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Sample records for cooling lake thermal

  1. Effect of thermal additions on the density and distribution of thermophilic amoebae and pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in a newly created cooling lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.; Ironside, K.S.; Metler, P.L.; Tan, E.L. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA)); Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B. (E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Aiken, SC (USA))

    1989-03-01

    Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of fatal human amoebic meningoencephalitis. The protozoan is ubiquitous in nature, and its presence is enhanced by thermal additions. In this investigation, water and sediments from a newly created cooling lake were quantitatively analyzed for the presence of thermophilic amoebae, thermophilic Naegleria spp., and the pathogen Naegleria fowleri. During periods of thermal additions, the concentrations of thermophilic amoebae and thermophilic Naegleria spp. increased as much as 5 orders of magnitude, and the concentration of the pathogen N. fowleri increased as much as 2 orders of magnitude. Concentrations of amoebae returned to prior thermal perturbation levels within 30 to 60 days after cessation of thermal additions. Increases in the thermophilic amoeba concentrations were noted in Savannah River oxbows downriver from the Savannah River plant discharge streams as compared with oxbows upriver from the discharges. Concentrations of thermophilic amoebae and thermophilic Naegleria spp. correlated significantly with temperature and conductivity. Air samples taken proximal to the lade during periods of thermal addition showed no evidence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. Isoenzyme patterns of the N. fowleri isolated from the cooling lake were identical to patterns of N. fowleri isolated from other sites in the United States and Belgium.

  2. Physical effects of thermal pollution in lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Râman Vinnâ, Love; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic heat emissions into inland waters influence water temperature and affect stratification, heat and nutrient fluxes, deep water renewal, and biota. Given the increased thermal stress on these systems by growing cooling demands of riparian/coastal infrastructures in combination with climate warming, the question arises on how to best monitor and manage these systems. In this study, we investigate local and system-wide physical effects on the medium-sized perialpine Lake Biel (Switzerland), influenced by point-source cooling water emission from an upstream nuclear power plant (heat emission ˜700 MW, ˜18 W m-2 lake wide). We use one-dimensional (SIMSTRAT) and three-dimensional (Delft3D-Flow) hydrodynamic numerical simulations and provide model resolution guidelines for future studies of thermal pollution. The effects on Lake Biel by the emitted excess heat are summarized as: (i) clear seasonal trend in temperature increase, locally up to 3.4°C and system-wide volume mean ˜0.3°C, which corresponds to one decade of regional surface water climate warming; (ii) the majority of supplied thermal pollution (˜60%) leaves this short residence time (˜58 days) system via the main outlet, whereas the remaining heat exits to the atmosphere; (iii) increased length of stratified period due to the stabilizing effects of additional heat; (iv) system-wide effects such as warmer temperature, prolonged stratified period, and river-caused epilimnion flushing are resolved by both models whereas local raised temperature and river short circuiting was only identifiable with the three-dimensional model approach. This model-based method provides an ideal tool to assess man-made impacts on lakes and their downstream outflows.

  3. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Alfred J.; Kurzeja, Robert J.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Bollinger, James S.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q" from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation σ of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q" can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing σ. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q" and σ when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between σ and q" of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q" computed from a function of σ and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q" (0.84 and 0.89). Finally, this research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  4. Lagrangian and Control Volume Models for Prediction of Cooling Lake Performance at SRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, A.J.

    2001-06-26

    The model validation described in this document indicates that the methods described here and by Cooper (1984) for predicting the performance of the proposed L-Area cooling lake are reliable. Extensive observations from the Par Pond system show that lake surface temperatures exceeding 32.2 degrees C (90 degrees F) are attained occasionally in the summer in areas where there is little or no heating from the P-Area Reactor. Regulations which restrict lake surface temperatures to less than 32.2 degrees C should be structured to allow for these naturally-occurring thermal excursions.

  5. Inhomogeneous thermal conductivity enhances thermoelectric cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingyu Lu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate the enhancement of thermoelectric cooling performance in thermoelectric refrigerators made of materials with inhomogeneous thermal conductivity, beyond the usual practice of enhancing thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT of materials. The dissipation of the Joule heat in such thermoelectric refrigerators is asymmetric which can give rise to better thermoelectric cooling performance. Although the thermoelectric figure of merit and the coefficient-of-performance are slightly enhanced, both the maximum cooling power and the maximum cooling temperature difference can be enhanced significantly. This finding can be used to increase the heat absorption at the cold end. We further find that the asymmetric dissipation of Joule heat leads to thermal rectification.

  6. Evaporative cooling: water for thermal comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rui Camargo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Evaporative cooling is an environmentally friendly air conditioning system that operates using induced processes of heat and mass transfer, where water and air are the working fluids. It consists, specifically, in water evaporation, induced by the passage of an air flow, thus decreasing the air temperature. This paper presents three methods that can be used as reference for efficient use of evaporative cooling systems, applying it to several Brazilian cities, characterized by different climates. Initially it presents the basic operation principles of direct and indirect evaporative cooling and defines the effectiveness of the systems. Afterwards, it presents three methods that allows to determinate where the systems are more efficient. It concludes that evaporative cooling systems have a very large potential to propitiate thermal comfort and can still be used as an alternative to conventional systems in regions where the design wet bulb temperature is under 24ºC.

  7. Floor cooling and air-cooling, the effects on thermal comfort or different cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijpheer, N.C.; Bakker, E.J.; Ligthart, F.A.T.M.; Opstelten, I.J. [ECN Energie in de Gebouwde Omgeving en Netten, Petten (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    One of the research areas of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings located on the premises of ECN. Measured data from these facilities together with weather data and computer models are used to evaluate innovative energy concepts and components in energy systems. Experiments with different cooling systems in ECN's research dwellings are executed to evaluate their effective influence on both energy use and thermal comfort. Influence of inhabitants' behaviour is taken into account in these experiments. The thermal comfort is indicated by the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) as defined by P.O. Fanger. For this paper, the results of measurements with a floor cooling and air cooling system are assessed. Effects on the PMV measured during experiments with the two different cooling systems will be presented.

  8. Effects of body size, condition, and lipid content on the survival of juvenile lake herring during rapid cooling events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangle, K.L.; Sutton, T.M.; Kinnunen, R.E.; Hoff, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Juvenile lake herring Coregonus artedi were exposed to rapid cooling events during two laboratory experiments to determine the effects of body size, physiological condition, and lipid content on survival. The first experiment was conducted at the onset of winter, exposing small (50 to 85 mm) and large (85 to 129 mm) fish to a decline in water temperature from 12 to 2??C at a rate of 1??C/hr. During this experiment, both large and small individuals exposed to a rapid cooling event experienced no mortality or abnormal behaviors. Separate fish were then maintained under thermal and photoperiod regimes that mimicked those in Lake Superior from October through May. Fish in each size class were maintained at two feeding treatments: Artemia ad libitum and no food. At the completion of the winter period, these lake herring were subjected to the same rapid cooling event conducted in the first experiment. During the experiment, lake herring exhibited no mortality or abnormal behaviors despite treatment-dependent differences in condition and lipid content. Our results indicate that mortality due to rapid cooling events does not appear to contribute to the recruitment variability observed for juvenile lake herring in Lake Superior.

  9. Recent trends in solar thermal sorption cooling system technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M Bataineh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Solar thermal cooling is the best alternative solution to overcome the problems associated with using nonrenewable resources. There are several thermal cooling methods developed differing from each other according to the thermodynamic cycle and type of refrigerant used. Recent developments in absorption and adsorption solar cooling systems are presented. Summarized thermodynamic modeling for both absorption and adsorption solar cooling systems is given. Brief thermal analysis among the types of solar collectors is presented. System efficiencies and optimization analysis are presented. The influences of geometrical, system configurations, and physical parameters on the performance of solar thermal sorption cooling system are investigated. The basis for the design of absorption and adsorption solar cooling systems is provided. Several case studies in different climatic conditions are presented. Economic feasibility for both systems is discussed. Comparison between the absorption and adsorption solar cooling system is summarized.

  10. How to measure thermal effects of personal cooling systems : Human, thermal manikin and human simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Psikuta, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Rossi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects, such as cooling power and thermophysiological responses initiated upon application of a personal cooling system, can be assessed with (i) humans, (ii) a thermal manikin and (iii) a thermophysiological human simulator. In order to compare these methods, a cooling shirt (mild cooling)

  11. Thermal Stratification in Lake Zige Tangco, Central Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wan-chun; YANG Xiang-dong; YIN Yu; JI Jiang; LI Shi-jie; PU Pei-min

    2005-01-01

    Lake Zige Tangco is an endorheic saline lake in central Tibetan Plateau. Investigations of 1998 and 1999 revealed that is was a typical stratified lake. The characteristics of thermal stratification of the lake have been extensively discussed from 4 aspects, i.e. thermocline, hydrochemistry and dissolved oxygen, stable isotope oxygen, and stability. The thermocline coupled with chemocline was further analyzed.

  12. Seasonal thermal ecology of adult walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tyler B; Hayden, Todd A.; Gutowsky, Lee F G; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Fielder, David G.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Murchie, Karen J; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those migrating to the main basin of Lake Huron, experienced higher temperatures, and thus accumulated more thermal units (the amount of temperature units amassed over time) throughout the year. Walleye that migrated toward the southern end of Lake Huron occupied higher temperatures than those that moved toward the north. Consequently, walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay experienced thermal environments that were more favorable for growth as they spent more time within their thermal optimas than those that remained in Saginaw Bay. Results presented in this paper provide information on the thermal experience of wild fish in a large lake, and could be used to refine sex- and lake-specific bioenergetics models of walleye in the Great Lakes to enable the testing of ecological hypotheses.

  13. Seasonal thermal ecology of adult walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tyler B; Hayden, Todd A; Gutowsky, Lee F G; Vandergoot, Christopher S; Fielder, David G; Madenjian, Charles P; Murchie, Karen J; Dettmers, John M; Krueger, Charles C; Cooke, Steven J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those migrating to the main basin of Lake Huron, experienced higher temperatures, and thus accumulated more thermal units (the amount of temperature units amassed over time) throughout the year. Walleye that migrated toward the southern end of Lake Huron occupied higher temperatures than those that moved toward the north. Consequently, walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay experienced thermal environments that were more favorable for growth as they spent more time within their thermal optimas than those that remained in Saginaw Bay. Results presented in this paper provide information on the thermal experience of wild fish in a large lake, and could be used to refine sex- and lake-specific bioenergetics models of walleye in the Great Lakes to enable the testing of ecological hypotheses.

  14. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  15. Experimental study on a transpiration cooling thermal protection system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Transpiration cooling thermal protection systems (TPS) are investigated for potential applications in hypersonic and re-entry vehicles,which are subjected to the severe aerodynamic heating environment. In this paper a transpiration cooling thermal protection system was designed and manufactured,and an experiment platform with radiant heating at the bottom as heat source was developed. The cooling capacity of the transpiration cooling TPS was experimentally investigated. By combining transpiration cooling method with traditional TPS,the heat load capability of the TPS can be improved. The structure temperature with active cooling applied was much lower than that without active cooling applied under the same heat load as well as the heat load increased with active cooling than the one without active cooling for the same structure temperature. The experimental results showed that at 5800 s,the temperature of inner structure was 100°C with active cooling applied compared to 500°C without active cooling applied,then the temperature increased and reached to 360°C at 8300 s. Heat load of this transpiration cooling TPS can be increased by over 70% as compared to the passion one and the cooling capability of the transpiration TPS was about 1700 kJ/kg. The results can provide fundamental data for developing the transpiration cooling TPS.

  16. Thermal structure of proglacial lakes in Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Shin; Minowa, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Daiki; Skvarca, Pedro; Sawagaki, Takanobu; Ohashi, Yoshihiko; Naito, Nozomu; Chikita, Kazuhisa

    2016-12-01

    Calving glaciers are rapidly retreating in many regions under the influence of ice-water interactions at the glacier front. In contrast to the numerous researches conducted on fjords in front of tidewater glaciers, very few studies have been reported on lakes in which freshwater calving glaciers terminate. To better understand ice-water interactions at the front of freshwater calving glaciers, we measured lakewater temperature, turbidity, and bathymetry near Glaciar Perito Moreno, Upsala, and Viedma, large calving glaciers of the Southern Patagonia Icefield. The thermal structures of these lakes were significantly different from those reported in glacial fjords. There was no indication of upwelling subglacial meltwater; instead, turbid and cold glacial water discharge filled the region near the lake bottom. This was because water density was controlled by suspended sediment concentrations rather than by water temperature. Near-surface wind-driven circulation reaches a depth of 180 m, forming a relatively warm isothermal layer (mean temperature of 5-6°C at Perito Moreno, 3-4°C at Upsala, and 6-7°C at Viedma), which should convey heat energy to the ice-water interface. However, the deeper part of the glacier front is in contact with stratified cold water, implying a limited amount of melting there. In the lake in front of Glaciar Viedma, the region deeper than 120 m was filled entirely with turbid and very cold water at pressure melting temperature. Our results revealed a previously unexplored thermal structure of proglacial lakes in Patagonia, suggesting its importance in the subaqueous melting of freshwater calving glaciers.

  17. Thermal computations for electronics conductive, radiative, and convective air cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary mechanisms of heat flowConductionApplication example: Silicon chip resistance calculationConvectionApplication example: Chassis panel cooled by natural convectionRadiationApplication example: Chassis panel cooled only by radiation 7Illustrative example: Simple thermal network model for a heat sinked power transistorIllustrative example: Thermal network circuit for a printed circuit boardCompact component modelsIllustrative example: Pressure and thermal circuits for a forced air cooled enclosureIllustrative example: A single chip package on a printed circuit board-the proble

  18. Cooling-dominated cracking in thermally stressed volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of thermally induced cracking in rocks have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and the mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesized to be different from those formed during heating. We present in situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution in a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. Results show that both the rate and the energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills, and lava flows.

  19. On the Thermal Anomaly of Lake Untersee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevington, James

    2015-01-01

    Reported here is the outcome from a student internship undertaken with Dr. Chris McKay at the NASA Ames Research Center. The project for this internship focuses on Lake Untersee, an Earth analog for icy moons. The anoxic hole of Lake Untersee has a thermal bump that was first observed by Wand et al., 1997 and has been confirmed several times (Wand et al., 2006; Andersen 2011). The expected thermal profile of the hole is linear from 0 C at the thermocline to approximately 4 C, the ground temperature in Antarctica, at the bottom. Instead, there is an increase from 0 C near the thermocline to 5 C which is maintained for 7 m, then a linear profile to approximately 4 C near the bottom. Thermal modeling was conducted to quantify the energy input required to maintain the bump. The results revealed 2 sources. Chemical reactions and radiative energy were analyzed as possible explanation. The chemical analysis revealed a peak in Chlorophyll a at the same depth as the shallower source and several interesting reactions with maximum rates at the same location as the lower depth source. However, the energy released from these reactions was orders of magnitude smaller than required source. The radiation analysis revealed a profile with two peaks in similar locations to the sources and a total energy input within a factor of 1.5 of the required sources. The conclusion from this work is that photosynthesis and the chemical reactions support microbial life in the water column which in turn acts as an opacity to convert radiative energy into thermal energy. Recommendations for future work are aimed at quantifying the quantity and types of microbes present in the water column. Beyond the work of the project, two field trips are described and a discussion on benefits to the student of the internship is given.

  20. Fuel Cell Thermal Management Through Conductive Cooling Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis was performed to evaluate the concept of utilizing conductive cooling plates to remove heat from a fuel cell stack, as opposed to a conventional internal cooling loop. The potential advantages of this type of cooling system are reduced stack complexity and weight and increased reliability through the reduction of the number of internal fluid seals. The conductive cooling plates would extract heat from the stack transferring it to an external coolant loop. The analysis was performed to determine the required thickness of these plates. The analysis was based on an energy balance between the thermal energy produced within the stack and the heat removal from the cooling plates. To accomplish the energy balance, the heat flow into and along the plates to the cooling fluid was modeled. Results were generated for various numbers of cells being cooled by a single cooling plate. The results provided cooling plate thickness, mass, and operating temperature of the plates. It was determined that utilizing high-conductivity pyrolitic graphite cooling plates can provide a specific cooling capacity (W/kg) equivalent to or potentially greater than a conventional internal cooling loop system.

  1. Desiccant Cooling System for Thermal Comfort: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEMANT PARMAR,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Desiccant cooling system (DCS is alternate suitable option against conventional cooling system in humid climates. A typical system combines a dehumidifier that uses dry desiccant wheel, with direct or indirect evaporative systems and a sensible cooling system. DCS is the environmental protection technique for cooling purpose of the building. This system reduces the CFC level in the environment because it restricts the use of conventional refrigerant. In this paper, all the working principles and expected research areashave been discussed. Through detailed literature survey it has been observed that a desiccant cooling system may be a suitable option for thermal comfort in the climate where the humidity is higher. Thedesiccant cooling system (DCS has proven their feasibility and cost saving in the field of air conditioning. This review provides a brief overview on the development of desiccant cooling system in different fields. Finally, concluding remarks regarding further development of desiccant cooling for thermal comfort are also provided. This technology is economically feasible and optimizes with low cost. This review is useful for making opportunities to further research in different areas of desiccant cooling system.

  2. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-04-05

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  3. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-08-09

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  4. Parametric study of closed wet cooling tower thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, S. M.; Hayder, M. J.

    2017-08-01

    The present study involves experimental and theoretical analysis to evaluate the thermal performance of modified Closed Wet Cooling Tower (CWCT). The experimental study includes: design, manufacture and testing prototype of a modified counter flow forced draft CWCT. The modification based on addition packing to the conventional CWCT. A series of experiments was carried out at different operational parameters. In view of energy analysis, the thermal performance parameters of the tower are: cooling range, tower approach, cooling capacity, thermal efficiency, heat and mass transfer coefficients. The theoretical study included develops Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predicting various thermal performance parameters of the tower. Utilizing experimental data for training and testing, the models simulated by multi-layer back propagation algorithm for varying all operational parameters stated in experimental test.

  5. Pathogenic amoebae in power-plant cooling lakes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-06-01

    Cooling waters and associated algae and sediments from four northern and four southern/western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. Unheated control waters and algae/sediments from four northern and five southern/western sites were also tested. When comparing results from the test versus control sites, a significantly higher proportion (P less than or equal to 0.05) of the samples from the test sites were positive for thermophilic amoeba, thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic Naegleria. The difference in number of samples positive for thermophilic Naegleria between heated and unheated waters, however, was attributable predominantly to the northern waters and algae/sediments. While two of four northern test sites yielded pathogenic Naegleria, seven of the eight isolates were obtained from one site. Seasonality effects relative to the isolation of the pathogen were also noted at this site. One pathogen was isolated from a southwestern test site. Pathogens were not isolated from any control sites. Some of the pathogenic isolates were analyzed serologically and classified as pathogenic Naegleria fowleri. Salinity, pH, conductivity, and bacteriological profiles did not obviously correlate with the presence or absence of pathogenic Naegleria. While thermal addition was significantly associated with the presence of thermophilic Naegleria (P less than or equal to 0.05), the data implicate other as yet undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic thermophile. Until further delineation of these parameters is effected, generalizations cannot be made concerning the effect of thermal impact on the growth of pathogenic amoeba in a particular cooling system.

  6. Phytoplankton distribution in three thermally different but edaphically similar reactor cooling reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E W

    1982-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure and the physicochemical characteristics of three reactor cooling reservoirs in close proximity and of similar age and bottom type were studied during 1978. The three reservoirs differed in thermal alteration resulting from reactor cooling water as follows: (1) considerable heating with lake-wide temperatures >30/sup 0/C, even in winter; (2) a maximal 5/sup 0/C increase occurring in only one of three major arms of the reservoir; and (3) no thermal effluent received during the study period. Considerable spatial and temporal differences in water quality and phytoplankton community structure were observed; however, water temperature independent of other environmental factors (e.g., light and nutrients) was found to be a relatively unimportant variable for explaining phytoplankton periodicity.

  7. Evaporative respiratory cooling augments pit organ thermal detection in rattlesnakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Viviana; Andrade, Denis V; Bovo, Rafael P; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2013-12-01

    Rattlesnakes use their facial pit organs to sense external thermal fluctuations. A temperature decrease in the heat-sensing membrane of the pit organ has the potential to enhance heat flux between their endothermic prey and the thermal sensors, affect the optimal functioning of thermal sensors in the pit membrane and reduce the formation of thermal "afterimages", improving thermal detection. We examined the potential for respiratory cooling to improve strike behaviour, capture, and consumption of endothermic prey in the South American rattlesnake, as behavioural indicators of thermal detection. Snakes with a higher degree of rostral cooling were more accurate during the strike, attacking warmer regions of their prey, and relocated and consumed their prey faster. These findings reveal that by cooling their pit organs, rattlesnakes increase their ability to detect endothermic prey; disabling the pit organs caused these differences to disappear. Rattlesnakes also modify the degree of rostral cooling by altering their breathing pattern in response to biologically relevant stimuli, such as a mouse odour. Our findings reveal that low humidity increases their ability to detect endothermic prey, suggesting that habitat and ambush site selection in the wild may be influenced by external humidity levels as well as temperature.

  8. Thermal regimes of Rocky Mountain lakes warm with climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James J.; Fausch, Kurt D.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Walters, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is causing a wide range of stresses in aquatic ecosystems, primarily through warming thermal conditions. Lakes, in response to these changes, are experiencing increases in both summer temperatures and ice-free days. We used continuous records of lake surface temperature and air temperature to create statistical models of daily mean lake surface temperature to assess thermal changes in mountain lakes. These models were combined with downscaled climate projections to predict future thermal conditions for 27 high-elevation lakes in the southern Rocky Mountains. The models predict a 0.25°C·decade-1increase in mean annual lake surface temperature through the 2080s, which is greater than warming rates of streams in this region. Most striking is that on average, ice-free days are predicted to increase by 5.9 days ·decade-1, and summer mean lake surface temperature is predicted to increase by 0.47°C·decade-1. Both could profoundly alter the length of the growing season and potentially change the structure and function of mountain lake ecosystems. These results highlight the changes expected of mountain lakes and stress the importance of incorporating climate-related adaptive strategies in the development of resource management plans.

  9. Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Advanced Liquid-Cooling Garment Using Highly Thermally Conductive Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bue, Grant C.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Tang, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This design of the liquid-cooling garment for NASA spacesuits allows the suit to remove metabolic heat from the human body more effectively, thereby increasing comfort and performance while reducing system mass. The garment is also more flexible, with fewer restrictions on body motion, and more effectively transfers thermal energy from the crewmember s body to the external cooling unit. This improves the garment s performance in terms of the maximum environment temperature in which it can keep a crewmember comfortable. The garment uses flexible, highly thermally conductive sheet material (such as graphite), coupled with cooling water lines of improved thermal conductivity to transfer the thermal energy from the body to the liquid cooling lines more effectively. The conductive sheets can be layered differently, depending upon the heat loads, in order to provide flexibility, exceptional in-plane heat transfer, and good through-plane heat transfer. A metal foil, most likely aluminum, can be put between the graphite sheets and the external heat source/sink in order to both maximize through-plane heat transfer at the contact points, and to serve as a protection to the highly conductive sheets. Use of a wicking layer draws excess sweat away from the crewmember s skin and the use of an outer elastic fabric ensures good thermal contact of the highly conductive underlayers with the skin. This allows the current state of the art to be improved by having cooling lines that can be more widely spaced to improve suit flexibility and to reduce weight. Also, cooling liquid does not have to be as cold to achieve the same level of cooling. Specific areas on the human body can easily be targeted for greater or lesser cooling to match human physiology, a warmer external environment can be tolerated, and spatial uniformity of the cooling garment can be improved to reduce vasoconstriction limits. Elements of this innovation can be applied to other embodiments to provide effective heat

  11. Thermal Isolation and Differential Cooling of Heterogeneously Integrated Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    holes for the vias were created with an excimer laser drilling technique by Corning Glass as a subcontractor under two via fill performers, who each...burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing...System through Laser Spot Heating ................................ 40 4.2 Microgap Cooling of Thermal Via Arrays

  12. Thermal behaviour of cooling ceilings; Thermisches Verhalten von Kuehldecken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, C.

    2002-07-01

    The thermal behaviour of cooling ceilings is so far described by characteristic equations in the form of q=C x {delta}{theta}{sup n}. In special cases these equations are extended by terms which take into account the radiation exchange between heat sink and space user (operational ambient temperature). This is insufficient. Therefore a model is presented, which describes more exactly the individual processes (radiation, convection) at the cooled surface. As a first step the ceiling area is divided into three ranges in which different phenomena are affecting the heat transfer considerably: 1. Range under the influence of free convection in the space. 2. Range with forced convection caused by a plume along the window. 3. Range with forced convection caused by air flow through supply air outlets. For each of these ranges the fundamentals of heat transfer are applied using the substantial variables. The results of these models are then compared in a second step with results from laboratory tests. This model is developed first for steady-state conditions. It is extended by a second model to describe the dynamic processes (storage). Finally, both steady-state and unsteady conditions are investigated systematically. Results are presented for the cooling rate effected by the temperature of cooling ceiling, ambient conditions, supply air flow rate, supply air temperature and type of the air outlet. The results computed indicate that the maximum total cooling rate is always gained by a combination of a cooling ceiling and a supply air with minimum permissible temperature. In these cases the cooling rate of the ceiling is lower than that without ventilation of the space. However, the additional cooling rate of the ventilation compensates this effect in all cases investigated. This is an important finding, since cooling ceilings usually must be combined with an HVAC system for reasons of dehumidifying. Dried, cooled supply air can thus be supplied to the space without

  13. Thermal structure of a lake with water in vertical motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, G.; Mongelli, F. (Bari Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Geodesia e Geofisica)

    The vertical temperature structures of the seasonal thermocline of two lakes in temperate latitude with different feedings have been examined experimentally and reproduced theoretically by the basic equation of heat diffusion. One of these lakes is fed mainly from springs emerging from the lake bottom: as a consequence a vertical motion of water is established. The other lake is fed from the former by a small superficial channel. It is argued that the observed quantitative features of the stratification cycle agree with the theoretical calculations in both lakes with the same value of the molecular thermal diffusivity. Moreover, the seasonal thermocline of the lake with the bottom feeding is reduced: this involves a faster drop in the temperature amplitude of the annual cycle.

  14. Liquid metal cooling in thermal management of computer chips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Kunquan; LIU Jing

    2007-01-01

    With the rapid improvement of computer performance,tremendous heat generation in the chip becomes a major serious concern for thermal management.Meanwhile,CPU chips are becoming smaller and smaller with almost no room for the heat to escape.The total power-dissipation levels now reside on the order of 100 W with a peak power density of 400-500 W/cm2,and are still steadily climbing.As a result,it is extremely hard to attain higher performance and reliability.Because the conventional conduction and forcedair convection techniques are becoming incapable in providing adequate cooling for sophisticated electronic systems,new solutions such as liquid cooling,thermoelectric cooling,heat pipes,vapor chambers,etc.are being studied.Recently,it was realized that using a liquid metal or its alloys with a low melting point as coolant could significantly lower the chip temperature.This new generation heat transfer enhancement method raised many important fundamentals and practical issues to be solved.To accommodate to the coming endeavor in this area,this paper is dedicated to presenting an overall review on chip cooling using liquid metals or their alloys as coolant.Much more attention will be paid to the thermal properties of liquid metals with low melting points or their alloys and their potential applications in the chip cooling.Meanwhile,principles of several typical pumping methods such as mechanical,electromagnetic or peristaltic pumps will be illustrated.Some new advancement in making a liquid metal cooling device will be discussed.The liquid metal cooling is expected to open a new world for computer chip cooling because of its evident merits over traditional coolant.

  15. Remote cooling by a novel thermal lens with anisotropic positive thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A novel thermal lens that can achieve a remote cooling effect is designed by transformation thermodynamics. The effective distance between the separate hot source and cold source is shortened by our shelled thermal lens without any negative thermal conductivity. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our thermal lens. Based on the effective medium theory, we also propose a practical way to realize our lens using two-layered isotropic thermal media that are both found in nature. The proposed thermal lens will have potential applications in remote temperature control and in creating other thermal illusions.

  16. Stability of thermal modes in cool prominence plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Parenti, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    Context: Magnetohydrodynamic thermal modes may play an important role in the formation, plasma condensation, and evolution of solar prominences. Unstable thermal modes due to unbalance between radiative losses and heating can lead to rapid plasma cooling and condensation. An accurate description of the radiative loss function is therefore crucial for this process. Aims: We study the stability of thermal modes in unbounded and uniform plasmas with properties akin to those in solar prominences. Effects due to partial ionization are taken into account. Three different parametrizations of the radiative loss function are used. Methods: By means of a normal mode analysis, we investigate linear nonadiabatic perturbations superimposed on the equilibrium state. We find an approximate instability criterion for thermal modes, while the exact linear growth rate is obtained by numerically solving the general dispersion relation. The stability of thermal disturbances is compared for the three different loss functions consi...

  17. Thermal comfort and energy-efficient cooling of nonresidential buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Kalz, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    This book supports HVAC planners in reducing the cooling energy demand, improving the indoor environment and designing more cost-effective building concepts. High performance buildings have shown that it is possible to go clearly beyond the energy requirements of existing legislation and obtaining good thermal comfort. However, there is still a strong uncertainty in day-to-day practice due to the lack of legislative regulations for mixed-mode buildings which are neither only naturally ventilated nor fully air-conditioned, but use a mix of different low-energy cooling techniques. Based on the f

  18. Thermal structure of proglacial lakes in Patagonia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugiyama, Shin; Minowa, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Daiki; Skvarca, Pedro; Sawagaki, Takanobu; Ohashi, Yoshihiko; Naito, Nozomu; Chikita, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    ...‐water interactions at the glacier front. In contrast to the numerous researches conducted on fjords in front of tidewater glaciers, very few studies have been reported on lakes in which freshwater calving glaciers terminate...

  19. Thermal Non-equilibrium Consistent with Widespread Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Mok, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Time correlation analysis has been used to show widespread cooling in the solar corona; this cooling has been interpreted as a result of impulsive (nanoflare) heating. In this work, we investigate wide-spread cooling using a 3D model for a solar active region which has been heated with highly stratified heating. This type of heating drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions, meaning that though the heating is effectively steady, the density and temperature in the solution are not. We simulate the expected observations in narrowband EUV images and apply the time correlation analysis. We find that the results of this analysis are qualitatively similar to the observed data. We discuss additional diagnostics that may be applied to differentiate between these two heating scenarios.

  20. Thermal Cooling Limits of Sbotaged Spent Fuel Pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Dr. Thomas F. Lin

    2010-09-10

    To develop the understanding and predictive measures of the post “loss of water inventory” hazardous conditions as a result of the natural and/or terrorist acts to the spent fuel pool of a nuclear plant. This includes the thermal cooling limits to the spent fuel assembly (before the onset of the zircaloy ignition and combustion), and the ignition, combustion, and the subsequent propagation of zircaloy fire from one fuel assembly to others

  1. Thermal ecology of Naegleria fowleri from a power plant cooling reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, H W; McLaughlin, G L

    1990-07-01

    The pathogenic, free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of human primary amebic meningoencephalitis. N. fowleri has been isolated from thermally elevated aquatic environments worldwide, but temperature factors associated with occurrence of the amoeba remain undefined. In this study, a newly created cooling reservoir (Clinton Lake, Illinois) was surveyed for Naegleria spp. before and after thermal additions from a nuclear power plant. Water and sediment samples were collected from heated and unheated arms of the reservoir and analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. and pathogenic N. fowleri. Amoebae were identified by morphology, in vitro cultivation, temperature tolerance, mouse pathogenicity assay, and DNA restriction fragment length analysis. N. fowleri was isolated from the thermally elevated arm but not from the ambient-temperature arm of the reservoir. The probability of isolating thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic N. fowleri increased significantly with temperature. Repetitive DNA restriction fragment profiles of the N. fowleri Clinton Lake isolates and a known N. fowleri strain of human origin were homogeneous.

  2. Thermal ecology of Naegleria fowleri from a power plant cooling reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizinga, H.W. (Illinois State Univ., Normal (USA)); McLaughlin, G.L. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The pathogenic, free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of human primary amebic meningoencephalitis. N. fowleri has been isolated from thermally elevated aquatic environments worldwide, but temperature factors associated with occurrence of the amoeba remain undefined. In this study, a newly created cooling reservoir (Clinton Lake, Illinois) was surveyed for Naegleria spp. before and after thermal additions from a nuclear power plant. Water and sediment samples were collected from heated and unheated arms of the reservoir and analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. and pathogenic N. fowleri. Amoebae were identified by morphology, in vitro cultivation, temperature tolerance, mouse pathogenicity assay, and DNA restriction fragment length analysis. N. fowleri was isolated from the thermally elevated arm but not from the ambient-temperature arm of the reservoir. The probability of isolating thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic N. fowleri increased significantly with temperature. Repetitive DNA restriction fragment profiles of the N. fowleri Clinton Lake isolates and a known N. fowleri strain of human origin were homogeneous.

  3. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a "segmented" thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed "segmented" model shows more precise than the "non-segmented" model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the "segmented" model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  4. Thermal Performance Testing of EMU and CSAFE Liquid Cooling Garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Richard; Bue, Grant; Hakam, Mark; Radford, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Future exploration missions require the development of a new liquid cooling garment (LCG) that offers greater system reliability, is more comfortable, and maximizes thermal performance. To inform the development of a future LCG a thermal performance test was conducted to evaluate three factors: (1) the effect of the thermal comfort undergarment (TCU) on tactile and thermal comfort, (2) the comparable thermal performance of an CSAFE developed engineering evaluation unit (EEU) LCG, which uses a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) wicking garment as the base, and (3) the performance of a torso or upper body only LCG configuration to evaluate a proposed auxiliary loop configuration. To evaluate the thermal performance of each configuration a metabolic suit test was conducted, utilizing suited subjects to generate metabolic heat by walking on a treadmill at various speeds. Three (3) test subjects of similar height and weight produced a metabolic load for five tests by either resting (300-600 BTU/hr), walking at a slow pace (1200 BTU/hr), and walking at a brisk pace (2200 BTU/hr). During the test, data was collected that would allow us to track the heat transfer to the LCG and ventilation system to determine the thermal performance of the LCG configurations. Four different test configurations were tested, with one configuration tested twice. The test results show that the CSAFE EEU LCG and EMU LCG had comparable performance. The testing also showed that an auxiliary loop LCG, sized similarly to the shirt-only configuration, should provide adequate cooling for contingency scenarios. Finally, the testing showed the previous analysis that assumed a UA deterioration from the TCU was too conservative and the TCU may prove to be acceptable for future development with additional analysis and testing.

  5. Thermally driven interaction of the littoral and limnetic zones by autumnal cooling processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolumban HUTTER

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In autumn, during the transition period, shores influence the interior dynamics of large temperate lakes by the formation of horizontal water-temperature gradients between the shallow and deep areas, whilst vertical temperature gradients are smoothed by convection due to surface cooling. A simple heat budget model, based on the heat balance of the water column without horizontal advection and turbulent mixing, allows deduction of the time-dependent difference between the mean temperature within the littoral area and the temperature in the upper mixed layer. The model corroborates that littoral areas cool faster than regions distant from shores, and provides a basis for an estimation of structure of flows from the beginning of cooling process till the formation of the thermal bar. It predicts the moment in the cooling process, when the corresponding density difference between the littoral and limnetic parts reaches a maximum. For a linear initial vertical temperature profile, the time-dependent "target depth" is explicitly calculated; this is the depth in the pelagic area with a temperature, characteristic of the littoral zone. This depth is estimated as 4/3 of the (concurrent thickness of the upper mixed layer. It is shown that, for a linear initial vertical temperature profile, the horizontal temperature profile between the shore and the lake has a self-similar behavior, and the temperature difference between the littoral waters and the upper mixed off-shore layer, divided by the depth of the upper mixed layer, is an invariant of the studied process. The results are in conformity with field data.

  6. Thermal Analysis of a Solar Powered Absorption Cooling System with Fully Mixed Thermal Storage at Startup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Stanciu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple effect one stage ammonia-water absorption cooling system fueled by solar energy is analyzed. The considered system is composed by a parabolic trough collector concentrating solar energy into a tubular receiver for heating water. This is stored in a fully mixed thermal storage tank and used in the vapor generator of the absorption cooling system. Time dependent cooling load is considered for the air conditioning of a residential two-storey house. A parametric study is performed to analyze the operation stability of the cooling system with respect to solar collector and storage tank dimensions. The results emphasized that there is a specific storage tank dimension associated to a specific solar collector dimension that could ensure the longest continuous startup operation of the cooling system when constant mass flow rates inside the system are assumed.

  7. Melt Quality Evaluation of Ductile Iron by Pattern Recognition of Thermal Analysis Cooling Curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhenhua; LI Yanxiang; ZHOU Rong

    2008-01-01

    The melt quality of ductile iron can be related to the melt's thermal analysis cooling curve. The freezing zone of the thermal analysis cooling curve was found to indicate the melt quality of the ductile iron. A comprehensive difference parameter, Ω, of the thermal analysis cooling curves was found to be related to the properties of ductile iron melts such as composition, temperature, and graphite morphology. As Ω ap- proached O, the thermal analysis cooling curves were found to come together with all the properties indicat- ing melt quality about the same. A database of thermal analysis cooling curves related to the properties of the ductile iron melts was set up as a basis for a method to accurately evaluate the melt quality of ductile iron by pattern recognition of thermal analysis cooling curves. The quality of a ductile iron melt can then be immediately determined by comparing its thermal analysis cooling curve freezing zone shape to those in the database.

  8. Equatorial mountain lakes show extended periods of thermal stratification with recent climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change in the Andes has already affected phenology, glaciology, and other ecosystem attributes, and now threatens to alter long-standing fundamental limnological properties. In the equatorial Andes, most lakes have traditionally been described as having waters that circulate continuously (polymictic, with only rare episodes of stratification. This characterization, albeit based on relatively few studies, is widely accepted, despite accelerated regional warming over the past 30 years.Here, we show that protracted periods of thermal stratification are presently the norm, not the exception, in equatorial mountain lakes. Annual circulation and stratification patterns recorded in four lakes from Ecuador’s southern Sierra show extended periods of stratification, which are stable and do not break down with nocturnal cooling. These data contrast with earlier research from this region, which reported full water column mixing and only infrequent stratification, but are not surprising in light of recent trends toward rising temperatures and declining wind velocities. Paleolimnological studies show that changes to the thermal regimes of these lakes likely began several decades ago and have resulted in ecosystem-scale changes including regime shifts in phytoplankton and declines in aquatic production.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of a Conduction Cooled Thermal Neutron Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heather Wampler; Adam Gerth; Heng Ban; Donna Post Guillen; Douglas Porter; Cynthia Papesch

    2010-06-01

    Installation of a conduction cooled thermal (low-energy) neutron filter in an existing domestic test reactor would provide the U.S. the capability to test new reactor fuels and materials for advanced fast (high-energy) reactor concepts. A composite consisting of Al3Hf-Al has been proposed for the neutron filter due to both the neutron filtering properties of hafnium and the conducting capabilities of aluminum. Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of the Al3Hf-Al composite is essential for the design of the filtering system. The present objectives are to identify a suitable fabrication technique and to measure the thermophysical properties of the Al3Hf intermetallic, which has not been done previous to this study. A centrifugal casting method was used to prepare samples of Al3Hf. X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were conducted to determine the structural make-up of each of the samples. Thermophysical properties were measured as follows: specific heat by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermal diffusivity by a laser flash thermal diffusivity measuring system, thermal expansion by a dilatometer, and thermal conductivity was calculated based on the previous measurements. All measurements were acquired over a temperature range of 90°C - 375°C with some measurements outside these bounds. The average thermal conductivity of the intermetallic Al3Hf (~7 at.% Hf) was found to be ~ 41 W/m-K for the given temperature range. This information fills a knowledge gap in the thermophysical properties of the intermetallic Al3Hf with the specified percentage of hafnium. A model designed to predict composite properties was used to calculate a thermal conductivity of ~177 W/m-K for an Al3Hf-Al composite with 23 vol% Al3Hf. This calculation was based upon the average thermal conductivity of Al3Hf over the specified temperature range.

  10. Thermal imaging of Erta 'Ale active lava lake (Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, L.; Oppenheimer, C.; Calvari, S.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.

    2009-04-01

    Active lava lakes represent the uppermost portion of a volume of convective magma exposed to the atmosphere, and provide open windows on magma dynamics within shallow reservoirs. Erta ‘Ale volcano located within the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia, hosts one of the few permanent convecting lava lakes, active at least since the last century. We report here the main features of Erta ‘Ale lake surface investigated using a hand-held infrared thermal camera between 11 and 12 November 2006. In both days, the lake surface was mainly characterized by efficient magma circulation reflecting in the formation of well-marked incandescent cracks and wide crust plates. These crossed the lake from the upwelling to the downwelling margin with mean speeds ranging between 0.01 and 0.15 m s-1. Hot spots opened eventually in the middle of crust plates and/or along cracks. These produced explosive activity lasting commonly between ~10 and 200 sec. Apparent temperatures at cracks ranged between ~700 and 1070˚C, and between ~300 and 500˚C at crust plates. Radiant power output of the lake varied between ~45 and 76 MW according to the superficial activity and continuous resurfacing of the lake. Time series analysis of the radiant power output data reveals cyclicity with a period of ~10 min. The combination of visual and thermal observations with apparent mean temperatures and convection rates allows us to interpret these signals as the periodic release of hot overpressured gas bubbles at the lake surface.

  11. Parametric study of thermal behavior of thrust chamber cooling channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima E. Amori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is adopted for two dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chamber wall (RL10, employing finite difference model with iterative scheme (implemented under relaxation factor of 0.9 for convergence to compute temperature distribution within thrust chamber wall (which is composed of Nickel and Copper layers. The analysis is conducted for different boundary conditions: only convection boundary conditions then combined radiation, convection boundary conditions also for different aspect ratio (AR of cooling channel. The results show that Utilizing cooling channels of high aspect ratio leads to decrease in temperature variation across thrust chamber wall, while no effects on heat transferred to the coolant is indicated. The radiation has a considerable effect on the computed wall temperature values.

  12. Flightweight radiantly and actively cooled panel: Thermal and structural performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, C. P.; Nowak, R. J.; Kelly, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    A 2- by 4-ft flightweight panel was subjected to thermal/structural tests representative of design flight conditions for a Mach 6.7 transport and to off-design conditions simulating flight maneuvers and cooling system failures. The panel utilized Rene 41 heat shields backed by a thin layer of insulation to radiate away most of the 12 Btu/ft2-sec incident heating. A solution of ethylene glycol in water circulating through tubes in an aluminum-honeycomb-sandwich panel absorbed the remainder of the incident heating (0.8 Btu/sq ft-sec). The panel successfully withstood (1) 46.7 hr of radiant heating which included 53 thermal cycles and 5000 cycles of uniaxial inplane loading of + or - 1200 lfb/in; (2) simulated 2g-maneuver heating conditions and simulated cooling system failures without excessive temperatures on the structural panel; and (3) the extensive thermal/structural tests and the aerothermal tests reported in NASA TP-1595 without significant damage to the structural panel, coolant leaks, or hot-gas ingress to the structural panel.

  13. Thermal cooling of the oceanic lithosphere from geoid height data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenae, A.

    1985-01-01

    Another type of geophysical observation has proved to be very useful in the study of thermal cooling of the oceanic lithosphere. It is the geoid height derivative with respect to plate age, a quantity computed from the short wavelength geoid step across fracture zones measured by altimeter satellites. Two categories of simples models are proposed to describe cooling and contraction of the oceanic lithosphere with age. Both plate model and half space model, give almost similar results up to ages of 50 to 70 ma, but predict quite distinct behavior of seafloor depth, heat flow and other parameters in old basins. Tests of thermal models are based on heat flow and topography data. However, heat flow is not very sensitive to the form of the thermal model. Large areas of the ocean floor are particularly shallow, and as a result topography data may not be very appropriate to discriminate between plate and half space models, and no clear concensus on a preferred model yet exists.

  14. Transient air cooling thermal modeling of a PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzakpa, K.P.; Ramousse, J.; Dube, Y.; Akremi, H.; Agbossou, K. [Hydrogen Research Institute and Departement de genie electrique, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, CP 500, Trois-Rivieres (QC) (Canada); Dostie, M.; Poulin, A.; Fournier, M. [LTE-Hydro-Quebec, 600 av. de la Montagne, Shawinigan (QC) (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    Fuel cell utilization for automobile and residential applications is a promising option in order to help reduce environmental concerns such as pollution. However, fuel cell development requires addressing their dynamic behavior to improve their performances and their life cycle. Since the temperature distribution in the cell is known to be an important factor to the fuel cell's efficiency, a cooling device is often added to homogenize the temperature in the cell and to ensure temperature control. A 3D dynamic thermal model of a single fuel cell is presented in this work in order to study the temperature distribution in a fuel cell cooled from the bottom to the top with air. The model is governed by the thermal energy balance, taking into account the inlet gas humidity. The model is developed with the finite difference method and is implemented in the Matlab/Simulink environment. The validation is based on the performances of the ''NEXA'' fuel cell produced by Ballard Power Systems. The efficiency analysis of that air cooling device reveals that the cell temperature is directly linked to the current density and to the gas humidity - varying from 30 C at 5A to 80 C at 35A at low humidity. Moreover, the temperature non-uniformity in the stack is shown to be very high. As a result, temperatures are higher at the top part of the cell than at the bottom part, with a difference of up to a 5 C. Moreover the non-uniformity of the air cooling between the cells of the stack leads to large temperature variations, up to 8 C, from one cell to another. These temperature variations result in large voltage disparities between the cells, which reduce the total electrical power of the entire stack. (author)

  15. Thermal Performance Testing of EMU and OSS Liquid Cooling Garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Richard; Bue, Grant; Hakam, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A test was conducted to evaluate three factors influencing the thermal performance of liquid cooling garments (LCG): (1) the comparable thermal performance of an Oceaneering developed engineering evaluation unit (EEU) prototype LDG, (2) the effect of the thermal comfort undergarment (TCU), and (3) the performance of a torso or upper body only LCG configuration. To evaluate the thermal performance of each configuration a metabolic test was conducted, utilizing suited subjects to generate the metabolic heat. For this study three (3) test subjects of similar health and weight produced a metabolic load on the LDG configuration by either resting (300-600 BTU/hr), walking at a slow pace (1200 BRU/hr), and walking at a brisk pace (2200 BTU/hr), as outlined in Figure 1, the metabolic profile. During the test, oxygen consumption, heart rate, relative humidity, air flow, inlet and outlet air pressure, inlet and outlet air temperature, delta air temperature, water flow (100 lb/hr), inlet water temperature (64 F), delta water temperature, water pressure, core body temperature, skin temperature, and sweat loss data was recorded. Four different test configurations were tested, with one configuration tested twice, as outlined in Table 1. The test was conducted with the suit subjects wearing the Demonstrator Suit, pressurized to vent pressure (approximately 0.5 psig). The demonstrator suit has an integrated ventilation duct system and was used to create a relevant environment with a captured ventilation return, an integrated vent tree, and thermal insulation from the environment.

  16. Experiment Investigation on Electrical and Thermal Performances of a Semitransparent Photovoltaic/Thermal System with Water Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Guiqiang Li; Gang Pei; Ming Yang; Jie Ji

    2014-01-01

    Different from the semitransparent building integrated photovoltaic/thermal (BIPV/T) system with air cooling, the semitransparent BIPV/T system with water cooling is rare, especially based on the silicon solar cells. In this paper, a semitransparent photovoltaic/thermal system (SPV/T) with water cooling was set up, which not only would provide the electrical power and hot water, but also could attain the natural illumination for the building. The PV efficiency, thermal efficiency, and exergy ...

  17. Climate change impacts on lake thermal dynamics and ecosystem vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, G. B; Forrest, A. L; Schladow, S. G ;; Reuter, J. E; Coats, R.; Dettinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Using water column temperature records collected since 1968, we analyzed the impacts of climate change on thermal properties, stability intensity, length of stratification, and deep mixing dynamics of Lake Tahoe using a modified stability index (SI). This new SI is easier to produce and is a more informative measure of deep lake stability than commonly used stability indices. The annual average SI increased at 16.62 kg/m2/decade although the summer (May–October) average SI increased at a higher rate (25.42 kg/m2/decade) during the period 1968–2014. This resulted in the lengthening of the stratification season by approximately 24 d. We simulated the lake thermal structure over a future 100 yr period using a lake hydrodynamic model driven by statistically downscaled outputs of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Model (GFDL) for two different green house gas emission scenarios (the A2 in which greenhouse-gas emissions increase rapidly throughout the 21st Century, and the B1 in which emissions slow and then level off by the late 21st Century). The results suggest a continuation and intensification of the already observed trends. The length of stratification duration and the annual average lake stability are projected to increase by 38 d and 12 d and 30.25 kg/m2/decade and 8.66 kg/m2/decade, respectively for GFDLA2 and GFDLB1, respectively during 2014–2098. The consequences of this change bear the hallmarks of climate change induced lake warming and possible exacerbation of existing water quality, quantity and ecosystem changes. The developed methodology could be extended and applied to other lakes as a tool to predict changes in stratification and mixing dynamics.

  18. Thermal Stability of RP-2 for Hydrocarbon Boost Regenerative Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Deans, Matthew C.; Stiegemeier, Benjamin R.; Psaras, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests were performed in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Heated Tube Facility to study the heat transfer and thermal stability behavior of RP-2 under conditions similar to those found in rocket engine cooling channels. It has long been known that hydrocarbon fuels, such as RP-2, can decompose at high temperature to form deposits (coke) which can adversely impact rocket engine cooling channel performance. The heated tube facility provides a simple means to study these effects. Using resistively heated copper tubes in a vacuum chamber, flowing RP-2 was heated to explore thermal effects at a range of test conditions. Wall temperature (850-1050F) and bulk fluid temperature (300-500F) were varied to define thermal decomposition and stability at each condition. Flow velocity and pressure were fixed at 75 fts and 1000 psia, respectively. Additionally, five different batches of RP-2 were tested at identical conditions to examine any thermal stability differences resulting from batch to batch compositional variation. Among these tests was one with a potential coke reducing additive known as 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroquinoline (THQ). While copper tubes were used for the majority of tests, two exploratory tests were performed with a copper alloy known as GRCop-42. Each tube was instrumented with 15 thermocouples to examine the temperature profile, and carbon deposition at each thermocouple location was determined post-test in an oxidation furnace. In many tests, intermittent local temperature increases were observed visually and in the thermocouple data. These hot spots did not appear to correspond with a higher carbon deposition.

  19. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  20. Coexistence of Legionella pneumophila Bacteria and Free-Living Amoebae in Lakes Serving as a Cooling System of a Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbikowska, Elżbieta; Kletkiewicz, Hanna; Walczak, Maciej; Burkowska, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed at determining whether potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) and Legionella pneumophila can be found in lakes serving as a natural cooling system of a power plant. Water samples were collected from five lakes forming the cooling system of the power plants Pątnów and Konin (Poland). The numbers of investigated organisms were determined with the use of a very sensitive molecular method-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The result of the present study shows that thermally altered aquatic environments provide perfect conditions for the growth of L. pneumophila and amoebae. The bacteria were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period and in the subsurface water layer in July and August. Hartmanella sp. and/or Naegleria fowleri were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period.

  1. Improvement of thermal comfort by cooling clothing in warm climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kolencíková, Sona;

    2014-01-01

    comfort compared to convective cooling alone. The supply of a small amount of water allowed the cooling clothing to provide a continuous cooling effect, whereas the effect of convective cooling alone decreased as sweat dried. However, the controllability of the cooling clothing needs to be improved....

  2. Mathematical modeling of the thermal and hydrodynamic structure of the cooling reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminskiy, G.; Debolskaya, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrothermal conditions of the cooling reservoir is determined by the heat and mass transfer from the water surface to the atmosphere and the processes of heat transfer directly in the water mass of the reservoir. As the capacity of power plants, the corresponding increase in the volume of heated water and the use of deep lakes and reservoirs as coolers there is a need to develop new, more accurate, and the application of existing methods for the numerical simulation. In calculating the hydrothermal regime it must take into account the effect of wind, density (buoyancy) forces, and other data of the cooling reservoir. In addition to solving practical problems it is important to know not only the magnitude of the average temperature, but also its area and depth distribution. A successful solution can be achieved through mathematical modeling of general systems of equations of transport processes and the correct formulation of the problem, based on appropriate initial data. The purpose of the work is application of software package GETM for simulating the hydrothermal regime of cooling reservoir with an estimate of three-dimensional structure of transfer processes, the effects of wind, the friction of the water surface. Three-dimensional models are rarely applied, especially for far-field problems. If such models are required, experts in the field must develop and apply them. Primary physical processes included are surface heat transfer, short-wave and long-wave radiation and penetration, convective mixing, wind and flow induced mixing, entrainment of ambient water by pumped-storage inflows, inflow density stratification as impacted by temperature and dissolved and suspended solids. The model forcing data consists of the system bathymetry developed into the model grid; the boundary condition flow and temperature; the tributary and flow and temperature; and the system meteorology. Ivankovskoe reservoir belongs to the reservoirs of valley type (Tver region, Russia). It

  3. Lake isotope records of the 8200-year cooling event in western Ireland: Comparison with model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jonathan A.; Tindall, Julia; Roberts, Neil; Marshall, William; Marshall, Jim D.; Bingham, Ann; Feeser, Ingo; O'Connell, Michael; Atkinson, Tim; Jourdan, Anne-Lise; March, Anna; Fisher, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    The early Holocene cooling, which occurred around 8200 calendar years before present, was a prominent abrupt event around the north Atlantic region. Here, we investigate the timing, duration, magnitude and regional coherence of the event as expressed in carbonate oxygen-isotope records from three lakes on northwest Europe's Atlantic margin in western Ireland, namely Loch Avolla, Loch Gealáin and Lough Corrib. An abrupt negative oxygen-isotope excursion lasted about 200 years. Comparison of records from three sites suggests that the excursion was primarily the result of a reduction of the oxygen-isotope values of precipitation, which was likely caused by lowered air temperatures, possibly coupled with a change in atmospheric circulation. Comparison of records from two of the lakes (Loch Avolla and Loch Gealáin), which have differing bathymetries, further suggests a reduction in evaporative loss of lake water during the cooling episode. Comparison of climate model experiments with lake-sediment isotope data indicates that effective moisture may have increased along this part of the northeast Atlantic seaboard during the 8200-year climatic event, as lower evaporation compensated for reduced precipitation.

  4. Conjugate heat transfer investigation on the cooling performance of air cooled turbine blade with thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yongbin; Ma, Chao; Ge, Bing; Zang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    A hot wind tunnel of annular cascade test rig is established for measuring temperature distribution on a real gas turbine blade surface with infrared camera. Besides, conjugate heat transfer numerical simulation is performed to obtain cooling efficiency distribution on both blade substrate surface and coating surface for comparison. The effect of thermal barrier coating on the overall cooling performance for blades is compared under varied mass flow rate of coolant, and spatial difference is also discussed. Results indicate that the cooling efficiency in the leading edge and trailing edge areas of the blade is the lowest. The cooling performance is not only influenced by the internal cooling structures layout inside the blade but also by the flow condition of the mainstream in the external cascade path. Thermal barrier effects of the coating vary at different regions of the blade surface, where higher internal cooling performance exists, more effective the thermal barrier will be, which means the thermal protection effect of coatings is remarkable in these regions. At the designed mass flow ratio condition, the cooling efficiency on the pressure side varies by 0.13 for the coating surface and substrate surface, while this value is 0.09 on the suction side.

  5. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  6. Flexible Transpiration Cooled Thermal Protection System for Inflatable Atmospheric Capture and Entry Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Andrews Space, Inc. proposes an innovative transpiration cooled aerobrake TPS design that is thermally protective, structurally flexible, and lightweight. This...

