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Sample records for cooling flow phase

  1. Performance characteristics of two-phase-flow turbo-expanders used in water-cooled chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasz, J.J. [United Technologies Carrier, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Use of two-phase-flow throttle loss recovery devices in water-cooled chillers requires satisfactory part-load operation. This paper describes the results of two-phase-flow impulse turbine testing and the data reduction of the test results into a two-phase-flow turbine off-design performance model. It was found that the main parameter controlling the efficiency of two-phase-flow turbine is the ratio of the nozzle spouting velocity to the rotor speed. The turbine mass flow rate is mainly controlled by inlet subcooling of the entering liquid. The strong sensitivity of turbine mass flow rate on inlet subcooling allows the use of a conventional float valve upstream of the turbine as an effective means of controlling the turbine during part-load operation. For a well-designed two-phase-flow turbine, nozzle spouting velocity and therefore turbine efficiency is hardly affected by the amount of inlet subcooling. Also, capacity can be substantially reduced by a reduction in the amount of inlet subcooling entering the turbine nozzles. Hence, turbine part-load efficiency equals its full-load efficiency over a wide range of flow rates using this control concept. (Author)

  2. Mathematical Model of Two Phase Flow in Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Including Flue Gas Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The previously developed model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer is extended to be able to take into account the flow of supersaturated moist air. The two phase flow model is based on void fraction of gas phase which is included in the governing equations. Homogeneous equilibrium model, where the two phases are well mixed and have the same velocity, is used. The effect of flue gas injection is included into the developed mathematical model by using source terms in governing equations and by using momentum flux coefficient and kinetic energy flux coefficient. Heat and mass transfer in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations, where the mass transfer is represented by measured fill Merkel number and heat transfer is calculated using prescribed Lewis factor.

  3. Analysis of two-phase flow instability in helical tube steam generator in high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yu; Lv, Xuefeng; Wang, Shengfei; Niu, Fenglei; Tian, Li [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (Switzerland)

    2012-03-15

    The steam generator composed of multi-helical tubes is used in high temperature gas cooled reactors and two-phase flow instability should be avoided in design. And density-wave oscillation which is mainly due to flow, density and the relationship between the pressure drop delays and feedback effects is one of the two-phase flow instability phenomena easily to occur. Here drift-flux model is used to simulate the performance of the fluid in the secondary side and frequency domain and time domain methods are used to evaluate whether the density-wave oscillation will happen or not. Several operating conditions with nominal power from 15% to 30% are calculated in this paper. The results of the two methods are in accordance, flow instability will occur when power is less than 20% nominal power, which is also according with the result of the experiments well.

  4. Experimental study on two-phase flow natural circulation in a core catcher cooling channel for EU-APR1400 using air-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Won [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Thanh Hung [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Song, Jinho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Revankar, Shripad T., E-mail: shripad@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Two-phase flow regimes and transition behavior were observed in the coolant channel. • Test were conducted for natural circulation with air-water. • Data were obtained on flow regime, void fraction, flow rates and re-wetting time. • The data were related to a cooling capability of core catcher system. - Abstract: Ex-vessel core catcher cooling system driven by natural circulation is designed using a full scaled air-water system. A transparent half symmetric section of a core catcher coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor was designed with instrumentations for local void fraction measurement and flow visualization. Two designs of air-water top separator water tanks are studied including one with modified ‘super-step’ design which prevents gas entrainment into down-comer. In the experiment air flow rates are set corresponding to steam generation rate for given corium decay power. Measurements of natural circulation flow rate, spatial local void fraction distribution and re-wetting time near the top wall are carried out for various air flow rates which simulate boiling-induced vapor generation. Since heat transfer and critical heat flux are strongly dependent on the water mass flow rate and development of two-phase flow on the heated wall, knowledge of two-phase flow characteristics in the coolant channel is essential. Results on flow visualization showing two phase flow structure specifically near the high void accumulation regions, local void profiles, rewetting time, and natural circulation flow rate are presented for various air flow rates that simulate corium power levels. The data are useful in assessing the cooling capability of and safety of the core catcher system.

  5. Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buote

    2000-04-01

    The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC, we have detected strong absorption over energies approximately 0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central approximately 1&arcmin; of the galaxy NGC 1399, the group NGC 5044, and the cluster A1795. These systems have among the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below approximately 0.4 keV, the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=105-106 K in which ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from H i and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass dropout in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra and X-Ray Multimirror Mission.

  6. Detailed evaluation of two phase natural circulation flow in the cooling channel of the ex-vessel core catcher for EU-APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae-Joon, E-mail: rjpark@kaeri.re.kr; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Rhee, Bo-Wook; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Ex-vessel core catcher of PECS is installed in EU-APR1400. • CE-PECS has been conducted to test a cooling capability of the PECS. • Two phase flow in CE-PECS and PECS was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3. • RELAP5 results are very similar to the CE-PECS data. • The super-step design is suitable for steam injection into the downcomer in PECS. - Abstract: The ex-vessel core catcher of the PECS (Passive Ex-vessel corium retaining and Cooling System) is installed to retain and cool down the corium in the reactor cavity of the EU (European Union)-APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400. A verification experiment on the cooling capability of the PECS has been conducted in the CE (Cooling Experiment)-PECS. Simulations of a two-phase natural circulation flow using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code in the CE-PECS and PECS have been conducted to predict the two-phase flow characteristics, to determine the natural circulation mass flow rate in the cooling channel, and to evaluate the scaling in the experimental design of the CE-PECS. Particularly from a comparative study of the prototype PECS and the scaled test facility of the CE-PECS, the orifice loss coefficient in the CE-PECS was found to be 6 to maintain the coolant circulation mass flux, which is approximately 273.1 kg/m{sup 2} s. The RELAP5 results on the coolant circulation mass flow rate are very similar to the CE-PECS experimental results. An increase in the coolant injection temperature and the heat flux lead to an increase in the coolant circulation mass flow rate. In the base case simulation, a lot of vapor was injected into the downcomer, which leads to an instability of the two-phase natural circulation flow. A super-step design at a downcomer inlet is suitable to prevent vapor injection into the downcomer piping.

  7. Effect of emergency core cooling system flow reduction on channel temperature during recirculation phase of large break loss-of-coolant accident at Wolsong unit 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Oh Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of cooling in a pressurized heavy water reactor after a large break loss-of-coolant accident has been analyzed using Multidimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety-KINS Standard code during the recirculation phase. Through evaluation of sensitivity of the fuel channel temperature to various effective recirculation flow areas, it is determined that proper cooling of the fuel channels in the broken loop is feasible if the effective flow area remains above approximately 70% of the nominal flow area. When the flow area is reduced by more than approximately 25% of the nominal value, however, incipience of boiling is expected, after which the thermal integrity of the fuel channel can be threatened. In addition, if a dramatic reduction of the recirculation flow occurs, excursions and frequent fluctuations of temperature in the fuel channels are likely to be unavoidable, and thus damage to the fuel channels would be anticipated. To resolve this, emergency coolant supply through the newly installed external injection path can be used as one alternative means of cooling, enabling fuel channel integrity to be maintained and permanently preventing severe accident conditions. Thus, the external injection flow required to guarantee fuel channel coolability has been estimated.

  8. Experimental Study of Single Phase Flow in a Closed-Loop Cooling System with Integrated Mini-Channel Heat Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow and heat transfer characteristics of a closed-loop cooling system with a mini-channel heat sink for thermal management of electronics is studied experimentally. The heat sink is designed with corrugated fins to improve its heat dissipation capability. The experiments are performed using variable coolant volumetric flow rates and input heating powers. The experimental results show a high and reliable thermal performance using the heat sink with corrugated fins. The heat transfer capability is improved up to 30 W/cm2 when the base temperature is kept at a stable and acceptable level. Besides the heat transfer capability enhancement, the capability of the system to transfer heat for a long distance is also studied and a fast thermal response time to reach steady state is observed once the input heating power or the volume flow rate are varied. Under different input heat source powers and volumetric flow rates, our results suggest potential applications of the designed mini-channel heat sink in cooling microelectronics.

  9. Alfv\\'en wave phase mixing in flows -- why over-dense solar coronal open magnetic field structures are cool?

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, D

    2015-01-01

    Our magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and analytical calculations show that, when a background flow is present, mathematical expressions for the Alfv\\'en wave (AW) damping via phase mixing are modified by a following substitution $C_A^\\prime(x) \\to C_A^\\prime(x)+V_0^\\prime(x)$, where $C_A$ and $V_0$ are AW phase and the flow speeds and prime denotes derivative in the direction across the background magnetic field. In uniform magnetic field and over-dense plasma structures, in which $C_A$ is smaller compared to surrounding plasma, the flow, that is confined to the structure, in the same direction as the AW, reduces the effect of phase mixing, because on the edges of the structure $C_A^\\prime$ and $V_0^\\prime$ have opposite sign. Thus, the wave damps via phase mixing {\\it slower} compared to the case without the flow. This is the consequence of the co-directional flow reducing the wave front stretching in the transverse direction. Although, the result is generic and is applicable to different laboratory or ...

  10. Numerical Investigation of Single Phase Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer In Rectangular Micro Channel Using Nanofluids as A Cooling Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sanjay V. Barad,

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper The Thermal behaviour of Micro channel heat sink were investigated used Al2o3-water base nanoluid. The model have been solved by ANSYS fluent 14.5 solver. The Dimension of each rectangular channel is 215m width, 821m depth and 4.48cm length. The Reynolds number range from 200 to 400 for power input 100 w. The high thermal conductivity of nanoparticles is shown to enhance the single phase heat transfer coefficient, especially for laminar flow. Higher heat transfer coefficient were achieved mostly in entrances region of micro channels. The enhancement was weaker in fully developed region.

  11. Warm Absorbing Gas in Cooling Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Buote, David A.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the discovery of oxygen absorption and warm (10^5-10^6 K) gas in cooling flows. Special attention is given to new results for M87 for which we find the strongest evidence to date for ionized oxygen absorption in these systems. We briefly discuss implications for observations of cooling flows with Chandra and XMM.

  12. Simulating the Cooling Flow of Cool-Core Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    We carry out high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of a cool core cluster, resolving the flow from Mpc scales down to pc scales. We do not (yet) include any AGN heating, focusing instead on cooling in order to understand how gas gets to the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the center of the cluster. We find that, as the gas cools, the cluster develops a very flat temperature profile, undergoing a cooling catastrophe only in the central 10-100 pc of the cluster. Outside of this region, the flow is smooth, with no local cooling instabilities, and naturally produces very little low-temperature gas (below a few keV), in agreement with observations. The gas cooling in the center of the cluster rapidly forms a thin accretion disk. The amount of cold gas produced at the very center grows rapidly until a reasonable estimate of the resulting AGN heating rate (assuming even a moderate accretion efficiency) would overwhelm cooling. We argue that this naturally produces a thermostat which links the coolin...

  13. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  14. On the Intracluster Medium in Cooling Flow & Non-Cooling Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Babul, A; Poole, G B; Babul, Arif; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; Poole, Greg B.

    2003-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations have highlighted clusters that lack entropy cores. At first glance, these results appear to invalidate the preheated ICM models. We show that a self-consistent preheating model, which factors in the effects of radiative cooling, is in excellent agreement with the observations. Moreover, the model naturally explains the intrinsic scatter in the L-T relation, with ``cooling flow'' and ``non-cooling flow'' systems corresponding to mildly and strongly preheated systems, respectively. We discuss why preheating ought to be favoured over merging as a mechanism for the origin of ``non-cooling flow'' clusters.

  15. Black holes, cooling flows and galaxy formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, J A

    2005-03-15

    Central black holes in galaxies are now well established as a ubiquitous phenomenon, and this fact is important for theories of cosmological structure formation. Merging of galaxy haloes must preserve the proportionality between black hole mass and baryonic mass; the way in which this happens may help solve difficulties with existing ing models of galaxy formation, which suffer from excessive cooling and thus over- produce stars. Feedback from active nuclei may be the missing piece of the puzzle, regulating galaxy-scale cooling flows. Such a process now seems to be observed in cluster-scale cooling flows, where dissipation of sound waves generated by radio lobes can plausibly balance the energy lost in X-rays, at least in a time-averaged sense.

  16. H I absorption toward cooling flows in clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bregman, Joel N.

    1990-01-01

    An H I survey of 14 cooling flow clusters and two noncooling flow clusters was conducted, and H I absorption features were detected against the nuclear radio continuum sources of two cooling flow dominant (CFD) galaxies, 2A 0335 + 096 and MKW3s. The absorption features are broad and redshifted with respect to the stellar absorption-line velocity of the CFDs by 90-225 km/s. This indicates that the H I is falling onto, and is probably gravitationally bound to, the CFDs. The kinematics of the H I clouds suggest a possible kinematic link between the warm and cold phases of the intracluster medium. The clouds are orders of magnitude smaller in radius and mass and larger in density than Galactic H I clouds. The detected CFDs have mass-accretion rates that are about 2.5 times larger than the CFDs that were not detected.

  17. Counter-Flow Cooling Tower Test Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Lukáš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article contains a design of a functional experimental model of a cross-flow mechanical draft cooling tower and the results and outcomes of measurements. This device is primarily used for measuring performance characteristics of cooling fills, but with a simple rebuild, it can be used for measuring other thermodynamic processes that take part in so-called wet cooling. The main advantages of the particular test cell lie in the accuracy, size, and the possibility of changing the water distribution level. This feature is very useful for measurements of fills of different heights without the influence of the spray and rain zone. The functionality of this test cell has been verified experimentally during assembly, and data from the measurement of common film cooling fills have been compared against the results taken from another experimental line. For the purpose of evaluating the data gathered, computational scripts were created in the MATLAB numerical computing environment. The first script is for exact calculation of the thermal balance of the model, and the second is for determining Merkel’s number via Chebyshev’s method.

  18. Stopping Cooling Flows with Cosmic Ray Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, William G

    2009-01-01

    Multi-Gyr two-dimensional calculations describe the gasdynamical evolution of hot gas in the Virgo cluster resulting from intermittent cavities formed with cosmic rays. Without cosmic rays, the gas evolves into a cooling flow, depositing about 85 solar masses per year of cold gas in the cluster core -- such uninhibited cooling conflicts with X-ray spectra and many other observations. When cosmic rays are produced or deposited 10 kpc from the cluster center in bursts of about 10^{59} ergs lasting 20 Myrs and spaced at intervals of 200 Myrs, the central cooling rate is greatly reduced to 0.1 - 1 solar masses per year, consistent with observations. After cosmic rays diffuse through the cavity walls, the ambient gas density is reduced and is buoyantly transported 30-70 kpc out into the cluster. Cosmic rays do not directly heat the gas and the modest shock heating around young cavities is offset by global cooling as the cluster gas expands. After several Gyrs the hot gas density and temperature profiles remain sim...

  19. The role of cooling flows in galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nulsen, P E J

    1995-01-01

    The present structure of galaxies is governed by the radiative dissipation of the gravitational and supernova energy injected during formation. A crucial aspect of this process is whether the gas cools as fast as it falls into the gravitational potential well. If it does then rapid normal star formation is assumed to ensue. If not, and the gas can still cool by the present time, then the situation resembles that of a cooling flow, such as commonly found in clusters of galaxies. The cooled matter is assumed to accumulate as very cold clouds and/or low mass stars, i.e. as baryonic dark matter. In this paper we investigate the likelihood of a cooling flow phase during the hierarchical formation of galaxies. We concentrate on the behaviour of the gas, using a highly simplified treatment of the evolution of the dark matter potential within which the gas evolves. We assume that normal star formation is limited by how much gas the associated supernovae can unbind and allow the gas profile to flatten as a consequence...

  20. Optimal convection cooling flows in general geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Alben, Silas

    2016-01-01

    We generalize a recent method for computing optimal 2D convection cooling flows in a horizontal layer to a wide range of geometries, including those relevant for technological applications. We write the problem in a conformal pair of coordinates which are the pure conduction temperature and its harmonic conjugate. We find optimal flows for cooling a cylinder in an annular domain, a hot plate embedded in a cold surface, and a channel with hot interior and cold exterior. With a constraint of fixed kinetic energy, the optimal flows are all essentially the same in the conformal coordinates. In the physical coordinates, they consist of vortices ranging in size from the length of the hot surface to a small cutoff length at the interface of the hot and cold surfaces. With the constraint of fixed enstrophy (or fixed rate of viscous dissipation), a geometry-dependent metric factor appears in the equations. The conformal coordinates are useful here because they map the problems to a rectangular domain, facilitating num...

  1. AGN effect on cooling flow dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bibi, F Alouani; Blundell, K; Omma, H

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the feedback of AGN jets on cooling flow clusters using three-dimensional AMR hydrodynamic simulations. We studied the interaction of the jet with the intracluster medium and creation of low X-ray emission cavities (Bubbles) in cluster plasma. The distribution of energy input by the jet into the system was quantified in its different forms, i.e. internal, kinetic and potential. We find that the energy associated with the bubbles, (pV + gamma pV/(gamma-1)), accounts for less than 10 percent of the jet energy.

