form FeIII phases. Both of these surfaces have been shown to be reactive with organic compounds. Chlorinated compounds undergo redox reactions at the pyrite-fluid interface, and sulfur-containing compounds undergo exceptionally strong sorption to both pristine and oxidized pyrite. This mineral may significantly influence the degradation of biocides in the Marcellus Shale. Thus, the overall goal of this study was to understand the effect of pyrite on biocide reactivity in hydraulic fracturing, focusing on the influence of pyrite on specific functional groups. The first specific objective was to demonstrate the effect of pyrite and pyrite reaction products on the degradation of the bromine-containing biocide, DBNPA. On the addition of pyrite to DBNPA, degradation rates of the doubly brominated compound were found to increase

  9. Kinetic model for predicting the composition of chlorinated water discharged from power plant cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietzke, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of applying a kinetic model to the chlorination data supplied by Commonwealth Edison on the once-through cooling system at the Quad Cities Nuclear Station provide a validation of the model. The two examples given demonstrate that the model may be applied to either once-through cooling systems or to cooling systems involving cooling towers

  10. The solar towers of Chankillo

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    An ancient solar observatory is composed by thirteen towers lined on a hill of a coastal desert of Peru. This is the Chankillo observatory. Here we discuss it, showing some simulations of the local sun direction. An analysis of the behaviour of shadows is also proposed.

  11. Dwelling towers of Czech castles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durdík, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (2009), s. 139-150 ISSN 1875-2896. [Meeting of Europa Nostra Scientific Council /44./. Kilkenny, 27.09.2008-02.10.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : castle * castellology * dwelling tower * donjon * keep * medieval archaeology * architecture * Bohemia * Middle Ages Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  12. Mobile Tower Radiation Protection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbar Slman Hussein

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clean environment is one of the most necessarily needs for Human life. So what about mobile effect and its towers pollution? It's effect on public health? Effect of huge groan of mobile networks. In counting of these dangers that will harm us from mobile towers in the far run, was the reasons for writing this research, came this study to look at the mobile towers and mobile effects possible health harm for the purpose of diagnosis of these effects and to suggest ways that can be used to avoid or minimize the risks.  Faraday Cage, is the solution suggested here, also there are many other solutions for this problem, a Faraday cage is a metallic enclosure that stops the entry or escape of an EM field. Also, two experiments are accomplished, first one showing the effect of Faraday cage on preventing the EMR from mobile cellphone, and the second  experiment gives the effect of Faraday cage on preventing the EMR from mobile tower EMR on human health listed in the research, that have been done by using conducting shell (grid design according the EM wavelength used by three company's mobile working in Iraq, the result show good isolations.

  13. Good towers of function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Nhut

    of q. In this thesis, we study a construction using Drinfeld modules that produces explicitly defined families of algebraic curves that asymptotically achieve Ihara’s constant. Such families of curves can also be described using towers of function fields. Restated in this language the aim...

  14. What comes out of the Goesgen cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a poll of 500 people (118 French-speaking Swiss, and 382 German-speaking Swiss) to find out what they think is discharged into the atmosphere by the Goesgen reactor, are discussed. It seems that, in general, the French-speaking Swiss (Romands) think that there is more pollution in the water vapor than do the German-speaking Swiss. (G.T.H.)

  15. An Optimal Unramified Tower of Function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efficient construction of long AG--codes resulting from optimal towers of function fields is known to be difficult. In the following a tower which is both optimal and unramified, that is a tower in which all places are unramified after some level, is investigated in the hope that its simple...

  16. Biocide By-Products in Aquatic Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, R. M.; Gibson, C. I.; Anderson, D. R.

    1981-05-01

    A three-year program has been conducted to study the chemistry and biological effects of products arising from the low-level chlorination of natural waters. These studies are related to environmental concerns arising from the discharge of chlorine-treated power plant cooling water. The studies have shown that addition of low levels (2 mg/l) of chlorine to natural waters produces haloforms in concentrations which are orders of magnitude lower than the LC{sub 50}'s measured in a number of fresh ana salt water organisms. Chlorination also produces nonhaloform lipophilic organohalogen products in concentrations much lower than the naloforms, although no evidence was obtained which suggested significant olomagnification of these during chronic exposure of juvenile salmon to chlorinated fresh water. No dramatic effects were noted in organisms chronically exposed to chlorinated waters, but changes in general condition were observed.

  17. Silver-enhanced block copolymer membranes with biocidal activity

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2014-11-12

    Silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface and pore walls of block copolymer membranes with highly ordered pore structure. Pyridine blocks constitute the pore surfaces, complexing silver ions and promoting a homogeneous distribution. Nanoparticles were then formed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The morphology varied with the preparation conditions (pH and silver ion concentration), as confirmed by field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Silver has a strong biocide activity, which for membranes can bring the advantage of minimizing the growth of bacteria and formation of biofilm. The membranes with nanoparticles prepared under different pH values and ion concentrations were incubated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and compared with the control. The strongest biocidal activity was achieved with membranes containing membranes prepared under pH 9. Under these conditions, the best distribution with small particle size was observed by microscopy.

  18. New filtering antimicrobial nonwovens with various carriers for biocides as respiratory protective materials against bioaerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata; Brochocka, Agnieszka; Brycki, Bogumił

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the bioactivity of polypropylene melt-blown filtering nonwovens used in respiratory protective devices (RPD) with a biocidal agent (alkylammonium microbiocides) on 2 mineral carriers. Two types of carriers were tested: a bentonite, with an aluminosilicate base, and a perlite, volcanic glass. High biostatic and biocidal effects of modified nonwovens with biocides were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria. Nonwovens modified with a biocide on a bentonite carrier showed an opposite reaction to a biocide on a perlite. The research also showed that 10% concentration of a biocidal agent on a perlite carrier was sufficient to inhibit the growth of bacteria (100% reduction) placed in the structure of a filtering material during normal use of RPD. A comparison of the biological activity of 2 filtering materials, each containing 10% of a perlite and produced in a laboratory and industrial conditions, showed no statistically significant differences.

  19. Phenotypic changes contributing to Enterobacter gergoviae biocide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périamé, M; Philippe, N; Condell, O; Fanning, S; Pagès, J-M; Davin-Regli, A

    2015-08-01

    Enterobacter gergoviae is a recurrent contaminant of cosmetic and hygiene products. To understand how this bacterium adapts to biocides, we studied Ent. gergoviae CIP 76.01 and its triclosan and Methylisothiazolinone-chloromethylisothiazolinone (MIT-CMIT) tolerant isogenic mutants. They were compared with others also isolated from contaminated cosmetics. Phenotypic differences were noted and these included changes in the bacterial envelope and flagella along with differences in motility, and biofilm growth rates. Triclosan and MIT-CMIT derivatives expressed flagella and other MIT-CMIT derivatives exhibited some external appendages. Those bacteria expressing a high-level minimal inhibitory concentration to MIT-CMIT, expressed a strong biofilm formation. No differential phenotypes were noted for carbon source utilisation. Enterobacter gergoviae demonstrated a diverse response to both of these preservatives contained in cosmetic preparations, depending on their concentrations. Interestingly, this adaptive response is associated with modifications of filament structure-related proteins contributing to increase the organism motility and the production of biofilm. Recurrent contaminations of cosmetics products by Ent. gergoviae, needed a better understanding concerning the bacterial adaptation to preservative agents, with particular concern to triclosan and MIT-CMIT. We demonstrated that bacteria response is associated to various mechanisms represented by expression of external appendages (pili or fimbriae) that control cell motility and biofilm formation and evolving as the concentration of biocides adaptation increased. Such mechanisms which are not chemical specific can also promote a cross-resistance to other biocidal agents. The characterization of Ent. gergoviae adaptability to biocides allows industry to adjust the ranges of concentrations and composition of preservatives in formula. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Usage Possibilities of Insecticide Effective Biocidals in Organic Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Şimşek, Muharrem; Yağcı, Mürşide; Yaşarer, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    In conventional agriculture it is aimed that mainly increase in the amount of products, synthetic chemicals and fertilizers are used extensively to provide it. Today, terms such as safe food, human and environment health have become more important. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the share of organic agriculture which have less negative impacts to human health and environment, and sustainable use of natural resources. Herein environmentally insecticide effective biocidals to pest contr...

  1. Chemical composition of silica-based biocidal modifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishina Anna Nikolaevna

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increase of the amount of fungi spores and micotixines causes the increase in the number of different diseases. Because of this, ensuring the biological safety in buildings is becoming more and more important today. The preferred way to guarantee the biological safety of a building is to employ modern building materials that prevent the settlement of the fungi colonies on the inner surfaces of walls. Such building materials can be produced using novel biocidal modifiers that allow controlling the number of microorganisms on the surface and in the bulk of a composite construction. The precipitation product of zinc hydrosilicates and sodium sulfate is one of the mentioned modifiers. Till now, the exact chemical composition of such precipitation product is controversial; it is obvious, though, that the efficacy of the biocidal modifier is mostly determined by the type of the copper compounds. In the present work an integrated approach is used for the investigation of the chemical composition of the biocidal modifier. Such an approach consists in the examination of the modifier’s composition by means of different, yet complementary, research methods: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and DTA. It is shown that the chemical composition of the modifier mainly depends on the amount of precipitant. X-ray diffraction reveals that the major part of the modifier is represented by amorphous phase. Along with the increase of the precipitant’s amount the crystalline phase Zn4SO4(OH6•xH2O formation takes place. Such a crystalline phase is not appropriate as a component of the biocidal modifier. Another two methods - DTA and IR spectroscopy - reveal that the amorphous phase consists essentially of zinc hydrosilicates.

  2. Biocidal properties of anti-icing additives for aircraft fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neihof, R A; Bailey, C A

    1978-04-01

    The biocidal and biostatic activities of seven glycol monoalkyl ether compounds were evaluated as part of an effort to find an improved anti-icing additive for jet aircraft fuel. Typical fuel contaminants, Cladosporium resinae, Gliomastix sp., Candida sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture containing sulfate-reducing bacteria were used as assay organisms. Studies were carried out over 3 to 4 months in two-phase systems containing jet fuel and aqueous media. Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether, triethylene glycol monomethyl ether, triethylene glycol monoethyl ether, and 2-methoxyethanol were generally biocidal in aqueous concentrations of 10 to 17% for all organisms except Gliomastix, which required 25% or more. 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-propoxyethanol, and 2-butoxyethanol were biocidal at progressively lower concentrations down to 1 to 2% for 2-butoxyethanol. The enhanced antimicrobial activity of these three compounds was attributed to cytoplasmic membrane damage because of the correlation between surface tension measurements and lytic activity with P. aeruginosa cells. The mechanism of action of the less active compounds appeared to be due to osmotic (dehydrating) effects. When all requirements are taken into account, diethylene glycol monomethyl ether appears to be the most promising replacement for the currently used additive, 2-methoxyethanol.

  3. Glass-(nAg, nCu) Biocide Coatings on Ceramic Oxide Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram-, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more th...

  4. Association constants of modified humic acids with biocides of the triazole series: Cyproconazole and tebuconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal'Tseva, E. V.; Yudina, N. V.; Chaikovskaya, O. N.; Nechaev, L. V.

    2011-09-01

    The interaction of humic acids with biocides of triazoles in dependence on the concentration of components in solutions was investigated by spectrofluorimetry. The complex behavior of intermolecular interactions between biocides and humic acids, including donor-acceptor and hydrophobic bonds, was established. The effect of conditions of mechanochemical modification of humic acids and pH on the efficiency of interaction with biocides is shown.

  5. Hybrid Tower, Designing Soft Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Tamke, Martin; Holden Deleuran, Anders

    2015-01-01

    predictions about the inherent interdependency and material dependent performance of the hybrid structure and (2) the inter-scalar design strategies for specification and fabrication. The first investigation focuses on the design pipelines developed between the implementation of realtime physics......This paper presents the research project Hybrid Tower, an interdisciplinary collaboration between CITA—Centre for IT and Architecture, KET—Department for Structural Design and Technology, Fibrenamics, Universidade do Minho Guimarães, AFF a. ferreira & filhos, sa, Caldas de Vizela, Portugal...... and Essener Labor für Leichte Flächentragwerke, Universität Duisburg-Essen. Hybrid Tower is a hybrid structural system combining bending active compression members and tensile members for architectural design. The paper presents two central investigations: (1) the creation of new design methods that embed...

  6. Polyacrylate–water partitioning of biocidal compounds: Enhancing the understanding of biocide partitioning between render and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollmann, Ulla E.; Ou, Yi; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the application of polymer-based renders and paints for façade coatings of buildings has risen enormously due to the increased mounting of thermal insulation systems. These materials are commonly equipped with biocides - algaecides, fungicides, and bactericides - to protect the m...... between the polymer - in this case polyacrylate - and water were studied using glass fibre filters coated with polyacrylate. The polyacrylate-water partition constants (logKAcW) of ten biocides used in construction material varied between 1.66 (isoproturon) and 3.57 (dichloro......-N-octylisothiazolinone). The correlation of the polyacrylate-water partition constants with the octanol-water partition constants is significant, but the polyacrylate-water partition constants were predominantly below octanol-water partition constants (Kow). The comparison with render-water distribution constants showed that estimating...

  7. Self-assembled granular towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Vazquez, Felipe; Moreau, Florian; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Dorbolo, Stephan; GroupResearch; Applications in Statistical Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    When some water is added to sand, cohesion among the grains is induced. In fact, only 1% of liquid volume respect to the total pore space of the sand is necessary to built impressive sandcastles. Inspired on this experience, the mechanical properties of wet piles and sand columns have been widely studied during the last years. However, most of these studies only consider wet materials with less than 35% of liquid volume. Here we report the spontaneous formation of granular towers produced when dry sand is poured on a highly wet sand bed: The impacting grains stick on the wet grains due to instantaneous liquid bridges created during the impact. The grains become wet by the capillary ascension of water and the process continues, giving rise to stable narrow sand towers. Actually, the towers can reach the maximum theoretical limit of stability predicted by previous models, only expected for low liquid volumes. The authors would like to thank FNRS and Conacyt Mexico for financial support. FPV is a beneficiary of a movility grant from BELSPO/Marie Curie and the University of Liege.

  8. Supramolecular assistance between cyclodextrins and didecyldimethylammonium chloride against enveloped viruses: Toward eco-biocidal formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Loïc; Dewilde, Anny; Aubry, Jean-Marie; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2016-10-15

    Nosocomial infections have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals. In this respect, biocides are widely used in hospitals leading to resistant microorganisms. We show here that cyclodextrins can remarkably boost the virucidal activity of di-n-decyldimethylammonium chloride. These oligosaccharides synergistically work with the biocide affording a noticeable reduction of the active virucide concentration between 40 and 85%. Partial replacement of a significant amount of the biocide by eco- and bio-compatible cyclodextrins whilst maintaining the same activity is of great interest as it allows the reduction of the toxicological drawbacks of classical biocide mixtures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Adaptive tolerance to phenolic biocides in bacteria from organic foods: Effects on antimicrobial susceptibility and tolerance to physical stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadea, Rebeca; Fernández Fuentes, Miguel Ángel; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio; Ortega, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of step-wise exposure of biocide-sensitive bacteria from organic foods to phenolic biocides triclosan (TC) and hexachlorophene [2,2'-methylenebis(3,4,6-trichlorophenol)] (CF). The analysis included changes in the tolerance to the biocide itself, the tolerance to other biocides, and cross-resistance to clinically important antibiotics. The involvement of efflux mechanisms was also studied as well as the possible implication of modifications in cytoplasmic membrane fluidity in the resistance mechanisms. The influence of biocide tolerance on growth capacity of the adapted strains and on subsequent resistance to other physical stresses has also been analyzed. Repeated exposure of bacteria from organic foods to phenolic biocides resulted in most cases in partially increased tolerance to the same biocide, to dissimilar biocides and other antimicrobial compounds. Nine TC-adapted strains and six CF-adapted strains were able to develop high levels of biocide tolerance, and these were stable in the absence of biocide selective pressure. Most strains adapted to TC and one CF-adapted strain showed significantly higher anisotropy values than their corresponding wildtype strains, suggesting that changes in membrane fluidity could be involved in biocide adaptation. Exposure to gradually increasing concentrations of CF induced a decrease in heat tolerance. Biocide adaptation had no significant effects of gastric acid or bile resistance, suggesting that biocide adaptation should not influence survival in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    OpenAIRE

    Eric A Hendricks; Wayne H Schubert

    2010-01-01

    Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV). This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with...

  11. Optimal Inflatable Space Towers of High Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Author provides theory and computations for building inflatable space towers up to a hundred km in height. These towers can be used for tourism; scientific observation of space, earth's surface, weather, top atmosphere, as well as for radio, television, and communication transmissions. These towers can also be used to launch space ships and Earth satellites. These projects are not expensive and do not require rockets. They require thin strong films composed from artificial fibers and fabricated by current industry. Towers can be built using present technology. Towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require work at high altitudes; all construction can be done at the earth's surface. The transport system for this tower consists a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the earth's surface. The tower is separated into sections and has special protection mechanism in case of a damage. Problems involving security, control, repair, and stability of the proposed towers are addressed in subsequent publications. The author is prepared to discuss these and other problems with serious organizations desiring to research and develop these projects.

  12. An Optimal Unramified Tower of Function Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Efficient construction of long algebraic geometric--codes resulting from optimal towers of function fields is known to be difficult. In the following a tower which is both optimal and unramified after its third level, is investigated in the hope that its simple ramification structure can be explo......Efficient construction of long algebraic geometric--codes resulting from optimal towers of function fields is known to be difficult. In the following a tower which is both optimal and unramified after its third level, is investigated in the hope that its simple ramification structure can...

  13. Optimal inflatable space towers of high height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolonkin, A.

    Author suggested, developed theory, and computed some projects of an optimal inflatable space tower of the heights some hundreds km. These towers can be used for tourism, scientist observation of space, Earth surface, Earth weather, Earth top atmosphere, and for radio, TV, communication transmissions. These towers can be used for launching of the space ships and Earth s atellites. The computed projects not expensive, do not request rockets. They need only in thin strong films composed from the artificial fibers and fabricated by a current industry. Towers can be built by a current technology. Towers can be explored (for tourism, communication, etc.) in a time of the construction process and give a profit, self- financing for further constriction. They can permanent increase their height. The tower design does not request a work at the high altitudes. All construction works will be making at the Earth surface. Author suggests the transport system for this tower of a high capability, which does not request a power energy issue. The small engine (only for a friction compensation) is located at the Earth surface. The tower is separated on sections and has a special protection of a case of a damage. It is considered also the problems of security, control, repair, etc. of the suggested towers. The author has also solved additional problems, which appear in these projects and which can look as difficult for the given proposal and current technology. The author is prepared to discuss the problems with serious organizations, which want to research and develop these projects.

  14. Current uses of nanomaterials in biocidal products and treated articles in the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Revilla Besora, Pau; Brinch, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Product Regulation (BPR) lays out a list of requirements that manufacturers of biocidal products have to comply with before they can place their products on the market. It is not entirely clear which commercially available articles in the EU have been treated with or incorporate NMs to provide biocidal...

  15. Bioassays and selected chemical analysis of biocide-free antifouling coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watermann, B.T.; Daehne, B.; Sievers, S.; Dannenberg, R.; Overbeke, J.C.; Klijnstra, J.W.; Heemken, O.

    2005-01-01

    Over the years several types of biocide-free antifouling paints have entered the market. The prohibition of biocidal antifouling paints in special areas of some European countries such as Sweden, Denmark and Germany has favoured the introduction of these paints to the market. Several types of

  16. Activated soil filters for removal of biocides from contaminated run-off and waste-waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bester, Kai; Banzhaf, Stefan; Burkhardt, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Building facades can be equipped with biocides to prevent formation of algal, fungal and bacterial films. Thus run-off waters may contain these highly active compounds. In this study, the removal of several groups of biocides from contaminated waters by means of an activated soil filter was studied...

  17. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood - a mechanistic interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupsea, Maria; Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2013-02-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper-boron-azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: - Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. - Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. - The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. - Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with \\OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. W-030, AY/AZ tank farm cooling and miscellaneous instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    This is the acceptance test report for construction functional testing of Project W-030 cooling systems and related instrumentation. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The Tank Farm Cooling System consists of four forced draft cooling towers, a chilled water system, and associated controls

  19. Passive downdraught evaporative cooling in office building - Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Al Asir, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    Wind driven ventilation presented in wind tower finds its roots in the Middle East vernacular architecture it catches the upper air stream cools and channelled it down to the occupied spaces. This paper explores the cooling potential of passive downdraught evaporative cooling wind catcher to ventilate an office building in Amman/Jordan. Summer comfort zone for Amman is developed to present a thermal assessment tool for the results. Study case of an office building in Amman is introduced based...

  20. Forced draft wet cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, A.; Caudron, L.; Viollet, P.L.

    1975-01-01

    The disposal of the heat released from a 1000MW power plant needs a natural draft tower of about 130m of diameter at the base, and 170m height, or a cooling system with a draft forced by about forty vans, a hundred meters in diameter, and thirty meters height. The plumes from atmospheric cooling systems form, in terms of fluid mechanics, hot jets in a cross current. They consist in complex flows that must be finely investigated with experimental and computer means. The study, currently being performed at the National Hydraulics Laboratory, shows that as far as the length and height of visible plumes are concerned, the comparison is favorable to some types of forced draft cooling system, for low and medium velocities, (below 5 or 6m/s at 10m height. Beyond these velocities, the forced draft sends the plume up to smaller heights, but the plume is generally more dilute [fr

  1. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood — A mechanistic interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupsea, Maria [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, ESE/Environment, 24 rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute [BAM — Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.1, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, ESE/Environment, 24 rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France)

    2013-02-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper–boron–azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: -Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. -Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. -The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. -Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with -OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. - Highlights: ► A pH dependent leaching mechanism for CBA treated wood is described. ► The fixation and mobilisation of inorganic and organic biocides was investigated. ► Extractives' quantity and nature depend on pH. ► Competition of ligands for protonation and complexation explains Cu behaviour. ► Tebuconazole seems to interact with -OH groups

  2. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  3. Exposure of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to high level biocide challenge can select multidrug resistant mutants in a single step.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah N Whitehead

    Full Text Available Biocides are crucial to the prevention of infection by bacteria, particularly with the global emergence of multiply antibiotic resistant strains of many species. Concern has been raised regarding the potential for biocide exposure to select for antibiotic resistance due to common mechanisms of resistance, notably efflux.Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was challenged with 4 biocides of differing modes of action at both low and recommended-use concentration. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the physiological state of the cells after biocide challenge. After 5 hours exposure to biocide, live cells were sorted by FACS and recovered. Cells recovered after an exposure to low concentrations of biocide had antibiotic resistance profiles similar to wild-type cells. Live cells were recovered after exposure to two of the biocides at in-use concentration for 5 hours. These cells were multi-drug resistant and accumulation assays demonstrated an efflux phenotype of these mutants. Gene expression analysis showed that the AcrEF multidrug efflux pump was de-repressed in mutants isolated from high-levels of biocide.These data show that a single exposure to the working concentration of certain biocides can select for mutant Salmonella with efflux mediated multidrug resistance and that flow cytometry is a sensitive tool for identifying biocide tolerant mutants. The propensity for biocides to select for MDR mutants varies and this should be a consideration when designing new biocidal formulations.