  7. Management applications for thermal IR imagery of lake processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, J. M.; Haynes, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    A thermal infrared scanning program was conducted in the Lake Ontario Basin region in an effort to determine: (1) limonologic data that could be collected by remote sensing techniques, and (2) local interest in and routine use of such data in water management programs. Difficulties encountered in the development of an infrared survey program in New York suggest that some of the major obstacles to acceptance of remotely sensed data for routine use are factors of psychology rather than technology. Also, terminology used should suit the measurement technique in order to encourage acceptance of the surface thermal data obtained.

  8. Survey for the presence of Naegleria fowleri amebae in lake water used to cool reactors at a nuclear power generating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Melissa; Remmers, Kenneth; Cabral, Guy; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2009-04-01

    Water from Lake Anna in Virginia, a lake that is used to cool reactors at a nuclear power plant and for recreational activities, was assessed for the presence of Naegleria fowleri, an ameba that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This survey was undertaken because it has been reported that thermally enriched water fosters the propagation of N. fowleri and, hence, increases the risk of infection to humans. Of 16 sites sampled during the summer of 2007, nine were found to be positive for N. fowleri by a nested polymerase chain reaction assay. However, total ameba counts, inclusive of N. fowleri, never exceeded 12/50 mL of lake water at any site. No correlation was obtained between the conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and pH of water and presence of N. fowleri. To date, cases of PAM have not been reported from this thermally enriched lake. It is postulated that predation by other protozoa and invertebrates, disturbance of the water surface from recreational boating activities, or the presence of bacterial or fungal toxins, maintain the number N. fowleri at a low level in Lake Anna.

  9. CTE-Matched, Liquid-Cooled, High Thermal Conductivity Heat Sink Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of a CTE-matched, liquid-cooled, high thermal conductivity heat sink for use in spacecraft thermal management applications. The material...

  10. Integrated microchannel cooling in a three dimensional integrated circuit: A thermal management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kang-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microchannel cooling is a promising technology for solving the three-dimensional integrated circuit thermal problems. However, the relationship between the microchannel cooling parameters and thermal behavior of the three dimensional integrated circuit is complex and difficult to understand. In this paper, we perform a detailed evaluation of the influence of the microchannel structure and the parameters of the cooling liquid on steady-state temperature profiles. The results presented in this paper are expected to aid in the development of thermal design guidelines for three dimensional integrated circuit with microchannel cooling.

  11. Thermal Pollution Mathematical Model. Volume 2: Verification of One-Dimensional Numerical Model at Lake Keowee. [environment impact of thermal discharges from power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    A one dimensional model for studying the thermal dynamics of cooling lakes was developed and verified. The model is essentially a set of partial differential equations which are solved by finite difference methods. The model includes the effects of variation of area with depth, surface heating due to solar radiation absorbed at the upper layer, and internal heating due to the transmission of solar radiation to the sub-surface layers. The exchange of mechanical energy between the lake and the atmosphere is included through the coupling of thermal diffusivity and wind speed. The effects of discharge and intake by power plants are also included. The numerical model was calibrated by applying it to Cayuga Lake. The model was then verified through a long term simulation using Lake Keowee data base. The comparison between measured and predicted vertical temperature profiles for the nine years is good. The physical limnology of Lake Keowee is presented through a set of graphical representations of the measured data base.

  12. Analysis of the factors affecting thermal evolution of hot rolled steel during coil cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The thermal evolution of steel coil during cooling was simulated and investigated by the use of in-house Q-CSP(R) software.The dependence of the thermal evolution of steel coil on cooling methods, temperature distribution of the strip before coiling, coil size and steel grades was also discussed.The study plays a significant role in helping steel makers to better understand and control the cooling process.

  13. Thermal relaxation of interacting fine magnetic particles - field-cooled and zero-field-cooled magnetization variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing Ju Lu; Hong Yuan Deng; Huei Li Huang E-mail: hlhuang@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2000-02-01

    Dipole interaction makes average energy barrier of magnetic fine particles for thermal relaxation reduced while the corresponding blocking temperature distribution is a function of both dipolar interaction strength and particle size distribution of the system. Flatness and fast drop-off of the {lambda}-shape behavior of the field-cooled and zero-field-cooled magnetization varies with both dipolar intereaction strength and field level applied.

  14. Thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a HTS NMR magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Se Hwan; Hong, Yong Jun; Yeom, Han Kil; Ko, Hyo Bong; Park, Seong Je [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The superconducting NMR magnets have used cryogen such as liquid helium for their cooling. The conduction cooling method using cryocoolers, however, makes the cryogenic cooling system for NMR magnets more compact and user-friendly than the cryogen cooling method. This paper describes the thermal and structural analysis of a cryogenic conduction cooling system for a 400 MHz HTS NMR magnet, focusing on the magnet assembly. The highly thermo-conductive cooling plates between HTS double pancake coils are used to transfer the heat generated in coils, namely Joule heating at lap splice joints, to thermal link blocks and finally the cryocooler. The conduction cooling structure of the HTS magnet assembly preliminarily designed is verified by thermal and structural analysis. The orthotropic thermal properties of the HTS coil, thermal contact resistance and radiation heat load are considered in the thermal analysis. The thermal analysis confirms the uniform temperature distribution for the present thermal design of the NMR magnet within 0.2 K. The mechanical stress and the displacement by the electromagnetic force and the thermal contraction are checked to verify structural stability. The structural analysis indicates that the mechanical stress on each component of the magnet is less than its material yield strength and the displacement is acceptable in comparison with the magnet dimension.

  15. Proof-of-Concept of a Revolutionary Cooling Shirt with a Thermal Manikin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    performance of cooling garments in a controlled environment. In this study, an epoxy thermal manikin from Measurement Technology Northwest was used...environments. Traditional cooling technologies are limited by the need for a power supply, the added weight of the product, and the cooling duration. This...the technology . Effective cooling rate was determined to be 30 W for the system. Calculations were based on the manikin zones covered by the shirt

  16. Coolness both underlies and protects against the painfulness of the thermal grill illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Daniel E; Hollins, Mark

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the contributions of warm and cool signals in generating the thermal grill illusion (TGI), a phenomenon in which interlaced warm and cool bars generate an experience of burning, and under some conditions painful, heat. Each subject underwent 3 runs, 2 of which tested the effects of preadapting subjects to the grill's warm or cool bars (while the interlaced bars were thermally neutral) on the subsequent intensity of the illusion. In a control run, all bars were neutral during the adaptation phase. Thermal visual analogue scale ratings during the warm and cool adaptation periods revealed significant and equivalent adaptation to the 2 temperatures. Adaptation to the grill's cool bars significantly reduced pain and perceived thermal intensity of the TGI, compared to the control condition, while adaptation to the grill's warm bars had little effect. These results suggest that the cool stimulus triggers the pain signals that produce the illusion. The inability of warm adaptation to attenuate the TGI is at odds with theories suggesting that the illusion depends upon a simple addition of warm and cool signals. While the grill's cool bars are necessary for the TGI's painfulness, we also observed that the more often a participant reported feeling coolness or coldness, the less pain he or she experienced from the TGI. These results are consistent with research showing that cool temperatures generate activity in both thermoreceptive-specific, pain-inhibitory neurons and nociceptive dorsal horn neurons.

  17. Temperature and thermal stress evolutions in sapphire crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wencheng; Zhao, Wenhan; Wu, Ming; Ding, Guoqiang; Liu, Lijun

    2017-09-01

    Transient numerical calculations were carried out to predict the evolutions of temperature and thermal stress in sapphire single crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method (HEM). Internal radiation in the semitransparent sapphire crystal was taken into account using the finite volume method (FVM) in the global heat transfer model. The numerical results seem to indicate that the narrow bottom region of the sapphire crystal is subjected to high thermal stress during the cooling process, which could be responsible for the seed cracking of the as-grown crystal, while the thermal stress is relatively small in the central main body of the crystal, and is less than 10 MPa during the whole cooling process. The fast decrease of the thermal stress in the bottom region of the crystal during the initial stage of cooling process is dominated by the reduction of the cooling helium gas in the heat exchanger shaft, and is not significantly affected by the heating power reduction rate.

  18. Thermal indoor environment and energy consumption in a plus-energy house: cooling season measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    . The house was cooled by a floor cooling system and was ventilated with a mechanical ventilation system. Different operative temperature set-points and different ventilation rates were tested. Operative temperature at a representative location inside the occupied zone was used as an indicator of the thermal...... the floor cooling system) and increasing the ventilation rate provided a better thermal indoor environment but with increased energy consumption. The thermal indoor environment and energy performance of the house can be improved with decreased glazing area, increased thermal mass, installation of solar......The present study is concerned with the thermal indoor environment and HVAC system energy consumption of a detached, one-story, single family, plus-energy house during a cooling season. The house was located in Denmark and it has been used as a full-scale experimental facility for one year...

  19. Effects of different cooling principles on thermal sensation and physiological responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loomans, Marcel G.L.C.; De Wit, Martin H.; Lichtenbelt, Wouter D. Van Marken

    2013-01-01

    by the floor and mixing ventilation, and (6) AC-R-D-F; active cooling through radiation by the floor and displacement ventilation. Though all cases were designed at PMV ≈ 0, subjective data indicate significant differences between the cases. For the prediction of thermal sensation and thermal comfort under non......Applying low exergy cooling concepts in the built environment allows reduction of use of high quality energy sources. Non-uniform thermal conditions, which may occur due to application of lowex systems, can result in discomfort. Two different cooling principles were studied: passive (through...

  20. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  1. Experiment Investigation on Electrical and Thermal Performances of a Semitransparent Photovoltaic/Thermal System with Water Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiqiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different from the semitransparent building integrated photovoltaic/thermal (BIPV/T system with air cooling, the semitransparent BIPV/T system with water cooling is rare, especially based on the silicon solar cells. In this paper, a semitransparent photovoltaic/thermal system (SPV/T with water cooling was set up, which not only would provide the electrical power and hot water, but also could attain the natural illumination for the building. The PV efficiency, thermal efficiency, and exergy analysis were all adopted to illustrate the performance of SPV/T system. The results showed that the PV efficiency and the thermal efficiency were about 11.5% and 39.5%, respectively, on the typical sunny day. Furthermore, the PV and thermal efficiencies fit curves were made to demonstrate the SPV/T performance more comprehensively. The performance analysis indicated that the SPV/T system has a good application prospect for building.

  2. Thermoelectric and thermal properties of GaAlAs Peltier-cooled laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hava, S.; Sequeira, H.B.; Hunsperger, R.G.

    1985-09-01

    Analyses of heat spreading, temperature distribution, and resultant cooling effects in a monolithically Peltier-cooled laser (MPCL) structure are presented. The analyses were obtained by using Laplace's equation and were made under steady-state conditions, assuming constant thermal conductivity. In this MPCL structure a metal surface layer surrounds a heat-generating p-n laser junction. It is shown that by depositing relatively thick metallic cooling plates a 15% temperature reduction and 25% thermal spreading can be achieved. This heat spreading due to the passive cooling is added to the cooling obtained when the Peltier cooler is operated. Experimental measurements of the effect of Peltier cooling reveal a 6.8 /sup 0/C reduction in junction temperature corresponding to a wavelength shift of as much as 20 A.

  3. Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Approaches to Turbine Blade Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Reliance on Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) to reduce the amount of air used for turbine vane cooling is beneficial both from the standpoint of reduced NOx production, and as a means of improving cycle efficiency through improved component efficiency. It is shown that reducing vane cooling from 10 to 5 percent of mainstream air can lead to NOx reductions of nearly 25 percent while maintaining the same rotor inlet temperature. An analysis is given which shows that, when a TBC is relied upon in the vane thermal design process, significantly less coolant is required using internal cooling alone compared to film cooling. This is especially true for small turbines where internal cooling without film cooling permits the surface boundary layer to remain laminar over a significant fraction of the vane surface.

  4. Cooled electronic system with thermal spreaders coupling electronics cards to cold rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2013-07-23

    Liquid-cooled electronic systems are provided which include an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket or removal of the card from the socket. A liquid-cooled cold rail is disposed at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader couples the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The thermally conductive extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  5. Effects of cooling and internal wave motions on gas transfer coefficients in a boreal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni J. Heiskanen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lakes and other inland waters contribute significantly to regional and global carbon budgets. Emissions from lakes are often computed as the product of a gas transfer coefficient, k 600 , and the difference in concentration across the diffusive boundary layer at the air–water interface. Eddy covariance (EC techniques are increasingly being used in lacustrine gas flux studies and tend to report higher values for derived k 600 than other approaches. Using results from an EC study of a small, boreal lake, we modelled k 600 using a boundary-layer approach that included wind shear and cooling. During stratification, fluxes estimated by EC occasionally were higher than those obtained by our models. The high fluxes co-occurred with winds strong enough to induce deflections of the thermocline. We attribute the higher measured fluxes to upwelling-induced spatial variability in surface concentrations of CO2 within the EC footprint. We modelled the increased gas concentrations due to the upwelling and corrected our k 600 values using these higher CO2 concentrations. This approach led to greater congruence between measured and modelled k values during the stratified period. k 600 has a well-resolved and ~cubic relationship with wind speed when the water column is unstratified and the dissolved gases well mixed. During stratification and using the corrected k 600 , the same pattern is evident at higher winds, but k 600 has a median value of ~7 cm h−1 when winds are less than 6 m s−1, similar to observations in recent oceanographic studies. Our models for k 600 provide estimates of gas evasion at least 200% higher than earlier wind-based models. Our improved k 600 estimates emphasize the need for integrating within lake physics into models of greenhouse gas evasion.

  6. Thermal behaviour analysis on ITER component cooling water system loop 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Bin, E-mail: guobin@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fu, Peng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Dell’Orco, Giovanni; Liliana, Teodoros; Tao, Jun [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Yang, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulic analysis model has been developed to perform thermal analysis on the component cooling water system loop 2B. • The cooling water temperature profile at client inlet and outlet during one cycle of the most demanding plasma operation scenario was obtained. • Operation behaviour of the main heat exchanger for CCWS-2B has been depicted. - Abstract: ITER cooling water system is composed by several cooling loops, the primary heat transfer loops that form the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS), the secondary heat transfer loops that form the Component Cooling Water System (CCWS) and the Chilled Water System (CHWS) and a tertiary heat transfer loop which is the Heat Rejection System (HRS). The CCWS is further divided into CCWS-1, CCWS-2A, CCWS-2B, CCWS-2C, CCWS-2D depending on the water chemistry needs of clients and wetted area material. The component cooling water system loop 2B (CCWS-2B) has the function to remove heat load from coil power supply component, Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) system component and diagnostic system which are located in different buildings. As the total number of the client connections for the loop is a few hundreds, simplified thermal hydraulic analysis model has been developed to perform thermal analysis on the component cooling water system loop 2B. The curve of the cooling water temperature at client inlet and outlet during one cycle of the most demanding plasma operation scenario was obtained and the cooling water flow rate can meet the thermal removal requirement of client was also confirmed from this analysis. In addition, operation behaviour of the main heat exchanger for CCWS-2B in this thermal analysis was depicted for main heat exchanger selection purposes. This study has been carried out with the AFT Fathom code.

  7. Thermal Conditions in a Simulated Office Environment with Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2013-01-01

    ventilation (MVRC). CB was based on convection cooling while the remaining three systems (CBR, CCMV and MVRC) on combined radiant and convective cooling. Measurements were performed in design (64 W/m2) and usual (38 W/m2) cooling conditions. Air temperature, operative temperature, radiant asymmetry, air......The thermal conditions in a two person office room were measured with four air conditioning systems: chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition mounted local radiant cooling panels with mixing...... velocity and turbulent intensity were measured and draft rate levels calculated in the room. Manikin-based equivalent temperature (MBET) was determined by two thermal manikins to identify the impact of the local thermal conditions generated by the studied systems on occupants’ thermal comfort. The results...

  8. Thermal and Trophic Stability of Deeper Maine Lakes in Granite Watersheds Impacted by Acid Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Robert E.; Wittchen, Bruce D.

    1990-09-01

    Acid deposition can lead to lake and watershed acidification, increases in lake transparency, and reductions in thermal stability and hypolimnetic oxygen deficits. On the basis of lake surveys during August-September 1985, we determined to what extent the deeper (maximum depth zm > 17 m) Maine lakes in acid-sensitive granitic watersheds have registered changes in temperature and oxygen stratification, as compared to 1938-1942, when G. P. Cooper performed the earliest scientific surveys of the state's lakes. After correcting for small but geographically consistent interannual differences in summer hypolimnetic temperatures related to spring turnover, and weather-dependent differences in mixed layer depth, there has been no significant change in thermal stratification in these Maine lakes over approximately 43 years. On the basis of specific historical contrasts in the late summer metalimnetic, hypolimnetic, and bathylimnetic oxygen concentrations there has been no significant change in lake trophic state or transparency.

  9. Thermal and trophic stability of deeper Maine lakes in granite waterhsheds implacted by acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, R.E.; Wittchen, B.D. (Univ. of Maine, Orono (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Acid deposition can lead to lake and watershed acidification, increases in lake transparency, and reduction in thermal stability and hypolimnetic oxygen deficits. On the basis of lake surveys during August-September 1985, we determined to what extent the deeper (maximum depth z{sub m}{gt}17 m) Maine lakes in acid-sensitive granitic watersheds have registered changes in temperature and oxygen stratification, as compared to 1938-1942, when G.P. Cooper performed the earliest scientific surveys of the state's lakes. After correcting for small but geographically consistent interannual differences in summer hypolimnetic temperatures related to spring turnover, and weather-dependent differences in mixed layer depth, there has been no significant change in thermal stratification in these Maine lakes over approximately 43 years. On the basis of specific historical contrasts in the late summer metalimnetic, hypolimnetic, and bathylimnetic oxygen concentrations there has been no significant change in lake trophic state or transparency.

  10. Construction and initial operation of the combined solar thermal and electric desiccant cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enteria, Napoleon; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Mochida, Akashi; Takaki, Rie [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Satake, Akira [Technical Research Institute, Maeda Corporation, Tokyo 179-8914 (Japan); Yoshie, Ryuichiro [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Atsugi 243-0297 (Japan); Mitamura, Teruaki [Faculty of Engineering, Ashikaga Institute of Technology, Ashikaga 326-8558 (Japan); Baba, Seizo [Earth Clean Tohoku Co., Ltd., Sendai 984-0038 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    This paper reports the constructed combined solar thermal and electric desiccant cooling system - its initial operation and operational procedures. The system, as designed, can be operated during nighttime and daytime. The nighttime operation is for thermal energy storage using the auxiliary electric heater, while the daytime operation is for solar energy collection and desiccant cooling. Ongoing experimental evaluation is being undertaken to observe and determine the long-term performance of the system. (author)

  11. Demonstration of Solar Heating and Cooling System using Sorption Integrated Solar Thermal Collectors

    OpenAIRE

    Blackman, Corey; Bales, Chris; Hallström, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Producing cost-competitive small and medium-sized solar cooling systems is currently a significant challenge. Due to system complexity, extensive engineering, design and equipment costs; the installation costs of solar thermal cooling systems are prohibitively high. In efforts to overcome these limitations, a novel sorption heat pump module has been developed and directly integrated into a solar thermal collector. The module comprises a fully encapsulated sorption tube containing hygroscopic ...

  12. The response of human thermal sensation and its prediction to temperature step-change (cool-neutral-cool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyuan Du

    Full Text Available This paper reports on studies of the effect of temperature step-change (between a cool and a neutral environment on human thermal sensation and skin temperature. Experiments with three temperature conditions were carried out in a climate chamber during the period in winter. Twelve subjects participated in the experiments simulating moving inside and outside of rooms or cabins with air conditioning. Skin temperatures and thermal sensation were recorded. Results showed overshoot and asymmetry of TSV due to the step-change. Skin temperature changed immediately when subjects entered a new environment. When moving into a neutral environment from cool, dynamic thermal sensation was in the thermal comfort zone and overshoot was not obvious. Air-conditioning in a transitional area should be considered to limit temperature difference to not more than 5°C to decrease the unacceptability of temperature step-change. The linear relationship between thermal sensation and skin temperature or gradient of skin temperature does not apply in a step-change environment. There is a significant linear correlation between TSV and Qloss in the transient environment. Heat loss from the human skin surface can be used to predict dynamic thermal sensation instead of the heat transfer of the whole human body.

  13. Automatic control of human thermal comfort with a liquid-cooled garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetz, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    Water cooling in a liquid-cooled garment is used to maintain the thermal comfort of crewmembers during extravehicular activity. The feasibility of a simple control that will operate automatically to maintain the thermal comfort is established. Data on three test subjects are included to support the conclusion that heat balance can be maintained well within allowable medical limits. The controller concept was also successfully demonstrated for ground-based applications and shows potential for any tasks involving the use of liquid-cooled garments.

  14. Novel device for tissue cooling during endoscopic laryngeal laser surgery: thermal damage study in an ex vivo calf model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hae Jin; Burns, James A; Kobler, James B; Heaton, James T; Zeitels, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Minimizing collateral thermal damage during endoscopic laryngeal laser surgery remains a priority, and tissue cooling is one way to achieve this goal. Cooling systems utilizing compressed air have been shown to reduce the extent of thermal trauma on the vocal folds, but these units are not ideal for endoscopic applications because cooling is inefficient at the low airflows needed. We examined whether a novel vortex cooling device that generates cooled air at low flow rates would provide a cooling benefit beyond that which could be obtained by using room-temperature air for cooling tissue or by using no cooling during simulated laryngeal laser surgery. A continuous-wave thulium laser was used to incise glottic tissue in 12 calf vocal folds. Cooling was achieved with a prototype vortex cooler (9 degrees C air output; flow rate, 3 L/min), and tissue temperature measurements were compared to those with room-air cooling and no cooling. Thermal damage was analyzed histologically by measuring the depth of lactate dehydrogenase inactivation surrounding the mucosal incision. The cooling conditions were tested during time-constant cuts (8 seconds) and depth-constant cuts (into the thyroarytenoid muscle). During time-constant cuts, comparison between vortex cooling and room-air cooling revealed that vortex cooling resulted in a thermal damage zone that was 14% smaller (519 versus 603 microm; p cooling created a thermal damage zone that was 32% smaller than that created with no cooling (p cooling (p cooling reduces thermal damage more effectively than room-air cooling or no cooling during both time-constant and depth-constant thulium laser cuts.

  15. Cooling water system thermal performance analysis using the COCO computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hom, J.; Jakub, R.M.; Durkosh, D.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Energy Systems Business Unit

    1996-10-01

    Westinghouse Energy Systems Business Unit (ESBU) has worked with electric utility personnel to analyze the thermal performance of essential cooling water systems at nuclear generating stations. The primary goal of these analyses has been to demonstrate the operability of the cooling water systems during postulated limiting post-accident operation. In previous cooling water system thermal analyses, peak containment operating conditions were generally used as input assuming steady-state conditions. This approach is conservative as it does not take into account the improvement in containment conditions and cooling water system temperatures over time. This approach can, also, lead to an inconsistent set of assumptions between the two distinct analyses which may result in overly conservative calculated system operating conditions. These conditions inevitably impose unnecessary restrictions on cooling water system operation. Over the last few years, Westinghouse ESBU has coupled both the containment integrity and the cooling water system thermal calculations into an integrated analysis. This allows the use of a consistent set of input parameters and assumptions in the calculation of limiting cooling water system operating conditions. This approach has been successfully used to increase system operating margins. This paper provides an overview of this coupled thermal analysis along with examples of where increased operating margins can be applied.

  16. Experimental Study on Solar Cooling Tube Using Thermal/Vacuum Emptying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huizhong Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A solar cooling tube using thermal/vacuum emptying method was experimentally studied in this paper. The coefficient of performance (COP of the solar cooling tube was mostly affected by the vacuum degree of the system. In past research, the thermal vacuum method, using an electric oven and iodine-tungsten lamp to heat up the adsorbent bed and H2O vapor to expel the air from the solar cooling tube, was used to manufacture solar cooling tubes. This paper presents a novel thermal vacuum combined with vacuum pump method allowing an increased vacuum state for producing solar cooling tubes. The following conclusions are reached: the adsorbent bed temperature of solar cooling tube could reaches up to 233°C, and this temperature is sufficient to meet desorption demand; the refrigerator power of a single solar cooling tube varies from 1 W to 12 W; the total supply refrigerating capacity is about 287 kJ; and the COP of this solar cooling tube is about 0.215.

  17. Cooling Systems Design in Hot Stamping Tools by a Thermal-Fluid-Mechanical Coupled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot stamping tools with cooling systems are the key facilities for hot stamping process of Ultrahigh strength steels (UHSS in automotive industry. Hot stamping tools have significant influence on the final microstructure and properties of the hot stamped parts. In serials production, the tools should be rapidly cooled by cooling water. Hence, design of hot stamping tools with cooling systems is important not only for workpieces of good quality but also for the tools with good cooling performance and long life. In this paper, a new multifield simulation method was proposed for the design of hot stamping tools with cooling system. The deformation of the tools was also analyzed by this method. Based on MpCCI (Mesh-based parallel Code Coupling Interface, thermal-fluid simulation and thermal-fluid-mechanical coupled simulation were performed. Subsequently, the geometrical parameters of the cooling system are investigated for the design. The results show that, both the distance between the ducts and the distance between the ducts and the tools loaded contour have significant influence on the quenching effect. And better quenching effect can be achieved with the shorter distance from the tool surface and with smaller distance between ducts. It is also shown that, thermal expansion is the main reason for deformation of the hot forming tools, which causes the distortion of the cooling ducts, and the stress concentration at corner of the ducts.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic tests of a recirculation cooling installation for the Rostov nuclear power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balunov, B. F.; Balashov, V. A.; Il'in, V. A.; Krayushnikov, V. V.; Lychakov, V. D.; Meshalkin, V. V.; Ustinov, A. N.; Shcheglov, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Results obtained from thermal-hydraulic tests of the recirculation cooling installation used as part of the air cooling system under the containments of the Rostov nuclear power station Units 3 and 4 are presented. The operating modes of the installation during normal operation (air cooling on the surface of finned tubes), under the conditions of anticipated operational occurrences (air cooling and steam condensation from a steam-air mixture), and during an accident (condensation of pure steam) are considered. Agreement is obtained between the results of tests and calculations carried out according to the recommendations given in the relevant regulatory documents. A procedure of carrying out thermal calculation for the case of steam condensation from a steam-air mixture on the surface of fins is proposed. The possibility of efficient use of the recirculation cooling installation in the system for reducing emergency pressure under the containment of a nuclear power station is demonstrated.

  19. Experimental measurement, calculation and thermal visualization condenser temperature of cooling device with a heat pipe technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemec Patrik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deal with evaluation of condenser temperature by experimental measurement, calculation and thermal visualization of cooling device working with a heat pipe technology. The referred device in the article is cooling device capable transfer high heat fluxes from electric elements to the surrounding. One from many things influenced the heat flux amount transferred from electronic elements through the cooling device to the surrounding is condenser construction, its capacity and option of heat removal. The work contain description, working principle and construction of cooling device. Experimental part describe the measuring method and mathematical calculation to condenser temperature evaluation of cooling device depending on the loaded heat of electronic components in range from 250 to 750 W. The mathematical calculation is based on physical phenomena of boiling, condensation and natural convection heat transfer. The results of experimental measurement and mathematical calculation are verified by thermal imagining of device condenser by IR camera.

  20. Development and construction of the novel solar thermal desiccant cooling system incorporating hot water production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enteria, Napoleon; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Mochida, Akashi; Takaki, Rie [Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Satake, Akira [Technical Research Institute, Maeda Corporation, Tokyo 179-8914 (Japan); Yoshie, Ryuichiro [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Atsugi 243-0297 (Japan); Baba, Seizo [Earth Clean Tohoku Co. Ltd., Sendai 984-0038 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    This paper reports the development and construction of the novel solar cooling and heating system. The system consists of the thermal energy subsystem and the desiccant cooling subsystem. The system utilizes both the cheaper nighttime electric energy and the free daytime solar energy. The system is conceptualized to produce both cooling during summer daytime and hot water production during winter. Testing and evaluation of the system had been done to determine its operational procedure and performance. Based on the results, the thermal energy subsystem functioned to its expected performance in solar energy collection and thermal storage. The desiccant cooling subsystem reduced both the temperature and the humidity content of the air using solar energy with a minimal amount of back-up electric energy. The system however, needs further investigation under real conditions. (author)

  1. A Novel Approach to Thermal Design of Solar Modules: Selective-Spectral and Radiative Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Dubey, Rajiv; Chattopadhyay, Shashwata; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Chavali, Raghu Vamsi; Silverman, Timothy J.; Kottantharayil, Anil; Vasi, Juzer; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-11-21

    For commercial solar modules, up to 80% of the incoming sunlight may be dissipated as heat, potentially raising the temperature 20-30 degrees C higher than the ambient. In the long run, extreme self-heating may erode efficiency and shorten lifetime, thereby, dramatically reducing the total energy output by almost ~10% Therefore, it is critically important to develop effective and practical cooling methods to combat PV self-heating. In this paper, we explore two fundamental sources of PV self-heating, namely, sub-bandgap absorption and imperfect thermal radiation. The analysis suggests that we redesign the optical and thermal properties of the solar module to eliminate the parasitic absorption (selective-spectral cooling) and enhance the thermal emission to the cold cosmos (radiative cooling). The proposed technique should cool the module by ~10 degrees C, to be reflected in significant long-term energy gain (~ 3% to 8% over 25 years) for PV systems under different climatic conditions.

  2. Thermal design of lithium bromide-water solution vapor absorption cooling system for indirect evaporative cooling for IT pod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Digvijay Ramkrishna

    Nowadays with increase use of internet, mobile there is increase in heat which ultimately increases the efficient cooling system of server room or IT POD. Use of traditional ways of cooling system has ultimately increased CO2 emission and depletion of CFC's are serious environmental issues which led scientific people to improve cooling techniques and eliminate use of CFC's. To reduce dependency on fossil fuels and 4environmental friendly system needed to be design. For being utilizing low grade energy source such as solar collector and reducing dependency on fossil fuel vapour absorption cooling system has shown a great driving force in today's refrigeration systems. This LiBr-water aabsorption cooling consists of five heat exchanger namely: Evaporator, Absorber, Solution Heat Exchanger, Generator, Condenser. The thermal design was done for a load of 23 kW and the procedure was described in the thesis. There are 120 servers in the IT POD emitting 196 W of heat each on full load and some of the heat was generated by the computer placed inside the IT POD. A detailed procedure has been discussed. A excel spreadsheet was to prepared with varying tube sizes to see the effect on flows and ultimately overall heat transfer coefficient.

  3. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  4. Pattern Recognition of Thermal Analysis Cooling Curves and Quality Evaluation of Melt Cast Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The development of thermal analysis techniques for evaluation of cast alloy melt quality and its current applications in the foundry were reviewed. The characteristics of the current thermal analysis techniques were analyzed. A new comprehensive method for cooling curve recognition has been proposed. The evaluation of cast alloy melt quality was realized.

  5. Flow Patterns and Thermal Drag in a One-Dimensional Inviscid Channel with Heating or Cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    In this paper investigations on the flow patterns and the thermal drag phenomenon in one -dimensional inviscid channel flow with heating or cooling are described and discussed:expressions of flow rate ratio and thermal drag coefficient for different flow patterns and its physical mechanism are presented.

  6. Thermally safe operation of a cooled semi-batch reactor: slow liquid-liquid reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, M.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Thermally safe operation of a semi-batch reactor (SBR) implies that conditions leading to strong accumulation of unreacted reactants must be avoided. All thermal responses of a SBR, in which a slow liquid-liquid reaction takes place, can be represented in a diagram with the kinetics, cooling capacit

  7. Cooling a solar telescope enclosure: plate coil thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Michael; Galapon, Chriselle; Montijo, Guillermo; Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka

    2016-08-01

    The climate of Haleakalā requires the observatories to actively adapt to changing conditions in order to produce the best possible images. Observatories need to be maintained at a temperature closely matching ambient or the images become blurred and unusable. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope is a unique telescope as it will be active during the day as opposed to the other night-time stellar observatories. This means that it will not only need to constantly match the ever-changing temperature during the day, but also during the night so as not to sub-cool and affect the view field of other telescopes while they are in use. To accomplish this task, plate coil heat exchanger panels will be installed on the DKIST enclosure that are designed to keep the temperature at ambient temperature +0°C/-4°C. To verify the feasibility of this and to validate the design models, a test rig has been installed at the summit of Haleakalā. The project's purpose is to confirm that the plate coil panels are capable of maintaining this temperature throughout all seasons and involved collecting data sets of various variables including pressures, temperatures, coolant flows, solar radiations and wind velocities during typical operating hours. Using MATLAB, a script was written to observe the plate coil's thermal performance. The plate coil did not perform as expected, achieving a surface temperature that was generally 2ºC above ambient temperature. This isn't to say that the plate coil does not work, but the small chiller used for the experiment was undersized resulting in coolant pumped through the plate coil that was not supplied at a low enough temperature. Calculated heat depositions were about 23% lower than that used as the basis of the design for the hillers to be used on the full system, a reasonable agreement given the fact that many simplifying assumptions were used in the models. These were not carried over into the testing. The test rig performance showing a 23% margin

  8. Estimation of Lake Water Temperature with ASTER and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS Thermal Infrared Bands: A Case Study Beysehir Lake (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Sehnaz; Sener, Erhan

    2016-08-01

    Beyşehir Lake is the largest fresh water lake in our country with the 653 km2 surface area. Lake water have used for drinking water of several settlements in the basin. Beyşehir Lake is a shallow lake and, especially in recent years its water level was dropped due to unplanned usage and effects of climate change.In this study, determination of the water temperature in Lake Beyşehir is aimed using 90m resolution thermal infrared bands of ASTER (Advance Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite and 30m resolution thermal infrared bands of Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS satellite. The Normalized Water Different Index (NWDI) has been applied to ASTER and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS satellite images to determine lake surface area. Accordingly, the lake water temperature is generally proportional to the depth and it relatively higher in the shallow area.

  9. Groundwater cooling of a supercomputer in Perth, Western Australia: hydrogeological simulations and thermal sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Heather A.; Schaubs, Peter M.; Rachakonda, Praveen K.; Trefry, Michael G.; Reid, Lynn B.; Lester, Daniel R.; Metcalfe, Guy; Poulet, Thomas; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater cooling (GWC) is a sustainable alternative to conventional cooling technologies for supercomputers. A GWC system has been implemented for the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre in Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater is extracted from the Mullaloo Aquifer at 20.8 °C and passes through a heat exchanger before returning to the same aquifer. Hydrogeological simulations of the GWC system were used to assess its performance and sustainability. Simulations were run with cooling capacities of 0.5 or 2.5 Mega Watts thermal (MWth), with scenarios representing various combinations of pumping rate, injection temperature and hydrogeological parameter values. The simulated system generates a thermal plume in the Mullaloo Aquifer and overlying Superficial Aquifer. Thermal breakthrough (transfer of heat from injection to production wells) occurred in 2.7-4.3 years for a 2.5 MWth system. Shielding (reinjection of cool groundwater between the injection and production wells) resulted in earlier thermal breakthrough but reduced the rate of temperature increase after breakthrough, such that shielding was beneficial after approximately 5 years pumping. Increasing injection temperature was preferable to increasing flow rate for maintaining cooling capacity after thermal breakthrough. Thermal impacts on existing wells were small, with up to 10 wells experiencing a temperature increase ≥ 0.1 °C (largest increase 6 °C).

  10. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  11. Electrical and Thermal View Points for Designing Conduction-Cooled Specimen Holder for Short Sample Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, J.; Stenvall, A.; Mikkonen, R.

    Theelectrical and stabilitypropertiesof superconductivestrandsareoftencharacterizedby short sample testing.These tests are often done in a measurement system where the sample is cooled by liquid cryogen or cold gas flow. In both approaches, the sample temperature during a measurement is stabilized by the abundance of available cooling power. This also helps to protect the sample during a thermal runaway i.e. quench. However, in some characterizations, e.g. minimum quench energy testing, the cooling conditions can have a significant effect on the results. Therefore a more adiabatic solution is prefer able as iten able seasier comparison of the results from different measurement stations. One solution to achieving the desired adiabacy is to use conduction-cooling and vacuum insulation. As there is no cooling fluidtorelyon, as cheme for sample protection has to be implemented. Inaconduction-cooled setup, one way to protect the sampleis to use an active protection system in conjunction with aproperly designed sample holder. In this publication, we present an electrical and thermal analysis of a conduction-cooled sample holder suitable for both critical current and minimum quench energy measurements. A coupled electro-thermal finite element method model was constructed to study the sample holder performance during measurement. For our application, the performance is defined by the ohmic losses in the holder component sand by the recovery time from as amplequench.

  12. Improving of the photovoltaic / thermal system performance using water cooling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Hashim A.; Numan, Ali H.; Abdulmunem, Abdulmunem R.

    2015-04-01

    This work is devoted to improving the electrical efficiency by reducing the rate of thermal energy of a photovoltaic/thermal system (PV/T).This is achieved by design cooling technique which consists of a heat exchanger and water circulating pipes placed at PV module rear surface to solve the problem of the high heat stored inside the PV cells during the operation. An experimental rig is designed to investigate and evaluate PV module performance with the proposed cooling technique. This cooling technique is the first work in Iraq to dissipate the heat from PV module. The experimental results indicated that due to the heat loss by convection between water and the PV panel's upper surface, an increase of output power is achieved. It was found that without active cooling, the temperature of the PV module was high and solar cells could only achieve a conversion efficiency of about 8%. However, when the PV module was operated under active water cooling condition, the temperature was dropped from 76.8°C without cooling to 70.1°C with active cooling. This temperature dropping led to increase in the electrical efficiency of solar panel to 9.8% at optimum mass flow rate (0.2L/s) and thermal efficiency to (12.3%).

  13. Numerical and analytical modelling of battery thermal management using passive cooling systems

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents the battery thermal management systems (BTMS) modelling of Li-ions batteries and investigates the design and modelling of different passive cooling management solutions from single battery to module level. A simplified one-dimensional transient computational model of a prismatic lithium-ion battery cell is developed using thermal circuit approach in conjunction with the thermal model of the heat pipe. The proposed model is compared to an analytical solution based on varia...

  14. Qualitative thermal characterization and cooling of lithium batteries for electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, A.; D'Annibale, F.; Boccardi, G.; Celata, G. P.; Menale, C.; Bubbico, R.; Vellucci, F.

    2014-04-01

    The paper deals with the cooling of batteries. The first step was the thermal characterization of a single cell of the module, which consists in the detection of the thermal field by means of thermographic tests during electric charging and discharging. The purpose was to identify possible critical hot points and to evaluate the cooling demand during the normal operation of an electric car. After that, a study on the optimal configuration to obtain the flattening of the temperature profile and to avoid hot points was executed. An experimental plant for cooling capacity evaluation of the batteries, using air as cooling fluid, was realized in our laboratory in ENEA Casaccia. The plant is designed to allow testing at different flow rate and temperatures of the cooling air, useful for the assessment of operative thermal limits in different working conditions. Another experimental facility was built to evaluate the thermal behaviour changes with water as cooling fluid. Experimental tests were carried out on the LiFePO4 batteries, under different electric working conditions using the two loops. In the future, different type of batteries will be tested and the influence of various parameters on the heat transfer will be assessed for possible optimal operative solutions.

  15. Simplified Building Thermal Model Used for Optimal Control of Radiant Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MPC has the ability to optimize the system operation parameters for energy conservation. Recently, it has been used in HVAC systems for saving energy, but there are very few applications in radiant cooling systems. To implement MPC in buildings with radiant terminals, the predictions of cooling load and thermal environment are indispensable. In this paper, a simplified thermal model is proposed for predicting cooling load and thermal environment in buildings with radiant floor. In this thermal model, the black-box model is introduced to derive the incident solar radiation, while the genetic algorithm is utilized to identify the parameters of the thermal model. In order to further validate this simplified thermal model, simulated results from TRNSYS are compared with those from this model and the deviation is evaluated based on coefficient of variation of root mean square (CV. The results show that the simplified model can predict the operative temperature with a CV lower than 1% and predict cooling loads with a CV lower than 10%. For the purpose of supervisory control in HVAC systems, this simplified RC thermal model has an acceptable accuracy and can be used for further MPC in buildings with radiation terminals.

  16. Startup of Pumping Units in Process Water Supplies with Cooling Towers at Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, V. V., E-mail: vberlin@rinet.ru; Murav’ev, O. A., E-mail: muraviov1954@mail.ru; Golubev, A. V., E-mail: electronik@inbox.ru [National Research University “Moscow State University of Civil Engineering,” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Aspects of the startup of pumping units in the cooling and process water supply systems for thermal and nuclear power plants with cooling towers, the startup stages, and the limits imposed on the extreme parameters during transients are discussed.

  17. Potential effects of climate change on the growth of fishes from different thermal guilds in Lakes Michigan and Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Chun; Madenjian, Charles P.; Bunnell, David B.; Lofgren, Brent M.; Perroud, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    We used a bioenergetics modeling approach to investigate potential effects of climate change on the growth of two economically important native fishes: yellow perch (Perca flavescens), a cool-water fish, and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), a cold-water fish, in deep and oligotrophic Lakes Michigan and Huron. For assessing potential changes in fish growth, we contrasted simulated fish growth in the projected future climate regime during the period 2043-2070 under different prey availability scenarios with the simulated growth during the baseline (historical reference) period 1964-1993. Results showed that effects of climate change on the growth of these two fishes are jointly controlled by behavioral thermoregulation and prey availability. With the ability of behavioral thermoregulation, temperatures experienced by yellow perch in the projected future climate regime increased more than those experienced by lake whitefish. Thus simulated future growth decreased more for yellow perch than for lake whitefish under scenarios where prey availability remains constant into the future. Under high prey availability scenarios, simulated future growth of these two fishes both increased but yellow perch could not maintain the baseline efficiency of converting prey consumption into body weight. We contended that thermal guild should not be the only factor used to predict effects of climate change on the growth of a fish, and that ecosystem responses to climate change should be also taken into account.

  18. a Cabinet Level Thermal Test Vehicle to Evaluate Hybrid Double-Sided Cooling Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qihong; Joshi, Yogendra

    Packaging of power semiconductor devices presents some of the greatest thermal design challenges due to the resulting high heat fluxes. Advanced cooling techniques are desired to help meet these demands for current and future devices. A hybrid double-sided approach combining micro-channel liquid cooling, thermoelectric cooling, and forced air convection is investigated via a test vehicle for the thermal management of electronic cabinets. A reduction of 74% in the chip junction temperature rise was achieved by using double-sided cooling, compared to single-sided air convection. Further reduction can be achieved by utilizing thermoelectric cooling (TEC). Additional reductions of 22.4% and 6.5% were achieved by utilizing TEC in single-sided air cooling and double-sided cooling, respectively. The effect of water flow rates through the air-to-liquid heat exchanger and the microchannel heat sink on the chip junction temperature rise was insignificant, compared to the effect of TEC, and cooling configuration.

  19. Summer and Winter Effect of Innovative Cool Roof Tiles on the Dynamic Thermal Behavior of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Laura Pisello

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cool roofs represent an acknowledged passive cooling technique to reduce building energy consumption for cooling and to mitigate urban heat island effects. This paper concerns the evaluation of the dynamic effect of new cool roof clay tiles on building thermal performance in summer and winter conditions. To this end, these properties have been analyzed on traditional roof brick tiles through an indoor and outdoor two-year long continuous monitoring campaign set up in a residential building located in central Italy. The analysis and the cooperation with industrial companies producing brick tiles and reflective coatings allowed the production of a new tile with notable “cool roof” properties through the traditional industrial manufacturing path of such tiles. Notable results show that during summer the high reflection tiles are able to decrease the average external roof surface temperature by more than 10 °C and the indoor operative temperature by more than 3 °C. During winter the average external surface temperature is lower with high reflection tiles by about 1 °C. Singular optic-thermal phenomena are registered while evaluating the dynamics of the cool roof effect. Interesting findings show how the sloped cool roof application could suggest further considerations about the dynamic effect of cool roofs.

  20. Influence of Cooling Channel Geometry on the Thermal Response in Silicon Nitride Plates Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    Engine manufacturers are continually attempting to improve the performance and efficiency of internal combustion engines. Usually they raise the operating temperature or reduce the cooling air requirement for the hot section turbine components. However, the success of these attempts depends on finding materials that are lightweight, are strong, and can withstand high temperatures. Ceramics are among the top candidate materials considered for such harsh applications. They hold low-density, high-temperature strength, and thermal conductivity, and they are undergoing investigation as potential materials for replacing nickel-base alloys and superalloys that are currently used for engine hot-section components. Ceramic structures can withstand higher operating temperatures and a harsh combustion environment. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass. The long-term objectives of the High Temperature Propulsion Components (HOTPC) Project are to develop manufacturing technology, thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TBC/EBC), and the analytical modeling capability to predict thermomechanical stresses in minimally cooled silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes under simulated engine conditions. Two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses with TBC were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Nondestructive evaluation was used to determine processing defects. The study included conducting preliminary parametric analytical runs of heat transfer and stress analyses under steady-state conditions to demonstrate the feasibility of using cooled Si3N4 parts for turbine applications. The influence of cooling-channel shapes (such as circular, square, and ascending-order cooling channels) on cooling efficiency and thermal stresses was investigated. Temperature distributions were generated for all cases considered under both cooling and no-cooling conditions, with air being the cooling medium. The table shows the magnitude of the

  1. Reducing Residential Peak Electricity Demand with Mechanical Pre-Cooling of Building Thermal Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Will [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Roux, Jordan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This study uses an advanced airflow, energy and humidity modelling tool to evaluate the potential for residential mechanical pre-cooling of building thermal mass to shift electricity loads away from the peak electricity demand period. The focus of this study is residential buildings with low thermal mass, such as timber-frame houses typical to the US. Simulations were performed for homes in 12 US DOE climate zones. The results show that the effectiveness of mechanical pre-cooling is highly dependent on climate zone and the selected pre-cooling strategy. The expected energy trade-off between cooling peak energy savings and increased off-peak energy use is also shown.

  2. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  3. Water cooling thermal power measurement in a vacuum diffusion pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Cardozo Amorin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion vacuum pumps are used both in industry and in laboratory science for high vacuum production. For its operation they must be refrigerated, and it is done by circulating water in open circuit. Considering that, vacuum systems stays operating by hours, the water consumption may be avoided if the diffusion vacuum pumps refrigeration were done in closed circuit. However, it is necessary to know the diffusion vacuum pump thermal power (the heat transferred to circulate water by time units to implement one of these and get in the refrigeration system dimension. In this paper the diffusion vacuum pump thermal power was obtained by measuring water flow and temperature variation and was calculated through the heat quantity variation equation time function. The thermal power value was 935,6 W, that is 397 W smaller and 35 W bigger than, respectively, the maximum and minimum diffusion pump thermal power suggested by its operation manual. This procedure have been shown useful to precisely determine the diffusion pump thermal power or of any other system that needs to be refrigerated in water closed circuit.

  4. Thermal and mechanical joints to cryo-cooled silicon monochromatorcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDowell, A.; Fakra, S.; Morrison, G.

    2006-07-14

    We describe the performance of various materials used as thethermal interface between silicon to silicon and silicon to copper jointswhen operated at ~;120K and loaded with ~;20 watts of thermal power. Wefind that only the indium based silicon-to-silicon joint isreliable.

  5. Test Method for Thermal Characterization of Li-Ion Cells and Verification of Cooling Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouven Christen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature gradients, thermal cycling and temperatures outside the optimal operation range can have a significant influence on the reliability and lifetime of Li-ion battery cells. Therefore, it is essential for the developer of large-scale battery systems to know the thermal characteristics, such as heat source location, heat capacity and thermal conductivity, of a single cell in order to design appropriate cooling measures. This paper describes an advanced test facility, which allows not only an estimation of the thermal properties of a battery cell, but also the verification of proposed cooling strategies in operation. To do this, an active measuring unit consisting of a temperature and heat flux density sensor and a Peltier element was developed. These temperature/heat flux sensing (THFS units are uniformly arranged around a battery cell with a spatial resolution of 25 mm. Consequently, the temperature or heat flux density can be controlled individually, thus forming regions with constant temperature (cooling or zero heat flux (insulation. This test setup covers the whole development loop from thermal characterization to the design and verification of the proposed cooling strategy.

  6. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Khalid S Shibib; Mohammad A Munshid; Kadim A Hubiter

    2013-10-01

    The transient analytical solutions of temperature distribution, stress, strain and optical path difference in convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod are derived. The results are compared with other works and good agreements are found. The effects of increasing the edge cooling and face cooling are studied. It is found that an increase in the edge cooling has significant effect on reducing the maximum temperature that can be reached in the laser rod but it has no effect on the value of optical path difference. It is also found that increasing this type of cooling significantly reduces the time required to reach the thermal equilibrium with a slight increase in the max. tensile hoop stress that can be reached as the cooling increases. On the other hand, increase in face cooling reduces the response time, optical path difference and the maximum temperature that can be reached in the laser rod but a significant increase in the max. tensile hoop stress is observed. A matching between the advantages of these two type of cooling may be useful for a designer.

  7. Efficiency and its bounds for thermal engines at maximum power using Newton's law of cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, H; Guo, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We study a thermal engine model for which Newton's cooling law is obeyed during heat transfer processes. The thermal efficiency and its bounds at maximum output power are derived and discussed. This model, though quite simple, can be applied not only to Carnot engines but also to four other types of engines. For the long thermal contact time limit, new bounds, tighter than what were known before, are obtained. In this case, this model can simulate Otto, Joule-Brayton, Diesel, and Atkinson engines. While in the short contact time limit, which corresponds to the Carnot cycle, the same efficiency bounds as that from Esposito et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)] are derived. In both cases, the thermal efficiency decreases as the ratio between the heat capacities of the working medium during heating and cooling stages increases. This might provide instructions for designing real engines.

  8. Efficiency and its bounds for thermal engines at maximum power using Newton's law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, H.; Guo, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We study a thermal engine model for which Newton's cooling law is obeyed during heat transfer processes. The thermal efficiency and its bounds at maximum output power are derived and discussed. This model, though quite simple, can be applied not only to Carnot engines but also to four other types of engines. For the long thermal contact time limit, new bounds, tighter than what were known before, are obtained. In this case, this model can simulate Otto, Joule-Brayton, Diesel, and Atkinson engines. While in the short contact time limit, which corresponds to the Carnot cycle, the same efficiency bounds as that from Esposito [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.150603 105, 150603 (2010)] are derived. In both cases, the thermal efficiency decreases as the ratio between the heat capacities of the working medium during heating and cooling stages increases. This might provide instructions for designing real engines.

  9. Thermally safe operation of a cooled semi-batch reactor: slow liquid-liquid reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Steensma, M.; Westerterp, K R

    1988-01-01

    Thermally safe operation of a semi-batch reactor (SBR) implies that conditions leading to strong accumulation of unreacted reactants must be avoided. All thermal responses of a SBR, in which a slow liquid-liquid reaction takes place, can be represented in a diagram with the kinetics, cooling capacity and potential temperature rise as the keyfactors. Slow reactions taking place in the dispersed phase were found to be more prone to accumulation than reactions in the continuous phase. An overhea...

  10. Thermal-hydraulic Optimization of Water-cooled Center Conductor Post for Spherical Tokamaks Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯严; 吴宜灿; 黄群英; 郑善良

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual structure of segmental water-cooled Center Con ductor Post (CCP) to be flexible in installment and replacement. Thermal-hydraulic optimization and sensitivity analysis of key parameters are performed based on a reference fusion transmutation system with 100 MW fusion power. Numerical simulation by using a commercial code PHOEN]CS has been carried out to be close to the thermal-hydraulic analytical results of the CCP mid-part.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  12. Non-thermal X-ray Emission An Alternative to Cluster Cooling Flows?

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Welch, G A; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; West, Michael J.; Welch, Gary A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of experiments aimed at reducing the major problem with cooling flow models of rich cluster X-ray sources: the fact that most of the cooled gas or its products have not been found. Here we show that much of the X-ray emission usually attributed to cooling flows can, in fact, be modeled by a power-law component which is indicative of a source(s) other than thermal bremsstrahlung from the intracluster medium. We find that adequate simultaneous fits to ROSAT PSPCB and ASCA GIS/SIS spectra of the central regions of ten clusters are obtained for two-component models that include a thermal plasma component that is attributable to hot intracluster gas and a power-law component that is likely generated by compact sources and/or extended non-thermal emission. For five of the clusters that purportedly have massive cooling flows, the best-fit models have power-law components that contribute $\\sim$ 30 % of the total flux (0.14 - 10.0 keV) within the central 3 arcminutes. Because cooling flow mass de...

  13. Comparative Thermal Analysis of Different Cool Roof Materials for Minimizing Building Energy Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The roof and walls in the urban areas contribute to major share in the absorption of solar radiations and also retard the outflow of the absorbed radiation from the building envelope, thereby increasing the global warming by inducing the heat island effect. The impact of using cool roof technologies on the thermal comfort of the office buildings has been estimated. Cool roofs reduce electricity consumption for maintaining the temperature of the air-conditioned buildings in the comfort level and also increase comfort in buildings merely not relying completely on cooling equipment. The cool roofs and cool pavements, however, can mitigate summer urban heat islands by improving indoor air quality and comfort. The thermal analysis of different materials has been carried out to analyze the impact of the rate of heat transfer on the building envelope and the results obtained indicate that different cool roof techniques are beneficial in maintaining the comfort level of the building which purely depends on the ambient temperature conditions.

  14. Thermal Hydraulics of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; Davie Petti

    2009-10-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  15. Influence of thermal flow field of cooling tower on recirculation ratio of a direct air-cooled system for a power plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Wanli; Liu Peiqing

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal flow field of direct air-cooled system,the hot water was supplied to the model of direct air-cooled condenser(ACC).The particle image velocimetery(PIV)experiments were carried out to get thermal flow field of a ACC under different conditions in low velocity wind tunnel,at the same time,the recirculation ratio at cooling tower was measured,so the relationship between flow field characteristics and recirculation ratio of cooling tower can be discussed.From the results we can see that the flow field configuration around cooling tower has great effects on average recirculation ratio under cooling tower.The eddy formed around cooling tower is a key reason that recireulation pro-duces.The eddy intensity relates to velocity magnitude and direction angle,and the configuration of eddy lies on the ge-ometry size of cooling tower.So changing the flow field configuration around cooling tower reasonably can decrease recir-culation ratio under cooling tower,and heat dispel effect of ACC can also be improved.

  16. Simplified approach of predictions of thermal performance for counterflow fully-wet cooling coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M. Khamis; Hassab, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    An innovative correlation associating the effectiveness (ɛ) of the fully-wet cooling coil with its number of transfer unit and vice versa is presented in this work. The thermal performance and design of fully-wet cooling coil can be predicted simply through those correlations. The analytical model was constructed on a basis of solving heat and mass transfer equation "enthalpy potential method" simultaneously coupled with the energy equations. The validity of the new correlations was tested by experimental reported in the available literature. A good agreement with deviation less than 10% was found during the comparison between the output results of the new correlations and those obtained from the literature. The main benefits of those new correlations (1) Its simplicity to be implemented through simple calculations of input parameters (2) It provides helpful guidelines for optimization of wet cooling coil performance during its operation coupling with the thermal system at which the coil is integrated.

  17. Thermal analysis and water-cooling design of the CSNS MEBT 324 MHz buncher cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hua-Chang; OUYANG Hua-Fu

    2008-01-01

    At least two bunchers are needed in the 3 MeV H- Medium Energy Beam Transport(MEBT)line located between RFQ and DTL for the CSNS(China Spallation Neutron Source).A nose-cone geometry has been adopted as the type of buncher cavity for its simplicity,higher impedance and lower risk of multipacting.By making use of the results got from the simulations on the buncher with two-dimension code SUPERFISH,the thermal and structural analyses have been carried out,the process and results to determine the resulting frequency shift due to thermal and structural distortion of the cavity are presented,the water-cooling channel position and the optimum cooling water temperature as well as the tuning method by adjusting the cooling water temperature when the cavity is out of resonance are also determined through the analyses.