  2. Conductivity probes for two-phase flow pattern determination during emergency core cooling (ECC) injection experiments at the COCO facility (PHDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasser, H.M. (Research Centre Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)); Kueppers, L. (Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe (Germany)); May, R. (Fraunhofer Inst. for Nondestructive Testing, Dept. Acoustical Methods for Nondestructive Testing, Evaluation and Quality Assurance, Dresden (Germany))

    1992-07-01

    The paper describes the use of needle-shaped conductivity probes for two-phase flow pattern determination during simulated ECC. The first results appear promising and the use of such probes as additional instrumentation can be envisaged in the future on power reactors, e.g. for the control of water level, once some improvements have been achieved, in particular regarding the stability of the probe. (orig.)

  3. Multiphase groundwater flow near cooling plutons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayba, D.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate groundwater flow near cooling plutons with a computer program that can model multiphase flow, temperatures up to 1200??C, thermal pressurization, and temperature-dependent rock properties. A series of experiments examines the effects of host-rock permeability, size and depth of pluton emplacement, single versus multiple intrusions, the influence of a caprock, and the impact of topographically driven groundwater flow. We also reproduce and evaluate some of the pioneering numerical experiments on flow around plutons. Host-rock permeability is the principal factor influencing fluid circulation and heat transfer in hydrothermal systems. The hottest and most steam-rich systems develop where permeability is of the order of 10-15 m2. Temperatures and life spans of systems decrease with increasing permeability. Conduction-dominated systems, in which permeabilities are ???10-16m2, persist longer but exhibit relatively modest increases in near-surface temperatures relative to ambient conditions. Pluton size, emplacement depth, and initial thermal conditions have less influence on hydrothermal circulation patterns but affect the extent of boiling and duration of hydrothermal systems. Topographically driven groundwater flow can significantly alter hydrothermal circulation; however, a low-permeability caprock effectively decouples the topographically and density-driven systems and stabilizes the mixing interface between them thereby defining a likely ore-forming environment.

  4. Two-Phase Flow in High-Heat-Flux Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Refrigeration Cooling Applications. Part 1: Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Direct Refrigeration Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    relation [Shah and London (1978), Incropera and Dewitt (2002)]: Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory 21 AP,pg = L- fsp.,G 2V, (1.3.4) where f,,.,Reg = 24...1.4.1) where q is the fin efficiency. Since the top wall is adiabatic, the fin efficiency is given by [ Incropera and Dewitt (2002)] tanh (m Hh...phase convection heat transfer coefficient prevalent in the highly subcooled inlet is given by the relation ( Incropera and Dewitt, 2002) Nu = -h D

  5. Two-Phase Flow in High-Heat-Flux Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Refrigeration Cooling Applications. Part 2: Low Temperature Hybrid Micro-Channel/Micro-Jet Impingement Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    pressure gradient ( Incropera , 1999). Watson (1964) used inviscid theory to determine Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory 23 thickness h of the wall jet...the pressure drop coefficient, f is inversely proportional to jet Reynolds ( Incropera , 1999) f = KRe,.,, (4.4) and K is fairly constant for the...both pool and forced convection boiling on submerged bodies in saturated liquids", Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, Vol. 26, pp. 389-399. Incropera , F.P

  6. Free-cooling of buildings with phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalba, B.; Marin, J.M. [Universidad de Zaragoza Maria de Luna (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica; Cabeza, L.F. [Universitat de Lleida (Spain). Departamento d' Informatica i Eng. Industrial; Mehling, H. [ZAE Bayern, Abt. 1 Energy Conversion and Storage, Garching (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, the application of phase change materials (PCM) in free-cooling systems is studied. Free-cooling is understood as a means to store outdoors coolness during the night, to supply indoors cooling during the day. The use of PCMs is suitable because of the small temperature difference between day indoors and night outdoors. An installation that allows testing the performance of PCMs in such systems was designed and constructed. The main influence parameters like ratio of energy/volume in the encapsulates, load/unload rate of the storage, and cost of the installation were determined, and experiments were performed following the design of experiments strategy. The statistical analysis showed that the effects with significant influence in the solidification process are the thickness of the encapsulation, the inlet temperature of the air, the air flow, and the interaction thickness x temperature. For the melting process the same holds, but the inlet air temperature had a higher influence than the thickness of the encapsulation. With the empirical model developed in this work, a real free-cooling system was designed and economically evaluated. (author)

  7. Convective cores in galactic cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kritsuk, A G; Müller, E

    2000-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive grid refinement to study the dependence of hot gas flows in X-ray luminous giant elliptical galaxies on the efficiency of heat supply to the gas. We consider a number of potential heating mechanisms including Type Ia supernovae and sporadic nuclear activity of a central supermassive black hole. As a starting point for this research we use an equilibrium hydrostatic recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). We show that a compact cooling inflow develops, if the heating is slightly insufficient to counterbalance radiative cooling of the hot gas in the central few kiloparsecs. An excessive heating in the centre, instead, drives a convectively unstable outflow. We model the onset of the instability and a quasi-steady convective regime in the core of the galaxy in two-dimensions assuming axial symmetry. Provided the power of net energy supply in the core is not too high, the convection remains subsonic. The convective pattern is dominated by buoyancy driven large-scale mushroom-...

  8. Relic Radio Bubbles and Cluster Cooling Flows

    CERN Document Server

    De Young, D S

    2003-01-01

    Recent suggestions that buoyant radio emitting cavities in the intracluster medium can cause significant reheating of cooling flows are re-examined when the effects of the intracluster magnetic field are included. Expansion of the cavity creates a tangential magnetic field in the ICM around the radio source, and this field can suppress instabilities that mix the ICM and the radio source. The onset of instability can be delayed for ~100 million years, and calculation of the actual reheating time shows that this may not occur until about 1Gy after creation of the cavity. These results may explain why the relic radio bubbles are still intact at such late times, and it may imply that the role of radio sources in reheating the ICM should be re-examined. In addition, the existence of relic radio cavities may also imply that the particle content of radio source lobes is primarily electrons and protons rather than electrons and positrons.

  9. Feedback Heating in Cooling Flow Clusters With Slow Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, N; Soker, Noam; Pizzolato, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    We propose a scenario in which a large fraction, or even most, of the gas cooling to low temperatures (T<10^4 K) in cooling flow clusters, directly gains energy from the central black hole. Most of the cool gas is accelerated to non-relativistic high velocities, v = 10^3-10^4 km/s, after flowing through, or close to, an accretion disk around the central black hole. A poorly collimated wind (or double not-well collimated opposite jets) is formed. According to the proposed scenario, this gas inflates some of the X-ray deficient bubbles, such that the average gas temperature inside these bubbles (cavities) in cooling flow clusters is kT_b~100 keV. This scenario is incorporated into the moderate cooling flow model; although not a necessary ingredient in that model, it brings it to better agreement with observations. In the moderate cooling flow model a cooling flow does exist, but the mass cooling rate is <10% of that in old versions of cooling flow models.

  10. IUE observations of star formation in a cooling flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    1998-01-01

    Star formation in cooling flows is usually found to have an initial mass function deficient in massive stars, but the center of the cooling flow in Hydra A has been shown to contain a significant number of early type stars. Here we use UV-spectra obtained with the IUE satellite together with ground...

  11. Solving the Cooling Flow Problem through Mechanical AGN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspari, M; Ruszkowski, M

    2012-01-01

    Unopposed radiative cooling of plasma would lead to the cooling catastrophe, a massive inflow of condensing gas, manifest in the core of galaxies, groups and clusters. The last generation X-ray telescopes, Chandra and XMM, have radically changed our view on baryons, indicating AGN heating as the balancing counterpart of cooling. This work reviews our extensive investigation on self-regulated heating. We argue that the mechanical feedback, based on massive subrelativistic outflows, is the key to solving the cooling flow problem, i.e. dramatically quenching the cooling rates for several Gyr without destroying the cool-core structure. Using a modified version of the 3D hydrocode FLASH, we show that bipolar AGN outflows can further reproduce fundamental observed features, such as buoyant bubbles, weak shocks, metals dredge- up, and turbulence. The latter is an essential ingredient to drive nonlinear thermal instabilities, which cause the formation of extended cold gas, a residual of the quenched cooling flow and,...

  12. Two-Phase Cooling of Targets and Electronics for Particle Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Thome, J R; Park, J E

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the LTCM lab’s decade of experience with two-phase cooling research for computer chips and power electronics will be described with its possible beneficial application to high-energy physics experiments. Flow boiling in multi-microchannel cooling elements in silicon (or aluminium) have the potential to provide high cooling rates (up to as high as 350 W/cm2), stable and uniform temperatures of targets and electronics, and lightweight construction while also minimizing the fluid inventory. An overview of two-phase flow and boiling research in single microchannels and multi-microchannel test elements will be presented together with video images of these flows. The objective is to stimulate discussion on the use of two-phase cooling in these demanding applications, including the possible use of CO2.

  13. Cool storage time of phase change wallboard room in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国会; 陈其针; 黄凯良; 牛润萍; 王琳

    2009-01-01

    More and more attention was paid to phase change energy storage in air conditioning domain and construction energy conservation,and became the focus of the international research. Through the test and analysis of the parameters of the indoor thermal property in phase change wallboard room and ordinary room,the effects of using phase change wallboards on indoor temperature in summer and air conditioning are obtained. The combination of construct enclosure and phase change materials can stabilize indoor temperature,improve indoor thermal comfort,reduce the frequency of the operation of air conditioning facility,cut the initial investment and operation expense,and meanwhile play an practical role in "the power balancing between the peak period and the valley period" policy. Through the experiment and the test of the effects exerted by phase change wallboard room and ordinary room on the indoor thermal environment,it is obtained that the phase change wallboard can reduce the fluctuation range of indoor temperature and the heat flow from the outside into indoor environment in summer. According to the study,it is found that the effect of cool-storing for 5 h is obvious. Through the analysis of the phase change wallboard without air conditioning in daytime,it is obtained that the frequency of the operation of air conditioning in phase change wallboard room is smaller than that in the ordinary room,which can prolong the lifetime of the facility and reduce operation expense.

  14. TURBINE COOLING FLOW AND THE RESULTING DECREASE IN TURBINE EFFICIENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    This algorithm has been developed for calculating both the quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool a turbine and the resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into the gas stream. Because of the trend toward higher turbine inlet temperatures, it is important to accurately predict the required cooling flow. This program is intended for use with axial flow, air-breathing jet propulsion engines with a variety of airfoil cooling configurations. The algorithm results have compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk metal temperatures and cooling configurations. The program calculates the required cooling flow and corresponding decrease in stage efficiency for each row of airfoils throughout the turbine. These values are combined with the thermodynamic efficiency of the uncooled turbine to predict the total bleed airflow required and the altered turbine efficiency. There are ten airfoil cooling configurations and the algorithm allows a different option for each row of cooled airfoils. Materials technology is incorporated and requires the date of the first year of service for the turbine stator vane and rotor blade. The user must specify pressure, temperatures, and gas flows into the turbine. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 3080 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 61K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1980.

  15. Properties of Accretion Shocks in Viscous Flows with Cooling Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Das, S; Das, Santabrata; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2004-01-01

    Low angular momentum accretion flows can have standing and oscillating shock waves. We study the region of the parameter space in which multiple sonic points occur in viscous flows in presence of various cooling effects such as bremsstrahlung and Comptonization. We also quantify the parameter space in which shocks are steady or oscillating. We find that cooling induces effects opposite to heating by viscosity even in modifying the topology of the solutions, though one can never be exactly balanced by the other due to their dissimilar dependence on dynamic and thermodynamic parameters. We show that beyond a critical value of cooling, the flow ceases to contain a shock wave.

  16. Convection-Dominated Accretion Flows with Radiative Cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuang-Liang; XUE Li; LU Ju-Fu

    2007-01-01

    @@ By numerically solving the set of basic equations describing black hole accretion flows with low accretion rates,we show that although the dynamical structure of these flows is essentially unaffected by radiative processes in comparison with the case in which the radiation is not considered, the radiative cooling can be more important than the advective cooling in the flow's convection-dominated zone, and this result may have implications to distinguish observationally convection-dominated accretion flows from advection-dominated accretion flows.

  17. Emplacing a Cooling-Limited Rhyolite Lava Flow: Similarities with Basaltic Lava Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Magnall

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate forecasts of lava flow length rely on estimates of eruption and magma properties and, potentially more challengingly, on an understanding of the relative influence of characteristics such as the apparent viscosity, the yield strength of the flow core, or the strength of the lava's surface crust. For basaltic lavas, the relatively high frequency of eruptions has resulted in numerous opportunities to test emplacement models on such low silica lava flows. However, the flow of high silica lava is much less well understood due to the paucity of contemporary events and, if observations of flow length change are used to constrain straightforward models of lava advance, remaining uncertainties can limit the insight gained. Here, for the first time, we incorporate morphological observations from during and after flow field evolution to improve model constraints and reduce uncertainties. After demonstrating the approach on a basaltic lava flow (Mt. Etna 2001, we apply it to the 2011–2012 Cordón Caulle rhyolite lava flow, where unprecedented observations and syn-emplacement satellite imagery of an advancing silica-rich lava flow have indicated an important influence from the lava flow's crust on flow emplacement. Our results show that an initial phase of viscosity-controlled advance at Cordón Caulle was followed by later crustal control, accompanied by formation of flow surface folds and large-scale crustal fractures. Where the lava was unconstrained by topography, the cooled crust ultimately halted advance of the main flow and led to the formation of breakouts from the flow front and margins, influencing the footprint of the lava, its advance rate, and the duration of flow advance. Highly similar behavior occurred in the 2001 Etna basaltic lava flow. In our comparison of these two cases, we find close similarities between the processes controlling the advance of a crystal-poor rhyolite and a basaltic lava flow, suggesting common controlling

  18. Simulation of the solidification in a channel of a water-cooled glass flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Ovando Chacon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer simulation study of a laminar steady-state glass flow that exits from a channel cooled with water is reported. The simulations are carried out in a two-dimensional, Cartesian channel with a backward-facing step for three different angles of the step and different glass outflow velocities. We studied the interaction of the fluid dynamics, phase change and thermal behavior of the glass flow due to the heat that transfers to the cooling water through the wall of the channel. The temperature, streamline, phase change and pressure fields are obtained and analyzed for the glass flow. Moreover, the temperature increments of the cooling water are characterized. It is shown that, by reducing the glass outflow velocity, the solidification is enhanced; meanwhile, an increase of the step angle also improves the solidification of the glass flow.

  19. Cell-cooling in flow cytometry by Peltier elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttlinger, C; Meyer, K L; Weichel, W; Müller, W; Raftery, B; Radbruch, A

    1986-05-01

    We have built a cooling device for cell suspensions in flow cytometry that makes use of the Peltier effect (Barnard RD, Thermo electricity in Metals and Alloys, Taylor and Francis, London; Siemens-Z 34:383-88, 1963). The prototype described here is used for cooling collection tubes during long-duration cell sorting and is capable of maintaining a temperature of 2-5 degrees C in a cell suspension of up to 3 ml. In general, Peltier element-based cooling is useful for equilibrating the temperature of small volumes of fluids. Furthermore, Peltier element-based cooling devices are easy to build and handle.

  20. Forced Two-Phase Helium Cooling Scheme for the Mu2e Transport Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatkowski, G. [Fermilab; Cheban, S. [Fermilab; Dhanaraj, N. [Fermilab; Evbota, D. [Fermilab; Lopes, M. [Fermilab; Nicol, T. [Fermilab; Sanders, R. [Fermilab; Schmitt, R. [Fermilab; Voirin, E. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids

  1. Two-phase cooling fluids; Les fluides frigoporteurs diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the diminution of heat transfer fluid consumption, the concept of indirect refrigerating circuits, using cooling intermediate fluids, is reviewed and the fluids that are currently used in these systems are described. Two-phase cooling fluids advantages over single-phase fluids are presented with their thermophysical characteristics: solid fraction, two-phase mixture enthalpy, thermal and rheological properties, determination of heat and mass transfer characteristics, and cold storage through ice slurry

  2. On the Relationship between Cooling Flows and Bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Katz, N; Balogh, M L; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; Babul, Arif; Katz, Neal; Balogh, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    A common feature of the X-ray bubbles observed in Chandra images of some "cooling flow" clusters is that they appear to be surrounded by bright, cool shells. Temperature maps of a few nearby luminous clusters reveal that the shells consist of the coolest gas in the clusters -- much cooler than the surrounding medium. Using simple models, we study the effects of this cool emission on the inferred cooling flow properties of clusters. We find that the introduction of bubbles into model clusters that do NOT have cooling flows results in temperature and surface brightness profiles that resemble those seen in nearby "cooling flow" clusters. They also approximately reproduce the recent XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of a high minimum temperature of 1-3 keV. Hence, bubbles, if present, must be taken into account when inferring the physical properties of the ICM. In the case of some clusters, bubbles may account entirely for these observed features, calling into question their designation as clusters with cooling...

  3. The role of Compton heating in cluster cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L; Pellegrini, S

    2003-01-01

    Recent observations by Chandra and XMM-Newton demonstrate that the central gas in "cooling flow" galaxy clusters has a mass cooling rate that decreases rapidly with decreasing temperature. This contrasts the predictions of a steady state cooling flow model. On the basis of these observational results, the gas can be in a steady state only if a steady temperature dependent heating mechanism is present; alternatively the gas could be in an unsteady state, i.e., heated intermittently. Intermittent heating can be produced by accretion on the supermassive black hole residing in the central cluster galaxy, via Compton heating. This mechanism can be effective provided that the radiation temperature of the emitted spectrum is higher than the gas temperature. Here we explore whether this heating mechanism can be at the origin of the enigmatic behavior of the hot gas in the central regions of ``cooling flow'' clusters. Although several characteristics of Compton heating appear attractive in this respect, we find that t...