  4. New system of cooling download Arrocampo. Project TEVA; Nuevos sistema refrigeracion descarga Arrocampo. Proyecto TEVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puerta Munoz, S.

    2012-07-01

    Project TEVA The new system is basically a mechanical forced-cooling tower, a system of pumping water from Arrocampo, pipes and valves supply a collection basin water tower, a channel to drain the existing auxiliary spillway own shot dam and a new power line from the Central.

  5. Biocidal Activity of Formaldehyde and Nonformaldehyde Biocides toward Mycobacterium immunogenum and Pseudomonas fluorescens in Pure and Mixed Suspensions in Synthetic Metalworking Fluid and Saline

    OpenAIRE

    Selvaraju, Suresh B.; Khan, Izhar U. H.; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2005-01-01

    The microbicidal activity of four different biocides was studied in synthetic metalworking fluid (MWF) against Mycobacterium immunogenum, a suspected causative agent for hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, a representative for the predominant gram-negative bacterial contaminants of MWF. The results indicated that M. immunogenum is more resistant than P. fluorescens to the tested formaldehyde-releasing biocides (Grotan and Bioban), isothiazolone (Kathon), and phenolic bi...

  6. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: Combining physiological and microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranza, M.; Wierzchos, J.; De Los Rios, A.; Perez-Ortega, S.; Souza-Egipsy, V.; Ascaso, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment. -- Highlights: ► We combined ChlaF measurements with EM images to analyses the biocides action on stone biodeterioration agents. ► At lower biocide concentrations damage to photobiont and mycobiont cells integrity, ultrastructure and vitality were observed. ► The limited action of biocides on fungi and algae were detected using SEM-BSE. ► The combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ. ► This new approach will help to

  7. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  8. Fire ants perpetually rebuild sinking towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonekeo, Sulisay; Mlot, Nathan; Monaenkova, Daria; Hu, David L.; Tovey, Craig

    2017-07-01

    In the aftermath of a flood, fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, cluster into temporary encampments. The encampments can contain hundreds of thousands of ants and reach over 30 ants high. How do ants build such tall structures without being crushed? In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we investigate the shape and rate of construction of ant towers around a central support. The towers are bell shaped, consistent with towers of constant strength such as the Eiffel tower, where each element bears an equal load. However, unlike the Eiffel tower, the ant tower is built through a process of trial and error, whereby failed portions avalanche until the final shape emerges. High-speed and novel X-ray videography reveal that the tower constantly sinks and is rebuilt, reminiscent of large multicellular systems such as human skin. We combine the behavioural rules that produce rafts on water with measurements of adhesion and attachment strength to model the rate of growth of the tower. The model correctly predicts that the growth rate decreases as the support diameter increases. This work may inspire the design of synthetic swarms capable of building in vertical layers.

  9. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingersh, Lee Jay [Westminster, CO

    2008-12-30

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  10. High performance polypyrrole coating for corrosion protection and biocidal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Amit; Qiao, Mingyu; Cook, Jonathan Edwin; Zhang, Xinyu; Huang, Tung-Shi

    2018-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) coating was electrochemically synthesized on carbon steel using sulfonic acids as dopants: p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA), sulfuric acid (SA), (±) camphor sulfonic acid (CSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS). The effect of acidic dopants (p-TSA, SA, CSA) on passivation of carbon steel was investigated by linear potentiodynamic and compared with morphology and corrosion protection performance of the coating produced. The types of the dopants used were significantly affecting the protection efficiency of the coating against chloride ion attack on the metal surface. The corrosion performance depends on size and alignment of dopant in the polymer backbone. Both p-TSA and SDBS have extra benzene ring that stack together to form a lamellar sheet like barrier to chloride ions thus making them appropriate dopants for PPy coating in suppressing the corrosion at significant level. Further, adhesion performance was enhanced by adding long chain carboxylic acid (decanoic acid) directly in the monomer solution. In addition, PPy coating doped with SDBS displayed excellent biocidal abilities against Staphylococcus aureus. The polypyrrole coatings on carbon steels with dual function of anti-corrosion and excellent biocidal properties shows great potential application in the industry for anti-corrosion/antimicrobial purposes.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  12. Consumer exposure to biocides - identification of relevant sources and evaluation of possible health effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Wolfgang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Products containing biocides are used for a variety of purposes in the home environment. To assess potential health risks, data on products containing biocides were gathered by means of a market survey, exposures were estimated using a worst case scenario approach (screening, the hazard of the active components were evaluated, and a preliminary risk assessment was conducted. Methods Information on biocide-containing products was collected by on-site research, by an internet inquiry as well as research into databases and lists of active substances. Twenty active substances were selected for detailed investigation. The products containing these substances were subsequently classified by range of application; typical concentrations were derived. Potential exposures were then estimated using a worst case scenario approach according to the European Commission's Technical Guidance Document on Risk Assessment. Relevant combinations of scenarios and active substances were identified. The toxicological data for these substances were compiled in substance dossiers. For estimating risks, the margins of exposure (MOEs were determined. Results Numerous consumer products were found to contain biocides. However, it appeared that only a limited number of biocidal active substances or groups of biocidal active substances were being used. The lowest MOEs for dermal exposure or exposure by inhalation were obtained for the following scenarios and biocides: indoor pest control using sprays, stickers or evaporators (chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos and spraying of disinfectants as well as cleaning of surfaces with concentrates (hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, glutardialdehyde. The risk from aggregate exposure to individual biocides via different exposure scenarios was higher than the highest single exposure on average by a factor of three. From the 20 biocides assessed 10 had skin-sensitizing properties. The biocides isothiazolinone (mixture of 5-chloro

  13. Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Mortensen

    2011-12-31

    This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

  14. Mechanical Properties of UHPFRC Joint for FORIDA Wind Turbine Tower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    FORIDA Development, Vestas and Aalborg University are currently undertaking the project “FORIDA Hybrid Towers – The towers for next generation of wind turbines”, aiming to develop a new wind turbine tower structure (The FORIDA Tower) for very tall turbines. The tower is going to be a hybrid of ma...... of materials combining steel and Ultra High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC), applied as precast units. The FORIDA Tower is competitive regarding price, design, flexibility and durability....

  15. Mechanical Properties of UHPFRC Joint for FORIDA Wind Turbine Tower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    FORIDA Development, Vestas and Aalborg University are currently undertaking the project “FORIDA Hybrid Towers – The towers for next generation of wind turbines”, aiming to develop a new wind turbine tower structure (The FORIDA Tower) for very tall turbines. The tower is going to be a hybrid...... of materials combining steel and Ultra High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC), applied as precast units. The FORIDA Tower is competitive regarding price, design, flexibility and durability....

  16. Augmented Reality Tower Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Ronald J.; Brown, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Augmented Reality technology may help improve Air Traffic Control Tower efficiency and safety during low-visibility conditions. This paper presents the assessments of five off-duty controllers who shadow-controlled' with an augmented reality prototype in their own facility. Initial studies indicated unanimous agreement that this technology is potentially beneficial, though the prototype used in the study was not adequate for operational use. Some controllers agreed that augmented reality technology improved situational awareness, had potential to benefit clearance, control, and coordination tasks and duties and could be very useful for acquiring aircraft and weather information, particularly aircraft location, heading, and identification. The strongest objections to the prototype used in this study were directed at aircraft registration errors, unacceptable optical transparency, insufficient display performance in sunlight, inadequate representation of the static environment and insufficient symbology.

  17. Adaptation to Biocides Cetrimide and Chlorhexidine in Bacteria from Organic Foods: Association with Tolerance to Other Antimicrobials and Physical Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadea, Rebeca; Glibota, Nicolás; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio; Ortega, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Chlorhexidine (CH) and quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC), such as cetrimide (CE), are widely used as disinfectants because of their broad antimicrobial spectrum. However, their frequent use for disinfection in different settings may promote bacterial drug resistance against both biocides and clinically relevant antibiotics. This study analyzes the effects of stepwise exposure to cetrimide (CE) and chlorhexidine (CH) of bacteria from organic foods and previously classified as biocide-sensitive. Gradual exposure of these strains to biocides resulted in mainly transient decreased antimicrobial susceptibility to other antibiotics and to biocides. Biocide-adapted bacteria also exhibit alterations in physiological characteristics, mainly decreased heat tolerance, or gastric acid tolerance in CE-adapted strains, while bile resistance does not seem to be influenced by biocide adaptation. Results from this study suggest that changes in membrane fluidity may be the main mechanism responsible for the acquisition of stable tolerance to biocides.

  18. Development of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli adapted to biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavri, Ana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The potential for adaptive resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli after step-wise exposure to increasing sub-inhibitory concentrations of five biocides as triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate and trisodium phosphate, was investigated, to identify the mechanisms underlying resistance. The biocide resistance and cross-resistance to the antimicrobials erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, and to sodium dodecyl sulphate, were examined according to the broth microdilution method. The presence of active efflux was studied on the basis of restored sensitivity in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitors phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine, cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone, verapamil and reserpine. Changes in the outer membrane protein profiles and morphological changes in adapted strains were studied, as compared with the parent strains. Repeated exposure of C. jejuni and C. coli to biocides resulted in partial increases in tolerance to biocides itself, to other biocides and antimicrobial compounds. The developed resistance was stable for up to 10 passages in biocide-free medium. More than one type of active efflux was identified in adapted strains. These adapted strains showed different alterations to their outer membrane protein profiles, along with morphological changes. The data presented here suggest that different mechanisms are involved in adaptation to biocides and that this adaptation is unique to each strain of Campylobacter and does not result from a single species-specific mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biocides in hydraulic fracturing fluids: a critical review of their usage, mobility, degradation, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Genevieve A; Blotevogel, Jens; Stewart, Philip S; Borch, Thomas

    2015-01-06

    Biocides are critical components of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") fluids used for unconventional shale gas development. Bacteria may cause bioclogging and inhibit gas extraction, produce toxic hydrogen sulfide, and induce corrosion leading to downhole equipment failure. The use of biocides such as glutaraldehyde and quaternary ammonium compounds has spurred a public concern and debate among regulators regarding the impact of inadvertent releases into the environment on ecosystem and human health. This work provides a critical review of the potential fate and toxicity of biocides used in hydraulic fracturing operations. We identified the following physicochemical and toxicological aspects as well as knowledge gaps that should be considered when selecting biocides: (1) uncharged species will dominate in the aqueous phase and be subject to degradation and transport whereas charged species will sorb to soils and be less bioavailable; (2) many biocides are short-lived or degradable through abiotic and biotic processes, but some may transform into more toxic or persistent compounds; (3) understanding of biocides' fate under downhole conditions (high pressure, temperature, and salt and organic matter concentrations) is limited; (4) several biocidal alternatives exist, but high cost, high energy demands, and/or formation of disinfection byproducts limits their use. This review may serve as a guide for environmental risk assessment and identification of microbial control strategies to help develop a sustainable path for managing hydraulic fracturing fluids.

  20. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  1. Effects of Material Choice on Biocide Loss in Orion Water Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, W. T.; Wallace, S. L.; Gazda, D. B.; Lewis, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    When preparing for long-duration spaceflight missions, maintaining a safe supply of potable water is of the utmost importance. One major aspect of that is ensuring that microbial growth is minimized. Historically, this challenge has been addressed through the use of biocides. When using biocides, the choice of materials for the storage containers is important, because surface reactions can reduce biocide concentrations below their effective range. In the water storage system baselined for the Orion vehicle, the primary wetted materials are stainless steel (316 L) and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Previous testing with these materials has shown that the biocide selected for use in the system (ionic silver) will plate out rapidly upon initial wetting of the system. One potential approach for maintaining an adequate biocide concentration is to spike the water supply with high levels of biocide in an attempt to passivate the surface. To evaluate this hypothesis, samples of the wetted materials were tested individually and together to determine the relative loss of biocide under representative surface area-to-volume ratios after 24 hours. Additionally, we have analyzed the efficacy of disinfecting a system containing these materials by measuring reductions in bacterial counts in the same test conditions. Preliminary results indicate that the use of titanium, either individually or in combination with stainless steel, can result in over 95% loss of biocide, while less than 5% is lost when using stainless steel. In bacterial testing, viable organisms were recovered from samples exposed to the titanium coupons after 24 hours. By comparison, no organisms were recovered from the test vessels containing only stainless steel. These results indicate that titanium, while possessing some favorable attributes, may pose additional challenges when used in water storage tanks with ionic silver biocide.

  2. Method for Reduction of Silver Biocide Plating on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John; Nalette, Timothy; Beringer, Durwood

    2013-01-01

    Silver ions in aqueous solutions (0.05 to 1 ppm) are used for microbial control in water systems. The silver ions remain in solution when stored in plastic containers, but the concentration rapidly decreases to non-biocidal levels when stored in metal containers. The silver deposits onto the surface and is reduced to non-biocidal silver metal when it contacts less noble metal surfaces, including stainless steel, titanium, and nickel-based alloys. Five methods of treatment of contact metal surfaces to deter silver deposition and reduction are proposed: (1) High-temperature oxidation of the metal surface; (2) High-concentration silver solution pre-treatment; (3) Silver plating; (4) Teflon coat by vapor deposition (titanium only); and (5) A combination of methods (1) and (2), which proved to be the best method for the nickel-based alloy application. The mechanism associated with surface treatments (1), (2), and (5) is thought to be the development of a less active oxide layer that deters ionic silver deposition. Mechanism (3) is an attempt to develop an equilibrium ionic silver concentration via dissolution of metallic silver. Mechanism (4) provides a non-reactive barrier to deter ionic silver plating. Development testing has shown that ionic silver in aqueous solution was maintained at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 15 months with method (5) (a combination of methods (1) and (2)), before the test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Method (1) resulted in the maintenance of a biocidal level (approximately 0.05 ppm) for up to 10 months before that test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Methods (1) and (2) used separately were able to maintain ionic silver in aqueous solution at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 10 months before the test was discontinued for stainless steel alloys. Method (3) was only utilized for titanium alloys, and was successful at maintaining ionic silver in aqueous solution at

  3. Blasting response of the Eiffel Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlyck, Lachlan; Hayes, Kieran; Caetano, Ryan; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    A finite element model of the Eiffel Tower was constructed using Strand7 software. The model replicates the existing tower, with dimensions justified through the use of original design drawings. A static and dynamic analysis was conducted to determine the actions of the tower under permanent, imposed and wind loadings, as well as under blast pressure loads and earthquake loads due to an explosion. It was observed that the tower utilises the full axial capacity of individual members by acting as a `truss of trusses'. As such, permanent and imposed loads are efficiently transferred to the primary columns through compression, while wind loads induce tensile forces in the windward legs and compressive forces in the leeward. Under blast loading, the tower experienced both ground vibrations and blast pressures. Ground vibrations induced a negligibly small earthquake loading into the structure which was ignored in subsequent analyses. The blast pressure was significant, and a dynamic analysis of this revealed that further research is required into the damping qualities of the structure due to soil and mechanical properties. In the worst case scenario, the blast was assumed to completely destroy several members in the adjacent leg. Despite this weakened condition, it was observed that the tower would still be able to sustain static loads, at least for enough time for occupant evacuation. Further, an optimised design revealed the structure was structurally sound under a 46% reduction of the metal tower's mass.

  4. Glass-(nAg, nCu) Biocide Coatings on Ceramic Oxide Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram−, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1–2 µg/cm2 in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10–15 µg/cm2 for the copper nanoparticles. PMID:22427967

  5. Glass-(nAg, nCu) biocide coatings on ceramic oxide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Malpartida, Francisco; Díaz, Luis Antonio; Torrecillas, Ramón; Rojo, Fernando; Moya, José Serafín

    2012-01-01

    The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based) substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram-, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1-2 µg/cm(2) in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10-15 µg/cm(2) for the copper nanoparticles.

  6. Glass-(nAg, nCu biocide coatings on ceramic oxide substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Esteban-Tejeda

    Full Text Available The present work was focused on obtaining biocide coatings constituted by a glassy soda-lime matrix containing silver or copper nanoparticles on ceramic (alumina and zirconia based substrates. Both glassy coatings showed a high biocide activity against Gram-, Gram+ bacteria and yeast, reducing cell numbers more than three logarithms. Silver nanoparticles had a significantly higher biocide activity than copper nanoparticles, since the lixiviation levels required to reduce cell numbers more than 3 logarithms was of almost 1-2 µg/cm(2 in the case of silver nanoparticles, and 10-15 µg/cm(2 for the copper nanoparticles.

  7. Biocide tolerance in Salmonella from meats in Southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Antonio Marin; Burgos, M Jose Grande; Márquez, M Luisa Fernández; Aguayo, M Carmen López; Pulido, Rubén Pérez; del Árbol, Julia Toledo; Gálvez, Antonio; López, Rosario Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars sampled from meat products in Southern Spain (Andalucía) during the period 2002-2007 were analyzed in this study. The serovars most frequently detected (in order) were Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Derby, Anatum and Rissen. Isolates (n = 43) were tested for sensitivity to biocides, including the quaternary ammonium compounds benzalkonium chloride (BC), cetrimide (CT) and hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HDP), and the bisphenols triclosan (TC) and hexachlorophene (CF). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the quaternary ammonium compounds was in the range of 25 to 50 mg/L for most isolates, although a few isolates required much higher concentrations, up to 250 mg/L. Bisphenols showed higher inhibitory activity, with a MIC of 2.5 to 25 mg/L. A few isolates showed a "non-wildtype" MIC for TC of up to 250 mg/L. These results indicate a low incidence of tolerance towards quaternary ammonium compounds and triclosan among Salmonella from meats and meat products.

  8. Evaluation of the performance of the systems cooling auxiliary of the Almaraz NPP turbine building; Evaluacion del rendimiento de los sistemas de refrigeracion auxiliar del edificio de turbinas de CNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Carmona, G.

    2011-07-01

    After the successive performance improvements, to evacuate the thermal loads, and maintain acceptable temperatures throughout the year, added an auxiliary cooling system of the building of turbine, TCA system, composed of 5 shot forced by unit cooling towers.

  9. Wind towers architecture, climate and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Mehdi N; Sayigh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a holistic treatment of wind towers, from their underlying scientific principles to design and operation. Includes suggestions for optimization based on the authors' own research findings from recent analytical studies.

  10. Performance Analysis of Tower Watch Camera Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hansen, Richard

    2001-01-01

    ...) system with integrated image intensification and long-range thermal (infrared) imaging. The goal was to determine the extent to which remote monitoring of rough inlet bar conditions and vessel traffic could reduce the need to staff a watch tower...

  11. LaGuardia air traffic control tower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    To celebrate FAA and its LaGuardia Airport employees past, : present, and future this booklet outlines the airports history and accomplishments and includes copies of some of the photographs in the : air traffic control towers history g...

  12. biological and biochemical effects of biocides and gamma radiation on pathogen attacked some horticulture crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, I.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    the present investigation was aimed to study the possibility of formulation of some essential oils having antimicrobial activity to be used as biocides. the results of this study showed that fennel, peppermint and caraway oils were the most inhibitory effective oils against some post harvest pathogens. the used oils. were formulated as biocides using different emulsifiers with the addition of different types of fixed oils . the prepared biocides were effective for controlling the growth of the studied microorganisms in vitro and in vivo on the host plant products. also , the interaction of biocides and different doses of gamma radiation were effective for extending the shelf life of potato tubers and orange fruits during storage at room temperature for periods of 150 and 75 days, respectively. biochemical changes in potato tubers and orange fruits as a result of treatments were studied

  13. Quaternary ammonium biocides as antimicrobial agents protecting historical wood and brick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Koziróg, Anna; Otlewska, Anna; Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Nowicka-Krawczyk, Paulina; Brycki, Bogumił; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are widely used in disinfection of water, surfaces and instruments as well as in textile, leather and food industries because of their relatively low toxicity, broad antimicrobial spectrum, non-volatility and chemical stability. Due to these advantages, QACs are also used in restoration and can be applied on historical material. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of biocides based on quaternary ammonium salts and containing various excipients in the protection of historical materials against microbial growth. The study determined the antimicrobial activity of three biocides against bacteria: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Staphylococcus equorum, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus muralis, Sporosarcina aquimarina and Rhodococcus fascians, and moulds: Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium citreonigrum, Cladosporium cladosporioides I, Acremonium strictum, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cladosporium cladosporioides II, all isolated from historical wood and brick. Staphylococcus equorum, Bacillus cereus, Sporosarcina aquimarina and Rhodococcus fascians bacteria, and Cladosporium cladosporioides I and Acremonium strictum moulds showed high sensitivity to quaternary ammonium biocides. Historical wood can be effectively disinfected by three applications of biocide A (30% v/v) containing dodecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC), citric acid, propiconazole and propanol. Disinfection of historical brick can be carried out by three applications of 6% v/v solutions of biocide B (based on DDAC and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid - EDTA) or biocide C (containing a non-ionic surfactant, DDAC and EDTA). Effective protection of historical building materials against microbial growth for a period of seven days can be achieved by the application of biocide A (30% v/v) on the wood surface and biocide B (6% v/v) on the brick surface.

  14. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs

  15. Increased persistence of antifouling paint biocides when associated with paint particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.V.; McHugh, M.; Hilton, M.; Waldock, M.

    2003-01-01

    Release of biocides associated with paint particles into marinas may increase their persistence in the environment. - Current regulatory risk assessment procedures only assess the impact of antifouling paint biocides that are released through leaching from a painted surface. Hull cleaning activities can lead to particles of antifouling paint containing biocides to enter the environment. Comparative pseudo-first order anaerobic degradation rate constants and half-lives were determined for a selection of common antifouling paint booster biocides, their degradation products, and associated with paint particles. Anaerobic half-lives of <0.5 days were calculated for chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, and SeaNine 211, between 1 and 3 days for DCPMU and DCPU, between 14 and 35 days for diuron and CPDU, and over 226 days for GS26575 and Irgarol 1051. Increased persistence was observed when the compounds were introduced to sediments associated with antifouling paint particles. When present as antifouling paint particles, an increased half-life of 9.9 days for SeaNine 211 and 1.4 days was calculated for dichlofluanid, no significant degradation was observed for diuron. It is suspected that this is due to much of the biocide being initially bound within the matrix of the paint particle that is slowly released through dissolution processes into the sediment pore water prior to degradation. The release of booster biocides associated with paint particles into marinas has the potential to lead to their accumulation unless activities such as hull cleaning are strictly regulated

  16. Increased persistence of antifouling paint biocides when associated with paint particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.V.; McHugh, M.; Hilton, M.; Waldock, M

    2003-05-01

    Release of biocides associated with paint particles into marinas may increase their persistence in the environment. - Current regulatory risk assessment procedures only assess the impact of antifouling paint biocides that are released through leaching from a painted surface. Hull cleaning activities can lead to particles of antifouling paint containing biocides to enter the environment. Comparative pseudo-first order anaerobic degradation rate constants and half-lives were determined for a selection of common antifouling paint booster biocides, their degradation products, and associated with paint particles. Anaerobic half-lives of <0.5 days were calculated for chlorothalonil, dichlofluanid, and SeaNine 211, between 1 and 3 days for DCPMU and DCPU, between 14 and 35 days for diuron and CPDU, and over 226 days for GS26575 and Irgarol 1051. Increased persistence was observed when the compounds were introduced to sediments associated with antifouling paint particles. When present as antifouling paint particles, an increased half-life of 9.9 days for SeaNine 211 and 1.4 days was calculated for dichlofluanid, no significant degradation was observed for diuron. It is suspected that this is due to much of the biocide being initially bound within the matrix of the paint particle that is slowly released through dissolution processes into the sediment pore water prior to degradation. The release of booster biocides associated with paint particles into marinas has the potential to lead to their accumulation unless activities such as hull cleaning are strictly regulated.