  18. Thermal analysis and water-cooling design of the CSNS MEBT 324 MHz buncher cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Chang; Ouyang, Hua-Fu

    2008-04-01

    At least two bunchers are needed in the 3 MeV H- Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line located between RFQ and DTL for the CSNS (China Spallation Neutron Source). A nose-cone geometry has been adopted as the type of buncher cavity for its simplicity, higher impedance and lower risk of multipacting. By making use of the results got from the simulations on the buncher with two-dimension code SUPERFISH, the thermal and structural analyses have been carried out, the process and results to determine the resulting frequency shift due to thermal and structural distortion of the cavity are presented, the water-cooling channel position and the optimum cooling water temperature as well as the tuning method by adjusting the cooling water temperature when the cavity is out of resonance are also determined through the analyses.

  19. Differences Between Passive And Active Cooling Systems In Gender, Physiological Responses, Thermal Sensation And Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, Lisje; Loomans, Marcel; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    could occur due to application of low energy/exergy cooling systems, on human thermal comfort, physiological responses, and productivity. Furthermore, focus is on the differences between gender. This paper presents preliminary results obtained from experiments with four test subjects. To examine...... ventilation (To=26oC), active cooling by convection through (2) mixing and (3) displacement ventilation, active cooling by radiation (4) through the ceiling and mixing ventilation (5) through the floor and mixing ventilation and (6) through the floor and displacement ventilation. Three female subjects visited...... the climate room on two occasions: (1) and (4). During the experiments both physiological responses and thermal sensation were measured. To assess the productivity and performance a ‘Remote Performance Measurement’ (RPM) method was used....

  20. Thermal field of the Joule-Thomson effect under conditions of bed cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharafutdinov, R.F.; Filippov, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Features are examined of the thermal field for the Joule-Thomson effect under bed conditions when there is cooling by injected water. It is indicated that the time for establishing the temperature significantly depends on the thermophysical properties of the bed and underlying rocks. Results of calculations of the temperature relationship for different conditions of well operation are presented.

  1. Thermal Cracking Analysis during Pipe Cooling of Mass Concrete Using Particle Flow Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipe cooling systems are among the potentially effective measures to control the temperature of mass concrete. However, if not properly controlled, thermal cracking in concrete, especially near water pipes, might occur, as experienced in many mass concrete structures. In this paper, a new numerical approach to simulate thermal cracking based on particle flow code is used to shed more light onto the process of thermal crack propagation and the effect of thermal cracks on thermal fields. Key details of the simulation, including the procedure of obtaining thermal and mechanical properties of particles, are presented. Importantly, a heat flow boundary based on an analytical solution is proposed and used in particle flow code in two dimensions to simulate the effect of pipe cooling. The simulation results are in good agreement with the monitored temperature data and observations on cored specimens from a real concrete gravity dam, giving confidence to the appropriateness of the adopted simulation. The simulated results also clearly demonstrate why thermal cracks occur and how they propagate, as well as the influence of such cracks on thermal fields.

  2. Analyzing Neutron Star in HESS J1731-347 from Thermal Emission and Cooling Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ofengeim, D D; Klochkov, D; Suleimanov, V; Yakovlev, D G

    2015-01-01

    The central compact object in the supernova remnant HESS J1731-347 appears to be the hottest observed isolated cooling neutron star. The cooling theory of neutron stars enables one to explain observations of this star by assuming the presence of strong proton superfluidity in the stellar core and the existence of the surface heat blanketing envelope which almost fully consists of carbon. The cooling model of this star is elaborated to take proper account of the neutrino emission due to neutron-neutron collisions which is not suppressed by proton superfluidity. Using the results of spectral fits of observed thermal spectra for the distance of 3.2 kpc and the cooling theory for the neutron star of age 27 kyr, new constraints on the stellar mass and radius are obtained which are more stringent than those derived from the spectral fits alone.

  3. Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mtunzi Busiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy of photovoltaic modules drops by 0.5% for each degree increase in temperature. Direct water cooling of photovoltaic modules was found to give improved electrical and thermal yield. A prototype was put in place to analyse the field data for a period of a year. The results showed an initial high performance ratio and electrical power output. The monthly energy saving efficiency of the directly water cooled module was found to be approximately 61%. The solar utilisation of the naturally cooled photovoltaic module was found to be 8.79% and for the directly water cooled module its solar utilisation was 47.93%. Implementation of such systems on households may reduce the load from the utility company, bring about huge savings on electricity bills and help in reducing carbon emissions.

  4. Early Results from a Multi-Thermal Model for the Cooling of Post-Flare Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. K.; Warren, H. P.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a multi-thermal model for the cooling of post-flare loops. The model consists of an arcade of many nested loops that reconnect and begin cooling at slightly different times, and have different cooling profiles because of the different loop lengths across the arcade. Cooling due to both conductive and radiative processes is taken into account. The free parameters in the model include initial temperature and density in the loop, loop width and the initial loop length. The results from the model are then compared to TRACE and SXT observations. Our many-loop model does a much better job of predicting the SXT and TRACE light curves than a similar model with only one loop.

  5. Noninvasive thermal coagulation of deep subsurface tissue structures using a laser probe with integrated contact cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilip, Christopher M; Scott, Nicholas J; Trammell, Susan R; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2008-01-01

    Cooling methods are used during cosmetic laser surgery to preserve a superficial layer of the skin surface. This study investigates contact cooling for sparing a deeper layer of the tissue surface during laser irradiation of subsurface tissues, with the goal of developing noninvasive laser therapy applications beyond cosmetic surgery. A laser probe was designed and tested for simultaneous laser irradiation and contact cooling of liver tissue, ex vivo. Gross and histologic examination was used to quantify thermal lesion dimensions. Liver lesions of 5.8-mm-diameter were created, while preserving the tissue surface to a depth of 1.5 mm. In vivo animal studies are planned to optimize the laser and cooling parameters for potential clinical applications.

  6. Optimizing X-ray mirror thermal performance using matched profile cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Cocco, Daniele; Kelez, Nicholas; Morton, Daniel S; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefan, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    To cover a large photon energy range, the length of an X-ray mirror is often longer than the beam footprint length for much of the applicable energy range. To limit thermal deformation of such a water-cooled X-ray mirror, a technique using side cooling with a cooled length shorter than the beam footprint length is proposed. This cooling length can be optimized by using finite-element analysis. For the Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors at LCLS-II, the thermal deformation can be reduced by a factor of up to 30, compared with full-length cooling. Furthermore, a second, alternative technique, based on a similar principle is presented: using a long, single-length cooling block on each side of the mirror and adding electric heaters between the cooling blocks and the mirror substrate. The electric heaters consist of a number of cells, located along the mirror length. The total effective length of the electric heater can then be adjusted by choosing which cells to energize, using electric power supplies. The residual height error can be minimized to 0.02 nm RMS by using optimal heater parameters (length and power density). Compared with a case without heaters, this residual height error is reduced by a factor of up to 45. The residual height error in the LCLS-II KB mirrors, due to free-electron laser beam heat load, can be reduced by a factor of ∼11 below the requirement. The proposed techniques are also effective in reducing thermal slope errors and are, therefore, applicable to white beam mirrors in synchrotron radiation beamlines.

  7. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O.; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-01

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  8. Determining the effects of thermal conductivity on epoxy molds using profiled cooling channels with metal inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altaf, Khurram; Rani, Abdul Ahmad Majdi; Ahmad, Faiz; Baharom, Masri [Mechanical Engineering Dept., Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Raghavan, Vijay R. [OYL Manufacturing, Sungai Buloh (Malaysia)

    2016-11-15

    Polymer injection molds are generally manufactured with metallic materials, such as tool steel, which provide reliable working of molds and extended service life. The manufacture of injection molds with steel is a prolonged process because of the strength of steel. For a short prototype production run, one of the suitable choices could be the use of aluminum-filled epoxy material, which can produce a functional mold in a short time as compared with a conventionally machined tool. Aluminum-filled epoxy tooling is a good choice for short production runs for engineering applications, yet works best for relatively simple shapes. The advantages in relation to the fabrication of injection molds with epoxy-based materials include time saving in producing the mold, epoxy curing at ambient temperature, and ease of machining and post processing. Nevertheless, one major drawback of epoxy material is its poor thermal conductivity, which results in a relatively longer cooling time for epoxy injection molds. This study investigates some of the innovative ideas for enhancing the thermal conductivity for epoxy molds. The basic concept behind these ideas was to embed a highly thermally conductive metal insert within the mold between cavities with an innovative design of cooling channels called profiled cooling channels. This technique will increase the effective thermal conductivity of the epoxy mold, leading to the reduction in cooling time for the injection molded polymer part. Experimental analysis conducted in the current study also verified that the mold with profiled cooling channels and embedded metal insert has significantly reduced the cooling time.

  9. Cooling vest for improving surgeons' thermal comfort: a multidisciplinary design project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langø, Thomas; Nesbakken, Ragnhild; Faerevik, Hilde; Holbø, Kristine; Reitan, Jarl; Yavuz, Yunus; Mårvik, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    A laparoscopic surgeon sometimes experiences heat-related discomfort even though the temperature situation is moderate. The aim of this project was to design a cooling vest using a phase change material to increase thermal comfort for the surgeon. The project focused on the design process to reveal the most important parameters for the design of a cooling vest that could be demonstrated in a clinical setting. We performed an entire design process, from problem analysis, situation observations, concept for a prototype, temperature measurements, and a final design based on clinical testing. The project was conducted by a multidisciplinary team consisting of product designers, engineers, physiologists, and surgeons. We carried out four physiological demonstrations of one surgeon's skin temperatures and heart rate during different laparoscopic procedures. A commercially available cooling vest for firemen and two proof-of-concept prototypes were tested alongside a reference operation without cooling. To aid the final design, one person went through a climate chamber test with two different set-ups of cooling elements. The final design was found to improve the conditions of our test subject. It was found that whole trunk cooling was more effective than only upper trunk cooling. A final design was proposed based on the design process and the findings in the operating room and in the laboratory. Although the experiences using the vest seemed positive, further studies on several operators and more surgical procedures are needed to determine the true benefits for the operator.

  10. Past climate changes and permafrost depth at the Lake El'gygytgyn site: implications from data and thermal modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mottaghy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present results of numerical simulations of the temperature field of the subsurface around and beneath the crater Lake El'gygytgyn in NE Russia, which is subject of an interdisciplinary drilling campaign within the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP. This study focuses on determining the permafrost depth and the transition between talik and permafrost regimes, both, under steady-state and transient conditions of past climate changes. Thermal properties of the subsurface are deduced from measurements on three representative core samples taken from the quaternary sediments and the underlying impact rock. Further information is derived from the available geophysical logs and literature data. The temperature data from the lake borehole ICDP site 5011-1 down to 400 m depth below lake bottom are dominated by thermal perturbations related to the drilling process, and thus only give reliable values for the lowermost value in the borehole. Undisturbed temperature data recorded over more than two years in the 140 m deep land-based borehole ICDP site 5011-3 allow to determine the mean annual ground surface temperature (GST, as well as its history (GSTH to a certain extent. Although the borehole's depth is by far not sufficient for a complete reconstruction of past temperatures back to the last glacial maximum (LGM, the temperature data and our modelling results show that there is still an influence of the LGM on the thermal regime, and thus on the permafrost depth. Whereas the latter result is obtained from the deeper part of the temperature profile, the rather strong curvature of the temperature data in shallower depths around 30 m can be explained by a comparatively large amplitude of the Little Ice Age (LIA, with a subsequently persistent cool period. Other mechanisms like varying porosity may also have an influence on the temperature profile, however, our modelling studies imply a major contribution from recent climate changes.

  11. Prediction of porous walls thermal protection by effusion or transpiration cooling: an analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andoh, Y.H. [Institut National Polytechnique Felix Houphouet-Boigny, Yamoussoukro (Ivory Coast); Lips, B. [Centre de Thermique de Lyon, Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2003-10-01

    The study is about the thermal control of porous walls submitted to severe heat fluxes. The numerical approach model of heat transfer, developed, is based on energy balance equation. The governing parameters are the volumetric heat transfer coefficient, the equivalent thermal conductivity of the material and fluid flow characteristics. The interactive effects of these parameters on heat transfer are presented to permit to understand the relative importance of varied phenomena occurring. The validity of the results is verified in a thermal behavior study of a porous plate submitted to a heat flux up to 3500 K and cooled by a refrigerant fluid. Good agreement with the previsions is obtained. (author)

  12. Efficiency and its bounds for thermal engines at maximum power using Newton's law of cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, H; Guo, H.

    2012-01-01

    We study a thermal engine model for which Newton's cooling law is obeyed during heat transfer processes. The thermal efficiency and its bounds at maximum output power are derived and discussed. This model, though quite simple, can be applied not only to Carnot engines but also to four other types of engines. For the long thermal contact time limit, new bounds, tighter than what were known before, are obtained. In this case, this model can simulate Otto, Joule-Brayton, Diesel, and Atkinson eng...

  13. A nonventing cooling system for space environment extravehicular activity, using radiation and regenerable thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes, Stephen A.; Trevino, Luis A.; Dinsmore, Craig E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the selection, design, and testing of a prototype nonventing regenerable astronaut cooling system for extravehicular activity space suit applications, for mission durations of four hours or greater. The selected system consists of the following key elements: a radiator assembly which serves as the exterior shell of the portable life support subsystem backpack; a layer of phase change thermal storage material, n-hexadecane paraffin, which acts as a regenerable thermal capacitor; a thermoelectric heat pump; and an automatic temperature control system. The capability for regeneration of thermal storage capacity with and without the aid of electric power is provided.

  14. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling of actively cooled thermal protection systems with nickel alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinzhi; He Yurong; Zheng Yan; Ma Junju; H. Inaki Schlaberg

    2014-01-01

    Actively cooled thermal protection system has great influence on the engine of a hyper-sonic vehicle, and it is significant to obtain the thermal and stress distribution in the system. So an analytic estimation and numerical modeling are performed in this paper to investigate the behavior of an actively cooled thermal protection system. The analytic estimation is based on the electric analogy method and finite element analysis (FEA) is applied to the numerical simulation. Temper-ature and stress distributions are obtained for the actively cooled channel walls with three kinds of nickel alloys with or with no thermal barrier coating (TBC). The temperature of the channel wall with coating has no obvious difference from the one with no coating, but the stress with coating on the channel wall is much smaller than that with no coating. Inconel X-750 has the best charac-teristics among the three Ni-based materials due to its higher thermal conductivity, lower elasticity module and greater allowable stress. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling results are com-pared with each other and a reasonable agreement is obtained.

  15. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling of actively cooled thermal protection systems with nickel alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xinzhi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Actively cooled thermal protection system has great influence on the engine of a hypersonic vehicle, and it is significant to obtain the thermal and stress distribution in the system. So an analytic estimation and numerical modeling are performed in this paper to investigate the behavior of an actively cooled thermal protection system. The analytic estimation is based on the electric analogy method and finite element analysis (FEA is applied to the numerical simulation. Temperature and stress distributions are obtained for the actively cooled channel walls with three kinds of nickel alloys with or with no thermal barrier coating (TBC. The temperature of the channel wall with coating has no obvious difference from the one with no coating, but the stress with coating on the channel wall is much smaller than that with no coating. Inconel X-750 has the best characteristics among the three Ni-based materials due to its higher thermal conductivity, lower elasticity module and greater allowable stress. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling results are compared with each other and a reasonable agreement is obtained.

  16. Hybrid optical-thermal devices and materials for light manipulation and radiative cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Weinstein, Lee; Huang, Xiaopeng; Loomis, James; Xu, Yanfei; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We report on optical design and applications of hybrid meso-scale devices and materials that combine optical and thermal management functionalities owing to their tailored resonant interaction with light in visible and infrared frequency bands. We outline a general approach to designing such materials, and discuss two specific applications in detail. One example is a hybrid optical-thermal antenna with sub-wavelength light focusing, which simultaneously enables intensity enhancement at the operating wavelength in the visible and reduction of the operating temperature. The enhancement is achieved via light recycling in the form of whispering-gallery modes trapped in an optical microcavity, while cooling functionality is realized via a combination of reduced optical absorption and radiative cooling. The other example is a fabric that is opaque in the visible range yet highly transparent in the infrared, which allows the human body to efficiently shed energy in the form of thermal emission. Such fabrics can find...

  17. Thermal environment in a simulated double office room with convective and radiant cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Rezgals, Lauris

    2017-01-01

    The thermal environment in a double office room obtained with chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and overhead mixing total volume ventilation (MTVV) under summer (cooling) condition was compared. Design (peak......) and usual (average) heat load from solar radiation, office equipment, lighting and occupants was simulated, respectively at 62 W/m2 and 38 W/m2 under four different workstation layouts. Air temperature, globe (operative) temperature, radiant asymmetry, air velocity and turbulent intensity were measured...... CCMV especially in the design heat load cases. With CBR, the thermal environment was found to be between CB and CCMV. MTVV generated high draught level under the tested design heat load cases. All cooling systems generated similar thermal environment in the usual heat load cases. It would...

  18. 3D Thermal Stratification of Koycegiz Lake, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcan, Tugba; Kurtulus, Bedri; Avsar, Ozgur; Avsar, Ulas

    2017-04-01

    Water temperature in lakes, streams and coastal areas is an important indicator for several purposes (water quality, aquatic organism, land use, etc..). There are over a hundred lakes in Turkey. Most of them locates in the area known as the Lake District in southwestern Turkey. The Study area is located at the south and southwest part of Turkey in Muǧla region. The present study focuses on determining possible thermocline changes in Lake Koyceǧiz by in-situ measurements. The measurement were done by two snapshot campaign at July and August 2013. Using Mugla Sıtkı Kocman University geological engineering floating platform, temperature, specific conductance, salinity and depth values were measured with the YSI 6600 and Horiba U2 devices in surface and depth of Lake Köyceǧiz at specific grid. When the depth of the water and the coordinates were measured by GPS. Scattered data interpolation is used to perform interpolation on a scattered dataset that resides in 3D space. The 3D temperature color mesh grid were generated by using Delaunay triangulation and Natural neighbor interpolation methodology. At the end of the study a 3D conceptual lake temperature dynamics model was reconstructed using MATLAB functions. The results show that Koycegiz Lake is a meromictic lake and has a significance decrease of Temperature at 7m of depth.In this regard, we would like also to thank TUBITAK project (112Y137), French Embassy in Turkey and Sıtkı Kocman Foundation for their financial support.

  19. Effect of the North Atlantic Oscillation on the Thermal Characteristics of Lakes in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrzesiński Dariusz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO on the thermal characteristics of lakes in Poland. In the analysis, the use was made of monthly air temperatures recorded at fifteen meteorological stations, water temperatures of twelve lakes, and Hurrell’s winter NAO indices. Over the study period (1971-2010, there was a marked increase in the temperatures of both, air and lake waters. Depending on the NAO phase, water temperatures were observed to depart from mean values, being markedly higher than average (even by 1°C in the positive winter NAO phase. The differences in water temperatures were statistically significant in the winter-spring season. In turn, in the negative NAODJFM phase lake water temperatures in winter and spring were markedly lower than average (in March even by 1.0°C. The unique response of some lakes depends on their morphometric parameters, including their mean depth.

  20. Thermal effects and component cooling in Magnum-PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijt, O.G., E-mail: kruijt@rijnhuizen.nl [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands); Scholten, J.; Smeets, P.H.M.; Brons, S.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Al, R.S.; Berg, M.A. van den; Meiden, H.J. van der; Rooij, G.J. van; Zelijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is a linear plasma generator, built at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen. Subject of study will be the interaction of plasma with a diversity of surface materials. The machine is designed to provide an environment with a steady state high-flux plasma (up to 10{sup 24} H{sup +} ions/m{sup 2} s) in a 3 T magnetic field with an exposed surface of 80 cm{sup 2} up to 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Magnum-PSI will provide new insights in the complex physics and chemistry that will occur in the divertor region of the future experimental fusion reactor ITER and reactors beyond ITER. The conditions at the surface of the sample can be varied over a wide range, such as plasma temperature, beam diameter, particle flux, inclination angle of the target, background pressure and magnetic field. An important subject of attention in the design of the machine was thermal effects originating in the excess heat and gas flow from the plasma source and radiation from the target.

  1. Solar cooling - comparative study between thermal and electrical use in industrial buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, N.; Badea, G. V.; Epureanu, A.; Frumuşanu, G.

    2016-08-01

    The increase in the share of renewable energy sources together with the emphasis on the need for energy security bring to a spotlight the field of trigeneration autonomous microsystems, as a solution to cover the energy consumptions, not only for isolated industrial buildings, but also for industrial buildings located in urban areas. The use of solar energy for cooling has been taken into account to offer a cooling comfort in the building. Cooling and air- conditioned production are current applications promoting the use of solar energy technologies. Solar cooling systems can be classified, depending on the used energy, in electrical systems using mechanical compression chillers and systems using thermal compression by absorption or adsorption. This comparative study presents the main strengths and weaknesses of solar cooling obtained: i) through the transformation of heat resulted from thermal solar panels combined with adsorption chillers, and ii) through the multiple conversion of electricity - photovoltaic panels - battery - inverter - combined with mechanical compression chillers. Both solutions are analyzed from the standpoints of energy efficiency, dynamic performances (demand response), and costs sizes. At the end of the paper, experimental results obtained in the climatic condition of Galafi city, Romania, are presented.

  2. Cool-down acceleration of G-M cryocoolers with thermal oscillations passively damped by helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, R. J.; Delmas, J.

    2015-12-01

    4 K Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers suffer from inherent temperature oscillations which can be a problem for certain attached electronic instrumentation. Sumitomo Heavy Industries has exploited the high volumetric specific heat of super-critical He to quell these oscillations (approx. 10 dB) by strongly thermally linking a separate vessel of He to the second stage; no significant thermal resistance is added between the payload and the working gas of the cryocooler. A noticeable effect of the helium damper is to increase the cool-down time of the second stage below 10 K. For the operation of niobium-based superconducting electronics (NbSCE), a common practice is to warm the circuits above the critical temperature (∼9 K) and then cool to the operating point in order to redistribute trapped magnetic fluxons, so for NbSCE users, the time to cool from 10 K is important. The gas in the helium damper is shared between a room-temperature buffer tank and the 2nd stage vessel, which are connected by a capillary tube. We show that the total cool-down time below 10 K can be substantially reduced by introducing a combination of thermal linkages between the cryocooler and the capillary tube and in-line relief valves, which control the He mass distribution between the warm canister and cold vessel. The time to reach operating temperature from the superconducting transition has been reduced to <25% of the time needed without these low-cost modifications.

  3. Effect of Material Inhomogeneity on Thermal Performance of a Rheocast Aluminum Heatsink for Electronics Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, M.; Belov, I.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Wessén, M.

    2016-06-01

    The relation between microstructural inhomogeneity and thermal conductivity of a rheocast component manufactured from two different aluminum alloys was investigated. The formation of two different primary α-Al particles was observed and related to multistage solidification process during slurry preparation and die cavity filling process. The microstructural inhomogeneity of the component was quantified as the fraction of α 1-Al particles in the primary Al phase. A high fraction of coarse solute-lean α 1-Al particles in the primary Al phase caused a higher thermal conductivity of the component in the near-to-gate region. A variation in thermal conductivity through the rheocast component of 10% was discovered. The effect of an inhomogeneous temperature-dependent thermal conductivity on the thermal performance of a large rheocast heatsink for electronics cooling in an operation environment was studied by means of simulation. Design guidelines were developed to account for the thermal performance of heatsinks with inhomogeneous thermal conductivity, as caused by the rheocasting process. Under the modeling assumptions, the simulation results showed over 2.5% improvement in heatsink thermal resistance when the higher conductivity near-to-gate region was located at the top of the heatsink. Assuming homogeneous thermo-physical properties in a rheocast heatsink may lead to greater than 3.5% error in the estimation of maximum thermal resistance of the heatsink. The variation in thermal conductivity within a large rheocast heatsink was found to be important for obtaining of a robust component design.

  4. Lava lake surface characterization by thermal imaging: Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, L.; Oppenheimer, C.; Calvari, S.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.

    2008-12-01

    Active lava lakes represent the exposed, uppermost part of convecting magma systems and provide windows into the dynamics of magma transport and degassing. Erta 'Ale volcano located within the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia hosts one of the few permanent convecting lava lakes, probably active for a century or more. We report here on the main features of the lava lake surface based on observations from an infrared thermal camera made on 11 November 2006. Efficient magma circulation was reflected in the sustained transport of the surface, which was composed of pronounced incandescent cracks that separated wide plates of cooler crust. These crossed the lake from the upwelling to the downwelling margin with mean speeds ranging between 0.01 and 0.15 m s-1. Hot spots eventually opened in the middle of crust plates and/or along cracks. These produced mild explosive activity lasting commonly between ˜10 and ˜200 s. Apparent temperatures of cracks ranged between ˜700 and 1070°C, and of crust between ˜300 and 500°C. Radiant power output of the lake varied between ˜45 and 76 MW according to the superficial activity and continuous resurfacing of the lake. Time series analysis of the radiant power output data reveals cyclicity with a period of ˜10 min. The combination of visual and thermal observations with apparent mean temperatures and convection rates allows us to interpret these signals as the periodic release of hot overpressured gas bubbles at the lake surface.

  5. Global trends in lake surface temperatures observed using multi-sensor thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philipp; Hook, Simon J.; Radocinski, Robert G.; Corlett, Gary K.; Hulley, Glynn C.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey; Steissberg, Todd E.

    2010-05-01

    Recent research has shown that the temperature of lakes and other inland water bodies does not only act as a good indicator of climate variability but under certain conditions can even increase more rapidly than the regional air temperature. Further investigation of this phenomenon in particular and of the interaction between lake temperature and climate variability in general requires extensive observations of lake temperature on a global scale. Current in situ records are limited in their spatial and/or temporal coverage and are thus insufficient for this task. However, a nearly 30-year archive of satellite-derived thermal infrared imagery from multiple sensors is available at this point and can be used to fill this data gap. We describe research on utilizing the existing archive of spaceborne thermal infrared imagery to generate multi-decadal time series of lake surface temperature for 170 of the largest lakes worldwide. The data used for this purpose includes imagery from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR), the series of (Advanced) Along-Track Scanning Radiometers ((A)ATSR), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Used in combination, these data sets offer a gapless time series of daily to near-daily thermal infrared retrievals from 1981 through present. In this contribution we demonstrate using comprehensive in situ data at Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada, that lake water surface temperature can be estimated using these sensors with an accuracy of up to 0.2 K. We further show that accurate continuous time series of water surface temperature can be derived from the data and that these time series can be used to detect significant trends in the temporal thermal behavior of lakes and other inland water bodies worldwide. Complementing our recent case study for lakes in California and Nevada for which a rapid increase in mean nighttime summertime lake surface temperatures of 0.11 K per year on average was found, we present

  6. Numerical investigation into thermal effects of pre-cooling zone in vitrification-based cryopreservation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsun-Heng; Tsai, Chien-Hsiung; Wu, Wei-Te; Chen, Fu-Zen; Chiang, Pei-Ju

    2015-02-01

    Most studies on ultra-fast cryopreservation assume an immediate placement of the cryopreservation tube in the liquid nitrogen tank. However, in practice, before the tube is placed into the liquid nitrogen, it passes through a space containing gaseous nitrogen (pre-cooling zone) formed via the evaporation of the bulk liquid nitrogen. Comparing with ultra-fast cryopreservation, the cooling rate is insufficiently high during the falling transition to vitrify the liquid. As the tube passes through this region, its temperature may fall to the temperature required for the formation of ice crystals, and thus cell damage may occur. Consequently, in optimizing the cryopreservation process, the effects of this transition region should be properly understood. Accordingly, the present study utilizes a thermal model to investigate the temperature variation in the tube as it falls through the pre-cooling region. The simulation results show that the cooling rate within the tube increases with an increasing tube velocity. Furthermore, the results reveal that the cooling rate at the front end of the tube is higher than that at any other position of the tube. Thus, to prevent the formation of ice crystals, the material used to seal the front end of the tube should have a low thermal conductivity. In addition, a streamlined design of the front end of the tube is advised. Finally, the cooling rate within the tube depends on the tube material as well as the falling speed. The height of the pre-cooling zone needs to be carefully designed based on the tube material and falling speed, thus the ice crystal formation can be prevented.

  7. Thermal and hydrologic suitability of Lake Erie and its major tributaries for spawning of Asian carps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Chapman, Duane C.; McKenna, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, silver carp H. molitrix, and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella (hereafter Asian carps) have expanded throughout the Mississippi River basin and threaten to invade Lakes Michigan and Erie. Adult bighead carp and grass carp have been captured in Lake Erie, but self-sustaining populations probably do not exist. We examined thermal conditions within Lake Erie to determine if Asian carps would mature, and to estimate time of year when fish would reach spawning condition. We also examined whether thermal and hydrologic conditions in the largest tributaries to western and central Lake Erie were suitable for spawning of Asian carps. We used length of undammed river, predicted summer temperatures, and predicted water velocity during flood events to determine whether sufficient lengths of river are available for spawning of Asian carps. Most rivers we examined have at least 100 km of passable river and summer temperatures suitable (> 21 C) for rapid incubation of eggs of Asian carps. Predicted water velocity and temperature were sufficient to ensure that incubating eggs, which drift in the water column, would hatch before reaching Lake Erie for most flood events in most rivers if spawned far enough upstream. The Maumee, Sandusky, and Grand Rivers were predicted to be the most likely to support spawning of Asian carps. The Black, Huron, Portage, and Vermilion Rivers were predicted to be less suitable. The weight of the evidence suggests that the largest western and central Lake Erie tributaries are thermally and hydrologically suitable to support spawning of Asian carps.

  8. Sustainable Heating, Cooling and Ventilation of a Plus-Energy House via Photovoltaic/Thermal Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Skrupskelis, Martynas; Sevela, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Present work addresses the HVAC and energy concerns of the Technical University of Denmark's house, Fold, for the competition Solar Decathlon Europe 2012. Various innovative solutions are investigated; photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels, utilization of ground as a heat source/sink and phase change...... two separate systems. PV/T panels enable the house to perform as a plus-energy house. PV/T also yields to a solar fraction of 63% and 31% for Madrid and Copenhagen, respectively. The ground heat exchanger acts as the heat sink/source of the house. Free cooling enables the same cooling effect...

  9. Numerical study on electromagnetics and thermal cooling of a switched reluctance motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jer-Huan Jang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the coupled thermomagnetic system of a switched reluctance motor for cooling performance improvement has been conducted numerically. The switched reluctance motor (SRM with output power of 3 kW and air cooling is under investigation. Aluminum cooling fins are fitted on the cooling casing of the motor in order to increase the convection surfaces. The commercial softwares used in this paper are JMAG-Designer and CFD-RC for electromagnetic field and thermal field analyzes, respectively. The electro-magnetic analysis for the switched reluctance motor is obtained in advanced in order to obtain the energy losses. They can then be treated as the heat sources for heat transfer analysis. Transient solutions for the temperatures of the components in SRM are calculated during operation. The transient temperature of SRM is analyzed for both with and without cooling casing. The influence of forced convection by the internal fan of the SRM is also under investigation. Results show the numerical model is in good agreement to the real practice. The model can be used for the SRM cooling design.

  10. Thermal simulation of a cooling system of hybrid commercial vehicles; Thermalsimulation eine Hybrid-LKW-Kuehlsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroh, Christoph; Schnoerch, Stefan; Rathberger, Christian [Magna Powertrain Engineering Center Steyr GmbH und Co. KG, St. Valentin (Austria)

    2012-11-01

    In the past few years hybrid vehicles have been in the center of automotive engineering efforts, in particular in the field of passenger cars. But hybrid powertrains will also be important for commercial trucks. This focus on hybrid vehicles leads to high demands on thermal management since the additional components in a hybrid vehicle need appropriate cooling or even heating. In the given paper the simulation of a complete cooling system of a hybrid commercial vehicle will be explained. For this virtual examination the commercial 1D thermal management software KULI will be used, a co-simulation with several programs will not be done deliberately. Yet all aspects which are relevant for a global assessment of the thermal management are considered. The main focus is put on the investigation of appropriate concepts for the fluid circuits, including low and high temperature circuits, electric water pumps, etc. Moreover, also a refrigerant circuit with a chiller for active battery cooling will be used, the appropriate control strategy is implemented as well. For simulating transient profiles a simple driving simulation model is included, using road profile, ambient conditions, and various vehicle parameters as input. In addition an engine model is included which enables the investigation of fuel consumption potentials. This simulation model shows how the thermal management of a hybrid vehicle can be investigated with a single program and with reasonable effort. (orig.)

  11. Cooling Rate Study of Nickel-Rich Material During Thermal Treatment and Quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Fransua; Murguia, Silvia Briseno (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    To investigate quench cracking that results from water quenching after heat treatment of binary and Ni-rich material, cooling rates of specimens were measured during quenching and hardness post-thermal treatment. For specific applications binary Ni-Ti is customarily thermally treated and quenched to attain desired mechanical properties and hardness. However, one problem emerging from this method is thermal cracking, either during the heat treatment process or during the specimen's application. This can result in material and equipment failure as well as financial losses. The objective of the study is to investigate the internal cooling rate of 60-NiTi during quenching and determine possible factors causing thermal cracking. Cubic (1 in.3) samples of both material were heat treated in air at 1000 deg C for 2 hrs and quenched in room temperature water using two methods: (1) dropped in the water and (2) agitated in the water. Hardness of the two fore-mentioned methods was measured post heat treatment. Results indicate that the quenching method had an effect on cooling rate during quenching but hardness was observed to be essentially the same through the thickness of the samples.

  12. Steady Thermal Field Simulation of Forced Air-cooled Column-type Air-core Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Qiu; LI Zhenbiao; YIN Xiaogen; YUAN Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the steady thermal field of the column-type air-core reactor,and further analyzing its distribution regularity,will help optimizing reactor design as well as improving its quality.The operation mechanism and inner insulation structure of a novel current limiting column-type air-core reactor is introduced in this paper.The finite element model of five encapsulation forced air-cooled column type air-core reactor is constructed using Fluent.Most importantly,this paper present a new method that,the steady thermal field of reactor working under forced air-cooled condition is simulated without arbitrarily defining the convection heat transfer coefficient for the initial condition; The result of the thermal field distribution shows that,the maximum steady temperature rise of forced air-cooled columntype air-core reactor happens approximately 5% to its top.The law of temperature distribution indicates:In the 1/3part of the reactor to its bottom,the temperature will rise rapidly to the increasing of height,yet the gradient rate is gradually decreasing; In the 5 % part of the reactor to its top,the temperature will drop rapidly to the increasing of height; In the part between,the temperature will rise slowly to the increasing of height.The conclusion draws that more thermal withstand capacity should be considered at the 5 % part of the reactor to its top to achieve optimal design solution.

  13. Passive solar/Earth sheltered office/dormitory cooling season thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, J.

    1984-06-01

    Continuous detailed hourly thermal performance measurements were taken since February 1982 in and around an occupied, underground, 4000 ft(2) office/dormitory building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This building has a number of energy saving features which were analyzed relative to their performance in a southeastern US climate and with respect to overall commercial building performance. Cooling season performance is documented, as well as effects of earth constact, interior thermal mass, an economizer cycle and interface of an efficient building envelope with a central three-ton heat pump. The Joint Institute Dormitory obtains a cooling energy savings of about 30% compared with an energy-efficient, above-grade structure and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The proper instllation of the overhand, interior thermal mass, massive supply duct system, and earth contact team up to prevent summertime overheating. From May through September, this building cost a total of $300 (at 5.7) cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate 24 hours per day. Besides thermal performance of the building envelope, extensive comfort data was taken illustrating that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time according to the PMV measurements.

  14. Thermal profile analysis of Doubly-Fed induction generator based wind power converter with air and liquid cooling methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede; Lau, Mogens;

    2013-01-01

    Today, wind power generation system keeps on moving from onshore to offshore and also upscaling in size. As the lifetime of the wind power converter is prolonged to 20–25 years, this paper will investigate and compare different cooling methods for power modules — the air cooling and the liquid...... cooling seen from a thermal profile assessment point of view. Firstly, an analytical approach from loss profile to thermal profile for the power semiconductor is proposed and verified in a 2 MW Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based wind turbine system. Then, the typical air cooling and liquid...... cooling in wind power converter are analyzed and compared in terms of the mean junction temperature and the junction temperature fluctuation. It is concluded that the liquid cooling approach has a similar junction temperature fluctuation but gives a lower mean junction temperature than the air cooling...

  15. Numerical modeling of the spring thermal bar and pollutant transport in a large lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsydenov, Bair O.; Kay, Anthony; Starchenko, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    The spring riverine thermal bar phenomenon is investigated numerically on an example of Lake Baikal, and the spread of pollutants coming from the Selenga River is forecast using the 2.5 D non-hydrostatic model in the Boussinesq approximation. This hydrodynamic model takes into account the diurnal variability of the heat fluxes on the lake surface and the effects of wind and the Earth's rotation. The results of numerical modeling show that the variability of the total heat flux over 24 h plays a significant role in the variation of the thermal bar movement rate that contributes to the rapid mixing of impurities entering with river water.

  16. Thermal energy storage - A review of concepts and systems for heating and cooling applications in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Georgi Krasimiroy; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    period required, economic viability, and operating conditions. One of the main issues impeding the utilization of the full potential of natural and renewable energy sources, e.g., solar and geothermal, for space heating and space cooling applications is the development of economically competitive......The use of thermal energy storage (TES) in buildings in combination with space heating and/or space cooling has recently received much attention. A variety of TES techniques have developed over the past decades. TES systems can provide short-term storage for peak-load shaving as well as long......-term (seasonal) storage for the introduction of natural and renewable energy sources. TES systems for heating or cooling are utilized in applications where there is a time mismatch between the demand and the most economically favorable supply of energy. The selection of a TES system mainly depends on the storage...

  17. Numerical simulation of porous latent heat thermal energy storage for thermoelectric cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trelles, J.P.; Dufly, J.J. [University of Massachusettes Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Energy Engineering

    2003-09-01

    Porous latent heat thermal energy storage for thermoelectric cooling is simulated via a matrix-based enthalpy formulation, having the temperature as unknown, in a three-dimensional domain. The system is made up of two aluminum containers; the inner one contains the cooling objective in water suspension and the outer one the phase change material (PCM) in a porous aluminum matrix. The system's charging and discharging processes are simulated for constant thermoelectric module cold side temperature under different porosities of the aluminum matrix. The mathematical modeling approach simplifies the analysis while the metal matrix in the PCM greatly improves performance. A direct application of the studied system is vaccine conservation in solar powered thermoelectric cooling systems. (Author)

  18. Personal, closed-cycle cooling and protective apparatus and thermal battery therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, James W.; Klett, Lynn B.

    2004-07-20

    A closed-cycle apparatus for cooling a living body includes a heat pickup body or garment which permits evaporation of an evaporating fluid, transmission of the vapor to a condenser, and return of the condensate to the heat pickup body. A thermal battery cooling source is provided for removing heat from the condenser. The apparatus requires no external power and provides a cooling system for soldiers, race car drivers, police officers, firefighters, bomb squad technicians, and other personnel who may utilize protective clothing to work in hostile environments. An additional shield layer may simultaneously provide protection from discomfort, illness or injury due to harmful atmospheres, projectiles, edged weapons, impacts, explosions, heat, poisons, microbes, corrosive agents, or radiation, while simultaneously removing body heat from the wearer.

  19. Passive thermal regulation of flat PV modules by coupling the mechanisms of evaporative and fin cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, M.; Senthilkumar, T.

    2016-07-01

    A passive thermal regulation technique with fins in conjunction with cotton wicks is developed in the present work for controlling the temperature of PV module during its operation. Experiments were conducted with the developed technique in the location of Tiruchirappalli (78.6°E and 10.8°N), Tamil Nadu, India with flat 25 Wp PV module and its viability was confirmed. The PV module temperature got reduced by 12 % while the electrical yield is increased by 14 % with the help of the developed cooling system. Basic energy balance equation applicable for PV module was used to evaluate the module temperatures and a fair agreement was obtained between the theoretical and experimental values for the cases of with cooling and without cooling.

  20. Flow and Thermal Performance of a Water-Cooled Periodic Transversal Elliptical Microchannel Heat Sink for Chip Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; Yang, Mo; Wang, Zhiyun; Xu, Hongtao; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-04-01

    Flow and thermal performance of transversal elliptical microchannels were investigated as a passive scheme to enhance the heat transfer performance of laminar fluid flow. The periodic transversal elliptical micro-channel is designed and its pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics in laminar flow are numerically investigated. Based on the comparison with a conventional straight micro- channel having rectangular cross section, it is found that periodic transversal elliptical microchannel not only has great potential to reduce pressure drop but also dramatically enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, when the Reynolds number equals to 192, the pressure drop of the transversal elliptical channel is 36.5% lower than that of the straight channel, while the average Nusselt number is 72.8% higher; this indicates that the overall thermal performance of the periodic transversal elliptical microchannel is superior to the conventional straight microchannel. It is suggested that such transversal elliptical microchannel are attractive candidates for cooling future electronic chips effectively with much lower pressure drop.

  1. A Novel 3D Thermal Impedance Model for High Power Modules Considering Multi-layer Thermal Coupling and Different Heating/Cooling Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    Thermal management of power electronic devices is essential for reliable performance especially at high power levels. One of the most important activities in the thermal management and reliability improvement is acquiring the temperature information in critical points of the power module. However...... the multi-layer thermal coupling among chips is proposed. The impacts to the thermal impedance by various cooling and heating conditions are also studied. It is concluded that the heating and cooling conditions will have influence on the junction to case thermal impedances and need to be carefully...

  2. Active Cooling and Thermal Management of a Downhole Tool Electronics Section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soprani, Stefano; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Just Nørgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    High Temperature (HT) wellbores represent one of today’s biggest challenges for the oil and gas industry. The majority of well intervention wireline tools contain temperature sensitive electronics that are not able to withstand the high temperatures of HT wellbores (> 150 °C), for an extended...... period of time. This work presents the design and construction of an actively cooled laboratory prototype, which is able to operate at temperatures which are higher than the temperature limit of the electronics. A different concept of heat management, compared to prior works, is presented: the design...... combines active and passive cooling techniques, aiming at an efficient thermal management, preserving the tool compactness and avoiding the use of moving parts. Thermoelectric coolers were used to transfer the dissipated heat from the temperature-sensitive electronics to the external environment. Thermal...

  3. Thermal performance demonstration of a prototype internally cooled nose tip/forebody/window assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Carl J.; Brooks, Lori C.; Teal, Gene; Karu, Zain; Kalin, David A.; Jones, Gregory W.; Romero, Harold

    1996-11-01

    Internally liquid cooled apertures (windows) installed in a full size forebody have been characterized under high heat flux conditions representative of endoatmospheric flight. Analysis and test data obtained in the laboratory and at arc heater test facilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center and NASA Ames are presented in this paper. Data for several types of laboratory bench tests are presented: transmission interferometry and imaging, coolant pressurization effects on optical quality, and coolant flow rate calibrations for both the window and other internally cooled components. Initially, using heat transfer calibration models identical in shape to the flight test articles, arc heater facility thermal test environments were obtained at several conditions representative of full flight thermal environments. Subsequent runs tested the full-up flight article including nosetip, forebody and aperture for full flight duplication of surface heating rates and exposure ties. Pretest analyses compared will to test measurements. These data demonstrate a very efficient internal liquid cooling design which can be applied to other applications such as cooled mirrors for high heat flux applications.

  4. Thermal behavior in the cracking reaction zone of scramjet cooling channels at different channel aspect ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Silong; Feng, Yu; Jiang, Yuguang; Qin, Jiang; Bao, Wen; Han, Jiecai; Haidn, Oskar J.

    2016-10-01

    To study the thermal behavior in the cracking reaction zone of regeneratively cooled scramjet cooling channels at different aspect ratios, 3-D model of fuel flow in terms of the fuel's real properties and cracking reaction is built and validated through experiments. The whole cooling channel is divided into non-cracking and cracking reaction zones. Only the cracking reaction zone is studied in this article. The simulation results indicate that the fuel conversion presents a similar distribution with temperature because the fuel conversion in scramjet cooling channels is co-decided by the temperature and velocity but the temperature plays the dominate role. For the cases given in this paper, increasing the channel aspect ratio will increase the pressure drop and it is not beneficial for reducing the wall temperature because of the much severer thermal stratification, larger conversion non-uniformity, the corresponding M-shape velocity profile which will cause local heat transfer deterioration and the decreased chemical heat absorption. And the decreased chemical heat absorption caused by stronger temperature and conversion non-uniformities is bad for the utilization of chemical heat sink, chemical recuperation process and the ignition performance.

  5. Thermal reactionomes reveal divergent responses to thermal extremes in warm and cool-climate ant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanton-Geddes, John; Nguyen, Andrew; Chick, Lacy

    2016-01-01

    (enhanced response), constitutively elevated expression of protective genes (genetic assimilation) or a shift from damage resistance to passive mechanisms of thermal stability (tolerance), we conducted an analysis of the reactionome: the reaction norm for all genes in an organism’s transcriptome measured......The distributions of species and their responses to climate change are in part determined by their thermal tolerances. However, little is known about how thermal tolerance evolves. To test whether evolutionary extension of thermal limits is accomplished through enhanced cellular stress response...

  6. Mathematical model for the thermal process of controlled cooling of wires and its numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongxiang Zhu; Xiaohong Hao; Zhi Wen; Yaogen Zhang; Huqiu Chen

    2004-01-01

    The mathematical model for the thermal process of billets rolling has been established, including transporting in air and temperature-holding cover, descaling with high-pressure water, and the process of rolling and cooling in water box. The calculated data by the model have been compared with the measured data and the results show that the model is right and creditable. Based on the model, the main thermal characters of rolling line have been simulated and the influence of all the parameters on the temperature of rolling has been analyzed.

  7. High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design: Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waye, Scot [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Power electronics that use high-temperature devices pose a challenge for thermal management. With the devices running at higher temperatures and having a smaller footprint, the heat fluxes increase from previous power electronic designs. This project overview presents an approach to examine and design thermal management strategies through cooling technologies to keep devices within temperature limits, dissipate the heat generated by the devices and protect electrical interconnects and other components for inverter, converter, and charger applications. This analysis, validation, and demonstration intends to take a multi-scale approach over the device, module, and system levels to reduce size, weight, and cost.

  8. ANSYS modeling of thermal contraction of SPL HOM couplers during cool-down

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, K

    2016-01-01

    During the cool-down the HOM coupler as well as the cavity inside the cryo module experience a thermal contraction. For most materials between room temperature and liquid helium temperatures, the changes in dimension are in the order of a few tenths of a percent change in volume. This paper presents the effect of thermal contraction on the RF transmission behavior of HOM couplers, and in particular the influence on its notch filter. Furthermore the simulation process with APDL is explained in detail. Conclusions about the necessary tuning range of the notch filter are made which is especially a concern for couplers with only notch filter.

  9. Simulation of Thermal Processes in Superconducting Pancake Coils Cooled by GM Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebioda, M.; Rymaszewski, J.; Korzeniewska, E.

    2014-04-01

    This article presents the thermal model of a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system with the closed cycle helium cryocooler. The authors propose the use of contact-cooled coils with maintaining the possibility of the system reconfiguring. The model assumes the use of the second generation superconducting tapes to make the windings in the form of flat discs (pancakes). The paper presents results for a field model of the single pancake coil and the winding system consisting of several coils.

  10. Thermal Model for a Mars Instrument with Thermo-electric Cooled Focal Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, D. R.; Martin, J. P.

    2006-04-01

    Two thermal models have been developed for a low mass (1.5 kg) Mars rover arm candidate instrument that employs a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) to cool a CCD focal plane. The Mineral Identification and Composition Analyzer (MICA) is a miniature instrument that employs X-ray scattering and visual imaging to determine nondestructively the mineralogy of a rock sample in-situ. Both thermal models incorporate the key components of MICA's CCD subsystem - CCD, heat sink, and lower radiator. The System Model includes the instrument's internal heat sources, including electronics, X-ray source, TEC dissipation, and the extreme diurnal temperature excursions of the ambient Martian atmosphere (~175 K to 255 K) and sky (~130 K to 200 K), convection (wind), and solar / IR radiation. The CCD Subsystem Model includes a passive thermal switch that provides heat sink cool-down by night and isolation by day. With or without the heat switch, TEC operation provides extended life for data collection at the upper end of the CCD operating range, ~ 208 K. Model parameter variation allows the instrument designer to optimize thermal capacities, thermal resistances, and internal heater power to hold critical electronics and mechanical components within their temperature operating limits. The charting feature of either model provides mechanical design guidance to ensure acceptable conditions for data collection over the experiment timeline.

  11. Effectiveness of indirect evaporative cooling and thermal mass in a hot arid climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Eduardo [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Tecnologia/Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Civil, Departamento de Construcao Civil, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana - UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro, 3165. Curitiba PR, CEP. 80230-901 (Brazil); Gonzalez Cruz, Eduardo [Instituto de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Arquitectura y Diseno (IFAD), Universidad del Zulia, Nucleo Tecnico de LUZ, Av. Goajira (16) con Calle 67, Maracaibo, CP 4011-A-526 (Venezuela); Givoni, Baruch [Department of Architecture, School of Arts and Architecture, UCLA, Los Angeles CA, USA, and Ben Gurion University (Israel)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we compare results of a long-term temperature monitoring in a building with high thermal mass to indoor temperature predictions of a second building that uses an indirect evaporative cooling system as a means of passive cooling (Vivienda Bioclimatica Prototipo -VBP-1), for the climatic conditions of Sde Boqer, Negev region of Israel (local latitude 30 52'N, longitude 34 46'E, approximately 480 m above sea level). The high-mass building was monitored from January through September 2006 and belongs to a student dormitory complex located at the Sde Boqer Campus of Ben-Gurion University. VBP-1 was designed and built in Maracaibo, Venezuela (latitude 10 34'N, longitude 71 44'W, elevation 66 m above sea level) and had its indoor air temperatures, below and above a shaded roof pond, as well as the pond temperature monitored from February to September 2006. Formulas were developed for the VBP-1, based on part of the whole monitoring period, which represent the measured daily indoor maximum, average and minimum temperatures. The formulas were then validated against measurements taken independently in different time periods. The developed formulas were here used for estimating the building's thermal and energy performance at the climate of Sde Boqer, allowing a comparison of two different strategies: indirect evaporative cooling and the use of thermal mass. (author)

  12. Surface Thermal Insulation and Pipe Cooling of Spillways during Concrete Construction Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhenhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that spillways adopt a hydraulic thin concrete plate structure, this structure is difficult to protect from cracks. The mechanism of the cracks in spillways shows that temperature stress is the major reason for cracks. Therefore, an effective way of preventing cracks is a timely and reasonable temperature-control program. Studies show that one effective prevention method is surface thermal insulation combined with internal pipe cooling. The major factors influencing temperature control effects are the time of performing thermal insulation and the ways of internal pipe cooling. To solve this problem, a spillway is taken as an example and a three-dimensional finite element program and pipe cooling calculation method are adopted to conduct simulation calculation and analysis on the temperature fields and stress fields of concretes subject to different temperature-control programs. The temperature-control effects are then compared. Optimization results show that timely and reasonable surface thermal insulation and water-flowing mode can ensure good temperature-control and anticrack effects. The method has reference value for similar projects.

  13. Plate coil thermal test bench for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) carousel cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka; Montijo, Guillermo; Hauth, David

    2014-08-01

    Analyses have shown that even a white-painted enclosure requires active exterior skin-cooling systems to mitigate dome seeing which is driven by thermal nonuniformities that change the refractive index of the air. For the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) Enclosure, this active surface temperature control will take the form of a system of water cooled plate coils integrated into the enclosure cladding system. The main objective of this system is to maintain the surface temperature of the enclosure as close as possible to, but always below, local ambient temperature in order to mitigate this effect. The results of analyses using a multi-layer cladding temperature model were applied to predict the behavior of the plate coil cladding system and ultimately, with safety margins incorporated into the resulting design thermal loads, the detailed designs. Construction drawings and specifications have been produced. Based on these designs and prior to procurement of the system components, a test system was constructed in order to measure actual system behavior. The data collected during seasonal test runs at the DKIST construction site on Haleakalā are used to validate and/or refine the design models and construction documents as appropriate. The test fixture was also used to compare competing hardware, software, components, control strategies, and configurations. This paper outlines the design, construction, test protocols, and results obtained of the plate coil thermal test bench for the DKIST carousel cooling system.

  14. Thermal analysis and cooling structure design of the primary collimator in CSNS/RCS

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Yi-Qing; Kang, Ling; Qu, Hua-Min; He, Zhe-Xi; Yu, Jie-Bing; 10.1088/1674-1137/37/5/057004

    2013-01-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a high intensity proton ring with beam power of 100 kW. In order to control the residual activation to meet the requirements of hands-on maintenance, a two-stage collimation system has been designed for the RCS. The collimation system consists of one primary collimator made of thin metal to scatter the beam and four secondary collimators as absorbers. Thermal analysis is an important aspect in evaluating the reliability of the collimation system. The calculation of the temperature distribution and thermal stress of the primary collimator with different materials is carried out by using ANSYS code. In order to control the temperature rise and thermal stress of the primary collimator to a reasonable level, an air cooling structure is intended to be used. The mechanical design of the cooling structure is presented, and the cooling effciency with different chin numbers and wind velocity is also analyzed. Finally, the fatigue life...

  15. Thermal Design and Analysis of a Multi-Stage 30K Radiative Cooling System for EPIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso; Bock, Jamie; Holmes, Warren; Raab, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Experimental Probe of Inflationary Cosmology (EPIC) is an implementation of the NASA Einstein Inflation Probe mission, to answer questions about the physics of Inflation in the early Universe by measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The mission relies on a passive cooling system to cool the enclosure of a telescope to 30 K; a cryocooler then cools this enclosure to 18 K and the telescope to 4 K. Subsequently, an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator further cools a large focal plane to approx.100 mK. For this mission, the telescope has an aperture of 1.4 m, and the spacecraft's symmetry axis is oriented approx. 45 degrees relative to the direction of the sun. The spacecraft will be spun at approx. 0.5 rpm around this axis, which then precesses on the sky at 1 rph. The passive system must both supply the necessary cooling power for the cryocooler and meet demanding temperature stability requirements. We describe the thermal design of a passive cooling system consisting of four V-groove radiators for shielding of solar radiation and cooling the telescope to 30 K. The design realizes loads of 20 and 68 mW at the 4 K and 18 K stages on the cooler, respectively. A lower cost option for reaching 40 K with three V-groove radiators is also described. The analysis includes radiation coupling between stages of the radiators and sunshields, and parasitic conduction in the bipod support, harnesses, and ADR leads. Dynamic effects are also estimated, including the very small variations in temperature due to the scan motion of the spacecraft.

  16. Mandate a Man to Fish?: Technological advance in cooling systems at U.S. thermal electric plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo-Alvarez, Victor M.; Bellas, Allen S.; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney J.; Lange, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Steam-based electrical generating plants use large quantities of water for cooling. The potential environmental impacts of water cooling systems have resulted in their inclusion in the Clean Water Act's (CWA) Sections 316(a), related to thermal discharges and 316(b), related to cooling water intake. The CWA mandates a technological standard for water cooling systems. This analysis examines how the performance-adjusted rates of thermal emissions and water withdrawals for cooling units have changed over their vintage and how these rates of change were impacted by imposition of the CWA. Results show that the rate of progress increased for cooling systems installed after the CWA whilethere was no progress previous to it.