  4. Phase change based cooling for high burst mode heat loads with temperature regulation above the phase change temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States of America as represented by the United States Department of Energy

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for transferring thermal energy from a heat load is disclosed. In particular, use of a phase change material and specific flow designs enables cooling with temperature regulation well above the fusion temperature of the phase change material for medium and high heat loads from devices operated intermittently (in burst mode). Exemplary heat loads include burst mode lasers and laser diodes, flight avionics, and high power space instruments. Thermal energy is transferred from the heat load to liquid phase change material from a phase change material reservoir. The liquid phase change material is split into two flows. Thermal energy is transferred from the first flow via a phase change material heat sink. The second flow bypasses the phase change material heat sink and joins with liquid phase change material exiting from the phase change material heat sink. The combined liquid phase change material is returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. The ratio of bypass flow to flow into the phase change material heat sink can be varied to adjust the temperature of the liquid phase change material returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. Varying the flowrate and temperature of the liquid phase change material presented to the heat load determines the magnitude of thermal energy transferred from the heat load.

  5. Influence of cooling on lava-flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, Mark V.; Jaupart, Claude; Stephen, R.; Sparks, J.

    1993-04-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the effects of cooling on the flow of fluids with strongly temperature dependent viscosity. Radial viscous-gravity currents of warm glucose syrup were erupted at constant rate into a flat tank filled with a cold aqueous solution. Cold, viscous fluid accumulates at the leading edge, altering the flow shape and thickness and slowing the spreading. The flows attain constant internal temperature distributions and bulk viscosities. The value of the bulk viscosity depends on the Péclet number, which reflects the advective and diffusive heat transport properties of the flow, the flow skin viscosity, which reflects cooling, and the eruption viscosity. Our results explain why most lava flows have bulk viscosities much higher than the lava eruption viscosity. The results can be applied to understanding dynamic lava features such as flow-front thickening, front avalanches, and welded basal breccias.

  6. Emplacing a cooling-limited rhyolite lava flow: similarities with basaltic lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnall, Nathan; James, Mike R.; Tuffen, Hugh; Vye-Brown, Charlotte

    2017-06-01

    Accurate forecasts of lava flow length rely on estimates of eruption and magma properties and, potentially more challengingly, an understanding of the relative influence of characteristics such as the apparent viscosity, the yield strength of the flow core, or the strength of the surface crust. Consequently, even the most straightforward models of lava advance involve sufficient parameters that constraints can be relatively easily fitted within the uncertainties involved, at the expense of gaining insight. Here, for the first time, we incorporate morphological observations from during and after flow field evolution to improve model constraints and reduce uncertainties. After demonstrating the approach on a basaltic lava flow (Mt. Etna, 2001), we apply it to the 2011-12 Cordón Caulle rhyolite flow, where unprecedented observations and syn-emplacement satellite imagery of an advancing silica-rich lava flow have indicated an important crustal influence on flow emplacement. Our results show that an initial phase of viscosity-controlled advance at Cordón Caulle was followed by later crustal control, accompanied by formation of flow surface folds and large-scale crustal fractures. Where the lava was unconstrained by topography, the cooled crust ultimately halted advance of the main flow and led to the formation of breakouts from the flow front and margins, influencing the footprint of the lava, its advance rate, and the duration of flow advance. Highly similar behaviour occurred in the 2001 Etna basaltic lava flow. The processes controlling the advance of crystal-poor rhyolite and basaltic lava flow therefore appear similar, indicating common controlling mechanisms that transcend profound rheological and compositional differences.

  7. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The

  8. Flow Cooling of Superconducting Magnets for Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, A. J.; Audette, W. E.; Barton, M. D.; Hilderbrand, J. K.; Marshall, W. S.; Rey, C. M.; Winter, D. S.; Petro, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    The development and testing of a flow cooling system for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets is described. The system includes a turbo-Brayton cryocooler, a magnet thermal interface, and a magnet thermal isolation and support system. The target application is the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). Turbo-Brayton coolers are well suited to such spacecraft applications, as they are compact, modular, lightweight, and efficient, with long maintenance-free lifetimes. Furthermore, the technology scales well to high-cooling capacities. The feasibility of using turbo-Brayton coolers in this application was proven in a design exercise in which existing cooler designs were scaled to provide cooling for the magnet sets required by 200 kW and 1 MW VASIMR engines. The performance of the concepts for the thermal interface and the thermal isolation and support system were measured in separate laboratory tests with a demonstration system built about a representative HTS magnet. Cooling for these tests was provided by a flow cooling loop comprising a compressor, recuperator and GM cryocooler, with the flow pressure, temperature, and mass flow rate selected to effectively simulate the turbo-Brayton operating condition. During system testing, the magnet was cooled below its design operating temperature of 35 K, and good thermal uniformity (<0.4 K) and low thermal loads (<0.5 W) were demonstrated.

  9. The Detectability of AGN Cavities in Cooling-Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Birzan, L; McNamara, B R; Nulsen, P E J; Wise, M W

    2009-01-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed X-ray cavities in many nearby cooling flow clusters. The cavities trace feedback from the central active galactic nulceus (AGN) on the intracluster medium (ICM), an important ingredient in stabilizing cooling flows and in the process of galaxy formation and evolution. But, the prevalence and duty cycle of such AGN outbursts is not well understood. To this end, we study how the cooling is balanced by the cavity heating for a complete sample of clusters (the Brightest 55 clusters of galaxies, hereafter B55). In the B55, we found 33 cooling flow clusters, 20 of which have detected X-ray bubbles in their ICM. Among the remaining 13, all except Ophiuchus could have significant cavity power yet remain undetected in existing images. This implies that the duty cycle of AGN outbursts with significant heating potential in cooling flow clusters is at least 60 % and could approach 100 %, but deeper data is required to constrain this further.

  10. A flow cryostat for cooling of eight independent pipe guns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Hansen, J.E.; Sass, B.

    1991-01-01

    A flow cryostat allowing independent cooling of eight pipe guns in a multishot deuterium pellet injector is described. The pipe guns are placed symmetrically around the flow cryostat and with a liquid helium consumption of 4-5 l/h the cooling is sufficient for simultaneous formation of eight...... pellets at 8-9 K with a diameter of 2.1 mm containing up to 8 x 10(20) atoms/pellet. The thermal interaction between the eight pipe guns is sufficiently low to allow successive firing of the guns with time intervals of up to 1 s....

  11. Heating Cooling Flows with Weak Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, W G; Brighenti, F

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of extended, approximately spherical weak shock waves in the hot intercluster gas in Perseus and Virgo has precipitated the notion that these waves may be the primary heating process that explains why so little gas cools to low temperatures. This type of heating has received additional support from recent gasdynamical models. We show here that outward propagating, dissipating waves deposit most of their energy near the center of the cluster atmosphere. Consequently, if the gas is heated by (intermittent) weak shocks for several Gyrs, the gas within 30-50 kpc is heated to temperatures that far exceed observed values. This heating can be avoided if dissipating shocks are sufficiently infrequent or weak so as not to be the primary source of global heating. Local PV and viscous heating associated with newly formed X-ray cavities are likely to be small, which is consistent with the low gas temperatures generally observed near the centers of groups and clusters where the cavities are located.

  12. Topological charge using cooling and the gradient flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrou, C.; Athenodorou, A. [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computation-based Science and Technology, Research Center; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    The equivalence of cooling to the gradient flow when the cooling step n{sub c} and the continuous flow step of gradient flow τ are matched is generalized to gauge actions that include rectangular terms. By expanding the link variables up to subleading terms in perturbation theory, we relate n{sub c} and τ and show that the results for the topological charge become equivalent when rescaling τ ≅ n{sub c}/(3-15c{sub 1}) where c{sub 1} is the Symanzik coefficient multiplying the rectangular term. We, subsequently, apply cooling and the gradient flow using the Wilson, the Symanzik tree-level improved and the Iwasaki gauge actions to configurations produced with N{sub f} = 2 + 1 + 1 twisted mass fermions. We compute the topological charge, its distribution and the correlators between cooling and gradient flow at three values of the lattice spacing demonstrating that the perturbative rescaling τ ≅ n{sub c}/(3-15c{sub 1}) leads to equivalent results.

  13. Models of steady state cooling flows in elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, Peter W.; Trester, Jeffrey J.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive set of steady state models for spherically symmetric cooling flows in early-type galaxies is presented. It is found that a reduction of the supernova (SN) rate in ellipticals produces a decrease in the X-ray luminosity of galactic cooling flows and a steepening of the surface brightness profile. The mean X-ray temperature of the cooling flow is not affected noticeably by a change in the SN rate. The external pressure around a galaxy does not markedly change the luminosity of the gas within the galaxy but does change the mean temperature of the gas. The presence of a dark matter halo in a galaxy only changes the mean X-ray temperature slightly. The addition of a distribution of mass sinks which remove material from the general accretion flow reduces L(X) very slightly, flattens the surface brightness profile, and reduces the central surface brightness level to values close to those actually observed. A reduction in the stellar mass-loss rate only slightly reduces the X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow and flattens the surface brightness by a small amount.

  14. On the Nature of Feedback Heating in Cooling Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pizzolato, F; Pizzolato, Fabio; Soker, Noam

    2004-01-01

    We study the feedback between heating and cooling of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in cooling flow (CF) galaxies and clusters. We adopt the popular view that the heating is due to an active galactic nucleus (AGN), i.e. a central black hole accreting mass and launching jets and/or winds. We propose that the feedback occurs with the entire cool inner region (r2 cool fast and are removed from the ICM before experiencing the next major AGN heating event. We term this scenario cold-feedback. Some of these blobs cool and sink toward the central black hole, while others might form stars and cold molecular clouds. We derive the conditions under which the dense blobs formed by perturbations might cool to low temperatures (T < 10^4 K), and feed the black hole. The main conditions are found to be: (1) An over-dense blob must be prevented from reaching an equilibrium position in the ICM: therefore it has to cool fast, and the density profile of the ambient gas should be shallow; (2) Non-linear perturbations are requi...

  15. Hotspot Liquid Microfluidic Cooling: Comparing The Efficiency between Horizontal Flow and Vertical Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yuki; Ryoson, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Koji; Honjo, Keiji; Ohba, Takayuki; Mita, Yoshio

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a novel cooling method for a local high-temperature block in an integrated circuit, which is called a “hotspot”. The method is to cool the chip in out-of-plane (3-D) direction to overcome efficiency limit of traditional horizontal (2-D) cooling. Our result indicates that high-temperature (over 180 °C) circuit block such as a phase-locked-loop (PLL), which is a performance limiting block in a modern CPU, can more efficiently be cooled by the vertical (3-D) cooling scheme.

  16. Computer cooling using a two phase minichannel thermosyphon loop heated from horizontal and vertical sides and cooled from vertical side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieliński, Henryk; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2010-10-01

    In the present paper it is proposed to consider the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop. A closed thermosyphon loop consists of combined two heaters and a cooler connected to each other by tubes. The first heater may be a CPU processor located on the motherboard of the personal computer. The second heater may be a chip of a graphic card placed perpendicular to the motherboard of personal computer. The cooler can be placed above the heaters on the computer chassis. The thermosyphon cooling system on the use of computer can be modeled using the rectangular thermosyphon loop with minichannels heated at the bottom horizontal side and the bottom vertical side and cooled at the upper vertical side. The riser and a downcomer connect these parts. A one-dimensional model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporators, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. The separate two-phase flow model is used in calculations. A numerical investigation for the analysis of the mass flux rate and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been accomplished.

  17. HII and H2 in the envelopes of cooling flow central galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, W; Baker, K

    2005-01-01

    We report observations of ionized and warm molecular gas in the extended regions of the central galaxies in several cooling flow clusters. These show that both gas phases are present in these clusters to large radii. We trace both Pa alpha and H2 lines to radii in excess of 20 kpc. The surface brightness profiles of the two phases trace each other closely. Apart from very close to the central AGN, line ratios in and between the phases vary only slowly with position. The kinematics of the phases are indistinguishable and away from the influence of the central AGN both the mean and dispersion in velocity are low (= 10^5 K.

  18. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  19. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  20. Analysis of Turbine Blade Relative Cooling Flow Factor Used in the Subroutine Coolit Based on Film Cooling Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer correlations of data on flat plates are used to explore the parameters in the Coolit program used for calculating the quantity of cooling air for controlling turbine blade temperature. Correlations for both convection and film cooling are explored for their relevance to predicting blade temperature as a function of a total cooling flow which is split between external film and internal convection flows. Similar trends to those in Coolit are predicted as a function of the percent of the total cooling flow that is in the film. The exceptions are that no film or 100 percent convection is predicted to not be able to control blade temperature, while leaving less than 25 percent of the cooling flow in the convection path results in nearing a limit on convection cooling as predicted by a thermal effectiveness parameter not presently used in Coolit.

  1. Cooling compact stars and phase transitions in dense QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedrakian, Armen [J.W. Goethe University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    We report new simulations of cooling of compact stars containing quark cores and updated fits to the Cas A fast cooling data. Our model is built on the assumption that the transient behaviour of the star in Cas A is due to a phase transition within the dense QCD matter in the core of the star. Specifically, the fast cooling is attributed to an enhancement in the neutrino emission triggered by a transition from a fully gapped, two-flavor, red-green color-superconducting quark condensate to a superconducting crystalline or an alternative gapless, color-superconducting phase. The blue-colored condensate is modeled as a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type color superconductor with spin-one pairing order parameter. We study the sensitivity of the fits to the phase transition temperature, the pairing gap of blue quarks and the timescale characterizing the phase transition (the latter modelled in terms of a width parameter). Relative variations in these parameter around their best-fit values larger than 10{sup -3} spoil the fit to the data. We confirm the previous finding that the cooling curves show significant variations as a function of compact star mass, which allows one to account for dispersion in the data on the surface temperatures of thermally emitting neutron stars. (orig.)

  2. Optimal design variable considerations in the use of phase change materials in indirect evaporative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilakapaty, Ankit Paul

    The demand for sustainable, energy efficient and cost effective heating and cooling solutions is exponentially increasing with the rapid advancement of computation and information technology. Use of latent heat storage materials also known as phase change materials (PCMs) for load leveling is an innovative solution to the data center cooling demands. These materials are commercially available in the form of microcapsules dispersed in water, referred to as the microencapsulated phase change slurries and have higher heat capacity than water. The composition and physical properties of phase change slurries play significant role in energy efficiency of the cooling systems designed implementing these PCM slurries. Objective of this project is to study the effect of PCM particle size, shape and volumetric concentration on overall heat transfer potential of the cooling systems designed with PCM slurries as the heat transfer fluid (HTF). In this study uniform volume heat source model is developed for the simulation of heat transfer potential using phase change materials in the form of bulk temperature difference in a fully developed flow through a circular duct. Results indicate the heat transfer potential increases with PCM volumetric concentration with gradually diminishing returns. Also, spherical PCM particles offer greater heat transfer potential when compared to cylindrical particles. Results of this project will aid in efficient design of cooling systems based on PCM slurries.

  3. Bubbles as tracers of heat input to cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, J; Omma, H

    2007-01-01

    We examine the distribution of injected energy in three-dimensional, adaptive-grid simulations of the heating of cooling flows. We show that less than 10 percent of the injected energy goes into bubbles. Consequently, the energy input from the nucleus is underestimated by a factor of order 6 when it is taken to be given by PVgamma/(gamma-1), where P and V are the pressure and volume of the bubble, and gamma the ratio of principal specific heats.

  4. Measurements in Film Cooling Flows with Periodic Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold- wire ) anemometry . Hot - wire anemometry was used for velocity measurements. The local film cooling...and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity, respectively. Boundary layer probes with 1.27 m...jet velocity and temperature were documented by Coulthard et al. 26 by traversing the constant current and hot - wire probes over the hole exit plane

  5. Preparation of Firefighting Hood for Cooling for Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Hwa Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There are two types of Phase Change Materials (PCMs which have been developed and adopted in textiles: heat (energy released and cool (energy absorbed. This paper discusses current PCM applications and explores future applications in firefighting gear. Phase change materials are considered latent heat storage units because as they change phase from solid to liquid, liquid to gas and vice versa, energy in the form of heat is absorbed or released. The goal of PCM textiles is to create reusable energy to maintain body temperature, as well as to optimize the performance of protective wear such as hoods. When the wearer’s body temperature increases or decreases, the PCMs applied to the fabric will change state helping to regulate the wearer’s body temperature by providing warmth or cooling. Maintaining a stable body temperature can improve working conditions and comfort.

  6. Preparation of Firefighting Hood for Cooling For Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Hwa Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There are two types of Phase Change Materials (PCMs which have been developed and adopted in textiles: heat (energy released and cool (energy absorbed. This paper discusses current PCM applications and explores future applications in firefighting gear. Phase change materials are considered latent heat storage units because as they change phase from solid to liquid, liquid to gas and vice versa, energy in the form of heat is absorbed or released. The goal of PCM textiles is to create reusable energy to maintain body temperature, as well as to optimize the performance of protective wear such as hoods. When the wearer’s body temperature increases or decreases, the PCMs applied to the fabric will change state helping to regulate the wearer’s body temperature by providing warmth or cooling. Maintaining a stable body temperature can improve working conditions and comfort.