  17. Time-Dependent Antimicrobial Activity of Filtering Nonwovens with Gemini Surfactant-Based Biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Okrasa, Małgorzata; Szulc, Justyna; Brycki, Bogumił; Gutarowska, Beata

    2017-09-27

    Previous studies on nonwovens used for respiratory protective devices (RPDs) were related to equipment intended for short-term use. There is only limited research on the development of biocidal nonwoven fabrics for reusable RPDs that could be used safely in an industrial work environment where there is a risk of microbial growth. Moreover, a new group of biocides with high antimicrobial activity-gemini surfactants, has never been explored for textile's application in previous studies. The aim of this study was to develop high-efficiency melt-blown nonwovens containing gemini surfactants with time-dependent biocidal activity, and to validate their antimicrobial properties under conditions simulating their use at a plant biomass-processing unit. A set of porous biocidal structures (SPBS) was prepared and applied to the melt-blown polypropylene (PP) nonwovens. The biocidal properties of the structures were triggered by humidity and had different activation rates. Scanning electron microscopy was used to undertake structural studies of the modified PP/SPBS nonwovens. In addition, simulation of plant biomass dust deposition on the nonwovens was performed. The biocidal activity of PP/SPBS nonwovens was evaluated following incubation with Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger from the American Type Culture Collection, and with Pseudomonas fluorescens and Penicillium chrysogenum isolated from the biomass. PP/SPBS nonwovens exhibited antimicrobial activity to varying levels. Higher antimicrobial activity was noted for bacteria (R = 87.85-97.46%) and lower for moulds (R = 80.11-94.53%).

  18. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  19. Drop Tower Facility at Queensland University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Theodore; Ong, Teng-Cheong

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Drop Tower Facility is a {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}2.1 second, 21.3 m fall, dual capsule drop tower system. The dual capsule comprises of an uncoupled exterior hollow drag shield that experiences drag by the ambient atmosphere with the experimental capsule falling within the drag shield. The dual capsule system is lifted to the top of the drop tower via a mechanical crane and the dropping process is initiated by the cutting of a wire coupling the experimental package and suspending the drag shield. The internal experimental capsule reaches the bottom of the drag shield floor just prior to the deceleration stage at the air bag and during this time experience gravity levels of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{-6} g. The deceleration system utilizes an inflatable airbag where experimental packages can be designed to experience a maximum deceleration of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{18} g for {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}0.1 seconds. The drag shield can house experimental packages with a maximum diameter of 0.8 m and height of 0.9 m. The drag shield can also be used in foam mode, where the walls are lined with foam and small experiments can be dropped completely untethered. This mode is generally used for the study of microsatellite manipulation. Payloads can be powered by on-board power systems with power delivered to the experiment until free fall occurs. Experimental data that can be collected includes but is not limited to video, temperature, pressure, voltage/current from the power supply, and triggering mechanisms outputs which are simultaneously collected via data logging systems and high speed video recording systems. Academic and commercial projects are currently under investigation at the QUT Drop Tower Facility and collaboration is openly welcome at this facility. Current research includes the study of heterogeneously burning metals in oxygen which is aimed at fire safety applications and

  20. User's manual for the BNW-I optimization code for dry-cooled power plants. [AMCIRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.J.; Daniel, D.J.; De Mier, W.V.; Faletti, D.W.; Wiles, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    This appendix provides a listing, called Program AMCIRC, of the BNW-1 optimization code for determining, for a particular size power plant, the optimum dry cooling tower design using ammonia flow in the heat exchanger tubes. The optimum design is determined by repeating the design of the cooling system over a range of design conditions in order to find the cooling system with the smallest incremental cost. This is accomplished by varying five parameters of the plant and cooling system over ranges of values. These parameters are varied systematically according to techniques that perform pattern and gradient searches. The dry cooling system optimized by program AMCIRC is composed of a condenser/reboiler (condensation of steam and boiling of ammonia), piping system (transports ammonia vapor out and ammonia liquid from the dry cooling towers), and circular tower system (vertical one-pass heat exchangers situated in circular configurations with cocurrent ammonia flow in the tubes of the heat exchanger). (LCL)

  1. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  2. Aerodynamical errors on tower mounted wind speed measurements due to the presence of the tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, H. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology; Dahlberg, J.Aa. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Field measurements of wind speed from two lattice towers showed large differences for wind directions where the anemometers of both towers should be unaffected by any upstream obstacle. The wind speed was measured by cup anemometers mounted on booms along the side of the tower. A simple wind tunnel test indicates that the boom, for the studied conditions, could cause minor flow disturbances. A theoretical study, by means of simple 2D flow modelling of the flow around the mast, demonstrates that the tower itself could cause large wind flow disturbances. A theoretical study, based on simple treatment of the physics of motion of a cup anemometer, demonstrates that a cup anemometer is sensitive to velocity gradients across the cups and responds clearly to velocity gradients in the vicinity of the tower. Comparison of the results from the theoretical study and field tests show promising agreement. 2 refs, 8 figs

  3. Introduction of a Cooling-Fan Efficiency Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiavon, S.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2009-01-01

    was determined for a ceiling fan, a desk fan, standing fan, and a tower fan in a real office at three room air temperatures and at different fan speed levels. The results reveal that the index is sensitive enough to identify differences in the performance of the cooling devices. A standard method for testing fan...

  4. Pilot scale evaluation of mine water (MW) as a cooling medium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    be problematic since it will complicate the chemical treatment of this water in a full scale cooling tower system. Introduction. Sasol One abstracts large volumes of water from various sources, such as the Zuikerbosch & Vaal River for various applications including make-up to the cooling water systems. The underground mine ...

  5. Tower Mesonetwork Climatology and Interactive Display Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bauman, William H., III

    2004-01-01

    Forecasters at the 45th Weather Squadron and Spaceflight Meteorology Group use data from the tower network over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to evaluate Launch Commit Criteria, and issue and verify forecasts for ground operations. Systematic biases in these parameters could adversely affect an analysis, forecast, or verification. Also, substantial geographical variations in temperature and wind speed can occur under specific wind directions. To address these concerns, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a climatology of temperatures and winds from the tower network, and identified the geographical variation and significant tower biases. The mesoclimate is largely driven by the complex land-water interfaces across KSC/CCAFS. Towers with close proximity to water typically had much warmer nocturnal temperatures and higher wind speeds throughout the year. The strongest nocturnal wind speeds occurred from October to March whereas the strongest mean daytime wind speeds occurred from February to May. These results of this project can be viewed by forecasters through an interactive graphical user interface developed by the AMU. The web-based interface includes graphical and map displays of mean, standard deviation, bias, and data availability for any combination of towers, variables, months, hours, and wind directions.

  6. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  7. Cytotoxic effects of air freshener biocides in lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung-Taek; Lee, Mimi; Seo, Gun-Baek; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Shim, Ilseob; Lee, Doo-Hee; Kim, Taksoo; Seo, Jung Kwan; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of mixtures of citral (CTR) and either benzisothiazolinone (BIT, Mix-CTR-BIT) or triclosan (TCS, Mix-CTR-TCS) in human A549 lung epithelial cells. We investigated the effects of various mix ratios of these common air freshener ingredients on cell viability, cell proliferation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and DNA damage. Mix-CTR-BIT and Mix-CTR-TCS significantly decreased the viability of lung epithelial cells and inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, both mixtures increased ROS generation, compared to that observed in control cells. In particular, cell viability, growth, and morphology were affected upon increase in the proportion of BIT or TCS in the mixture. However, comet analysis showed that treatment of cells with Mix-CTR-BIT or Mix-CTR-TCS did not increase DNA damage. Taken together, these data suggested that increasing the content of biocides in air fresheners might induce cytotoxicity, and that screening these compounds using lung epithelial cells may contribute to hazard assessment.

  8. Nanosilver against fungi. Silver nanoparticles as an effective biocidal factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulit, Jolanta; Banach, Marcin; Szczygłowska, Renata; Bryk, Mirosław

    2013-01-01

    The work presents a method of obtaining an aqueous raspberry extract as well as its physicochemical and analytical characteristics. The paper also contains a description of the method of preparation of nanosilver suspensions based on this extract. The raspberry extract served as a source of phenolic compounds which acted as both reducing and stabilizing agents. Suspensions of silver nanoparticles were obtained with the use of chemical reduction method. The silver ions concentration, pH value and temperature of samples incubation were independent variables. The next step of the research was to measure the antifungal activity of the received silver nanoparticles as well as to perform a mycological efficacy resistance analysis of the tested preparations in relation to different concentrations of nanostructured silver. Tests were conducted in compliance with the Eucast guidelines. The results of microbiological study of (the samples') biocidal effect against Cladosporium cladosporoides and Aspergillus niger are described. It was found that using nanosilver suspension at the concentration of 50 ppm inhibited the growth of Cladosporium cladosporoides and Aspergillus niger by 90% and 70%, respectively.

  9. One-pot facile green synthesis of biocidal silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudrat Hazarika, Shabiha; Gupta, Kuldeep; Shamin, Khan Naseem Ahmed Mohammed; Bhardwaj, Pushpender; Boruah, Ratan; Yadav, Kamlesh K.; Naglot, Ashok; Deb, P.; Mandal, M.; Doley, Robin; Veer, Vijay; Baruah, Indra; Namsa, Nima D.

    2016-07-01

    The plant root extract mediated green synthesis method produces monodispersed spherical shape silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with a size range of 15-30 nm as analyzed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. The material showed potent antibacterial and antifungal properties. Synthesized AgNPs display a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak at 420 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffractometer analysis revealed the crystalline and face-centered cubic geometry of in situ prepared AgNPs. Agar well diffusion and a colony forming unit assay demonstrated the potent biocidal activity of AgNPs against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas diminuta and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Intriguingly, the phytosynthesized AgNPs exhibited activity against pathogenic fungi, namely Trichophyton rubrum, Aspergillus versicolor and Candida albicans. Scanning electron microscopy observations indicated morphological changes in the bacterial cells incubated with silver nanoparticles. The genomic DNA isolated from the bacteria was incubated with an increasing concentration of AgNPs and the replication fidelity of 16S rDNA was observed by performing 18 and 35 cycles PCR. The replication efficiency of small (600 bp) and large (1500 bp) DNA fragments in the presence of AgNPs were compromised in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that the Thalictrum foliolosum root extract mediated synthesis of AgNPs could be used as a promising antimicrobial agent against clinical pathogens.

  10. Searching for “Environmentally-Benign” Antifouling Biocides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ting Cui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the result of the ecological impacts from the use of tributyltins (TBT in shipping, environmental legislation for the registration of chemicals for use in the environment has grown to a monumental challenge requiring product dossiers to include information on the environmental fate and behavior of any chemicals. Specifically, persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity, collectively known as PBT, are properties of concern in the assessment of chemicals. However, existing measurements of PBT properties are a cumbersome and expensive process, and thus not applied in the early stages of the product discovery and development. Inexpensive methods for preliminary PBT screening would minimize risks arising with the subsequent registration of products. In this article, we evaluated the PBT properties of compounds reported to possess anti-fouling properties using QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship prediction programs such as BIOWIN™ (a biodegradation probability program, KOWWIN™ (log octanol-water partition coefficient calculation program and ECOSAR™ (Ecological Structure Activity Relationship Programme. The analyses identified some small (Mr < 400 synthetic and natural products as potential candidates for environmentally benign biocides. We aim to demonstrate that while these methods of estimation have limitations, when applied with discretion, they are powerful tools useful in the early stages of research for compound selection for further development as anti-foulants.

  11. Biocide tolerance in Salmonella from meats in Southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marin Garrido

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella serovars sampled from meat products in Southern Spain (Andalucía during the period 2002-2007 were analyzed in this study. The serovars most frequently detected (in order were Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Derby, Anatum and Rissen. Isolates (n = 43 were tested for sensitivity to biocides, including the quaternary ammonium compounds benzalkonium chloride (BC, cetrimide (CT and hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HDP, and the bisphenols triclosan (TC and hexachlorophene (CF. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for the quaternary ammonium compounds was in the range of 25 to 50 mg/L for most isolates, although a few isolates required much higher concentrations, up to 250 mg/L. Bisphenols showed higher inhibitory activity, with a MIC of 2.5 to 25 mg/L. A few isolates showed a “non-wildtype” MIC for TC of up to 250 mg/L. These results indicate a low incidence of tolerance towards quaternary ammonium compounds and triclosan among Salmonellafrom meats and meat products.

  12. Fabrication of polypropylene/silver nanocomposites for biocidal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliani, Washington Luiz; Parra, Duclerc Fernandes; Komatsu, Luiz Gustavo Hiroki; Lincopan, Nilton; Rangari, Vijaya Kumar; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a study on biocidal effect of polymer nanocomposite films of gamma irradiated polypropylene (PP) and silver nanoparticles. The modified polypropylene was obtained from isotactic polypropylene (iPP) in pellets form by irradiation with gamma rays in the presence of acetylene. A new morphology with long chain branching of PP and distinct rheology is obtained by this process. The blend of 50/50wt% neat PP and PP modified by gamma radiation were further mixed using a twin screw extruder. The AgNPs were infused into this polymer blend at different concentrations of: 0.1%; 0.25%; 0.5%; 1.0%; 1.0% (PVP), 2.0% and 4.0% by wt%. These polymer nanocomposites were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cytotoxicity test and Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion techniques. The bactericidal effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were assessed in detail. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and biocidal activity of modified poly(vinyl alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Refaie Kenawy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized polymers and their polymer nature give them more advantages than the corresponding small molecules. In this respect, polymeric ammonium and phosphonium salts were prepared by chemical modifications of poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA aiming to explore their antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The modifications were performed by chloroacetylation with chloroacetyl chloride. Incorporation of the ammonium and phosphonium salts was conducted by the reaction of chloroacetylated poly(vinyl alcohol (CPVA with triethylamine (TEA, triphenylphosphine (TPP, and tributylphosphine (TBP. The antimicrobial activity of the polymers against variety of test microorganisms was examined by the cut plug and viable cell counting methods of shake cultures of 10 times dilute nutrient broth and Sabouraud’s media, seeded with the test microorganisms. It was found that the immobilized polymers exhibited antimicrobial activity against the Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella sp. and Salmonella typhi and Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and B. cereus and the dermatophyte fungus (Trichophyton rubrum. The growth inhibition of the test microorganisms (ratio of surviving cell number, M/C varied according to the composition of the active group in the polymer and the test organism. It increased by increasing the concentration of the polymer. Triphenyl phosphonium salt of the modified poly(vinyl alcohol exhibited the most biocidal activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria after 24 h.

  14. Antimacrofouling Efficacy of Innovative Inorganic Nanomaterials Loaded with Booster Biocides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldad Gutner-Hoch

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of nano-structured compounds has been increasing rapidly in recent years, in several fields. The use of engineered nano-materials as carriers of antifouling compounds is just beginning and already reveals clear advantages compared to bulk active compounds, such as slowed and controlled release, novel functionality, and high loading capacity. This present study assesses the antifouling efficacy of two nanostructured materials, spherical mesoporous silica nanocapsules (SiNC and Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDH, loaded with two commercial biocides, zinc prithione (ZnPT and copper pyrithione (CuPT. The study used adult mussels from three geographical regions, the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and the Red Sea, to examine the efficacy of the innovative compounds. The efficacy of these compounds on larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina from the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea was also examined. The results of this study demonstrated the environmentally friendly properties of unloaded LDH against the two-model systems, adult mussels or bryozoan larvae. ZnPT entrapped in LDH demonstrated the most effective antifouling compound against the two model systems. A comparison of the impact of the two compounds on macrofouling organisms from the different marine habitats examined in this study indicates a distinction associated with the organisms’ different ecosystems. The Red Sea mussels and bryozoans, representing a tropical marine ecosystem, yielded the highest efficacy values among tested Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea mussels and bryozoans.

  15. Damping of wind turbine tower vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Mark Laier; Pedersen, Mikkel Melters

    Damping of wind turbine vibrations by supplemental dampers is a key ingredient for the continuous use of monopiles as support for offshore wind turbines. The present thesis consists of an extended summary with four parts and appended papers [P1-P4] concerning novel strategies for damping of tower...... in a stroke amplifying brace, which amplifies the displacement across the damper and thus reduces the desired level of damper force. For optimal damping of the two lowest tower modes, a novel toggle-brace concept for amplifying the bending deformation of the tower is presented. Numerical examples illustrate...... damper with IFFis validated by a series of real time hybrid simulations (RTHS). The experimental results illustrate the ability of the hybrid damper concept to increase damper stroke or attainable damping. The results also show that the actuator signal is quitesensitive to drift due an offset...

  16. Engineering photochemical smog through convection towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Prueitt, M.L.; Bossert, J.E.; Mroz, E.J.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacobson, M.Z.; Turco, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Dept.

    1995-02-01

    Reverse convection towers have attracted attention as a medium for cleansing modern cities. Evaporation of an aqueous mist injected at the tower opening could generate electrical power by creating descent, and simultaneously scavenge unsightly and unhealthful particulates. The study offered here assesses the influence to tower water droplets on the photochemical component of Los Angeles type smog. The primary radical chain initiator OH is likely removed into aqueous phases well within the residence time of air in the tower, and then reacts away rapidly. Organics do not dissolve, but nighttime hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} depletes the nitrogen oxides. A lack of HOx would slow hydrocarbon oxidation and so also ozone production. Lowering of NOx would also alter ozone production rates, but the direction is uncertain. SO{sub 2} is available in sufficient quantities in some urban areas to react with stable oxidants, and if seawater were the source of the mist, the high pH would lead to fast sulfur oxidation kinetics. With an accommodation coefficient of 10{sup {minus}3}, however, ozone may not enter the aqueous phase efficiently. Even if ozone is destroyed or its production suppressed, photochemical recovery times are on the order of hours, so that tower processing must be centered on a narrow midday time window. The cost of building the number of structures necessary for this brief turnover could be prohibitive. The increase in humidity accompanying mist evaporation could be controlled with condensers, but might otherwise counteract visibility enhancements by recreating aqueous aerosols. Quantification of the divergent forcings convection towers must exert upon the cityscape would call for coupled three dimensional modeling of transport, microphysics, and photochemistry. 112 refs.

  17. Dolmen and Tower Tombs (3600 - 2000 BC)

    OpenAIRE

    Steimer-Herbet, Tara

    2014-01-01

    In the proto-historic period, the territory of contemporary Jordan was covered with megalithic tombs of two types that correspond to different livelihoods, associated with more or less arid environments. Thus, sedentary settlements developed dolmen necropolises, while the steppe was covered with tower tombs. Figure II.15 — Tower Tombs and Dolmens in Ancient Bronze Time. In Jordan, the construction of megalithic tombs began in the early 4th millennium BC and faded at the turn of the 2nd mille...

  18. In vitro activity of seven hospital biocides against Mycobacterium abscessus: Implications for patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Caskey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycobacterium abscessus pulmonary infection has recently emerged as a significant pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF and is associated with significant morbidity and accelerated pulmonary decline. There is a paucity of data describing the activity of hospital biocides against this organism. Methods: M. abscessus isolates (n = 13 were recovered from CF and non-CF respiratory specimens. Seven commonly employed hospital biocides with generic ingredients as follows: acetone, propan-2-ol, diethylene glycol, 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one and 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, chlorine dioxide, 4% chlorhexidine, alcohol, and disodium carbonate, compound with hydrogen peroxide, 10% sodium hypochlorite were assayed for their biocidal activity against M. abscessus. Fresh cultures of M. abscessus were exposed to biocide in liquid medium as per manufacturers' instruction and were immediately plated following the completion of the contact period. The mean concentration of M. abscessus plated was 9.82 × 106 colony-forming units (range: 1.63 × 105–1.12 × 108. In addition, the remaining bacteria/biocide solution was enriched nonselectively in Mueller Hinton broth (37°C/1 week and then plated. Results: All M. abscessus isolates survived in alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride, 5-chloro-2-methyl-2H-isothiazol-3-one (EC No. 247-500-7 and 2-methyl-2H-isothiazol-3-one, 4% Chlorhexidine™, O-phenylphenol and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate™ and disodium carbonate, compound with hydrogen peroxide. One out of 13 M. abscessus cultures was killed by Chlorine Dioxide™ and one by Sodium Dichloroisocyanurate™, representing a 5-log kill. Two isolates were killed by Alcohol™ again representing a 5 log kill. Following enrichment, O-phenylphenol and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate™ showed the greatest biocidal activity with 11/13 isolates, whereas 2/13 cultures were killed by sodium dichloroisocyanurate™. All other biocide/culture combinations

  19. In vitro activity of seven hospital biocides against Mycobacterium abscessus: Implications for patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Steven; Moore, John E; Rendall, Jacqueline C

    2018-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus pulmonary infection has recently emerged as a significant pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with significant morbidity and accelerated pulmonary decline. There is a paucity of data describing the activity of hospital biocides against this organism. M. abscessus isolates (n = 13) were recovered from CF and non-CF respiratory specimens. Seven commonly employed hospital biocides with generic ingredients as follows: acetone, propan-2-ol, diethylene glycol, 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one and 2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one, chlorine dioxide, 4% chlorhexidine, alcohol, and disodium carbonate, compound with hydrogen peroxide, 10% sodium hypochlorite were assayed for their biocidal activity against M. abscessus. Fresh cultures of M. abscessus were exposed to biocide in liquid medium as per manufacturers' instruction and were immediately plated following the completion of the contact period. The mean concentration of M. abscessus plated was 9.82 × 10 6 colony-forming units (range: 1.63 × 10 5 -1.12 × 10 8 ). In addition, the remaining bacteria/biocide solution was enriched nonselectively in Mueller Hinton broth (37°C/1 week) and then plated. All M. abscessus isolates survived in alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride, 5-chloro-2-methyl-2H-isothiazol-3-one (EC No. 247-500-7) and 2-methyl-2H-isothiazol-3-one, 4% Chlorhexidine™, O-phenylphenol and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate™ and disodium carbonate, compound with hydrogen peroxide. One out of 13 M. abscessus cultures was killed by Chlorine Dioxide™ and one by Sodium Dichloroisocyanurate™, representing a 5-log kill. Two isolates were killed by Alcohol™ again representing a 5 log kill. Following enrichment, O-phenylphenol and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate™ showed the greatest biocidal activity with 11/13 isolates, whereas 2/13 cultures were killed by sodium dichloroisocyanurate™. All other biocide/culture combinations yielded growth. These data indicate that M

  20. Susceptibility of Mycobacterium immunogenum and Pseudomonas fluorescens to formaldehyde and non-formaldehyde biocides in semi-synthetic metalworking fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Khan, Izhar U H; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2011-01-20

    Mycobacterium immunogenum, a newly identified member of the Mycobacterium chelonae_M. abscessus complex is considered a potential etiological agent for hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in machine workers exposed to contaminated metalworking fluid (MWF). This study investigated the biocidal efficacy of the frequently applied commercial formaldehyde-releasing (HCHO) biocides Grotan and Bioban CS 1135 and non-HCHO type biocides Kathon 886 MW (isothiazolone) and Preventol CMK 40 (phenolic) toward this emerging mycobacterial species (M. immunogenum) in HP-linked MWFs, alone and in presence of a representative of the Gram-negative bacterial contaminants, Pseudomonas fluorescens, using two semi-synthetic MWF matrices (designated Fluid A and Fluid B). Relative biocide susceptibility analysis indicated M immunogenum to be comparatively more resistant (2-1600 fold) than P. fluorescens to the tested biocides under the varied test conditions. In terms of minimum inhibitory concentration, Kathon was the most effective biocide against M. immunogenum. Fluid factors had a major effect on the biocide susceptibility. Fluid A formulation provided greater protective advantage to the test organisms than Fluid B. Fluid dialysis (Fluid A) led to an increased biocidal efficacy of Grotan, Kathon and Preventol against M. immunogenum further implying the role of native fluid components. Used fluid matrix, in general, increased the resistance of the two test organisms against the biocides, with certain exceptions. M. immunogenum resistance increased in presence of the co-contaminant P. fluorescens. Collectively, the results show a multifactorial nature of the biocide susceptibility of MWF-colonizing mycobacteria and highlight the importance of more rigorous efficacy testing and validation of biocides prior to and during their application in metalworking fluid operations.