  17. Thermal X-Ray Emission and Cooling of Solid Quark Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, M

    2009-01-01

    We try to understand the thermal X-ray emission and reproduce the cooling behavior of isolated pulsars in a solid quark star regime. We focus on the population with common properties of manifesting considerable thermal emission, owning ordinary magnetic fields $\\sim10^{11-13}$ G, comparatively young ages $10^{3-6}$ yrs, and spins of a few tens of milliseconds to a few seconds. The sample thus includes 14 active cooling pulsar candidates, 6 central compact objects (CCOs) and the Magnificent Seven, or 7 X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINs); other 11 sources with identification of the upper limits on their thermal luminosity are also considered. The release rate of residual inner energy of solid quark stars, evaluated by Debye elastic medium theory, is found to be negligible comparing with the observational X-ray bolometric luminosity, and hence, for solid quark stars, the thermal emission could predominantly originate from stellar heating processes. For pulsars with magnetospheric activities, the heating co...

  18. Performance Analysis of Cool Roof, Green Roof and Thermal Insulation on a Concrete Flat Roof in Tropical Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Zingre, Kishor T.; Yang, Xingguo; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    In the tropics, the earth surface receives abundant solar radiation throughout the year contributing significantly to building heat gain and, thus, cooling demand. An effective method that can curb the heat gains through opaque roof surfaces could provide significant energy savings. This study investigates and compares the effectiveness of various passive cooling techniques including cool roof, green roof and thermal insulation for reducing the heat gain through a flat concrete roof in tropic...

  19. Thermal-mechanical and thermal-hydraulic integrated study of the Helium-Cooled Lithium Lead Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiovaro, P., E-mail: pg.chiovaro@din.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Universita di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Di Maio, P.A.; Giammusso, R.; Lupo, Q.; Vella, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Universita di Palermo, Palermo (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    The Helium-Cooled Lithium Lead Test Blanket Module (HCLL-TBM) is one of the two TBM to be installed in an ITER equatorial port since day 1 of operation, with the specific aim to investigate the main concept functionalities and issues such as high efficiency helium cooling, resistance to thermo-mechanical stresses, manufacturing techniques, as well as tritium transport, magneto-hydrodynamics effects and corrosion. In particular, in order to show a DEMO-relevant thermo-mechanical and thermal-hydraulic behavior, the HCLL-TBM has to meet several requirements especially as far as its coolant thermofluid-dynamic conditions and its thermal-mechanical field are concerned. The present paper is focused on the assessment of the HCLL-TBM thermal-mechanical performances under both nominal and accidental load conditions, by adopting a computational approach based on the Finite Element Method. A realistic 3D finite element model of the whole HCLL-TBM, in the horizontal first wall design has been set up, consisting of about 597,000 elements and 767,000 nodes. In particular, since the thermal fields of both the module and the coolant are strictly coupled, the helium flow domain has been modeled too and a thermal contact model has been set up to properly simulate the convective heat transfer between the structure wall and the coolant. Pure conductive heat transfer has been assumed within the Pb-Li eutectic alloy of the breeder units. The volumetric density of the nuclear deposited power, recently calculated at Department of Nuclear Engineering of the University of Palermo by the MCNP 4C code, has been applied as distributed thermal load in order to assess the potential influence on the module thermo-mechanical performances of the markedly non-uniform poloidal and toroidal distributions that have been predicted within the Segment Box. Different loading scenarios have been considered as to the heat flux onto the module First Wall. Steady state and transient thermal-mechanical analyses

  20. Use of local convective and radiant cooling at warm environment: effect on thermal comfort and perceived air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Duszyk, Marcin; Krejcirikova, Barbora

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four local cooling devices (convective, radiant and combined) on thermal comfort and perceived air quality reported by 24 subjects at 28 ˚C and 50% RH was studied. The devices studied were: (1) desk cooling fan, (2) personalized ventilation providing clean air, (3) two radiant panels...

  1. Cooling Tower Engineering in Thermal Power Generation%火力发电冷却塔工程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芳

    2014-01-01

    This paper expounds the working principle of thermal power cooling tower and introduces the construction scheme and safety facilities of the cooling tower.%阐述火力发电冷却塔的工作原理。同时,说明冷却塔施工作业方案及安全设施。

  2. The influence of local effects on thermal sensation under non-uniform environmental conditions — Gender differences in thermophysiology, thermal comfort and productivity during convective and radiant cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, L.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; de Wit, M.H.;

    2012-01-01

    , thermal comfort and productivity in response to thermal non-uniform environmental conditions. Twenty healthy subjects (10 males and 10 females, age 20–29years) were exposed to two different experimental conditions: a convective cooling situation (CC) and a radiant cooling situation (RC). During...... the experiments physiological responses, thermal comfort and productivity were measured. The results show that under both experimental conditions the actual mean thermal sensation votes significantly differ from the PMV-index; the subjects are feeling colder than predicted. Furthermore, the females are more...

  3. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: Geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA is a large high-altitude (2200 m, fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007 - 2008 using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50 - 90 oC contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous ‘streamer’ communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5 - 6 were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot’s Crater (pH 5 - 6. Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S, hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP.

  4. Savings in Cooling Energy with a Thermal Management System for LED Lighting in Office Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Lip Ahn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Light-emitting diode (LED lighting should be considered for lighting efficiency enhancement, however, waste heat from light-emitting diode (LED lighting increases the internal cooling load during the summer season. In order to solve this problem we propose a thermal management system for light-emitting diode (LED lighting with a heat exchanger module integrated with the building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC system to move the lighting’s waste heat outdoors. An experiment was carried out to investigate the thermal effects in a test chamber and the heat exchange rate between the heat sink and the duct air. The heat generated by the light-emitting diode (LED lighting was calculated as 78.1% of light-emitting diode (LED input power and the heat exchange rate of the lighting heat exchange module was estimated to be between 86.5% and 98.1% according to the light-emitting diode (LED input power and the flow rate of air passing the heat sink. As a result, the average light-emitting diode (LED lighting heat contribution rate for internal heat gain was determined as 0.05; this value was used to calculate the heating and cooling energy demand of the office building through an energy simulation program. In the simulation results, the cooling energy demand was reduced by 19.2% compared with the case of conventionally installed light-emitting diode (LED lighting.

  5. Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

    1979-02-28

    The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

  6. Multi-criteria decision analysis of concentrated solar power with thermal energy storage and dry cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sharon J W

    2013-12-17

    Decisions about energy backup and cooling options for parabolic trough (PT) concentrated solar power have technical, economic, and environmental implications. Although PT development has increased rapidly in recent years, energy policies do not address backup or cooling option requirements, and very few studies directly compare the diverse implications of these options. This is the first study to compare the annual capacity factor, levelized cost of energy (LCOE), water consumption, land use, and life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of PT with different backup options (minimal backup (MB), thermal energy storage (TES), and fossil fuel backup (FF)) and different cooling options (wet (WC) and dry (DC). Multicriteria decision analysis was used with five preference scenarios to identify the highest-scoring energy backup-cooling combination for each preference scenario. MB-WC had the highest score in the Economic and Climate Change-Economy scenarios, while FF-DC and FF-WC had the highest scores in the Equal and Availability scenarios, respectively. TES-DC had the highest score for the Environmental scenario. DC was ranked 1-3 in all preference scenarios. Direct comparisons between GHG emissions and LCOE and between GHG emissions and land use suggest a preference for TES if backup is require for PT plants to compete with baseload generators.

  7. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  8. Climate change expands the spatial extent and duration of preferred thermal habitat for lake Superior fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Cline

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to alter species distributions and habitat suitability across the globe. Understanding these shifting distributions is critical for adaptive resource management. The role of temperature in fish habitat and energetics is well established and can be used to evaluate climate change effects on habitat distributions and food web interactions. Lake Superior water temperatures are rising rapidly in response to climate change and this is likely influencing species distributions and interactions. We use a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model that captures temperature changes in Lake Superior over the last 3 decades to investigate shifts in habitat size and duration of preferred temperatures for four different fishes. We evaluated habitat changes in two native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush ecotypes, siscowet and lean lake trout, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and walleye (Sander vitreus. Between 1979 and 2006, days with available preferred thermal habitat increased at a mean rate of 6, 7, and 5 days per decade for lean lake trout, Chinook salmon, and walleye, respectively. Siscowet lake trout lost 3 days per decade. Consequently, preferred habitat spatial extents increased at a rate of 579, 495 and 419 km(2 per year for the lean lake trout, Chinook salmon, and walleye while siscowet lost 161 km(2 per year during the modeled period. Habitat increases could lead to increased growth and production for three of the four fishes. Consequently, greater habitat overlap may intensify interguild competition and food web interactions. Loss of cold-water habitat for siscowet, having the coldest thermal preference, could forecast potential changes from continued warming. Additionally, continued warming may render more suitable conditions for some invasive species.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Effects of Acoustic Sound Absorbers on the Cooling Performance of Thermally Active Building Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, L. Marcos; Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Rage, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Free-hanging horizontal and vertical sound absorbers are commonly used in buildings for room acoustic control; however, when these sound absorbers are used in combination with Thermally Active Building Systems, they will decrease the cooling performance of Thermally Active Building Systems...... plug-in for acoustic elements, which allows modeling free-hanging horizontal sound absorbers that partially cover the ceiling. With horizontal sound absorbers, the cooling performance of the Thermally Active Building System decreased by 11%, 23% and 36% for ceiling coverage ratios of 43%, 60% and 80...... and this will affect the thermal indoor environment in that space. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to quantify and model these effects in the design phase. This study quantifies experimentally the effects of horizontal and vertical free-hanging sound absorbers on the cooling performance of Thermally Active...

  10. Thermal and Lorentz force analysis of beryllium windows for a rectilinear muon cooling channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratakis, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Virostek, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Palmer, R. B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bowring, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Reduction of the 6-dimensional phase-space of a muon beam by several orders of magnitude is a key requirement for a Muon Collider. Recently, a 12-stage rectilinear ionization cooling channel has been proposed to achieve that goal. The channel consists of a series of low frequency (325 MHz-650 MHz) normal conducting pillbox cavities, which are enclosed with thin beryllium windows (foils) to increase shunt impedance and give a higher field on-axis for a given amount of power. These windows are subject to ohmic heating from RF currents and Lorentz force from the EM field in the cavity, both of which will produce out of the plane displacements that can detune the cavity frequency. In this study, using the TEM3P code, we report on a detailed thermal and mechanical analysis for the actual Be windows used on a 325 MHz cavity in a vacuum ionization cooling rectilinear channel for a Muon Collider.

  11. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-10-06

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.

  12. Using the Spindle Cooling Temperature as a Tool for Compensating the Thermal Deformation of Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vyroubal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal error compensation of machine tools is a relatively complex problem nowadays. Machine users have very high expectations, and it is necessary to use all means to improve the cutting accuracy of existing machines. This paper deals with a novel approach, which combines standard temperature measurement of a machine tool and new temperature measurement of the spindle cooling liquid. A multinomial regression equation is then used to calculate the compensation correction of the position of the tool. This calculation does not critically overload the control system of the machines, so no external computing hardware is required. The cooling liquid approach improves the accuracy of the machine tool over an operational time of several hours. 

  13. Thermal and Lorentz Force Analysis of Beryllium Windows for the Rectilinear Muon Cooling Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [LBL, Berkeley; Li, D. [LBL, Berkeley; Virostek, S. [LBL, Berkeley; Palmer, R. [Brookhaven; Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven; Bowring, D. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Reduction of the 6-dimensional phase-space of a muon beam by several orders of magnitude is a key requirement for a Muon Collider. Recently, a 12-stage rectilinear ionization cooling channel has been proposed to achieve that goal. The channel consists of a series of low frequency (325 MHz-650 MHz) normal conducting pillbox cavities, which are enclosed with thin beryllium windows (foils) to increase shunt impedance and give a higher field on-axis for a given amount of power. These windows are subject to ohmic heating from RF currents and Lorentz force from the EM field in the cavity, both of which will produce out of the plane displacements that can detune the cavity frequency. In this study, using the TEM3P code, we report on a detailed thermal and mechanical analysis for the actual Be windows used on a 325 MHz cavity in a vacuum ionization cooling rectilinear channel for a Muon Collider.

  14. Temperature-time distribution and thermal stresses on the RTG fins and shell during water cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) packages designed for space missions generally do not require active cooling. However, the heat they generate cannot remain inside of the launch vehicle bay and requires active removal. Therefore, before the Shuttle bay door is closed, the RTG coolant tubes attached to the heat rejection fins must be filled with water, which will circulate and remove most of the heat from the cargo bay. There is concern that charging a system at initial temperature around 200 C with water at 24 C can cause unacceptable thermal stresses in the RTG shell and fins. A computer model is developed to estimate the transient temperature distribution resulting from such charging. The thermal stresses resulting from the temperature gradients do not exceed the elastic deformation limit for the material. Since the simplified mathematical model for thermal stresses tends to overestimate stresses, it is concluded that the RTG can be cooled by introducing water at 24 C to the initially hot fin coolant tubes while the RTG is in the Shuttle cargo bay.

  15. Thermal Manikin Evaluation of Liquid Cooling Garments Intended for Use in Hazardous Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, J. P.; Semeniuk, K.; Makris, A.; Teal, W.; Laprise, B.

    2003-02-26

    Thermal manikins are valuable tools for quantitatively evaluating the performance of protective clothing ensembles and microclimate cooling systems. The goal of this investigation was to examine the performance of Coretech personal cooling systems, designed to reduce the effects of physiological and environmental heat stress, using a sweating thermal manikin. A sweating manikin takes into account the effective physiological evaporative heat transfer. Three tubesuits containing different densities of tubing were evaluated on the thermal manikin in conjunction with body armor and two Chemical-Biological suits (SPM and JSLIST). The experiments were carried out in an environmental chamber set at a temperature of 35 C with a relative humidity of 30%. For the tubesuits, two flow rates were tested and the heat removal rates were obtained by measuring the amount of power required to maintain the manikin's surface at a constant temperature of 35 C. The sweating rates were adjusted to maintain a fully wetted manikin surface at the above environmental conditions. For fluid flow rates ranging from approximately 250 to 750 ml/min, and inlet temperatures to the tubesuit ranging from 7 to 10 C, heat removal rates between 220 W to 284 W were measured, indicating the effectiveness of tubesuits at removing excessive body heat. This research was performed at the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) in Natick, Massachusetts.

  16. Temperature-time distribution and thermal stresses on the RTG fins and shell during water cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) packages designed for space missions generally do not require active cooling. However, the heat they generate cannot remain inside of the launch vehicle bay and requires active removal. Therefore, before the Shuttle bay door is closed, the RTG coolant tubes attached to the heat rejection fins must be filled with water, which will circulate and remove most of the heat from the cargo bay. There is concern that charging a system at initial temperature around 200 C with water at 24 C can cause unacceptable thermal stresses in the RTG shell and fins. A computer model is developed to estimate the transient temperature distribution resulting from such charging. The thermal stresses resulting from the temperature gradients do not exceed the elastic deformation limit for the material. Since the simplified mathematical model for thermal stresses tends to overestimate stresses, it is concluded that the RTG can be cooled by introducing water at 24 C to the initially hot fin coolant tubes while the RTG is in the Shuttle cargo bay.

  17. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Flaschel, Nils; Diez, Sergio; Gerboles, Marta; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Mussgiller, Andreas; Quirion, David; Tackmann, Kerstin; Ullan, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics for thermal management of silicon tracking detectors. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more lightweight and direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. DESY and IMB-CNM are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  18. Global Freshwater Thermal Pollution from Steam-Electric Power Plants with Once-Through Cooling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, C. E.; van Vliet, M. T. H.; Pfister, S.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric power generation requires large amounts of cooling water. In facilities employing once-through cooling systems the heat removed in the power cycle is rejected directly into a water body. Several studies have focused on the impacts of power-related thermal emissions in Europe and the U.S., in terms of river temperature increase and the capacity for power production, especially in the light of legislative measures designed to protect freshwater bodies from excessive temperature. In this work we present a comprehensive, global analysis of current freshwater thermal pollution by thermoelectric facilities. The Platts World Electric Power Plant (WEPP) database was the principal data source. Data gaps in the principal parameters of the steam-electric power cycle were filled in by regression relationships developed in this work. Some 2400 steam-electric units using once-through freshwater cooling systems, amounting to 19% of the global installed capacity of thermoelectric units, were identified and georeferenced, and a global view of thermal emission rates was achieved by systematically solving the Rankine cycle on a power generating unit level. The rejected heat rates are linearly proportional to the steam flow rate, which in turn is directly proportional to the power produced. By applying the appropriate capacity factors, the rejected heat rate can be estimated for each unit or agglomeration of units at the desired temporal resolution. We coupled mean annual emission rates with the global gridded hydrological-river temperature model VIC-RBM to obtain a first view of river temperature increases resulting from power generation. The results show that in many cases, even on a mean annual emission rate basis and a relatively large spatial resolution of 0.5 x 0.5 degrees, the local limits for temperature increase are often exceeded, especially in the U.S. and Europe.

  19. Design and evaluation of automatic control for human/liquid cooling garment thermal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Karen Lujean

    An automatic control system was designed and developed to control the thermal comfort of an astronaut wearing a liquid cooling garment (LCG). Experimental trials were run with test subjects performing arm cranking exercise in an environmental chamber. The thermal control algorithm incorporates the use of carbon dioxide production as a measure of metabolic rate to initiate the control response and mean body temperature, as a function of ear canal and skin temperatures, to provide feedback of the human thermal state to the controller. Nine test subjects each completed three, ninety-minute tests in three different environmental temperatures. Subjective comfort levels were obtained from the subjects throughout each test. Evaluation of subjective comfort level and quantitative energy storage indicates good performance of the controller in maintaining thermal neutrality for the subject over a wide range of environmental and transient metabolic states. The Wissler human thermoregulation model was utilized in the control design process and was used to further analyze the experimental results following testing. Subsequent application of the model allowed evaluation of additional protocols for which the LCG thermal controller may be used in the future.

  20. Assessment of thermal performance for the design of a passively-cooled plutonium storage vault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joseph Conway

    A passively-cooled plutonium storage vault, rather than one with a safety-qualified, forced-flow cooling system, could save as much as 100 million over the project lifetime. Either configuration must maintain the temperature of the stored plutonium metal, with its significant internal heat generation, below 239 sp circF. Alpha-phase metal, if allowed to exceed this temperature, will transition to beta-phase metal and undergo a volumetric expansion which could rupture the storage container system. An investigation was performed to determine whether a passively-cooled vault is feasible. Significant temperature drops occurred in two regions, both were gas-filled vertical annuli with heat flux boundary conditions on the inner surfaces and fixed temperature boundary conditions on the outer surfaces. The thermal resistance method was employed to evaluate radial heat transfer across each annulus, coupling natural convection, radiation, and conduction. Correlations from Thomas et al and Kulacki et al were used to evaluate the degree of natural convective enhancement. For the helium-filled region between the plutonium metal rod and the container with a characteristic length of 3.9 centimeters and an aspect ratio of 5.6, the Rayleigh number was 800 when the effect of radiation was removed. This resulted in a Nusselt number of 1.8. For the air-filled region between twelve vertically arranged containers and the storage tube with a characteristic length of 5.8 centimeters and an aspect ratio of 78, the Rayleigh number was 5times10sp5. This resulted in a Nusselt number of approximately 4.5, neglecting the effect of radiation. FIDAP 7.62\\copyright$ (Fluid Dynamics Analysis Package) was used to perform multi-dimensional finite element analyses of these regions employing both buoyant and radiative effects. Both simplified and more geometrically complex models were employed, all of which compared favorably to the results using the thermal resistance method. The results of the

  1. Effects of acoustic ceiling units on the cooling performance of thermally activated building systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacarte, Luis Marcos Domínguez; Rage, Niels; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2017-01-01

    the effects of two types of free hanging ceiling absorbers (horizontal and vertical) on the cooling performance of the TABS and the implications this has on the occupant thermal comfort. The measurements were carried out in a full-scale TABS test facility. The results show a reduction of 11% of the heat...... absorbers for equivalent levels of sound absorption. A reduction of 12% of the heat removed by the TABS has been measured for vertical sound absorbers (equivalent sound absorption levels to 60% coverage ratio with horizontal sound absorbers). This reduction was of 13% for vertical sound absorbers...

  2. Sensitivity analysis of the thermal performance of radiant and convective terminals for cooling buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dréau, J.; Heiselberg, P.

    2014-01-01

    on both radiation and convection. In order to characterise the advantages and drawbacks of the different terminals, steady-state simulations of a typical office room have been performed using four types of terminals (active chilled beam, radiant floor, wall and ceiling). A sensitivity analysis has been...... conducted to determine the parameters influencing their thermal performance the most. The air change rate, the outdoor temperature and the air temperature stratification have the largest effect on the cooling need (maintaining a constant operative temperature). For air change rates higher than 0.5 ACH...

  3. Spatial heterogeneity in geothermally-influenced lakes derived from atmospherically corrected Landsat thermal imagery and three-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, Mathew G; Hamilton, David P.; Trolle, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric correction of Landsat 7 thermal data was carried out for the purpose of retrieval of lake skin water temperature in Rotorua lakes, and Lake Taupo, North Island, New Zealand. The effect of the atmosphere was modelled using four sources of atmospheric profile data as input to the MODerate...... in surface water temperature in the lake. This study demonstrated the potential of accurate satellite-based thermal monitoring to validate temperature outputs from 3-D hydrodynamic model simulations. It also provided atmospheric correction options for local and global applications of Landsat thermal data. (C...... resolution atmospheric TRANsmission (MODTRAN) radiative transfer model. The retrieved skin water temperatures were validated using a high-frequency temperature sensor deployed from a monitoring buoy at the water surface of Lake Rotorua. The most accurate atmospheric correction method was with. Moderate...

  4. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Macur, Richard E; Clingenpeel, Scott; Tenney, Aaron; Lovalvo, David; Beam, Jacob P; Kozubal, Mark A; Shanks, W C; Morgan, Lisa A; Kan, Jinjun; Gorby, Yuri; Yooseph, Shibu; Nealson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) is a large high-altitude (2200 m), fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007-2008) using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50-90°C) contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous "streamer" communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5-6) were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot's Crater (pH 5-6). Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S), hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP.

  5. Time-scales of assembly and thermal history of a composite felsic pluton: constraints from the Emerald Lake area, northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Ian M.; Villeneuve, Mike E.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Duncan, Robert A.; Russell, James K.; Mortensen, James K.

    2002-05-01

    Knowledge of the time-scales of emplacement and thermal history during assembly of composite felsic plutons in the shallow crust are critical to deciphering the processes of crustal growth and magma chamber development. Detailed petrological and chemical study of the mid-Cretaceous, composite Emerald Lake pluton, from the northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon Territory, coupled with U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology, indicates that this pluton was intruded as a series of magmatic pulses. Intrusion of these pulses produced a strong petrological zonation from augite syenite, hornblende quartz syenite and monzonite, to biotite granite. Our data further indicate that multiple phases were emplaced and cooled to below the mineral closure temperatures over a time-scale on the order of the resolution of the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique (˜1 Myr), and that emplacement occurred at 94.3 Ma. Simple thermal modelling and heat conduction calculations were used to further constrain the temporal relationships within the intrusion. These calculations are consistent with the geochronology and show that emplacement and cooling were complete in less than 100 kyr and probably 70±5 kyr. These results demonstrate that production, transport and emplacement of the different phases of the Emerald Lake pluton occurred essentially simultaneously, and that these processes must also have been closely related in time and space. By analogy, these results provide insights into the assembly and petrogenesis of other complex intrusions and ultimately lead to an understanding of the processes involved in crustal development.

  6. Numerically Analysed Thermal Condition of Hearth Rollers with the Water-Cooled Shaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanov

    2016-01-01

    rollers without insulation. Insulation (screens or bulk insulation between the shaft and the barrel of roller allows reducing the cooling water losses. A comparative analysis of research results allowed us to find that operating conditions of the furnace rolls with screen insulation are more favorable in terms of thermal conditions and losses, than those of rollers without the insulation and rollers with the bulk insulation.

  7. Hypothermic Cooling Measured by Thermal Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Feasibility and Implications for Virtual Imaging in the Urogenital Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarecky, Douglas; Yu, Hon; Linehan, Jennifer; Morales, Blanca; Su, Min-Ying; Fwu, Peter; Ahlering, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    To study the combination of thermal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and novel hypothermic cooling, via an endorectal cooling balloon (ECB), to assess the effective dispersion and temperature drop in pelvic tissue to potentially reduce inflammatory cascade in surgical applications. Three male subjects, before undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, were cooled via an ECB, rendered MRI compatible for patient safety before ECB hypothermia. MRI studies were performed using a 3T scanner and included T2-weighted anatomic scan for the pelvic structures, followed by a temperature mapping scan. The sequence was performed repeatedly during the cooling experiment, whereas the phase data were collected using an integrated MR-high-intensity focused ultrasound workstation in real time. Pelvic cooling was instituted with a cooling console located outside the MRI magnet room. The feasibility of pelvic cooling measured a temperature drop of the ECB of 20-25 degrees in real time was achieved after an initial time delay of 10-15 seconds for the ECB to cool. The thermal MRI anatomic images of the prostate and neurovascular bundle demonstrate cooling at this interface to be 10-15 degrees, and also that cooling extends into the prostate itself ~5 degrees, and disperses into the pelvic region as well. An MRI-compatible ECB coupled with thermal MRI is a feasible method to assess effective hypothermic diffusion and saturation to pelvic structures. By inference, hypothermia-induced rectal cooling could potentially reduce inflammation, scarring, and fistula in radical prostatectomy, as well as other urologic tissue procedures of high-intensity focused ultrasound, external beam radiation therapy, radioactive seed implants, transurethral microwave therapy, and transurethral resection of the prostate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Femtosecond quantum dynamics and laser-cooling in thermal molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Warmuth, C

    2000-01-01

    of thermal trans-stilbene upon excitation at the omega sub 0 frequency. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical analysis. This work deals with coherent and incoherent vibrational phenomena in thermal systems, wave packet motion and laser-cooling. In the first part, the principle of COIN (Coherence Observation by Interference Noise) has been applied as a new approach to measuring wave packet motion. In the experiment pairs of phase-randomized femtosecond pulses with relative delay-time tau prepare interference fluctuations in the excited state population, so the variance of the correlated fluorescence intensity directly mimics the dynamics of the propagating wave packet. The scheme is demonstrated by measuring the vibrational coherence of wave packet-motion in the B-state of gaseous iodine. The COIN-interferograms obtained recover propagation, recurrences, spreading, and revivals as the typical signature of wave packets. Due to the disharmony of the B-state-potential, fractional revival...

  9. Thermal management of next-generation contact-cooled synchrotron x-ray mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khounsary, A.

    1999-10-29

    In the past decade, several third-generation synchrotrons x-ray sources have been constructed and commissioned around the world. Many of the major problems in the development and design of the optical components capable of handling the extremely high heat loads of the generated x-ray beams have been resolved. It is expected, however, that in the next few years even more powerful x-ray beams will be produced at these facilities, for example, by increasing the particle beam current. In this paper, the design of a next generation of synchrotron x-ray mirrors is discussed. The author shows that the design of contact-cooled mirrors capable of handing x-ray beam heat fluxes in excess of 500 W/mm{sup 2} - or more than three times the present level - is well within reach, and the limiting factor is the thermal stress rather then thermally induced slope error.

  10. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  11. Frequency thermal response and cooling performance in a microscopic system with a time-dependent perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraha, N.; Soba, A.; Carusela, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Following the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism we study the thermal transport in a composite chain subject to a time-dependent perturbation. The system is formed by two finite linear asymmetric harmonic chains subject to an on-site potential connected together by a time-modulated coupling. The ends of the chains are coupled to two phononic reservoirs at different temperatures. We present the relevant equations used to calculate the heat current along each segment. We find that the system presents different transport regimes according the driving frequency and temperature gradients. One of the regimes corresponds to a heat pump against thermal gradient, thus a characterization of the cooling performance of the device is presented.

  12. Multi-stage pulse tube cryocooler with acoustic impedance constructed to reduce transient cool down time and thermal loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, David R. (Inventor); Wilson, Kyle B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The cool down time for a multi-stage, pulse tube cryocooler is reduced by configuring at least a portion of the acoustic impedance of a selected stage, higher than the first stage, so that it surrounds the cold head of the selected stage. The surrounding acoustic impedance of the selected stage is mounted in thermally conductive connection to the warm region of the selected stage for cooling the acoustic impedance and is fabricated of a high thermal diffusivity, low thermal radiation emissivity material, preferably aluminum.

  13. Thermal models of buildings. Determination of temperatures, heating and cooling loads. Theories, models and computer programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellblad, K.

    1998-05-01

    The need to estimate indoor temperatures, heating or cooling load and energy requirements for buildings arises in many stages of a buildings life cycle, e.g. at the early layout stage, during the design of a building and for energy retrofitting planning. Other purposes are to meet the authorities requirements given in building codes. All these situations require good calculation methods. The main purpose of this report is to present the authors work with problems related to thermal models and calculation methods for determination of temperatures and heating or cooling loads in buildings. Thus the major part of the report deals with treatment of solar radiation in glazing systems, shading of solar and sky radiation and the computer program JULOTTA used to simulate the thermal behavior of rooms and buildings. Other parts of thermal models of buildings are more briefly discussed and included in order to give an overview of existing problems and available solutions. A brief presentation of how thermal models can be built up is also given and it is a hope that the report can be useful as an introduction to this part of building physics as well as during development of calculation methods and computer programs. The report may also serve as a help for the users of energy related programs. Independent of which method or program a user choose to work with it is his or her own responsibility to understand the limits of the tool, else wrong conclusions may be drawn from the results 52 refs, 22 figs, 4 tabs

  14. Decadal trends and common dynamics of the bio-optical and thermal characteristics of the African Great Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Loiselle

    Full Text Available The Great Lakes of East Africa are among the world's most important freshwater ecosystems. Despite their importance in providing vital resources and ecosystem services, the impact of regional and global environmental drivers on this lacustrine system remains only partially understood. We make a systematic comparison of the dynamics of the bio-optical and thermal properties of thirteen of the largest African lakes between 2002 and 2011. Lake surface temperatures had a positive trend in all Great Lakes outside the latitude of 0° to 8° south, while the dynamics of those lakes within this latitude range were highly sensitive to global inter-annual climate drivers (i.e. El Niño Southern Oscillation. Lake surface temperature dynamics in nearly all lakes were found to be sensitive to the latitudinal position of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone. Phytoplankton dynamics varied considerably between lakes, with increasing and decreasing trends. Intra-lake differences in both surface temperature and phytoplankton dynamics occurred for many of the larger lakes. This inter-comparison of bio-optical and thermal dynamics provides new insights into the response of these ecosystems to global and regional drivers.

  15. Thermal environment in simulated offices with convective and radiant cooling systems under cooling (summer) mode of operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2016-01-01

    calculated. Manikin-based equivalent temperature (MBET) was determined by using two thermal manikins to identify the impact of the local thermal conditions generated by the studied systems on occupants' thermal perception. The results revealed that the differences in the thermal conditions achieved...

  16. [Study on seasonal characteristics of thermal stratification in lacustrine zone of Lake Qiandao].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Ying; Yu, Zuo-Ming; Wu, Zhi-Xu; Wu, Chun-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Lake Qiandao is a typical subtropical man-made reservoir in China. The investigation on the seasonal and vertical dynamics of water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), pH value, turbidity, photosynthetic available radiation (PAR) and chlorophyll a was conducted in 2011 in order to find out the physical characteristics of Lake Qiandao. The average surface water temperature ranged from 10.4 to 32.7 degrees C. A monomictic thermal stratification was observed in Lake Qiandao, initiating in April and lasting until December. The results showed that thermal stratification had influences on vertical distribution of DO, pH value, turbidity, PAR and chlorophyll a. Very strong stratification of DO was found, inducing lower oxygen concentration in the thermocline layer and temporal hypoxia in the bottom water. The maximum turbidity was found in the thermocline layer and the precipitation affected the surface turbidity value. Moreover, the chlorophyll a concentration was higher in the surface water and lower in the bottom water as found in this study, implying that water quality was affected by stratification. Besides, the maximum photosynthesis rate and algal growth rate were found at the depth 5-10 m below the water surface. Therefore, the results can provide theoretical support for the sampling and analysis of algal blooms in Lake Qiandao.

  17. Experimental investigations on active cooling thermal protection structure of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor in arc heated facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianqiang, Tu; Jinlong, Peng; Xianning, Yang; Lianzhong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    The active cooling thermal protection technology is the efficient method to resolve the long-duration work and reusable problems of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor, where worst thermo-mechanical loads occur. The fuel is passed through coolant channels adjacent to the heated surfaces to absorb heat from the heating exchanger panels, prior to injection into the combustor. The heating exchanger both cooled down the wall temperature of the combustor wall and heats and cracks the hydrocarbon fuel inside the panel to permit an easier combustion and satisfying combustion efficiency. The subscale active cooling metallic panels, with dimensions of 100×100 mm and different coolant channel sizes, have been tested under typical combustion thermal environment produced by arc heated Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD). The heat exchange ability of different coolant channel sizes has been obtained. The big-scale active cooling metallic panel, with dimensions of 100 × 750 mm and the coolant channel sizes of better heating exchange performance, has been made and tested in the big-scale arc heated TFD facility. The test results show that the local superheated ablation is easy to happen for the cooling fuel assigned asymmetrically in the bigscale active cooling metallic panel, and the cooling fuel rate can reduce 8%˜10% after spraying the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) in the heating surface.

  18. Thermal-structural analysis of the platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge of hypersonic vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongpeng, Liu; Weiqiang, Liu

    2016-10-01

    One of the main challenges for the hypersonic vehicle is its thermal protection, more specifically, the cooling of its leading edge. To investigate the feasibility of a platelet heat-pipe-cooled leading edge structure, thermal/stress distributions for steady-state flight conditions are calculated numerically. Studies are carried on for IN718/Na, C-103/Na and T-111/Li compatible material combinations of heat pipe under nominal operations and a central heat pipe failure cases, and the influence of wall thickness on the design robustness is also investigated. And the heat transfer limits (the sonic limit, the capillary limit and the boiling limit) are also computed to check the operation of platelet heat pipes. The results indicate that, with a 15 mm leading edge radius and a wall thickness of 0.5 mm, C-103/Na and T-111/Li combinations of heat pipe is capable of withstanding both nominal and failure conditions for Mach 8 and Mach 10 flight respectively.

  19. Design and Analysis of Phase Change Material based thermal energy storage for active building cooling: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin .D. Patil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials (PCMs are "latent" thermal storage materials. They use chemical bonds to store and release heat. The thermal energy transfer occurs when a material changes from a solid to a liquid orfrom a liquid to a solid form. This is called a change in state or "phase." Initially, these solid-liquid PCMs perform like conventional storage materials; their temperature rises as they absorb solar heat. Unlike conventional heat storage materials, when PCMs reach the temperature at which they change phase (their melting point, they absorb large amounts of heat without getting hotter. When the ambient temperature in the space around the PCM material drops, the Phase Change Material solidifies, releasing its stored latent heat. PCMs absorb and emit heat while maintaining a nearly constant temperature. Within the human comfort and electronic-equipment tolerance range of 20°C to 35°C, latent thermal storage materials are very effective.They can be used for equalization of day & night temperature and for transport of refrigerated products. In the proposed project heat of fusion of Cacl2. 6H2o as PCM is used for cooling water during night and this cooled water is used as circulating medium trough fan coil unit, air trough FCU will get cooled by transferring heat to water and fresh & cool air will be thrown in a room. In the proposed project FREE COOLING & ACTIVE BUILDING COOLING concepts of Thermal Energy Storage are used in combine

  20. Measurements of thermal characteristics in silicon germanium un-cooled micro-bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Mario; Torres, Alfonso; Kosarev, Andrey [National Institute for Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Z.P. 7200 Puebla (Mexico); Ambrosio, Roberto; Mireles, Jose [Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Electrical Department, Av. Del Charro 450 N, Z.P. 32310, C. J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Garcia, Maria [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Physics Department, Av. San Claudio S/N Z.P. 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-04-15

    We present a study of the thermal characteristics of an infrared detector (un-cooled micro-bolometer), based on an amorphous silicon germanium film (a-Si{sub x}Ge{sub y}:H), deposited by plasma at low temperature ({proportional_to} 300 C) and compatible with the standard CMOS technology. These films have been studied due to their high performance characteristics as high activation energy (E{sub a}{approx} 0.37 eV), high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR{approx} -0.047 K{sup -1}) and moderate room temperature conductivity ({sigma}{sub RT}{approx} 2x10{sup -5}{omega} cm), which provides a moderate pixel resistance (R{sub cell}{approx}3.5x10{sup 8}{omega}). We have used two simple methods to calculate the thermal characteristics of the micro-bolometer. The thermal conductance (G{sub th}) has been obtained from the electrical I(U) characteristics in the range where self heating due to bias is not presented. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance and as well the temperature dependence of the thermal resistance have been obtained by measuring the I(U) characteristics in the device at different temperature values. Finally the results of both methods have been compared. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Heart rate variability in sleeping preterm neonates exposed to cool and warm thermal conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Stéphan-Blanchard

    Full Text Available Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the main cause of postneonatal infant death. Thermal stress is a major risk factor and makes infants more vulnerable to SIDS. Although it has been suggested that thermal stress could lead to SIDS by disrupting autonomic functions, clinical and physiopathological data on this hypothesis are scarce. We evaluated the influence of ambient temperature on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in thirty-four preterm neonates (mean ± SD gestational age: 31.4±1.5 weeks, postmenstrual age: 36.2±0.9 weeks. Heart rate variability was assessed as a function of the sleep stage at three different ambient temperatures (thermoneutrality and warm and cool thermal conditions. An elevated ambient temperature was associated with a higher basal heart rate and lower short- and long-term variability in all sleep stages, together with higher sympathetic activity and lower parasympathetic activity. Our study results showed that modification of the ambient temperature led to significant changes in autonomic nervous system control in sleeping preterm neonates. The latter changes are very similar to those observed in infants at risk of SIDS. Our findings may provide greater insight into the thermally-induced disease mechanisms related to SIDS and may help improve prevention strategies.

  2. Heart rate variability in sleeping preterm neonates exposed to cool and warm thermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stéphan-Blanchard, Erwan; Chardon, Karen; Léké, André; Delanaud, Stéphane; Bach, Véronique; Telliez, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the main cause of postneonatal infant death. Thermal stress is a major risk factor and makes infants more vulnerable to SIDS. Although it has been suggested that thermal stress could lead to SIDS by disrupting autonomic functions, clinical and physiopathological data on this hypothesis are scarce. We evaluated the influence of ambient temperature on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in thirty-four preterm neonates (mean ± SD gestational age: 31.4±1.5 weeks, postmenstrual age: 36.2±0.9 weeks). Heart rate variability was assessed as a function of the sleep stage at three different ambient temperatures (thermoneutrality and warm and cool thermal conditions). An elevated ambient temperature was associated with a higher basal heart rate and lower short- and long-term variability in all sleep stages, together with higher sympathetic activity and lower parasympathetic activity. Our study results showed that modification of the ambient temperature led to significant changes in autonomic nervous system control in sleeping preterm neonates. The latter changes are very similar to those observed in infants at risk of SIDS. Our findings may provide greater insight into the thermally-induced disease mechanisms related to SIDS and may help improve prevention strategies.

  3. Thermal Performance for Wet Cooling Tower with Different Layout Patterns of Fillings under Typical Crosswind Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermal-state model experimental study was performed in lab to investigate the thermal performance of a wet cooling tower with different kinds of filling layout patterns under windless and 0.4 m/s crosswind conditions. In this paper, the contrast analysis was focused on comparing a uniform layout pattern and one kind of optimal non-uniform layout pattern when the environmental crosswind speed is 0 m/s and 0.4 m/s. The experimental results proved that under windless conditions, the heat transfer coefficient and total heat rejection of circulating water for the optimal non-uniform layout pattern can enhance by approximately 40% and 28%, respectively, compared with the uniform layout pattern. It was also discovered that the optimal non-uniform pattern can dramatically relieve the influence of crosswind on the thermal performance of the tower when the crosswind speed is equal to 0.4 m/s. For the uniform layout pattern, the heat transfer coefficient under 0.4 m/s crosswind conditions decreased by 9.5% compared with the windless conditions, while that value lowered only by 2.0% for the optimal non-uniform layout pattern. It has been demonstrated that the optimal non-uniform layout pattern has the better thermal performance under 0.4 m/s crosswind condition.

  4. 3D thermal analysis of a permanent magnet motor with cooling fans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng TAN; Xue-guan SONG; Bing JI; Zheng LIU; Ji-en MA; Wen-ping CAO

    2015-01-01

    Overheating of permanent magnet (PM) machines has become a major technical challenge as it gives rise to magnet demagnetization, degradation of insulation materials, and loss of motor efficiency. This paper proposes a state-of-the-art cooling system for an axial flux permanent magnet (AFPM) machine with the focus on its structural optimization. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with thermal consideration has been shown to be an efficient approach in the literature and is thus employed in this work. Meanwhile, a simplified numerical approach to the AFPM machine with complex configuration in 3D consisting of conduction, forced convection, and conjugate heat transfer is taken as a case study. Different simplification meth-ods (including configuration and working conditions) and two optimized fans for forced convection cooling are designed and installed on the AFPM machine and compared to a natural convection cooling system. The results show that the proposed ap-proach is effective for analyzing the thermal performance of a complex AFPM machine and strikes a balance between reasona-ble simplification, accuracy, and computational resource.%目的:提出一种适合永磁电机的冷却系统设计方案,降低电机本体温度。  创新点:提出一种适合永磁电机热分析的CFD仿真模型。  方法:采用计算流体动力学方法对包含冷却风扇的永磁电机进行空间三维热力学分析和优化设计。  结论:本文提出并优化后的冷却风扇可有效降低永磁电机的最高和平均温度。

  5. Heat removal using microclimate foot cooling: a thermal foot manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, John W; Demes, Robert; Endrusick, Thomas L; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J

    2014-04-01

    It has been proposed that microclimate cooling systems exploit the peripheral extremities because of more efficient heat transfer. The purpose of this study was to quantify, using a patented microclimate cooling technique, the heat transfer from the plantar surface of the foot for comparison to other commonly cooled body regions. A military boot was fitted with an insole embedded with a coiled, 1.27 m length of hollow tubing terminating in inlet and outlet valves. A thermal foot manikin with a surface temperature of 34 degrees C was placed in the boot and the valves were connected to a system that circulated water through the insole at a temperature of 20 degrees C and flow rate of 120 ml x min(-1). The manikin foot served as a constant heat source to determine heat transfer provided by the insole. Testing was done with the foot model dry and sweating at a rate of 500 ml x h(- 1) x m(-2). Climatic chamber conditions were 30 degrees C with 30% RH. Heat loss was approximately 4.1 +/- 0.1 and approximately 7.7 +/- 0.3 W from the dry and sweating foot models, respectively. On a relative scale, the heat loss was 3.0 W and 5.5 W per 1% (unit) body surface area, respectively, for the dry and sweating conditions. The relative heat loss afforded by plantar foot cooling was similar compared to other body regions, but the absolute amount of heat removal is unlikely to make an impact on whole body heat balance.

  6. Cooling Effect of Evapotranspiration (ET) and ET Measurement by Thermal Remote Sensing in Urban

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, G. Y.; Yang, B.; Li, X.; Guo, Q.; Tan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Affected by global warming and rapid urbanization, urban thermal environment and livability are getting worse over the world. Global terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) can annually consume 1.483 × 1023 joules of solar energy, which is about 300 times of the annual human energy use on the earth (4.935×1020 joules). This huge amount of energy use by ET indicates that there is great potential to cool the urban by regulating ET. However, accurately measurement of urban ET is quiet difficult because of the great spatial heterogeneity in urban. This study focuses on to quantify the cooling effects ET by mobile traverse method and improve a methodology to measure the urban ET by thermal remote sensing. The verifying experiment was carried out in Shenzhen, a sub-tropical mega city in China. Results showed that ET of vegetation could obviously reduce the urban temperature in hot season. Daily transpiration rate of a small-sized Ficus tree (Ficus microcarpa, 5 m in height and 20 cm of trunk diameter, measured by sap-flow method) was 36-55 kg and its cooling effect was equivalent to a 1.6-2.4 kWh air conditioner working for 24 hours. A 10% increase in the vegetated area could decrease urban temperature by 0.60°C at hot night. Moreover, it was found that a region with a vegetated area ratio over 55% had obvious effect on temperature decreasing. In addition, a methodology by using "thermal remote sensing + three-temperature model" was improved to measure the urban ET. Results showed that the urban ET could be reasonably measured by the proposed method. The daily ET of an urban lawn was 0.01-2.86 mm and monthly ET was 21-60 mm. This result agreed well with the verification study (Bowen ratio method, r=0.953). These results are very useful for urban planning, urban lower impact development, and improving of urban thermal environment.

  7. Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

    2012-06-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or

  8. Thermal and structural finite element analysis of water cooled silicon monochromator for synchrotron radiation comparison of two different cooling schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiev, A I; Busetto, E; Hrdy, J; Mrazek, D; Plesek, I; Savoia, A

    2001-01-01

    The article describes the results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the first Si monochromator crystal distortions due to Synchrotron Radiation (SR) heat load and consequent analysis of the influence of the distortions on a double crystal monochromator performance. Efficiencies of two different cooling schemes are compared. A thin plate of Si crystal is lying on copper cooling support in both cases. There are microchannels inside the cooling support. In the first model the direction of the microchannels is parallel to the diffraction plane. In the second model the direction of the microchannels is perpendicular to the diffraction plane or in other words, it is a conventional cooling scheme. It is shown that the temperature field along the crystal volume is more uniform and more symmetrical in the first model than in the second (conventional) one.

  9. An effect of heat insulation parameters on thermal losses of water-cooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mihailov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is research in the insulation parameters effect on the thermal losses of watercooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces. An analytical method has been used for the investigation in heat transfer conditions in the working area. The results of the research can be used to choose optimal cooling parameters and select a suitable kind of insulation for water-cooled surfaces.

  10. Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  11. Effects of Finish Cooling Temperature on Tensile Properties After Thermal Aging of Strain-Based API X60 Linepipe Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Sunghak; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul

    2015-09-01

    Two types of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 linepipe steels were fabricated at two finish cooling temperatures, 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C), and the effects of the finish cooling temperatures on the tensile properties after thermal aging were investigated. The strain-based API X60 linepipe steels consisted mainly of polygonal ferrite (PF) or quasi-polygonal ferrite and the volume fraction of acicular ferrite increased with the increasing finish cooling temperature. In contrast, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and secondary phases decreased. The tensile properties before and after thermal aging at 473 K and 523 K (200 °C and 250 °C) were measured. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature. The strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the higher finish cooling temperature decreased rapidly after thermal aging, probably due to the Cottrell atmosphere, whereas the strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the lower finish cooling temperature changed slightly after thermal aging. The uniform elongation and total elongation decreased with increasing thermal aging temperature, probably due to the interactions between carbon atoms and dislocations. The uniform elongation decreased rapidly with the decreasing volume fractions of BF and martensite and secondary phases. The yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature, whereas the strain hardening exponent decreased. The strain hardening exponent of PL steel decreased rapidly after thermal aging because of the large number of mobile dislocations between PF and BF or martensite or secondary phases.

  12. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Diez, Sergio; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Tackmann, Kerstin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gerboles, Marta; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Ullan, Miguel [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-01-15

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  13. Continuous Cooling Bainite Transformation Characteristics of a Low Carbon Microalloyed Steel under the Simulated Welding Thermal Cycle Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangwei Kong; Chunlin Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cooling transformation of a low carbon microalloyed steel was investigated after it was subjected to the simulation welding thermal cycle process and the interrupted cooling test.Microstructure observation was performed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.On the basis of the dilatometric data and microstructure observation,the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram was determined,which showed that the main microstructure changes from a mixture of lath martensite and bainitic ferrite to full granular bainite with the increase in the cooling time t8/5 from 10 to 600 s,accompanied with a decrease in the microhardness.The interrupted cooling test confirmed that the bainitic ferrite can form attached to grain boundaries at the beginning of transformation even if the final microstructure contains a mixture of granular bainite and bainitic ferrite.

  14. Skin thermal response to sapphire contact and cryogen spray cooling: a comparative study based on measurements in a skin phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jorge H.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Tanenbaum, B. S.; Anvari, Bahman

    2000-05-01

    Non-specific thermal injury to the epidermis may occur as a result of laser treatment of cutaneous hypervascular malformations (e.g. port wine stains) and other dermatoses. Methods to protect the epidermis from thermal injury include sapphire contact cooling (SCC) and cryogen spray cooling (CSC). Evaluation of the skin thermal response to either cooling method and better understanding of the heat transfer process at the skin surface are essential for further optimization of cooling technique during laser therapy. We present internal temperature measurements in an epoxy resin phantom in response to both SCC and CSC, and use the results in conjunction with a mathematical model to predict the temperature distributions within human skin. Based on our results, a conductive heat transfer process at the skin interface appears to be the primary mechanism for both SCC and CSC. In the case of CSC, 'film cooling' rather than 'evaporative cooling' seems to be the dominant mode during the spurt duration. Currently, due to the lower temperature of the cryogen film and its shorter time of application, CSC produces larger temperature reductions at the skin surface and smaller temperature reductions at depths greater than 200 micrometer (i.e., higher spatial selectivity) when compared to SCC. However, SCC can potentially induce temperature reductions comparable to those produced by CSC if a sapphire temperature similar to that for a cryogen could be achieved in practice.

  15. G65.2+5.7: A Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant With a Cool Shell

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, R L; Petre, R

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the G65.2+5.7 supernova remnant (also known as G65.3+5.7). Little material obscures this remnant and so it was well observed, even at the softest end of ROSAT's bandpass (~0.11 to 0.28 keV). These soft X-ray images reveal the remnant's centrally-filled morphology which, in combination with existing radio frequency observations, places G65.2+5.7 in the thermal composite (mixed morphology) class of supernova remnants. Not only might G65.2+5.7 be the oldest known thermal composite supernova remnant, but owing to its optically revealed cool, dense shell, this remnant supports the proposal that thermal composite supernova remnants lack X-ray bright shells because they have evolved beyond the adiabatic phase. These observations also reveal a slightly extended point source centered on RA = 19h 36m 46s, dec = 30deg 40' 07'' and extending 6.5 arcmin in radius in the band 67 map. The source of this emission has yet to be discovered, as there is no known pulsar at ...

  16. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  17. Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  18. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  19. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  20. Divergence of gastropod life history in contrasting thermal environments in a geothermal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M P; Ermold, F; Kristjánsson, B K; Laurila, A

    2016-10-01

    Experiments using natural populations have provided mixed support for thermal adaptation models, probably because the conditions are often confounded with additional environmental factors like seasonality. The contrasting geothermal environments within Lake Mývatn, northern Iceland, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate thermal adaptation models using closely located natural populations. We conducted laboratory common garden and field reciprocal transplant experiments to investigate how thermal origin influences the life history of Radix balthica snails originating from stable cold (6 °C), stable warm (23 °C) thermal environments or from areas with seasonal temperature variation. Supporting thermal optimality models, warm-origin snails survived poorly at 6 °C in the common garden experiment and better than cold-origin and seasonal-origin snails in the warm habitat in the reciprocal transplant experiment. Contrary to thermal adaptation models, growth rate in both experiments was highest in the warm populations irrespective of temperature, indicating cogradient variation. The optimal temperatures for growth and reproduction were similar irrespective of origin, but cold-origin snails always had the lowest performance, and seasonal-origin snails often performed at an intermediate level compared to snails originating in either stable environment. Our results indicate that central life-history traits can differ in their mode of evolution, with survival following the predictions of thermal optimality models, whereas ecological constraints have shaped the evolution of growth rates in local populations.

  1. In situ thermal characterization of cooling/crystallizing lavas during rheology measurements and implications for lava flow emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Giordano, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Transport properties of natural silicate melts at super-liquidus temperatures are reasonably well understood. However, migration and transport of silicate melts in the Earth's crust and at its surface generally occur at sub-liquidus temperatures and in settings where the melts undergo crystallization under various cooling and/or decompression conditions. In such dynamic situations the occurrence of processes such as the release of latent heat during phase changes, viscous heating, thermal advection and -inertia, and changing heat capacity, all represent potential influences on the state, and thereby on the physico-chemical behavior of the system. To date, rheological data at sub-liquidus temperatures are scarce and cooling-rate dependent, disequilibrium rheological data are virtually absent. In fact, no in situ thermal characterization of liquid or multiphase mixtures during rheological experiments, under either static or dynamic thermal conditions has been presented to date. Here we describe a new experimental setup for in situ thermal characterization of cooling/crystallizing lavas during viscosity measurement at temperatures up to 1600 °C. We use this device to recover in situ, real-time, observations of the combined rheological and thermal evolution of natural, re-melted lava samples during the transient disequilibrium conditions characteristic of lava flows and shallow crustal magma migration and storage systems in nature. We present the calibration procedure and the method employed to recover the thermal evolution of an experimental sample during flow in varying shear regimes, assess the experimental uncertainty and show the ability of the apparatus to measure the release of latent heat of crystallization during transient rheological experiments. We further report the results from a first experimental study on the rheological and thermal evolution of a basaltic lava undergoing continuous cooling at a series of different cooling rates and discuss the

  2. Test case specifications for coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulics calculation of Gas-cooled Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuský, F.; Bahdanovich, R.; Farkas, G.; Haščík, J.; Tikhomirov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is focused on development of the coupled neutronics-thermal hydraulics model for the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor. It is necessary to carefully investigate coupled calculations of new concepts to avoid recriticality scenarios, as it is not possible to ensure sub-critical state for a fast reactor core under core disruptive accident conditions. Above mentioned calculations are also very suitable for development of new passive or inherent safety systems that can mitigate the occurrence of the recriticality scenarios. In the paper, the most promising fuel material compositions together with a geometry model are described for the Gas-cooled fast reactor. Seven fuel pin and fuel assembly geometry is proposed as a test case for coupled calculation with three different enrichments of fissile material in the form of Pu-UC. The reflective boundary condition is used in radial directions of the test case and vacuum boundary condition is used in axial directions. During these condition, the nuclear system is in super-critical state and to achieve a stable state (which is numerical representation of operational conditions) it is necessary to decrease the reactivity of the system. The iteration scheme is proposed, where SCALE code system is used for collapsing of a macroscopic cross-section into few group representation as input for coupled code NESTLE.

  3. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyu, M.K. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  4. Data Mining of the Thermal Performance of Cool-Pipes in Massive Concrete via In Situ Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Embedded cool-pipes are very important for massive concrete because their cooling effect can effectively avoid thermal cracks. In this study, a data mining approach to analyzing the thermal performance of cool-pipes via in situ monitoring is proposed. Delicate monitoring program is applied in a high arch dam project that provides a good and mass data source. The factors and relations related to the thermal performance of cool-pipes are obtained in a built theory thermal model. The supporting vector machine (SVM technology is applied to mine the data. The thermal performances of iron pipes and high-density polyethylene (HDPE pipes are compared. The data mining result shows that iron pipe has a better heat removal performance when flow rate is lower than 50 L/min. It has revealed that a turning flow rate exists for iron pipe which is 80 L/min. The prediction and classification results obtained from the data mining model agree well with the monitored data, which illustrates the validness of the approach.