  7. Espresso coffee foam delays cooling of the liquid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa, Kaho

    2017-04-01

    Espresso coffee foam, called crema, is known to be a marker of the quality of espresso coffee extraction. However, the role of foam in coffee temperature has not been quantitatively clarified. In this study, we used an automatic machine for espresso coffee extraction. We evaluated whether the foam prepared using the machine was suitable for foam analysis. After extraction, the percentage and consistency of the foam were measured using various techniques, and changes in the foam volume were tracked over time. Our extraction method, therefore, allowed consistent preparation of high-quality foam. We also quantitatively determined that the foam phase slowed cooling of the liquid phase after extraction. High-quality foam plays an important role in delaying the cooling of espresso coffee.

  8. Liouville`s theorem and phase-space cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, R.L. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Sessler, A.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-09-28

    A discussion is presented of Liouville`s theorem and its consequences for conservative dynamical systems. A formal proof of Liouville`s theorem is given. The Boltzmann equation is derived, and the collisionless Boltzmann equation is shown to be rigorously true for a continuous medium. The Fokker-Planck equation is derived. Discussion is given as to when the various equations are applicable and, in particular, under what circumstances phase space cooling may occur.

  9. Applicability Assessment of Phase Transfromation Models of Low Carbon Steel in Laminar Flow Cooling Process%层流冷却过程低碳钢相变模型的适用性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程杰锋; 唐广波; 刘正东

    2011-01-01

    Available austenite phase transformation models of C-Mn steels were collected and compared to investigate their applicability. Five groups of incubation period models (according to Scheil's additivity rule) were used to calculate ferrite transformation start temperature, seven groups of avrami equations were used to describe phase transformation kinetic process, and five groups of grain size models were used to predict ferrite grain size after transformation completion. By use of a developed integrated process modeling system in which thermal, mechanical and metallurgical processes from reheating furnace to coiling of a steel strip had been numerically and successfully coupled together. Phase transformation process was investigated under three different runout table cooling conditions (cooling rate is 10 ℃/s, 20 ℃/s and 40 ℃/s respectively) during hot strip rolling at 2050 HSM of Baosteel Co. Ltd. Applicability of phase transformation models were discussed by comparing the calculated data with experimental data. The results show that models proposed by Kwon are suitable for the incubation period,models of Avrami equations proposed by Liu, Donnay and Sun are suitable for the kinetics of phase transformation, and for the ferrite grain size, models proposed by Hodgson is suitable.%选取了现有典型的C-Mn钢相变过程的物理冶金模型,包括5组孕育期模型、7组相变动力学方程模型、5组相变后铁素体晶粒尺寸模型.利用自行开发的组织性能预报系统软件模拟计算了在3组实际冷却工艺条件下各模型的奥氏体转变过程,并对各模型进行了评价.结果表明,对于所设定的成分和工艺条件,适用性较好的孕育期模型是Kwon所提出的模型;适用性较好的动力学方程模型是Liu、Donnay和Sun所提出的模型;适用性较好的铁索体晶粒尺寸模型是Hodgson所提出的模型.

  10. Contribution to the study of the thermal and hydrodynamical properties of a two-phase natural circulation flow of normal helium (He I) for the cooling of superconducting magnets; Contribution a l'etude des proprietes thermiques et hydrodynamiques d'un ecoulement d'helium normal (He I) diphasique en circulation naturelle pour le refroidissement des aimants supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkheira, L

    2007-06-15

    The method of cooling based on the thermosyphon principle is of great interest because of its simplicity, its passivity and its low cost. It is adopted to cool down to 4,5 K the superconducting magnet of the CMS particles detector of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment under construction at CERN, Geneva. This work studies heat and mass transfer characteristics of two phase He I in a natural circulation loop. The experimental set-up consists of a thermosyphon single branch loop mainly composed of a phase separator, a downward tube, and a test section. The experiments were conducted with varying several parameters such as the diameter of the test section (10 mm or 14 mm) and the applied heat flux up to the appearance of the boiling crisis. These experiments have permitted to determine the laws of evolution of the various parameters characterizing the flow (circulation mass flow rate, vapour mass flow rate, vapour quality, friction coefficient, two phase heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux) as a function of the applied heat flux. On the base of the obtained results, we discuss the validity of the various existing models in the literature. We show that the homogeneous model is the best model to predict the hydrodynamical properties of this type of flow in the vapour quality range 0{<=}x{<=}30%. Moreover, we propose two models for the prediction of the two phase heat transfer coefficient and the density of the critical heat flux. The first one considers that the effects of the forced convection and nucleate boiling act simultaneously and contribute to heat transfer. The second one correlates the measured critical heat flux density with the ratio altitude to diameter. (author)

  11. Cooling of Compact Stars with Color Superconducting Phase in Quark Hadron Mixed Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, Tsuneo; Matsuo, Yasuhide; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Fujimoto, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    We present a new scenario for the cooling of compact stars considering the central source of Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The Cas A observation shows that the central source is a sort of neutron star which has high effective temperature, and it is consistent with the well known standard cooling model. The observation also gives the mass range of $M \\geq 1.5 M_\\odot$, which is inconsistent with current plausible cooling scenario of compact stars. There are some cooled compact stars such as Vela or 3C58, which cannot be explained by the standard cooling processes: we invoke some kinds of exotic cooling processes, where a heavier star cools faster than lighter one. However, the scenario seems to be inconsistent with the observation of Cas A. Therefore, we give a new cooling scenario to explain the observation of Cas A by constructing models, which include a quark color superconducting phase with a large energy gap, which appears at ultrahigh density region and reduces neutrino emissivity. In our model, a compact star h...

  12. Evidence for Rapid Redshift Evolution of Strong Cluster Cooling Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Samuele, R; Vikhlinin, A; Mullis, C R

    2011-01-01

    We present equivalent widths of the [OII] and Ha nebular emission lines for 77 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) selected from the 160 Square Degree $ROSAT$ X-ray survey. We find no [OII] or Ha emission stronger than -15 angstroms or -5 angstroms, respectively, in any BCG. The corresponding emission line luminosities lie below 6E40 erg/s, which is a factor of 30 below that of NGC1275 in the Perseus cluster. A comparison to the detection frequency of nebular emission in BCGs lying at redshifts above z = 0.35 drawn from the Brightest Cluster Survey (Crawford et al. 1999) indicates that we should have detected roughly one dozen emission-line galaxies, assuming the two surveys are selecting similar clusters in the X-ray luminosity range 10E42 erg/s to 10E45 erg/s. The absence of luminous nebular emission (ie., Perseus-like systems) in our sample is consistent with an increase in the number density of {\\it strong} cooling flow (cooling core) clusters between $\\rm z=0.5$ and today. The decline in their numbers at h...

  13. Herschel photometry of brightest cluster galaxies in cooling flow clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Edge, A C; Mittal, R; Allen, S W; Baum, S A; Boehringer, H; Bregman, J N; Bremer, M N; Combes, F; Crawford, C S; Donahue, M; Egami, E; Fabian, A C; Hamer, S L; Hatch, N A; Jaffe, W; Johnstone, R M; McNamara, B R; O'Dea, C P; Popesso, P; Quillen, A C; Salome, P; Sarazin, C L; Voit, G M; Wilman, R J; Wise, M W

    2010-01-01

    The dust destruction timescales in the cores of clusters of galaxies are relatively short given their high central gas densities. However, substantial mid-infrared and sub-mm emission has been detected in many brightest cluster galaxies. In this letter we present Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometry of the brightest cluster galaxy in three strong cooling flow clusters, A1068, A2597 and Zw3146. This photometry indicates that a substantial mass of cold dust is present (>3 x 10^7 Mo) at temperatures significantly lower (20-28K) than previously thought based on limited MIR and/or sub-mm results. The mass and temperature of the dust appear to match those of the cold gas traced by CO with a gas-to-dust ratio of 80-120.

  14. Flow Pattern and Heat Transfer Behavior of Boiling Two—Phase flow in Inclined Pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuDezhang; OuyangNing

    1992-01-01

    Movable Electrical Conducting Probe (MECP),a kind of simple and reliable measuring transducer,used for predicting full-flow-path flow pattern in a boiling vapor/liquid two-phase flow is introduced in this paper when the test pipe is set at different inclination angles,several kinds of flow patterns,such as bubble,slug,churn,intermittent,and annular flows,may be observed in accordance with the locations of MECP.By means of flow pattern analysis,flow fleld numerical calculations have been carried out,and heat transfer coeffcient correlations along full-flow-path derived.The results show that heat transfer performance of boiling two-phase flow could be significanfly augmanted as expected in some flow pattern zones.The results of the investigation,measuring techniques and conclusions contained in this paper would be a useful reference in foundational research for prediction of flow pattern and heat transfer behavior in boiling two-phase flow,as well as for turbine vane liquid-cooling design.

  15. Modeling and energy simulation of the variable refrigerant flow air conditioning system with water-cooled condenser under cooling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yueming; Wu, Jingyi [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics (China); Shiochi, Sumio [Daikin Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    As a new system, variable refrigerant flow system with water-cooled condenser (water-cooled VRF) can offer several interesting characteristics for potential users. However, at present, its dynamic simulation simultaneously in association with building and other equipments is not yet included in the energy simulation programs. Based on the EnergyPlus's codes, and using manufacturer's performance parameters and data, the special simulation module for water-cooled VRF is developed and embedded in the software of EnergyPlus. After modeling and testing the new module, on the basis of a typical office building in Shanghai with water-cooled VRF system, the monthly and seasonal cooling energy consumption and the breakdown of the total power consumption are analyzed. The simulation results show that, during the whole cooling period, the fan-coil plus fresh air (FPFA) system consumes about 20% more power than the water-cooled VRF system does. The power comparison between the water-cooled VRF system and the air-cooled VRF system is performed too. All of these can provide designers some ideas to analyze the energy features of this new system and then to determine a better scheme of the air conditioning system. (author)

  16. Flow visualisation of the external flow from a converging slot-hole film-cooling geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargison, J. E.; Oldfield, M. L. G.; Guo, S. M.; Lock, G. D.; Rawlinson, A. J.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents flow visualisation experiments for a novel film-cooling hole, the converging slot-hole or console for short. Previously published experimental results have demonstrated that the console improved both the heat transfer and the aerodynamic performance of turbine vane and rotor blade cooling systems. Flow visualisation data for a row of consoles were compared with that of cylindrical and fan-shaped holes and a slot at the same inclination angle of 35° to the surface, on a large-scale, flat-plate model at engine-representative Reynolds numbers in a low speed tunnel with ambient temperature mainstream flow. In the first set of experiments, the flow was visualised by using a fine nylon mesh covered with thermochromic liquid crystals, allowing the measurement of gas temperature contours in planes perpendicular to the flow. This data demonstrated that the console film was similar to a slot film, and remained thin and attached to the surface for the coolant-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios of 1.1 to 40 and for a case with no crossflow (infinite momentum flux ratio). A second set of flow visualisation experiments using water/dry-ice fog have confirmed these results and have shown that the flow through all coolant geometries is unsteady.

  17. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development

  18. Experimental validation of the simulation module of the water-cooled variable refrigerant flow system under cooling operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yue Ming; Wu, Jing Yi [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shiochi, Sumio [Daikin Industries, Ltd., 1304 Kanaoka-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai, Osaka 591-8511 (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    On the basis of EnergyPlus's codes, the catalogue and performance parameters from some related companies, a special simulation module for variable refrigerant flow system with a water-cooled condenser (water-cooled VRF) was developed and embedded in the software of EnergyPlus, the building energy simulation program. To evaluate the energy performance of the system and the accuracy of the simulation module, the measurement of the water-cooled VRF is built in Dalian, China. After simulation and comparison, some conclusions can be drawn. The mean of the absolute value of the daily error in the 9 days is 11.3% for cooling capacity while the one for compressor power is 15.7%. At the same time, the accuracy of the power simulation strongly depends on the accuracy of the cooling capacity simulation. (author)

  19. Simulation of Evaporator for Two-phase Flow in the New Plate-fin Desalination Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study a new desalination unit is established. It has four cells such as cooling cell, heating cell, evaporation cell and condensation cell. Seawater is pumped into cooling cell to be preheated and then goes to evaporation cell. In the new desalination unit the evaporation and condensation cell is heated and cooled by the heating and cooling cells respectively. The heating of the evaporation cell is ensured by hot water flowing upward along heating cells. The cooling of the condensation cell is ensured by seawater in cooling cell. Fluent 6.3 is used to simulate gas-liquid two-phase flow of boiling evaporation numerically. A simulation calculation to get fluid in a new desalination unit under the influence of the flow, pressure distribution and heat transfer performance of the evaporator.

  20. Application of a two-phase thermosyphon loop with minichannels and a minipump in computer cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieliński Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop with minichannels and minipump. The one-dimensional separate model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop with minichannels and minipump has been used in calculations. The latest correlations for minichannels available in literature have been applied. This model is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporator, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. A numerical analysis of the mass flux and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been presented.

  1. Improving cooling devices for the hot face of Peltier pellets based on phase change fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarte, J. [Centros Tecnologicos de Navarra, Poligono Industrial Noain, 31009 Navarra (Spain); Blanco, J.M.; Mendia, F. [Depto. Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Universidad del Pais Vasco/EHU, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Pena, F. [Iberdrola Generacion, Bahia de Santurce, 48009 Vizcaya (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    The thermoelectricity has not suffered any important progress for the last twenty years, owed mainly to the low efficiency of the heat sinks, because the Peltier pellet provides a high calorific power across a small surface. In this paper a deep study of the fin cooling for Peltier pellets, has been carried out, by means of both an experimental model and also through computational fluid dynamics. A phase change device called thermosyphon has also been designed and optimized, which allows to uniform the heat flow, decreasing in this way the pellet thermal resistance. The work focuses on its hot face and leaves for another study the cold face optimization. (author)

  2. Mechanical properties of cast A356 alloy, solidified at cooling rates enhanced by phase transition of a cooling medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: zhangly6244@yahoo.com.cn; Zhou, B.D. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhan, Z.J. [R and D Center for Advanced Materials, National University Science Park Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Jia, Y.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shan, S.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, B.Q. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, W.K. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2007-03-15

    Phase transition cooling (PTC), using the absorbed latent heat during the melting of phase transition cooling medium to cool and solidify alloys in the process of casting, is a new fast cooling technology. Specimens of A356 casting aluminum alloy were prepared by this method. For comparison, specimens made by water-cooling copper mould (WCCM) were prepared too. The mechanical properties of A356 alloy made by PTC and WCCM were measured by microhardness and tensile strength testing methods. Microstructures of A356 alloy were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-rays diffraction (XRD). The results show that both microhardness and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of A356 alloy made by PTC method are much higher than those made by WCCM method. This can be attributed to the refined microstructure and the extended solubility of silicon in {alpha}-Al. The solubility of silicon in {alpha}-Al was 2.7 at.% in specimens solidified in phase transition cooling medium and 2.4 at.% in specimens solidified in water-cooling copper mould.

  3. Carbon-based nanostructured surfaces for enhanced phase-change cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj Kousalya, Arun

    To maintain acceptable device temperatures in the new generation of electronic devices under development for high-power applications, conventional liquid cooling schemes will likely be superseded by multi-phase cooling solutions to provide substantial enhancement to the cooling capability. The central theme of the current work is to investigate the two-phase thermal performance of carbon-based nanostructured coatings in passive and pumped liquid-vapor phase-change cooling schemes. Quantification of the critical parameters that influence thermal performance of the carbon nanostructured boiling surfaces presented herein will lead to improved understanding of the underlying evaporative and boiling mechanisms in such surfaces. A flow boiling experimental facility is developed to generate consistent and accurate heat transfer performance curves with degassed and deionized water as the working fluid. New means of boiling heat transfer enhancement by altering surface characteristics such as surface energy and wettability through light-surface interactions is explored in this work. In this regard, carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings are exposed to low-intensity irradiation emitted from a light emitting diode and the subcooled flow boiling performance is compared against a non-irradiated CNT-coated copper surface. A considerable reduction in surface superheat and enhancement in average heat transfer coefficient is observed. In another work involving CNTs, the thermal performance of CNT-integrated sintered wick structures is evaluated in a passively cooled vapor chamber. A physical vapor deposition process is used to coat the CNTs with varying thicknesses of copper to promote surface wetting with the working fluid, water. Thermal performance of the bare sintered copper powder sample and the copper-functionalized CNT-coated sintered copper powder wick samples is compared using an experimental facility that simulates the capillary fluid feeding conditions of a vapor chamber

  4. Cooling of mobile electronic devices using phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, F.L.; Tso, C.P. [Nanyang Technological University (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    2004-02-01

    An experimental study is conducted on the cooling of mobile electronic devices, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and wearable computers, using a heat storage unit (HSU) filled with the phase change material (PCM) of n-eicosane inside the device. The high latent heat of n-eicosane in the HSU absorbs the heat dissipation from the chips and can maintain the chip temperature below the allowable service temperature of 50{sup o}C for 2 h of transient operations of the PDA. The heat dissipation of the chips inside a PDA and the orientation of the HSU are experimentally investigated in this paper. It was found that different orientation of the HSU inside the PDA could affect significantly the temperature distribution. (author)

  5. Research on the Flow-Head Characteristics of the Turbine Driving Fan in Cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yanpin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The flow-head characteristics of the special turbine in cooling tower are very different from the general power turbines’. This study has analyzed the former theoretically and proposed the theoretical formula of the head-flow. At the same time, the paper has studied the characteristics of the flow-head using the CFD method. The tests results have proved the principle of the flow-head of the turbine in cooling tower.