  1. Susceptibility of Mycobacterium immunogenum and Pseudomonas fluorescens to Formaldehyde and Non-Formaldehyde Biocides in Semi-Synthetic Metalworking Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B. Selvaraju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium immunogenum, a newly identified member of the Mycobacterium chelonae_M. abscessus complex is considered a potential etiological agent for hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP in machine workers exposed to contaminated metalworking fluid (MWF. This study investigated the biocidal efficacy of the frequently applied commercial formaldehyde-releasing (HCHO biocides Grotan and Bioban CS 1135 and non-HCHO type biocides Kathon 886 MW (isothiazolone and Preventol CMK 40 (phenolic toward this emerging mycobacterial species (M. immunogenum in HP-linked MWFs, alone and in presence of a representative of the Gram-negative bacterial contaminants, Pseudomonas fluorescens, using two semi-synthetic MWF matrices (designated Fluid A and Fluid B. Relative biocide susceptibility analysis indicated M immunogenum to be comparatively more resistant (2–1600 fold than P. fluorescens to the tested biocides under the varied test conditions. In terms of minimum inhibitory concentration, Kathon was the most effective biocide against M. immunogenum. Fluid factors had a major effect on the biocide susceptibility. Fluid A formulation provided greater protective advantage to the test organisms than Fluid B. Fluid dialysis (Fluid A led to an increased biocidal efficacy of Grotan, Kathon and Preventol against M. immunogenum further implying the role of native fluid components. Used fluid matrix, in general, increased the resistance of the two test organisms against the biocides, with certain exceptions. M. immunogenum resistance increased in presence of the co-contaminant P. fluorescens. Collectively, the results show a multifactorial nature of the biocide susceptibility of MWF-colonizing mycobacteria and highlight the importance of more rigorous efficacy testing and validation of biocides prior to and during their application in metalworking fluid operations.

  2. Control Towers in Supply Chain Management - Past and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Trzuskawska-Grzesińska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The global economy requires global supply chain management which relies on visibility and responsiveness. Determinants such as: information technology tools, process knowledge, sales and operations planning experiences, etc., enable the formation of theory and practice for the supply chain control tower concept. The goal of the research paper is to identify business examples of different approaches to the supply chain control tower in the past and initiate a discussion on their future. This paper synthesizes past control tower practices and identifies possible future trends. The author performed: literature analysis, three selected companies' case studies and comparative analyses. As the control towers evolve, while supply chains are transforming continuous, update from the market is needed. The research findings showed the selected companies, in the future, perceived control tower's activities as a potential source of revenue not just solely a source of cost and time optimization as well as a source of value added to customer. The researched control towers were built and still they are developed. The business frequently changes and requires control towers to be adjusted, reengineered and adaptive. The researched control towers are needed to keep control over supply chain while it is transforming. There is a differentiation between the supply chain control towers, logistic services control towers and reverse supply chain control towers. An integration mechanism between the control towers would be necessary to assure entire supply chain visibility and orchestration. The research also shows the knowledge gap regarding the control towers in supply chain, specially their possible configurations and future.

  3. Evaluation of the Biocidal Efficacy of Different Forms of Silver Against Cupriavidus (formerly Wautersia) Species Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, Daniel B.; Schultz, John R.; Wong, Wing; Algate, Michelle T.; Bryant, Becky; Castro, Victoria A.

    2009-01-01

    Contingency Water Containers (CWCs) are used to store potable and technical water that is transferred to the International Space Station (ISS) from the Shuttle orbiter vehicles. When CWCs are filled, water from the orbiter galley is passed through an ion exchange/activated carbon cartridge that removes the residual iodine biocide used on Shuttle before silver biocide is added. Removal of iodine and addition of silver is necessary to inhibit microbial growth inside CWCs and maintain compatibility with the water systems in the Russian segment of ISS. As part of nominal water transfer activities, crewmembers collect samples from several CWCs for postflight analysis. Results from the analysis of water transfer samples collected during the docked phases of STS-118/13A.1 and STS-120/10A showed that several of the CWCs contained up to 10(exp 4) CFU/mL of bacteria despite the fact that the silver concentrations in the CWCs were within acceptable limits. The samples contained pure cultures of a single bacteria, a Cupriavidus (formerly Wautersia) species that has been shown to be resistant to metallic biocides. As part of the investigation into the cause and remediation of the bacterial contamination in these CWCs, ground studies were initiated to evaluate the resistance of the Cupriavidus species to the silver biocides used on ISS and to determine the minimum effective concentration for the different forms of silver present in the biocides. The initial findings from those experiments are discussed herein.

  4. Co, Zn and Ag-MOFs evaluation as biocidal materials towards photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Betancor, Keila; Aguado, Sonia; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Tamayo-Belda, Miguel; Leganés, Francisco; Rosal, Roberto; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, the biocidal activity of three different metal organic frameworks (MOFs) based on Co (Co-SIM1), Zn (Zn-SIM1) and Ag (Ag-TAZ) has been evaluated towards one green alga and two cyanobacteria. These organisms are present in fresh- and seawater and take part in the early stages of the biofouling process. The biocidal activity of these materials was evaluated by measuring chlorophyll a concentration and by inhibition zone testing. After 24h of exposure the three different MOFs caused >50% of chlorophyll a concentration inhibition towards both cyanobacteria, however, although the green alga presented a great sensitivity for Ag-TAZ (reaching 90% of chlorophyll a concentration inhibition), it was much more resistant to the rest of MOFs. Bioavailability of these metals was studied using ICP-MS, the chemical speciation program Visual MINTEQ, and a heavy metal bioreporter bioanalytical tool. We have elucidated that the biocidal activity presented by these MOFs was due to the dissolved metals released from them and more exactly, it depended on the bioavailability presented by these metal ions, which was closely related with the free ion concentration. This article highlights the potential use of different MOFs as biocidal material towards photosynthetic organisms and reveals important differences in the sensitivity between these organisms that should be taken into account in order to increase the biocidal spectrum of these materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Controlling the invasive diatom Didymosphenia geminata: an ecotoxicity assessment of four potential biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellyman, P G; Clearwater, S J; Clayton, J S; Kilroy, C; Blair, N; Hickey, C W; Biggs, B J F

    2011-07-01

    In 2004, an invasive mat-forming freshwater diatom, Didymosphenia geminata (didymo), was found in New Zealand causing concern with regard to potential consequences for local freshwater ecosystems. A four-stage research program was initiated to identify methods to control D. geminata. This article reports the results of Stage 2, in which four potential control compounds [Gemex™ (a chelated copper formulation), EDTA, Hydrothol®191, and Organic Interceptor™ (a pine oil formulation)] selected in Stage 1 were evaluated for their biocidal efficacy on D. geminata and effects on non-target organisms using both artificial stream and laboratory trials. Artificial stream trials evaluated the mortality rates of D. geminata and fishes to three concentrations of the four biocides, whereas laboratory toxicity trials tested the response of green alga and cladocera to a range of biocide concentrations and exposure times. In artificial stream trials, Gemex and Organic Interceptor were the most effective biocides against D. geminata for a number of measured indices; however, exposure of fishes to Organic Interceptor resulted in high mortality rates. Laboratory toxicity testing indicated that Gemex might negatively affect sensitive stream invertebrates, based on the cladoceran sensitivity at the proposed river control dose. A decision support matrix evaluated the four biocides based on nine criteria stipulated by river stakeholders (effectiveness, non-target species impacts, stalk removal, degradation profile, risks to health and safety, ease of application, neutralization potential, cost, and local regulatory requirements) and Gemex was identified as the product warranting further refinement prior to an in-river trial.

  6. Elaboration of a concept for the cumulative environmental exposure assessment of biocides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Rita; Bunke, Dirk; Moch, Katja [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie e.V., Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Gartiser, Stefan [Hydrotox GmbH, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Article 10(1) of the EU Biocidal Products Directive 98/8/EC (BPD) requires that for the inclusion of an active substance in Annex I, Annex IA or IB, cumulation effects from the use of biocidal products containing the same active substance shall be taken into account, where relevant. The study proves the feasibility of a technical realisation of Article 10(1) of the BPD and elaborates a first concept for the cumulative environmental exposure assessment of biocides. Existing requirements concerning cumulative assessments in other regulatory frameworks have been evaluated and their applicability for biocides has been examined. Technical terms and definitions used in this context were documented with the aim to harmonise terminology with other frameworks and to set up a precise definition within the BPD. Furthermore, application conditions of biocidal products have been analysed to find out for which cumulative exposure assessments may be relevant. Different parameters were identified which might serve as indicators for the relevance of cumulative exposure assessments. These indicators were then integrated in a flow chart by means of which the relevance of cumulative exposure assessments can be checked. Finally, proposals for the technical performance of cumulative exposure assessments within the Review Programme have been elaborated with the aim to bring the results of the project into the upcoming development and harmonization processes on EU level. (orig.)

  7. Effect of biocides and anionic homopolymeric inhibitors on the precipitation behavior of calcium fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ur Rehman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effect of biocides and of the anionic homopolymeric inhibitors on the precipitation behavior of calcium fluoride (CaF2.The efficiency of inhibitors in the presence and absence of biocides was calculated using the half-life (t1/2 approach, where 50% of the concentration has been precipitated. Conductometric and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis have been performed for the calcium fluoride scale minerals using three polymeric inhibitors and three biocides, which are commonly used in industrial processes. The main aim of the study was to investigate the role of anionic homopolymerspoly(acrylic acid PAA, and of the oxidizing and non-oxidizing biocides such as; sodium hypochlorite, gluteraldehyde, tris(hydroxymethyl nitromethane. It was found that addition of low concentration (1-10 mg/L of the polymers (K-752, K-732 and K-702 have great inhibitory effect on the precipitation of calcium fluoride (CaF2. Their inhibition efficiency was in the order, K-752 > K-732 > K-702. The observed behaviour can be attributed to the effect of molecular weight of the polymer. The polymer having higher molecular weight shows weaker inhibiting ability. However, the oxidizing and non-oxidizing biocides have no appreciable effect on their performance and hence on the overall inhibition process.

  8. Long-term behaviour of towers & fabric structures. The bell tower of Monza cathedral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigia Binda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available After the collapse of some heavy buildings and towers in Italy and elsewhere, the hypothesis of possible continuous damage to these structures due to the dead and cyclic loads (wind, temperature variations, etc. has been formulated by the authors. The long term behaviour of historic masonry has also been detected by laboratory creep and cyclic tests. The results indicate that a laboratory and on site investigation together with analytical modelling are important peculiarly for tall bell-towers. The application of these procedures on the Bell-Tower of the Cathedral of Monza is here reported and discussed.

  9. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of RPV Support Cooling System for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Qi; Wu Xinxin; Li Xiaowei; Zhang Li; He Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Passive safety is now of great interest for future generation reactors because of its reduction of human interaction and avoidance of failures of active components. reactor pressure vessel (RPV) support cooling system (SCS) for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is a passive safety system and is used to cool the concrete seats for the four RPV supports at its bottom. The SCS should have enough cooling capacity to ensure the temperature of the concrete seats for the supports not exceeding the limit temperature. The SCS system is composed of a natural circulation water loop and an air cooling tower. In the water loop, there is a heat exchanger embedded in the concrete seat, heat is transferred by thermal conduction and convection to the cooling water. Then the water is cooled by the air cooler mounted in the air cooling tower. The driving forces for water and air are offered by the density differences caused by the temperature differences. In this paper, the thermal hydraulic analysis for this system was presented. Methods for decoupling the natural circulation and heat transfer between the water loop and air flow were introduced. The operating parameters for different working conditions and environment temperatures were calculated. (author)

  10. Lifting system and apparatus for constructing wind turbine towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Tracy; Schrader, Terry; Goldhardt, James; Lott, James

    2011-02-01

    The disclosed invention is utilized for mounting a wind turbine and blade assembly on the upper end of a wind turbine tower. The invention generally includes a frame or truss that is pivotally secured to the top bay assembly of the tower. A transverse beam is connected to the frame or truss and extends fore of the tower when the frame or truss is in a first position and generally above the tower when in a second position. When in the first position, a wind turbine or blade assembly can be hoisted to the top of the tower. The wind turbine or blade assembly is then moved into position for mounting to the tower as the frame or truss is pivoted to a second position. When the turbine and blade assembly are secured to the tower, the frame or truss is disconnected from the tower and lowered to the ground.

  11. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  12. Low-cost Triangular Lattice Towers for Small Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ram Chandra

    This thesis focuses on the study of low-cost steel and bamboo triangular lattice towers for small wind turbines. The core objective is to determine the material properties of bamboo and assess the feasibility of bamboo towers. Using the experimentally determined buckling resistance, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio, a 12 m high triangular lattice tower for a 500W wind turbine has been modeled as a tripod to formulate the analytical solutions for the stresses and tower deflections, which enables design of the tower based on buckling strength of tower legs. The tripod formulation combines the imposed loads, the base distance between the legs and tower height, and cross-sectional dimensions of the tower legs. The tripod model was used as a reference for the initial design of the bamboo tower and extended to finite element analysis. A 12 m high steel lattice tower was also designed for the same turbine to serve as a comparison to the bamboo tower. The primary result of this work indicates that bamboo is a valid structural material. The commercial software package ANSYS APDL was used to carry out the tower analysis, evaluate the validity of the tripod model, and extend the analysis for the tower design. For this purpose, a 12 m high steel lattice tower for a 500 W wind turbine was examined. Comparison of finite element analysis and analytical solution has shown that tripod model can be accurately used in the design of lattice towers. The tower designs were based on the loads and safety requirements of international standard for small wind turbine safety, IEC 61400-2. For connecting the bamboo sections in the lattice tower, a steel-bamboo adhesive joint combined with conventional lashing has been proposed. Also, considering the low durability of bamboo, periodic replacement of tower members has been proposed. The result of this study has established that bamboo could be used to construct cost-effective and lightweight lattice towers for wind turbines of 500 Watt

  13. Biocides in urban wastewater treatment plant influent at dry and wet weather: concentrations, mass flows and possible sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollmann, Ulla E.; Petersen, Camilla Tang; Eriksson, Eva

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, exterior thermal insulation systems became more and more important leading to an increasing amount of houses equipped with biocide-containing organic façade coatings or fungicide treated wood. It is known that these biocides, e.g. terbutryn, carbendazim, and diuron, as well as wood...

  14. Analysis of metal and biocides resistance genes in drug resistance and susceptible Salmonella enterica from food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Generally drug resistant bacteria carry antibiotic resistance genes and heavy metal and biocide resistance genes on large conjugative plasmids. The presence of these metal and biocide resistance genes in susceptible bacteria are not assessed comprehensively. Hence, WGS data of susceptib...

  15. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Burgsteden, J.A. van; Heer, C. de

    2005-01-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of

  16. Characterization of new sites for news NPPs: Cooling Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copete, M.; Ortega, S.; Vaquero, J. C.; Cervantes, E.

    2010-01-01

    The increase of power consumption because of the lifestyle of the current society has implied the called renaissance of nuclear power. This situation has encouraged utilities to make new investments in studies, analyses and assessments of future new nuclear power plants. As part of these studies, the characterization or process of conveying information about new sites for new nuclear power plants is strongly considered nowadays. This one encompasses diverse analyses (geology, seismology, weather conditions, flooding, population, and so on) being one of the most important, the study about cooling system requirements. This study is based on diverse tasks: studies about the existing technologies of cooling (wet towers, hybrid towers), development of a thermal model for each component involved in the cooling process, availability of site conditions data and, to perform finally operating windows.

  17. The Exact Limit of Some Cubic Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Beelen, Peter; Nguyen, Nhut

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a new explicit tower of function fields was introduced by Bassa, Beelen, Garcia and Stichtenoth (BBGS). This resulted in currently the best known lower bound for Ihara’s constant in the case of non-prime finite fields. In particular over cubic fields, the tower’s limit is at least as good...

  18. The Tower of Hanoi and Inductive Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrotsy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the "Australian Curriculum," the concept of mathematical induction is first met in the senior secondary subject Specialist Mathematics. This article details an example, the Tower of Hanoi problem, which provides an enactive introduction to the inductive process before moving to more abstract and cognitively demanding representations.…

  19. X-ray Observations at Gaisberg Tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasan Hettiarachchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the occurrence of X-rays at ground level due to cloud-to-ground flashes of upward-initiated lightning from Gaisberg Tower, in Austria, which is located at an altitude of 1300 m. This is the first observation of X-ray emissions from upward lightning from a tower top located at high altitude. Measurements were carried out using scintillation detectors installed close to the tower top in two phases from 2011 to 2015. X-rays were recorded in three subsequent strokes of three flashes out of the total of 108 flashes recorded in the system during both phases. In contrast to the observations from downward natural or triggered lightning, X-rays were observed only within 10 µs before the subsequent return stroke. This shows that X-rays were emitted when the dart leader was in the vicinity of the tower top, hence during the most intense phase of the dart leader. Both the detected energy and the fluence of X-rays are far lower compared to X-rays from downward natural or rocket-triggered lightning. In addition to the above 108 flashes, an interesting observation of X-rays produced by a nearby downward flash is also presented. The shorter length of dart-leader channels in Gaisberg is suggested as a possible cause of this apparently weaker X-ray production.

  20. The Exact Limit of Some Cubic Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Beelen, Peter; Nguyen, Nhut

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a new explicit tower of function fields was introduced by Bassa, Beelen, Garcia and Stichtenoth (BBGS). This resulted in currently the best known lower bound for Ihara’s constant in the case of non-prime finite fields. In particular over cubic fields, the tower’s limit is at least as go...

  1. A very cool cooling system

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The NA62 Gigatracker is a jewel of technology: its sensor, which delivers the time of the crossing particles with a precision of less than 200 picoseconds (better than similar LHC detectors), has a cooling system that might become the precursor to a completely new detector technique.   The 115 metre long vacuum tank of the NA62 experiment. The NA62 Gigatracker (GTK) is composed of a set of three innovative silicon pixel detectors, whose job is to measure the arrival time and the position of the incoming beam particles. Installed in the heart of the NA62 detector, the silicon sensors are cooled down (to about -20 degrees Celsius) by a microfluidic silicon device. “The cooling system is needed to remove the heat produced by the readout chips the silicon sensor is bonded to,” explains Alessandro Mapelli, microsystems engineer working in the Physics department. “For the NA62 Gigatracker we have designed a cooling plate on top of which both the silicon sensor and the...

  2. Thermal degradation of biocidal organic N-halamines and N-halamine polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chylińska, Marta; Kaczmarek, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel biocidal N-halamines have been substituted to poly(p-methyl styrene). • Thermal stability of all obtained compounds has been studied by thermogravimetry. • Stabilization of selected polymer has been achieved using octyl tin mercaptide. • The mechanism of thermal degradation of N-halamine polymers has been proposed. - Abstract: Novel biocidal organic N-halamines (based on imidazoline dione rings) were used as a substituents for poly(p-methyl styrene). The biocidal polymers and substituents have been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis. The thermal resistance of investigated compounds was compared to those of non-halogenated precursors. The introduction of chlorine atoms to polymers decreases their thermal resistance comparing to precursors but efficient stabilization is possible by using octyl tin mercaptide. The complex mechanism of thermal decomposition of polymers has been discussed

  3. Tall tower or mountain top measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Ines; Eugster, Werner; Oney, Brian; Brunner, Dominik; Leuenberger, Markus; Schanda, Rüdiger; Henne, Stephan; Buchmann, Nina

    2014-05-01

    Resolving the regional transport and distribution of greenhouse gases in the troposphere is a key topic that challenges both modelers and experimentalists. A dense network of measurement stations would be required, in particular including measurements at high elevation to better represent the entire lower troposphere, and not only small-scale local conditions in the near-surface atmosphere. While this can be achieved by tall towers, also mountain top stations (e.g. Schauinsland, Brocken) and other stations at high elevation (e.g., Mouna Loa, Jungfraujoch) are often appropriate, due to their extended concentration footprint. However, especially over complex, mountainous terrain, the transport of atmospheric gases and their spatio-temporal distribution is difficult to predict due to the development of thermally induced local wind patterns and boundary layer processes. Therefore, the main goal of our study is to test to what extend boundary layer processes at the surface and local wind patterns close to the ground at a mountain top site influence the ambient greenhouse gas patterns compared to measurements taken at a similar altitude but at a tall tower site. To this end we use measurements from the Zugerberg mountain top station, located at a pre-Alpine mountain ridge (987 m a.s.l., 4 m above ground) exposed to the prevailing synoptic winds in Switzerland, and compare these measurements with a neighboring tall tower site (Beromünster radio broadcast tower with its top at 1014 m a.s.l., 217 m above local ground level, and ≡500 m above the Swiss Plateau). The Beromünster tall tower is located at a distance of only 30 km from the mountain top station as the bird flies, and hence a direct comparison minimizes confounding factors that are not related to the tall tower vs. mountain top position of the measurements. Both stations are part of the CarboCount CH greenhouse gas observation network (http://www.carbocount.ch) initiated for long-term monitoring and modeling of

  4. Time-Dependent Antimicrobial Activity of Filtering Nonwovens with Gemini Surfactant-Based Biocides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Majchrzycka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on nonwovens used for respiratory protective devices (RPDs were related to equipment intended for short-term use. There is only limited research on the development of biocidal nonwoven fabrics for reusable RPDs that could be used safely in an industrial work environment where there is a risk of microbial growth. Moreover, a new group of biocides with high antimicrobial activity—gemini surfactants, has never been explored for textile’s application in previous studies. The aim of this study was to develop high-efficiency melt-blown nonwovens containing gemini surfactants with time-dependent biocidal activity, and to validate their antimicrobial properties under conditions simulating their use at a plant biomass-processing unit. A set of porous biocidal structures (SPBS was prepared and applied to the melt-blown polypropylene (PP nonwovens. The biocidal properties of the structures were triggered by humidity and had different activation rates. Scanning electron microscopy was used to undertake structural studies of the modified PP/SPBS nonwovens. In addition, simulation of plant biomass dust deposition on the nonwovens was performed. The biocidal activity of PP/SPBS nonwovens was evaluated following incubation with Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger from the American Type Culture Collection, and with Pseudomonas fluorescens and Penicillium chrysogenum isolated from the biomass. PP/SPBS nonwovens exhibited antimicrobial activity to varying levels. Higher antimicrobial activity was noted for bacteria (R = 87.85–97.46% and lower for moulds (R = 80.11–94.53%.