  5. Changes in ultrasonic properties of liver tissue in vitro during heating-cooling cycle concomitant with thermal coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min Joo; Guntur, Sitaramanjaneya Reddy; Lee, Joo Myoung; Paeng, Dong Guk; Lee, Kang I L; Coleman, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The present work considers the ultrasonic properties of porcine liver tissue in vitro measured during heating concomitant with thermal coagulation followed by natural cooling, so as to provide information about changes in the ultrasonic properties of the tissue after thermal coagulation. The excised liver samples were heated in a degassed water bath up to 75°C and naturally cooled down to 30°C. The tissue was observed to begin thermally coagulating at temperatures lower than 75°C. The ultrasonic parameters considered include the speed of sound, the attenuation coefficient, the backscatter coefficient and the nonlinear parameter of B/A. They were more sensitive to temperature when heating than during natural cooling. All of the parameters were shown to rise significantly on completion of the heating-cooling cycle. At 35°C after thermal coagulation, the B/A value was increased by 96%, the attenuation and backscatter coefficients were increased by 50%∼68% and 33%∼37%, respectively, in the typical frequency ranges of 3 MHz∼5 MHz used for ultrasonic imaging and the speed of sound was increased by 1.4%. The results of this study added to the evidence that tissue characterization, in particular, based on the B/A could be valuable for ultrasonically imaging the thermal lesions following high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimizing x-ray mirror thermal performance using variable length cooling for second generation FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Corey L.; Srinivasan, Venkat N.; Amores, Lope; Kelez, Nicholas M.; Morton, Daniel S.; Stefan, Peter M.; Nicolas, Josep; Zhang, Lin; Cocco, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    The success of the LCLS led to an interest across a number of disciplines in the scientific community including physics, chemistry, biology, and material science. Fueled by this success, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is developing a new high repetition rate free electron laser, LCLS-II, a superconducting linear accelerator capable of a repetition rate up to 1 MHz. Undulators will be optimized for 200 to 1300 eV soft X-rays, and for 1000 to 5000 eV hard X-rays. To absorb spontaneous radiation, higher harmonic energies and deflect the x-ray beam to various end stations, the transport and diagnostics system includes grazing incidence plane mirrors on both the soft and Hard X-ray beamline. To deliver the FEL beam with minimal power loss and wavefront distortion, we need mirrors of height errors below 1nm rms in operational conditions. We need to mitigate the thermal load effects due to the high repetition rate. The absorbed thermal profile is highly dependent on the beam divergence, and this is a function of the photon energy. To address this complexity, we developed a mirror cradle with variable length cooling and first order curve correction. Mirror figure error is minimized using variable length water-cooling through a gallium-indium eutectic bath. Curve correction is achieved with an off-axis bender that will be described in details. We present the design features, mechanical analysis and results from optical and mechanical tests of a prototype assembly, with particular regards to the figure sensitivity to bender corrections.

  7. Next generation cooled long range thermal sights with minimum size, weight, and power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, R.; Ihle, T.; Wendler, J.; Rühlich, I.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Situational awareness and precise targeting at day, night and severe weather conditions are key elements for mission success in asymmetric warfare. To support these capabilities for the dismounted soldier, AIM has developed a family of stand-alone thermal weapon sights based on high performance cooled IR-modules which are used e.g. in the infantryman of the future program of the German army (IdZ). The design driver for these sights is a long ID range system of the German army with additional capabilities like a wireless data link to the soldier backbone computer. Minimum size, weight and power (SWaP) are most critical requirements for the dismounted soldiers' equipment and sometimes push a decision towards uncooled equipment with marginal performance referring to the outstanding challenges in current asymmetric warfare, e.g. the capability to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in adequate ranges. To provide the uncompromised e/o performance with SWaP parameters close to uncooled, AIM has developed a new thermal weapon sight based on high operating temperature (HOT) MCT MWIR FPAs together with a new low power single piston stirling cooler. In basic operation the sight is used as a clip-on in front of the rifle scope. An additional eyepiece for stand-alone targeting with e.g. AGLs or a biocular version for relaxed surveillance will be available. The paper will present details of the technologies applied for such long range cooled sights with size, weight and power close to uncooled.

  8. Numerical Study of the Effects of Thermal Barrier Coating and Turbulence Intensity on Cooling Performances of a Nozzle Guide Vane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasert Prapamonthon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical investigation of the combined effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC with mainstream turbulence intensity (Tu on a modified vane of the real film-cooled nozzle guide vane (NGV reported by Timko (NASA CR-168289. Using a 3D conjugate heat transfer (CHT analysis, the NGVs with and without TBC are simulated at three Tus (Tu = 3.3%, 10% and 20%. The overall cooling effectiveness, TBC effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate the following three interesting phenomena: (1 TBC on the pressure side (PS is more effective than that on the suction side (SS due to a fewer number of film holes on the SS; (2 for all three Tus, the variation trends of the overall cooling effectiveness are similar, and TBC plays the positive and negative roles in heat flux at the same time, and significantly increases the overall cooling effectiveness in regions cooled ineffectively by cooling air; (3 when Tu increases, the TBC effect is more significant, for example, at the highest Tu (Tu = 20% the overall cooling effectiveness can increase as much as 24% in the film cooling ineffective regions, but near the trailing edge (TE and the exits and downstream of film holes on the SS, this phenomenon is slight.

  9. A high-resolution lake sediment record of glacier activity from SE Greenland defines abrupt Holocene cooling events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balascio, N. L.; Bradley, R. S.; D'Andrea, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Orbital driven changes in high latitude summer insolation during the Holocene are responsible for the primary millennial-scale climate trends in the Arctic. Following deglaciation, maximum summer temperatures generally occurred during the early to mid-Holocene and declined through the late Holocene. Superimposed on this gradual cooling trend are centennial- and decadal-scale intervals that indicate more rapid perturbations of the arctic climate system. Highly resolved sedimentary records from terrestrial and marine sites help to better characterize climate system dynamics during the Holocene and investigate forcing and feedback mechanism that operate on different timescales. Reconstructing glacial activity can provide valuable paleoclimate information about trends in summer temperature and/or winter precipitation. Proglacial lakes contain sediment archives of meltwater input from glaciers and typically have high sedimentation rates preserving detailed information on glacial activity. However, interpreting proglacial sedimentary records can be difficult because 1) there may be significant input of sediment from non-glacial sources, 2) there is often a lack of organic material for radiocarbon dating, and 3) not all glaciers are sensitive to rapid climatic changes. Here we present a c. 10 cal ka BP record of glacier activity from Kulusuk Lake (65.6°N, 37.1°W; 202 m a.s.l.), a proglacial lake in southeast Greenland that is well constrained by radiocarbon dates and shows a clear signal of changes in glacial input throughout the Holocene. Kulusuk Lake is presently fed by meltwater from two cirque glaciers. It has a small catchment and no other significant source of sediment input. A 3.5 m sediment core contains distinct lithologic changes defined by grain size, magnetic susceptibility, organic content, and scanning XRF data. During the early Holocene, an overall decrease in meltwater input from 8.7-7.7 ka indicates the retreat of the glaciers in response to regional

  10. Analysis of rail cooling strategies through numerical simulation with instant calculation of thermal expansion coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernía-Espinoza, A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a new methodology to simulate the cooling process for an asymmetrical Ri60 grooved rail, designed for city tramways, in a more realistic manner than that conducted previously by other authors for long steel sections. The approach considers the phase transformation of the steel and the forced convection cooling. The process is modelled as an uncoupled thermo-mechanical problem. First, the rail’s temperature history is obtained from a computer fluid dynamic model and subsequently introduced in the finite element model, in order to model the stresses and displacements. This second stage involves the calculation of the thermal expansion coefficient, for each element and at each iteration. The calculation is made according to the continuous cooling transformation diagram. These results lead to the extremely reliable determination of residual stresses as proved by the comparison with experimental data obtained in the industrial plant. The methodology allows for an accurate study of two types of cooling strategies for the Ri60 and the selection of the more suitable one.

    En este artículo se describe una nueva metodología para simular el proceso de enfriamiento de un rail asimétrico Ri60, diseñado para tranvías, de una forma mucho más realista que lo realizado hasta ahora para perfiles largos de acero. La propuesta considera los efectos de la transformación de fases del acero y el enfriamiento por convección forzada. El proceso es simulado como un proceso termo-mecánico desacoplado. Primero, las curvas de enfriamiento del rail son obtenidas a partir de un modelo basado en dinámica de fluidos computacional y posteriormente introducidas en el modelo de elementos finitos para calcular las tensiones y desplazamientos. En esta segunda fase se calcula, para cada elemento finito y en cada iteración, el coeficiente de dilatación térmica lineal según el diagrama de curvas de enfriamiento continuo. Estos resultados

  11. Cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators in the temperature range 300 — 200 K using Peltier elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palashov, O. V.; Ievlev, Ivan V.; Perevezentsev, E. A.; Katin, E. V.; Khazanov, Efim A.

    2011-09-01

    A new method for cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators using Peltier elements is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The scheme of thermal stabilisation of the magnetooptical elements ensures reliable operation of the device at the absorbed power ~2 W, which corresponds to the transmitted laser radiation power 1.5 kW. The results of the work make it possible to predict high efficiency of this method at the laser power of tens of kilowatts.

  12. Cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators in the temperature range 300 - 200 K using Peltier elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palashov, O V; Ievlev, Ivan V; Perevezentsev, E A; Katin, E V; Khazanov, Efim A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-30

    A new method for cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators using Peltier elements is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The scheme of thermal stabilisation of the magnetooptical elements ensures reliable operation of the device at the absorbed power {approx}2 W, which corresponds to the transmitted laser radiation power 1.5 kW. The results of the work make it possible to predict high efficiency of this method at the laser power of tens of kilowatts.

  13. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  14. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393, Japan) (Japan); Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo [NDD Corporation (1-1-6 Jounan, Mito, Ibaraki 310-0803, Japan) (Japan); Ito, Masahiro [NESI Inc. (4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393, Japan) (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  15. Thermal Modelling of Permanent Magnent Machines Using double layer winding - Strategies for cooling of PM motors in ship propulsion pods

    OpenAIRE

    Therattil Mohanan, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    The trend to carry out thermal analysis of Electric Motor is increasing day by day so as to improve the performance of the machines. This paper deals with the thermal analysis of Electric Motors and their cooling solutions, focusing on Ship Propulsion Pods. Using Finite element analysis (FEM), temperature distribution in two coils in a slot, with different turn profiles are considered in this study. The effect of temperature with the use of different conductor s shapes in slot of the machine,...

  16. Comparative study on thermal performance of natural draft cooling towers with finned shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, Mohsen [Bu-Ali Sina Univ., Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-10-15

    The cooling efficiency of natural draft cooling towers under crosswind condition should be improved. In the present research work three different externally finned shells were considered for a typical natural draft cooling tower to investigate the cooling improvement. They were numerically simulated under normal and crosswind conditions. Numerical results show that twisting four fin plates over the tower shell along the 45 peripheral angle, could improve the cooling efficiency up to 6.5 %. Because of the periodic shape of the fin plates, the cooling efficiency of the cooling tower with finned shell is less sensitive to the change of wind.

  17. Experimental study of an air-cooled thermal management system for high capacity lithium-titanate batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Michael R.; Prasad, Ajay K.; Advani, Suresh G.

    2012-10-01

    Lithium-titanate batteries have become an attractive option for battery electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. In order to maintain safe operating temperatures, these batteries must be actively cooled during operation. Liquid-cooled systems typically employed for this purpose are inefficient due to the parasitic power consumed by the on-board chiller unit and the coolant pump. A more efficient option would be to circulate ambient air through the battery bank and directly reject the heat to the ambient. We designed and fabricated such an air-cooled thermal management system employing metal-foam based heat exchanger plates for sufficient heat removal capacity. Experiments were conducted with Altairnano's 50 Ah cells over a range of charge-discharge cycle currents at two air flow rates. It was found that an airflow of 1100 mls-1 per cell restricts the temperature rise of the coolant air to less than 10 °C over ambient even for 200 A charge-discharge cycles. Furthermore, it was shown that the power required to drive the air through the heat exchanger was less than a conventional liquid-cooled thermal management system. The results indicate that air-cooled systems can be an effective and efficient method for the thermal management of automotive battery packs.

  18. Thermal Disk Winds in X-Ray Binaries: Realistic Heating and Cooling Rates Give Rise to Slow, but Massive, Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, N.; Proga, D.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    A number of X-ray binaries exhibit clear evidence for the presence of disk winds in the high/soft state. A promising driving mechanism for these outflows is mass loss driven by the thermal expansion of X-ray heated material in the outer disk atmosphere. Higginbottom & Proga recently demonstrated that the properties of thermally driven winds depend critically on the shape of the thermal equilibrium curve, since this determines the thermal stability of the irradiated material. For a given spectral energy distribution, the thermal equilibrium curve depends on an exact balance between the various heating and cooling mechanisms at work. Most previous work on thermally driven disk winds relied on an analytical approximation to these rates. Here, we use the photoionization code cloudy to generate realistic heating and cooling rates which we then use in a 2.5D hydrodynamic model computed in ZEUS to simulate thermal winds in a typical black hole X-ray binary. We find that these heating and cooling rates produce a significantly more complex thermal equilibrium curve, with dramatically different stability properties. The resulting flow, calculated in the optically thin limit, is qualitatively different from flows calculated using approximate analytical rates. Specifically, our thermal disk wind is much denser and slower, with a mass-loss rate that is a factor of two higher and characteristic velocities that are a factor of three lower. The low velocity of the flow—{v}\\max ≃ 200 km s‑1—may be difficult to reconcile with observations. However, the high mass-loss rate—15 × the accretion rate—is promising, since it has the potential to destabilize the disk. Thermally driven disk winds may therefore provide a mechanism for state changes.

  19. Thermal modelling of cooling tool cutting when milling by electrical analogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benmoussa H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurement temperatures by (some devises are applied immediately after shut-down and may be corrected for the temperature drop that occurs in the interval between shut-down and measurement. This paper presents a new procedure for thermal modelling of the tool cutting used just after machining; when the tool is out off the chip in order to extrapolate the cutting temperature from the temperature measured when the tool is at stand still. A fin approximation is made in enhancing heat loss (by conduction and convection to air stream is used. In the modelling we introduce an equivalent thermal network to estimate the cutting temperature as a function of specific energy. In another hand, a local modified element lumped conduction equation is used to predict the temperature gradient with time when the tool is being cooled, with initial and boundary conditions. These predictions provide a detailed view of the global heat transfer coefficient as a function of cutting speed because the heat loss for the tool in air stream is an order of magnitude larger than in normal environment. Finally we deduct the cutting temperature by inverse method.

  20. Thermal modelling of cooling tool cutting when milling by electrical analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabid, F.; Arrouf, M.; Assas, M.; Benmoussa, H.

    2010-06-01

    Measurement temperatures by (some devises) are applied immediately after shut-down and may be corrected for the temperature drop that occurs in the interval between shut-down and measurement. This paper presents a new procedure for thermal modelling of the tool cutting used just after machining; when the tool is out off the chip in order to extrapolate the cutting temperature from the temperature measured when the tool is at stand still. A fin approximation is made in enhancing heat loss (by conduction and convection) to air stream is used. In the modelling we introduce an equivalent thermal network to estimate the cutting temperature as a function of specific energy. In another hand, a local modified element lumped conduction equation is used to predict the temperature gradient with time when the tool is being cooled, with initial and boundary conditions. These predictions provide a detailed view of the global heat transfer coefficient as a function of cutting speed because the heat loss for the tool in air stream is an order of magnitude larger than in normal environment. Finally we deduct the cutting temperature by inverse method.

  1. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  2. Thermal chip fabrication with arrays of sensors and heaters for micro-scale impingement cooling heat transfer analysis and measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C H; Gau, C

    2004-07-30

    The design and fabrication for a thermal chip with an array of temperature sensors and heaters for study of micro-jet impingement cooling heat transfer process are presented. This thermal chip can minimize the heat loss from the system to the ambient and provide a uniform heat flux along the wall, thus local heat transfer processes along the wall can be measured and obtained. The fabrication procedure presented can reach a chip yield of 100%, and every one of the sensors and heaters on the chip is in good condition. In addition, micro-jet impingement cooling experiments are performed to obtain the micro-scale local heat transfer Nusselt number along the wall. Flow visualization for the micro-impinging jet is also made. The experimental results indicate that both the micro-scale impinging jet flow structure and the heat transfer process along the wall is significantly different from the case of large-scale jet impingement cooling process.

  3. Durability of zirconia thermal-barrier ceramic coatings on air-cooled turbine blades in cyclic jet engine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, C. H.; Jacobs, R. E.; Stecura, S.; Morse, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal barrier ceramic coatings of stabilized zirconia over a bond coat of Ni Cr Al Y were tested for durability on air cooled turbine rotor blades in a research turbojet engine. Zirconia stabilized with either yttria, magnesia, or calcia was investigated. On the basis of durability and processing cost, the yttria stabilized zirconia was considered the best of the three coatings investigated.

  4. Operative temperature drifts and occupant satisfaction with thermal environment in three office buildings using radiant heating/ cooling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub; Toftum, Jørn; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse operative temperature drifts and occupant satisfaction with thermal environment in office buildings utilizing embedded radiant heating/cooling systems. Three office buildings were investigated: Town Hall in Viborg, Denmark (floor area 19400 m2), IDOM...

  5. Passive residual energy utilization system in thermal cycles on water-cooled power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placco, Guilherme M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F., E-mail: placco@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV/DCTA) Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Santos, Rubens S. dos, E-mail: rsantos@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN -RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work presents a concept of a residual energy utilization in nuclear plants thermal cycles. After taking notice of the causes of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, an idea arose to adapt a passive thermal circuit as part of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). One of the research topics of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), as part of the heat conversion of a space nuclear power system is a passive multi fluid turbine. One of the main characteristics of this device is its passive capability of staying inert and be brought to power at moments notice. During the first experiments and testing of this passive device, it became clear that any small amount of gas flow would generate power. Given that in the first stages of the Fukushima accident and even during the whole event there was plenty availability of steam flow that would be the proper condition to make the proposed system to work. This system starts in case of failure of the ECCS, including loss of site power, loss of diesel generators and loss of the battery power. This system does not requires electricity to run and will work with bleed steam. It will generate enough power to supply the plant safety system avoiding overheating of the reactor core produced by the decay heat. This passive system uses a modified Tesla type turbine. With the tests conducted until now, it is possible to ensure that the operation of this new turbine in a thermal cycle is very satisfactory and it performs as expected. (author)

  6. Minimizing Superficial Thermal Injury Using Bilateral Cryogen Spray Cooling During Laser Reshaping of Composite Cartilage Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Jen; Cheng, Sally M.H.; Chiu, Lynn L.; Wong, Brian J.F.; Ting, Keen

    2014-01-01

    Composite cartilage grafts were excised from New Zealand rabbit ears. Flat composite grafts (of cartilage and overlying skin graft on both surfaces) were obtained from each ear and cut into a rectangle measuring 50 mm by 25 mm (x by y) with an average thickness of approximately 1.3 mm (z), skin included. Specimens were manually deformed with a jig and maintained in this new position during laser illumination. The composite cartilage grafts were illuminated on the concave surface with an Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm, 3 mm spot) at 10 W, 20 W, 30 W, 40 W, 50 W. Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) was applied to both exterior (convex) and interior (concave) surfaces of the tissue to reduce thermal injury to the grafts. CSC was delivered: (1) in controlled applications (cryogen released when surface reached 40°C, and (2) receiving only laser at above wattage, no CSC [representing the control group]. The specimens were maintained in a deformation for 15 minutes after illumination and serially examined for 14 days. The control group with no CSC caused injury to all specimens, ranging from minor to full thickness epidermal thermal injury. Although most levels of laser and CSC yielded a high degree of reshaping over an acute time period, after 14 days specimens exposed to 30 W, 40 W, 50 W retained shape better than those treated at 10 W and 20 W. The specimens exposed to 50 W with controlled CSC retained its new shape to the highest degree over all others, and thermal injury was minimal. In conclusion, combinations of laser and CSC parameters were effective and practical for the reshaping of composite cartilage grafts. Lasers Surg. PMID:18727025

  7. Investigation of wellbore cooling by circulation and fluid penetration into the formation using a wellbore thermal simulator computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The high temperatures of geothermal wells present severe problems for drilling, logging, and developing these reservoirs. Cooling the wellbore is perhaps the most common method to solve these problems. However, it is usually not clear what may be the most effective wellbore cooling mechanism for a given well. In this paper, wellbore cooling by the use of circulation or by fluid injection into the surrounding rock is investigated using a wellbore thermal simulator computer code. Short circulation times offer no prolonged cooling of fluid in the wellbore, but long circulation times (greater than ten or twenty days) greatly reduce the warming rate after shut-in. The dependence of the warming rate on the penetration distance of cooler temperatures into the rock formation (as by fluid injection) is investigated. Penetration distances of greater than 0.6 m appear to offer a substantial reduction in the warming rate. Several plots are shown which demonstrate these effects. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Impact of Cooling Rate-Induced Recrystallization on High G Mechanical Shock and Thermal Cycling in Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas R.; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical stability and thermo-mechanical fatigue performance of solder joints with low silver content Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt.%) (SAC105) alloy based on different cooling rates are investigated in high G level shock environment and thermal cycling conditions. The cooling rate-controlled samples ranging from 1°C/min to 75°C/min cooling rate, not only show differences in microstructure, where a fine poly-granular microstructure develops in the case of fast cooling versus normal cooling, but also show various shock performances based on the microstructure changes. The fast cooling rate improves the high G shock performance by over 90% compared to the normal cooled SAC105 alloy air-cooling environment commonly used after assembly reflow. The microstructure effect on thermal cycling performance is also discussed, which is analyzed based on the Sn grain orientation, interconnect stability, and solder joint bulk microstructure.

  9. ANTEO+: A subchannel code for thermal-hydraulic analysis of liquid metal cooled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodi, F., E-mail: francesco.lodi5@unibo.it [DIN – Laboratory of Montecuccolino, University of Bologna, Via dei Colli 16, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Grasso, G., E-mail: giacomo.grasso@enea.it [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development), via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mattioli, D., E-mail: davide.mattioli@enea.it [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development), via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Sumini, M., E-mail: marco.sumini@unibo.it [DIN – Laboratory of Montecuccolino, University of Bologna, Via dei Colli 16, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The code structure is presented in detail. • The performed validation is outlined. • Results are critically discussed assessing code accuracy. • Conclusions are drawn and ground for future work identified. - Abstract: Liquid metal cooled fast reactors are promising options for achieving the high degrees of safety and sustainability demanded by the Generation IV paradigm. Among the critical aspects to be addressed in the design process, thermal-hydraulics is one of the most challenging; in order to embed safety in the core conceptualization, these aspects are to be considered at the very beginning of the design process, and translated in a design perspective. For achieving these objectives the subchannel code ANTEO+ has been conceived, able to simulate pin bundle arrangements cooled by liquid metals. The main purposes of ANTEO+ are simplifying the problem description maintaining the required accuracy, enabling a more transparent interface with the user, and having a clear and identifiable application domain, in order to help the user interpreting the results and, mostly, defining their confidence. Since ANTEO+ relies on empirical correlations, the validation phase is of paramount importance along with a clear discussion on the simplifications adopted in modeling the conservation equations. In the present work a detailed description of ANTEO+ structure is given along with a thorough validation of the main models implemented for flow split, pressure drops and subchannel temperatures. The analysis confirmed the ability of ANTEO+ in reproducing experimental data in its anticipated validity domain, with a relatively high degree of accuracy when compared to other classical subchannel tools like ENERGY-II, COBRA-IV-I-MIT and BRS-TVS.

  10. Preliminary thermal/structural analysis of a carbon-carbon/refractory-metal heat-pipe-cooled wing leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Camarda, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    This study presents preliminary thermal/structural analyses of a carbon-carbon/refractory-metal heat-pipe-cooled wing leading edge concept designed for an air breathing single-stage-to-orbit hypersonic vehicle. The concept features chordwise (i.e., normal to the leading edge) and spanwise (i.e., parallel to the leading edge) refractory-metal heat pipes which are completely embedded within a carbon-carbon primary structure. Studies of the leading edge were performed using nonlinear thermal and linear structural three-dimensional finite element analyses. The concept was shown to be thermally feasible within the limits of the assumptions made in the analyses when internal radiative cooling is present during ascent, and a three-dimensional carbon-carbon architecture is used. In addition, internal radiative cooling was found not to be necessary during descent. The linear stress analysis indicated excessively large thermal stresses in the rafractory metal walls of the heat pipes even though a soft layer of carbon was included between the heat pipe and the carbon-carbon structure in an attempt to reduce the thermal stresses. A nonlinear structural analysis may be necessary to properly model the response of the refractory-metal heat pipes.

  11. Screening of Gas-Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulic and Safety Analysis Tools and Experimental Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Seung Wook (and others)

    2007-08-15

    This report is a final report of I-NERI Project, 'Screening of Gas-cooled Reactor Thermal Hydraulic and Safety Analysis Tools and Experimental Database 'jointly carried out by KAERI, ANL and INL. In this study, we developed the basic technologies required to develop and validate the VHTR TH/safety analysis tools and evaluated the TH/safety database information. The research tasks consist of; 1) code qualification methodology (INL), 2) high-level PIRTs for major nucleus set of events (KAERI, ANL, INL), 3) initial scaling and scoping analysis (ANL, KAERI, INL), 4) filtering of TH/safety tools (KAERI, INL), 5) evaluation of TH/safety database information (KAERI, INL, ANL) and 6) key scoping analysis (KAERI). The code qualification methodology identifies the role of PIRTs in the R and D process and the bottom-up and top-down code validation methods. Since the design of VHTR is still evolving, we generated the high-level PIRTs referencing 600MWth block-type GT-MHR and 400MWth pebble-type PBMR. Nucleus set of events that represents the VHTR safety and operational transients consists of the enveloping scenarios of HPCC (high pressure conduction cooling: loss of primary flow), LPCC/Air-Ingress (low pressure conduction cooling: loss of coolant), LC (load changes: power maneuvering), ATWS (anticipated transients without scram: reactivity insertion), WS (water ingress: water-interfacing system break) and HU (hydrogen-side upset: loss of heat sink). The initial scaling analysis defines dimensionless parameters that need to be reflected in mixed convection modeling and the initial scoping analysis provided the reference system transients used in the PIRTs generation. For the PIRTs phenomena, we evaluated the modeling capability of the candidate TH/safety tools and derived a model improvement need. By surveying and evaluating the TH/safety database information, a tools V and V matrix has been developed. Through the key scoping analysis using available database, the

  12. Thermal energy storage with geothermal triplet for space heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendal, Martin; Hartog, Niels

    2017-04-01

    Many governmental organizations and private companies have set high targets in avoiding CO2 emissions and reducing energy (Kamp, 2015; Ministry-of-Economic-affairs, 2016). ATES systems use groundwater wells to overcome the discrepancy in time between the availability of heat (during summer) and the demand for heat (during winter). Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage is an increasingly popular technique; currently over 2000 ATES systems are operational in the Netherlands (Graaf et al., 2016). High temperature ATES may help to improve performance of these conventional ATES systems. ATES systems use heat pumps to get the stored heat to the required temperature for heating of around 40-50°C and to produce the cold water for cooling in summer. These heat pumps need quite a lot of power to run; on average an ATES system produces 3-4 times less CO2 emission compared to conventional. Over 60% of those emission are accounted for by the heat pump (Dekker, 2016). This heat pump power consumption can be reduced by utilizing other sources of sustainable heat and cooling capacity for storage in the subsurface. At such operating temperatures the required storage temperatures do no longer match the return temperatures in the building systems. Therefore additional components and an additional well are required to increase the groundwater temperature in summer (e.g. solar collectors) and decrease it in winter (e.g. dry coolers). To prevent "pollution" of the warm and cold well return water from the building can be stored in a third well until weather conditions are suitable for producing the required storage temperature. Simulations and an economical evaluation show great potential for this type of aquifer thermal energy storage; economic performance is better than normal ATES while the emissions are reduce by a factor ten. At larger temperature differences, also the volume of groundwater required to pump around is much less, which causes an additional energy saving. Research now

  13. A Case Study of MgB2 and HTS Magnets Being Cooled and Cooled Down using a Hydrogen Thermal-siphon Cooling-loop with Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael A.

    When one fabricates a magnet using MgB2 or HTS conductors, the operating temperature of the magnet can be increased into the temperature range from about 15 to 30 K. This temperature range is between the triple-point (13.8 K) and the critical point of para-hydrogen (32.3 K). Hydrogen has excellent heat transfer properties both as a liquid and as a gas at low temperature. The heat of vaporization of hydrogen is larger than any cryogenic fluid. In addition, the specific heat of the liquid and the gas is higher than any cryogenic fluid. Hydrogen may be the best fluid to use to connect a magnet operating between 15 and 30 K with a source of refrigeration. This paper compares magnet cooling at 20 K using helium and hydrogen. A safe completely passive cooling loop is discussed in this paper.

  14. Daytime space cooling with phase change material ceiling panels discharged using rooftop photovoltaic/thermal panels and night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Pean, Thibault Quentin; Gennari, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of using photovoltaic/thermal panels for producing cold water through the process of night-time radiative cooling was experimentally examined. The cold water was used to discharge phase change material in ceiling panels in a climatic chamber. Both night-time radiative cooling...... the photovoltaic/thermal varied from 56% to 122%. The phase change material ceiling panels were thus, capable of providing an acceptable thermal environment and the photovoltaic/thermal panels were able to provide most of the required electricity and cold water needed for cooling....

  15. Thermal Characteristics of Air-Water Spray Impingement Cooling of Hot Metallic Surface under Controlled Parametric Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh Kumar Nayak; Purna Chandra Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper.The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures,plate thickness,water flow rate,nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface.The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate,heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined.Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length,120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm,6 mm,and 8 mm respectively were tested.The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface.Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e,4 mm thick plates.Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling.At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar,maximum cooling rates 670℃/s and average cooling rate of 305.23℃/s were achieved for a temperature of 850℃ of the steel plate.

  16. Phytochemical profiles and health-promoting effects of cool-season food legumes as influenced by thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baojun; Chang, Sam K C

    2009-11-25

    The effects of four thermal processing methods (conventional boiling, conventional steaming, pressure boiling, and pressure steaming) on phytochemical profiles, antioxidant capacities, and antiproliferation properties of commonly consumed cool-season food legumes, including green pea, yellow pea, chickpea, and lentil, were investigated. Four groups of individual phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids, anthocyanins, and flavan-3-ols, as well as flavonols and flavones were quantified using HPLC, respectively. As compared to the original raw legumes, all processing methods caused significant (pphytic acid content, chemical antioxidant capacities in terms of ferric reducing antioxidant power and peroxyl radical scavenging capacity, and cellular antioxidant activity as well as antiproliferation capacities of cool-season food legumes. Different cooking methods have varied effects on reducing total phenolics, saponins, phytic acids, and individual phenolic compounds. For all cool-season food legumes, steaming appeared to be a better cooking method than boiling in retaining antioxidants and phenolic components, whereas boiling appeared to be effective in reducing saponin and phytic acid contents. In the case of lentil, all thermal processing methods (except conventional steaming) caused significant (pacid, and total phenolic acid. All thermal processing methods caused significant (p<0.05) decreases in (+)-catechin and flavan-3-ols in each cool-season food legume.

  17. Theoretical modelling, experimental studies and clinical simulations of urethral cooling catheters for use during prostate thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Sean R H [Division of Medical Physics, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Sherar, Michael D [Division of Medical Physics, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2003-03-21

    Urethral cooling catheters are used to prevent thermal damage to the urethra during thermal therapy of the prostate. Quantification of a catheter's heat transfer characteristics is necessary for prediction of the catheter's influence on the temperature and thermal dose distribution in periurethral tissue. Two cooling catheters with different designs were examined: the Dornier Urowave catheter and a prototype device from BSD Medical Corp. A convection coefficient, h, was used to characterize the cooling ability of each catheter. The value of the convection coefficient (h = 330 W m{sup -2} deg C{sup -1} for the Dornier catheter, h = 160 W m{sup -2} deg C{sup -1} for the BSD device) was obtained by comparing temperatures measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom material to temperatures predicted by a finite element method simulation of the phantom experiments. The coefficient was found to be insensitive to the rate of coolant flow inside the catheter between 40 and 120 ml min{sup -1}. The convection coefficient method for modelling urethral catheters was incorporated into simulations of microwave heating of the prostate. Results from these simulations indicate that the Dornier device is significantly more effective than the BSD catheter at cooling the tissue surrounding the urethra.

  18. Cool products for building envelope - Part II: Experimental and numerical evaluation of thermal performances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revel, G.M.; Martarelli, M.; Emiliani, M.; Celotti, L.; Nadalini, R.; Ferrari, A.D.; Hermanns, S.; Beckers, E.

    2014-01-01

    Cool materials have a large potential as cost-effective solution for reducing cooling energy consumption in hot summer and mild winter regions like Mediterranean countries. A previous paper has described in detail the development of cool coloured ceramic tiles, acrylic paints and bituminous membrane

  19. Radiative energy balance of Venus: An approach to parameterize thermal cooling and solar heating rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal cooling rates QC and solar heating rates QH in the atmosphere of Venus at altitudes between 0 and 100 km are investigated using the radiative transfer and radiative balance simulation techniques described by Haus et al. (2015b, 2016). QC strongly responds to temperature profile and cloud parameter changes, while QH is less sensitive to these parameters. The latter mainly depends on solar insolation conditions and the unknown UV absorber distribution. A parameterization approach is developed that permits a fast and reliable calculation of temperature change rates Q for different atmospheric model parameters and that can be applied in General Circulation Models to investigate atmospheric dynamics. A separation of temperature, cloud parameter, and unknown UV absorber influences is performed. The temperature response parameterization relies on a specific altitude and latitude-dependent cloud model. It is based on an algorithm that characterizes Q responses to a broad range of temperature perturbations at each level of the atmosphere using the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) as basis temperature model. The cloud response parameterization considers different temperature conditions and a range of individual cloud mode factors that additionally change cloud optical depths as determined by the initial latitude-dependent model. A QH response parameterization for abundance changes of the unknown UV absorber is also included. Deviations between accurate calculation and parameterization results are in the order of a few tenths of K/day at altitudes below 90 km. The parameterization approach is used to investigate atmospheric radiative equilibrium (RE) conditions. Polar mesospheric RE temperatures above the cloud top are up to 70 K lower and equatorial temperatures up to 10 K higher than observed values. This radiative forcing field is balanced by dynamical processes that maintain the observed thermal structure.

  20. Thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling applications. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H.W.; Kedl, R.J.

    1976-11-01

    This is the first in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities at ORNL to develop thermal energy storage (TES) technology applicable to building heating and cooling. Studies to be carried out will emphasize latent heat storage in that sensible heat storage is held to be an essentially existing technology. Development of a time-dependent analytical model of a TES system charged with a phase-change material was started. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources is nearing completion. Studies into the physical chemistry of TES materials were initiated. Preliminary data were obtained on the melt-freeze cycle behavior and viscosities of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and a mixture of Glauber's salt and Borax; limited melt-freeze data were obtained on two paraffin waxes. A subcontract was signed with Monsanto Research Corporation for studies on form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for TES; subcontracts are being negotiated with four other organizations (Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Franklin Institute, and Suntek Research Associates). Review of 10 of 13 unsolicited proposals received was completed by the end of June 1976.

  1. Cooling Curve Analysis of Micro- and Nanographite Particle-Embedded Salt-PCMs for Thermal Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, R.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, the focus of phase change materials (PCM) research was on the development of salt mixtures with particle additives to improve their thermal energy storage (TES) functionalities. The effect of addition of microsized (50 μm) and nanosized (400 nm) graphite particles on TES parameters of potassium nitrate was analyzed in this work. A novel technique of computer-aided cooling curve analysis was employed here to study the suitability of large inhomogeneous PCM samples. The addition of graphite micro- and nanoparticles reduced the solidification time of the PCM significantly enhancing the heat removal rates, in the first thermal cycle. The benefits of dispersing nanoparticles diminished in successive 10 thermal cycles, and its performance was comparable to the microparticle-embedded PCM thereafter. The decay of TES functionalities on thermal cycling is attributed to the agglomeration of nanoparticles which was observed in SEM images. The thermal diffusivity property of the PCM decreased with addition of graphite particles. With no considerable change in the cooling rates and a simultaneous decrease in thermal diffusivity, it is concluded that the addition of graphite particles increased the specific heat capacity of the PCM. It is also suggested that the additive concentration should not be greater than 0.1% by weight of the PCM sample.

  2. Preliminary design and thermal analysis of device for finish cooling Jaffa biscuits in a.d. 'Jaffa'- Crvenka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salemović Duško R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper preliminary design of device for finish cooling chocolate topping of biscuits in A.D. 'Jaffa'- Crvenka was done. The proposed preliminary design followed by the required technological process of finish cooling biscuits and required parameters of process which was supposed to get and which represented part of project task. Thermal analysis was made and obtained percentage error between surface contact of the air and chocolate topping, obtained from heat balance and geometrical over proposed preliminary design, wasn't more than 0.67%. This is a preliminary design completely justified because using required length of belt conveyor receive required temperature of chocolate topping at the end of the cooling process.

  3. Effect of cooling rates on dendrite spacings of directionally solidified DZ125 alloy under high thermal gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Weiguo; LIU Lin; ZHAO Xinbao; HUANG Taiwen; YU Zhuhuan; QU Min; FU Hengzhi

    2009-01-01

    The dendrite morphologies and spacings of directionally solidified DZ125 superalloy were investigated under high thermal gradient about 500 K/cm. The results reveal that, with increasing cooling rate, both the spacings of primary and secondary dendrite arms decrease, and the dendrite morphologies transit from coarse to superfine dendrite. The secondary dendrite arms trend to be refined and be well developed, and the tertiary dendrite will occur. The predictions of the Kurz/Fisher model and the Hunt/Lu model accord basically with the experimental data for primary dendrite arm spacing. The regression equation of the primary dendrite arm spacings λ_1 and the cooling rate V_c is λ_1=0.013V_c~(-0.32). The regression equation of the secondary dendrite arm spacing λ_2 and the cooling rate V_c is λ_2=0.00258V_c~(-0.31), which gives good agreement with the Feurer/Wunderlin model.

  4. Automated tracking of lava lake level using thermal images at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Swanson, Don; Orr, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Tracking the level of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i, is an essential part of monitoring the ongoing eruption and forecasting potentially hazardous changes in activity. We describe a simple automated image processing routine that analyzes continuously-acquired thermal images of the lava lake and measures lava level. The method uses three image segmentation approaches, based on edge detection, short-term change analysis, and composite temperature thresholding, to identify and track the lake margin in the images. These relative measurements from the images are periodically calibrated with laser rangefinder measurements to produce real-time estimates of lake elevation. Continuous, automated tracking of the lava level has been an important tool used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory since 2012 in real-time operational monitoring of the volcano and its hazard potential.

  5. Cosmic ray heating in cool core clusters - II. Self-regulation cycle and non-thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Svenja; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2017-05-01

    Self-regulated feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be critical in balancing radiative cooling of the low-entropy gas at the centres of galaxy clusters and in regulating star formation in central galaxies. In a companion paper, we found steady-state solutions of the hydrodynamic equations that are coupled to the cosmic ray (CR) energy equation for a large cluster sample. In those solutions, radiative cooling in the central region is balanced by streaming CRs through the generation and dissipation of resonantly generated Alfvén waves and by thermal conduction at large radii. Here, we demonstrate that the predicted non-thermal emission resulting from hadronic CR interactions in the intracluster medium exceeds observational radio (and gamma-ray) data in a subsample of clusters that host radio mini haloes (RMHs). In contrast, the predicted non-thermal emission is well below observational data in cooling galaxy clusters without RMHs. These are characterized by exceptionally large AGN radio fluxes, indicating high CR yields and associated CR heating rates. We suggest a self-regulation cycle of AGN feedback in which non-RMH clusters are heated by streaming CRs homogeneously throughout the central cooling region. We predict radio micro haloes surrounding the AGNs of these CR-heated clusters in which the primary emission may predominate the hadronically generated emission. Once the CR population has streamed sufficiently far and lost enough energy, the cooling rate increases, which explains the increased star formation rates in clusters hosting RMHs. Those could be powered hadronically by CRs that have previously heated the cluster core.

  6. Cosmic ray heating in cool core clusters II: Self-regulation cycle and non-thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Svenja; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulated feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be critical in balancing radiative cooling of the low-entropy gas at the centres of galaxy clusters and in regulating star formation in central galaxies. In a companion paper, we found steady state solutions of the hydrodynamic equations that are coupled to the CR energy equation for a large cluster sample. In those solutions, radiative cooling in the central region is balanced by streaming CRs through the generation and dissipation of resonantly generated Alfvén waves and by thermal conduction at large radii. Here we demonstrate that the predicted non-thermal emission resulting from hadronic CR interactions in the intra-cluster medium exceeds observational radio (and gamma-ray) data in a subsample of clusters that host radio mini halos (RMHs). In contrast, the predicted non-thermal emission is well below observational data in cooling galaxy clusters without RMHs. These are characterised by exceptionally large AGN radio fluxes, indicating high CR yields and associated CR heating rates. We suggest a self-regulation cycle of AGN feedback in which non-RMH clusters are heated by streaming CRs homogeneously throughout the central cooling region. We predict radio micro halos surrounding the AGNs of these CR-heated clusters in which the primary emission may predominate the hadronically generated emission. Once the CR population has streamed sufficiently far and lost enough energy, the cooling rate increases, which explains the increased star formation rates in clusters hosting RMHs. Those could be powered hadronically by CRs that have previously heated the cluster core.

  7. Residual thermal stress of a mounted KDP crystal after cooling and its effects on second harmonic generation of a high-average-power laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ruifeng; Liu, Haitao; Liang, Yingchun; Yu, Fuli

    2017-01-01

    Thermal problems are huge challenges for solid state lasers that are interested in high output power, cooling of the nonlinear optics is insufficient to completely solve the problem of thermally induced stress, as residual thermal stress remains after cooling, which is first proposed, to the best of our knowledge. In this paper a comprehensive model incorporating principles of thermodynamics, mechanics and optics is proposed, and it is used to study the residual thermal stress of a mounted KDP crystal after cooling process from mechanical perspective, along with the effects of the residual thermal stress on the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of a high-average-power laser. Effects of the structural parameters of the mounting configuration of the KDP crystal on the residual thermal stress are characterized, as well as the SHG efficiency. The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility of solving the problems of residual thermal stress from the perspective on structural design of mounting configuration.

  8. Thermal Hydraulic Design and Analysis of a Water-Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket with Superheated Steam for CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoman; Ma, Xuebin; Jiang, Kecheng; Chen, Lei; Huang, Kai; Liu, Songlin

    2015-09-01

    The water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) is one of the blanket candidates for China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR). In order to improve power generation efficiency and tritium breeding ratio, WCCB with superheated steam is under development. The thermal-hydraulic design is the key to achieve the purpose of safe heat removal and efficient power generation under normal and partial loading operation conditions. In this paper, the coolant flow scheme was designed and one self-developed analytical program was developed, based on a theoretical heat transfer model and empirical correlations. Employing this program, the design and analysis of related thermal-hydraulic parameters were performed under different fusion power conditions. The results indicated that the superheated steam water-cooled blanket is feasible. supported by the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000 and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  9. Determination of Optimum Thermal Insulation Thicknesses for External Walls Considering the Heating, Cooling and Annual Energy Requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KAYNAKLI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, optimization of thermal insulation thickness applied to the external walls of buildings has been carried out comparatively based on the seasonal (space-heating and cooling and the annual energy requirements considering solar radiation effect. This study has been performed for four degree-day regions of Turkey, namely, Iskenderun (in the first region, Istanbul (in the second region, Ankara (in the third region and Ardahan (in the fourth region. By determining the sol-air temperatures for each region and maximizing the present worth value of seasonal and annual energy savings, the optimum thermal insulation thicknesses have been calculated. The effects of solar radiation on heating-cooling energy requirements, the variation of optimum insulation thicknesses and payback periods with respect to degree-day regions, the differences between the analyses based on seasonal and annual have been presented in tabular and graphical form.

  10. Thermal modeling in an engine cooling system to control coolant flow for fuel consumption improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangki; Woo, Seungchul; Kim, Minho; Lee, Kihyung

    2016-09-01

    The design and evaluation of engine cooling and lubrication systems is generally based on real vehicle tests. Our goal here was to establish an engine heat balance model based on mathematical and interpretive analysis of each element of a passenger diesel engine cooling system using a 1-D numerical model. The purpose of this model is to determine ways of optimizing the cooling and lubrication components of an engine and then to apply these methods to actual cooling and lubrication systems of engines that will be developed in the future. Our model was operated under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) mode conditions, which represent the fuel economy evaluation mode in Europe. The flow rate of the cooling system was controlled using a control valve. Our results showed that the fuel efficiency was improved by as much as 1.23 %, cooling loss by 1.35 %, and friction loss by 2.21 % throughout NEDC modes by modification of control conditions.

  11. Anomalous Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Watters, Jonathan M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the impact of turbulent suppression of parallel heat conduction on the cooling of post-flare coronal loops. Depending on the value of the mean free path {λ }T associated with the turbulent scattering process, we identify four main cooling scenarios. The overall temperature evolution, from an initial temperature in excess of 107 K, is modeled in each case, highlighting the evolution of the dominant cooling mechanism throughout the cooling process. Comparison with observed cooling times allows the value of {λ }T to be constrained, and interestingly this range corresponds to situations where collision-dominated conduction plays a very limited role, or even no role at all, in the cooling of post-flare coronal loops.

  12. Anomalous Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Nicolas H; Kontar, Eduard P; Emslie, A Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of turbulent suppression of parallel heat conduction on the cooling of post-flare coronal loops. Depending on the value of the mean free path $\\lambda_T$ associated with the turbulent scattering process, we identify four main cooling scenarios. The overall temperature evolution, from an initial temperature in excess of $10^7$~K, is modeled in each case, highlighting the evolution of the dominant cooling mechanism throughout the cooling process. Comparison with observed cooling times allows the value of $\\lambda_T$ to be constrained, and interestingly this range corresponds to situations where collision-dominated conduction plays a very limited role, or even no role at all, in the cooling of post-flare coronal loops.

  13. Thermal management in high-power electronics cooled down using capillary pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiecek, Boguslaw; Wajman, Tomasz; Felczak, Mariola; Berlinski, Marek

    2003-04-01

    By using the evaporation of working fluid in the capillary it is possible to design and build cooling device, with high cooling effectiveness. This paper presents a preliminary cooling system integrated with electronic device., which is supported by evaporation and capillarity effects. A simplified modeling of conjugate heat transfer including evaporation using FLUENT package is discussed. The experiments for open and close loop capillary pomp are shown to compare and verify the measurements and simulation results.

  14. Energy Optimization for Transcritical CO2 Heat Pump for Combined Heating and Cooling and Thermal Storage Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Carmo, Carolina Madeira Ramos; Blarke, Morten; Yazawa, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    A transcritical heat pump (THP) cycle using carbon dioxide (CO2) as the refrigerant is known to feature an excellent coefficient of performance (COP) as a thermodynamic system. Using this feature, we are designing and building a system that combines a water-to-water CO2 heat pump with both hot...... and cold thermal storages know as Thermal Battery (TB) (Blarke, 2012). Smart and effective use of intermittent renewable energy resources (for example solar and wind power) is obtained supplying water heating (>70 oC) and cooling services (

  15. Study of Nano Particles for Enhanced Heat Transfer Characteristics of Base Fluids for Cool Thermal Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promit Choudhury

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable heat transfer is very crucial for heat demand and supply related applications where the optimum demand is not met. Cool thermal energy systems are the units which find application in conditioning and preserving items. A colloidal mixture of nano particles in a base fluid tremendously enhances the heat transfer characteristics of the original base fluid and is ideally suited for practical application due to its marvelous characteristics.

  16. Novel thermal management system using boiling cooling for high-powered lithium-ion battery packs for hybrid electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zareer, Maan; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    2017-09-01

    A thermal management system is necessary to control the operating temperature of the lithium ion batteries in battery packs for electrical and hybrid electrical vehicles. This paper proposes a new battery thermal management system based on one type of phase change material for the battery packs in hybrid electrical vehicles and develops a three dimensional electrochemical thermal model. The temperature distributions of the batteries are investigated under various operating conditions for comparative evaluations. The proposed system boils liquid propane to remove the heat generated by the batteries, and the propane vapor is used to cool the part of the battery that is not covered with liquid propane. The effect on the thermal behavior of the battery pack of the height of the liquid propane inside the battery pack, relative to the height of the battery, is analyzed. The results show that the propane based thermal management system provides good cooling control of the temperature of the batteries under high and continuous charge and discharge cycles at 7.5C.

  17. Use of Cooling Thermal Storage as a Heat Sink for Steam Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Ahmed Sabry

    In the present paper, a system is proposed for improving the performance of steam power plant with air-cooled condenser during peak loads. In this system, the power plant comprises two steam turbines, and the air-cooled condenser is replaced by two condensers. The first one is air-cooled (dry) and used for condensing the exhaust steam of the first turbine, while the second is water-cooled and serves to condense the steam outlet of the second turbine. The warm cooling water exiting the wet condenser is pumped to a cooling storage container, where it is cooled and re-circulated to the wet condenser. Cooling is produced by a refrigeration machine driven by the extra electric power generated by the two turbines during the time of the off-peak-loads (low electricity rates). Simple energy analyses have been developed to predict the energy characteristics of this system. The results of this paper showed that the proposed system leads to improving the plant power output at peak-loads. About 6, 16, 24 and 33% increase in generated plant power can be achieved at peak-loads (high electricity rates) when the ambient temperature is 20, 30, 40 and 50°C respectively, and the whole steam exiting both turbines is cooled in a wet condenser to a design temperature of 20°C. The results showed also that choice of the capacity of each turbine is essentially affected by the quality of the refrigeration machine and ambient temperature.

  18. Technical use of solar energy: Conversion from solar to thermal energy, solar cooling and thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, A.; Fisch, N.; Hahne, E.; Kraus, K.; Seemann, D.; Seifert, B.; Sohns, J.; Schetter, G.; Schweigerer, W.

    1983-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies in the field of solar energy utilization are reviewed. Specific topics considered are: flat plate water collectors, solar absorbers, air collectors, solar absorption cooling, solar simulators, aquifiers, latent heat stores, and space heating systems.

  19. Analysis and Application of Airborne Thermal Data at the Local Level Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley-Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    1999-01-01

    Expanding cities are transforming periurban environments such as agricultural land, natural grasslands, forests, wetlands, and and land, into urban surfaces, such as asphalt and concrete. This transformation is part of a process defined as "urban heat island". The urban surfaces get much hotter during the daylight hours in the summer than the natural or vegetated environment. The heat builds up creating a dome effect over the city making it many degrees hotter than it's surrounding area. The impacts from this, which include higher usage of air conditioners, water, etc., are numerous and costly. As cities expand, this problem is exacerbated. It is necessary to incorporate better quality data into urban analysis and for establishing methods that systematically and objectively monitor growth and change due to increased urbanization. NASA initiated Project Atlanta in 1997 "as an interdisciplinary remote sensing study to observe and measure the growth and development of the urban heat island effect over Atlanta, and its associated impacts". This project has recently included Salt Lake City, among others, in the study of the development and effects of "urban heat islands". NASA has made available to Salt Lake City, high resolution, 10 meter, multispectral thermal data collected in June 1998. The data collection was part of a special NASA over-flight, a mission supported by the U.S. EPA in conjunction with their Urban Heat Island (UHI) Mitigation Initiative. Salt Lake City is one of three pilot cities selected to participate in this unique initiative. Hence, this project constitutes a rare opportunity to capitalize upon state-of-the-art NASA technology and link it to an urban community very concerned about rapid growth and development. This data will enhance existing data and be used for improving technical tools used to plan for Utah's future.

  20. Heat Flow Characteristics of a Newly-Designed Cooling System with Multi-Fans and Thermal Baffle in the Wheel Loader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidai Liao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional cooling case, there is usually one fan in charge of heat transfer and airflow for all radiators. However, this seems to be inappropriate, or even insufficient, for modern construction machinery, as its overall heat flow density is increasing but thermal distribution is becoming uneven. In order to ensure that the machine works in a better condition, this paper employs a new cooling system with multiple fans and an independent cooling region. Based on the thermal flow and performance requirements, seven fans are divided into three groups. The independent cooling region is segregated from the engine region by a thermal baffle to avoid heat flowing into the engine region and inducing an overheat phenomenon. The experiment validates the efficiency of the new cooling system and accuracy of simulation. After validation, the simulation then analyzes heat transfer and flow characteristics of the cooling system, changing with different cross-sections in different axis directions, as well as different distances of the fan central axes. Finally, thermal baffles are set among the fan groups and provided a better cooling effect. The research realizes a multi-fan scheme with an independent cooling region in a wheel loader, which is a new, but high-efficiency, cooling system and will lead to a new change of various configurations and project designs in future construction machinery.

  1. Investigation of the Cooling and Thermal-Measuring System of a Compound-Structure Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingang Bai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The compound-structure permanent-magnet synchronous machine (CS-PMSM is a power-split device which can enable the internal combustion engine (ICE to operate at optimum efficiency during all driving conditions by controlling its torque and speed. However, the CS-PMSM has more serious temperature rise and heat dissipation problems than conventional permanent-magnet (PM machines, especially when the CS-PMSM is running at low speed and under full load conditions. As the thermal resistance of double-layer air gaps is quite big, the hot spot proves to be in the inner winding rotor. To ensure the safe operation of the CS-PMSM, the use of forced-air and water cooling in the inner winding rotor are investigated. The study shows that the water cooling can provide a better cooling effect, but require a complicated mechanical structure. Considering the complexity of the high efficiency cooling system, a real-time temperature monitoring method is proposed and a temperature measuring system which can accurately measure the real-time temperature of multiple key points in the machine is developed to promptly adjust the operating and cooling conditions based on the measured temperature results. Finally, the temperature rise experiment of the CS-PMSM prototype is done and the simulation results are partly validated by the experimental data.

  2. Thermal investigation of an internally cooled strut injector for scramjet application at moderate and hot gas conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröske, Nils C.; Förster, Felix J.; Weigand, Bernhard; von Wolfersdorf, Jens

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we present a combined experimental and numerical approach to assess the thermal loads and the cooling mechanism of an internally cooled strut injector for a supersonic combustion ramjet. Infrared measurements of the injector surface are conducted at a moderate external flow temperature. In addition, the main flow field is investigated with the LITA technique. Main features of the cooling mechanism are identified based on experimental data. However, a full evaluation can only be obtained using a complex, conjugate CFD simulation, which couples the external and internal flow fields to the heat conduction inside the injector body. Furthermore, numerical simulations are also presented for hot gas conditions corresponding to combustion experiments. Both hydrogen, which would be used as fuel for flight tests, and air are considered as coolants. While the main features of the cooling mechanism will be shown to remain unchanged, the combustor wall temperature is found to have a significant influence on the cooling. This emphasizes the importance and the usefulness of such complex conjugate numerical simulations.

  3. Cosmic ray heating in cool core clusters II: Self-regulation cycle and non-thermal emission

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, Svenja

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulated feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be critical in balancing radiative cooling of the low-entropy gas at the centres of galaxy clusters and in regulating star formation in central galaxies. In a companion paper, we found stable steady-state solutions of the hydrodynamic equations that are coupled to the CR energy equation for a large cluster sample. In those solutions, radiative cooling in the central region is balanced by streaming CRs through the generation and dissipation of resonantly generated Alfv{\\'e}n waves and by thermal conduction at large radii. Here we demonstrate that the predicted non-thermal emission resulting from hadronic CR interactions in the intra-cluster medium exceeds observational radio (and gamma-ray) data in a subsample of clusters that host radio mini halos (RMHs). In contrast, the predicted non-thermal emission is well below observational data in cooling galaxy clusters without RMHs. These are characterised by exceptionally large AGN radio fluxes, ind...