  6. Large eddy simulations of turbulent flows on graphics processing units: Application to film-cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Aaron F.

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can be very computationally expensive, especially for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent ows. In LES the large, energy containing eddies are resolved by the computational mesh, but the smaller (sub-grid) scales are modeled. In DNS, all scales of turbulence are resolved, including the smallest dissipative (Kolmogorov) scales. Clusters of CPUs have been the standard approach for such simulations, but an emerging approach is the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which deliver impressive computing performance compared to CPUs. Recently there has been great interest in the scientific computing community to use GPUs for general-purpose computation (such as the numerical solution of PDEs) rather than graphics rendering. To explore the use of GPUs for CFD simulations, an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver was developed for a GPU. This solver is capable of simulating unsteady laminar flows or performing a LES or DNS of turbulent ows. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved via a fractional-step method and are spatially discretized using the finite volume method on a Cartesian mesh. An immersed boundary method based on a ghost cell treatment was developed to handle flow past complex geometries. The implementation of these numerical methods had to suit the architecture of the GPU, which is designed for massive multithreading. The details of this implementation will be described, along with strategies for performance optimization. Validation of the GPU-based solver was performed for fundamental bench-mark problems, and a performance assessment indicated that the solver was over an order-of-magnitude faster compared to a CPU. The GPU-based Navier-Stokes solver was used to study film-cooling flows via Large Eddy Simulation. In modern gas turbine engines, the film-cooling method is used to protect turbine blades from hot combustion gases. Therefore, understanding the physics of

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF SINGLE-PHASED WATER-COOLING RADIATOR FOR COMPUTER CHIP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Ping; CHENG Guangming; LIU Jiulong; YANG Zhigang; SUN Xiaofeng; PENG Taijiang

    2007-01-01

    In order to cool computer chip efficiently with the least noise, a single phase water-cooling radiator for computer chip driven by piezoelectric pump with two parallel-connection chambers is developed. The structure and work principle of this radiator is described. Material, processing method and design principles of whole radiator are also explained. Finite element analysis (FEA) software,ANSYS, is used to simulate the heat distribution in the radiator. Testing equipments for water-cooling radiator are also listed. By experimental tests, influences of flowrate inside the cooling system and fan on chip cooling are explicated. This water-cooling radiator is proved more efficient than current air-cooling radiator with comparison experiments. During cooling the heater which simulates the working of computer chip with different power, the water-cooling radiator needs shorter time to reach lower steady temperatures than current air-cooling radiator.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR FLOW FIELD AND FILM COOLING EFFECTIVENESS IN FILM-COOLED TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulation of three-dimensional flow field and film cooling effectiveness in film-cooled turbine rotor and stationary turbine cascade were carried out by using the κ-ε turbulence model, and the predictions of the three-dimensional velocities were compared with the measured results by Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Results reveal the secondary flow near the blade surface in the wake region behind the jet hole. Compared with the stationary cascade, there are the centrifugal force and Coriolis force existing in the flow field of the turbine rotor, and these forces make the three-dimensional flow field change in the turbine rotor, especially for the radial velocity. The effect of rotation on the flow field and the film cooling effectiveness on the pressure side is more apparent than that on the suction side as is shown in the computational and measured results, and the low film cooling effectiveness appears on the pressure surface of the turbine rotor blade compared with that of the stationary cascade.

  9. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  10. A Massive, Cooling-Flow-Induced Starburst in the Core of a Highly Luminous Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; Benson, B A; Foley, R J; Ruel, J; Sullivan, P; Veilleux, S; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bazin, G; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Egami, E; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lieu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Rawle, T D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Rex, M; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Simcoe, R; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Suhada, R; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-01-01

    In the cores of some galaxy clusters the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous "cooling flows" of gas sinking towards the cluster center, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star formation rates and cool gas masses for these "cool core" clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by astrophysical feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical, and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (L_2-10 keV = 8.2 x 10^45 erg/s) galaxy cluster which hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (dM/dt = 3820 +/- 530 Msun/yr). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (740 +/- 160 Msun/yr), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool core clusters may not yet be fully establishe...

  11. Flow Patterns and Thermal Drag in a One-Dimensional Inviscid Channel with Heating or Cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    In this paper investigations on the flow patterns and the thermal drag phenomenon in one -dimensional inviscid channel flow with heating or cooling are described and discussed:expressions of flow rate ratio and thermal drag coefficient for different flow patterns and its physical mechanism are presented.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Film Cooling in Supersonic Flow in Hypersonic Inlet with Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silong Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic film cooling is an efficient method to cool the engine with extremely high heat load. In order to study supersonic film cooling in a real advanced engine, a two-dimensional model of the hypersonic inlet in a scramjet engine with supersonic film cooling in the isolator is built and validated through experimental data. The simulation results show that the cooling effect under different coolant injection angles does not show clear differences; a small injection angle can ensure both the cooling effect and good aerodynamic performances (e.g., flow coefficient of the hypersonic inlet. Under selected coolant injection angle and inlet Mach number, the cooling efficiency increases along with the injection Mach number of the coolant flow, only causing a little total pressure loss in the isolator. Along with the increase of the inlet Mach number of the hypersonic inlet, the cooling efficiency does not present a monotonic change because of the complex shock waves. However, the wall temperature shows a monotonic increase when the inlet Mach number increases. The mass flow rate of coolant flow should be increased to cool the engine more efficiently according to the mass flow rate of the main stream when the inlet Mach number increases.

  13. Investigation of structure of superconducting power transmission cables with LN2 counter-flow cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Mitsuho; Fuchino, Shuichiro; Higuchi, Noboru

    2003-04-01

    Establishment of long-distance cooling techniques and design of a compact cross section are required for development of HTC superconducting underground power cables. To save space of return coolant, a counter-flow cooling system appears promising. However, it is difficult to cool down long cables because of heat exchange between counter-flows due to high thermal conductivity of dielectric materials which separate both flows in range of liquid nitrogen temperature. We estimated temperature distributions analytically along model HTS power cables with counter-flow. Results of calculation showed that when liquid-nitrogen-impregnated polypropylene laminated paper was chosen for a dielectric material, great thickness was required to reduce heat exchange between counter-flows. We investigated various cable structures to optimize the counter-flow cooling system and cable size.

  14. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  15. Two-phase flow in refrigeration systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Junjie; Gan, Zhongxue

    2013-01-01

    Two-Phase Flow in Refrigeration Systems presents recent developments from the authors' extensive research programs on two-phase flow in refrigeration systems. This book covers advanced mass and heat transfer and vapor compression refrigeration systems and shows how the performance of an automotive air-conditioning system is affected through results obtained experimentally and theoretically, specifically with consideration of two-phase flow and oil concentration. The book is ideal for university postgraduate students as a textbook, researchers and professors as an academic reference book, and b

  16. Do Cluster Cooling Flows Survive Head-on Galaxy Cluster Mergers?

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, P L; Roettiger, K; Burns, J O

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of recent numerical simulations of the head-on merger of a cooling flow cluster with an infalling subcluster of galaxies. These simulations examined the effects of different types of cluster mergers (with 16:1 and 4:1 mass ratios) on the evolution of cluster cooling flows (mass accretion rates of 100 and 400 M/year. The 2-dimensional simulations were performed with a Hydro/N-body code on a uniform grid with a resolution of 20 kpc. We find that the ram-pressure of the infalling gas is crucial in determining the fate of the cooling flow as disruption occurs when a substantial amount of subcluster gas reaches the primary's core. In such cases, the subcluster gas can increase the central cooling time by displacing the high-density cooling gas and by heating it via shocks and turbulent gas motions. Moreover, the fate of a merging cooling flow is also dependent on its initial cooling time. In cases where the initial cooling time is very small then, even if the flow is disrupted, the central co...

  17. Cooling flow bulk motion corrections to the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, P M; Puy, D; Jetzer, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We study the influence of converging cooling flow bulk motions on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. To that purpose we derive a modified Kompaneets equation which takes into account the contribution of the accelerated electron media of the cooling flow inside the cluster frame. The additional term is different from the usual kinematic SZ-effect, which depends linearly on the velocity, whereas the contribution described here is quadratic in the macroscopic electron fluid velocity, as measured in the cluster frame. For clusters with a large cooling flow mass deposition rate and/or a small central electron density, it turns out that this effect becomes relevant.

  18. Energy and exergy analysis of counter flow wet cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Mani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling tower is an open system direct contact heat exchanger, where it cools water by both convection and evaporation. In this paper, a mathematical model based on heat and mass transfer principle is developed to find the outlet condition of water and air. The model is solved using iterative method. Energy and exergy analysis infers that inlet air wet bulb temperature is found to be the most important parameter than inlet water temperature and also variation in dead state properties does not affect the performance of wet cooling tower. .

  19. Microgravity two-phase flow regime modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.; Best, F.R.; Faget, N.

    1987-01-01

    A flow pattern or flow regime is the characteristics spatial distribution of the phases of fluid in a duct. Since heat transfer and pressure drop are dependent on the characteristic distribution of the phases, it is necessary to describe flow patterns in an appropriate manner so that a hydrodynamic or heat transfer theory applicable to that pattern can be chosen. The objective of the present analysis is to create a flow regime map based on physical modeling of vapor/liquid interaction phenomena in a microgravity environment. In the present work, four basic flow patterns are defined: dispersed flow, stratified flow, slug flow, and annular flow. Fluid properties, liquid and vapor flow rates, and pipe size were chosen as the principal parameters. It is assumed that a transition from one flow pattern to another will occur when there is a change in the dominant force which controls that flow pattern. The forces considered in this modeling are surface tension force, both force, inertial force, friction, and turbulent fluctuations.

  20. Two-phase flow studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kestin, J.; Maeder, P.F.

    1980-08-01

    Progress on the following is reported: literature survey, design of two-phase flow testing facility, design of nozzle loop, thermophysical properties, design manual, and advanced energy conversion systems. (MHR)

  1. Model Algorithm Research on Cooling Path Control of Hot-rolled Dual-phase Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-qing XU; Xiao-dong HAO; Shi-guang ZHOU; Chang-sheng LIU; Qi-fu ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    With the development of advanced high strength steel,especially for dual-phase steel,the model algorithm for cooling control after hot rolling has to achieve the targeted coiling temperature control at the location of downcoiler whilst maintaining the cooling path control based on strip microstructure along the whole cooling section.A cooling path control algorithm was proposed for the laminar cooling process as a solution to practical difficulties associated with the realization of the thermal cycle during cooling process.The heat conduction equation coupled with the carbon diffusion equation with moving boundary was employed in order to simulate temperature change and phase transfor-mation kinetics,making it possible to observe the temperature field and the phase fraction of the strip in real time. On this basis,an optimization method was utilized for valve settings to ensure the minimum deviations between the predicted and actual cooling path of the strip,taking into account the constraints of the cooling equipment′s specific capacity,cooling line length,etc.Results showed that the model algorithm was able to achieve the online cooling path control for dual-phase steel.

  2. Investigating Cooling Rates of a Controlled Lava Flow using Infrared Imaging and Three Heat Diffusion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlow, S.; Lev, E.; Zappa, C. J.; Karson, J.; Wysocki, B.

    2011-12-01

    Observation and investigation of surface cooling rates of active lava flows can help constrain thermal parameters necessary for creating of more precise lava flow models. To understand how the lava cools, temperature data was collected using an infrared video camera. We explored three models of the release of heat from lava stream; one based on heat conduction, another based on crust thickness and radiation, and a third model based on radiative cooling and variable crust thickness. The lava flow, part of the Syracuse University Lava Project (http://lavaproject.syr.edu), was made by pouring molten basalt at 1300 Celsius from a furnace into a narrow trench of sand. Hanging roughly 2 m over the trench, the infrared camera, records the lava's surface temperature for the duration of the flow. We determine the average surface temperature of the lava flow at a fixed location downstream as the mean of the lateral cross section of each frame of the IR imagery. From the recorded IR frames, we calculate the mean cross-channel temperature for each downstream distance. We then examine how this mean temperature evolves over time, and plot cooling curves for selected down-stream positions. We then compared the observed cooling behavior to that predicted by three cooling models: a conductive cooling model, a radiative cooling model with constant crust thickness, and a radiative cooling model with variable crust thickness. All three models are solutions to the one-dimensional heat equation. To create the best fit for the conductive model, we constrained thermal diffusivity and to create the best fit for the radiative model, we constrained crust thickness. From the comparison of our data to the models we can conclude that the lava flow's cooling is primarily driven by radiation.

  3. Development of a Single-Phase Thermosiphon for Cold Collection and Storage of Radiative Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ronggui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhao, Dongliang [University of Colorado; Martini, Christine Elizabeth [University of Colorado; Jiang, Siyu [University of Colorado; Ma, Yaoguang [University of Colorado; Zhai, Yao [University of Colorado; Tan, Gang [University of Wyoming; Yin, Xiaobo [University of Colorado

    2017-09-19

    A single-phase thermosiphon is developed for cold collection and storage of radiative cooling. Compared to the conventional nocturnal radiative cooling systems that use an electric pump to drive the heat transfer fluid, the proposed single-phase thermosiphon uses the buoyancy force to drive heat transfer fluid. This solution does not require electricity, therefore improving the net gain of the radiative cooling system. A single-phase thermosiphon was built, which consists of a flat panel, a cold collection tank, a water return tube, and a water distribution tank. Considering that outdoor radiative cooling flux is constantly changing (i.e. uncontrollable), an indoor testing facility was developed to provide a controllable cooling flux (comparable to a radiative cooling flux of 100 W/m2) for the evaluation of thermosiphon performance. The testing apparatus is a chilled aluminum flat plate that has a controlled air gap separation relative to the flat panel surface of the thermosiphon to emulate radiative cooling. With an average of 105 W/m2 cooling flux, the 18 liters of water in the thermosiphon was cooled to an average temperature of 12.5 degrees C from an initial temperature of 22.2 degrees C in 2 h, with a cold collection efficiency of 96.8%. The results obtained have demonstrated the feasibility of using a single-phase thermosiphon for cold collection and storage of radiative cooling. Additionally, the effects of the thermosiphon operation conditions, such as tilt angle of the flat panel, initial water temperature, and cooling energy flux, on the performance have been experimentally investigated. Modular design of the single-phase thermosiphon gives flexibility for its scalability. A radiative cooling system with multiple thermosiphon modules is expected to play an important role in cooling buildings and power plant condensers.

  4. X-RAY EMITTING FILAMENTS IN THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER-A2029

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARAZIN, CL; OCONNELL, RW; MCNAMARA, BR

    1992-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray observations of the cluster A2029 with the ROSAT HRI which confirm the presence of a cooling flow, despite the lack of optical line emission or evidence for recent star formation. The cooling rate and radius are M(c) almost-equal-to 370 M. yr-1 and r(c) almost-equal-

  5. SENSITIVE LIMITS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT OF CLUSTER COOLING FLOWS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MCNAMARA, BR; JAFFE, W

    1994-01-01

    We have searched for molecular gas toward six cluster cooling flows in the CO(2-1) line using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The sample includes clusters with estimated total cooling rates Of m(CF) approximately 10-600M. yr-1, at redshifts between z approximately 0.01-0.06. None were detected ei

  6. Closed-cycle gas flow system for cooling of high Tc d.c. SQUID magnetometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den P.J.; Holland, H.J.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Rogalla, H.

    1995-01-01

    A high Tc.d.c SQUID based magnetometer for magnetocardiography is currently under development at the University of Twente. Since such a magnetometer should be simple to use, the cooling of the system can be realized most practically by means of a cryocooler. A closed-cycle gas flow cooling system in

  7. X-RAY EMITTING FILAMENTS IN THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER-A2029

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARAZIN, CL; OCONNELL, RW; MCNAMARA, BR

    1992-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray observations of the cluster A2029 with the ROSAT HRI which confirm the presence of a cooling flow, despite the lack of optical line emission or evidence for recent star formation. The cooling rate and radius are M(c) almost-equal-to 370 M. yr-1 and r(c) almost-equal-

  8. Core flows and heat transfer induced by inhomogeneous cooling with sub- and supercritical convection

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Wieland; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The amount and spatial pattern of heat extracted from cores of terrestrial planets is ultimately controlled by the thermal structure of the lower rocky mantle. Using the most common model to tackle this problem, a rapidly rotating and differentially cooled spherical shell containing an incompressible and viscous liquid is numerically investigated. To gain the physical basics, we consider a simple, equatorial symmetric perturbation of the CMB heat flux shaped as a spherical harmonic $Y_{11}$. The thermodynamic properties of the induced flows mainly depend on the degree of nonlinearity parametrised by a horizontal Rayleigh number $Ra_h=q^\\ast Ra$, where $q^\\ast$ is the relative CMB heat flux anomaly amplitude and $Ra$ is the Rayleigh number which controls radial buoyancy-driven convection. Depending on $Ra_h$ we characterise three flow regimes through their spatial patterns, heat transport and flow speed scalings: in the linear conductive regime the radial inward flow is found to be phase shifted $90^\\circ$ eas...