  5. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  6. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  7. Effects of antifouling biocides to the germination and growth of the marine macroalga, Hormosira banksii (Turner) Desicaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Jackie H. . E-mail jhmyers@deakin.edu.au; Gunthorpe, Leanne . E-mail Leanne.Gunthorpe@dpi.vic.gov.au; Allinson, Graeme . E-mail graemea@deakin.edu.au; Duda, Susan . E-mail Susan.Duda@dpi.vic.gov.au

    2006-01-01

    The International Maritime Organisation's (IMO) ban on the use of tributyltin in antifouling paints has inevitability increased the use of old fashioned antifoulants and/or the development of new paints containing 'booster biocides'. These newer paints are intended to be environmentally less harmful, however the broader environmental effects of these 'booster biocides' are poorly known. Germination and growth inhibition tests using the marine macroalga, Hormosira banksii (Turner) Desicaine were conducted to evaluate the toxicity of four new antifouling biocides in relation to tributyltin-oxide (TBTO). Each of the biocides significantly inhibited germination and growth of Hormosira banksii spores. Toxicity was in increasing order: diuron < zineb < seanine 211 < zinc pyrithione < TBTO. However, the lack of knowledge on partitioning in the environment makes it difficult to make a full assessment on whether the four biocides tested offer an advantage over organotin paints in terms of environmental impact

  8. Effects of antifouling biocides to the germination and growth of the marine macroalga, Hormosira banksii (Turner) Desicaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Jackie H. [School of Ecology and Environment, Deakin University, P.O. Box 423, Warrnambool, Victoria 3280 (Australia) and Department of Primary Industries Research Victoria, Queenscliff, P.O. Box 114 Queenscliff, Victoria 3225 (Australia) and School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton Campus, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)]. E-mail jhmyers@deakin.edu.au; Gunthorpe, Leanne [Department of Primary Industries Research Victoria, Queenscliff, P.O. Box 114 Queenscliff, Victoria 3225 (Australia)]. E-mail Leanne.Gunthorpe@dpi.vic.gov.au; Allinson, Graeme [School of Ecology and Environment, Deakin University, P.O. Box 423, Warrnambool, Victoria 3280 (Australia)]. E-mail graemea@deakin.edu.au; Duda, Susan [Department of Primary Industries Research Victoria, Queenscliff, P.O. Box 114 Queenscliff, Victoria 3225 (Australia)]. E-mail Susan.Duda@dpi.vic.gov.au

    2006-09-15

    The International Maritime Organisation's (IMO) ban on the use of tributyltin in antifouling paints has inevitability increased the use of old fashioned antifoulants and/or the development of new paints containing 'booster biocides'. These newer paints are intended to be environmentally less harmful, however the broader environmental effects of these 'booster biocides' are poorly known. Germination and growth inhibition tests using the marine macroalga, Hormosira banksii (Turner) Desicaine were conducted to evaluate the toxicity of four new antifouling biocides in relation to tributyltin-oxide (TBTO). Each of the biocides significantly inhibited germination and growth of Hormosira banksii spores. Toxicity was in increasing order: diuron < zineb < seanine 211 < zinc pyrithione < TBTO. However, the lack of knowledge on partitioning in the environment makes it difficult to make a full assessment on whether the four biocides tested offer an advantage over organotin paints in terms of environmental impact.

  9. Evaluation of the release characteristics of covalently attached or electrostatically bound biocidal polymers utilizing SERS and UV-Vis absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Mathioudakis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biocidal polymers with antimicrobial quaternized ammonium groups introduced in the polymer biocidal chains either through covalent attachment or electrostatic interaction have been separately incorporated in a poly (methyl methacrylate polymer matrix. The objective of present study was to highlight the release characteristics of biocidal polymers, primarily in saline but also in water ethanol solutions, utilizing UV-Vis absorption and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS. It is shown that through the combination of UV-Vis and SERS techniques, upon the release process, it is possible the discrimination of the polymeric backbone and the electrostatically bound biocidal species. Moreover, it is found that electrostatically bound and covalently attached biocidal species show different SERS patterns. The long term aim is the development of antimicrobial polymeric materials containing both ionically bound and covalently attached quaternary ammonium thus achieving a dual functionality in a single component polymeric design.

  10. Biocidal efficacy of monochloramine against planktonic and biofilm-associated Naegleria fowleri cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudot, S; Herbelin, P; Mathieu, L; Soreau, S; Banas, S; Jorand, F P A

    2014-04-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) in aqueous systems are a problem for water network managers and health authorities because some are pathogenic, such as Naegleria fowleri, and they have also been reported to operate as reservoirs and vectors of several pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, to better control the occurrence of such amoebae, we evaluate the efficacy of monochloramine against planktonic forms (trophozoites and cysts) and also biofilm-associated cells of N. fowleri as FLA are often associated with biofilms. From a freshwater biofilm growing in a pilot reactor and inoculated with N. fowleri, we obtained Ct values ranging from 4 to 17 mg Cl2 min l(-1) at 25°C and pH 8·2 on both planktonic and biofilm associated cells. In addition, the inactivation pattern of biofilm associated was intermediate between those of trophozoïtes and cysts. The monochloramine efficiency varies with the life stage of N. fowleri (trophozoïte, cyst, and biofilm-associated). The sensitivity to disinfectant of amoeba, that is, trophozoïtes and cysts, in the biofilm life stage is as high as that of their planktonic cyst form. This study gives Ct values for cysts and biofilm-associated N. fowleri. This may impact on water treatment strategies against amoebae and should be considered when controlling N. fowleri in man-made water systems such as cooling towers or hot water systems. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic simulation and analysis of Research Reactor Cooling Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Khatib, H.H.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to formulate a model to simulate the thermal hydraulic behavior of integrated cooling system in a typical material testing reactor (MTR) under loss of ultimate heat sink, the model involves three interactively coupled sub-models for reactor core, heat exchanger and cooling tower. The developed model predicts the temperature profiles in addition it predicts inlet and outlet temperatures of the hot and cold stream as well as the heat exchangers and cooling tower. The model is validated against PARET code for steady-state operation and also verified by the reactor operational records, and then the model is used to simulate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor under a loss of ultimate heat sink. The simulation is performed for two operational regimes named regime I of (11 MW) thermal power and three operated cooling tower cells and regime II of (22 MW) thermal power and six operated cooling tower cells. In regime I, the simulation is performed for 1, 2 and 3 cooling tower failed cells while in regime II, it is performed for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 cooling tower failed cells. The safety action is conducted by the reactor protection system (RPS) named power reduction safety action, it is triggered to decrease the reactor power by amount of 20% of the present power when the water inlet temperature to the core reaches 43 degree C and a scram (emergency shutdown) is triggered in case of the inlet temperature reaches 44 degree C. The model results are analyzed and discussed. The temperature profiles of fuel, clad and coolant are predicted during transient where its maximum values are far from thermal hydraulic limits.

  12. Biofilms and Oxidizing Biocides; Evaluation of Disinfection and Removal Effects by Using Established Microbial Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Mariko

    2017-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilms and their disinfection and removal have been important subjects in the maintenance of water quality in areas such as public spas, swimming pools, food processing lines, industrial water systems, and in the hygienic control of medical devices, hospital procedures, etc. Presented here is an outline of biofilm formation, as well as studies on the disinfection and removal of biofilms by oxidizing biocides using established biofilms. These studies using established biofilms may increase the understanding of the variable response of biofilms to planktonic bacteria, and the unique aspects of oxidizing biocides in the disinfection and removal of biofilms.

  13. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  14. An automatic and effective approach in identifying tower cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Li; Liu, Yaqi

    2012-04-01

    A method which can distinguish tower cranes from other objects in an image is proposed in this paper. It synthesizes the advantages of both morphological theory and geometrical characters to identify tower cranes accurately. The algorithm uses morphological theory to remove noise and segment images. Moreover, geometrical characters are adopted to extract tower cranes with thresholds. To test the algorithm's practical applicability, we apply it to another image to check the result. The experiments show that the approach can locate the position of tower cranes precisely and calculate the number of cranes at 100% accuracy rate. It can be applied to identifying tower cranes in small regions.

  15. Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations, Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Noble County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations dataset current as of 2008. Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers..

  16. Study on Tower Models for EHV Transmission Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightning outage accident is one of the main factors that threat seriously the safe and reliable operation of power system. So it is very important to establish reasonable transmission tower model and evaluate the impulse response characteristic of lightning wave traveling on the transmission tower properly for determining reliable lightning protection performance. With the help of Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP, six 500kV tower models are built. Aiming at one line to one transformer operating mode of 500kV substation, the intruding wave overvoltage under different tower models is calculated. The effect of tower model on intruding overvoltage has been studied. The results show that different tower models can result in great differences to the calculation results. Hence, reasonable selection of the tower model in the calculation of back- strike intruding wave is very important.

  17. ATLAS - Liquid Cooling Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Bonneau, P.

    1998-01-01

    Photo 1 - Cooling Unit - Side View Photo 2 - Cooling Unit - Detail Manifolds Photo 3 - Cooling Unit - Rear View Photo 4 - Cooling Unit - Detail Pump, Heater and Exchanger Photo 5 - Cooling Unit - Detail Pump and Fridge Photo 6 - Cooling Unit - Front View

  18. Restoration of the Serranos Towers in Valencia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Mileto

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent restoration of the emblematic Serranos Towers carried out by an interdisciplinary team of specialists was an excuse to delve into the history and masonry of the towers, from their initial building and use as a prison to the restorations works practised in the 19th century and subsequent repairs. The cleaning of the walls permitted a direct study of the masonry, which provided a great deal of information that complemented the rigorous historical investigation. The maintenance scheme planned for the future is an interesting proposal, where good sense prevails over improvisation, so often a reality in the restoration of monuments today.

  19. Optical study of solar tower power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddhibi, F; Amara, M Ben; Balghouthi, M; Guizani, A

    2015-01-01

    The central receiver technology for electricity generation consists of concentrating solar radiation coming from the solar tracker field into a central receiver surface located on the top of the tower. The heliostat field is constituted of a big number of reflective mirrors; each heliostat tracks the sun individually and reflects the sunlight to a focal point. Therefore, the heliostat should be positioned with high precision in order to minimize optical losses. In the current work, a mathematical model for the analysis of the optical efficiency of solar tower field power plant is proposed. The impact of the different factors which influence the optical efficiency is analyzed. These parameters are mainly, the shading and blocking losses, the cosine effect, the atmospheric attenuation and the spillage losses. A new method for the calculation of blocking and shadowing efficiency is introduced and validated by open literature

  20. Water cooler towers and other man-made aquatic systems as environmental collection systems for agents of concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, Robin; Kingsley, Mark T.

    2018-04-03

    An apparatus and process of using existing process water sources such as cooling towers, fountains, and waterfalls is provided in which the water sources are utilized as monitoring system for the detection of environmental agents which may be present in the environment. The process water is associated with structures and have an inherent filtering or absorbing capability available in the materials and therefore can be used as a rapid screening tool for quality and quantitative assessment of environmental agents.

  1. Solar tower and farming plants compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinecke, W.; Becker, M.; Klaiss, H.

    1991-01-01

    The article gives an abbreviated version of a study under the guidance of the DLR, comparing solar tower and farming plants (channel collectors) for electricity generation, in respect of technical and economical aspects. The comparison considers various influencing factors such as for instance: Meteorological conditions, characteristic technical differences, unit size, and permits conclusions, which are important for the development and construction of future plants. (orig.) [de

  2. Monitoring of the booster biocide dichlofluanid in water and marine sediment of Greek marinas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamwijk, C.; Schouten, A.; Foekema, E.M.; Ravenberg, J.C.; Collombon, M.T.; Schmidt, K.; Kugler, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dichlofluanid (N-dichlorofluoromethylthio-N¿-dimethyl-N-phenylsulphamide) is used as booster biocide in antifouling paints. The occurrence of dichlofluanid and its metabolite DMSA (N¿-dimethyl-N-phenyl-sulphamide) was monitored in seawater and marine sediment from three Greek marinas. Seawater and

  3. Development of detection techniques for monitoring and optimizing biocide dosing in seawater flooding systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Moniee, M.A.; Al-Abeedi, F.N.; Koopal, C.G.J.; Akmal, N.; Sanders, P.F.; Veen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms which are frequently associated with corrosion fail Control of bacterial activity are posing major challenge in Saudi Arabia's massive seawater flooding systems. Biocides are used to control bacteria throughout the oil industry. A study to explore the feasibility to develop

  4. Optimization of the cumulative risk assessment of pesticides and biocides using computational techniques: Pilot project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Reffstrup, Trine Klein; Petersen, Annette

    This pilot project is intended as the first step in developing a computational strategy to assist in refining methods for higher tier cumulative and aggregate risk assessment of exposure to mixture of pesticides and biocides. For this purpose, physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models were...

  5. Decreased bio-inhibition of building materials due to transport of biocides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erich, S.J.F.; Mendoza, S.M.; Floor, W.; Hermanns, S.P.M.; Homan, W.J.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Bio-inhibition of buildings and structures is an important issue. In many cases building materials have biocides added to prevent growth of micro-organisms. Growth of microorganisms on building materials has several negative effects; (1) Aesthetic damage, e.g. fungi, algae grow on the material,

  6. Monitoring of the booster biocide dichlofluanid in water and marine sediment of Greek marinas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamwijk, C.; Schouten, A.; Foekema, E.M.; Ravensberg, J.C.; Collombon, M.T.; Schmidt, K.; Kugler, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dichlofluanid (N-dichlorofluoromethylthio-N′-dimethyl-N- phenylsulphamide) is used as booster biocide in antifouling paints. The occurrence of dichlofluanid and its metabolite DMSA (N′-dimethyl-N-phenyl- sulphamide) was monitored in seawater and marine sediment from three Greek marinas. Seawater and

  7. The Prevalence of Antibiotic and Biocide Resistance Among Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni from Different Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mavri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing levels of antimicrobial resistance among foodborne bacteria are recognised as an important emerging public health problem. Reduced susceptibility to biocides also appears to be increasing. A potential concern is the possibility that the widespread use of biocides is responsible for the selection and maintenance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Here, we examine the prevalence of erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride, trisodium phosphate and sodium dodecyl sulphate resistance among 27 isolates of Campylobacter coli and 15 isolates of Campylobacter jejuni from food, animal, human and environmental water sources. These antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by the broth microdilution method. In the 42 Campylobacter strains studied, different antibiotic resistance levels were seen. The resistance to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin was observed in 14.3 % of Campylobacter strains. A higher rate of erythromycin resistance and multi-resistance was observed among isolated C. coli than among C. jejuni strains. Similar situations were seen for triclosan. Conversely, the level of benzalkonium chloride resistance was higher in C. jejuni than in C. coli. No correlation between biocide and antibiotic resistance was observed. This study does not provide evidence to confirm that tolerance to biocides is connected to antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter.

  8. A Photodegradation Study of Three Common Paint and Plaster Biocides under monochromatic UV Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minelgaite, Greta; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2014-01-01

    Photodegradation of the three common paint-and-plaster biocides (carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn) was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions. Samples prepared in two types of water (demineralized water and pond water) were subjected to 254 nm monochromatic UV light. Light intensity (W m...

  9. Reduced susceptibility of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae to biocides: An emerging threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dealing with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-Kp strains, which are generally pan-drug resistant, is an uphill task for health care professionals. Owing to limited therapeutic options and the possibility of development of resistance to commonly used biocides in hospital settings, CR-Kp infections pose a serious threat of emergence of a dreaded pandemic. The aim of the study was to highlight the possibility of emergence of biocide resistance among CR-Kp strains. A case study was conducted in a Super-specialty Hospital in September 2015. A 65-year-old female patient post-laparotomy was admitted to the General Intensive Care Unit of a Super-specialty Hospital. CR-Kp was isolated from the blood and mucus trap samples of this patient. Susceptibility testing of three commonly used biocides in our hospital, namely sodium hypochlorite (4% available chlorine, 5% w/v povidone iodine (0.5% w/v of available iodine and absolute ethanol (99.9%, respectively, was carried out using K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 as control. The test isolate showed reduced susceptibility to sodium hypochlorite in comparison to K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603. The possibility of emergence of biocide resistance among CR-Kp strains poses a threat of disrupting our ongoing efforts for implementation of effective infection control measures.

  10. Effect of enterocin AS-48 in combination with biocides on planktonic and sessile Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Natacha Caballero; Abriouel, Hikmate; Grande, M A José; Pulido, Rubén Pérez; Gálvez, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Enterocin AS-48 was tested on a cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes strains in planktonic and sessile states, singly or in combination with biocides benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, didecyldimethylammonium bromide, triclosan, poly-(hexamethylen guanidinium) hydrochloride, chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene, and the commercial sanitizers P3 oxonia and P3 topax 66. Combinations of sub-inhibitory bacteriocin concentrations and biocide concentrations 4 to 10-fold lower than their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) completely inhibited growth of the planktonic listeriae. Inactivation of Listeria in biofilms formed on polystyrene microtiter plates required concentrations of enterocin AS-48 greater than 50 μg/ml, and biocide concentrations ten to 100-fold higher. In combination with enterocin AS-48 (25 or 50 μg/ml), microbial inactivation increased remarkably for all biocides except P3 oxonia and P3 topax 66 solutions. Polystyrene microtiter plates conditioned with enterocin solutions (0.5-25 μg/ml) decreased the adherence and biofilm formation of the L. monocytogenes cell cocktail, avoiding biofilm formation for at least 24 h at a bacteriocin concentration of 25 μg/ml. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Leaching of biocides from building facades: Upscaling of a local two-region leaching model to the city scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, S.; Rota, C.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Facades are protected by paints that contain biocides as protection against degradation. These biocides are leached by rainfall (albeit at low concentrations). At the city scale, however, the surface area of building facades is significant, and leached biocides are a potential environmental risk to receiving waters. A city-scale biocide-leaching model was developed based on two main steps. In the first step, laboratory experiments on a single facade were used to calibrate and validate a 1D, two-region phenomenological model of biocide leaching. The same data set was analyzed independently by another research group who found empirically that biocide leachate breakthrough curves were well represented by a sum of two exponentials. Interestingly, the two-region model was found analytically to reproduce this functional form as a special case. The second step in the method is site-specific, and involves upscaling the validated single facade model to a particular city. In this step, (i) GIS-based estimates of facade heights and areas are deduced using the city's cadastral data, (ii) facade flow is estimated using local meteorological data (rainfall, wind direction) and (iii) paint application rates are modeled as a stochastic process based on manufacturers' recommendations. The methodology was applied to Lausanne, Switzerland, a city of about 200,000 inhabitants. Approximately 30% of the annually applied mass of biocides was estimated to be released to the environment.

  12. INTEGRATED TWIN TOWERS DAN ISLAMISASI ILMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaifuddin Syaifuddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows some idea as follows: First, integrated design of the Twin Towers as the changing action from IAIN to UIN Sunan Ampel. The religion and general knowledge’s position of Twin Towers’ integrated design is not mixed into one, but it works individually, and at the certain time are united in mutual dialogue. Second, Islamize design is done in order to criticize the general knowledge which has western sources and are secular, materialistic, and individualistic. In the process to Islamize the knowledge, Islamic knowledge tries to intervene the general knowledge in order to filter it so the knowledge will be Islamized. Consequently, to Islamize knowledge is to give an Islamic concept into general knowledge. Third, there are the similarities and differences between integrated design knowledge based on Islamic knowledge and integrated Twin Towers. The difference is in its epistemology process. The similarity is in the curriculum (ontology and objective (axiology. In the curriculum, the examined knowledge is religion and general knowledge. While the objective, Islamize knowledge and integrated Twin Towers aims to integrate religion and general knowledge, to dialogue, to communicate, and to synergy, so it can be a knowledge which is intact-integral-integrative.

  13. Simplified models for assessing heat and mass transfer in evaporative towers

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Alessandra De; Lorenzini, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this book is to supply valid and reasonable parameters in order to guide the choice of the right model of industrial evaporative tower according to operating conditions which vary depending on the particular industrial context: power plants, chemical plants, food processing plants and other industrial facilities are characterized by specific assets and requirements that have to be satisfied. Evaporative cooling is increasingly employed each time a significant water flow at a temperature which does not greatly differ from ambient temperature is needed for removing a remarkable heat l

  14. Investigations of effects of thermal discharges in Rhine river waters. Part of a coordinated programme on the physical and biological effects of cooling systems and thermal discharges at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikarski, W.

    1978-12-01

    The report envisages two aspects of cooling systems: heat exchange between water and atmosphere; cooling tower plume modelling. The author gives the estimated ''cooling capacity'' of German rivers and estuaries and describes a station at Rheinhausen, measuring directly the heat exchange between the river Rhine and the atmosphere. The influence of meteorological and topographical parameters is discussed and the total incertainty in extrapolating formular is assessed. A number of field studies have been carried out to measure plume behaviour of cooling towers and to provide the data basis for comparison of existing models. The average plume rise is well predicted. The experimental programme carried out in Germany since 1973 is described. The one dimensional models TOWER and SAUNA.S are in agreement with experimental results except for short plumes. The last plume model WALKURE shows considerable improvement. It is specially suited for the calculations of the cooling tower plume behaviour under influence of temperature and humidity stratifications in the ambient atmosphere

  15. Choice of optimal biocide combination to control flies (Diptera: Muscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Kavran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Flies – by feeding on decaying matter, human waste and food – have been implicated in the spread of numerous animal and human diseases. Excessive fly populations are generally associated with livestock units and domestic waste due to decaying organic matter. A large number of flies cause extreme disturbance in the behavior of the host, resulting in skin irritation, lesions, wounds, and secondary infections are likely to appear. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of combined applications of larvicide (cyromazine and adulticides (acetamiprid in formulation with pheromone and thiamethoxam on the suppression of fly populations. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on a pig farm. The piglet farms are one of the most favorable places for fly breeding. Three units were used for biocide applications and a fourth unit as the control where biocides were not applied. The monitoring of pre- and post-treatment of adult fly populations was carried out by glued cardboards. The cards were hung on metal rods above piglet’s cage. This monitoring method served as a parameter for the estimation of biological effectiveness. Results. The highest degree of fly control (88.4% mortality 8 days after treatment was achieved when a combination of cyromazine and thiamethoxam was used. A biocide based on sex pheromone (Z-9-tricosene + acetamiprid was the most effective on flies 3 days after biocide application, with a mortality rate of 69.1 %. Thiamethoxam achieved the highest reduction of flies 6 days after treatment, with 78.19% obtained mortality. Conclusion. Biological efficacy of the applied biocides in combination ciromazine + thiamethoxam and thiamethoxam alone was justified.