  4. Thermal Aspects of Using Alternative Nuclear Fuels in Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Lisa Christine

    A SuperCritical Water-cooled Nuclear Reactor (SCWR) is a Generation IV concept currently being developed worldwide. Unique to this reactor type is the use of light-water coolant above its critical point. The current research presents a thermal-hydraulic analysis of a single fuel channel within a Pressure Tube (PT)-type SCWR with a single-reheat cycle. Since this reactor is in its early design phase many fuel-channel components are being investigated in various combinations. Analysis inputs are: steam cycle, Axial Heat Flux Profile (AHFP), fuel-bundle geometry, and thermophysical properties of reactor coolant, fuel sheath and fuel. Uniform and non-uniform AHFPs for average channel power were applied to a variety of alternative fuels (mixed oxide, thorium dioxide, uranium dicarbide, uranium nitride and uranium carbide) enclosed in an Inconel-600 43-element bundle. The results depict bulk-fluid, outer-sheath and fuel-centreline temperature profiles together with the Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) profiles along the heated length of fuel channel. The objective is to identify the best options in terms of fuel, sheath material and AHFPS in which the outer-sheath and fuel-centreline temperatures will be below the accepted temperature limits of 850°C and 1850°C respectively. The 43-element Inconel-600 fuel bundle is suitable for SCWR use as the sheath-temperature design limit of 850°C was maintained for all analyzed cases at average channel power. Thoria, UC2, UN and UC fuels for all AHFPs are acceptable since the maximum fuel-centreline temperature does not exceed the industry accepted limit of 1850°C. Conversely, the fuel-centreline temperature limit was exceeded for MOX at all AHFPs, and UO2 for both cosine and downstream-skewed cosine AHFPs. Therefore, fuel-bundle modifications are required for UO2 and MOX to be feasible nuclear fuels for SCWRs.

  5. Ecological Regime Shifts in Lake Kälksjön, Sweden, in Response to Abrupt Climate Change Around the 8.2 ka Cooling Event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsalu-Wendrup, L.; Conley, D.J.; Snowball, I.;

    2012-01-01

    periphytic to planktonic diatom dominance over a 250-year period and a gradual diversification of the periphytic community that spanned c. 150 years. Rapid climate warming following the 8.2 ka event likely caused these changes and both regime shifts are examples of externally driven abrupt ecological change......A detailed diatom record from Lake Ka¨ lksjo¨ n, westcentral Sweden, reveals two periods of abrupt ecological change correlative with the 8.2 ka cooling event. Using a combination of abrupt step changes and piece-wise linear regressions, the diatom data were analyzed for change points over time...... increase in nutrient supply to the lake. The second event was characterized by a substantial shift within the planktonic diatom community from taxa indicative of colder conditions to those indicating warm over 5–10 years at c. 7850 cal. y BP. This event was superimposed on a successive change from...

  6. 3D-modelling of the thermal circumstances of a lake under artificial aeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoqing; Pan, Huachen; Köngäs, Petrina; Horppila, Jukka

    2017-06-01

    A 3D-model was developed to study the effects of hypolimnetic aeration on the temperature profile of a thermally stratified Lake Vesijärvi (southern Finland). Aeration was conducted by pumping epilimnetic water through the thermocline to the hypolimnion without breaking the thermal stratification. The model used time transient equation based on Navier-Stokes equation. The model was fitted to the vertical temperature distribution and environmental parameters (wind, air temperature, and solar radiation) before the onset of aeration, and the model was used to predict the vertical temperature distribution 3 and 15 days after the onset of aeration (1 August and 22 August). The difference between the modelled and observed temperature was on average 0.6 °C. The average percentage model error was 4.0% on 1 August and 3.7% on 22 August. In the epilimnion, model accuracy depended on the difference between the observed temperature and boundary conditions. In the hypolimnion, the model residual decreased with increasing depth. On 1 August, the model predicted a homogenous temperature profile in the hypolimnion, while the observed temperature decreased moderately from the thermocline to the bottom. This was because the effect of sediment was not included in the model. On 22 August, the modelled and observed temperatures near the bottom were identical demonstrating that the heat transfer by the aerator masked the effect of sediment and that exclusion of sediment heat from the model does not cause considerable error unless very short-term effects of aeration are studied. In all, the model successfully described the effects of the aerator on the lake's temperature profile. The results confirmed the validity of the applied computational fluid dynamic in artificial aeration; based on the simulated results, the effect of aeration can be predicted.

  7. Thermal comfort and ventilation effectiveness in an office room with radiant floor cooling and displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajcik, Michal; Tomasi, Roberta; Simone, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The influence of displacement ventilation and a cooled floor on indoor climate in the cooling season were experimentally studied in a room representing an office with a shaded window, occupied by two simulated employees. The aim was to investigate whether the combination of these two systems can...

  8. Numerical simulation of the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the ITER blanket cooling system under the draining operational procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maio, P.A. [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Dell’Orco, G.; Furmanek, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Garitta, S. [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Raffray, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Spagnuolo, G.A. [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Vallone, E., E-mail: eug.vallone@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER blanket cooling system hydraulic behaviour is studied under draining transient. • A computational approach based on the finite volume method has been followed. • Draining efficiency has been assessed in term of transient duration and residual water. • Transient duration ranges from ∼40 to 50 s, under the reference draining scenario. • Residual water is predicted to range from few tens of gram up to few kilograms. - Abstract: Within the framework of the research and development activities supported by the ITER Organization on the blanket system issues, an intense analysis campaign has been performed at the University of Palermo with the aim to investigate the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the cooling system of a standard 20° sector of ITER blanket during the draining transient operational procedure. The analysis has been carried out following a theoretical-computational approach based on the finite volume method and adopting the RELAP5 system code. In a first phase, attention has been focused on the development and validation of the finite volume models of the cooling circuits of the most demanding modules belonging to the standard blanket sector. In later phase, attention has been put to the numerical simulation of the thermal-hydraulic transient behaviour of each cooling circuit during the draining operational procedure. The draining procedure efficiency has been assessed in terms of both transient duration and residual amount of coolant inside the circuit, observing that the former ranges typically between 40 and 120 s and the latter reaches at most ∼8 kg, in the case of the cooling circuit of twinned modules #6–7. Potential variations to operational parameters and/or to circuit lay-out have been proposed and investigated to optimize the circuit draining performances. In this paper, the set-up of the finite volume models is briefly described and the key results are summarized and critically discussed.

  9. Methodology of Supervision by Analysis of Thermal Flux for Thermal Conduction of a Batch Chemical Reactor Equipped with a Monofluid Heating/Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghania Henini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the thermal behavior of a batch reactor to jacket equipped with a monofluid heating/cooling system. Heating and cooling are provided respectively by an electrical resistance and two plate heat exchangers. The control of the temperature of the reaction is based on the supervision system. This strategy of management of the thermal devices is based on the usage of the thermal flux as manipulated variable. The modulation of the monofluid temperature by acting on the heating power or on the opening degrees of an air-to-open valve that delivers the monofluid to heat exchanger. The study shows that the application of this method for the conduct of the pilot reactor gives good results in simulation and that taking into account the dynamics of the various apparatuses greatly improves ride quality of conduct. In addition thermal control of an exothermic reaction (mononitration shows that the consideration of heat generated in the model representation improve the results by elimination any overshooting of the set-point temperature.

  10. Thermal Comfort and Energy Consumption Using Different Radiant Heating/Cooling Systems in a Modern Office Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemethova, Ema; Stutterecker, Werner; Schoberer, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the potential of enhancing thermal comfort and energy consumption created by three different radiant systems in the newly-built Energetikum office building. A representative office, Simulation room 1/1, was selected from 6 areas equipped with portable sensor groups for the indoor environment monitoring. The presented data obtained from 3 reference weeks; the heating, transition and cooling periods indicate overheating, particularly during the heating and transition period. The values of the indoor air temperature during the heating and transition period could not meet the normative criteria according to standard EN 15251:2007 (cat. II.) for 15-30% of the time intervals evaluated. Consequently, a simulation model of the selected office was created and points to the possibilities of improving the control system, which can lead to an elimination of the problem with overheating. Three different radiant systems - floor heating/ cooling, a thermally active ceiling, and a near-surface thermally active ceiling were implemented in the model. A comparison of their effects on thermal comfort and energy consumption is presented in the paper.

  11. Active seepage and water infiltration in Lake Baikal sediments: new thermal data from TTR-Baikal 2014 (Class@Baikal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poort, Jeffrey; Khlystov, Oleg M.; Akhmanov, Grigorii G.; Khabuev, Andrei V.; Belousov, Oleg V.

    2015-04-01

    New thermal data from the sediments of Lake Baikal were collected in July 2014 during the first Training-Through-Research cruise on Lake Baikal (Class@Baikal) organized by MGU and LIN. TTR-Baikal is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program to train students on the field on pertinent scientific topics. The cruise program focused on seafloor sampling, acoustic investigations and heat flow measurements of gas seeps, flares, mud volcanoes, slumps and debris flows, canyons and channels in the coastal proximity. The thermal data were acquired using autonomous temperature sensors on a 3 meter long gravity corer that allowed analysis at the same spot of sediments, pore fluids, hydrates and microbiology. A total of eight thermal measurements were performed in five structures located on the lake floor of the Central Baikal Basin at 333-1530 meter water depths: 3 mud volcanoes (Novosibirsk, Unshuy and Krest), 1 seep site (Seep 13), and one fault outcrop in the Selenga transfer zone. All studied structures show signals of active seepage, water infiltration and/or hydrate dynamics. The strongest thermal gradient has been measured in Seep 13, suggesting a strong upflow of warm fluids similar to the Gorevoy Utes seep. At the three mud volcanoes, hydrate presence have been evidenced and both enhanced and reduced thermal gradients have been observed. This is similar to the hydrate-bearing K-2 mud volcano in Baikal (Poort et al., 2012). A strongly reduced thermal gradient was observed in the Krest mud volcano where the presence of oxidized channels at 30-40 cm under the sediment surface indicate an infiltration of cold lake water. The water infiltration process at hydrate bearing seep sites will be discussed and compared with other seep areas in the world.

  12. Survey and evaluation of available thermal insulation materials for use on solar heating and cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This is the final report of a survey and evaluation of insulation materials for use with components of solar heating and cooling systems. The survey was performed by mailing questionnaires to manufacturers of insulation materials and by conducting an extensive literature search to obtain data on relevant properties of various types of insulation materials. The study evaluated insulation materials for active and passive solar heating and cooling systems and for multifunction applications. Primary and secondary considerations for selecting insulation materials for various components of solar heating and cooling systems are presented.

  13. Dynamic Heat Storage and Cooling Capacity of a Concrete Deck with PCM and Thermally Activated Building System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2012-01-01

    the performance of the new deck with PCM concrete is the thermal properties of such a new material, as the PCM concrete is yet to be well defined. The results presented in the paper include models in which the PCM concrete material properties, such as thermal conductivity, and specific heat capacity were first......This paper presents a heat storage and cooling concept that utilizes a phase change material (PCM) and a thermally activated building system (TABS) implemented in a hollow core concrete deck. Numerical calculations of the dynamic heat storage capacity of the hollow core concrete deck element...... with and without microencapsulated PCM are presented. The new concrete deck with microencapsulated PCM is the standard deck on which an additional layer of the PCM concrete was added and, at the same time, the latent heat storage was introduced to the construction. The challenge of numerically simulating...

  14. Enzymological researches on the mud in the „Ochiul Mare” Thermal Lake („1 Mai” Baths, Bihor county

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Dora SAMUEL

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The mud of the lakes beds is a complex microbial community and the bacterias' characteristics (like diversity, activity indicate the ecological state of the lake. The mud samples were taken seasonally from four places in the Ochiul Mare lake and were examined from enzymological point of view.We have determined quantitatively the following enzymatic activities: dehydrogenase- (actual and potential, phosphatase-, catalase- and urease activities.Every determined enzymatic activity had medium or high values. The actual and potential dehydrogenase activities and the phosphatase- and urease activities are the lowest in the samples, which were collected from the 3rd collection zone. This area is the most polluted zone of the lake and the microbes' growth is inhibited here. The catalase activity was the most intensive among the samples, which were collected from the 4th collection zone. The enzymatic activities showed little seasonal oscillation, reduced numerical fluctuation and the highest values were registered during the summer and in autumn.The values of the Enzymatic Indicator of the Mud Quality (EIMQ were the highest in the case of the samples collected from the 1st collection zone, which is the least polluted area of the lake. The low values of the Enzymatic Coefficient of Variety of the Mud Quality (ECVMQ (0.088 – 0.162 indicate the sediments homogeneity in the whole lake and the enzyme activities' high stability independent of the investigated season.Based on the obtained results it has been found that the Ochiul Mare lake's sediment has a medium but stable enzymatic potential, which is not influenced by seasonal fluctuations. This stability is insured by the stable microclimate of the thermal lake.

  15. Microbial community dynamics in Inferno Crater Lake, a thermally fluctuating geothermal spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Laura; Taylor, Michael W; Power, Jean F; Scott, Bradley J; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how microbial communities respond and adjust to ecosystem perturbation is often difficult to interpret due to multiple and often simultaneous variations in observed conditions. In this research, we investigated the microbial community dynamics of Inferno Crater Lake, an acidic geothermal spring in New Zealand with a unique thermal cycle that varies between 30 and 80 °C over a period of 40-60 days. Using a combination of next-generation sequencing, geochemical analysis and quantitative PCR we found that the microbial community composition was predominantly chemolithotrophic and strongly associated with the thermal cycle. At temperatures >65 °C, the microbial community was dominated almost exclusively by sulphur-oxidising archaea (Sulfolobus-like spp.). By contrast, at mesophilic temperatures the community structure was more mixed, comprising both archaea and bacteria but dominated primarily by chemolithotrophic sulphur and hydrogen oxidisers. Multivariate analysis of physicochemical data confirmed that temperature was the only significant variable associated with community turnover. This research contributes to our understanding of microbial community dynamics in variable environments, using a naturally alternating system as a model and extends our limited knowledge of acidophile ecology in geothermal habitats.

  16. Brain thermal inertia, but no evidence for selective brain cooling, in free-ranging western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Kamerman, Peter R; Mitchell, Graham; Mitchell, Duncan

    2009-04-01

    Marsupials reportedly can implement selective brain cooling despite lacking a carotid rete. We measured brain (hypothalamic) and carotid arterial blood temperatures every 5 min for 5, 17, and 63 days in spring in three free-living western grey kangaroos. Body temperature was highest during the night, and decreased rapidly early in the morning, reaching a nadir at 10:00. The highest body temperatures recorded occurred sporadically in the afternoon, presumably associated with exercise. Hypothalamic temperature consistently exceeded arterial blood temperature, by an average 0.3 degrees C, except during these afternoon events when hypothalamic temperature lagged behind, and was occasionally lower than, the simultaneous arterial blood temperature. The reversal in temperatures resulted from the thermal inertia of the brain; changes in the brain to arterial blood temperature difference were related to the rate of change of arterial blood temperature on both heating and cooling (P cooling in kangaroos. The effect of thermal inertia on brain temperature is larger than might be expected in the grey kangaroo, a discrepancy that we speculate derives from the unique vascular anatomy of the marsupial brain.

  17. The impact of thermal treatment and cooling methods on municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash with an emphasis on Cl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Kawano, Takashi; Kakuta, Yoshitada

    2016-10-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom-ash products possess qualifications to be utilized in cement production. However, the instant use of bottom ash is inhibited by a number of factors, among which the chlorine (Cl) content is always strictly restricted. In this paper, the unquenched MSWI bottom ash was used as the experimental substance, and the influences of thermal treatment and cooling methods on the content and existence of Cl in the ash residues were investigated. The characterization of the MSWI bottom-ash samples examined by utilizing X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results show that as a function of thermal treatment, the reduction rate of Cl is slight below 15.0%, which is relatively low compared with water washing process. Different cooling methods had impacts on the existing forms of Cl. It was understood that most of Cl existed in the glass phase if the bottom ash was air cooled. Contrarily in case of water-quenched bottom ash, Cl could also be accumulated in the newly-formed quench products as chloride salts or hydrate substances such as Friedel's salt.

  18. Effect of the Evaporative Cooling on the Human Thermal Comfort and Heat Stress in a Greenhouse under Arid Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abdel-Ghany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal sensation and heat stress were evaluated in a plastic greenhouse, with and without evaporative cooling, under arid climatic conditions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Suitable thermal comfort and heat stress scales were selected for the evaluation. Experiments were conducted in hot sunny days to measure the required parameters (i.e., the dry and wet bulb temperatures, globe temperature, natural wet bulb temperature, and solar radiation flux in the greenhouse. The results showed that in the uncooled greenhouse, workers are exposed to strong heat stress and would feel very hot most of the day time; they are safe from heat stress risk and would feel comfortable during night. An efficient evaporative cooling is necessary during the day to reduce heat stress and to improve the comfort conditions and is not necessary at night. In the cooled greenhouse, workers can do any activity: except at around noon they should follow a proposed working schedule, in which the different types of work were scheduled along the daytimes based on the heat stress value. To avoid heat stress and to provide comfort conditions in the greenhouses, the optimum ranges of relative humidity and air temperature are 48–55% and 24–28°C, respectively.

  19. Demonstration of a Passive Thermal Management System for Cooling Electronics in Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extended operation of exploratory systems on the surface of planets like Venus, means that techniques to cool system electronics to essentially room temperature...

  20. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-3: High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module…

  1. Application of thermoelectric cooling theory to the characterization of Peltier effect thermal elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, N.

    1980-04-01

    A synthesis of the theory of thermoelectric cooling is applied to the practical as well as numerical characterization of cooling systems that work by the Peltier effect. A computerized calculation procedure for determining the coefficient of performance of a Peltier module, given its Seebeck coefficient, its conductivity, its resistance, and its J coefficient of merit, is outlined. An example of application is drawn from the design analysis of a SPACELAB experiment package. Calculation results are in good agreement with test results.

  2. Implications for the thermal regime of acoustic noise measurements in Crater Lake, Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Hurst, A. W.; Poussielgue, N.

    1994-12-01

    Hydrophone measurements of acoustic noise levels in the Crater Lake of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand were made on 18 January 1991 from an inflatable rubber boat on the lake. The greatest sound pressures were recorded in the 1 10 Hz band, with sound levels generally decreasing about 20 dB per decade from 10 Hz to 80 kHz. The low frequency noise did not have an obvious relationship to the tremor observed at a seismic station within 1 km of the lake. The comparatively low levels of middle and high frequency sound meant that at the time of measurement, direct steam input did not make a significant contribution to the heating of Crater Lake. This is consistent with the earlier conclusion that during the last decade a major part of the heat input of Crater Lake has come from lake water that was heated below the lake and recycled back into the lake.

  3. Carbon nanotube-copper exhibiting metal-like thermal conductivity and silicon-like thermal expansion for efficient cooling of electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Yasuda, Yuzuri; Takeya, Satoshi; Ata, Seisuke; Nishizawa, Ayumi; Futaba, Don; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2014-03-07

    Increasing functional complexity and dimensional compactness of electronic devices have led to progressively higher power dissipation, mainly in the form of heat. Overheating of semiconductor-based electronics has been the primary reason for their failure. Such failures originate at the interface of the heat sink (commonly Cu and Al) and the substrate (silicon) due to the large mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients (∼300%) of metals and silicon. Therefore, the effective cooling of such electronics demands a material with both high thermal conductivity and a similar coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to silicon. Addressing this demand, we have developed a carbon nanotube-copper (CNT-Cu) composite with high metallic thermal conductivity (395 W m(-1) K(-1)) and a low, silicon-like CTE (5.0 ppm K(-1)). The thermal conductivity was identical to that of Cu (400 W m(-1) K(-1)) and higher than those of most metals (Ti, Al, Au). Importantly, the CTE mismatch between CNT-Cu and silicon was only ∼10%, meaning an excellent compatibility. The seamless integration of CNTs and Cu was achieved through a unique two-stage electrodeposition approach to create an extensive and continuous interface between the Cu and CNTs. This allowed for thermal contributions from both Cu and CNTs, resulting in high thermal conductivity. Simultaneously, the high volume fraction of CNTs balanced the thermal expansion of Cu, accounting for the low CTE of the CNT-Cu composite. The experimental observations were in good quantitative concurrence with the theoretically described 'matrix-bubble' model. Further, we demonstrated identical in-situ thermal strain behaviour of the CNT-Cu composite to Si-based dielectrics, thereby generating the least interfacial thermal strain. This unique combination of properties places CNT-Cu as an isolated spot in an Ashby map of thermal conductivity and CTE. Finally, the CNT-Cu composite exhibited the greatest stability to temperature as indicated by its low

  4. Supernova-regulated ISM: the effects of radiative cooling and thermal conductivity on the multi-phase structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gent, Frederick; Shukurov, Anvar; Fletcher, Andrew; Sarson, Graeme R

    2010-01-01

    The hydrodynamic state of the interstellar medium (ISM) heated and randomly stirred by supernovae (SNe) is investigated. We use a three-dimensional non-ideal hydrodynamic ISM model in a domain extending 0.5 x 0.5 kpc horizontally and 2 kpc vertically to explore the relative importance of various physical and numerical effects on the multi-phase, turbulent ISM. We include both Type I and II SNe, the latter occurring only in dense regions. First we investigate the role of the thermal instability in the temperature range 300-6100 K, comparing results obtained for two different cooling functions, one susceptible to the instability, the other stable. The presence of thermal instability in the system is mainly visible as the tendency of the gas to avoid the relevant temperature range, as it quickly evolves towards either colder or warmer phases. Nevertheless, the formation of dense structures for both cooling functions appears to be dominated by expanding and colliding supernova remnants, rather than by the thermal...

  5. An experimental study of pyroxene crystallization during rapid cooling in a thermal gradient; applications to komatiites and chondrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bouquain

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the crystallization of pyroxene in spinifex-textured komatiites and in chondrites we undertook a series of experiments in which compositions in the CMAS system were cooling rapidly in a thermal gradient. Cooling rates were generally between 5 to 10 °C h−1 but some runs were made at 100–200 °C h−1; thermal gradients were between 10 and 20 °C cm−1. These conditions reproduced those at various levels in the crust of komatiitic lava flow. The starting composition was chosen to have pigeonite on the liquidus and a majority of the experiments crystallized zoned pigeonite-diopside crystals like those in komatiite lavas. A~conspicuous aspect of the experimental results was their lack of reproduceability. Some experiments crystallized forsterite whereas others that were run under similar conditions crystallized two pyroxenes and no forsterite; some experiments were totally glassy but others totally crystallized to pyroxene. The degree of supercooling at the onset of pyroxene crystallization was variable, from less than 25 °C to more than 110 °C. We attribute these results to the difficulty of nucleation of pyroxene. In some cases forsterite crystallized metastably and modified the liquid composition to inhibit pyroxene crystallization; in others no nucleation took place until a large degree of supercooling was achieved, then pyroxene crystallized rapidly. Pigeonite crystallized under a wide range of conditions, at cooling rates from 3 to 100 °C h−1. The notion that this mineral only forms at low cooling rates is not correct.

  6. Past climate changes and permafrost depth at the Lake El'gygytgyn site: implications from data and thermal modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mottaghy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the temperature field observed in boreholes drilled as part of interdisciplinary scientific campaign targeting the El'gygytgyn Crater Lake in NE Russia. Temperature data are available from two sites: the lake borehole 5011-1 located near the center of the lake reaching 400 m depth, and the land borehole 5011-3 at the rim of the lake, with a depth of 140 m. Constraints on permafrost depth and past climate changes are derived from numerical simulation of the thermal regime associated with the lake-related talik structure. The thermal properties of the subsurface needed for these simulations are based on laboratory measurements of representative cores from the quaternary sediments and the underlying impact-affected rock, complemented by further information from geophysical logs and data from published literature. The temperature observations in the lake borehole 5011-1 are dominated by thermal perturbations related to the drilling process, and thus only give reliable values for the lowermost value in the borehole. Undisturbed temperature data recorded over more than two years are available in the 140 m deep land-based borehole 5011-3. The analysis of these observations allows determination of not only the recent mean annual ground surface temperature, but also the ground surface temperature history, though with large uncertainties. Although the depth of this borehole is by far too insufficient for a complete reconstruction of past temperatures back to the Last Glacial Maximum, it still affects the thermal regime, and thus permafrost depth. This effect is constrained by numerical modeling: assuming that the lake borehole observations are hardly influenced by the past changes in surface air temperature, an estimate of steady-state conditions is possible, leading to a meaningful value of 14 ± 5 K for the post-glacial warming. The strong curvature of the temperature data in shallower depths around 60 m can be explained by a

  7. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) thermal surface water mapping and its correlation to LANDSAT. [Lake Anna, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvocoresses, A. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Graphics are presented which show HCMM mapped water-surface temperature in Lake Anna, a 13,000 dendrically-shaped lake which provides cooling for a nuclear power plant in Virginia. The HCMM digital data, produced by NASA were processed by NOAA/NESS into image and line-printer form. A LANDSAT image of the lake illustrates the relationship between MSS band 7 data and the HCMM data as processed by the NASA image processing facility which transforms the data to the same distortion-free hotline oblique Mercator projection. Spatial correlation of the two images is relatively simple by either digital or analog means and the HCMM image has a potential accuracy approaching the 80 m of the original LANDSAT data. While it is difficult to get readings that are not diluted by radiation from cooler adjacent land areas in narrow portions of the lake, digital data indicated by the line-printer display five different temperatures for open-water areas. Where the water surface response was not diluted by land areas, the temperature difference recorded by HCMM corresponds to in situ readings with rsme on the order of 1 C.

  8. Ecosystem effects of thermal manipulation of a whole lake, Lake Breisjøen, southern Norway (THERMOS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lydersen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a 3-year artificial deepening of the thermocline in the dimictic Lake Breisjøen, southern Norway, by means of a large submerged propeller. An adjacent lake served as untreated reference. The manipulation increased thermocline depth from 6 to 20 m, caused a significant increase in the heat content, and delayed ice-on by about 20 days.

    There were only minor changes in water chemistry. Concentrations of sulphate declined, perhaps due to greater reduction of sulphate at the sediment-water interface. Concentrations of particulate carbon and nitrogen decreased, perhaps due to increased sedimentation velocity. Water transparency increased. There was no significant change in concentration of phosphorus, the growth-limiting nutrient.

    There were few significant changes in principal biological components. Phytoplankton biomass and productivity did not change, although the chlorophyll-a concentration showed a small decrease. Phytoplankton species richness increased, and the species composition shifted. Growth of periphyton increased. There was no change in the macrophyte community. The manipulation did not affect the zooplankton biodiversity, but caused a significant shift in the relative abundance (measured as biomass in the two major copepod species. The manipulation did not affect the individual density, but appeared to have changed the vertical distribution of zoobenthos. Fish populations were not affected.

    The lake is oligotrophic and clearwater and the manipulation did not change the supply of phosphorus, and thus there were only minor changes in lake chemistry and biology. Effects might be larger in eutrophic and dystrophic lakes in which internal processes are stronger.

  9. Ecosystem effects of thermal manipulation of a whole lake, Lake Breisjøen, southern Norway (THERMOS project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lydersen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a 3-year artificial deepening of the thermocline in the dimictic Lake Breisjøen, southern Norway, by means of a large submerged propeller. An adjacent lake served as untreated reference. The manipulation increased thermocline depth from 6 to 20 m, caused a significant increase in the heat content, and delayed ice-on by about 20 days.

    There were only minor changes in water chemistry. Concentrations of sulphate declined, perhaps due to greater reduction of sulphate at the sediment-water interface. Concentrations of particulate carbon and nitrogen decreased, perhaps due to increased sedimantation velocity. Water transparency increased. There was no significant change in concentration of phosphorus, the growth-limiting nutrient.

    There were few significant changes in principal biological components. Phytoplankton biomass and productivity did not change, although the chlorophyll-a concentration showed a small decrease. Phytoplankton species richness increased, and the species composition shifted. Growth of periphyton increased. There was no change in the macrophyte community. The manipulation did not affect the zooplankton biodiversity, but caused a significant shift in the relative abundance (measured as biomass in the two major copepod species. The manipulation did not affect the individual density, but appeared to have changed the vertical distribution of zoobenthos. Fish populations were not affected.

    The lake is oligotrophic and clearwater and the manipulation did not change the supply of phosphorus, and thus there were only minor changes in lake chemistry and biology. Effects might be larger in eutrophic and dystrophic lakes in which internal processes are stronger.

  10. Evaluation of a method for heat transfer measurements and thermal visualization using a composite of a heater element and liquid crystals. [thermal performance of turbine blade cooling configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippensteele, S. A.; Russell, L. M.; Stepka, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Commercially available elements of a composite consisting of a plastic sheet coated with liquid crystal, another sheet with a thin layer of a conducting material (gold or carbon), and copper bus bar strips were evaluated and found to provide a simple, convenient, accurate, and low-cost measuring device for use in heat transfer research. The particular feature of the composite is its ability to obtain local heat transfer coefficients and isotherm patterns that provide visual evaluation of the thermal performances of turbine blade cooling configurations. Examples of the use of the composite are presented.

  11. Reliability and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite insulating coatings on cooled hydrogen-oxygen rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. G., Jr.; Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structural integrity and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite coatings was conducted. These coatings were plasma sprayed onto the combustion side of water-cooled, 12.7-centimeter throat diameter, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chambers operating at 2.07 to 4.14 meganewtons per square meter chamber pressure. The metallic-ceramic composites functioned for six to 17 cycles and for as long as 213 seconds of rocket operations and could have probably provided their insulating properties for many additional cycles. The effective thermal conductivity of all the coatings was in the range of 0.7472 to 4.483 w/(m)(K), which makes the coatings a very effective thermal barrier. Photomicrographic studies of cross-sectioned coolant tubes seem to indicate that the effective thermal conductivity of the coatings is controlled by contact resistance between the particles, as a result of the spraying process, and not the thermal conductivity of the bulk materials.

  12. Thermal damage reduction associated with in vivo skin electroporation: A numerical investigation justifying aggressive pre-cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S.M.; Kuznetsov, A.V. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2007-01-15

    Electroporation is an approach used to enhance transdermal transport of large molecules in which the skin is exposed to a series of electric pulses. Electroporation temporarily destabilizes the structure of the outer skin layer, the stratum corneum, by creating microscopic pores through which agents, which ordinarily are unable to pass into the skin, are able to pass through this outer barrier. Of possible concern when exposing biological tissue to an electric field is thermal tissue damage associated with Joule heating. In order to find the electrical and transient thermal solutions associated with this process, this study develops a three-dimensional transient finite-volume composite model of in vivo skin electroporation. The electroporation process modeled consists of five 150ms long DC square wave pulses administered at 1-s intervals with an applied voltage of 400V. This paper finds that minor thermal influence of the electrode plate and the of a small presence blood vessel have a large impact on thermal damage. An aggressive pre-cooling technique is presented which is shown to dramatically reduce the risk of thermal damage. (author)

  13. Seasonal and Spatial Changes of Planktonic Bacterial Communities Inhabiting the Natural Thermal Lake Hévíz, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krett, Gergely; Nagymáté, Zsuzsanna; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2016-03-01

    Lake Hévíz is a unique thermal spa located in Hungary. Owing to the thermal springs nourishing the lake, it has a relatively rapid water turnover. In spring 2011 a comprehensive embankment reconstruction was performed to preserve the water supply of the surrounding wetland habitats. The physical and chemical parameters as well as the planktonic microbial communities were studied with special respect to the effect of the disturbance of the water of Lake Hévíz. According to the abiotic components, both temporal and spatial differences were revealed with the exception of autumn samples. The reconstruction resulted in a short term but dramatic alteration of the total planktonic bacterial and cyanobacterial community structures as revealed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. In addition, greater seasonal than spatial differences of bacterial communities were also observed. Planktonic bacterial community composition of Lake Hévíz included mainly typical freshwater species within phylum Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria and class Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria. Most of them were aerobic or facultative anaerobic heterotrophic but chemolitotrophic (e.g. Thiobacillus) or photolithotrophic (e.g. Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi) autotrophic microbes were also identified.

  14. Limnological Comparisons of Threats to Aquatic Life Owing to Thermal Stratification in two Morphometrically Different Urban Shallow Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Roy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A minimum value in the Dissolved Oxygen distribution of two shallow lakes namely, Rabindra Sarobar in south Kolkata and Subhas Sarobar in East Kolkata in the Gangetic Delta plain, has been observed to develop in the Hypolimnion during the stratified period. This minimum is usually explained by the accumulation of organic matter from the overlying layer of water. The introduction of organic matter from allochthonous and autochthonous sources is also a likely contributor to the accelerated oxygen depletion within Hypolimnion. The thermal stratification, in general, which occurs in these tropical lakes, is of direct relevance in maintaining the water quality standards, particularly for higher aquatic life. The present article attempts to investigate the possible depletion of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion as a result of the impact of thermal stratification. These investigations will be the basic guidelines for the fishermen and their livelihoods potentially depend upon the different varieties of fishing on daily basis. The massive summer fish kills in these lakes is a major devastating happenings that is reported by the fishermen and also it is well evident from our experimental observations. The comparison of the biodiversity of these two lakes is attempted in the present investigation.

  15. Steady state thermal-hydraulic analyses of the MITICA cooling circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaupa, M.; Sartori, E.; Dalla Palma, M.; Fellin, F.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A.

    2016-02-01

    Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advancement is the full scale prototype of the heating and current drive neutral beam injectors for ITER, to be built at Consorzio RFX (Padova). The engineering design of its components is challenging: the total heat loads they will be subjected to (expected between 2 and 19 MW), the high heat fluxes (up to 20 MW/m2), and the beam pulse duration up to 1 h, set demanding requirements for reliable active cooling circuits. In support of the design, the thermo-hydraulic behavior of each cooling circuit under steady state condition has been investigated by using one-dimensional models. The final results, obtained considering a number of optimizations for the cooling circuits, show that all the requirements in terms of flow rate, temperature, and pressure drop are properly fulfilled.

  16. Steady state thermal-hydraulic analyses of the MITICA cooling circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaupa, M., E-mail: matteo.zaupa@igi.cnr.it [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, Padova 35122 (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Sartori, E.; Dalla Palma, M.; Fellin, F.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advancement is the full scale prototype of the heating and current drive neutral beam injectors for ITER, to be built at Consorzio RFX (Padova). The engineering design of its components is challenging: the total heat loads they will be subjected to (expected between 2 and 19 MW), the high heat fluxes (up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}), and the beam pulse duration up to 1 h, set demanding requirements for reliable active cooling circuits. In support of the design, the thermo-hydraulic behavior of each cooling circuit under steady state condition has been investigated by using one-dimensional models. The final results, obtained considering a number of optimizations for the cooling circuits, show that all the requirements in terms of flow rate, temperature, and pressure drop are properly fulfilled.

  17. Thermal-comfort analysis and simulation for various low-energy cooling-technologies applied to an office building in a subtropical climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Ashfaque Ahmed; Rasul, M.G.; Khan, M.M.K. [College of Engineering and the Built Environment, Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Qld 4702 (Australia)

    2008-06-15

    Simulation of buildings' thermal-performances is necessary to predict comfort of the occupants in buildings and to identify alternate cooling control-systems for achieving better indoor thermal environments. An analysis and prediction of thermal-comfort using DesignBuilder, based on the state-of-the-art building performance simulation software EnergyPlus, is carried out in an air-conditioned multi-storeyed building in the city of Rockhampton in Central Queensland, Australia. Rockhampton is located in a hot humid-region; therefore, indoor thermal-comfort is strongly affected by the outdoor climate. This study evaluates the actual thermal conditions of the Information Technology Division (ITD) building at Central Queensland University during winter and summer seasons and identifies the thermal comfort level of the occupants using low-energy cooling technologies namely, chilled ceiling (CC), economiser usages and pre-cooling. The Fanger comfort-model, Pierce two-node model and KSU two-node model were used to predict thermal performance of the building. A sophisticated building-analysis tool was integrated with the thermal comfort models for determining appropriate cooling-technologies for the occupants to be thermally comfortable while achieving sufficient energy savings. This study compares the predicted mean-vote (PMV) index on a seven-point thermal-sensation scale, calculated using the effective temperature and relative humidity for those cooling techniques. Simulated results show that systems using a chilled ceiling offer the best thermal comfort for the occupants during summer and winter in subtropical climates. The validity of the simulation results was checked with measured values of temperature and humidity for typical days in both summer and winter. The predicted results show a reasonable agreement with the measured data. (author)

  18. THERMAL DESIGN FOR HARMON DRY-COOLING SYSTEM IN LARGE POWER STATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the analysis of air flow and heat transfer in the dry-cooling tower for Harmon system, a combined iteration method is presented to solve the coupled heat transfer and draft equations derived from theoretical and empirical formulas, with the size of the exchangers and the cooling tower or the systematic parameters being determined. Taking the 686 MW unit as an example, the present calculating results are well agreed with those of the real case, and thus the method presented is practical and feasible for reasonable design of Harmon system.

  19. A Conduction-Cooled Superconducting Magnet System-Design, Fabrication and Thermal Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Holbøll, Joachim; Wang, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high-vacuumed c......A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high...

  20. Thermal design for areas of interference heating on actively cooled hypersonic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, R. L.; Stone, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous actively cooled panel design alternatives for application in regions on high speed aircraft that are subject to interference heating effects were studied. Candidate design concepts were evaluated using mass, producibility, reliability and inspectability/maintainability as figures of merit. Three design approaches were identified as superior within certain regimes of the matrix of design heating conditions considered. Only minor modifications to basic actively cooled panel design are required to withstand minor interference heating effects. Designs incorporating internally finned coolant tubes to augment heat transfer are recommended for moderate design heating conditions. At severe heating conditions, an insulated panel concept is required.

  1. Micro-Scale Thermal Imaging of Organic and Polymeric Materials with Cooled and Uncooled Infrared Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The emissivity corrected thermal imaging combined with a real-time direct imposed-signal system on the freezing of biological cells is presented, which makes it possible to visualize the exothermic latent heat at a minus temperature. The applicability of the uncooled micro bolometer (thermal detector to the micro-scale thermal analysis on the phase transitions of organic and polymeric materials is discussed in comparison with the photon detector, equipped with the optics originally designed.

  2. Implications of climate change on the heat budget of lentic systems used for power station cooling: Case study Clinton Lake, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Juan C; Jackson, P. Ryan; Santacruz, Santiago; Morales, Viviana M; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2016-01-01

    We use a numerical model to analyze the impact of climate change--in particular higher air temperatures--on a nuclear power station that recirculates the water from a reservoir for cooling. The model solves the hydrodynamics, the transfer of heat in the reservoir, and the energy balance at the surface. We use the numerical model to (i) quantify the heat budget in the reservoir and determine how this budget is affected by the combined effect of the power station and climate change and (ii) quantify the impact of climate change on both the downstream thermal pollution and the power station capacity. We consider four different scenarios of climate change. Results of simulations show that climate change will reduce the ability to dissipate heat to the atmosphere and therefore the cooling capacity of the reservoir. We observed an increase of 25% in the thermal load downstream of the reservoir, and a reduction in the capacity of the power station of 18% during the summer months for the worst-case climate change scenario tested. These results suggest that climate change is an important threat for both the downstream thermal pollution and the generation of electricity by power stations that use lentic systems for cooling.

  3. Implications of Climate Change on the Heat Budget of Lentic Systems Used for Power Station Cooling: Case Study Clinton Lake, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Juan C; Jackson, P Ryan; Santacruz, Santiago; Morales, Viviana M; García, Marcelo H

    2016-01-05

    We use a numerical model to analyze the impact of climate change-in particular higher air temperatures-on a nuclear power station that recirculates the water from a reservoir for cooling. The model solves the hydrodynamics, the transfer of heat in the reservoir, and the energy balance at the surface. We use the numerical model to (i) quantify the heat budget in the reservoir and determine how this budget is affected by the combined effect of the power station and climate change and (ii) quantify the impact of climate change on both the downstream thermal pollution and the power station capacity. We consider four different scenarios of climate change. Results of simulations show that climate change will reduce the ability to dissipate heat to the atmosphere and therefore the cooling capacity of the reservoir. We observed an increase of 25% in the thermal load downstream of the reservoir, and a reduction in the capacity of the power station of 18% during the summer months for the worst-case climate change scenario tested. These results suggest that climate change is an important threat for both the downstream thermal pollution and the generation of electricity by power stations that use lentic systems for cooling.

  4. Enhanced energy harvesting and analysis of a High Concentration Photovoltaic / Thermal System with support of Cooling fluid and Increased Mass Flow Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S R Murty

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a high concentration photovoltaic (HCPV system is considered. A parabolic dish collector focuses the incident energy on to a triple junction solar system. High concentration ratios ranging from 10 x to 1000x increases the cell temperature, resulting in a decrease in electrical efficiency. Thermal analysis of a water based cooling system is modeled to enhance the electrical efficiency and also to study the thermal efficiency of such HCPV system. It is to be noted that with an increase in mass flow rate of water, the electrical efficiency increases and the thermal efficiency decreases. Finally, a comparison of efficiencies with and without cooling are presented.

  5. Minimization of thermal impact by application of electrode cooling in a co-linear PEF treatment chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Nicolas; Jaeger, Henry; Knorr, Dietrich

    2011-10-01

    A co-linear pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment chamber was analyzed and optimized considering electrical process conditions, temperature, and retention of heat-sensitive compounds during a continuous PEF treatment of peach juice. The applicability of a jacket heat-exchanger device surrounding the ground electrode was studied in order to provide active cooling and to avoid temperature peaks within the treatment chamber thus reducing the total thermal load to which the product is exposed. Simulation of the PEF process was performed using a finite element method prior to experimental verification. Inactivation of polyphenoloxydase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) as well as the degradation of ascorbic acid (AA) in peach juice was quantified and used as indirect indicators for the temperature distribution. Peaks of product temperature within the treatment chamber were reduced, that is, from 98 to 75 °C and retention of the indicators PPO, POD, and AA increased by more than 10% after application of the active electrode cooling device. Practical Application:  The co-linear PEF treatment chamber is widely used for continuous PEF treatment of liquid products and also suitable for industrial scale application; however, Joule heating in combination with nonuniform electric field distribution may lead to unwanted thermal effects. The proposed design showed potential to reduce the thermal load, to which the food is exposed, allowing the retention of heat-sensitive components. The design is applicable at laboratory or industrial scale to perform PEF trials avoiding temperature peaks, which is also the basis for obtaining inactivation kinetic models with minimized thermal impact on the kinetic variables.

  6. Cooling Performance Characteristics of the Stack Thermal Management System for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles under Actual Driving Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Seong Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The cooling performance of the stack radiator of a fuel cell electric vehicle was evaluated under various actual road driving conditions, such as highway and uphill travel. The thermal stability was then optimized, thereby ensuring stable operation of the stack thermal management system. The coolant inlet temperature of the radiator in the highway mode was lower than that associated with the uphill mode because the corresponding frontal air velocity was higher than obtained in the uphill mode. In both the highway and uphill modes, the coolant temperatures of the radiator, operated under actual road driving conditions, were lower than the allowable limit (80 °C; this is the maximum temperature at which stable operation of the stack thermal management system of the fuel cell electric vehicle could be maintained. Furthermore, under actual road driving conditions in uphill mode, the initial temperature difference (ITD between the coolant temperature and air temperature of the system was higher than that associated with the highway mode; this higher ITD occurred even though the thermal load of the system in uphill mode was greater than that corresponding to the highway mode. Since the coolant inlet temperature is expected to exceed the allowable limit (80 °C in uphill mode under higher ambient temperature with air conditioning system operation, the FEM design layout should be modified to improve the heat capacity. In addition, the overall volume of the stack cooling radiator is 52.2% higher than that of the present model and the coolant inlet temperature of the improved radiator is 22.7% lower than that of the present model.

  7. Isopods failed to acclimate their thermal sensitivity of locomotor performance during predictable or stochastic cooling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Schuler

    Full Text Available Most organisms experience environments that vary continuously over time, yet researchers generally study phenotypic responses to abrupt and sustained changes in environmental conditions. Gradual environmental changes, whether predictable or stochastic, might affect organisms differently than do abrupt changes. To explore this possibility, we exposed terrestrial isopods (Porcellio scaber collected from a highly seasonal environment to four thermal treatments: (1 a constant 20°C; (2 a constant 10°C; (3 a steady decline from 20° to 10°C; and (4 a stochastic decline from 20° to 10°C that mimicked natural conditions during autumn. After 45 days, we measured thermal sensitivities of running speed and thermal tolerances (critical thermal maximum and chill-coma recovery time. Contrary to our expectation, thermal treatments did not affect the thermal sensitivity of locomotion; isopods from all treatments ran fastest at 33° to 34°C and achieved more than 80% of their maximal speed over a range of 10° to 11°C. Isopods exposed to a stochastic decline in temperature tolerated cold the best, and isopods exposed to a constant temperature of 20°C tolerated cold the worst. No significant variation in heat tolerance was observed among groups. Therefore, thermal sensitivity and heat tolerance failed to acclimate to any type of thermal change, whereas cold tolerance acclimated more during stochastic change than it did during abrupt change.

  8. Spectroscopic study of jet-cooled indole-3-carbinol by thermal evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Cheol Joo; Kim, Eun Bin; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Seong, Yeon Guk; Choi, Myong Yong [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, kale, broccoli, and cauliflower have relatively high levels of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), which can be used as a possible cancer preventative agent particularly for breast, cervical, colorectal, and other hormone-related cancers. Thus, this naturally occurring substance, I3C, is now being used in dietary supplements. In conclusion, we have succeeded in obtaining the R2PI spectrum of a thermally unstable sample, I3C, by using a thermal buffer (herein, uracil) for the first time. Use of thermal evaporation method for thermally unstable biomolecules using thermal buffers will allow us to explore more gas phase spectroscopic studies for their intrinsic physiological properties in the near future.

  9. Effect of nanofluid on thermal performance of heat pipe with two evaporators; application to satellite equipment cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaei, P. R.; Shahryari, M.

    2015-06-01

    A study on the behavior of nanofluid in a cylindrical heat pipe with two heat sources is performed to analyze the nanofluid application in heat-dissipating satellite equipment cooling. Pure water, Al2O3-water and TiO2-water nanofluids are used as working fluids. An analytical modeling is presented to predict the wall temperature profile for the heat pipe assuming saturated vapor and conduction heat transfer for porous media and wall, respectively. The effects of particle concentration levels (φ=0 (distilled water), 2, 4, and 8%), particle diameters (dp=10, 20, and 40 nm) on the local wall temperature, heat transfer coefficient, thermal resistance, and the size of the heat pipe are investigated. It is observed that the better wall temperature uniformity can be achieved using nanofluid which results in lower temperature difference between evaporators and condenser sections. Results reveal that applying nanoparticle with smaller size and higher concentration level increases heat transfer coefficient remarkably by reducing thermal resistance of saturated porous media. It is also found that the presence of nanoparticles in water can lead to a reduction in weight of heat pipe, and thus satellite, under nearly identical condition. The findings of this paper prove the potential of nanofluid in satellite equipment cooling application.

  10. A coupled thermal and electrochemical study of lithium-ion battery cooled by paraffin/porous-graphite-matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Angelo; Jiang, Xi

    2016-05-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery cooling using a phase change material (PCM)/compressed expanded natural graphite (CENG) composite is investigated, for a cylindrical battery cell and for a battery module scale. An electrochemistry model (average model) is coupled to the thermal model, with the addition of a one-dimensional model for the solution and solid diffusion using the nodal network method. The analysis of the temperature distribution of the battery module scale has shown that a two-dimensional model is sufficient to describe the transient temperature rise. In consequence, a two-dimensional cell-centred finite volume code for unstructured meshes is developed with additions of the electrochemistry and phase change. This two-dimensional thermal model is used to investigate a new and usual battery module configurations cooled by PCM/CENG at different discharge rates. The comparison of both configurations with a constant source term and heat generation based on the electrochemistry model showed the superiority of the new design. In this study, comparisons between the predictions from different analytical and computational tools as well as open-source packages were carried out, and close agreements have been observed.

  11. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  12. Theoretical modeling of RF ablation with internally cooled electrodes: comparative study of different thermal boundary conditions at the electrode-tissue interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, María J; Molina, Juan A López; Trujillo, Macarena; Berjano, Enrique J

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies on computer modeling of RF ablation with cooled electrodes modeled the internal cooling circuit by setting surface temperature at the coolant temperature (i.e., Dirichlet condition, DC). Our objective was to compare the temperature profiles computed from different thermal boundary conditions at the electrode-tissue interface. We built an analytical one-dimensional model based on a spherical electrode. Four cases were considered: A) DC with uniform initial condition, B) DC with pre-cooling period, C) Boundary condition based on Newton's cooling law (NC) with uniform initial condition, and D) NC with a pre-cooling period. The results showed that for a long time (120 s), the profiles obtained with (Cases B and D) and without (Cases A and C) considering pre-cooling are very similar. However, for shorter times ( 30 s), Cases A and C overestimated the temperature at points away from the electrode-tissue interface. In the NC cases, this overestimation was more evident for higher values of the convective heat transfer coefficient (h). Finally, with NC, when h was increased the temperature profiles became more similar to those with DC. The results suggest that theoretical modeling of RF ablation with cooled electrodes should consider: 1) the modeling of a pre-cooling period, especially if one is interested in the thermal profiles registered at the beginning of RF application; and 2) NC rather than DC, especially for low flow in the internal circuit.

  13. Parameter Survey of Thermally Highly Loaded, Porous and Cooled Multi-Layer Systems for Turbine Blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Shan; Dieter Bohn; Jing Ren; N.Surken

    2007-01-01

    This study is an advanced investigation for the cooling of high temperature turbine vanes and blades. The efficient heat exchanging near the surface of a blade may be achieved by forcing a cooling air flow emitting out of a thin layer of the porous metal which is pasted on the structural high strength metal. The contents include the consideration on the computational model of heat transfer through a layer of porous material, the concrete modeling and the analysis of the model, the numerical survey of key parameters for both the two-layer porous materials and the heat transfer fluid flow passing through the model channels. The results revealed that the constructed system is reasonable. Proposed an evaluation formula for the porous material heat transfer efficiency.

  14. Loading experiment and thermal analysis for conduction cooled magnet of SMES system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang WU; Huiling WANG; Jiangbo XIE; Yan ZHAO; Yuejin TANG; Jindong LI; Jing SHI

    2009-01-01

    China's first 35kJ high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system with an experiment equipment was depicted. The dynamic heat analysis of the magnet of the SMES was conducted through the current load test on the directly cooled conduction magnet. The research results were as follows:when the converter charges and discharges the magnet for energy storage, the hysteresis loss is the main part of power loss, and contributes significantly to temperature rise;reducing the current frequency at the side of direct current is conducive to restraining temperature rise. The optimizing factors of the cool-guide structure were analyzed based on the heat stability theory, and it was found that the heat transfer of its key part (at the top of the magnet) must be strengthened to reduce the axial temperature difference of the magnet.

  15. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahi, A. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Durschlag, H. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Elliott, D. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Hartsough, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Shukla, N. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Kosny, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulkinsulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosedreflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  16. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahi, A. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Duraschlag, H. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Elliott, D. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Hartsough, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Shukla, N. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Kosny, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulk insulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosed reflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  17. Thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, California: Implications for conventional and hot dry rock geothermal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimac, J.; Goff, F.; Wohletz, K.

    1997-06-01

    The combination of recent volcanism, high heat flow ({ge} HFU or 167 mW/m{sup 2}), and high conductive geothermal gradient (up to 120{degree} C/km) makes the Clear Lake region of northern California one of the best prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development in the US. The lack of permeability in exploration wells and lack of evidence for widespread geothermal reservoirs north of the Collayomi fault zone are not reassuring indications for conventional geothermal development. This report summarizes results of thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, and discusses implications for HDR site selection in the region. The thermal models incorporate a wide range of constraints including the distribution and nature of volcanism in time and space, water and gas geochemistry, well data, and geophysical surveys. The nature of upper crustal magma bodies at Clear Lake is inferred from studying sequences of related silicic lavas, which tell a story of multistage mixing of silicic and mafic magma in clusters of small upper crustal chambers. Thermobarometry on metamorphic xenoliths yield temperature and pressure estimates of {approximately}780--900 C and 4--6 kb respectively, indicating that at least a portion of the deep magma system resided at depths from 14 to 21 km (9 to 12 mi). The results of thermal modeling support previous assessments of the high HDR potential of the area, and suggest the possibility that granitic bodies similar to The Geysers felsite may underlie much of the Clear Lake region at depths as little as 3--6 km. This is significant because future HDR reservoirs could potentially be sited in relatively shallow granitoid plutons rather than in structurally complex Franciscan basement rocks.

  18. Scaling approach and thermal-hydraulic analysis in the reactor cavity cooling system of a high temperature gas -cooled reactor and thermal-jet mixing in a sodium fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotowa, Olumuyiwa A.

    This dissertation develops and demonstrates the application of the top-down and bottom-up scaling methodologies to thermal-hydraulic flows in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and upper plenum of the sodium fast reactor (SFR), respectively. The need to integrate scaled separate effects and integral tests was identified. Experimental studies and computational tools (CFD) have been integrated to guide the engineering design, analysis and assessment of this scaling methods under single and two-phase flow conditions. To test this methods, two applicable case studies are considered, and original contributions are noted. Case 1: "Experimental Study of RCCS for the HTGR". Contributions include validation of scaling analysis using the top-down approach as guide to a ¼-scale integral test facility. System code, RELAP5, was developed based on the derived scaling parameters. Tests performed included system sensitivity to decay heat load and heat sink inventory variations. System behavior under steady-state and transient scenarios were predicted. Results show that the system has the capacity to protect the cavity walls from over-heating during normal operations and provide a means for decay heat removal under accident scenarios. A full width half maximum statistical method was devised to characterize the thermal-hydraulics of the non-linear two-phase oscillatory behavior. This facilitated understanding of the thermal hydraulic coupling of the loop segments of the RCCS, the heat transfer, and the two-phase flashing flow phenomena; thus the impact of scaling overall. Case 2: "Computational Studies of Thermal Jet Mixing in SFR". In the pool-type SFR, susceptible regions to thermal striping are the upper instrumentation structure and the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). We investigated the thermal mixing above the core to UIS and the potential impact due to poor mixing. The thermal mixing of dual-jet flows at different

  19. Thermal modeling and the optimized design of metal plate cooling systems for single concentrator solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Min; Chen Nuo-Fu; Deng Jin-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    A metal plate cooling model for 400× single concentrator solar cells was established.The effects of the thickness and the radius of the metal plate,and the air environment on the temperature of the solar cells were analyzed in detail.It is shown that the temperature of the solar cells decreased sharply at the beginning,with the increase in the thickness of the metal plate,and then changed more smoothly.When the radius of the metal plate was 4 cm and the thickness increased to 2 mm or thicker,the temperature of the solar cell basically stabilized at about 53 ℃.Increasing the radius of the metal plate and the convective transfer coefficient made the temperature of the solar cell decrease remarkably.The effects of A1 and Cu as the metal plate material on cooling were analyzed contrastively,and demonstrated the superiority of Al material for the cooling system.Furthermore,considering cost reduction,space holding and the stress of the system,we optimized the structural design of the metal plate.The simulated results can be referred to the design of the structure for the metal plate.Finally,a method to devise the structure of the metal plate for single concentrator solar cells was given.

  20. Annual Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort of Autonomously Heated and Cooled Office Chairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Scott [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Booten, Chuck [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robertson, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chin, Justin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Dane [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Jacquelyn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arent, Doug [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Energy use in offices buildings is largely driven by air conditioning demands. But the optimal temperature is not the same for all building occupants, leading to the infamous thermostat war. And many occupants have independently overcome building comfort weaknesses with their own space heaters or fans. NREL tested is a customized office chair that automatically heats and cools the occupant along the seat and chair back according to the occupants' personal preferences. This product is shown to deliver markedly better comfort at room temperatures well above typical office cooling setpoints. Experimental subjects reported satisfaction in these elevated air temperatures, partly because the chair's cooling effect was tuned to their own individual needs. Simulation of the chair in office buildings around the U.S. shows that energy can be saved everywhere, with impacts varying due to the climate. Total building HVAC energy savings exceeded 10% in hot-dry climate zones. Due to high product cost, simple payback for the chair we studied is beyond the expected chair life. We then understood the need to establish cost-performance targets for comfort delivery packages. NREL derived several hypothetical energy/cost/comfort targets for personal comfort product systems. In some climate regions around the U.S., these show the potential for office building HVAC energy savings in excess of 20%. This report documents this research, providing an overview of the research team's methods and results while also identifying areas for future research building upon the findings.