  9. An ALE Finite Element Approach for Two-Phase Flow with Phase Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Erik; Anjos, Gustavo; Thome, John; Ltcm Team; Gesar Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, two-phase flow with phase change is investigated through the Finite Element Method (FEM) in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework. The equations are discretized on an unstructured mesh where the interface between the phases is explicitly defined as a sub-set of the mesh. The two-phase interface position is described by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The methodology proposed for computing the curvature leads to very accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational costs. Such a methodology can be employed to study accurately many two-phase flow and heat transfer problems in industry such as oil extraction and refinement, design of refrigeration systems, modelling of microfluidic and biological systems and efficient cooling of electronics for computational purposes. The latter is the principal aim of the present research. The numerical results are discussed and compared to analytical solutions and reference results, thereby revealing the capability of the proposed methodology as a platform for the study of two-phase flow with phase change.

  10. Two-Phase Cavitating Flow in Turbomachines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor I. Bernad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cavitating flows are notoriously complex because they are highly turbulent and unsteady flows involving two species (liquid/vapor with a large density difference. These features pose a unique challenge to numerical modeling works. The study briefly reviews the methodology curently employed for industrial cavitating flow simulations using the two-phase mixture model. The two-phase mixture model is evaluated and validated using benchmark problem where experimental data are available. A 3D cavitating flow computation is performed for the GAMM Francis runner. The model is able to qualitatively predict the location and extent of the 3D cavity on the blade, but further investigation are needed to quatitatively assess the accuracy for real turbomachinery cavitating flows.

  11. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O.; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-01

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  12. Influence of thermal flow field of cooling tower on recirculation ratio of a direct air-cooled system for a power plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Wanli; Liu Peiqing

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal flow field of direct air-cooled system,the hot water was supplied to the model of direct air-cooled condenser(ACC).The particle image velocimetery(PIV)experiments were carried out to get thermal flow field of a ACC under different conditions in low velocity wind tunnel,at the same time,the recirculation ratio at cooling tower was measured,so the relationship between flow field characteristics and recirculation ratio of cooling tower can be discussed.From the results we can see that the flow field configuration around cooling tower has great effects on average recirculation ratio under cooling tower.The eddy formed around cooling tower is a key reason that recireulation pro-duces.The eddy intensity relates to velocity magnitude and direction angle,and the configuration of eddy lies on the ge-ometry size of cooling tower.So changing the flow field configuration around cooling tower reasonably can decrease recir-culation ratio under cooling tower,and heat dispel effect of ACC can also be improved.

  13. Hot Bubbles from Active Galactic Nuclei as a Heat Source in Cooling Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M; Brueggen, Marcus; Kaiser, Christian R.

    2002-01-01

    The hot plasma permeating clusters of galaxies often shows a central peak in the X-ray surface brightness that is coincident with a drop in entropy. This is taken as evidence for a cooling flow where the radiative cooling in the central regions of a cluster causes a slow subsonic inflow. Searches in all wavebands have revealed significantly less cool gas than predicted indicating that the mass deposition rate of cooling flows is much lower than expected. However, most cooling flow clusters host an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) at their centres. AGN can inflate large bubbles of hot plasma that subsequently rise through the cluster atmosphere, thus stirring this gas. Here we report on the results from highly resolved hydrodynamic simulations which for the first time show that buoyant bubbles increase the cooling time in the inner cluster regions and thereby significantly reduce the deposition of cold gas. This work demonstrates that the action of AGN in the centres of cooling flow clusters can explain the obser...

  14. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.K.; Bendle, J.A.P.; Bohaty, S.M.; Pross, J.; Schouten, S.; Tauxe, L.; Stickley, C.E.; McKay, R.M.; Röhl, U.; Olney, M.; Sluijs, A.; Escutia, C.; Brinkhuis, H.; Expedition 318 Scientists

    2013-01-01

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52-50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica

  15. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.K.; Bendle, J.A.P.; Bohaty, S.M.; Pross, J.; Schouten, S.; Tauxe, L.; Stickley, C.E.; McKay, R.M.; Röhl, U.; Olney, M.; Sluijs, A.; Escutia, C.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52–50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of

  16. Thermal modeling in an engine cooling system to control coolant flow for fuel consumption improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangki; Woo, Seungchul; Kim, Minho; Lee, Kihyung

    2016-09-01

    The design and evaluation of engine cooling and lubrication systems is generally based on real vehicle tests. Our goal here was to establish an engine heat balance model based on mathematical and interpretive analysis of each element of a passenger diesel engine cooling system using a 1-D numerical model. The purpose of this model is to determine ways of optimizing the cooling and lubrication components of an engine and then to apply these methods to actual cooling and lubrication systems of engines that will be developed in the future. Our model was operated under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) mode conditions, which represent the fuel economy evaluation mode in Europe. The flow rate of the cooling system was controlled using a control valve. Our results showed that the fuel efficiency was improved by as much as 1.23 %, cooling loss by 1.35 %, and friction loss by 2.21 % throughout NEDC modes by modification of control conditions.

  17. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  18. Steady state cooling flow models with gas loss for normal elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Craig L.; Ashe, Gregory A.

    1989-01-01

    A grid of cooling flow models for the hot gas in normal elliptical galaxies is calculated, including the loss of gas due to inhomogeneous cooling. The loss process is modeled as a distributed sink for the gas with the rate of loss being proportional to the local cooling rate. The cooling flow models with gas loss have smaller sonic radii, smaller inflow rates in their central regions, lower densities, and higher temperatures than homogeneous models. The reduction in the amount of hot gas flowing into the center of the models brings the models into much better agreement with the observed X-ray surface brightness profiles of elliptical galaxies. However, there is a large dispersion in the observed X-ray luminosities of ellipticals, and this cannot be explained by variations in the efficiency of gas loss. The gas-loss models have X-ray surface brightness profiles which are much less centrally peaked than the no-gas-loss models.

  19. On the Formation of Cool, Non-Flowing Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, J O; Norman, M L; Bryan, G L

    2003-01-01

    We present a new model for the creation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters within a LambdaCDM cosmological framework using the results from high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh hydro/N-body simulations. It is proposed that cores of cool gas first form in subclusters and these subclusters merge to create rich clusters with cool, central X-Ray excesses. The rich cool clusters do not possess ``cooling flows'' due to the presence of bulk velocities in the intracluster medium in excess of 1000 km/sec produced by on-going accretion of gas from supercluster filaments. This new model has several attractive features including the presence of substantial core substructure within the cool cores, and it predicts the appearance of cool bullets, cool fronts, and cool filaments all of which have been recently observed with X-Ray satellites. This hierarchical formation model is also consistent with the observation that cool cores in Abell clusters occur preferentially in dense supercluster environments. On the other ...

  20. Counter flow induced draft cooling tower option for supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidaparti, Sandeep R., E-mail: sandeep.pidaparti@gmail.com [Georgia Institute of Technology, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ranjan, Devesh, E-mail: devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A code was developed to investigate the various aspects of using cooling tower for S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles. • Cooling tower option to reject heat is quantitatively compared to the direct water cooling and dry air cooling options. • Optimum water conditions resulting in minimal plant capital cost per unit power consumption are calculated. - Abstract: A simplified qualitative analysis was performed to investigate the possibility of using counter flow induced draft cooling tower option to reject heat from the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for advanced fast reactor (AFR)-100 and advanced burner reactor (ABR)-1000 plants. A code was developed to estimate the tower dimensions, power and water consumption, and to perform economic analysis. The code developed was verified against a vendor provided quotation and is used to understand the effect of ambient air and water conditions on the design of cooling tower. The calculations indicated that there exists optimum water conditions for given ambient air conditions which will result in minimum power consumption, thereby increasing the cycle efficiency. A cost-based optimization technique is used to estimate the optimum water conditions which will improve the overall plant economics. A comparison of different cooling options for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle indicated that the cooling tower option is a much more practical and economical option compared to the dry air cooling or direct water cooling options.

  1. Measurements of Flow Mixing at Subchannels in a Wire-Wrapped 61-Rod Bundle for a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Hyungmo; Ko, Yung Joo; Choi, Hae Seob; Euh, Dong-Jin; Jeong, Ji-Young; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    For a safety analysis in a core thermal design of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), flow mixing characteristics at subchannels in a wire-wrapped rod bundle are crucial factor for the design code verification and validation. Wrapped wires make a cross flow in a circumference of the fuel rod, and this effect lets flow be mixed. Therefore the sub-channel analysis method is commonly used for thermal hydraulic analysis of a SFR, a wire wrapped sub-channel type. To measure flow mixing characteristics, a wire mesh sensing technique can be useful method. A wire mesh sensor has been traditionally used to measure the void fraction of a two-phase flow field, i.e. gas and liquid. However, the recent reports that the wire mesh sensor can be used successfully to recognize the flow field in liquid phase by injecting a tracing liquid with a different level of electric conductivity. The subchannel flow characteristics analysis method is commonly used for the thermal hydraulic analysis of a SFR, a wire wrapped subchannel type. In this study, mixing experiments were conducted successfully at a hexagonally arrayed 61-pin wire-wrapped fuel rod bundle test section. Wire mesh sensor was used to measure flow mixing characteristics. The developed post-processing method has its own merits, and flow mixing results were reasonable.

  2. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow of Nanofluids in Laminar Radial Flow Cooling Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gilles ROY; Samy Joseph PALM; Cong Tam NGUYEN

    2005-01-01

    Nanofluids are considered as interesting alternatives to conventional coolants. It is well known that traditional fluids have limited heat transfer capabilities when compared to common metals. It is therefore quite conceivable that a small amount of extremely fine metallic particles placed in suspension in traditional fluids will considerably increase their heat transfer performances. A numerical investigation into the heat transfer enhancement capabilities of coolants with suspended metallic nanoparticles inside a radial, laminar flow cooling configuration is presented. Temperature dependant nanofluid properties are evaluated from experimental data available in recent literature. Results indicate that considerable heat transfer increases are possible with the use of relatively small volume fractions of nanoparticles. Generally, however, these are accompanied by considerable increases in wall shear-stress. Results also show that predictions obtained with temperature variable nanofluid properties yield greater heat transfer capabilities and lower wall shear stresses when compared to predictions using constant properties.

  3. Numerical Simulation for Effect of Inlet Cooling Rate on Fluid Flow and Temperature Distribution in Tundish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Tian-peng; LIU Cheng-jun; JIANG Mao-fa

    2012-01-01

    The fluid flow in tundish is a non-isothermal process and the temperature variation of stream from teeming ladle dominates the fluid flow and thermal distribution in tundish. A numerical model was established to investigate the effect of inlet cooling rate on fluid flow and temperature distribution in tundish based on a FTSC (Flexible Thin Slab Casting) tundish. The inlet cooling rate varies from 0. 5 to 0. 25 ~C/rain. Under the present calculation conditions, the following conclusions were made. When the stream temperature from teeming ladle drops seriously (for inlet cooling rate of 0.5℃/min), there is a "backward flow" at the coming end of casting. The horizontal flow along the free surface turns to flow along the bottom of tundish. The bottom flow shortens the fluid flow route in tundish and deteriorates the removal effect of nonmetallic inclusions from molten steel. Nevertheless, when the inlet cooling rate decreases to 0.25℃/min, the horizontal flow is sustained during the whole casting period. The present research provides theoretical directions for temperature control in teeming ladle and continuous casting tundish during production of advanced steels.

  4. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetian, Emil [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux. (note)

  5. Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  6. Flooding in counter-current two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragland, W.A.; Ganic, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Flooding is a phenomenon which is best described as the transition from counter-current to co-current flow. Early notice was taken of this phenomenon in the chemical engineering industry. Flooding also plays an important role in the field of two-phase heat transfer since it is a limit for many systems involving counter-current flow. Practical applications of flooding limited processes include wickless thermosyphons and the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) of pressurized water nuclear reactors. The phenomenon of flooding also is involved in the behavior of nuclear reactor core materials during severe accident conditions where flooding is one of the mechanisms governing the motion of the molten fuel pin cladding.

  7. Film Cooling Optimization Using Numerical Computation of the Compressible Viscous Flow Equations and Simplex Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Elsayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling is vital to gas turbine blades to protect them from high temperatures and hence high thermal stresses. In the current work, optimization of film cooling parameters on a flat plate is investigated numerically. The effect of film cooling parameters such as inlet velocity direction, lateral and forward diffusion angles, blowing ratio, and streamwise angle on the cooling effectiveness is studied, and optimum cooling parameters are selected. The numerical simulation of the coolant flow through flat plate hole system is carried out using the “CFDRC package” coupled with the optimization algorithm “simplex” to maximize overall film cooling effectiveness. Unstructured finite volume technique is used to solve the steady, three-dimensional and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The results are compared with the published numerical and experimental data of a cylindrically round-simple hole, and the results show good agreement. In addition, the results indicate that the average overall film cooling effectiveness is enhanced by decreasing the streamwise angle for high blowing ratio and by increasing the lateral and forward diffusion angles. Optimum geometry of the cooling hole on a flat plate is determined. In addition, numerical simulations of film cooling on actual turbine blade are performed using the flat plate optimal hole geometry.

  8. A brief review on mixed convection heat transfer in channel flow with vortex generator for electronic chip cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mandal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to increase processor speeds, 3D IC architecture is being aggressively pursued by researchers and chip manufacturers. This architecture allows extremely high level of integration with enhanced electrical performance and expanded functionality, and facilitates realization of VLSI and ULSI technologies. However, utilizing the third dimension to provide additional device layers poses thermal challenges due to the increased heat dissipation and complex electrical interconnects among different layers. The conflicting needs of the cooling system requiring larger flow passage dimensions to limit the pressure drop, and the IC architecture necessitating short interconnect distances to reduce signal latency warrant paradigm shifts in both of their design approach. Additional considerations include the effects due to temperature non-uniformity, localized hot spots, complex fluidic connections, and mechanical design. This paper reviews the advances in electronic chip cooling in the last decade and provides a vision for code signing integrated cooling systems. For various heat fluxes on each side of a chip acting as discrete heat source, the current single-phase cooling technology is projected to provide adequate cooling, albeit with high pressure drops. Effectively mitigating the high temperatures surrounding local hot spots remains a challenging issue. Various forms of tabulators above the chips, different geometric arrangements of the chips positioned top and bottom wall of the duct serves very well in the heat augmentation technique with better performance

  9. Effect of wall thickness and helium cooling channels on duct magnetohydrodynamic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qingyun; Feng, Jingchao; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • MHD flows in ducts of different wall thickness compared with wall uniform. • Study of velocity, pressure distribution in ducts MHD flows with single pass of helium cooling channels. • Comparison of three types of dual helium cooling channels and acquisition of an option for minimum pressure drop. • A single short duct MHD flow in blanket without FCI has been simulated for pressure gradient analysis. - Abstract: The concept of dual coolant liquid metal (LM) blanket has been proposed in different countries to demonstrate the technical feasibility of DEMO reactor. In the system, helium gas and PbLi eutectic, separated by structure grid, are used to cool main structure materials and to be self-cooled, respectively. The non-uniform wall thickness of structure materials gives rise to wall non-homogeneous conductance ratio. It will lead to electric current distribution changes, resulting in significant changes in the velocity distribution and pressure drop of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. In order to investigate the effect of helium channels on MHD flows, different methods of numerical simulations cases are carried out including the cases of different wall thicknesses, single pass of helium cooling channels, and three types of dual helium cooling channels. The results showed that helium tubes are able to affect the velocity distribution in the boundary layer by forming wave sharp which transfers from Hartmann boundary layer to the core area. In addition, the potential profile and pressure drop in the cases have been compared to these in the case of walls without cooling channel, and the pressure gradient of a simplified single short duct MHD flow in blanket shows small waver along the central axis in the helium channel position.

  10. Phased arrays: inline flow line hub inspection using phased arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, J.G.P.; Chougrani, K.; Rundberg, H.; Oldenziel, G.; Deleye, X.; Martina, Q.

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of the inspection of flow line hubs using the phased array technique was investigated to determine the surface area of the seal area degraded by corrosion. A clean model of the hub was simulated to gain insight into the geometrical echoes and to determine the area covered by the ultr

  11. Two-phase Flow Patterns in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller / Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kanuma, Hitoshi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko; Takeishi, Masayuki

    There is a lack of information about vapor-liquid two-phase flow patterns determined using void signals in high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. Sensing void fraction has been hampered because lithium bromide aqueous solution of strong alkalinity is employed as working fluid at high temperature and high level of vacuum. New void sensor applicable to such difficult conditions was developed. The void Fractions at 48 locations in a high temperature generator were measured simultaneously in both cooling and heating operations. Analysis of void signals detected reveals that the most violent boiling occurs at the upper part of rear plate of combustion chamber and the first line of vertical tubes located in the flue. The flow patterns are strongly affected by the system pressure difference between the cooling and heating operations: there appear bubbly, slug and froth flows in the cooling operation, but only bubbly flow in the heating operation.