  16. Cool Snacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogager, Stinne Gunder Strøm; Grunert, Klaus G; Brunsø, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Young people snack and their snacking habits are not always healthy. We address the questions whether it is possible to develop a new snack product that adolescents will find attractive, even though it is based on ingredients as healthy as fruits and vegetables, and we argue that developing...... such a product requires an interdisciplinary effort where researchers with backgrounds in psychology, anthropology, media science, philosophy, sensory science and food science join forces. We present the COOL SNACKS project, where such a blend of competences was used first to obtain thorough insight into young...... people's snacking behaviour and then to develop and test new, healthier snacking solutions. These new snacking solutions were tested and found to be favourably accepted by young people. The paper therefore provides a proof of principle that the development of snacks that are both healthy and attractive...

  17. Cool visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Pictured, from left to right: Tim Izo (saxophone, flute, guitar), Bobby Grant (tour manager), George Pajon (guitar). What do the LHC and a world-famous hip-hop group have in common? They are cool! On Saturday, 1st July, before their appearance at the Montreux Jazz Festival, three members of the 'Black Eyed Peas' came on a surprise visit to CERN, inspired by Dan Brown's Angels and Demons. At short notice, Connie Potter (Head of the ATLAS secretariat) organized a guided tour of ATLAS and the AD 'antimatter factory'. Still curious, lead vocalist Will.I.Am met CERN physicist Rolf Landua after the concert to ask many more questions on particles, CERN, and the origin of the Universe.

  18. Energy study of a medieval tower, restored as a museum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, A.M.; Avgelis, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Santamouris, M. [National Kapodestrean University, Athens (Greece). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2003-10-01

    Museums are buildings of particular significance due to their function and their status. At the same time they are buildings in which the principles of energy conservation are rarely applied, sometimes without reason. It has been decided by the Hellenic Ministry of Culture to convert a medieval tower, built in the year 1344 as a fortress with 0.8-1.5 m thick walls and almost no windows, into a museum. The present paper discusses the difficulties that arise in the attempt to balance between the indoor climate conditions necessary to protect the exhibits and to provide comfortable conditions to the visitors, whilst respecting the aesthetics and the historical significance of the building. Furthermore, one needs to consider the difficult but necessary task of assessing factors such as the building's shell's thermal conductivity and capacity, the ventilation necessary as well as the indoor air movement, in order to determine the cooling loads. Finally, the challenge lies in designing and dimensioning an effective and efficient HVAC system, which should be as discrete as possible. The present paper aims to present the results of the study, to discuss the expected energy behaviour of the building and to comment on the options for introducing energy conservation techniques. (author)

  19. Preliminary Design of KAIST Micro Modular Reactor with Dry Air Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Seung Joon; Bae, Seong Jun; Kim, Seong Gu; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2014-01-01

    KAIST research team recently proposed a Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) concept which integrates power conversion unit (PCU) with the reactor core in a single module. Using supercritical CO 2 as a working fluid of cycle can achieve physically compact size due to small turbomachinery and heat exchangers. The objective of this project is to develop a concept that can operate at isolated area. The design focuses especially on the operation in the inland area where cooling water is insufficient. Thus, in this paper the potential for dry air cooling of the proposed reactor will be examined by sizing the cooling system with preliminary approach. The KAIST MMR is a recently proposed concept of futuristic SMR. The MMR size is being determined to be transportable with land transportation. Special attention is given to the MMR design on the dry cooling, which the cooling system does not depend on water. With appropriately designed air cooling heat exchanger, the MMR can operate autonomously. Two types of air cooling methods are suggested. One is using fan and the other is utilizing cooling tower for the air flow. With fan type air cooling method it consumes about 0.6% of generated electricity from the nuclear reactor. Cooling tower occupies an area of 227 m 2 and 59.6 m in height. This design is just a preliminary estimation of the dry cooling method, and therefore more detailed and optimal design will be followed in the next phase

  20. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  1. Analysis of Ideal Towers for Tall Wind Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, Katherine L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Damiani, Rick R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Roberts, Joseph O [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lantz, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-27

    Innovation in wind turbine tower design is of significant interest for future development of wind power plants. First, wind turbine towers account for a large portion of overall capital expenditures for wind power projects. Second, for low wind-resource regions of the world, the use of low-cost tall-tower technology has the potential to open new markets for development. This study investigates the relative potential of various tower configurations in terms of mass and cost. For different market applications and hub heights, idealized tall towers are designed and compared. The results show that innovation in wind turbine controls makes reaching higher hub heights with current technology economically viable. At the same time, new technologies hold promise for reducing tower costs as these technologies mature and hub heights reach twice the current average.

  2. WORKSHOP: Beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling - the control of unruly particles to provide well-behaved beams - has become a major new tool in accelerator physics. The main approaches of electron cooling pioneered by Gersh Budker at Novosibirsk and stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer at CERN, are now complemented by additional ideas, such as laser cooling of ions and ionization cooling of muons

  3. Optimal Electrostatic Space Tower (Mast, New Space Elevator)

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researched the new and revolutionary inflatable electrostatic AB space towers (mast, new space elevator) up to one hundred twenty thousands kilometers (or more) in height. The main innovation is filling the tower by electron gas, which can create pressure up one atmosphere, has negligible small weight and surprising properties. The suggested mast has following advantages in comparison with conventional space elevator: 1. Electrostatic AB tower may be built from Earth surface...

  4. Review of New Concepts, Ideas and Innovations in Space Towers

    OpenAIRE

    Krinker, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Under Space Tower the author understands structures having height from 100 km to the geosynchronous orbit and supported by surface of Earths. The classical Space Elevator is not included in space towers. That has three main identifiers which distingue from Space Tower: Space Elevator has part over Geosynchronous Orbit (GSO) and all installation supported only the centrifugal force of Earth, immobile cable connected to surface of Earth, no pressure on the surface. A lot of new concepts, ideas ...

  5. Radiation scanning aids tower diagnosis at Arun LNG plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naklie, M.M.; Pless, L.; Gurning, T.P.; Hyasak, M.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation scanning has been used effectively to troubleshoot the treating towers of the Arun LNG plant in Sumatra, Indonesia. The plant is one of the world's largest such facilities. The analysis was part of an investigation aimed at increasing the capacity of the treater section of the plant. Radiation scanning is a tool which, in addition to tower differential pressure and product purity, can aid in diagnosing tower performance

  6. Energic, Exergic, Exergo‐economic investigation and optimization of auxiliary cooling system (ACS equipped with compression refrigerating system (CRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Karimi Sadaghiyani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Heller main cooling tower as air-cooled heat exchanger is used in the combined cycle power plants (CCPP to reduce the temperature of condenser. In extreme summer heat, the efficiency of the cooling tower is reduced and it lessens performance of Steam Turbine Generation (STG unit of Combined Cycle Power Plant (CCPP. Thus, the auxiliary cooling system (ACS is equipped with compression refrigerating system (CRS. This auxiliary system is linked with the Heller main cooling tower and improves the performance of power plant. In other words, this auxiliary system increases the generated power of STG unit of CCPP by decreasing the temperature of returning water from cooling tower Therefore, in the first step, the mentioned auxiliary cooling system (ACS as a heat exchanger and compression refrigerating system (CRS have been designed via ASPEN HTFS and EES code respectively. In order to validate their results, these two systems have been built and theirs experimentally obtained data have been compared with ASPEN and EES results. There are good agreements between results. After that, exergic and exergo-economic analysis of designed systems have been carried out. Finally, the compression refrigerating system (CRS has been optimized via Genetic Algorithm (GA. Increasing in exergy efficiency (ε from 14.23% up to 36.12% and decreasing the total cost rate (ĊSystem from 378.2 ($/h to 308.2 ($/h are as results of multi-objective optimization.

  7. Biocide and antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella isolates obtained before and after cleaning at six Danish pig slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Pedersen, Karl; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2014-01-01

    that bacteria exposed to disinfectants can develop resistance toward disinfectants and can have a higher risk of developing antibiotic resistance.The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of biocide resistant Salmonella sp. in Danish pig slaughterhouses, to evaluate if there was a correlation....... The susceptibility toward three different biocides, triclosan and two commercial disinfection products: Desinfect Maxi, a quaternary ammonium compound, and Incimaxx DES, an acetic compound, was determined. We found no resistance toward the biocides tested, but we did find that isolates obtained after cleaning had...... that there was a weak statistical correlation between MICs toward the biocides and some antibiotics, but no difference in log(MIC)s toward antibiotics between isolates obtained before and after cleaning, nor did we find any difference in the number of resistances of isolates obtained before and after cleaning...

  8. Transmission Tower Environment Monitoring Using UAV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redzuwan, Redia Mohd; Din, Norashidah Md; Baharuddin, Mohd Zafri; Mustafa, Intan Shafinaz; Omar, Rohayu Che'

    2013-01-01

    Power utility engineers used to conduct ground survey to collect topographic data. Therefore, they can get detailed and accurate information, but these techniques take a lot of labors and expenses, and spending times for the surveying. An attractive solution to the ground survey is using images taken using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Images captured from UAV can be collected quickly and efficiently over the same area covered in the land survey, in a fraction of the time. The purpose of this research is to mosaic the large numbers of spectral images together into a region wide panoramic image which allows experts to analyze the data for transmission tower monitoring purposes.

  9. GPM GROUND VALIDATION METEOROLOGICAL TOWER ENVIRONMENT CANADA GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Meteorological Tower Environment Canada GCPEx dataset provides temperature, relative humidity, 10m winds, pressure and solar radiation data...

  10. Newton slopes for Artin-Schreier-Witt towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher; Wan, Daqing; Xiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We fix a monic polynomial f(x)∈Fq[x] over a finite field and consider the Artin-Schreier-Witt tower defined by f(x); this is a tower of curves ⋯→Cm→Cm−1→⋯→C0=A1, with total Galois group Zp. We study the Newton slopes of zeta functions of this tower of curves. This reduces to the study of the Newton...... a result on the behavior of the slopes of the eigencurve associated to the Artin-Schreier-Witt tower, analogous to the result of Buzzard and Kilford....

  11. GPM GROUND VALIDATION METEOROLOGICAL TOWER ENVIRONMENT CANADA GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Meteorological Tower Environment Canada GCPEx dataset provides temperature, relative humidity, 10 m winds, pressure and solar radiation...

  12. Predictive Studies Suggest that the Risk for the Selection of Antibiotic Resistance by Biocides Is Likely Low in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    OpenAIRE

    S?nchez, Mar?a Blanca; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo; Mart?nez, Jos? Luis; Hern?ndez, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Biocides are used without restriction for several purposes. As a consequence, large amounts of biocides are released without any control in the environment, a situation that can challenge the microbial population dynamics, including selection of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Previous work has shown that triclosan selects Stenotrophomonas maltophilia antibiotic resistant mutants overexpressing the efflux pump SmeDEF and induces expression of this pump triggering transient low-level resistance...

  13. Biocides in hydraulic fracturing: A comparison to agricultural and assessment of hazard and vulnerability with respect to groundwater pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Fred; Wilson, Miles; Davies, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Biocides are one possible chemical additive to frack fluids and their role is to control bacterial growth. Since biocides are designed to be toxic to particular organisms, their accidental or deliberate release into the environment has become a growing topic of concern, especially with regards to fracking. The objective of this study was to consider whether biocides proposed for use in fracking, could be a threat to English groundwater based on past groundwater monitoring data. The study considered all groundwater samples analysed for biocides in English groundwater between 2005 and 2014. The monitoring records were compared to: records of application (both amount and area); and chemical and molecular data for the biocides. The study did not use traditional adsorption and degradation data as these parameters are prone to variability and are not pure molecular parameters. The study showed that of the 110 biocides tested for in English groundwaters in the decade 2005 - 2014. The total number of detections was 2234 out of 1475000 observations of 95 compounds, and 38 were compounds that were not applied during the period of record. The detection of these 38 compounds did not decline over the 10 year period implying very long residence times and that once compounds do pollute an aquifer, then they will be a persistent problem. The study was able to develop binomial regression models of the probability of detecting pesticide in groundwater based upon molecular and application variables; and solely upon molecular properties. The solubility of the range of biocides used in frack fluids would imply a potentially higher hazard than for most agricultural biocides, but molecular modelling implied that one compound could be safer than others.

  14. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  15. A study on the possibility of cooling of schools by natural wind flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setodemaram, K. [West Azarbayjan Management Power Generation Co. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golneshan, A.A.; Jafarpur, Kh. [Shiraz Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    Wind towers have been used for natural ventilation and passive cooling of buildings in traditional architecture in hot regions of Iran and neighbouring countries.This paper discussed the feasibility of using modern wind towers to cool air in schools. The value of the convective heat transfer coefficient in classrooms was determined. A 1:35 scale plexiglass model of a typical 8 class-room school was created. A series of experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel. Mass transfer analogy using naphthalene sublimation was employed to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient in the model. The plexiglass model was equipped with a wind tower in order to study the movement of air in the classrooms. The convective heat transfer coefficient was determined. The effect of students as well as night ventilation on temperature variations in the classrooms was studied through computerized simulation. The ambient temperature and pressure and naphthalene sublimated mass rate were evaluated. The exhausted wind tunnel air temperature between the mouth of the tower and windows in each class were measured in each of the tests. Air velocity in classrooms was determined using Reynolds number and air change per hour. A typical hot summer day in Shiraz was selected for a case study. It was concluded that the proposed design was suitable for hot and dry regions, and that a wind tower could significantly reduce the cooling load of the buildings. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Antimicrobial commodities. 7. Biocide for water treatment; Kokin seikatsu yohin. 7. Suraimu control zai no kokin bo kabi sayo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugi, T. [Kurita Water Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    Outlined in this report are microbe-caused troubles that happen in manufacturing processes particularly in water treatment systems, measures for dealing with such troubles, and the antimicrobial and fungicidal functions presented by slime inhibiting agents. In heat exchangers in production lines in chemical and iron-making industries, and in paper making processes in paper and pulp industry, deposits, called slime and composed mainly of microbes, occur to cause various troubles such as reduction in production efficiency. In general, vermicides and multiplication depressants are used for the prevention and removal of slime deposition. They include chlorine gas, sodium hypochlorite, chlorinated isocyanuric acid, and dibromohydantoin, which are used for slime control mainly in cooling water systems. Slime inhibitors are needed for paper pulp, antiseptic agents with its effect lasting long are required for industrial production, and, in small cooling towers where chlorine management is demanding, antimicrobial agents of the organic nature are used. In case water treatment is inappropriately performed, troubles may be caused by Legionella microbes, for whose destruction chemical-aided washing is necessary. (NEDO)

  17. Integrated systems for power plant cooling and wastewater management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haith, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of integrated management of energy and water resources, demonstrated in hydropower development, may be applicable to steam-generated power, also. For steam plants water is a means of disposing of a waste product, which is unutilized energy in the form of heat. One framework for the evolution of integrated systems is the consideration of possible technical linkages between power plant cooling and municipal wastewater management. Such linkages include the use of waste heat as a mechanism for enhancing wastewater treatment, the use of treated wastewater as make-up for evaporative cooling structures, and the use of a pond or reservoir for both cooling and waste stabilization. This chapter reports the results of a systematic evaluation of possible integrated systems for power plant cooling and waste water management. Alternatives were analyzed for each of three components of the system--power plant cooling (condenser heat rejection), thermally enhanced waste water treatment, and waste water disposal. Four cooling options considered were evaporative tower, open cycle, spray pond, and cooling pond. Three treatment alternatives considered were barometric condenser-activated sludge, sectionalized condenser-activated sludge, and cooling/stabilization pond. Three disposal alternatives considered were ocean discharge, land application (spray irrigation), and make-up (for evaporative cooling). To facilitate system comparisons, an 1100-MW nuclear power plant was selected. 31 references

  18. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models.

  19. The tower of Hanoi myths and maths

    CERN Document Server

    Hinz, Andreas M; Petr, Ciril

    2018-01-01

    The solitaire game “The Tower of Hanoi" was invented in the 19th century by the French number theorist Édouard Lucas. The book presents its mathematical theory and offers a survey of the historical development from predecessors up to recent research. In addition to long-standing myths, it provides a detailed overview of the essential mathematical facts with complete proofs, and also includes unpublished material, e.g., on some captivating integer sequences. The main objects of research today are the so-called Hanoi graphs and the related Sierpiński graphs. Acknowledging the great popularity of the topic in computer science, algorithms, together with their correctness proofs, form an essential part of the book. In view of the most important practical applications, namely in physics, network theory and cognitive (neuro)psychology, the book also addresses other structures related to the Tower of Hanoi and its variants. The updated second edition includes, for the first time in English, the breakthrough reach...

  20. Synthesis of biocidal polymers containing metal NPs using an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwonyong; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Hee-Yeon; Yoon, Jeyong; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2012-01-01

    Metal containing antibacterial polymers were prepared by the polymerization of methylmethacrylate and methacrylic acid with copper or zinc. When the thin film of the polymers coated on a glass was irradiated with an electron beam, nanoparticles were obtained. It was found that these polymers exhibited a potent antibacterial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. The metal containing polymers showed a 99.999% (5.0 logs) reduction in E. coli at a contact time of 12 h. In addition, polymers had a good antifouling effect against marine organisms. - Graphical abstract: Biocidal activity of Cu nanoparticle/polymer composite film against Gram-negative bacteria. Highlights: ► Metal containing antibacterial polymers were prepared with copper. ► Using the electron beam, nanoparticles were obtained. ► It was found that these polymers exhibited potent biocidal activity against E. coli. ► The metal containing polymers showed a 99.999% reduction of E. coli.

  1. Assessment of TBT and organic booster biocide contamination in seawater from coastal areas of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Sook; Shim, Won Joon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Hong, Sang Hee; Ha, Sung Yong; Han, Gi Myung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-01-15

    Seawater samples from major enclosed bays, fishing ports, and harbors of Korea were analyzed to determine levels of tributyltin (TBT) and booster biocides, which are antifouling agents used as alternatives to TBT. TBT levels were in the range of not detected (nd) to 23.9 ng Sn/L. Diuron and Irgarol 1051, at concentration ranges of 35-1360 ng/L and nd to 14 ng/L, respectively, were the most common alternative biocides present in seawater, with the highest concentrations detected in fishing ports. Hot spots were identified where TBT levels exceeded environmental quality targets even 6 years after a total ban on its use in Korea. Diuron exceeded the UK environmental quality standard (EQS) value in 73% of the fishing port samples, 64% of the major bays, and 42% of the harbors. Irgarol 1051 levels were marginally below the Dutch and UK EQS values at all sites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Encapsulation of Antifouling Organic Biocides in Poly(lactic acid) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamtsikakis, Aristotelis; Kavetsou, Eleni; Chronaki, Konstantina; Kiosidou, Evangelia; Pavlatou, Evangelia; Karana, Alexandra; Papaspyrides, Constantine; Detsi, Anastasia; Karantonis, Antonis; Vouyiouka, Stamatina

    2017-09-26

    The scope of the current research was to assess the feasibility of encapsulating three commercial antifouling compounds, Irgarol 1051, Econea and Zinc pyrithione, in biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles. The emulsification-solvent evaporation technique was herein utilized to manufacture nanoparticles with a biocide:polymer ratio of 40%. The loaded nanoparticles were analyzed for their size and size distribution, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency and thermal properties, while the relevant physicochemical characteristics were correlated to biocide-polymer system. In addition, the encapsulation process was scaled up and the prepared nanoparticles were dispersed in a water-based antifouling paint in order to examine the viability of incorporating nanoparticles in such coatings. Metallic specimens were coated with the nanoparticles-containing paint and examined regarding surface morphology.

  3. Biocidal properties of anti-icing additives for jet aircraft fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, C.A.; Neihof, R.A.

    1976-03-01

    As part of an effort to find an improved anti-icing additive for jet aircraft fuel the anti-microbial activity of five glycol ether compounds was examined and compared with the currently used additive, 2-methoxyethanol. Cladosporium resinae, Gliomastix sp., Candida sp., and Pseudo-monas aeruginosa were used as assay organisms. Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether, triethylene glycol monomethyl ether, and triethylene glycol monoethyl ether had approximately the same biocidal and biostatic properties as 2-methoxyethanol and appear to be suitable jet-fuel additives as far as the antimicrobial function is concerned. A relatively higher biocidal potency was shown by 2-propoxyethanol and 2-butoxyethanol, possibly because of their greater surface activity; however, nonbiological considerations preclude their use as fuel additives. (GRA)

  4. Dose-response assessments of Kathon biocide. (II). Threshold prophetic patch testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, C W; Weaver, J E; Bailey, P T

    1986-07-01

    Biocidal preservative agents are important in preventing the growth of pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms in a variety of personal care, household and industrial products. Nearly all effective, commonly used preservative materials possess skin sensitization potential. In a series of 13 prophetic human repeat insult patch tests involving a total of 1450 subjects, no skin sensitization was induced at concentrations of 10 ppm, 6 ppm or 5 ppm (1121 subjects) or at 15 ppm (200 subjects) of a new isothiazolinone preservative mixture (Kathon CG). Delayed contact hypersensitivity was induced in 1 of 84 subjects at 12.5 ppm and in 2 of 45 subjects at 20 ppm. These results add further support to the previously reported conclusion that use of this new biocide at the very low concentrations required for effective preservation of rinse-off products involves an extremely low risk of clinical dermatoses.

  5. A passive apparatus for controlled-flux delivery of biocides: hydrogen peroxide as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stefan Møller; Pedersen, L.T.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    A new test method has been developed to estimate the required release rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to prevent marine biofouling. The technique exploits a well-defined concentration gradient of biocide across a cellulose acetate membrane. A controlled flux of H2O2, an environmentally friendly...... biocide, was obtained. Larvae of the barnacle, Balanus improvisus, were subjected to known release rates of H2O2 from a surface, under laboratory conditions. It was found that the distribution of settled larvae was not significantly different from the controls when H2O2 fluxes of 5-8 mu g cm(-2) day(-1......) were applied. However, release rates of 40 mu g cm(-2) day(-1) significantly displaced the distribution of settled larvae towards the area of the chamber farthest away from the membrane. Membrane tests in seawater (Jyllinge Harbour, Denmark) for over 16 weeks showed that release rates of H2O2...

  6. Therapeutic agents and biocides for ocular infections by free-living amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrijo-Carvalho, Linda Christian; Sant'ana, Viviane Peracini; Foronda, Annette Silva; de Freitas, Denise; de Souza Carvalho, Fabio Ramos

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a sight-threatening infectious disease. Resistance of the cystic form of the protozoan to biocides and the potential toxicity of chemical compounds to corneal cells are the main concerns related to long-term treatment with the clinically available ophthalmic drugs. Currently, a limited number of recognized antimicrobial agents are available to treat ocular amoebic infections. Topical application of biguanide and diamidine antiseptic solutions is the first-line therapy. We consider the current challenges when treating Acanthamoeba keratitis and review the chemical properties, toxicities, and mechanisms of action of the available biocides. Antimicrobial therapy using anti-inflammatory drugs is controversial, and aspects related to this topic are discussed. Finally, we offer our perspective on potential improvement of the effectiveness and safety of therapeutic profiles, with the focus on the quality of life and the advancement of individualized medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  8. Effect of water treatment on the comparative costs of evaporative and dry cooled power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, H.; Goldstein, D.J.; Yung, D.