  1. Ice-dammed lake drainage cools and raises surface salinities in a tidewater outlet glacier fjord, west Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, K. K.; Mortensen, J.; Bendtsen, J.; Petersen, D.; Lennert, K.; Rysgaard, S.

    2014-06-01

    The drainage of ice-dammed lakes in the form of outburst floods in Greenland is detected regularly by remote sensing, and these events are expected to occur more frequently in a warmer climate. However, their impact on ice sheet stability and neighboring water bodies is still unknown. In this interdisciplinary study, we investigate lake drainages from the Greenland Ice Sheet into a west Greenland fjord by analyzing simultaneous time series of satellite observations and direct hydrographic measurements of temperature and salinity in the fjord. Satellite images show that, in general, lake drainages have occurred quasiperiodically during the last decade. A particular sequence of drainage events was observed by satellite in 2009 and was analyzed together with the first direct hydrographic observations. Signs of ice-dammed lake drainages were observed by a downstream mooring located just below the intertidal zone. The release of freshwater occurred at the fjord subsurface at a tidewater outlet glacier. The downstream in-water sequence of property changes in relation to these drainage events was observed as an almost immediate decrease in surface layer temperature (~2°C) followed within a week by the arrival of a high-saline pulse (~ +5 units) with elevated salinity lasting for several days during the passage. During lake drainages, large amounts of relatively warm and saline intermediate water are brought to the near-surface layers by entrainment processes near the glacier front, and this influences the hydrography of the fjord but also impacts the ecosystem through upwelling of nutrient-rich intermediate water.

  2. Climate Change Effect on Thermal Power Cooling in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maintaining reasonable surface-water temperatures is paramount for aquatic ecosystem health. Thermal pollution from power plant effluent can result in unnatural river temperature spikes locally, as well as cause damaging breaches to river temperature. The threat of a nonstationar...

  3. Thermal simulation of different construction types in six climatic regions on heating and cooling loads

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumirai, T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available were designed to evaluate the following: ? Case A ? base case ? Case B ? insulated walls ? Case C ? insulated walls and insulated ceiling ? Case D ? insulated walls, insulated ceiling and roof ? Case E ? increased thermal mass wall and insulated... ceiling ? Case F ? centrally insulated wall and insulated ceiling ? Case G ? double insulated wall and insulated ceiling ? Case H ? increased thermal mass wall ? Case I ? centrally insulated wall Table 1: Detailed description of cases A?I Case Roof...

  4. Exergetic analysis of a double stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O thermal compressor cooled by air/water and driven by low grade heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, M. [Instituto C.C. Eduardo Torroja (CSIC), Edificacion y Habitabilidad, Madrid (Spain); Venegas, M.; Garcia, N. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Termica y Fluidos; Palacios, E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Mecanica Industrial

    2005-05-01

    In the present paper, an exergetic analysis of a double stage thermal compressor using the lithium bromide-water solution is performed. The double stage system considered allows obtaining evaporation temperatures equal to 5{sup o} C using solar heat coming from flat plate collectors and other low grade thermal sources. In this study, ambient air and water are alternatively used as cooling fluids without crystallization problems up to condensation-absorption temperatures equal to 50 {sup o}C. The results obtained give the entropy generated, the exergy destroyed and the exergetic efficiency of the double stage thermal compressor as a function of the absorption temperature. The conclusions obtained show that the irreversibilities generated by the double stage thermal compressor will tend to increase with the absorption temperature up to 45 {sup o}C. The maximum value corresponds to 1.35 kJ kg{sup -}1{sup K-1}. The entropy generated and the exergy destroyed by the air cooled system are higher than those by the water cooled one. The difference between the values increases when the absorption temperature increases. For an absorption temperature equal to 50 {sup o}C, the air cooled mode generates 14% more entropy and destroys 14% more exergy than the water cooled one. Also, the results are compared with those of previous studies for single and double effect air cooled and water cooled thermal compressors. The conclusions show that the double stage system has about 22% less exergetic efficiency than the single effect one and 32% less exergetic efficiency than the double effect one. (author)

  5. TACT1- TRANSIENT THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A COOLED TURBINE BLADE OR VANE EQUIPPED WITH A COOLANT INSERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    As turbine-engine core operating conditions become more severe, designers must develop more effective means of cooling blades and vanes. In order to design reliable, cooled turbine blades, advanced transient thermal calculation techniques are required. The TACT1 computer program was developed to perform transient and steady-state heat-transfer and coolant-flow analyses for cooled blades, given the outside hot-gas boundary condition, the coolant inlet conditions, the geometry of the blade shell, and the cooling configuration. TACT1 can analyze turbine blades, or vanes, equipped with a central coolant-plenum insert from which coolant-air impinges on the inner surface of the blade shell. Coolant-side heat-transfer coefficients are calculated with the heat transfer mode at each station being user specified as either impingement with crossflow, forced convection channel flow, or forced convection over pin fins. A limited capability to handle film cooling is also available in the program. The TACT1 program solves for the blade temperature distribution using a transient energy equation for each node. The nodal energy balances are linearized, one-dimensional, heat-conduction equations which are applied at the wall-outer-surface node, at the junction of the cladding and the metal node, and at the wall-inner-surface node. At the mid-metal node a linear, three-dimensional, heat-conduction equation is used. Similarly, the coolant pressure distribution is determined by solving the set of transfer momentum equations for the one-dimensional flow between adjacent fluid nodes. In the coolant channel, energy and momentum equations for one-dimensional compressible flow, including friction and heat transfer, are used for the elemental channel length between two coolant nodes. The TACT1 program first obtains a steady-state solution using iterative calculations to obtain convergence of stable temperatures, pressures, coolant-flow split, and overall coolant mass balance. Transient

  6. Thermal/structural analyses of several hydrogen-cooled leading-edge concepts for hypersonic flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.; Mockler, Theodore T.; Tong, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic heating at high flight Mach numbers, when shock interference heating is included, can be extremely high and can exceed the capability of most conventional metallic and potential ceramic materials available. Numerical analyses of the heat transfer and thermal stresses are performed on three actively cooled leading-edge geometries (models) made of three different materials to address the issue of survivability in a hostile environment. These analyses show a mixture of results from one configuration to the next. Results for each configuration are presented and discussed. Combinations of enhanced internal film coefficients and high material thermal conductivity of copper and tungsten are predicted to maintain the maximum wall temperature for each concept within acceptable operating limits. The exception is the TD nickel material which is predicted to melt for most cases. The wide range of internal impingement film coefficients (based on correlations) for these conditions can lead to a significant uncertainty in expected leading-edge wall temperatures. The equivalent plastic strain, inherent in each configuration which results from the high thermal gradients, indicates a need for further cyclic analysis to determine component life.

  7. Thermal modeling of step-out targets at the Soda Lake geothermal field, Churchill County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, Ryan Kenneth

    Temperature data at the Soda Lake geothermal field in the southeastern Carson Sink, Nevada, highlight an intense thermal anomaly. The geothermal field produces roughly 11 MWe from two power producing facilities which are rated to 23 MWe. The low output is attributed to the inability to locate and produce sufficient volumes of fluid at adequate temperature. Additionally, the current producing area has experienced declining production temperatures over its 40 year history. Two step-out targets adjacent to the main field have been identified that have the potential to increase production and extend the life of the field. Though shallow temperatures in the two subsidiary areas are significantly less than those found within the main anomaly, measurements in deeper wells (>1,000 m) show that temperatures viable for utilization are present. High-pass filtering of the available complete Bouguer gravity data indicates that geothermal flow is present within the shallow sediments of the two subsidiary areas. Significant faulting is observed in the seismic data in both of the subsidiary areas. These structures are highlighted in the seismic similarity attribute calculated as part of this study. One possible conceptual model for the geothermal system(s) at the step-out targets indicated upflow along these faults from depth. In order to test this hypothesis, three-dimensional computer models were constructed in order to observe the temperatures that would result from geothermal flow along the observed fault planes. Results indicate that the observed faults are viable hosts for the geothermal system(s) in the step-out areas. Subsequently, these faults are proposed as targets for future exploration focus and step-out drilling.

  8. Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics of thermal collapse in a freely cooling granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolvin, Itamar; Livne, Eli; Meerson, Baruch

    2010-08-01

    We show that, in dimension higher than one, heat diffusion and viscosity cannot arrest thermal collapse in a freely evolving dilute granular gas, even in the absence of gravity. Thermal collapse involves a finite-time blowup of the gas density. It was predicted earlier in ideal, Euler hydrodynamics of dilute granular gases in the absence of gravity, and in nonideal, Navier-Stokes granular hydrodynamics in the presence of gravity. We determine, analytically and numerically, the dynamic scaling laws that characterize the gas flow close to collapse. We also investigate bifurcations of a freely evolving dilute granular gas in circular and wedge-shaped containers. Our results imply that, in general, thermal collapse can only be arrested when the gas density becomes comparable with the close-packing density of grains. This provides a natural explanation to the formation of densely packed clusters of particles in a variety of initially dilute granular flows.

  9. On the development of a cooled metallic thermal protection system for spacecraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buursink, J.

    2005-01-01

    To achieve a significant cost reduction for launch of payloads to space, it is essential that the launcher is reused to the largest possible extent, and that the maintenance and operations cost of this launcher are minimised. To achieve this, work is ongoing on metallic thermal protection systems (T

  10. Hydraulic and thermal testing of different helium cooled irradiation rig models for the IFMIF High Flux Test Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Christine, E-mail: Christine.Klein@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik; Martin, Thomas; Taubmann, Peter

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Two different single 1:1 irradiation rigs inside a mock-up container are presented. • Pressure drops in the single rig minichannels are measured. • Temperature fields are measured under different heater and flow conditions. • Predictability and reproducibility of the cooling flows can be shown. - Abstract: The hydraulic and thermal testing of two different irradiation rig models A and B, differing in the inlet nozzle design, bottom reflector length and steps inside a mock-up container is part of the HFTM validation activities which support the engineering design of the High Flux Test Module. The pressure drops for all models in the test section are measured for overall mass flow rates of 1–12 g/s and different absolute pressures of 1500 hPa and 2500 hPa at the pressure port at the inlet section. The pressure drops in different sections of the experiment and in the single rig minichannels are also measured with additional pressure ports on the surfaces of the rig models. Predictability and reproducibility of the cooling effects of the main cooling channels in the HFTM irradiation zone can be shown. Rig model B with a backward facing step is for high mass flow rates >∼7.5 g/s (this is the operation regime of the HFTM) superior to rig model A. Uniform perfusion of the multiple parallel minichannels of the irradiation rigs by helium gas is of importance to obtain uniform and predictable temperatures. Temperature fields under different heater and flow conditions have been measured.

  11. A review on the thermal hydraulic characteristics of the air-cooled heat exchangers in forced convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ankur Kumar; Jyeshtharaj B Joshi; Arun K Nayak; Pallippattu K Vijayan

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a review is presented on the experimental investigations and the numerical simulations performed to analyze the thermal-hydraulic performance of the air-cooled heat exchangers. The air-cooled heat exchangers mostly consist of the finned-tube bundles. The primary role of the extended surfaces (fins) is to provide more heat transfer area to enhance the rate of heat transfer on the air side. The secondary role of the fins is to generate vortices, which help in enhancing the mixing and the heat transfer coefficient. In this study, the annular and plate fins are considered, the annular fins are further divided into four categories: (1) plane annular fins, (2) serrated fins, (3) crimped spiral fins, (4) perforated fins, and similarly for the plate fins, the fin types are: (1) plain plate fins, (2) wavy plate fins, (3) plate fins with DWP, and (4) slit and strip fins. In Section 4, the performance of the various types of fins is presented with respect to the parameters: (1) Reynolds number, (2) fin pitch, (3) fin height, (4) fin thickness, (5) tube diameter, (6) tube pitch, (7) tube type, (8) number of tube rows, and (9) effect of dehumidifying conditions. In Section 5, the conclusions and the recommendations for the future work have been given.

  12. Exertional thermal strain, protective clothing and auxiliary cooling in dry heat: evidence for physiological but not cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Joanne N; Patterson, Mark J; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2012-10-01

    Individuals exposed to extreme heat may experience reduced physiological and cognitive performance, even during very light work. This can have disastrous effects on the operational capability of aircrew, but such impairment could be prevented by auxiliary cooling devices. This hypothesis was tested under very hot-dry conditions, in which eight males performed 2 h of low-intensity exercise (~30 W) in three trials, whilst wearing biological and chemical protective clothing: temperate (control: 20°C, 30% relative humidity) and two hot-dry trials (48°C, 20% relative humidity), one without (experimental) and one with liquid cooling (water at 15°C). Physiological strain and six cognitive functions were evaluated (MiniCog Rapid Assessment Battery), and participants drank to sustain hydration state. Maximal core temperatures averaged 37.0°C (±0.1) in the control trial, and were significantly elevated in the experimental trial (38.9°C ± 0.3; P 0.05). However, despite inducing profound hyperthermia and volitional fatigue, no cognitive degradation was evident in the heat (P > 0.05). Since extensive dehydration was prevented, it appears that thermal strain in the absence of dehydration may have minimal impact upon cognitive function, at least as evaluated within this experiment.

  13. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

  14. Development of thermal-hydraulic analysis methodology for multiple modules of water-cooled breeder blanket in fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • A methodology to simulate the K-DEMO blanket system was proposed. • The results were compared with the CFD, to verify the prediction capability of MARS. • 46 Blankets in a single sector in K-DEMO were simulated using MARS-KS. • Supervisor program was devised to handle each blanket module individually. • The calculation results showed the flow rates, pressure drops, and temperatures. - Abstract: According to the conceptual design of the fusion DEMO reactor proposed by the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea, the water-cooled breeding blanket system incorporates a total of 736 blanket modules. The heat flux and neutron wall loading to each blanket module vary along their poloidal direction, and hence, thermal analysis for at least one blanket sector is required to confirm that the temperature limitations of the materials are satisfied in all the blanket modules. The present paper proposes a methodology of thermal analysis for multiple modules of the blanket system using a nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis code, MARS-KS. In order to overcome the limitations of the code, caused by the restriction on the number of computational nodes, a supervisor program was devised, which handles each blanket module separately at first, and then corrects the flow rate, considering pressure drops that occur in each module. For a feasibility test of the proposed methodology, 46 blankets in a single sector were simulated; the calculation results of the parameters, such as mass flow, pressure drops, and temperature distribution in the multiple blanket modules showed that the multi-module analysis method can be used for efficient thermal-hydraulic analysis of the fusion DEMO reactor.

  15. Potential for thermal tolerance to mediate climate change effects on three members of a cool temperate lizard genus, Niveoscincus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Amanda J; While, Geoffrey M; Beeton, Nicholas J; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Climatic changes are predicted to be greater in higher latitude and mountainous regions but species specific impacts are difficult to predict. This is partly due to inter-specific variance in the physiological traits which mediate environmental temperature effects at the organismal level. We examined variation in the critical thermal minimum (CTmin), critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and evaporative water loss rates (EWL) of a widespread lowland (Niveoscincus ocellatus) and two range restricted highland (N. microlepidotus and N. greeni) members of a cool temperate Tasmanian lizard genus. The widespread lowland species had significantly higher CTmin and CTmax and significantly lower EWL than both highland species. Implications of inter-specific variation in thermal tolerance for activity were examined under contemporary and future climate change scenarios. Instances of air temperatures below CTmin were predicted to decline in frequency for the widespread lowland and both highland species. Air temperatures of high altitude sites were not predicted to exceed the CTmax of either highland species throughout the 21st century. In contrast, the widespread lowland species is predicted to experience air temperatures in excess of CTmax on 1 or 2 days by three of six global circulation models from 2068-2096. To estimate climate change effects on activity we reran the thermal tolerance models using minimum and maximum temperatures selected for activity. A net gain in available activity time was predicted under climate change for all three species; while air temperatures were predicted to exceed maximum temperatures selected for activity with increasing frequency, the change was not as great as the predicted decline in air temperatures below minimum temperatures selected for activity. We hypothesise that the major effect of rising air temperatures under climate change is an increase in available activity period for both the widespread lowland and highland species. The

  16. Thermal studies of a high gradient quadrupole magnet cooled with pressurized, stagnant superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, L; Kerby, J S; Lamm, M J; Novitski, I; Orris, D; Ozelis, J P; Peterson, Thomas J; Tartaglia, M; Zlobin, A V

    2001-01-01

    A 2-m long superconducting model of an LHC Interaction Region quadrupole magnet was wound with stabrite coated cable. The resulting low interstrand resistance and high AC losses presented the opportunity to measure magnet quench performance in superfluid as a function of helium temperature and heat deposition in the coil. Our motivation was to duplicate the high radiation heat loads predicted for the inner triplet quadrupoles at LHC and study the coil cooling conditions in the magnet. At the Magnet Test Facility in Fermilab's Technical Division, the magnet quench performance was tested as a function of bulk helium temperature and current ramp rate near the planned high luminosity interaction region field gradient of 205 T/m. AC loss measurements provided a correlation between current ramp rate and heat deposition in the coil. Analysis indicates that the results are consistent with there being little participation of superfluid helium in the small channels inside the inner layer in the heat removal from the co...

  17. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using piston cooling for a GDCI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Gregory T; Husted, Harry L; Sellnau, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of nozzles, at least one nozzle per cylinder, with each nozzle configured to spray oil onto the bottom side of a piston of the engine to cool that piston. Independent control of the oil spray from the nozzles is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the oil spray onto the piston in that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in in a cylinder of the engine and controlling an oil spray targeted onto the bottom of a piston disposed in that cylinder is also presented.

  18. Thermal physiology. Keeping cool: Enhanced optical reflection and radiative heat dissipation in Saharan silver ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Norman Nan; Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Camino, Fernando; Bernard, Gary D; Yu, Nanfang; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2015-07-17

    Saharan silver ants, Cataglyphis bombycina, forage under extreme temperature conditions in the African desert. We show that the ants' conspicuous silvery appearance is created by a dense array of triangular hairs with two thermoregulatory effects. They enhance not only the reflectivity of the ant's body surface in the visible and near-infrared range of the spectrum, where solar radiation culminates, but also the emissivity of the ant in the mid-infrared. The latter effect enables the animals to efficiently dissipate heat back to the surroundings via blackbody radiation under full daylight conditions. This biological solution for a thermoregulatory problem may lead to the development of biomimetic coatings for passive radiative cooling of objects.

  19. Effects of post-reflow cooling rate and thermal aging on growth behavior of interfacial intermetallic compound between SAC305 solder and Cu substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaowu; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Xiongxin; Li, Yulong; Liu, Yi; Min, Zhixian

    2016-04-01

    The interfacial reactions between Cu and Sn3Ag0.5Cu (SAC305) solder reflowed under various cooling rates were investigated. It is found that the cooling rate is an important parameter in solder reflow process because it influences not only microstructure of solder alloy but also the morphology and growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed between solder and Cu substrate. The experimental results indicate that only scallop-like Cu6Sn5 IMC layer is observed between solder and Cu substrate in case of water cooling and air cooling, while bilayer composed of scallop-like Cu6Sn5 and thin layer-like Cu3Sn is detected under furnace cooling due to sufficient reaction time to form Cu3Sn between Cu6Sn5 IMC and Cu substrate which resulted from slow cooling rate. Samples with different reflow cooling rates were further thermal-aged at 423 K. And it is found that the thickness of IMC increases linearly with square root of aging time. The growth constants of interfacial IMC layer during aging were obtained and compared for different cooling rates, indicating that the IMC layer thickness increased faster in samples under low cooling rate than in the high cooling rate under the same aging condition. The long prismatic grains were formed on the existing interfacial Cu6Sn5 grains to extrude deeply into solder matrix with lower cooling rate and long-term aging, and the Cu6Sn5 grains coarsened linearly with cubic root of aging time.

  20. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A LIQUID-METAL-COOLED NEUTRON SPALLATION TARGET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. GREGORY; R. MARTIN; T. VALACHOVIC

    2000-07-01

    We have carried out numerical simulations of the thermal hydraulic behavior of a neutron spallation target where liquid metal lead-bismuth serves as both coolant and as a neutron spallation source. The target is one of three designs provided by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Russia. This type of target is proposed for Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) to eliminate plutonium from hazardous fission products. The thermal hydraulic behavior was simulated by use of a commercial CFD computer code called CFX. Maximum temperatures in the diaphragm window and in the liquid lead were determined. In addition the total pressure drop through the target was predicted. The results of the CFX analysis were close to those results predicted by IPPE in their preliminary analysis.

  1. Adsorption refrigeration-green cooling driven by low grade thermal energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ruzhu; WANG Liwei

    2005-01-01

    As a type of environmental benign refrigeration technology powered by low grade thermal energy, adsorption refrigeration have aroused more and more attention in recent years. In this paper, the research frontiers of adsorption refrigeration, including adsorbent, adsorption theory, heat recovery process, technology of adsorber, the research achievements, and the development achievements, are summarized. Typical systems for adsorption refrigeration research facing to applications in the recent years are presented. Future applications of adsorption refrigeration are analysed.

  2. The Opportunity Analyses of Using Thermosyphons in Cooling Systems of Power Transformers on Thermal Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurpeiis Аtlant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity analyses of using the thermosyphons as the main elements in the systems of thermal regime supplying has been conducted under the conditions of their usage in power transformers on thermal stations. Mathematical modeling of jointly proceeding processes of conduction, forced convection and phase transitions (evaporation and condensation of coolant in the thermosyphon of rectangular cross section has been carried out. The problem of conjugated conductive-convective heat transfer was formulated in dimensionless variables “vorticity/stream function/temperature” and solved by finite difference method. The effect of the heat flux density supplied to the bottom cover of the thermosyphon from a transformer tank on the temperature drop in the steam channel was shown based on the analysis of numerical simulation results (temperature fields and velocities of steam. The parameters of energy-saturated equipment of thermal stations were found to be controlled by an intensification of heat removal from the top cover surface of the thermosyphon.

  3. Thermal structure of the Poraquê lake, Central Amazonian, Brazil = Estrutura térmica do lago Poraquê, Amazônia Central, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Marques Aprile

    2011-01-01

    Thermal gradient of a Central Amazonian lake was studied to establish a link between seasonal variations in the water level, temperature, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and thermal stratification. Bimonthly measurements of temperature and PAR radiation were made at 0.25 m intervals from the surface to bottom from February 2004 to July 2006. Daily occurs full vertical mixing of the water column, and classic thermal stratification was not observed in the period. The effect of the winds asso...

  4. Climate change impact on thermal and oxygen regime of shallow lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiy Kirillin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the numerous processes that govern the functioning of a lake ecosystem, the regime of dissolved oxygen (DO is of primary importance. The DO content is strongly affected by the temperature regime, mixing conditions and by the duration of the ice-covered period. These are formed due to atmospheric forcing and are, therefore, subject to variations in regional climate. Despite the large amount of data revealing the physical effect on the biological and chemical regimes in lakes, there is still insufficient understanding, both qualitative and quantitative, of how a lake ecosystem would be affected by changes in the lake temperature and mixing conditions due to changes in the atmospheric forcing. Below, the study of shallow lakes’ response to climatic changes using the coupled FLake–FLakeEco modelling system is presented. The results obtained reveal the extreme vulnerability of the lakes’ ecosystems to changes in atmospheric forcing. In ‘future’ climate the permanent existence of potentially dangerous anaerobic zones in shallow lakes is expected. The projected decreased oxygen concentrations are caused by: (1 the reduced oxygen flux from the atmosphere to the lakes due to increased temperature; and (2 strengthened density stratification of the water columns which would prevent aeration of the near-bottom layers.

  5. Cooling of Gas Turbines I - Effects of Addition of Fins to Blade Tips and Rotor, Admission of Cooling Air Through Part of Nozzles, and Change in Thermal Conductivity of Turbine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Byron

    1947-01-01

    An analysis was developed for calculating the radial temperature distribution in a gas turbine with only the temperatures of the gas and the cooling air and the surface heat-transfer coefficient known. This analysis was applied to determine the temperatures of a complete wheel of a conventional single-stage impulse exhaust-gas turbine. The temperatures were first calculated for the case of the turbine operating at design conditions of speed, gas flow, etc. and with only the customary cooling arising from exposure of the outer blade flange and one face of the rotor to the air. Calculations were next made for the case of fins applied to the outer blade flange and the rotor. Finally the effects of using part of the nozzles (from 0 to 40 percent) for supplying cooling air and the effects of varying the metal thermal conductivity from 12 to 260 Btu per hour per foot per degree Farenheit on the wheel temperatures were determined. The gas temperatures at the nozzle box used in the calculations ranged from 1600F to 2000F. The results showed that if more than a few hundred degrees of cooling of turbine blades are required other means than indirect cooling with fins on the rotor and outer blade flange would be necessary. The amount of cooling indicated for the type of finning used could produce some improvement in efficiency and a large increase in durability of the wheel. The results also showed that if a large difference is to exist between the effective temperature of the exhaust gas and that of the blade material, as must be the case with present turbine materials and the high exhaust-gas temperatures desired (2000F and above), two alternatives are suggested: (a) If metal with a thermal conductivity comparable with copper is used, then the blade temperature can be reduced by strong cooling at both the blade tip and root. The center of the blade will be less than 2000F hotter than the ends; (b) With low conductivity materials some method of direct cooling other than

  6. Mathematical modelling of the thermal performance of a phase-change material (PCM) store: cooling cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuerklue, A. [Akdeniz University, Faculty of Agriculture, Antalya (Turkey); Wheldon, A.; Hadley, P. [Reading Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering]|[Reading Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Plant Sciences

    1996-07-01

    A mathematical model for the prediction of the thermal performances of a PCM store containing 1 m long and 38 mm diameter polypropylene tube has been developed in this study. Air was utilised in the store as the heat transfer fluid. The model was based on an energy balance or the `conservation of energy principle`. The results indicate that the agreement between the predicted and observed temperature of heat transfer data is generally good. The amount of energy used in increasing the temperature of the PCM at any time during the phase- change process is predicted to be about 3.5% of the total energy stored. (Author)

  7. Thermal study of the structure of an internal combustion engine and assessment of cooling system efficiency by a numerical tridimensional simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, J.P.; Rossi, F.N. (Regie Nationale des Usines Renault 92 - Boulogne (FR))

    1989-01-01

    This paper proposes a calculation tool to evaluate the thermal field of the structure of an internal combustion engine. For this purpose a calculation procedure has been devised to take into account the thermal exchanges with the cooling fluid, the gases taking part to the combustion, the exchanges with the environment under the hood, the lubrificating liquid. The particularity of our study is to model with precision the action of the cooling fluid by solving the tridimensional thermo-hydraulic problem. This enables to evaluate quantitatively the efficiency of the cooling system and the influence of some geometrical modifications. We discuss the case of the housing of a car diesel-engine in using simultaneously an industrial thermo-hydraulic finite elements software (developed by C.E.A.) and a combustion specific one-dimensional software.

  8. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Cr-Doped GdAlO3 Phosphor Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the high luminescence intensity from a Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) thermographic phosphor enables non-rastered full-field temperature mapping of thermal barrier coating (TBC) surfaces to temperatures above 1000C. In this presentation, temperature mapping by Cr:GdAlO3 based phosphor thermometry of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces is demonstrated for both scaled-up cooling hole geometries as well as for actual components in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  9. Thermal Comfort in Simulated Office Environment with Four Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Mustakallio, Panu; Kolencíková, Sona

    2013-01-01

    with overhead mixing ventilation (MVRC). Whole body thermal sensation (TS) and whole body TS acceptability under the four systems in a simulated office room for one hour exposure were collected. The simulated two-man office (4.12 x 4.20 x 2.89 m, L x W x H) was kept at 26 oC room air temperature. Moderate heat...... load of 64 W/m2 was generated by simulated solar heat load, 2 laptops and 2 occupants, giving in total 1104 W. The supplied outdoor air temperature was kept at 16 oC. The supply air flow rate for CB, CBR and CCMV was set to 26 L/s (category II low-polluting building, EN 15251-2007). For MVRC supply...... to “neutral” compared to male, whose votes were closer to the “slightly warm” thermal sensation. The whole body TS acceptability was rated close to ''clearly acceptable'' (EN 15251-2007) and was independent of subject's gender for all tested systems....

  10. Porosity Effect in the Core Thermal Hydraulics for Ultra High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoo Fumizawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental method of porosity evaluation and a predictive thermal-hydraulic analysis with packed spheres in a nuclear reactor core. The porosity experiments were carried out in both a fully shaken state with the closest possible packing and in a state of non-vibration. The predictive analysis considering the fixed porosity value was applied as a design condition for an Ultra High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX. The thermal-hydraulic computer code was developed and identified as PEBTEMP. The highest outlet coolant temperature of 1316 oC was achieved in the case of an UHTREX at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, which was a small scale UHTR. In the present study, the fuel was changed to a pebble type, a porous media. In order to compare the present pebble bed reactor and UHTREX, a calculation based on HTGR-GT300 was carried out in similar conditions with UHTREX; in other words, with an inlet coolant temperature of 871oC, system pressure of 3.45 MPa and power density of 1.3 w/cm3. As a result, the fuel temperature in the present pebble bed reactor showed an extremely lower value compared to that of UHTREX.

  11. Techno-economic assessment of boiler feed water production by membrane distillation with reuse of thermal waste energy from cooling water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J.M.; Leerdam, R.C. van; Medevoort, J. van; Tongeren, W.G.J.M. van; Verhasselt, B.; Verelst, L.; Vermeersch, M.; Corbisier, D.

    2015-01-01

    The European KIC-Climate project Water and Energy for Climate Change (WE4CC) aims at the technical demonstration, business case evaluation and implementation of new value chains for the production of high-quality water using low-grade thermal waste energy from cooling water. A typical large-scale wa

  12. Thermal History of São João Nepomuceno (IVA) Iron Meteorite Inferred from Ganguly's Cooling Rate Model and 57Fe Mössbauer Spectroscopy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, E.; Scorzelli, R. B.; Varela, M. E.

    2016-08-01

    The intracrystalline Fe-Mg distribution in orthopyroxenes, as measured by means of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and associated to Ganguly’s cooling rate numerical method, are used to infer the thermal history of São João Nepomuceno (IVA) meteorite.

  13. Techno-economic assessment of boiler feed water production by membrane distillation with reuse of thermal waste energy from cooling water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J.M.; Leerdam, R.C. van; Medevoort, J. van; Tongeren, W.G.J.M. van; Verhasselt, B.; Verelst, L.; Vermeersch, M.; Corbisier, D.

    2015-01-01

    The European KIC-Climate project Water and Energy for Climate Change (WE4CC) aims at the technical demonstration, business case evaluation and implementation of new value chains for the production of high-quality water using low-grade thermal waste energy from cooling water. A typical large-scale

  14. Investigation of the thermal performance of a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon as a passive cooling system for a nuclear reactor spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusuma, Mukhsinun Hadi; Putra, Nandy; Imawan, Ficky Augusta [Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Universitas Indonesia, Kampus (Indonesia); Antariksawan, Anhar Riza [Centre for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong (Indonesia)

    2017-04-15

    The decay heat that is produced by nuclear reactor spent fuel must be cooled in a spent fuel storage pool. A wickless heat pipe or a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) is used to remove this decay heat. The objective of this research is to investigate the thermal performance of a prototype model for a large-scale vertical TPCT as a passive cooling system for a nuclear research reactor spent fuel storage pool. An experimental investigation and numerical simulation using RELAP5/MOD 3.2 were used to investigate the TPCT thermal performance. The effects of the initial pressure, filling ratio, and heat load were analyzed. Demineralized water was used as the TPCT working fluid. The cooled water was circulated in the water jacket as a cooling system. The experimental results show that the best thermal performance was obtained at a thermal resistance of 0.22°C/W, the lowest initial pressure, a filling ratio of 60%, and a high evaporator heat load. The simulation model that was experimentally validated showed a pattern and trend line similar to those of the experiment and can be used to predict the heat transfer phenomena of TPCT with varying inputs.

  15. A case study for influence of building thermal insulation on cooling load and air-conditioning system in the hot and humid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktacir, Mehmet Azmi [Harran University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osmanbey Campus, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Bueyuekalaca, Orhan; Yilmaz, Tuncay [Cukurova University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Adana (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    Ensuring the effective thermal insulation in regions, where the cooling requirement of building with respect to heating requirement is dominant, is very important from the aspect of energy economy. In this study, the influence of thermal insulation on the building cooling load and the cooling system in case of air-conditioning by an all-air central air-conditioning system was evaluated for a sample building located in Adana, based on the results of three different types of insulation (A, B and C-type buildings) according to the energy efficiency index defined in the Thermal Insulation Regulation used in Turkey. The operating costs of the air-conditioning system were calculated using cooling bin numbers. Life-cycle cost analysis was carried out utilizing the present-worth cost method. Results showed that both the initial and the operating costs of the air-conditioning system were reduced considerably for all three insulation thicknesses. However, the optimum results in view of economic measurements were obtained for a C-type building. The thickness of thermal insulation for the buildings in the southern Turkey should be determined according to the guidelines for a C-type building. (author)

  16. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of an innovative decay heat removal system for lead-cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetti, Fabio; Vitale Di Maio, Damiano; Naviglio, Antonio; Caruso, Gianfranco, E-mail: gianfranco.caruso@uniroma1.it

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • LOOP thermal-hydraulic transient analysis for lead-cooled fast reactors. • Passive decay heat removal system concept to avoid lead freezing. • Solution developed for the diversification of the decay heat removal functions. • RELAP5 vs. RELAP5-3D comparison for lead applications. - Abstract: Improvement of safety requirements in GEN IV reactors needs more reliable safety systems, among which the decay heat removal system (DHR) is one of the most important. Complying with the diversification criteria and based on pure passive and very reliable components, an additional DHR for the ALFRED reactor (Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator) has been proposed and its thermal-hydraulic performances are analyzed. It consists in a coupling of two innovative subsystems: the radiative-based direct heat exchanger (DHX), and the pool heat exchanger (PHX). Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses, by using RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© computer programs, have been carried out showing that the whole system can safely operate, in natural circulation, for a long term. Sensitivity analyses for: the emissivity of the DHX surfaces, the PHX water heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and the lead HTC have been carried out. In addition, the effects of the density variation uncertainty on the results has been analyzed and compared. It allowed to assess the feasibility of the system and to evaluate the acceptable range of the studied parameters. A comparison of the results obtained with RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© has been carried out and the analysis of the differences of the two codes for lead is presented. The features of the innovative DHR allow to match the decay heat removal performance with the trend of the reactor decay heat power after shutdown, minimizing at the same time the risk of lead freezing. This system, proposed for the diversification of the DHR in the LFRs, could be applicable in the other pool-type liquid metal fast reactors.

  17. In-flight validation and recovery of water surface temperature with Landsat-5 thermal infrared data using an automated high-altitude lake validation site at Lake Tahoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, S.J.; Chander, G.; Barsi, J.A.; Alley, R.E.; Abtahi, A.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Markham, B.L.; Richards, R.C.; Schladow, S.G.; Helder, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    The absolute radiometric accuracy of the thermal infrared band (B6) of the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument on the Landsat-5 (L5) satellite was assessed over a period of approximately four years using data from the Lake Tahoe automated validation site (California-Nevada). The Lake Tahoe site was established in July 1999, and measurements of the skin and bulk temperature have been made approximately every 2 min from four permanently moored buoys since mid-1999. Assessment involved using a radiative transfer model to propagate surface skin temperature measurements made at the time of the L5 overpass to predict the at-sensor radiance. The predicted radiance was then convolved with the L5B6 system response function to obtain the predicted L5B6 radiance, which was then compared with the radiance measured by L5B6. Twenty-four cloud-free scenes acquired between 1999 and 2003 were used in the analysis with scene temperatures ranging between 4??C and 22??C. The results indicate LSB6 had a radiance bias of 2.5% (1.6??C) in late 1999, which gradually decreased to 0.8% (0.5??C) in mid-2002. Since that time, the bias has remained positive (predicted minus measured) and between 0.3% (0.2??C) and 1.4% (0.9??C). The cause for the cold bias (L5 radiances are lower than expected) is unresolved, but likely related to changes in instrument temperature associated with changes in instrument usage. The in situ data were then used to develop algorithms to recover the skin and bulk temperature of the water by regressing the L5B6 radiance and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) total column water data to either the skin or bulk temperature. Use of the NCEP data provides an alternative approach to the split-window approach used with instruments that have two thermal infrared bands. The results indicate the surface skin and bulk temperature can be recovered with a standard error of 0.6??C. This error is larger than errors obtained with other instruments due, in part, to the

  18. A cooled intraesophageal balloon to prevent thermal injury during endocardial surgical radiofrequency ablation of the left atrium: a finite element study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berjano, Enrique J [Center for Research and Innovation on Bioengineering, Valencia Polytechnic University, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Hornero, Fernando [Cardiac Surgery Department, Valencia University General Hospital, Avd Tres Cruces s/n, 46014, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-10-21

    Recent clinical studies on intraoperative monopolar radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation have reported some cases of injury to the esophagus. The aim of this study was to perform computer simulations using three-dimensional finite element models in order to investigate the feasibility of a cooled intraesophageal balloon appropriately placed to prevent injury. The models included atrial tissue and a fragment of esophagus and lung linked by connective tissue. The lesion depth in the esophagus was assessed using a 50 deg. C isotherm and expressed as a percentage of thickness of the esophageal wall. The results are as follows: (1) chilling the esophagus by means of a cooled balloon placed in the lumen minimizes the lesion in the esophageal wall compared to the cases in which no balloon is used (a collapsed esophagus) and with a non-cooled balloon; (2) the temperature of the cooling fluid has a more significant effect on the minimization of the lesion than the rate of cooling (the thermal transfer coefficient for forced convection); and (3) pre-cooling periods previous to RF ablation do not represent a significant improvement. Finally, the results also suggest that the use of a cooled balloon could affect the transmurality of the atrial lesion, especially in the cases where the atrium is of considerable thickness. (note)

  19. Effects of Short-Term Thermal Alteration on Organic Matter in Experimentally-Heated Tagish Lake Observed by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Nakato, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Nakamura, T.; Kebukawa, Y.; Maisano, J.; Colbert, M.; Martinez, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites exhibit a wide range of aqueous and thermal alteration characteristics, while some are known to demonstrate mineralogical and petrologic evidence of having been thermally metamorphosed after aqueous alteration. This group of meteorites are commonly referred as thermally met-amorphosed carbonaceous chondrites (TMCCs), and their reflectance spectra show resemblances to that of C-type asteroids which typically have low albedos. This suggests that the surfaces of the C-type asteroids are also composed of both hydrous and dehydrated minerals, and thus TMCCs are among the best samples that can be studied in laboratory to reveal the true nature of the C-type asteroids. Although TMCCs are usually meteorites that were previously categorized as CI and CM chondrites, they are not strictly CI/CM because they exhibit isotopic and petrographic characteristics that significantly deviate from typical CI/CM. More appropriately, they are called CI-like and/or CM-like chondrites. Typical examples of TMCCs include the C2-ung/CM2TIV Belgica (B)-7904 and Yamato (Y) 86720. Thermal alteration is virtually complete in these meteorites and thus they are considered typical end-members of TMCCs exhibiting complete dehydration of matrix phyllosilicates. The estimated heating conditions are 10 to 103 days at 700 C to 1 to 100 hours at 890 C, i.e. short-term heating induced by impact and/or solar radiation. While the petrology and chemistry of TMCCs have only recently been extensively characterized, we have just begun to study in detail their organic contents. In order to understand how short-term heating affects the maturity of insoluble organic matter (IOM) in hydrous chondrites, we investigated experimentally-heated Tagish Lake meteorite using Raman spectroscopy, as the chemical and bulk oxygen isotopic compositions of the matrix of the carbonate (CO3)-poor lithology of the Tagish Lake (hereafter Tag) meteorite bears similarities to the TMCCs.

  20. Modeling and Thermal Performance Evaluation of Porous Curd Layers in Sub-Cooled Boiling Region of PWRs and Effects of Sub-Cooled Nucleate Boiling on Anomalous Porous Crud Deposition on Fuel Pin Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay Jones

    2005-06-27

    A significant number of current PWRs around the world are experiencing anomalous crud deposition in the sub-cooled region of the core, resulting in an axial power shift or Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA), a condition that continues to elude prediction of occurrence and thermal/neutronic performance. This creates an operational difficulty of not being able to accurately determine power safety margin. In some cases this condition has required power ''down rating'' by as much as thirty percent and the concomitant considerable loss of revenue for the utility. This study examines two aspects of the issue: thermal performance of crud layer and effect of sub-cooled nucleate boiling on the solute concentration and its influence on initiation of crud deposition/formation on fuel pin surface.

  1. Effects of Climate Warming, North Atlantic Oscillation, and El Niño-Southern Oscillation on Thermal Conditions and Plankton Dynamics in Northern Hemispheric Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Gerten

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of climate warming on freshwater ecosystems have been documented recently for a variety of sites around the globe. Here we provide a review of studies that report long-term (multidecadal effects of warming trends on thermal properties and plankton dynamics in northern hemispheric lakes. We show that higher lake temperatures, shorter periods with ice cover, and shorter stagnation periods were common trends for lakes across the hemisphere in response to the warmer conditions. Only for shallow dimictic lakes was it observed that deep-water temperatures decreased. Moreover, it became evident that phytoplankton dynamics and primary productivity altered in conjunction with changes in lake physics. Algal spring blooms developed early and were more pronounced in several European lakes after mild winters with short ice cover periods, and primary productivity increased in North American lakes. Effects of elevated temperatures on zooplankton communities were seen in an early development of various species and groups, as is documented for cladocerans, copepods, and rotifers in European lakes. Furthermore, thermophile species reached higher abundance in warmer years.

  2. Interpretation of thermochronological cooling ages using thermal modelling: an example from shallow magma intrusions from the Kerguelen archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Floriane; Delpech, Guillaume; Gautheron, Cécile; Nomade, Sébastien; Zeyen, Hermann; Guillaume, Damien

    2017-04-01

    Low temperature thermochronology on plutonic rocks is traditionally used to calculate erosion rates over large time scale. However, this method requires a good knowledge of the local or regional geology and particularly the thermal structure and evolution of the crust. The Kerguelen Islands (48-50°S, 68/5-70.5°E, Indian Ocean) are the emerged part of a vast oceanic plateau and are mostly made up of Oligocene basaltic traps that are cross cut by a dense network of large and deep valleys. Numerous plutonic complexes of various age (20-4.5 Ma) locally intrude theses traps and cover about 15% of the main island's surface. The Rallier du Baty peninsula is the largest plutonic complex, it is mainly constituted of syenites and is divided into two adjacent circular plutonic complexes whose centres are distant of 15 km. The southern part has a laccolith structure with satellites plutons and was emplaced at shallow depth (about 1 to 3 km) between 13.7 ± 0.3 and 8.0 ± 0.2 Ma. The northern part was emplaced later between 7.8 ± 0.25 and 4.5 ± 0.1 Ma. The Kerguelen Islands are of particular interest to understand the impact of Cenozoïc climatic variations on the long-term geomorphological evolution of emerged reliefs at mid-latitudes. To understand the erosion of the area, we conducted the first study on the Kerguelen Islands using the biotite 40Ar/39Ar (BAr), apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometers (AHe and ZHe). In the southern part, the BAr ages for the various intrusions of the complex range from 9.44 ± 0.13 Ma to 13.84 ± 0.07 Ma. These ages are identical to high-temperature crystallisation ages (U-Pb on zircon) indicating an extremely rapid cooling between ˜700 and ˜300°C. The mean ZHe ages range between 7.1 ± 2.3 and 8.8 ± 1.4 and the mean AHe ages range between 4.4 ± 0.3 Ma and 7.4 ± 0.7 Ma. The AHe ages of the southern complex are similar to the crystallization ages of the northern part of the complex. The mean AHe ages in the northern part are

  3. Optimal Design of Cogeneration Systems in Industrial Plants Combined with District Heating/Cooling and Underground Thermal Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Dovì

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Combined heat and power (CHP systems in both power stations and large plants are becoming one of the most important tools for reducing energy requirements and consequently the overall carbon footprint of fundamental industrial activities. While power stations employ topping cycles where the heat rejected from the cycle is supplied to domestic and industrial consumers, the plants that produce surplus heat can utilise bottoming cycles to generate electrical power. Traditionally the waste heat available at high temperatures was used to generate electrical power, whereas energy at lower temperatures was either released to the environment or used for commercial or domestic heating. However the introduction of new engines, such as the ones using the organic Rankine cycle, capable of employing condensing temperatures very close to the ambient temperature, has made the generation of electrical power at low temperatures also convenient. On the other hand, district heating is becoming more and more significant since it has been extended to include cooling in the warm months and underground storage of thermal energy to cope with variable demand. These developments imply that electric power generation and district heating/cooling may become alternative and not complementary solutions for waste energy of industrial plants. Therefore the overall energy management requires the introduction of an optimisation algorithm to select the best strategy. In this paper we propose an algorithm for the minimisation of a suitable cost function, for any given variable heat demand from commercial and domestic users, with respect to all independent variables, i.e., temperatures and flowrates of warm fluid streams leaving the plants and volume and nature of underground storage. The results of the preliminary process integration analysis based on pinch technology are used in this algorithm to provide bounds on the values of temperatures.

  4. Gray-Box Approach for Thermal Modelling of Buildings for Applications in District Heating and Cooling Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurav, Kumar; Chandan, Vikas

    2017-05-19

    District-heating-and-cooling (DHC) systems are a proven energy solution that has been deployed for many years in a growing number of urban areas worldwide. They comprise a variety of technologies that seek to develop synergies between the production and supply of heat, cooling, domestic hot water and electricity. Although the benefits of DHC systems are significant and have been widely acclaimed, yet the full potential of modern DHC systems remains largely untapped. There are several opportunities for development of energy efficient DHC systems, which will enable the effective exploitation of alternative renewable resources, waste heat recovery, etc., in order to increase the overall efficiency and facilitate the transition towards the next generation of DHC systems. This motivated the need for modelling these complex systems. Large-scale modelling of DHC-networks is challenging, as it has several components such as buildings, pipes, valves, heating source, etc., interacting with each other. In this paper, we focus on building modelling. In particular, we present a gray-box methodology for thermal modelling of buildings. Gray-box modelling is a hybrid of data driven and physics based models where, coefficients of the equations from physics based models are learned using data. This approach allows us to capture the dynamics of the buildings more effectively as compared to pure data driven approach. Additionally, this approach results in a simpler models as compared to pure physics based models. We first develop the individual components of the building such as temperature evolution, flow controller, etc. These individual models are then integrated in to the complete gray-box model for the building. The model is validated using data collected from one of the buildings at Lule{\\aa}, a city on the coast of northern Sweden.

  5. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  6. Integral and Separate Effects Tests for Thermal Hydraulics Code Validation for Liquid-Salt Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per

    2012-10-30

    The objective of the 3-year project was to collect integral effects test (IET) data to validate the RELAP5-3D code and other thermal hydraulics codes for use in predicting the transient thermal hydraulics response of liquid salt cooled reactor systems, including integral transient response for forced and natural circulation operation. The reference system for the project is a modular, 900-MWth Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), a specific type of Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR). Two experimental facilities were developed for thermal-hydraulic integral effects tests (IETs) and separate effects tests (SETs). The facilities use simulant fluids for the liquid fluoride salts, with very little distortion to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics behavior. The CIET Test Bay facility was designed, built, and operated. IET data for steady state and transient natural circulation was collected. SET data for convective heat transfer in pebble beds and straight channel geometries was collected. The facility continues to be operational and will be used for future experiments, and for component development. The CIET 2 facility is larger in scope, and its construction and operation has a longer timeline than the duration of this grant. The design for the CIET 2 facility has drawn heavily on the experience and data collected on the CIET Test Bay, and it was completed in parallel with operation of the CIET Test Bay. CIET 2 will demonstrate start-up and shut-down transients and control logic, in addition to LOFC and LOHS transients, and buoyant shut down rod operation during transients. Design of the CIET 2 Facility is complete, and engineering drawings have been submitted to an external vendor for outsourced quality controlled construction. CIET 2 construction and operation continue under another NEUP grant. IET data from both CIET facilities is to be used for validation of system codes used for FHR modeling, such as RELAP5-3D. A set of

  7. Proof-of-Concept Testing of the Passive Cooling System (T-CLIP™) for Solar Thermal Applications at an Elevated Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Jun [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Quintana, Donald L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Vigil, Gabrielle M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Perraglio, Martin Juan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Farley, Cory Wayne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Tafoya, Jose I. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Martinez, Adam L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology

    2015-11-30

    The Applied Engineering and Technology-1 group (AET-1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted the proof-of-concept tests of SolarSPOT LLC’s solar thermal Temperature- Clipper, or T-CLIP™ under controlled thermal conditions using a thermal conditioning unit (TCU) and a custom made environmental chamber. The passive T-CLIP™ is a plumbing apparatus that attaches to a solar thermal collector to limit working fluid temperature and to prevent overheating, since overheating may lead to various accident scenarios. The goal of the current research was to evaluate the ability of the T-CLIP™ to control the working fluid temperature by using its passive cooling mechanism (i.e. thermosiphon, or natural circulation) in a small-scale solar thermal system. The assembled environmental chamber that is thermally controlled with the TCU allows one to simulate the various possible weather conditions, which the solar system will encounter. The performance of the T-CLIP™ was tested at two different target temperatures: 1) room temperature (70 °F) and 2) an elevated temperature (130 °F). The current test campaign demonstrated that the T-CLIP™ was able to prevent overheating by thermosiphon induced cooling in a small-scale solar thermal system. This is an important safety feature in situations where the pump is turned off due to malfunction or power outages.

  8. Thermal performance of a controlled cooling system for low-level optical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, M.M.P.; Arguelles, E.B.; Rodriguez, J.C.C.; Garcia, M.A.P. [Universidad de Oviedo, Asturias (Spain). Dpto. de Energia

    2004-10-01

    Low-level light signals that are highly dependent on temperature are very common in measurement applications that employ sensors coupled to optical fibres. In order to amplify and condition the signal, photomultipliers are traditionally used together with climatic chambers in which the ambient temperature of the chamber is controlled. The present paper proposes the use of an avalanche photodiode (due to its lower price and size) to amplify the signal. However, this change implies more careful temperature control. This is why we propose to control the temperature in the photodiode itself and to use a thermoelectric cooler. This system design suggests the convenience of the development of a thermal study that is presented here. The electrical intensity of the thermoelectric cooler, the influence of the surrounding temperature and the use of isolating material or air in the space between the photodiode and the walls of the chamber are analysed. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques were applied to model the system and the model was satisfactorily validated. The feasibility of carrying out the temperature control in the cold junction of the thermoelectric cooler instead of in the photodiode itself was tested and was found to improve control. (author)

  9. Thermal instabilities in cooling galactic coronae: fuelling star formation in galactic discs

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, Alexander; Power, Chris; Cole, David

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the means by which cold gas can accrete onto Milky Way mass galaxies from a hot corona of gas, using a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, 'SPHS'. We find that the 'cold clumps' seen in many classic SPH simulations in the literature are not present in our SPHS simulations. Instead, cold gas condenses from the halo along filaments that form at the intersection of supernovae-driven bubbles from previous phases of star formation. This positive feedback feeds cold gas to the galactic disc directly, fuelling further star formation. The resulting galaxies in the SPH and SPHS simulations differ greatly in their morphology, gas phase diagrams, and stellar content. We show that the classic SPH cold clumps owe to a numerical thermal instability caused by an inability for cold gas to mix in the hot halo. The improved treatment of mixing in SPHS suppresses this instability leading to a dramatically different physical outcome. In our highest resolution SPHS simulation, we find that the cold filaments ...

  10. Analysis of the hydrothermal behavior and entropy generation in a regenerative cooling channel considering thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoodi, M., E-mail: mostafamahmoodi@engineer.com [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Malek-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kandelousi, Sh., E-mail: m.Kandelousi.sh@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Heat transfer enhancement of kerosene–alumina nanofluid is studied. • DTM is applied to solve the governing equations. • Nu is an increasing function of Rd, ϕ. • Be is a decreasing function of R, Ec. - Abstract: A semi-analytical investigation is performed into the force convection heat transfer characteristics and entropy generation of kerosene–alumina nanofluid in a channel of semi cryogenic engine. Thermal radiation effect is considered in energy equation. The governing equations are reduced to ordinary equation by means of similarity solution and solve by Differential Transformation Method. Velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number and Bejan number are determined for different values of pertinent parameters such as Radiation parameter, nanofluid volume fraction, Viscosity parameter and Eckert number. Results indicate that entropy generation is an increasing function of Viscosity parameter and Eckert number while it is a decreasing function of Radiation parameter. Also it can be concluded that Nusselt number enhances with augment of Radiation parameter and nanofluid volume fraction while it decreases with increase of Radiation and Viscosity parameter parameters.

  11. Mechanical and thermal analysis of beryllium windows for RF cavities in a muon cooling channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun; Ladran, A.; Lozano, D.; Rimmer, R.

    2002-05-30

    Thin beryllium windows (foils) may be utilized to increase shunt impedance of closed-cell RF cavities. These windows are subject to ohmic heating from RF currents. The resulting temperature gradients in the windows can produce out of plane displacements that detune the cavity frequency. The window displacement can be reduced or eliminated by pre-stressing the foils in tension. Because of possible variations during manufacture, it is important to quantify the actual prestress of a Be window before it is put into service. We present the thermal and mechanical analyses of such windows under typical operating conditions and describe a simple non-destructive means to quantify the pre-stress using the acoustic signature of a window. Using finite element analysis, thin plate theory and physical measurements of the vibration modes of a window we attempted to characterize the actual Be window pre-stress in a small number of commercially sourced windows (30% of yield strength is typical). This method can be used for any window material and size, but this study focused on 16 cm diameter Be Windows ranging in thickness from 125 microns to 508 microns and with varying pre-stresses. The method can be used to nondestructively test future Be windows for the desired prestress.

  12. Thermal-hydraulics of helium cooled First Wall channels and scoping investigations on performance improvement by application of ribs and mixing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: frederik.arbeiter@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion – Programme Management Unit, Garching (Germany); Chen, Yuming; Ilić, Milica; Schwab, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sieglin, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wenninger, Ronald [EUROfusion – Programme Management Unit, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Existing first wall designs and expected plasma heat loads are reviewed. • Heat transfer enhancement methods are investigated by CFD. • The results for heat transfer and friction are given, compared and explained. • Relations for needed pumping power and gained thermal heat are shown. • A range for the maximum permissible heat loads from the plasma is estimated. - Abstract: The first wall (FW) of DEMO is a component with high thermal loads. The cooling of the FW has to comply with the material's upper and lower temperature limits and requirements from stress assessment, like low temperature gradients. Also, the cooling has to be integrated into the balance-of-plant, in a sense to deliver exergy to the power cycle and require a limited pumping power for coolant circulation. This paper deals with the basics of FW cooling and proposes optimization approaches. The effectiveness of several heat transfer enhancement techniques is investigated for the use in helium cooled FW designs for DEMO. Among these are wall-mounted ribs, large scale mixing devices and modified hydraulic diameter. Their performance is assessed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are compared. Based on the results, an extrapolation to high heat fluxes is tried to estimate the higher limits of cooling capabilities.