  12. In situ thermal characterization of cooling/crystallizing lavas during rheology measurements and implications for lava flow emplacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Giordano, D.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Transport properties of natural silicate melts at super-liquidus temperatures are reasonably well understood. However, migration and transport of silicate melts in the Earth's crust and at its surface generally occur at sub-liquidus temperatures and in settings where the melts undergo crystallization under various cooling and/or decompression conditions. In such dynamic situations the occurrence of processes such as the release of latent heat during phase changes, viscous heating, thermal advection and -inertia, and changing heat capacity, all represent potential influences on the state, and thereby on the physico-chemical behavior of the system. To date, rheological data at sub-liquidus temperatures are scarce and cooling-rate dependent, disequilibrium rheological data are virtually absent. In fact, no in situ thermal characterization of liquid or multiphase mixtures during rheological experiments, under either static or dynamic thermal conditions has been presented to date. Here we describe a new experimental setup for in situ thermal characterization of cooling/crystallizing lavas during viscosity measurement at temperatures up to 1600 °C. We use this device to recover in situ, real-time, observations of the combined rheological and thermal evolution of natural, re-melted lava samples during the transient disequilibrium conditions characteristic of lava flows and shallow crustal magma migration and storage systems in nature. We present the calibration procedure and the method employed to recover the thermal evolution of an experimental sample during flow in varying shear regimes, assess the experimental uncertainty and show the ability of the apparatus to measure the release of latent heat of crystallization during transient rheological experiments. We further report the results from a first experimental study on the rheological and thermal evolution of a basaltic lava undergoing continuous cooling at a series of different cooling rates and discuss the

  13. Experimental investigation of single-phase microjet cooling of microelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusowicz Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of electronics, which aims to improve the functionality of electronic devices, aims at increasing the packing of transistors in a chip and boosting clock speed (the number of elementary operations per second. While pursuing this objective, one encounters the growing problem of thermal nature. Each switching of the logic state at the elementary level of an integrated circuit is associated with the generation of heat. Due to a large number of transistors and high clock speeds, higher heat flux is emitted by the microprocessor to a level where the component needs to be intensively cooled, or otherwise it will become overheated. This paper presents the cooling of microelectronic components using microjets.

  14. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  15. Pressure Effects on Solid State Phase Transformation of Aluminium Bronze in Cooling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-Yan; CHEN Yan; LIU Yu-Wen; LI Fei; LIU Jian-Hua; PENG Gui-Rong; WANG Wen-Kui

    2009-01-01

    Effects of high pressure (6 GPa) on the solid state phase transformation kinetic parameters of aluminum bronze during the cooling process are investigated, based on the measurement and calculation of its solid state phase transformation temperature, duration and activation energy and the observation of its microstructures. The results show that high pressure treatment can reduce the solid phase transformation temperature and activation energy in the cooling process and can shorten the phase transformation duration, which is favorable when forming fine-grained aluminum bronze.

  16. Two-Phase Quality/Flow Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Werlink, Rudy J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A quality and/or flow meter employs a capacitance probe assembly for measuring the dielectric constant of flow stream, particularly a two-phase flow stream including liquid and gas components.ne dielectric constant of the flow stream varies depending upon the volume ratios of its liquid and gas components, and capacitance measurements can therefore be employed to calculate the quality of the flow, which is defined as the volume ratio of liquid in the flow to the total volume ratio of gas and liquid in the flow. By using two spaced capacitance sensors, and cross-correlating the time varying capacitance values of each, the velocity of the flow stream can also be determined. A microcontroller-based processing circuit is employed to measure the capacitance of the probe sensors.The circuit employs high speed timer and counter circuits to provide a high resolution measurement of the time interval required to charge each capacitor in the probe assembly. In this manner, a high resolution, noise resistant, digital representation of each of capacitance value is obtained without the need for a high resolution A/D converter, or a high frequency oscillator circuit. One embodiment of the probe assembly employs a capacitor with two ground plates which provide symmetry to insure that accurate measurements are made thereby.

  17. Isothermal study of effusion cooling flows using a large eddy simulation approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.P.Bennett; Z.Yang; J.J. McGuirk

    2009-01-01

    An isothermal numerical study of effusion cooling flow is conducted using a large eddy simulation (LES) approach. Two main types of cooling are considered, namely tangential film cooling and oblique patch effusion cooling. To represent tangential film cooling, a simplified model of a plane turbulent wall jet along a flat plate in quiescent surrounding fluid is considered. In contrast to a classic turbulent boundary layer flow, the plane turbulent wall jet possesses an outer free shear flow region, an inner near wall region and an interaction region, characterised by substantial levels of turbulent shear stress transport. These shear stress characteristics hold significant implications for RANS modelling, implications that also apply to more complex tangential film cooling flows with non-zero free stream velocities. The LES technique used in the current study provides a satisfactory overall prediction of the plane turbulent wall jet flow, including the initial transition region, and the characteristic separation of the zero turbulent shear stress and zero shear strain locations.Oblique effusion patch cooling is modelled using a staggered array of 12 rows of effusion holes, drilled at 30° to the flat plate surface. The effusion holes connect two channels separated by the flat plate. Specifically, these comprise of a channel representing the combustion chamber flow and a cooling air supply channel. A difference in pressure between the two channels forces air from the cooling supply side, through the effusion holes, and into the combustion chamber side. Air from successive effusion rows coalesces to form an aerodynamic film between the combustion chamber main flow and the flat plate. In practical applications, this film is used to separate the hot combustion gases from the combustion chamber liner. The numerical model is shown to be capable of accurately predicting the injection, penetration, downstream decay, and coalescence of the effusion jets. In addition, the

  18. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, M; Fahy, A; Martens, J; Dastoor, P C

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  19. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, M.; Fahy, A.; Martens, J.; Dastoor, P. C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  20. Analysis of the horizontal flow in the advanced gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); He, S., E-mail: s.he@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Ganesan, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Gotts, J. [EDF Energy, Barnwood, Gloucester GL4 3RS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • CFD is used to assess the effect of horizontal flows in AGRs. • The horizontal flows can reduce the graphite brick temperature significantly. • Such effects are not taken into consideration in current engineering calculations. • There might be flow instabilities when the fuel channel flow is very low but horizontal flows reduce its possibility. - Abstract: The purpose of the paper is to report a computational investigation of horizontal flows in the UK advanced-gas-cooled reactor (AGR) by using computational fluid dynamics with ANSYS FLUENT. The study is relevant to practical issues encountered in some AGR stations currently in operation in the UK. It is carried out using a comparative approach based on the results of two contrasting models: one simulating the full effect of the cross flow, the other simulating the simplified approach currently employed by the industry which neglects the momentum of the horizontal cross flow. The study reveals that the horizontal cross flow plays a significant role in the cooling of the moderator brick, while the axial variation of the brick geometry also significantly changes the distribution of the temperature within the brick. It is also found that under some circumstances the so-called horizontal inter-brick leakage (HIBL) flow could influence the cooling performance in the narrow gaps, resulting in a local hot spot. Furthermore, there may be flow instabilities in the flows in AGR fuel channels due to the interactions between the flow in the main arrowhead flow passages and that in some narrow passages connected to it, but the influence on the brick temperature is negligible. Horizontal cross flow has an effect of reducing such instabilities.

  1. Effect of the cooling rate on the phase composition and structure of copper matte converting slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanov, E. N.; Gulyaeva, R. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Belyaev, V. V.; Pankratov, A. A.

    2009-08-01

    The effect of the cooling rate on the phase composition and microstructure of copper matte converting slags is studied by X-ray diffraction, combined thermogravimetry and calorimetry, mineragraphy, and electron-probe microanalysis. The compositions of oxide and sulfide phases are determined, and the forms of nonferrous metals in slags cooled at a rate of 0.3 and 900°C/s are revealed. At high cooling rates of the slags, iron silicate glass is shown to form apart from sulfide phases. Repeated heating of the slags leads to the development of devitrification, “cold” crystallization, and melting. A decrease in the cooling rate favors an increase in the grain sizes in oxides (magnetite, iron silicates) and sulfides (bornite-, sphalerite, and galena-based solid solutions).

  2. A microfluidic device providing continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, A.; Farquhar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to describe a new type of microfluidic device that could be used to manipulate fluid temperature in many microfluidic applications. The key component is a composite material containing a thermally conductive phase placed in a purposeful manner to manipulate heat flow into and out of an embedded microchannel. In actual use, the device is able to vary temperature along a defined flow path with remarkable precision. As a demonstration of capability, a functional prototype was designed and fabricated using four layers of patterned copper laminated between alternating layers of polyimide and acrylic. The key fabrication steps included laser micromachining, acid etching, microchannel formation, and hot lamination. In order to achieve the desired temperature variations along the microchannel, an outer optimization loop and an inner finite element analysis loop were used to iteratively obtain a near-optimal copper pattern. With a minor loss of generality, admissible forms were restricted to comb-like patterns. For a given temperature profile, the pattern was found by refining a starting guess based on a deterministic rubric. Thermal response was measured using fine thermocouples placed at critical locations along the microchannel wall. At most of these points, the agreement between measured and predicted temperatures was within 1 °C, and temperature gradients as high as ±45 °C mm-1 (equivalent to ±90 °C s-1 at 2 μl min-1 flow rate) were obtained within the range of 59-91 °C. The particular profile chosen for case study makes it possible to perform five cycles of continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in less than 15 s, i.e. it entails five successive cycles of cooling from 91 to 59 °C, rapid reheating from 59 to 73 °C, slow reheating from 73 to 76 °C, and a final reheating from 73 to 91 °C, using a resistively heated source at 100 °C at and a thermoelectrically cooled sink at 5 °C.

  3. Structural Changes of α Phase in Furnace Cooled Eutectoid Zn-Al Based Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.H. Zhu; K.C. Chan; G.K.H. Pang; T.M. Yue; W.B. Lee

    2007-01-01

    Furnace cooling is a slow cooling process. It is of importance to study structural evolution and its effects on the properties of alloys during the furnace cooling. Decomposition of aluminium rich α phase in a furnace cooled eutectoid Zn-Al based alloy was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Two kinds of precipitates in the α phase were detected in the FCZA22 alloy during ageing at 170℃. One was the hcp transitional α"m phase which appears as directional rods and the round precipitates. The other was the fcc α'm phase.It was found that the transitional phase α'm grew in three preferential directions of , and . The orientation relationship between the α phase and transitional phase α'm was determined as (02-2)α'm(fcc)//(02-2)α(fcc), [-111]α'm(fcc)//[-233]α(fcc). The non-equilibrium phase decomposition of the α phase is discussed in correlation with the equilibrium phase relationships.

  4. 3D couette flow of dusty fluid with transpiration cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOVINDARAJAN A.; RAMAMURTHY V.; SUNDARAMMAL K.

    2007-01-01

    The couette dusty flow between two horizontal parallel porous flat plates with transverse sinusoidal injection of the dusty fluid at the stationary plate and its corresponding removal by constant suction through the plate in uniform motion was analyzed. Due to this type of injection velocity the dusty flow becomes 3D. Perturbation method is used to obtain the expressions for the velocity and temperature fields of both the fluid and dust. It was found that the velocity profiles of both the fluid and dust in the main flow direction decrease with the increase of the mass concentration of the dust panicles, and those in cross flow direction increase with an increase in the mass concentration of the dust particles up to the middle of the channel and thereafter decrease with increase in mass concentration of the dust particles. The skin friction components Tx and Tz in the main flow and transverse directions respectively increase with an increase in the mass concentration of the dust particles (or) injection parameter. The heat transfer coefficient decreases with the increase of the injection parameter and increases with the increase in the mass concentration of the dust particles.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of a cross-flow induced-draft cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo Elazm Mahmoud Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to find a proper solution for the cross-flow water cooling tower problem, also to find an empirical correlation's controlling heat and mass transfer coefficients as functions of inlet parameters to the tower. This is achieved by constructing an experimental rig and a computer program. The computer simulation solves the problem numerically. The apparatus used in this study comprises a cross-flow cooling tower. From the results obtained, the 'characteristic curve' of cross-flow cooling towers was constructed. This curve is very helpful for designers in order to find the actual value of the number of transfer units, if the values of inlet water temperature or inlet air wet bulb temperature are changed. Also an empirical correlation was conducted to obtain the required number of transfer units of the tower in hot water operation. Another correlation was found to obtain the effectiveness in the wet bulb operation.

  6. Abnormal correlation between phase transformation and cooling rate for pure metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J. J.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, X. J.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z.-K.; Zhang, T.-Y.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This work aims to achieve deep insight into the phenomenon of phase transformation upon rapid cooling in metal systems and reveal the physical meaning of scatter in the time taken to reach crystallization. The total number of pure metals considered in this work accounts for 14. Taking pure copper as an example, the correlation between phase selection of crystal or glass and cooling rate was investigated using molecular dynamic simulations. The obtained results demonstrate that there exists a cooling rate region of 6.3 × 1011–16.6 × 1011 K/s, in which crystalline fractions largely fluctuate along with cooling rates. Glass transformation in this cooling rate region is determined by atomic structure fluctuation, which is controlled by thermodynamic factors. According to the feature of bond-orientation order at different cooling rates, we propose two mechanisms of glass formation: (i) kinetic retardation of atom rearrangement or structural relaxation at a high cooling rate; and (ii) competition of icosahedral order against crystal order near the critical cooling rate.

  7. Abnormal correlation between phase transformation and cooling rate for pure metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J J; Wang, C P; Liu, X J; Wang, Y; Liu, Z-K; Zhang, T-Y; Jiang, J Z

    2016-03-04

    This work aims to achieve deep insight into the phenomenon of phase transformation upon rapid cooling in metal systems and reveal the physical meaning of scatter in the time taken to reach crystallization. The total number of pure metals considered in this work accounts for 14. Taking pure copper as an example, the correlation between phase selection of crystal or glass and cooling rate was investigated using molecular dynamic simulations. The obtained results demonstrate that there exists a cooling rate region of 6.3 × 10(11)-16.6 × 10(11) K/s, in which crystalline fractions largely fluctuate along with cooling rates. Glass transformation in this cooling rate region is determined by atomic structure fluctuation, which is controlled by thermodynamic factors. According to the feature of bond-orientation order at different cooling rates, we propose two mechanisms of glass formation: (i) kinetic retardation of atom rearrangement or structural relaxation at a high cooling rate; and (ii) competition of icosahedral order against crystal order near the critical cooling rate.

  8. Three dimensional free convection couette flow with transpiration cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Free convection flow between two vertical parallel plates with transverse sinusoidal injection of the fluid at the stationary plate and its corresponding removal by constant suction through the plate in uniform motion has been analyzed. Due to this type of injection velocity, the flow becomes three-dimensional. Analytical expressions for the velocity, temperature, skin friction and rate of heat transfer were obtained. The important characteristics of the problem, namely the skin friction and the rate of heat transfer are discussed in detail with the help of graphs.

  9. Non-thermal X-ray Emission An Alternative to Cluster Cooling Flows?

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, I G; Welch, G A; Carthy, Ian G. Mc; West, Michael J.; Welch, Gary A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of experiments aimed at reducing the major problem with cooling flow models of rich cluster X-ray sources: the fact that most of the cooled gas or its products have not been found. Here we show that much of the X-ray emission usually attributed to cooling flows can, in fact, be modeled by a power-law component which is indicative of a source(s) other than thermal bremsstrahlung from the intracluster medium. We find that adequate simultaneous fits to ROSAT PSPCB and ASCA GIS/SIS spectra of the central regions of ten clusters are obtained for two-component models that include a thermal plasma component that is attributable to hot intracluster gas and a power-law component that is likely generated by compact sources and/or extended non-thermal emission. For five of the clusters that purportedly have massive cooling flows, the best-fit models have power-law components that contribute $\\sim$ 30 % of the total flux (0.14 - 10.0 keV) within the central 3 arcminutes. Because cooling flow mass de...

  10. CFD Analysis for Flow Behavior Characteristics in the Upper Plenum during low flow/low pressure transients for the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Theron Marshall; Kevan Weaver; Hans Gougar

    2007-05-01

    Gas coolant at low pressure exhibits poor heat transfer characteristics. This is an area of concern for the passive response targeted by the Generation IV GCFR design. For the first 24 hour period, the decay heat removal for the GCFR design is dependent on an actively powered blower, which also would reduce the temperature in the fuel during transients, before depending on the passive operation. Natural circulation cooling initiates when the blower is stopped for the final phase of the decay heat removal, as under forced convection the core decay heat is adequately cooled by the running blower. The ability of the coolant to flow in the reverse direction or having recirculation, when the blowers are off, necessitates more understanding of the flow behavior characteristics in the upper plenum. The work done here focuses primarily on the period after the blower has been turned off, as the core is adequately cooled when the blowers are running, thus there was no need to carry out the analysis for the first 24 hours. In order to understand the plume behavior for the GCFR upper plenum several cases were run, with air, helium and helium-air mixture. For each case, the FLUENT was used to characterize the steady state velocity vectors and corresponding temperature in the upper plenum under passive decay heat removal conditions. This study will provide better insight into the plume interaction in the upper plenum at low flow and low pressure conditions.

  11. Model Based Control of Single-Phase Marine Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ”, it is shown that the part of the proposed model relating to the thermodynamics is dynamically accurate and with relatively small steady state deviations. The same is shown for a linear version of the part of the model governing the hydraulics of the cooling system. On the subject of control, the main focus...... in this work is on the development of a nonlinear robust control design. The design is based on principles from feedback. linearization to compensate for nonlinearities as well as transport delays by including a delay estimate in the feedback law. To deal with the uncertainties that emerged from the feedback...

  12. Modeling of Nonlinear Marine Cooling Systems with Closed Circuit Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2011-01-01

    of container ships. The purpose of the model is to describe the important dynamics of the system, such as nonlinearities, transport delays and closed circuit flow dynamics to enable the model to be used for control design and simulation. The control challenge is related to the highly non-standard type of step...