    1976-07-01

    The report presents the results of a study on the relative cost of energy from a nominal 1000 Mwe nuclear steam electric generating plant using either dry or evaporative cooling at four sites in the United States: Rochester, New York; Sheridan, Wyoming; Gallup, New Mexico and Dallas, Texas. Previous studies have shown that because of lower efficiencies the total annual evaluated costs for dry cooling systems exceeds the total annual evaluated costs of evaporative cooling systems, not including the cost of water. The cost of water comprises the cost of supplying the makeup water, the cost of treatment of the makeup and/or the circulating water in the tower, and the cost of treatment and disposal of the blowdown in an environmentally acceptable manner. The purpose of the study is to show the effect of water costs on the comparative costs of dry and evaporative cooled towers

  9. Encapsulation of Antifouling Organic Biocides in Poly(lactic acid) Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kamtsikakis, Aristotelis; Kavetsou, Eleni; Chronaki, Konstantina; Kiosidou, Evangelia; Pavlatou, Evangelia; Karana, Alexandra; Papaspyrides, Constantine; Detsi, Anastasia; Karantonis, Antonis; Vouyiouka, Stamatina

    2017-01-01

    The scope of the current research was to assess the feasibility of encapsulating three commercial antifouling compounds, Irgarol 1051, Econea and Zinc pyrithione, in biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles. The emulsification–solvent evaporation technique was herein utilized to manufacture nanoparticles with a biocide:polymer ratio of 40%. The loaded nanoparticles were analyzed for their size and size distribution, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency and thermal properties, w...

  10. Ability of tropical forest soils of French Guiana and Reunion to depollute woods impregnated with biocides

    OpenAIRE

    Zaremski, Alba; Gastonguay, Louis; Zaremski, Clara; Chaffanel, Fanny; Le Floch, Gaetan; Beauchêne, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Our study sought to fine-tune knowledge about those microorganisms, particularly wood-decaying fungi degrading pollutants in situ. With a view to the depollution or bioremediation of treated woods, wood-decaying microorganisms from tropical forest soils in French Guiana and the island of Reunion were assessed for their ability to degrade toxic biocides such as pentachlorophenol (PCP) or copper chromium arsenic compounds (CCA). The degradation of red pine (Pinus resinosa) test pieces was monit...

  11. Activated soil filters for removal of biocides from contaminated run-off and waste-waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, Kai; Banzhaf, Stefan; Burkhardt, Michael; Janzen, Niklas; Niederstrasser, Bernd; Scheytt, Traugott

    2011-11-01

    Building facades can be equipped with biocides to prevent formation of algal, fungal and bacterial films. Thus run-off waters may contain these highly active compounds. In this study, the removal of several groups of biocides from contaminated waters by means of an activated soil filter was studied. A technical scale activated vertical soil filter (biofilter) with different layers (peat, sand and gravel), was planted with reed (Phragmites australis) and used to study the removal rates and fate of hydrophilic to moderate hydrophobic (log K(ow) 1.8-4.4) biocides and biocide metabolites such as: Terbutryn, Cybutryn (Irgarol® 1051), Descyclopropyl-Cybutryn (Cybutryn and Terbutryn metabolite), Isoproturon, Diuron, and its metabolite Diuron-desmonomethyl, Benzo-isothiazolinone, n-Octyl-isothiazolinone, Dichloro-n-octylisothiazolinone and Iodocarbamate (Iodocarb). Three experiments were performed: the first one (36 d) under low flow conditions (61 L m(-2) d(-1)) reached removal rates between 82% and 100%. The second one was performed to study high flow conditions: During this experiment, water was added as a pulse to the filter system with a hydraulic load of 255 L m(-2) within 5 min (retention time waters or infiltration into soil without appropriate removal. In the last experiment the removal efficiencies of the different layers were studied. Though the peat layer was responsible for most of the removal, the sand and gravel layers also contributed significantly for some compounds. All compounds are rather removed by degradation than by sorption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impedimetric test for rapid determination of performic acid (PFA) biocidal activity toward Echerichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Lasik; Renata Dobrucka; Piotr Konieczny

    2013-01-01

      Background. Performic acid has recently become available on a commercial scale for potential use in waste-water disinfection and can become an innovative biocide for various purposes in food processing. The aim of our study was: 1) to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of performic acid as high active and non toxic chemical disinfectant against Escherichi coli (hygiene indicator test  microorganism used in industrial micro- biology) and 2) to evaluate the electrical impedanc...

  13. Diversity and biocide susceptibility of fungal assemblages dwelling in the Art Gallery of Magura Cave, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena M. Mitova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magura Cave, north-western Bulgaria, possesses valuable rock-art paintings made with bat guano and dated from the period between the Eneolithic and Bronze Ages. Since 2008, the Art Gallery is closed to the general public in order to protect the paintings from vandalism, microclimatic changes caused by visitors and artificial illumination, and the consequent growth of fungi and phototrophs. Nevertheless, some tourist visits are allowed under the supervision of cave managers. This study provides the first scientific report on cultivable fungal assemblages dwelling different substrata in the Art Gallery. A total of 78 strains, belonging to 37 OTUs (Ascomycota 81%, Zygomycota 13%, Basidiomycota 5%, were isolated in the study. This fungal diversity was clearly dominated by Penicillium (50% of strains and Aspergillus (13%. The most relevant visible fungal colonies were detected in sediments rich in bat guano, where, besides Penicillium, other guanophilic fungi such as Mucor, Mortierella, Trichosporon and Trichoderma were dominant. Conversely, scarce fungi were detected on rock surface of painted walls. Based on the biocide susceptibility assay, octylisothiazolinone (OIT and benzalkonium chloride (BAC were effective inhibiting the in vitro growth of dominant fungal species in Magura Cave, when applied at concentrations ranged from 100 to 1,000 mg/L. These data provide a valuable knowledge about Magura fungi, and exemplify a type of preliminary test that may be conducted before planning any biocide treatment. However, considering the irreversible effects of biocides on the ecological balance in caves, and the low fungal contamination in painted walls of Magura Cave, there is no reason to use conventional biocides in this cave. Further studies, monitoring microbial communities and microclimatic parameters, should be conducted to improve the knowledge on microbial ecology in Magura Cave and possible human impacts, as well as to allow the early detection

  14. A multiproxy approach to evaluate biocidal treatments on biodeteriorated majolica glazed tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, M L; Miller, A Z; Martin-Sanchez, P M; Mirão, J; Gomez-Bolea, A; Machado-Moreira, B; Cerqueira-Alves, L; Jurado, V; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Lima, A; Phillips, A J L; Pina, F; Macedo, M F

    2016-12-01

    The Fishing House located on the grounds of the Marquis of Pombal Palace, Oeiras, Portugal, was built in the 18th century. During this epoch, Portuguese gardens, such as the one surrounding the Fishing House, were commonly ornamented with glazed wall tile claddings. Currently, some of these outdoor tile panels are covered with dark colored biofilms, contributing to undesirable aesthetic changes and eventually inducing chemical and physical damage to the tile surfaces. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the investigated biofilms are mainly composed of green algae, cyanobacteria and dematiaceous fungi. With the aim of mitigating biodeterioration, four different biocides (TiO 2 nanoparticles, Biotin ® T, Preventol ® RI 80 and Albilex Biostat ® ) were applied in situ to the glazed wall tiles. Their efficacy was monitored by visual examination, epifluorescence microscopy and DNA-based analysis. Significant changes in the microbial community composition were observed 4 months after treatment with Preventol ® RI 80 and Biotin ® T. Although the original community was inactivated after these treatments, an early stage of re-colonization was detected 6 months after the biocide application. TiO 2 nanoparticles showed promising results due to their self-cleaning effect, causing the detachment of the biofilm from the tile surface, which remained clean 6 and even 24 months after biocide application. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Biocidal properties of anti-icing additives for aircraft fuels. [Glycol monoalkyl ether compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neihof, R.A.; Bailey, C.A.

    1978-04-01

    The biocidal and biostatic activities of seven glycol monoalkyl ether compounds were evaluated as part of an effort to find an improved anti-icing additive for jet aircraft fuel. Typical fuel contaminants, Cladosporium resinae, Gliomastix sp., Candida sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a mixed culture containing sulfate-reducing bacteria were used as assay organisms. Studies were carried out over 3 to 4 months in two-phase systems containing jet fuel and aqueous media. Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether, triethylene glycol monomethyl ether, triethylene glycol monoethyl ether, and 2-methoxyethanol were generally biocidal in aqueous concentrations of 10 to 17% for all organisms except Gliomastix, which required 25% or more. 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-propoxyethanol, and 2-butoxyethanol were biocidal at progressively lower concentrations down to 1 to 2% for 2-butoxyethanol. The enhanced antimicrobial activity of these three compounds was attributed to cytoplasmic membrane damage because of the correlation between surface tension measurements and lytic activity with P. aeruginosa cells. The mechanism of action of the less active compounds appeared to be due to osmotic (dehydrating) effects. When all requirements are taken into account, diethylene glycol monomethyl ether appears to be the most promising replacement for the currently used additive, 2-methoxyethanol.

  16. Synergistic sub-lethal effects of a biocide mixture on the springtail Folsomia fimetaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnug, Lisbeth; Leinaas, Hans Petter; Jensen, John

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of three biocides, esfenvalerate, picoxystrobin and triclosan, on adult survival and recruitment of juveniles was studied in the springtail Folsomia fimetaria, both in single and mixture experiments. Recruitment of juveniles was more sensitive to biocide exposure than adult survival. The concepts of concentration addition and independent action returned almost identical toxicity predictions, though both models failed to predict the observed toxicity due to synergistic deviations at high exposure concentrations. A comparison with a similar study on earthworms showed that response-patterns were species-specific. Consequently, there is no single reference concept which is applicable for all species of one ecosystem, which in turn questions the usefulness of such mixture prediction concepts in ecological risk assessment. -- Highlights: • Toxicity of esfenvalerate, picoxystrobin and triclosan to Folsomia fimetaria was assessed. • Both, the single biocides and the mixture affected recruitment stronger than survival. • Concentration addition and independent action predictions were almost identical. • Inhibition of recruitment after mixture exposure was stronger than predicted. • Comparison with an earthworm study showed that responses are species-specific. -- The concepts of concentration addition and independent action failed to predict mixture toxicity due to dose-dependent synergistic effects

  17. Investigations on the emissions of biocides and PCBs under low volume conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Birte; Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a low volume air sampling strategy for biocides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) at low air change rates in modern, air-tight showcases as they are present in museums. Lindane, pentachlorophenol, dichlofluanid, tolyfluanid, isodrin, p,p-dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and permethrin were the biocides and PCB28 and PCB153 were the PCBs studied, all of which are semi volatile organic compounds (SVOC). Their occurrences in the museum environment originate from various sources e.g. preventive treatment of organic exhibits or organic building materials. Exhibits are long-term exposed to these pollutants due to storing in showcases or other storage equipment at low air change rates. To achieve air sampling under the aforementioned conditions the influences of temperature, air circulation, air change rate and relative humidity on the emission behavior of the selected biocides and PCBs had to be determined. This was carried out with pre-soaked wood samples in low volume air sampling experiments using 27L test showcases and 23L and 24L emission test chambers and also diffusive sampling with glass as the sampling material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. BioCIDER: a Contextualisation InDEx for biological Resources discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horro, Carlos; Cook, Martin; Attwood, Teresa K; Brazas, Michelle D; Hancock, John M; Palagi, Patricia; Corpas, Manuel; Jimenez, Rafael

    2017-08-15

    The vast, uncoordinated proliferation of bioinformatics resources (databases, software tools, training materials etc.) makes it difficult for users to find them. To facilitate their discovery, various services are being developed to collect such resources into registries. We have developed BioCIDER, which, rather like online shopping 'recommendations', provides a contextualization index to help identify biological resources relevant to the content of the sites in which it is embedded. BioCIDER (www.biocider.org) is an open-source platform. Documentation is available online (https://goo.gl/Klc51G), and source code is freely available via GitHub (https://github.com/BioCIDER). The BioJS widget that enables websites to embed contextualization is available from the BioJS registry (http://biojs.io/). All code is released under an MIT licence. carlos.horro@earlham.ac.uk or rafael.jimenez@elixir-europe.org or manuel@repositive.io. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Limit groups, positive-genus towers and measure equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Bridson, Martin R; Tweedale, Michael; Wilton, Henry

    2005-01-01

    By definition, an $\\omega$-residually free tower is positive-genus if all surfaces used in its construction are of positive genus. We prove that every limit group is virtually a subgroup of a positive-genus $\\omega$-residually free tower. By combining this with results of Gaboriau, we prove that elementarily free groups are measure equivalent to free groups.

  20. Wind-induced Vibrations in the European Court Towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jannick B.; Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Ken G.

    2012-01-01

    Issues regarding occupancy comfort in vibration-sensitive structures are the motivation of this study concerning windinduced vibrations in the European Court Towers in Luxembourg. In one of the two identical towers tuned liquid dampers (TLD) have been installed. Recent studies investigate the cha...

  1. 47 CFR 5.109 - Antenna and tower requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna and tower requirements. 5.109 Section 5... BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.109 Antenna and tower requirements. (a) Applicants with fixed stations that use antennas that exceed 6 meters in height above the ground level or...

  2. Trends in the development of ehv ac tower lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurtrie, N.J.

    1966-01-01

    Some of the more important current trends in the development of EHV ac tower lines are outlined. The emphasis is primarily on the design and construction aspects of such items as towers, foundations, conductors, insulators and hardware, and the growing integration of the new designs with construction methods. Particular attention is given to the role played by Canadian utilities, manufacturers and engineers.

  3. Frequency analysis of a tower-cable coupled system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moo Yeol; Kim, Seock Hyun; Park, In Su; Cui, Chengxun

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the prediction of natural frequency to avoid resonance in a wind turbine tower- cable coupled system. An analytical model based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method is proposed to predict the resonance frequency of a wind turbine tower structure supported by four guy cables. To verify the validity of the analytical model, a small tower-cable model is manufactured and tested. The frequency and mode data of the tower model are obtained by modal testing and finite element analysis. The validity of the proposed method is verified through the comparison of the frequency analysis results. Finally, using a parametric study with the analytical model, we identified how the cable tension and cable angle affect the resonance frequency of the wind turbine tower structure. From the analysis results, the tension limit and optimal angle of the cable are identified.

  4. The design and stability determination of wind turbine tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abas Abd Wahab; Khairul Barriyah

    2001-01-01

    In wind turbine tower design, two load categories (static and wind load) were considered. The static load for this structure is the tower self-weight, which can be calculated from its density and area of the material, whereas the wind load was calculated based on CP3: Chapter V: Part 2: 1972, using the maximum wind speed of 30 m/s. The stability of this tower under the action of these two loads has been determined using RISA-3D program. The program were subjected to two joint types, i.e pinned and fixed joints. The tower using fixed joint members has established the necessary tower stability. The simulation, calculation and results are being discussed in detail in this paper. (Author)

  5. Adaptive Backstepping Control of Lightweight Tower Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Borup, Kasper Trolle; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of operating a wind turbine with lightweight tower in the full load region exploiting an adaptive nonlinear controller that allows the turbine to dynamically lean against the wind while maintaining nominal power output. The use of lightweight structures...... for towers and foundations would greatly reduce the construction cost of the wind turbine, however extra features ought be included in the control system architecture to avoid tower collapse. An adaptive backstepping collective pitch controller is proposed for tower point tracking control, i.e. to modify...... the angular deflection of the tower with respect to the vertical axis in response to variations in wind speed. The controller is shown to guarantee asymptotic tracking of the reference trajectory. The performance of the control system is evaluated through deterministic and stochastic simulations including...

  6. Molecular Characterization of Reduced Susceptibility to Biocides in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Active efflux is regarded as a common mechanism for antibiotic and biocide resistance. However, the role of many drug efflux pumps in biocide resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii remains unknown. Using biocide-resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates, we investigated the incidence of 11 known/putative antimicrobial resistance efflux pump genes (adeB, adeG, adeJ, adeT1, adeT2, amvA, abeD, abeM, qacE, qacEΔ1, and aceI and triclosan target gene fabI through PCR and DNA sequencing. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR was conducted to assess the correlation between the efflux pump gene expression and the reduced susceptibility to triclosan or chlorhexidine. The A. baumannii isolates displayed high levels of reduced susceptibility to triclosan, chlorhexidine, benzalkonium, hydrogen peroxide, and ethanol. Most tested isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Efflux resistance genes were widely distributed and generally expressed in A. baumannii. Although no clear relation was established between efflux pump gene expression and antibiotic resistance or reduced biocide susceptibility, triclosan non-susceptible isolates displayed relatively increased expression of adeB and adeJ whereas chlorhexidine non-susceptible isolates had increased abeM and fabI gene expression. Increased expression of adeJ and abeM was also demonstrated in multiple antibiotic resistant isolates. Exposure of isolates to subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan or chlorhexidine induced gene expression of adeB, adeG, adeJ and fabI, and adeB, respectively. A point mutation in FabI, Gly95Ser, was observed in only one triclosan-resistant isolate. Multiple sequence types with the major clone complex, CC92, were identified in high level triclosan-resistant isolates. Overall, this study showed the high prevalence of antibiotic and biocide resistance as well as the complexity of intertwined resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of A. baumannii, which highlights the

  7. Resistance to Biocides in Listeria monocytogenes Collected in Meat-Processing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conficoni, Daniele; Losasso, Carmen; Cortini, Enzo; Di Cesare, Andrea; Cibin, Veronica; Giaccone, Valerio; Corno, Gianluca; Ricci, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of microorganisms exerting resistance to biocides is a challenge to meat-processing environments. Bacteria can be intrinsically resistant to biocides but resistance can also be acquired by adaptation to their sub-lethal concentrations. Moreover, the presence of biocide resistance determinants, which is closely linked to antibiotic resistance determinants, could lead to co-selection during disinfection practices along the food chain, and select cross-resistant foodborne pathogens. The purpose of this work was to test the resistance of wild strains of Listeria monocytogenes, isolated from pork meat processing plants, toward benzalkonium chloride (BC), used as proxy of quaternary ammonium compounds. Furthermore, the expression of two non-specific efflux pumps genes (lde and mdrL) under biocide exposure was evaluated. L. monocytogenes were isolated from five processing plants located in the Veneto region (northeast of Italy) before and after cleaning and disinfection (C&D) procedures. A total of 45 strains were collected: 36 strains before and nine after the C&D procedures. Collected strains were typed according to MLST and ERIC profiles. Strains sampled in the same site, isolated before, and after the C&D procedures and displaying the same MLST and ERIC profiles were tested for their sensitivity to different concentrations of BC, in a time course assay. The expression of non-specific efflux pumps was evaluated at each time point by qPCR using tufA gene as housekeeping. A differential expression of the two investigated genes was observed: lde was found to be more expressed by the strains isolated before C&D procedures while its expression was dose-dependent in the case of the post C&D procedures strain. On the contrary, the expression of mdrL was inhibited under low biocidal stress (10 ppm BC) and enhanced in the presence of high stress (100 ppm BC). These findings suggests a possible role for C&D procedures to select L. monocytogenes persisters, pointing

  8. Resistance to Biocides inListeria monocytogenesCollected in Meat-Processing Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conficoni, Daniele; Losasso, Carmen; Cortini, Enzo; Di Cesare, Andrea; Cibin, Veronica; Giaccone, Valerio; Corno, Gianluca; Ricci, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of microorganisms exerting resistance to biocides is a challenge to meat-processing environments. Bacteria can be intrinsically resistant to biocides but resistance can also be acquired by adaptation to their sub-lethal concentrations. Moreover, the presence of biocide resistance determinants, which is closely linked to antibiotic resistance determinants, could lead to co-selection during disinfection practices along the food chain, and select cross-resistant foodborne pathogens. The purpose of this work was to test the resistance of wild strains of Listeria monocytogenes , isolated from pork meat processing plants, toward benzalkonium chloride (BC), used as proxy of quaternary ammonium compounds. Furthermore, the expression of two non-specific efflux pumps genes ( lde and mdrL ) under biocide exposure was evaluated. L. monocytogenes were isolated from five processing plants located in the Veneto region (northeast of Italy) before and after cleaning and disinfection (C&D) procedures. A total of 45 strains were collected: 36 strains before and nine after the C&D procedures. Collected strains were typed according to MLST and ERIC profiles. Strains sampled in the same site, isolated before, and after the C&D procedures and displaying the same MLST and ERIC profiles were tested for their sensitivity to different concentrations of BC, in a time course assay. The expression of non-specific efflux pumps was evaluated at each time point by qPCR using tufA gene as housekeeping. A differential expression of the two investigated genes was observed: lde was found to be more expressed by the strains isolated before C&D procedures while its expression was dose-dependent in the case of the post C&D procedures strain. On the contrary, the expression of mdrL was inhibited under low biocidal stress (10 ppm BC) and enhanced in the presence of high stress (100 ppm BC). These findings suggests a possible role for C&D procedures to select L. monocytogenes persisters

  9. Process fluid cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  10. PORFIDO on the NEMO Phase 2 tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaffoni, Orlando; Cordelli, Marco; Habel, Roberto; Martini, Agnese; Trasatti, Luciano [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy)

    2014-11-18

    We have designed and built an underwater measurement system, PORFIDO (Physical Oceanography by RFID Outreach) to gather oceanographic data from the Optical Modules of a neutrino telescope with a minimum of disturbance to the main installation. PORFIDO is composed of a sensor glued to the outside of an Optical Module, in contact with seawater, and of a reader placed inside the sphere, facing the sensor. Data are transmitted to the reader through the glass by RFID and to shore in real time for periods of years. The sensor gathers power from the radio frequency, thus eliminating the need for batteries or connectors through the glass. We have deployed four PORFIDO probes measuring temperatures with the NEMO-KM3Net-Italy Phase 2 tower in april 2013. The four probes are operative and are transmitting temperature data from 3500 m depth.

  11. PORFIDO on the NEMO Phase 2 tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaffoni, Orlando; Cordelli, Marco; Habel, Roberto; Martini, Agnese; Trasatti, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and built an underwater measurement system, PORFIDO (Physical Oceanography by RFID Outreach) to gather oceanographic data from the Optical Modules of a neutrino telescope with a minimum of disturbance to the main installation. PORFIDO is composed of a sensor glued to the outside of an Optical Module, in contact with seawater, and of a reader placed inside the sphere, facing the sensor. Data are transmitted to the reader through the glass by RFID and to shore in real time for periods of years. The sensor gathers power from the radio frequency, thus eliminating the need for batteries or connectors through the glass. We have deployed four PORFIDO probes measuring temperatures with the NEMO-KM3Net-Italy Phase 2 tower in april 2013. The four probes are operative and are transmitting temperature data from 3500 m depth

  12. Comparative analysis of copper and zinc based agrichemical biocide products: materials characteristics, phytotoxicity and in vitro antimicrobial efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikishan Kannan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, copper based biocides have been extensively used in food crop protection including citrus, small fruits and in all garden vegetable production facilities. Continuous and rampant use of copper based biocides over decades has led to accumulation of this metal in the soil and the surrounding ecosystem. Toxic levels of copper and its derivatives in both the soil and in the run off pose serious environmental and public health concerns. Alternatives to copper are in great need for the agriculture industry to produce food crops with minimal environmental risks. A combination of copper and zinc metal containing biocide such as Nordox 30/30 or an improved version of zinc-only containing biocide would be a good alternative to copper-only products if the efficacy can be maintained. As of yet there is no published literature on the comparative study of the materials characteristics and phyto-compatibility properties of copper and zinc-based commercial products that would allow us to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of both versions of pesticides. In this report, we compared copper hydroxide and zinc oxide based commercially available biocides along with suitable control materials to assess their efficacy as biocides. We present a detailed material characterization of the biocides including morphological studies involving electron microscopy, molecular structure studies involving X-ray diffraction, phytotoxicity studies in model plant (tomato and antimicrobial studies involving surrogate plant pathogens (Xanthomonas alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Zinc based compounds were found to possess comparable to superior antimicrobial properties while exhibiting significantly lower phytotoxicity when compared to copper based products thus suggesting their potential as an alternative.