  13. Thermal cooling effects in the microstructure and properties of cast cobalt-base biomedical alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Valer, Vladimir

    Joint replacement prosthesis is widely used in the biomedical field to provide a solution for dysfunctional human body joints. The demand for orthopedic knee and hip implants motivate scientists and manufacturers to develop novel materials or to increase the life of service and efficiency of current materials. Cobalt-base alloys have been investigated by various researchers for biomedical implantations. When these alloys contain Chromium, Molybdenum, and Carbon, they exhibit good tribological and mechanical properties, as well as excellent biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In this study, the microstructure of cast Co-Cr-Mo-C alloy is purposely modified by inducing rapid solidification through fusion welding processes and solution annealing heat treatment (quenched in water at room temperature. In particular the effect of high cooling rates on the athermal phase transformation FCC(gamma)↔HCP(epsilon) on the alloy hardness and corrosion resistance is investigated. The Co-alloy microstructures were characterized using metallography and microscopy techniques. It was found that the as cast sample typically dendritic with dendritic grain sizes of approximately 150 microm and containing Cr-rich coarse carbide precipitates along the interdendritic boundaries. Solution annealing gives rise to a refined microstructure with grain size of 30 microm, common among Co-Cr-Mo alloys after heat treating. Alternatively, an ultrafine grain structure (between 2 and 10 microm) was developed in the fusion zone for specimens melted using Laser and TIG welding methods. When laser surface modification treatments were implemented, the developed solidification microstructure shifted from dendritic to a fine cellular morphology, with possible nanoscale carbide precipitates along the cellular boundaries. In turn, the solidified regions exhibited high hardness values (461.5HV), which exceeds by almost 110 points from the alloy in the as-cast condition. The amount of developed athermal

  14. INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

    2006-09-01

    INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT

  15. Thermal hydraulic investigations on porous blockage in a prototype sodium cooled fast reactor fuel pin bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, M.Naveen; Velusamy, K., E-mail: kvelu@igcar.gov.in; Maity, Ram Kumar

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • We simulate flow and temperature fields in FBR fuel bundle with porous blockage. • We perform RANS-based CFD simulation for 217 pin bundle of 7 axial pitch lengths. • Flow reduction in fuel bundle due to porous internal blockage is estimated. • Monitoring bulk sodium outlet temperature does not guarantee blockage detection. • Admissible blockage length to avoid sodium boiling is determined. - Abstract: Thermal hydraulic characteristics of sodium flow in a prototype fuel subassembly with porous internal blockage have been investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. CFD solutions for a subassembly having 217 pin bundle with seven helical pitch length were obtained by parallel processing. The CFD model has been validated against benchmark blockage experiment reported in literature. Wide parametric ranges for blockage radius, porosity, mean particle diameter and location of blockage have been considered. Critical length of blockage that would result in local sodium boiling as a function of aforementioned blockage parameters has been estimated and the parametric zone posing risk of sodium boiling has been identified. Attention has been paid to coolant mixing and flow and temperature fields downstream of the blockage zone. It is seen that for a prototype subassembly with various sections contributing to pressure loss, the total flow reduction is <2.5% for all blockages that can lead to local sodium boiling. This suggests, that global bulk sodium temperature monitoring at subassembly outlet is unlikely to detect slowly growing blockages. Comparing the sodium flow and temperature fields in unblocked and blocked bundles, it is found that the wake-induced temperature non-uniformity persist even upto 3 helical pitch length, highlighting that the sodium temperature non-uniformity at the bundle exit can serve as an efficient blockage indicator, provided that the cross-section temperature is mapped by a proper instrumentation. The peak

  16. Free cooling in an urban environment - A lake and ground water distribution network to cover the heating and cooling needs of buildings - Feasibility study for the City of Neuchatel, Switzerland; Freecooling en milieu urbain. Reseau de distribution d'eau de lac et d'eau souterraine pour couvrir les besoins en rafraichissement et en chaleur des batiments. Etude de faisabilite pour la Ville de Neuchatel, Suisse - Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthey, B.; Affolter, M.

    2009-12-15

    The potential cooling demand in the City of Neuchatel (35,000 inhabitants) is estimated to at least 15 MW. Considering the natural cooling resources available (the Lake of Neuchatel, the Serriere spring, groundwater), these needs can be satisfied without electrical refrigeration equipment. However, the multiplicity of resources and needs implicates the use of multiple and complementary water supply systems: individual wells, multiple building network, lake water distribution network for an entire district. Three exploitation systems to supply cooling water to the center of Neuchatel have been evaluated: lake water, ground water, existing drinking water network. The analysis indicates that the realization of a lake water network for free cooling and heat pumps is economically attractive. In a first step and to meet the short-term demand, the providing of cool water through the existing drinking water network can be considered. In Serriere, the use of the heating and cooling resource of the Serriere river has been evaluated. The results demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of a heating and cooling water supply network. (authors)

  17. Thermal models, stable isotopes and cooling ages from the incrementally constructed Tuolumne batholith, Sierra Nevada: why large chambers did exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, S. R.; Okaya, D. A.; Memeti, V.; Mundil, R.; Lackey, J.; Clemens-Knott, D.

    2009-12-01

    Our studies of the zoned, 1100 km2, 95-85 Ma Tuolumne batholith are in part designed to evaluate the thermal evolution of normally zoned, large magma bodies formed by the amalgamation of a few to many magma pulses. We use finite difference models with full spatial heterogeneity of rock properties, fine-scale internal grid spacing allowing for rock geometries at scales between sub-m to km’s, small internal time steps for runs over durations of days to millions of years and latent heat of fusion. Our initial stable isotopic studies, including δ18O variation in zircon (6-6.5‰), titanite (4.5-5.2‰), quartz (9-10‰), and whole rock (7-9 ‰) (Lackey et al. 2008, J. Pet.) and of the dD of biotites (-65 to -75‰) reveal isotopic exchange during magmatic cooling but the absence of a pervasive hydrothermal circulation system. We thus excluded advective cooling from our models. A range of incremental chamber construction scenarios are modeled including (1) repeated intrusions of rectangular or elliptical geometry (sills, dikes, or blobs); (2) a sequence of intrusions emplaced at specified but arbitrary times or according to a time rate with pulse shapes fixed or set to randomly vary within a range of dimensions and aspect ratios; (3) sheeted dike complexes in which the thermal model expands according to an extension rate to accommodate the emplacement of new dikes with width and time between dikes coupled to growth rate; (4) nested diapiric pulses; and (5) nested, irregularly shaped bodies based on maps or cross-sections that are digitally rendered into rock types, assigned thermal properties and intruded at specified times as new magma pulses. This wide range of batholith construction scenarios naturally results in a wide range of length and timescales of magma chambers. However, many likely scenarios for the TB, based on flux rates constrained by mapping and geochronology indicate that (1) the lobes of the Tuolumne batholith will crystallize in 100

  18. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  19. A cooled water-irrigated intraesophageal balloon to prevent thermal injury during cardiac ablation: experimental study based on an agar phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lequerica, Juan L [Cardiac Research Laboratory, Instituto de Biomedicina, Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Valencia (Spain); Berjano, Enrique J [Institute for Research and Innovation on Bioengineering, Valencia Polytechnic University, Valencia (Spain); Herrero, Maria [Cardiac Research Laboratory, Instituto de Biomedicina, Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Valencia (Spain); Melecio, Lemuel [Cardiac Research Laboratory, Instituto de Biomedicina, Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Valencia (Spain); Hornero, Fernando [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Consorcio Hospital General Universitario, Valencia (Spain)

    2008-02-21

    A great deal of current research is directed to finding a way to minimize thermal injury in the esophagus during radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrium. A recent clinical study employing a cooling intraesophageal balloon reported a reduction of the temperature in the esophageal lumen. However, it could not be determined whether the deeper muscular layer of the esophagus was cooled enough to prevent injury. We built a model based on an agar phantom in order to experimentally study the thermal behavior of this balloon by measuring the temperature not only on the balloon, but also at a hypothetical point between the esophageal lumen and myocardium (2 mm distant). Controlled temperature (55 {sup 0}C) ablations were conducted for 120 s. The results showed that (1) the cooling balloon provides a reduction in the final temperature reached, both on the balloon surface and at a distance of 2 mm; (2) coolant temperature has a significant effect on the temperature measured at 2 mm from the esophageal lumen (it has a less effect on the temperature measured on the balloon surface) and (3) the pre-cooling period has a significant effect on the temperature measured on the balloon surface (the effect on the temperature measured 2 mm away is small). The results were in good agreement with those obtained in a previous clinical study. The study suggests that the cooling balloon gives thermal protection to the esophagus when a minimum pre-cooling period of 2 min is programmed at a coolant temperature of 5 deg. C or less. (note)

  20. Origin of two maxima in specific heat in enthalpy relaxation under thermal history composed of cooling, annealing, and heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-12-01

    The origin of two maxima in specific heat observed at the higher and the lower temperatures in the glass-transition region in the heating process has been studied for polymethyl methacrylate and polyvinyl chloride using differential scanning calorimetry, and the calculation was done using the phenomenological model equation under a thermal history of the typical annealing experiment composed of cooling, annealing, and heating. The higher maximum is observed above the glass-transition temperature, and it remains almost unchanged independent of annealing time ta, while the lower one is observed above an annealing temperature Ta and shifts toward the higher one, increasing its magnitude with ta. The analysis by the phenomenological model equation proposed in order to interpret the memory effect in the glassy state clarifies that under a typical annealing history, two maxima in specific heat essentially appear. The shift of the lower maximum toward higher temperatures from above Ta is caused by an increase in the amount of relaxation during annealing with ta. The annealing temperature and the amount of relaxation during annealing play a major role in the determination of the number of maxima in the specific heat.

  1. Origin of two maxima in specific heat in enthalpy relaxation under thermal history composed of cooling, annealing, and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-12-01

    The origin of two maxima in specific heat observed at the higher and the lower temperatures in the glass-transition region in the heating process has been studied for polymethyl methacrylate and polyvinyl chloride using differential scanning calorimetry, and the calculation was done using the phenomenological model equation under a thermal history of the typical annealing experiment composed of cooling, annealing, and heating. The higher maximum is observed above the glass-transition temperature, and it remains almost unchanged independent of annealing time t_{a}, while the lower one is observed above an annealing temperature T_{a} and shifts toward the higher one, increasing its magnitude with t_{a}. The analysis by the phenomenological model equation proposed in order to interpret the memory effect in the glassy state clarifies that under a typical annealing history, two maxima in specific heat essentially appear. The shift of the lower maximum toward higher temperatures from above T_{a} is caused by an increase in the amount of relaxation during annealing with t_{a}. The annealing temperature and the amount of relaxation during annealing play a major role in the determination of the number of maxima in the specific heat.

  2. Amorphization and thermal stability of aluminum-based nanoparticles prepared from the rapid cooling of nanodroplets: effect of iron addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan; Deng, Huiqiu; Deng, Lei; Hu, Wangyu

    2015-03-07

    Despite an intensive investigation on bimetallic nanoparticles, little attention has been paid to their amorphization in the past few decades. The study of amorphization on a nanoscale is of considerable significance for the preparation of amorphous nanoparticles and bulk metallic glass. Herein, we pursue the amorphization process of Al-based nanoparticles with classic molecular dynamics simulations and local structural analysis techniques. By a comparative study of the amorphization of pure Al and Fe-doped Al-based nanodroplets in the course of rapid cooling, we find that Fe addition plays a very important role in the vitrification of Al-based nanodroplets. Owing to the subsurface segregated Fe atoms with their nearest neighbors tending to form relatively stable icosahedral (ICO) clusters, the Fe-centred cluster network near the surface effectively suppresses the crystallization of droplets from surface nucleation and growth as the concentration of Fe attains a certain value. The glass formation ability of nanodroplets is suggested to be enhanced by the high intrinsic inner pressure as a result of small size and surface tension, combined with the dopant-inhibited surface nucleation. In addition, the effect of the size and the added concentration of nanoparticles on amorphization and the thermal stability of the amorphous nanoparticles are discussed. Our findings reveal the amorphization mechanism in Fe-doped Al-based nanoparticles and provide a theoretical guidance for the design of amorphous materials.

  3. Heat transfer and parametric studies of an encapsulated phase change material based cool thermal energy storage system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHERALATHAN M.; VELRAJ R.; RENGANARAYANAN S.

    2006-01-01

    This work investigates the transient behaviour of a phase change material based cool thermal energy storage (CTES)system comprised of a cylindrical storage tank filled with encapsulated phase change materials (PCMs) in spherical container integrated with an ethylene glycol chiller plant. A simulation program was developed to evaluate the temperature histories of the heat transfer fluid (HTF) and the phase change material at any axial location during the charging period. The results of the model were validated by comparison with experimental results of temperature profiles of HTF and PCM. The model was also used to investigate the effect of porosity, Stanton number, Stefan number and Peclet number on CTES system performance. The results showed that increase in porosity contributes to a higher rate of energy storage. However, for a given geometry and heat transfer coefficient, the mass of PCM charged in the unit decreases as the increase in porosity. The St number as well as the Ste number is also influential in the performance of the unit. The model is a convenient and more suitable method to determine the heat transfer characteristics of CTES system. The results reported are much useful for designing CTES system.

  4. Data use investigations for applications Explorer Mission A (Heat Capacity Mapping Mission): HCMM's role in studies of the urban heat island, Great Lakes thermal phenomena and radiometric calibration of satellite data. [Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester New York and Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Schimminger, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The utility of data from NASA'a heat capacity mapping mission satellite for studies of the urban heat island, thermal phenomena in large lakes and radiometric calibration of satellite sensors was assessed. The data were found to be of significant value in all cases. Using HCMM data, the existence and microstructure of the heat island can be observed and associated with land cover within the urban complex. The formation and development of the thermal bar in the Great Lakes can be observed and quantitatively mapped using HCMM data. In addition, the thermal patterns observed can be associated with water quality variations observed both from other remote sensing platforms and in situ. The imaging radiometer on-board the HCMM satellite is shown to be calibratible to within about 1.1 C of actual surface temperatures. These findings, as well as the analytical procedures used in studying the HCMM data, are included.

  5. Analysis of the energetic/environmental performances of gas turbine plant: Effect of thermal barrier coatings and mass of cooling air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ion V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 is the most common material to be applied in thermal barrier coatings owing to its excellent properties: low thermal conductivity, high toughness and thermal expansion coefficient as ceramic material. Calculation has been made to evaluate the gains of thermal barrier coatings applied on gas turbine blades. The study considers a top ceramic coating Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 on a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and Inconel 738LC as substrate. For different thickness and different cooling air flow rates, a thermodynamic analysis has been performed and pollutants emissions (CO, NOx have been estimated to analyze the effect of rising the gas inlet temperature. The effect of thickness and thermal conductivity of top coating and the mass flow rate of cooling air have been analyzed. The model for heat transfer analysis gives the temperature reduction through the wall blade for the considered conditions and the results presented in this contribution are restricted to a two considered limits: (1 maximum allowable temperature for top layer (1200ºC and (2 for blade material (1000ºC. The model can be used to analyze other materials that support higher temperatures helping in the development of new materials for thermal barrier coatings.

  6. Acid rain recovery may help to mitigate the impacts of climate change on thermally sensitive fish in lakes across eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Dana R; Kraft, Clifford E; Josephson, Daniel C; Driscoll, Charles T

    2016-12-15

    From the 1970s to 1990s, more stringent air quality regulations were implemented across North America and Europe to reduce chemical emissions that contribute to acid rain. Surface water pH slowly increased during the following decades, but biological recovery lagged behind chemical recovery. Fortunately, this situation is changing. In the past few years, northeastern US fish populations have begun to recover in lakes that were historically incapable of sustaining wild fish due to acidic conditions. As lake ecosystems across the eastern United States recover from acid deposition, the stress to the most susceptible populations of native coldwater fish appears to be shifting from acidification effects to thermal impacts associated with changing climate. Extreme summer temperature events - which are expected to occur with increasing frequency in the coming century - can stress and ultimately kill native coldwater fish in lakes where thermal stratification is absent or highly limited. Based on data from northeastern North America, we argue that recovery from acid deposition has the potential to improve the resilience of coldwater fish populations in some lakes to impacts of climate change. This will occur as the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the water increases with increasing lake pH. Increased DOC will reduce water clarity and lead to shallower and more persistent lake thermoclines that can provide larger areas of coldwater thermal refuge habitat. Recovery from acidification will not eliminate the threat of climate change to coldwater fish, but secondary effects of acid recovery may improve the resistance of coldwater fish populations in lakes to the effects of elevated summer temperatures in historically acidified ecosystems. This analysis highlights the importance of considering the legacy of past ecosystem impacts and how recovery or persistence of those effects may interact with climate change impacts on biota in the coming decades.

  7. Climate Change Expands the Spatial Extent and Duration of Preferred Thermal Habitat for Lake Superior Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Cline, Timothy J.; Bennington, Val; James F Kitchell

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is expected to alter species distributions and habitat suitability across the globe. Understanding these shifting distributions is critical for adaptive resource management. The role of temperature in fish habitat and energetics is well established and can be used to evaluate climate change effects on habitat distributions and food web interactions. Lake Superior water temperatures are rising rapidly in response to climate change and this is likely influencing species distribut...

  8. Using an Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) and a thermal infrared camera to estimate temperature differences on a lake surface, revealing incoming groundwater seepage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Helene; Müller, Sascha; Friborg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    UAVs are at the budding stage of becoming efficient tools in geosciences due to their fast coverage of large areas, creating opportunities to collect comprehensive amounts of spatially distributed data. In this survey a fixed-wing UAV is equipped with a thermal infrared camera (Optris PI 450) conducting spatially distributed measurements of radiometric surface temperature, from a small groundwater-fed lake. We hypothesis that larger temperature differences in the lake surface will reveal locations of incoming groundwater seepage. During wintertime, warmer groundwater will have great incentive to rise to the lake surface without significant mixing with colder lake water and hence enable detection of incoming groundwater seepage with surface measurements. The investigated area is a 300x150 m section of Lake Vaeng in southern Jutland, Denmark. Detecting areas of groundwater seepage into lakes and quantifying these fluxes are of great importance not only for water budgets but also in relation to lake environments. Incoming groundwater might be a large nutrient source in lakes. GPS coordinates from the UAV are correlated with each thermal image based on UTC time stamps. Geo-reference is further improved with ground control points in the form of 0.2x0.2 m aluminum foil rectangles. Aluminum stands out clearly in thermal images and using seven of these ground control points, evenly distributed in the investigated area, led to an accuracy of 0.3 m. Using the Structure from Motion photogrammetric technique, a point cloud model is produced and camera positions along with intrinsic and extrinsic properties are established. Distinct temperature differences of 1.5 C have been detected along the south-eastern shore of Lake Vaeng. The location of these hotspots is in agreement with temperature differences measured with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system - indicating zones of groundwater seepage into the lake. In addition to faster execution of large spatially distributed

  9. Overview of issues affecting the demand for dry and wet/dry cooling for thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1978-09-01

    The Dry Cooling Enhancement Program was initiated to: develop economic and performance models for cost optimization of total heat rejection systems using dry and dry/wet cooling; analyze and disseminate operating experience on existing dry-cooled plant performance; and demonstrate certain features of existing technology equipment to provide confidence for specification by utilities. The ultimate objective was to promote water conservation through industry use of dry cooling by developing and demonstrating the reliability of lower-cost systems. The economic, legal, and water availability factors that will contribute to future selection of dry and wet/dry cooling and thus influence the projected market for these types of cooling systems in the next 20 years are considered.

  10. Results and experience of an aquifer thermal energy storage for heating and cooling of an office building and a demonstration center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bael, Johan van; Desmedt, Johan; Vanhoudt, Dirk [Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO), Mol (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) was introduced in the Belgian market since 1995. Until now over 10 installations with a thermal power of more than 300 kW cooling are installed. One of the first projects consists of the integration of ATES with a nominal power of 570 kWh in an existing office building and a new built demonstration center (3,000 m{sup 2}) for new lighting systems. The ATES system exists of a doublet: a cold and a warm well. The groundwater flow between the wells amounts to 90 m{sup 3}/h in the cooling modus and 45 m{sup 3}/h in the heating modus. The ATES system delivers the complete cooling demand of both buildings and a part of the heating demand. A gas fired boiler delivers the remaining heat demand. The project was funded by the Flemish Government in the Program of the Flemish Energy Demonstration Projects. The research institute VITO monitored the project during an evaluation period of three years. The energy flows (cooling and heating delivered to both buildings), the groundwater flow, the groundwater temperatures, the electricity consumption of the ATES and the gas consumption of the boiler were measured and stored every 30 minutes. This paper provides an overview of the monitoring results. (orig.)

  11. Economic and Environmental Analysis of Cool Thermal Energy Storage as an Alternative to Batteries for the Integration of Intermittent Renewable Energy Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Matthew John

    2015-01-01

    The balance of the supply of renewable energy sources with electricity demand will become increasingly difficult with further penetration of renewable energy sources. Traditionally, large stationary batteries have been used to store renewable energy in excess of electricity demand and dispatch the stored energy to meet future electricity demand. Cool thermal energy storage is a feasible renewable energy balancing solution that has economic and environmental advantages over utility scale stati...

  12. Geothermal potential and origin of natural thermal fluids in the northern Lake Abaya area, Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, A.; Corti, G.; Tassi, F.; Darrah, T. H.; Vaselli, O.; Montanari, D.; Montegrossi, G.; Yirgu, G.; Selmo, E.; Teclu, A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the occurrence, chemical composition, origin and geothermal significance of thermal springs and fumaroles naturally discharging in the area located north of the Lake Abaya (western margin of the Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa) are reviewed in relation with recent tectonics. All thermal springs showed a dominantly Na-HCO3 composition, consistent with observations dating from at least 1972, and most of them displayed a narrow range of δD and δ18O isotopic compositions for water similar to regional meteoric origins. These observations suggest that water-rock interaction processes occur in all aquifers and dominate the contributions of water that actively circulate within thermal fluids, and also suggest a similar elevation of groundwater recharge throughout the study area. Most of the thermal springs are dominated by a CO2-rich gas phase and discharge along the active faults bordering the western edge of the Main Ethiopian Rift valley. The δ13C values of CO2 and the 3He/4He isotopic ratios are consistent with the presence of mantle-derived fluids similar to what is observed in many other areas along the kinematically active African Rift, especially within Ethiopia. The application of geothermometric techniques in the liquid and the gas phases suggests the presence of a deep reservoir in which the fluids equilibrated at a maximum temperature of approximately 180 °C. Additionally, the presence of fumaroles at boiling temperatures and water/mud boiling pools in several places suggests that the geothermal reservoir is positioned at a relatively shallow depth and likely located in the western side of the study area. The analysis of data collected throughout time reveals that the waters of Lake Abaya have experienced an increase in salinity of 20% paralleled contemporaneously with a decrease in pH and δ18O and δD of water in the last 40 years; these changes do not appear to be related to climate change-induced increases in temperature or evaporation

  13. Experimental Study Using the Passive Solar Chimney for Evaporative Cooling With PCM and CFM as a Thermal Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talib K. Murtadha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a test room was built in Baghdad city, with (2*1.5*1.5 m3 in dimensions, while the solar chimneys (SC were designed with aspect ratio (ar bigger than 12. Test room was supplied by many solar collectors; vertical single side of air pass with ar equals 25, and tilted 45o double side of air passes with ar equals 50 for each pass, both collectors consist of flat thermal energy storage box collector (TESB that covered by transparent clear acrylic sheet, third type of collector is array of evacuated tubular collectors with thermosyphon in 45o instelled in the bottom of TESB of vertical SC. The TESB was made from metallic iron sheets as a shell and fuelled by paraffin wax as phase change material (PCM. The PCM supported by copper foam matrix (CFM to enhance thermal conductivity of wax. When heat is released from TESB to the air, a buoyancy force will be generated in chimney gaps. Then a difference in pressure between inside and outside test room leads to induce the air flow to test room through wet corrugated cellulose pad, where evaporative cooling (EC occurs. Results of experimental work, that achieved in June, for 12 to24 hour in the test day, refer to effectiveness using EC to decrease the room temperature comparing. The system reduces test room temperature of up to 8.5~9.2 oC in 11:00 am to 3:00 pm and at highest effectiveness of EC, while minimum reduces in temperature of up to 3.5 oC in 8:00pm to 3:00 am. Also, the results showed the affectivity to using the TESB, during the night time for ventilation and EC, with lower effectiveness than from day time. The range of EC effectiveness equals 30.5-37.5 with a natural vent, while The maximum air change per hour (ACH equals (3.8-6.187, and the maximum mass flow rate is equal to (36.651 kg.hr-1 at experimental evaluation of the system’s discharge coefficient value 0.371.

  14. Simulation of the Passive Condensation Cooling Tank of the PASCAL Test Facility using the Component Thermal-hydraulic Analysis Code CUPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Lee, Seung Jun; Yoon, Han Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The need for a multi-dimensional analysis of transient thermal hydraulic phenomena in a component of a nuclear reactor is increasing with the advanced design features, such as a direct vessel injection system, a gravity-driven safety injection system, and a passive cooling system. Motivated by this, the development of a new thermal-hydraulic analysis code, named CUPID, is in progress at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Its numerical solver and two-phase flow models have been verified against standard conceptual problems of single and two-phase flows and validated for thermal-hydraulic experiments in our previous studies. The simulation of the passive secondary cooling system, PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System) has been considered as one of the practical applications of CUPID. In the present study, the PCCT (Passive Condensation Cooling Tank) of the PASCAL test facility was analyzed with CUPID prior to simulating the prototype PAFS system. The objectives of the PASCAL simulation were to validate physical models of CUPID and its applicability to the PAFS analysis. This paper presents the two-dimensional transient calculation results and the comparisons with the experimental data

  15. Study of thermal management in water-cooled PEMFC%水冷型PEMFC的热管理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱柳; 朱新坚; 沈海峰

    2012-01-01

    质子交换膜燃料电池(PEMFC)电堆内气、水两相的分布和热量的产生与传递间相互影响.为提高电堆的性能和寿命,根据连续方程和质量守恒定律,建立了电堆内气、水两相传输的动态模型;根据能量守衡原理,建立了PEMFC电堆温度和冷却水温度的动态模型;并在此基础上采用李雅普诺夫函数反向递推法设计了—种非线性鲁棒控制器,使系统温度能在一定摄动范围内保持稳定.最后,在Matlab/Simulink平台上验证了该模型及控制策略的有效性.%The distributions of gas and liquid water, thermal generation and transferring are interacting with each other dosely in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). According to the continuity equation and law of mass conservation, a dynamic model of two-phase (gas and liquid water) transmission in PEMFC was established; and on the basis of energy conservation theory, models of stack temperature and cooling water temperature were developed; what's more, based on these foregoing models, a nonlinear robust controller was proposed by adopting the method of Lyapunov function reverse recursion. Finally, the effectiveness and robustness of the whole model and control strategies were verified on the platform of Matlab/Simulink.

  16. Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Retrievals with Ground Truth from the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station Cooling Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2002-12-09

    Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at the Squaw Creek reservoir at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station near Granbury Texas. Temperatures calculated for thirty-four images covering the period May 2000 to March 2002 are compared with water temperatures measured at 10 instrumented buoy locations supplied by the Savannah River Technology Center. The data set was used to examine the effect of image quality on temperature retrieval as well as to document any bias between the sensor chip arrays (SCA's). A portion of the data set was used to evaluate the influence of proximity to shoreline on the water temperature retrievals. This study found errors in daytime water temperature retrievals of 1.8 C for SCA 2 and 4.0 C for SCA 1. The errors in nighttime water temperature retrievals were 3.8 C for SCA 1. Water temperature retrievals for nighttime appear to be related to image quality with the largest positive bias for the highest quality images and the largest negative bias for the lowest quality images. The daytime data show no apparent relationship between water temperature retrieval error and image quality. The average temperature retrieval error near open water buoys was less than corresponding values for the near-shore buoys. After subtraction of the estimated error in the ground truth data, the water temperature retrieval error was 1.2 C for the open-water buoys compared to 1.8 C for the near-shore buoys. The open-water error is comparable to that found at Nauru.

  17. 采用蒸发冷却的辐射供冷空调系统室内热环境模拟验证%Simulation Study on Indoor Thermal Environment of Radiant Cooling System Based on Evaporative Cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣永梅; 黄翔; 康宁; 闫振华

    2012-01-01

    我国西北地区夏季气候干燥,蒸发冷却技术能以较高的COP值提供辐射供冷和新风系统需要的高温冷水和冷风,形成基于蒸发冷却的辐射供冷空调系统.介绍了复合系统的工作原理和流程,在此基础上,采用Airpak软件模拟了地板辐射供冷加置换通风复合系统以及顶板辐射供冷加置换通风复合系统的室内热环境.模拟结果表明,采用地板辐射供冷的复合系统室内垂直温度梯度大于顶板辐射供冷的复合系统,两系统室内温度场均匀,符合设计要求,并且0.1m和1.1m高对应的室内垂直温度差值均小于3℃,符合ISO7730规定的舒适性标准.CFD模拟结果与试验结果吻合良好,可采用该模拟方法进一步研究复合系统室内热环境.%In northwest China, because of the hot and arid summer climate, the cooled water of radiant cooling and cooled fresh air can be provided by evaporative cooling method with a high COP. That constitutes a hybrid radiant cooling air conditioning system based on evaporative cooling. The schematic diagram of the hybrid system was introduced. The indoor thermal environment of radiant floor and displacement ventilation system as well as chilled ceiling and displacement ventilation system were simulated by software Airpak. The simulation results indicated that the vertical temperature difference of the former system was higher than that of the later system. The corresponding temperature differences between 0. Lm and 1.1m heights of both systems were lower than 3℃, the recommended comfort value of ISO7730 comfort standard. The simulated indoor air temperatures meet the designed criteria. The numerical simulation results coincided well with experimental data. Indoor thermal environment of proposed hybrid system can be further studied by this method.

  18. A Comparative Study of Antioxidant Enzymes Activity to Heat Shock in Amphipods Gmelinoides fasciatus of Littoral Community of Lake Baikal and Thermal Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubyaga Y.A.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to comparative assessment of the antioxidant enzymes activity (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase in endemic species Gmelinoides fasciatus (Stebbing, 1899 inhabitants of the littoral community of the Lake Baikal and the thermal spring under short term thermal stress. It was shown, that the exposure of G. fasciatus from different areas to acute temperature stress didn’t lead to changes in the activities of three key enzymes of the antioxidant system. However, it was found that the activity of glutathione S-transferase in the control animals of thermal springs population is higher than in animals of Lake Baikal. This can be determined by peculiarities of environment of different populations.

  19. "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. XII. Thermal light curves of Haumea, 2003 VS2 and 2003 AZ84 with Herschel/PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Groussin, O.; Lacerda, P.; Müller, T. G.; Ortiz, J. L.; Kiss, C.; Vilenius, E.; Stansberry, J.; Duffard, R.; Fornasier, S.; Jorda, L.; Thirouin, A.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Time series observations of the dwarf planet Haumea and the Plutinos 2003 VS2 and 2003 AZ84 with Herschel/PACS are presented in this work. Thermal emission of these trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) were acquired as part of the "TNOs are Cool" Herschel Space Observatory key programme. Aims: We search for the thermal light curves at 100 and 160 μm of Haumea and 2003 AZ84, and at 70 and 160 μm for 2003 VS2 by means of photometric analysis of the PACS data. The goal of this work is to use these thermal light curves to obtain physical and thermophysical properties of these icy Solar System bodies. Methods: When a thermal light curve is detected, it is possible to derive or constrain the object thermal inertia, phase integral and/or surface roughness with thermophysical modeling. Results: Haumea's thermal light curve is clearly detected at 100 and 160 μm. The effect of the reported dark spot is apparent at 100 μm. Different thermophysical models were applied to these light curves, varying the thermophysical properties of the surface within and outside the spot. Although no model gives a perfect fit to the thermal observations, results imply an extremely low thermal inertia (0.73) for Haumea's surface. We note that the dark spot region appears to be only weakly different from the rest of the object, with modest changes in thermal inertia and/or phase integral. The thermal light curve of 2003 VS2 is not firmly detected at 70 μm and at 160 μm but a thermal inertia of (2 ± 0.5) MKS can be derived from these data. The thermal light curve of 2003 AZ84 is not firmly detected at 100 μm. We apply a thermophysical model to the mean thermal fluxes and to all the Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS thermal data of 2003 AZ84, obtaining a close to pole-on orientation as the most likely for this TNO. Conclusions: For the three TNOs, the thermal inertias derived from light curve analyses or from the thermophysical analysis of the mean thermal fluxes confirm the generally small

  20. Improvement of energy efficiency by optimized thermal insulation of cooling water pipes of air conditioning systems and refrigerant pipes of cooling systems; Steigerung der Energieeffizienz durch optimierte Daemmung der Kuehlwasserrohrleitungen von Klimaanlagen und Kaeltemittelrohrleitungen von Kuehlanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielarski, Jarema [ARMACELL SWITZERLAND AG, Pfaffnau (Switzerland)

    2011-05-31

    Higher energy efficiency is an issue also in air conditioning and refrigeration, which accounts for 14 percent of Germany's total energy consumption today (according to ASERCOM) and can be assumed to have a similar energy consumption level in other European levels. The new Energy Conservation Ordinance of October 2009 was the first that specified obligatory thermal insulation also of cooling and cold water pipes in space HVAC systems. A current study by the Armacell company showed that while this is an important first step, thicker insulation layers must be specified for the future.

  1. Acute thermal tolerance of tropical estuarine fish occupying a man-made tidal lake, and increased exposure risk with climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltham, Nathan J.; Sheaves, Marcus

    2017-09-01

    Understanding acute hyperthermic exposure risk to animals, including fish in tropical estuaries, is increasingly necessary under future climate change. To examine this hypothesis, fish (upper water column species - glassfish, Ambassis vachellii; river mullet, Chelon subviridis; diamond scale mullet, Ellochelon vaigiensis; and ponyfish, Leiognathus equulus; and lower water bottom dwelling species - whiting Sillago analis) were caught in an artificial tidal lake in tropical north Queensland (Australia), and transported to a laboratory tank to acclimate (3wks). After acclimation, fish (between 10 and 17 individuals each time) were transferred to a temperature ramping experimental tank, where a thermoline increased (2.5 °C/hr; which is the average summer water temperature increasing rate measured in the urban lakes) tank water temperature to establish threshold points where each fish species lost equilibrium (defined here as Acute Effect Temperature; AET). The coolest AET among all species was 33.1 °C (S. analis), while the highest was 39.9 °C (A. vachellii). High frequency loggers were deployed (November and March representing Austral summer) in the same urban lake where fish were sourced, to measure continuous (20min) surface (0.15 m) and bottom (0.1 m) temperature to derive thermal frequency curves to examine how often lake temperatures exceed AET thresholds. For most fish species examined, water temperature that could be lethal were exceeded at the surface, but rarely, if ever, at the bottom waters suggesting deep, cooler, water provides thermal refugia for fish. An energy-balance model was used to estimate daily mean lake water temperature with good accuracy (±1 °C; R2 = 0.91, modelled vs lake measured temperature). The model was used to predict climate change effects on lake water temperature, and the exceedance of thermal threshold change. A 2.3 °C climate warming (based on 2100 local climate prediction) raised lake water temperature by 1.3 °C. However

  2. Progress of thermal hydraulic evaluation methods and experimental studies on a sodium-cooled fast reactor and its safety in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamide, Hideki, E-mail: kamide.hideki@jaea.go.jp; Ohshima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: ohshima.hiroyuki@jaea.go.jp; Sakai, Takaaki, E-mail: sakai.takaaki@jaea.go.jp; Tanaka, Masaaki, E-mail: tanaka.masaaki@jaea.go.jp

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulic issues for safety design criteria of sodium cooled fast reactors. • Measurement of velocity data in a subchannel surrounded by wire wrapped fuel-pins. • Statistical evaluation of core hot spot temperature during natural circulation. • Simulation of dynamics of molten fuel pool in a core disruptive accident. • V&V procedure of a multi-dimensional thermal hydraulic code on thermal striping. - Abstract: In the framework of the Generation-IV International Forum, the safety design criteria (SDC) incorporating safety-related R&D results on innovative technologies and lessons learned from Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants accident has been established to provide the set of general criteria for the safety designs of structures, systems and components of Generation-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (Gen-IV SFRs). A number of thermal-hydraulic evaluations are necessary to meet the concept of the criteria in the design studies of Gen-IV SFRs. This paper focuses on four kinds of thermal-hydraulic issues associated with the SDC, i.e., fuel subassembly thermal-hydraulics, natural circulation decay heat removal, core disruptive accidents, and thermal striping. Progress of evaluation methods on these issues is shown with activities on verification and validation (V&V) and experimental studies towards commercialization of SFR in Japan. These evaluation methods are planned to be eventually integrated into a comprehensive numerical simulation system that can be applied to all possible phenomena in SFR systems and that can be expected to become an effective tool for the development of human resource and the handing our knowledge and technologies down.

  3. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...... is considered as extruded profiles are inadequate for compact designs. An optimal pin fin shape and configuration is sought also taking manufacturing costs into consideration. Standard methods for geometrical modeling and thermal analysis are applied....

  4. Ceramics and healthy heating and cooling systems: thermal ceramic panels in buildings. Conditions of comfort and energy demand versus convective systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Echarri Iribarren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Porcelain stoneware is a widely used building material. In recent years, its range of uses has expanded to encompass a new spectrum of innovative and inventive applications in architecture. In this research, we analysed the patented Thermal Ceramic Panel. This consists of a thin porcelain stoneware panel that incorporates a capillary system of polypropylene tubes measuring 3.5 mm in diameter embedded in a conductive ceramic interface. The system works with hot or cold water, producing healthy heating and cooling by means of radiant surfaces. Following an initial prototype test in which panels were placed on the walls of an office, we conducted simulations at the University of Alicante Museum using wall, ceiling and baffle panels, having previously monitored the state of the building. Thermal behaviour parameters were analysed and compared with those of other standard finishing materials, obtaining results for thermal comfort and energy savings in comparison with all-air systems.

  5. A coupled lake-atmosphere model (CLAM) and its application to Lake Kinneret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hai

    1999-08-01

    and 22-km long), the micrometeorological conditions, lake currents and thermal structure, and the lake-surface heat fluxes vary spatially very significantly, even on a daily basis. It is found that the daily-mean wind curl, which is predominantly determined by the passage of the Mediterranean Sea breeze (MSB) over the lake, is mostly responsible for the gyres in the lake. The thermocline oscillation in the lake is mainly controlled by the surface elevation set up by the time-dependent winds. The intense MSB over the lake in the late afternoon pushes the heated surface water eastward, forces the deep, cooler water to be advected westward, and creates strong mixing in the lake, resulting in a higher temperature off the eastern shore and a lower temperature off the western shore. The variation of lake-surface temperature not only directly affects the atmospheric processes over the lake, but it also changes the wind field, which then influences hydrodynamic processes in the lake. An analytical model of the flow response to spatial variation of atmospheric cooling in coastal ocean was also developed in this study. This model is used to explain the contribution of the spatial variation of latent heat flux to the circulation in Lake Kinneret, and also the cyclonic flow, which is observed in many lakes and semi-enclosed coastal oceans.

  6. Thermal hydraulic parametric investigation of decay heat removal from degraded core of a sodium cooled fast Breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Lokesh [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kumar Sharma, Anil, E-mail: aksharma@igcar.gov.in [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India); Velusamy, K. [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Decay heat removal from degraded core of a typical SFR is highlighted. • Influence of number of DHXs in operation on PAHR is analyzed. • Investigations on structural integrity of the inner vessel and core catcher. • Feasibility study for retention of a part of debris in upper pool of SFR. - Abstract: Ensuring post accident decay heat removal with high degree of reliability following a Core Disruptive Accident (CDA) is very important in the design of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR). In the recent past, a lot of research has been done towards the design of an in-vessel core catcher below the grid plate to prevent the core debris reaching the main vessel in a pool type SFR. However, during an energetic CDA, the entire core debris is unlikely to reach the core catcher. A significant part of the debris is likely to settle in core periphery between radial shielding subassemblies and the inner vessel. Failure of inner vessel due to the decay heat can lead to core debris reaching the main vessel and threatening its integrity. On the other hand, retention of a part of debris in core periphery can reduce the load on main core catcher. Towards achieving an optimum design of SFR and safety evaluation, it is essential to quantify the amount of heat generating core debris that can be retained safely within the primary vessel. This has been performed by a mathematical simulation comprising solution of 2-D transient form of the governing equations of turbulent sodium flow and heat transfer with Boussinesq approximations. The conjugate conduction-convection model adopted for this purpose is validated against in-house experimental data. Transient evolutions of natural convection in the pools and structural temperatures in critical components have been predicted. It is found that 50% of the core debris can be safely accommodated in the gap between radial shielding subassemblies and inner vessel without exceeding structural temperature limit. It is also

  7. Effect of cooling rate on MC carbide in directionally solidified nickel-based superalloy under high thermal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weiguo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of directional solidification experiments have been performed to study the effect of cooling rate on the precipitation behavior of MC carbide in nickel-based superalloy under the temperature gradient of 500 K·s-1. Results reveal that the morphology of MC carbide changes from coarse block to fine strip, then to Chinese-script, and their sizes reduce gradually with the increasing of cooling rate from 2.53 K·s-1 to 36.4 K·s-1. At low cooling rates, most of these carbides are found to be located at the grain boundary and interdendritic regions, while the coupled growth of some carbides and γ matrix in the center of γ grains is occurred at high cooling rate. The main elements forming MC carbide are Ta, W, and Hf.

  8. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradin, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Muci, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Hassan, Yassin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Dominguez, A. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Hamman, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  9. Using passive cooling strategies to improve thermal performance and reduce energy consumption of residential buildings in U.A.E. buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan M. Taleb

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Passive design responds to local climate and site conditions in order to maximise the comfort and health of building users while minimising energy use. The key to designing a passive building is to take best advantage of the local climate. Passive cooling refers to any technologies or design features adopted to reduce the temperature of buildings without the need for power consumption. Consequently, the aim of this study is to test the usefulness of applying selected passive cooling strategies to improve thermal performance and to reduce energy consumption of residential buildings in hot arid climate settings, namely Dubai, United Arab Emirates. One case building was selected and eight passive cooling strategies were applied. Energy simulation software – namely IES – was used to assess the performance of the building. Solar shading performance was also assessed using Sun Cast Analysis, as a part of the IES software. Energy reduction was achieved due to both the harnessing of natural ventilation and the minimising of heat gain in line with applying good shading devices alongside the use of double glazing. Additionally, green roofing proved its potential by acting as an effective roof insulation. The study revealed several significant findings including that the total annual energy consumption of a residential building in Dubai may be reduced by up to 23.6% when a building uses passive cooling strategies.

  10. Thermal analysis for energy consumption reduction in cooling water systems; Analisis termico para la reduccion del consumo de energia en sistemas de agua de enfriamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picon Nunez, Martin [Instituto de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico); Quillares Vargas, Luis [Tecnopinch, S. A. de C. V., (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the fundamental principles for the thermal analysis of cooling water systems in processing plants. In existing heat dissipating networks this methodology application allows the identification of opportunities for reducing the energy consumption used for cooling water pumping. The methodology is based on the determination of the minimum cooling water flow as a function of the installed heat exchange capacity, subjected to the restrictions of the maximum allowed temperature elevation. The methodology application to real systems, has resulted in saving 20% of the total energy consumed in cooling water pumping. [Espanol] En este trabajo se presentan los principios fundamentales para el analisis termico de sistemas de enfriamiento en plantas de proceso. En redes de eliminacion de calor existentes, la aplicacion de esta metodologia permite identificar oportunidades para reducir el consumo de energia utilizada para el bombeo del fluido enfriante. La metodologia se basa en la determinacion del flujo minimo de agua de enfriamiento en funcion de la capacidad de transferencia de calor instalada, sujeta a las restricciones de maximo incremento de temperatura permitido. La aplicacion de la metodologia a sistemas reales, ha resultado en ahorros del 20% del total de la energia que se consume en el bombeo del agua de enfriamiento.

  11. The influence of composition, cooling rate and atmosphere on the synthesis and thermal stability of aluminum titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghizadeh, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rnaghizadeh@iust.ac.ir; Rezaie, H.R.; Golestani-fard, F. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    The formation and stability of tialite (Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}) have been studied in equimolar of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} (AT) in specimen, mixtures with excess of alumina or rutile and specimen AT with graphite addition. After firing the specimens at 1400 deg. C/3 h in different atmospheres, they were cooled with two routs, slow cooling in the furnace, and special fast cooling. X-ray diffraction of powders showed that in oxidation atmosphere, tialite formed and some of corundum and/or rutile remained. In reduction conditions at slow cooling rate in equimolar and nonequimolar Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} samples tialite was observed along with corundum, rutile and titanium suboxides but in graphite content specimens tialite was not detected. In fast cooling at AT sample tialite was present but in excess alumina or TiO{sub 2} contents and graphite addition specimens tialite was not present. The mechanism of instability of tialite in reducing condition without annealing process was investigated and microstructures of samples were observed. Results showed that in this condition due to transformation of rutile to titanium suboxides, tialite formation severely decreased and/or established at firing temperature during cooling at 1280-700 deg. C and intensively decomposed to parent oxides or high alumina and titania phases.

  12. Predicted effects of future climate warming on thermal habitat suitability for Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens, Rafinesque, 1817) in rivers in Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John D.; Stewart, Jana S.

    2015-01-01

    The Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens, Rafinesque, 1817) may be threatened by future climate warming. The purpose of this study was to identify river reaches in Wisconsin, USA, where they might be vulnerable to warming water temperatures. In Wisconsin, A. fulvescens is known from 2291 km of large-river habitat that has been fragmented into 48 discrete river-lake networks isolated by impassable dams. Although the exact temperature tolerances are uncertain, water temperatures above 28–30°C are potentially less suitable for this coolwater species. Predictions from 13 downscaled global climate models were input to a lotic water temperature model to estimate amounts of potential thermally less-suitable habitat at present and for 2046–2065. Currently, 341 km (14.9%) of the known habitat are estimated to regularly exceed 28°C for an entire day, but only 6 km (0.3%) to exceed 30°C. In 2046–2065, 685–2164 km (29.9–94.5%) are projected to exceed 28°C and 33–1056 km (1.4–46.1%) to exceed 30°C. Most river-lake networks have cooler segments, large tributaries, or lakes that might provide temporary escape from potentially less suitable temperatures, but 12 short networks in the Lower Fox and Middle Wisconsin rivers totaling 93.6 km are projected to have no potential thermal refugia. One possible adaptation to climate change could be to provide fish passage or translocation so that riverine Lake Sturgeon might have access to more thermally suitable habitats.

  13. Rapid cooled lens cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, David M.; Hsu, Ike C.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes the optomechanical design, thermal analysis, fabrication, and test evaluation processes followed in developing a rapid cooled, infrared lens cell. Thermal analysis was the key engineering discipline exercised in the design phase. The effect of thermal stress on the lens, induced by rapid cooling of the lens cell, was investigated. Features of this lens cell that minimized the thermal stress will be discussed in a dedicated section. The results of thermal analysis on the selected lens cell design and the selection of the flow channel design in the heat exchanger will be discussed. Throughout the paper engineering drawings, illustrations, analytical results, and photographs of actual hardware are presented.

  14. Thermal relations leading to the formation of gaseous phase within the ice covering lakes and ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruba, J.; Kletetschka, G.

    2013-12-01

    When cutting the ice from the lakes and ponds gaseous phase displays often ubiquitous bubble textures along the ice thickness. The occurrence of bubbles (enclosures filled with the gas) in ice relates to a content of the dissolved gas in the lake/pond water prior to freezing over the surface. When water freezes, dissolved gases are rejected and redistributed at the ice-water interface, depending on the saturation ratio between the gas and water. If the concentration of dissolved gases surpasses a critical value (as freezing progresses), the water at the interface becomes supersaturated, and gas bubbles nucleate and grow to a visible size along the interface. The bubbles generated at the ice-water interface are either incorporated into the ice crystal as the water-ice interface advances, thus forming gas pores in the ice, or released from the interface. If there is incorporation or release is determined by several factors. The bubbles nucleated at the advancing ice-water interface may be characterized by concentration, shape, and size, which depend on growth rate of ice, the amount of gases dissolved in water, and the particulate content of water. Our work focused on the relation between growth rates of the ice and the occurrence of bubbles in the pond ice. We monitored the temperature of the ice formed under natural conditions over the pond Dolní Tušimy in Mokrovraty, Czech Republic. Distinct layers of gas bubbles were observed when the ice samples have been retrieved. These layers may relate to fast growth rates of ice. In this case the maximum growth rates were about 1 μm/s. The results were compared with similar work done (Bari and Hallett, 1974; Carte 1961; Yoshimura et al., 2008). This comparison showed distinction that may be due to different methods of ice formation (laboratory condition vs. natural conditions). References: Bari, S.A., Hallett, J. (1974): Nucleation and Growth of Bubbles at an Ice-Water Interface. Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 13, No. 69, p

  15. Experimental study of passive cooling of building facade using phase change materials to increase thermal comfort in buildings in hot humid areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Madhumathi, B. M.C. Sundarraja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Storage of cooler night temperatures using Phase Change Material (PCM energy storage technique, for cooling of ambient air during hot day times can be an alternate of current cooling techniques in building sector. This work presents the results of an experimental set-up to test energy saving potential of phase change materials with typical construction materials in building facade in Hot-Humid Climatic Regions in real conditions. The main objective of this research is to demonstrate experimentally that it is possible to improve the thermal comfort and reduce the energy consumption of a building without substantial increase in the weight of the construction materials with the inclusion of PCM. This research was conducted to study and evaluate the performance of the existing materials integrated with Organic PCM Polyethylene glycol (PEG E600. This research suggested that the heat gain is significantly reduced when the PCM is incorporated into the brick (conventional building material.

  16. Simulation of the passive condensation cooling tank of the PASCAL test facility using the component thermal-hydraulic analysis code CUPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kang, K. H.; Yoon, H. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 1045 Daeduk-daero, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    For the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components, a three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code, named CUPID, has been being developed. In the present study, the CUPID code was applied for the simulation of the PASCAL (PAFS Condensing Heat Removal Assessment Loop) test facility constructed with an aim of validating the cooling and operational performance of the PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System). The PAFS is one of the advanced safety features adopted in the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor +), which is intended to completely replace the conventional active auxiliary feedwater system. This paper presents the preliminary simulation results of the PASCAL facility performed with the CUPID code in order to verify its applicability to the thermal-hydraulic phenomena inside the system. A standalone calculation for the passive condensation cooling tank was performed by imposing a heat source boundary condition and the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviors inside the system, such as the water level, temperature and velocity, were qualitatively investigated. The simulation results verified that the natural circulation and boiling phenomena in the water pool can be well reproduced by the CUPID code. (authors)

  17. Influence of cooling rate in planar thermally assisted magnetic random access memory: Improved writeability due to spin-transfer-torque influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavent, A. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 38000 Grenoble (France); Ducruet, C.; Portemont, C.; Creuzet, C.; Alvarez-Hérault, J. [Crocus Technology, 38000 Grenoble (France); Vila, L. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Sousa, R. C.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPINTEC, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-14

    This paper investigates the effect of a controlled cooling rate on magnetic field reversal assisted by spin transfer torque (STT) in thermally assisted magnetic random access memory. By using a gradual linear decrease of the voltage at the end of the write pulse, the STT decays more slowly or at least at the same rate as the temperature. This condition is necessary to make sure that the storage layer magnetization remains in the desired written direction during cooling of the cell. The influence of the write current pulse decay rate was investigated on two exchange biased synthetic ferrimagnet (SyF) electrodes. For a NiFe based electrode, a significant improvement in writing reproducibility was observed using a gradual linear voltage transition. The write error rate decreases by a factor of 10 when increasing the write pulse fall-time from ∼3 ns to 70 ns. For comparison, a second CoFe/NiFe based electrode was also reversed by magnetic field assisted by STT. In this case, no difference between sharp and linear write pulse fall shape was observed. We attribute this observation to the higher thermal stability of the CoFe/NiFe electrode during cooling. In real-time measurements of the magnetization reversal, it was found that Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling in the SyF electrode vanishes for the highest pulse voltages that were used due to the high temperature reached during write. As a result, during the cooling phase, the final state is reached through a spin-flop transition of the SyF storage layer.

  18. 混合动力轿车电池包液冷系统设计%A Hybrid Car Battery Thermal Management of Liquid Cooling System Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵久志; 宋军; 张宝鑫; 王诗铭; 武文杰

    2016-01-01

    高效的热管理系统对控制电池组工作温度范围,提升续驶里程及改善安全性起到至关重要的作用。本文提出了一种混合动力轿车电池液冷方案,基于整车开发需求,明确热管理系统性能目标及制冷与加热部件开启阀值。利用三维计算流体动力学数值计算建立整个液冷板模型,通过数值分析获取液冷板内速度与压力等关键参数分布,最后对电池液冷系统进行了试验测试。结果表明,该液冷系统设计方案能够满足该混合动力轿车的行驶要求,传热效率高,能够有效控制温差,保证电池包工作处在最优温度范围内。%Efficient thermal management system has a crucial rule in controlling the temperature range of the battery pack, enhancing miles and improving safety. This paper describes the liquid cooling system design of hybrid vehicles, based on the demand of vehicle development, it makes the target of thermal management system and the heating and cooling part opening threshold clear. CFD simulation software is used to build the liquid cooling plate simulation model.Using CFD simulation software establish the battery pack simulation model , Through this method, the key parameters such as the speed and pressure of the liquid cooling plate,then we test the battery cooling system.Results show that the liquid cooling system can meet the requirements of the hybrid car, high heat transfer efficiency, can effectively control the temperature to ensure battery work in the optimal range.

  19. Analysis of the effect of renal excretory system cooling during thermal radiofrequency ablation in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Meireles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Analysis of renal excretory system integrity and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation with and without irrigation with saline at 2 o C (SF2. Materials and Methods: The median third of sixteen kidneys were submitted to radiofrequency (exposition of 1 cm controlled by intra-surgical ultrasound, with eight minutes cycles and median temperature of 90 o C in eight female pigs. One excretory renal system was cooled with SF2, at a 30ml/min rate, and the other kidney was not. After 14 days of post-operatory, the biggest diameters of the lesions and the radiological aspects of the excretory system were compared by bilateral ascending pyelogram and the animals were sacrificed in order to perform histological analysis. Results: There were no significant differences between the diameters of the kidney lesions whether or not exposed to cooling of the excretory system. Median diameter of the cooled kidneys and not cooled kidneys were respectively (in mm: anteroposterior: 11.46 vs. 12.5 (p = 0.23; longitudinal: 17.94 vs. 18.84 (p = 0.62; depth: 11.38 vs. 12.25 (p = 0.47. There was no lesion of the excretory system or signs of leakage of contrast media or hydronephrosis at ascending pyelogram. Conclusion: Cooling of excretory system during radiofrequency ablation does not significantly alter generated coagulation necrosis or affect the integrity of the excretory system in the studied model.

  20. Numerical study on the thermal and flow characteristics of periodically formed inner wavy structures in a cooling channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Chul; Park, Sang Hu; Son, Chang Min; Min, June Kee; Ha, Man Yeong [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jong Rae [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    In industrial fields of machine and aerospace, cooling systems consisting of channels are widely used to increase energy efficiency and prevent system overheat. In cooling channels, a reduced pressure drop, an enhanced heat transfer, and a short channel length are considered key design requirements for optimizing the total volume and weight of a system. In this work, we improved heat transfer efficiency by using milli-scale wavy structures inside the channel. By optimizing the inner structures through computational fluid dynamics analysis and Taguchi method, the Nusselt number increased by approximately 11.7% with a similar pressure drop compared with that of a normal channel for a Reynolds number of 1000.

  1. Application of remote sensing techniques for monitoring the thermal pollution of cooling-water discharge from nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuqun; Shi, Ping; Mao, Qingwen

    2003-08-01

    This article introduces a practical method to investigate thermal pollution in coastal water from satellite data. The intensity and distribution areas of thermal pollution by the heated effluent discharge from the nuclear power plant on Daya Bay, southern China were investigated by using Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) thermal band data from 1994 to 2001. A local algorithm was developed, based on sea-truth data of water surface temperature measured when the satellite passed over the study area. The local algorithm was then applied to estimate water temperature from TM data. It shows that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means to quantitatively monitor the intensity of thermal pollution and to retrieve a very detailed distribution pattern of thermal pollution in coastal waters. The remotely-sensed results of the thermal pollution can be used for environmental management of coastal waters.

  2. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C., E-mail: kuijper@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-15

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO{sub 2}-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR

  3. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C., E-mail: kuijper@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-15

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO{sub 2}-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-Af