  13. Solar heating and cooling system with absorption chiller and low temperature latent heat storage: Energetic performance and operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, M.; Keil, C.; Hiebler, S.; Mehling, H.; Schweigler, C. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern) (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Absorption cooling systems based on water/lithium bromide (LiBr) solution typically require an open wet cooling tower to transfer the reject heat to the ambient. Yet, water consumption, the need for water make-up and cleaning, formation of fog, and the risk of Legionella bacteria growth are hindering factors for the implementation of small solar cooling systems. The application of a latent heat storage supporting the heat rejection of the absorption chiller in conjunction with a dry cooling system allows eliminating the wet cooling tower. By that means heat rejection of the chiller is shifted to periods with lower ambient temperatures, i.e. night time or off-peak hours. The system concept and the hydraulic scheme together with an analysis of the energetic performance of the system are presented, followed by a report on the operation of a first pilot installation. (author)

  14. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  15. Development of wind turbine towers using fiber reinforced polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungkurapinan, Nibong

    With an ongoing trend in the wind turbine market, the size of wind turbines has been increasing continuously. Larger wind turbines imply an increase in size, weight, and loads acting on the wind turbine tower. This requires towers to be stronger and stiffer, and consequently leads to bigger tower diameters. Because of their size and weight, transportation and erection require heavy equipment that makes the use of such towers prohibitive in remote communities. To tackle this problem, a research program was initiated at the University of Manitoba to develop the technology required for the fabrication of wind turbine towers constructed of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) for use in remote communities in Canada. The research program was carried out in stages. During the first stage, a feasibility study and an analytical investigation on various shapes of FRP towers were conducted. The concept of a multi-cellular composite tower was examined in great detail and the finite element results showed that such a tower could result in almost 45 percent reduction in weight. In the second stage of this research program, a robotic filament winding machine was designed and constructed in the Composites Laboratory of the University of Manitoba. It was used to fabricate the multi-cell tower specimens for testing. The third stage of the research program involved the experimental investigation, which was carried out in three phases. In the first phase, two single cell specimens were tested to failure under lateral loading. The specimens were 8 ft (2.44 m) long. The second phase involved the testing of two single cells loaded in compression. The third phase of the experimental investigation involved the testing of two eight-cell jointed tower specimens. The specimens were octagonal and tapered, with a diameter of 21.4 in (543 mm) at the base and 17.4 in (441 mm) at the top. They were 16 ft (4.88 m) in height and tested as cantilever under static loading. Local buckling was the dominant

  16. Cooling water requirements and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    Indian nuclear power programme is poised to scuttle the energy crisis of our time by proposing joint ventures for large power plants. Large fossil/nuclear power plants (NPPs) rely upon water for cooling and are therefore located near coastal areas. The amount of water a power station uses and consumes depends on the cooling technology used. Depending on the cooling technology utilized, per megawatt existing NPPs use and consume more water (by a factor of 1.25) than power stations using other fuel sources. In this context the distinction between 'use' and 'consume' of water is important. All power stations do consume some of the water they use; this is generally lost as evaporation. Cooling systems are basically of two types; Closed cycle and Once-through, of the two systems, the closed cycle uses about 2-3% of the water volumes used by the once-through system. Generally, water used for power plant cooling is chemically altered for purposes of extending the useful life of equipment and to ensure efficient operation. The used chemicals effluent will be added to the cooling water discharge. Thus water quality impacts on power plants vary significantly, from one electricity generating technology to another. In light of massive expansion of nuclear power programme there is a need to develop new ecofriendly cooling water technologies. Seawater cooling towers (SCT) could be a viable option for power plants. SCTs can be utilized with the proper selection of materials, coatings and can achieve long service life. Among the concerns raised about the development of a nuclear power industry, the amount of water consumed by nuclear power plants compared with other power stations is of relevance in light of the warming surface seawater temperatures. A 1000 MW power plant uses per day ∼800 ML/MW in once through cooling system; while SCT use 27 ML/MW. With the advent of new marine materials and concrete compositions SCT can be constructed for efficient operation. However, the

  17. Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2011-04-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

  18. Biocide Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus CC398 and CC30 Isolates from Pigs and Identification of the Biocide Resistance Genes, qacG and qacC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seier-Petersen, Maria Amalie; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in particular clonal complex (CC) 398, is increasingly found in livestock. Recently, MRSA CC30 was identified in Danish pigs. We determined the susceptibility of porcine S. aureus isolates of CC398 and CC30 to disinfectants used in pig...... farming (benzalkonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, sodium hypochlorite, and caustic soda). Furthermore, efflux pump activity, antimicrobial resistance profiles, hemolysis properties, and the presence of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL......)-encoding virulence factors were investigated. Methods: Susceptibilities to biocides and antimicrobial agents of 79 porcine S. aureus isolates were determined by the microdilution method. Isolates comprised 21 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 40 MRSA isolates belonging to CC398 and 13 MSSA and 5 MRSA...

  19. Performance test of solar-assisted ejector cooling system

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Bin-Juine

    2014-03-01

    A solar-assisted ejector cooling/heating system (SACH-2k) is built and test result is reported. The solar-driven ejector cooling system (ECS) is connected in series with an inverter-type air conditioner (IAC). Several advanced technologies are developed in SACH-k2, including generator liquid level control in ECS, the ECS evaporator temperature control, and optimal control of fan power in cooling tower of ECS. From the field test results, the generator liquid level control performs quite well and keeps stable performance of ejector. The ECS evaporator temperature control also performs satisfactorily to keep ejector performance normally under low or fluctuating solar radiation. The fan power control system cooling tower performs stably and reduces the power consumption dramatically without affecting the ECS performance. The test results show that the overall system COPo including power consumptions of peripheral increases from 2.94-3.3 (IAC alone) to 4.06-4.5 (SACH-k2), about 33-43%. The highest COPo is 4.5. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and IIR. All rights reserved.

  20. Virtual and remote control tower research, design, development and validation

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The interdisciplinary research and development work carried out in the last ten years which is presented in this book aimed at replacing the conventional airport control tower by a new “remote tower operation” work environment (RTO) which should enhance work efficiency and safety and reduce costs. This revolutionary human–system interface allows for remote aerodrome traffic control without a physical tower building and enables the establishment of remote airport traffic control centers (RTC) of which each may serve several airports from a central location.

  1. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  2. Antibiotics and common antibacterial biocides stimulate horizontal transfer of resistance at low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkina, J; Marathe, N P; Flach, C-F; Larsson, D G J

    2018-03-01

    There is a rising concern that antibiotics, and possibly other antimicrobial agents, can promote horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. For most types of antimicrobials their ability to induce conjugation below minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) is still unknown. Our aim was therefore to explore the potential of commonly used antibiotics and antibacterial biocides to induce horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance. Effects of a wide range of sub-MIC concentrations of the antibiotics cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and the antibacterial biocides chlorhexidine digluconate, hexadecyltrimethylammoniumchloride and triclosan were investigated using a previously optimized culture-based assay with a complex bacterial community as a donor of mobile resistance elements and a traceable Escherichia coli strain as a recipient. Chlorhexidine (24.4μg/L), triclosan (0.1mg/L), gentamicin (0.1mg/L) and sulfamethoxazole (1mg/L) significantly increased the frequencies of transfer of antibiotic resistance whereas similar effects were not observed for any other tested antimicrobial compounds. This corresponds to 200 times below the MIC of the recipient for chlorhexidine, 1/20 of the MIC for triclosan, 1/16 of the MIC for sulfamethoxazole and right below the MIC for gentamicin. To our best knowledge, this is the first study showing that triclosan and chlorhexidine could stimulate the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance. Together with recent research showing that tetracycline is a potent inducer of conjugation, our results indicate that several antimicrobials including both common antibiotics and antibacterial biocides at low concentrations could contribute to antibiotic resistance development by facilitating the spread of antibiotic resistance between bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biocide and corrosion inhibition use in the oil and gas industry: Effectiveness and potential environmental impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandon, D.M.; Fillo, J.P.; Morris, A.E.; Evans, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment chemicals are used in all facets of the natural gas industry (NGI) from well development through transmission and storage of natural gas. The multitude of chemicals used, combined with the dozens of chemical manufacturers and/or suppliers has lead to the availability of hundreds of possible chemical products. Because of the widespread use of chemical products and their numerous sources, the NGI needs access to consistent data regarding their effectiveness and potential environmental impacts. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness and potential environmental impacts of, chemical products used in the NGI. This assessment was initially focused on biocides and corrosion inhibitors and their use in the gas production, storage and transmission facilities, The overall approach was obtain the necessary data on chemical use and effectiveness directly from the oil and gas industry, supplemented with data/information obtained from the published literature. Five case histories of chemical use were documented and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of these chemicals. Potential environmental impacts were addressed by performing a screening environmental assessment on the use of glutaraldehyde, a widely used biocide. Prototype discharge scenarios were formulated and modeled to evaluate potential impacts to groundwater and surface water. The paper describes the basis for the study, provides an overview of chemical use with a focus on biocides and corrosion inhibitors, describes and assesses the specific uses of chemicals, and presents the results of the environmental assessment. It was found that various chemicals can be effective in treating microbiologically influenced corrosion and souring, but that the effectiveness of specific chemicals is dependent on the operational scenario and the site-specific conditions

  4. Bioluminescence inhibition assays for toxicity screening of wood extractives and biocides in paper mill process waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Anna; Latorre, Anna; Lacorte, Sílvia; Barceló, Damià

    2004-02-01

    The risk associated with wood extractives, biocides, and other additives in pulp and paper mill effluents was evaluated by performing a characterization of process waters and effluents in terms of toxicity and chemical analysis. The individual toxicity of 10 resin acids, two unsaturated fatty acids, and three biocides was estimated by measuring the bioluminescence inhibition with a ToxAlert 100 system. Median effective concentration values (EC50) of 4.3 to 17.9, 1.2 to 1.5, and 0.022 to 0.50 mg/L were obtained, respectively. Mixtures of these three families of compounds showed antagonistic effects. Chemical analysis of process waters was performed by liquid chromatography- and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Biocides such as 2-(thiocyanomethylthio)-benzotiazole (TCMTB) (EC50 = 0.022 mg/L) and 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilpropionamide (DBNPA) (EC50 = 0.50 mg/L) were the most toxic compounds tested and were detected at concentrations of 16 and 59 microg/L, respectively, in a closed-circuit recycling paper mill. Process waters from kraft pulp mills, printing paper mills, and packing board paper mills showed the highest concentration of resin acids (up to 400 microg/L) and accounted for inhibition percentages up to 100%. Detergent degradation products such as nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) and the plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA) were also detected in the waters at levels of 0.6 to 10.6, 0.3 to 1.4, and 0.7 to 187 microg/L, respectively. However, once these waters were biologically treated, the concentration of detected organic compounds diminished and the toxicity decreased in most cases to values of inhibition lower than 20%.

  5. Effects of marine microbial biofilms on the biocide release rate from antifouling paints – A model-based analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yebra, Diego Meseguer; Kiil, Søren; Erik Weinell, Claus

    2006-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) paint model of Kiil et al. [S. Kiil, C.E. Weinell, M.S. Pedersen, K. Dam-Johansen, Analysis of self-polishing antifouling paints using rotary experiments and mathematical modelling, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 40 (2001) 3906-3920] and the simplified biofilm. growth model of Gujer......, polishing behaviour of AF paints. It is concluded that the perturbation of the local sea water conditions (e.g. pH), as a consequence of the metabolic activity of the biofilm should not affect the net biocide leaching and binder reaction rates significantly. This results from the thin and poorly active...... biofilms which presumably grow onto the highly effective modern AF paints. According to simulations, the experimental decrease in the biocide leaching rate caused by biofilm growth must be mainly attributed to adsorption of the biocide by the exopolymeric substances secreted by the microorganisms...

  6. Gas-Bearing Crucible for Shot Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngberg, C. L.; Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.; Finnerty, A. A.

    1983-01-01

    Device protects molten drops from contamination and distortion. Gas flowing through levitator tube levitates small balls while they melt. Gas heated by filament extending through center of tube. Gas bearing crucible on tube has concave configuration to hold single relatively large ball or many recesses to hold many small balls. By time spheres reach foam, they are cooled sufficiently by radiation to retain their shape.

  7. Analysis of a New Dissipation System for a Solar Cooling Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Monné Bailo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a solar absorption cooling installation located at the University of Zaragoza (Spain. The installation is based on the performance of an absorption chiller. The solar cooling system consists of 37,5 m2 of flat plate collector, a 4.5 kW, single-effect LiBr-H2O absorption chiller, and a dry cooling tower. The installation provides cooling to a gymnasium belonging to the sports center of the university. To carry out the installation analysis, the system was continuously monitored. In 2007, 2008 and 2009, several studies have been performed in order to analyze the full system operation. The measured data showed the strong influence of the cooling water temperature and the generator driving temperature on the COP. Due to the experimental evidence of the influence of the cooling water temperature, a new heat rejection system based on a geothermal heat sink has been installed and studied.

  8. Distribution of anti fouling biocides in coastal seawater of Egadi Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massanisso, Paolo; Ubaldi, Carla; Chiavarini, Salvatore; Pezza, Massimo; Cannarsa, Sigfrido; Bordone, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pollution level due to anti fouling biocides in the Marine Protected Area of Egadi Islands (MPA) has been evaluated by both grab and passive sampling. Analyses of tributyltin (TBT), diuron, irgarol, chlorothalonil and dichlofluanid have been carried out on seawater and sediments. The results indicate a good condition of the coastline, but further studies with passive sampling for TBT are required to help the MPA administrators to control the status of the seawater with a methodology suitable to reach the Environmental Quality Standard values established by the Water Framework Directive [it

  9. Degradation of a commercial textile biocide with advanced oxidation processes and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of significant amounts of biocidal finishing agents in the environment as a consequence of intensive textile finishing activities has become a subject of major public health concern and scientific interest only recently. In the present study, the treatment efficiency of selected, well-known advanced oxidation processes (Fenton, Photo-Fenton, TiO(2)/UV-A, TiO(2)/UV-A/H(2)O(2)) and ozone was compared for the degradation and detoxification of a commercial textile biocide formulation containing a 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether as the active ingredient. The aqueous biocide solution was prepared to mimic typical effluent originating from the antimicrobial finishing operation (BOD(5,o) Daphnia magna)=8% v/v). Ozonation experiments were conducted at different ozone doses (500-900 mg/h) and initial pH (7-12) to assess the effect of ozonation on degradation (COD, DOC removal), dearomatization (UV(280) and UV(254) abatement), dechlorination (AOX removal) and detoxification (changes in LC(50)). For the Fenton experiments, the effect of varying ferrous iron catalyst concentrations and UV-A light irradiation (the Photo-Fenton process) was examined. In the heterogenous photocatalytic experiments, Degussa P25-type TiO(2) was used as the catalyst and the effect of reaction pH (3, 7 and 12) and H(2)O(2) addition on the photocatalytic treatment efficiency was examined. Although in the photochemical (i.e. Photo-Fenton, TiO(2)/UV-A and TiO(2)/UV-A/H(2)O(2)) experiments appreciably higher COD and DOC removal efficiencies were obtained, ozonation appeared to be equally effective to achieve dearomatization (UV(280) abatement) at all studied reaction pH. During ozonation of the textile biocide effluent, AOX abatement proceeded significantly faster than dearomatization and was complete after 20 min ozonation (267 mg O(3)). On the other hand, for complete detoxification, ozonation had to be continued for at least 30 min (corresponding to 400mg O(3)). Effective AOX

  10. Kinetics of dissolution of a biocide soda-lime glass powder containing silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban-Tejeda, L.; Silva, A. C. da; Mello-Castanho, S. R.; Pacharroman, C.; Moya, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we have studied the lixiviation kinetics of silver nanoparticles, as well as the solubility of a particulate system ( 2 lixiviation followed a Jander model (α 2 /4 ≈ Kt). It has been proven that nanostructured soda-lime glass/nAg composed by particles <30 μm with a 20 wt% of silver are a strong biocide versus Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. This soda-lime glass/nAg acts as a perfect dispenser of silver nanoparticles to the liquid media, avoiding the fast increasing of its concentration over the toxicity limit for human cells and for the environment.

  11. Simulation for temperature changing investigation at RSG-GAS cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utaja

    2002-01-01

    The RSG-GAS cooling system considers of primary and secondary system, is used for heat rejection from reactor core to the atmosphere. For temperature changing investigation cause by atmospherics condition changing or coolant flow rate changing, is more safe done by simulation. This paper describes the simulation for determine the RSG-GAS coolant temperature changing base on heat exchange and cooling tower characteristic. The simulation is done by computer programme running under WINDOWS 95 or higher. The temperature changing is based on heat transfer process on heat exchanger and cooling tower. The simulation will show the water tank temperature changing caused by the temperature and humidity of the atmosphere or by coolant flow rate changing. For example the humidity changing from 60% to 80% atmospherics temperature 30 oC and 32400 k Watt power will change the tank temperature from 37,97 oC to 40,03 oC

  12. Thematic strategy on sustainable use of plant protection products. Prospects and requirements for transferring proposals for plant protection products to biocides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartiser, Stefan [Hydrotox GmbH, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Lueskow, Heike [Institut fuer Oekologie und Politik GmbH (OEKOPOL), Hamburg (Germany); Gross, Rita [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie e.V., Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The sustainable use of pesticides pursues, independent of the authorisation of single products, the aim to minimise existing environmental risks of pesticide use and therefore contribute to the reduction of its impact on the environmental protection goals. The Thematic Strategy (TS) and the Framework Directive 2009/128/EC (FWD) on sustainable use of pesticides have so far only been implemented for plant protection products (PPP). For biocides there exists no harmonised approach. Within the project the possibilities and requirements for transferring measures of the FWD to the biocide area have been analysed, with specific focus on wood preservatives, insecticides, and antifouling products. Several biocidal active substances are found in the outlets of sewage treatment plants and in surface water, but an inventory of the present environmental impact as well as reliable data on biocide consumption and use patterns, which could be used to identify key action areas, are generally missing. These data are urgently needed for the development of suitable indicators and the definition of the objectives. Sustainable use of biocides addresses the three issues; social, environmental and economic impact at which the ecological background assigns the borderline and beam barrier of the economic and social development. A systematic analysis of the instruments for improving sustainable use of pesticides described in TS and FWD indicated that many issues can be transferred to the biocide area. This concerns e.g. education and training, requirements for sales, the establishment of awareness programmes, control of the machinery for biocide application, the development of best practice standards based on integrated pest management principles, and the collection of statistics on biocide consumption. Some biocide specific characteristics need to be considered: E.g. unlike PPP, the intended use of some biocides is to be directly applied in water bodies or indoors. Furthermore for some

  13. Hadron calorimeter towers with a high space resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellettini, G.; Bertani, R.; Bradaschia, C.; Del Fabbro, R.; Scribano, A.; Terreni, G.

    1982-01-01

    The performances of a set of hadron calorimeter towers for measuring the hadron impact point are described. It is shown that an accuracy of 1-2 cm can be achieved with a proper treatment of the data. (orig.)

  14. NAMMA SENEGAL RADIOSONDE AND TOWER FLUX DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Radiosonde and Tower Flux data includes measurements of humidity, wind speed/direction and velocity. Additionally, the flux data includes...

  15. Transient Simulation of Wind Turbine Towers under Lightning Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simulation algorithm is proposed in this paper for lightning transient analysis of the wind turbine (WT towers. In the proposed algorithm, the tower body is first subdivided into a discrete multiconductor system. A set of formulas are given to calculate the electrical parameters of the branches in the multiconductor system. By means of the electrical parameters, each branch unit in the multiconductor system is replaced as a coupled π-type circuit and the multiconductor system is converted into a circuit model. Then, the lightning transient responses can be obtained in different parts on the tower body by solving the circuit equations of the equivalent discretization network. The laboratory measurement is also made by a reduced-scale tower for checking the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  16. NAMMA SENEGAL RADIOSONDE AND TOWER FLUX DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Radiosonde and Tower Flux data includes measurements of humidity, wind speed/direction and velocity. Additionally the Flux data includes...

  17. Evaluation of Tower Shadowing on Anemometer Measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of tower shadowing from the meteorology towers at LANL during 2014. This study is in response to the Department of Energy Meteorological Coordinating Council visit in 2015 that recommended an evaluation of any biases in the wind data introduced by the tower and boom alignment at all meteorology towers.

  18. Muon cooling channels

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhard-K-Kei

    2003-01-01

    A procedure uses the equations that govern ionization cooling, and leads to the most important parameters of a muon cooling channel that achieves assumed performance parameters. First, purely transverse cooling is considered, followed by both transverse and longitudinal cooling in quadrupole and solenoid channels. Similarities and differences in the results are discussed in detail, and a common notation is developed. Procedure and notation are applied to a few published cooling channels. The parameters of the cooling channels are derived step by step, starting from assumed values of the initial, final and equilibrium emittances, both transverse and longitudinal, the length of the cooling channel, and the material properties of the absorber. The results obtained include cooling lengths and partition numbers, amplitude functions and limits on the dispersion at the absorber, length, aperture and spacing of the absorber, parameters of the RF system that achieve the longitudinal amplitude function and bucket area ...

  19. Effects of Antifouling Biocides on Molecular and Biochemical Defense System in the Gill of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Seon; Kim, Young Dae; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Youn-Jung; Kim, Jang Kyun; Rhee, Jae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Antifouling biocides such as organotin compounds and their alternatives are potent toxicants in marine ecosystems. In this study, we employed several molecular and biochemical response systems of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to understand a potential mode of action of antifouling biocides (i.e. tributyltin (TBT), diuron and irgarol) after exposure to different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1 μg L-1) for 96 h. As a result, all the three antifouling biocides strongly induced the antioxidant defense system. TBT reduced both enzymatic activity and mRNA expression of Na+/K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lower levels of both Na+/K+-ATPase activity and AChE mRNA expression were observed in the diuron-exposed oysters compared to the control, while the irgarol treatment reduced only the transcriptional expression of AChE gene. We also analyzed transcript profile of heat shock protein (Hsp) superfamily in same experimental conditions. All antifouling biocides tested in this study significantly modulated mRNA expression of Hsp superfamily with strong induction of Hsp70 family. Taken together, overall results indicate that representative organotin TBT and alternatives have potential hazardous effects on the gill of C. gigas within relatively short time period. Our results also suggest that analyzing a series of molecular and biochemical parameters can be a way of understanding and uncovering the mode of action of emerging antifouling biocides. In particular, it was revealed that Pacific oysters have different sensitivities depend on the antifouling biocides. PMID:28006823

  20. 75 FR 16732 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; Aqua-Loop Cooling Towers, Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ...)), has continued the Regulations in effect under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S... authorization from the U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC''). Pursuant... facilitating or coordinating the export of approximately 174 rolls of hog hair filter media, part number HH6O...