  13. Phase appearance or disappearance in two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, Floraine; Kumbaro, Anela

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the treatment of specific numerical problems which appear when phase appearance or disappearance occurs in models of two-phase flows. Such models have crucial importance in many industrial areas such as nuclear power plant safety studies. In this paper, two outstanding problems are identified: first, the loss of hyperbolicity of the system when a phase appears or disappears and second, the lack of positivity of standard shock capturing schemes such as the Roe scheme. After an asymptotic study of the model, this paper proposes accurate and robust numerical methods adapted to the simulation of phase appearance or disappearance. Polynomial solvers are developed to avoid the use of eigenvectors which are needed in usual shock capturing schemes, and a method based on an adaptive numerical diffusion is designed to treat the positivity problems. An alternate method, based on the use of the hyperbolic tangent function instead of a polynomial, is also considered. Numerical results are presente...

  14. Review of Two-phase Electronics Cooling for Army Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    by Incropera et al. (21), and indicated in figure 7a, the transition 14 from subcooled boiling, to bubbly flow, slug flow, and annular flow...Sullivan, P. F.; Ramadhyani, S.; Incropera , F. P. Extended surfaces to enhance impingement cooling with single circular liquid jets. in...Coolant Comparison of Oil and PGW; ADM002075; U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, Nov. 1 2006. 21. Incropera , F.; Dewitt, D.; Bergman, T.; Lavine, A

  15. Search for cooling flows in southern X-ray clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, R.; Altamore, A.

    1990-08-01

    EFOSC spectroscopic observations of 20 galaxies belonging to 10 distant X-ray southern clusters, selected from the HEAO1-A1 catalogue, are presented. The redshifts derived for the observed clusters (z = 0.15) are systematically lower than expected from their Duus and Newell distance class, but in good agreement with the distance class reported in the southern clusters catalog by Abell, Corwin, and Olowin. In the central cluster galaxies, no emission lines typical of cooling flow clusters, with negative results have been found. The '4000 break' amplitudes also have values typical for normal elliptical galaxies. These findings suggest that the observed clusters are unlikely to have strong ongoing cooling flows.

  16. CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS PHASE 2 FULL SCALE COOLING COILS GROUT FILL DEMONSTATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Alex Cozzi, A

    2008-06-19

    This report documents the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) support for the Tank Closure and Technology Development (TCTD) group's strategy for closing high level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Specifically, this task addresses the ability to successfully fill intact cooling coils, presently within the HLW tanks, with grout that satisfies the fresh and cured grout requirements [1] under simulated field conditions. The overall task was divided into two phases. The first phase was the development of a grout formulation that satisfies the processing requirements for filling the HLW tank cooling coils [5]. The second phase of the task, which is documented in this report, was the filling of full scale cooling coils under simulated field conditions using the grout formulation developed in the first phase. SRS Type I tank cooling coil assembly design drawings and pressure drop calculations were provided by the Liquid Waste (LW) customer to be used as the basis for configuring the test assemblies. The current concept for closing tanks equipped with internal cooling coils is to pump grout into the coils to inhibit pathways for infiltrating water. Access to the cooling coil assemblies is through the existing supply/return manifold headers located on top of the Type I tanks. The objectives for the second phase of the testing, as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance plan (TTQAP) [2], were to: (1) Perform a demonstration test to assess cooling coil grout performance in simulated field conditions, and (2) Measure relevant properties of samples prepared under simulated field conditions. SRNL led the actual work of designing, fabricating and filling two full-scale cooling coil assemblies which were performed at Clemson Engineering Technologies Laboratory (CETL) using the South Carolina University Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program. A statement of work (SOW) was issued to CETL [6] to perform this work.

  17. Coupling two-phase fluid flow with two-phase darcy flow in anisotropic porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, J.

    2014-06-03

    This paper reports a numerical study of coupling two-phase fluid flow in a free fluid region with two-phase Darcy flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic porous medium region. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Obtained results have shown the anisotropic properties effect on the velocity and pressure of the two-phase flow. 2014 Jie Chen et al.

  18. Prediction of Air Flow and Temperature Distribution Inside a Yogurt Cooling Room Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Surendhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Air flow and heat transfer inside a yogurt cooling room were analysed using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Air flow and heat transfer models were based on 3D, unsteady state, incompressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and energy equations. Yogurt cooling room was modelled with the measured geometry using 3D design tool AutoCAD. Yogurt cooling room model was exported into the flow simulation software by specifying properties of inlet air, yogurt, pallet and walls of the room. Packing material was not considered in this study because of less thickness (cup-0.5mm, carton box-1.5mm and negligible resistance created in the conduction of heat. 3D Computational domain was meshed with hexahedral cells and governing equations were solved using explicit finite volume method. Air flow pattern inside the room and the temperature distribution in the bulk of palletized yogurt were predicted. Through validation, the variation in the temperature distribution and velocity vector from the measured value was found to be 2.0oC (maximum and 30% respectively. From the simulation and the measured value of the temperature distribution, it was observed that the temperature was non-uniform over the bulk of yogurt. This might be due to refrigeration capacity, air flow pattern, stacking of yogurt or geometry of the room. Required results were achieved by changing the location of the cooling fan.

  19. AGN Feedback and Cooling Flows: The Failure of Simple Hydrodynamical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Vernaleo, J C; Vernaleo, John C.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that Active Galactic Nuclei, and radio-galaxies in particular, have an impact on large scale structure and galaxy formation. In principle, radio-galaxies are energetic enough to halt the cooling in the inner regions clusters, solving the cooling flow problem and explaining the high-mass truncation of the galaxy luminosity function. We explore this process through a series of high resolution, three dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of jetted active galaxies which act in response to cooling-mediated accretion of an ICM atmosphere. We find that such models are incapable of producing a long term balance of heating and cooling; catastrophic cooling can be delayed by the jet action but inevitably takes hold. At the heart of the failure of these models is the formation of a low density channel through which the jet can freely flow, carrying its energy out of the cooling core. While this obviously highlights the need to include physics beyond the ideal hydrodynamics...

  20. Superfluid phases of triplet pairing and rapid cooling of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev B. Leinson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In a simple model it is demonstrated that the neutron star surface temperature evolution is sensitive to the phase state of the triplet superfluid condensate. A multicomponent triplet pairing of superfluid neutrons in the core of a neutron star with participation of several magnetic quantum numbers leads to neutrino energy losses exceeding the losses from the unicomponent pairing. A phase transition of the neutron condensate into the multicomponent state triggers more rapid cooling of superfluid core in neutron stars. This makes it possible to simulate an anomalously rapid cooling of neutron stars within the minimal cooling paradigm without employing any exotic scenarios suggested earlier for rapid cooling of isolated neutron star in Cassiopeia A.

  1. Numerical simulation on internal and external flow field of a SCAL indirect air cooling tower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Songfeng; CHAI Yanqin; XIANG Tongqiong; ZHOU Guangsha

    2014-01-01

    According to the actual size of cooling tube bundle and the arrangement of cooling triangle of a surface condenser aluminum exchangers (SCAL)natural draft cooling tower,the geometric model of heat transfer elements at the tower bottom was established.On the basis of the RNG k-εturbulence model and porous medium model,three-dimensional numerical simulation was carried out for the inner and external flow field of the air cooling tower,to investigate the influence of environmental conditions on the tower's operation performance.The results show that,with an increase in ambient wind speed,the inlet air speed at windward side of the tower increases gradually,while that at crosswind side and lee side decreases and tends to be obvious;the tower ventilation rate and outlet air speed increases at first and then decreases,and their maximum values appear when the wind speed is 2 m/s.

  2. Flow measurement in base cooling air passages of a rotating turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    The operational performance is decribed of a shaft-mounted system for measuring the air mass flow rate in the base cooling passages of a rotating turbine blade. Shaft speeds of 0 to 9000 rpm, air mass flow rates of 0.0035 to 0.039 kg/sec (0.0077 to 0.085 lbm/sec), and blade air temperatures of 300 to 385 K (80 to 233 F) were measured. Comparisons of individual rotating blade flows and corresponding stationary supply orifice flows agreed to within 10 percent.

  3. Numerical Analysis of Rotating Pumping Flows in Inter-Coil Rotor Cavities and Short Cooling Grooves of a Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tong

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An important characteristic of wall rotating-driven flows is the tendency of fluid with high angular momentum to be flung radially outward. For a generator, the rotor rotating-driven flow, usually referred to as the rotating pumping flow, plays an important role in rotor winding cooling. In this study, three-dimensional numerical analyzes are presented for turbulent pumping flow in the inter-coil rotor cavity and short cooling grooves of a generator. Calculations of the flow field and the mass flux distribution through the grooves were carried out in a sequence of four related cases Under an isothermal condition: (a pumping flow, which is the self-generated flow resulted from the rotor pumping action; (b mixing flow, which is the combination of the ventilating flow and pumping flow, under a constant density condition; (c mixing flow, with density modeled by the ideal gas law; and (d mixing flow, with different pressure differentials applied on the system. The comparisons of the results from these cases can provide useful information regarding the impacts of the ventilating flow, gas density, and system pressure differential on the mass flux distribution in the short cooling grooves. Results show that the pumping effect is strong enough to generate the cooling flow for rotor winding cooling. Therefore, for small- or mid-size generators ventilation fans may be eliminated. It also suggests that increasing the chimney dimension can improve the distribution uniformity of mass flux through the cooling grooves.

  4. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayana, B [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Mills, Michael J. [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Ohio State University, The, Columbus

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FLOW FIELDS IN A NATURAL DRAFT WET-COOLING TOWER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The flow field in the hyperbolic natural draft wet-cooling tower, which has great effects on the economy and security of power plant, was studied through numerical simulation. The mathematical model was established and analyzed in order to optimize the cooling-tower and to evaluate its efficiency. Various working conditions were considered and compared with each other, such as the circulating water flux, air temperature and tower resistance. It is concluded that when the cooling-tower runs without wind, there is a vacuum region inside the tower and the pressure rises with the increase of the tower height. Meanwhile, the inner flow field is axisymmetrical. The air velocity achieves its climax at the axis. It is also found that the effect of circulating water temperature is equivalent to that of the water flux.

  6. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  7. The Growth of Black Holes and Bulges at the Cores of Cooling Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafferty, D.A.; McNamara, B.R.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Wise, M.

    2007-01-01

    Central cluster galaxies (cDs) in cooling flows are growing rapidly through gas accretion and star formation. At the same time, AGN outbursts fueled by accretion onto supermassive black holes are generating X-ray cavity systems and driving outflows that exceed those in powerful quasars. We show that

  8. The Growth of Black Holes and Bulges at the Cores of Cooling Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafferty, D.A.; McNamara, B.R.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Wise, M.

    2007-01-01

    Central cluster galaxies (cDs) in cooling flows are growing rapidly through gas accretion and star formation. At the same time, AGN outbursts fueled by accretion onto supermassive black holes are generating X-ray cavity systems and driving outflows that exceed those in powerful quasars. We show that

  9. Numerical investigation of the mechanism of two-phase flow instability in parallel narrow channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lian [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Chongqing University (China); Chen, Deqi, E-mail: chendeqi@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Chongqing University (China); CNNC Key Laboratory on Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics Technology, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Huang, Yanping, E-mail: hyanping007@163.com [CNNC Key Laboratory on Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics Technology, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Yuan, Dewen; Wang, Yanling [CNNC Key Laboratory on Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics Technology, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Pan, Liangming [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Chongqing University (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • A mathematical model is proposed to predict the two-phase flow instability. • The mathematical model predicted result agrees well with the experimental result. • Oscillation characteristics of the two-phase flow instability is discussed in detail. - Abstract: In this paper, the mechanism of two-phase flow instability in parallel narrow channels is studied theoretically, and the characteristic of the flow instability is discussed in detail. Due to the significant confining effect of the narrow channel on the vapor–liquid interface, the two-phase flow resistance in the narrow channel is probably different from that in conventional channel. Therefore, the vapor confined number (N{sub conf}), defined by the size of narrow channel and bubble detachment diameter, is considered in the “Chisholm B model” to investigate the two-phase flow pressure drop. The flow instability boundaries are plotted in parameter plane with phase-change-number (N{sub pch}) and subcooling-number (N{sub sub}) under different working conditions. It is found that the predicted result agrees well with the experimental result. According to the predicted result, the oscillation behaviors near the flow instability boundary indicate that the Supercritical Hopf bifurcation appears in high sub-cooled region and the Subcritical Hopf bifurcation appears in low sub-cooled region. Also, a detailed analysis about the effects of key parameters on the characteristic of two-phase flow instability and the flow instability boundary is proposed, including the effects of inlet subcooling, heating power, void distribution parameter and drift velocity.

  10. Gas flow headspace liquid phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui; Qiu, Jinxue; Ren, Chunyan; Piao, Xiangfan; Li, Xifeng; Wu, Xue; Li, Donghao

    2009-11-06

    There is a trend towards the use of enrichment techniques such as microextraction in the analysis of trace chemicals. Based on the theory of ideal gases, theory of gas chromatography and the original headspace liquid phase microextraction (HS-LPME) technique, a simple gas flow headspace liquid phase microextraction (GF-HS-LPME) technique has been developed, where the extracting gas phase volume is increased using a gas flow. The system is an open system, where an inert gas containing the target compounds flows continuously through a special gas outlet channel (D=1.8mm), and the target compounds are trapped on a solvent microdrop (2.4 microL) hanging on the microsyringe tip, as a result, a high enrichment factor is obtained. The parameters affecting the enrichment factor, such as the gas flow rate, the position of the microdrop, the diameter of the gas outlet channel, the temperatures of the extracting solvent and of the sample, and the extraction time, were systematically optimized for four types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The results were compared with results obtained from HS-LPME. Under the optimized conditions (where the extraction time and the volume of the extracting sample vial were fixed at 20min and 10mL, respectively), detection limits (S/N=3) were approximately a factor of 4 lower than those for the original HS-LPME technique. The method was validated by comparison of the GF-HS-LPME and HS-LPME techniques using data for PAHs from environmental sediment samples.

  11. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron-self Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value $\\dot M \\sim 3\\alpha\\ \\dot M_{\\rm Edd}$, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down onto the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenari...

  12. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhaoming

    2016-06-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron self-Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value dot{M} ˜ 3α dot{M}_Edd, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down on to the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary, our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenario for the state transition.

  13. Transient state study of electric motor heating and phase change solid-liquid cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellettre, J.; Sartre, V.; Lallemand, A. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Centre de Thermique de Lyon, Villeurbanne, 69 (France); Biais, F. [AUXILEC, Chatou, 78 (France)

    1997-01-01

    This study reports on modelling of an autosynchronous electric motor stator, operating at transient state. The developed model, of the modal type, includes around 20 nodes. The simulations showed that hot spots are localized on the winding heads and led to the choice of a solid-liquid phase change cooling system. The comparison between simulation and experiment permitted the identification of unknown parameters. The model gives a good accuracy during steady-state and in the rising temperature phase. The modelling of the phase change cooling is realized by the addition of two nodes. The sensitivity analysis to PCM properties shows that the hot spot temperature decreases with increasing conductivities, inertia and latent heat of melting of the PCM and with decreasing melting temperature. Gallium (metal melting at 30{sup o}C) is the best PCM for the cooling of hot spots and P116 paraffin is the best non-metallic PCM. (author)

  14. Nonlinear Phase Distortion in a Ti:Sapphire Optical Amplifier for Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, Matthew [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Piot, Philippe [NICADD, DeKalb; Ruan, Jinhao [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Optical Stochastic Cooling (OSC) has been considered for future high-luminosity colliders as it offers much faster cooling time in comparison to the micro-wave stochastic cooling. The OSC technique relies on collecting and amplifying a broadband optical signal from a pickup undulator and feeding the amplified signal back to the beam. It creates a corrective kick in a kicker undulator. Owing to its superb gain qualities and broadband amplification features, Titanium:Sapphire medium has been considered as a gain medium for the optical amplifier (OA) needed in the OSC*. A limiting factor for any OA used in OSC is the possibility of nonlinear phase distortions. In this paper we experimentally measure phase distortions by inserting a single-pass OA into one leg of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The measurement results are used to estimate the reduction of the corrective kick a particle would receive due to these phase distortions in the kicker undulator.

  15. Flow and Thermal Performance of a Water-Cooled Periodic Transversal Elliptical Microchannel Heat Sink for Chip Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; Yang, Mo; Wang, Zhiyun; Xu, Hongtao; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-04-01

    Flow and thermal performance of transversal elliptical microchannels were investigated as a passive scheme to enhance the heat transfer performance of laminar fluid flow. The periodic transversal elliptical micro-channel is designed and its pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics in laminar flow are numerically investigated. Based on the comparison with a conventional straight micro- channel having rectangular cross section, it is found that periodic transversal elliptical microchannel not only has great potential to reduce pressure drop but also dramatically enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, when the Reynolds number equals to 192, the pressure drop of the transversal elliptical channel is 36.5% lower than that of the straight channel, while the average Nusselt number is 72.8% higher; this indicates that the overall thermal performance of the periodic transversal elliptical microchannel is superior to the conventional straight microchannel. It is suggested that such transversal elliptical microchannel are attractive candidates for cooling future electronic chips effectively with much lower pressure drop.

  16. A closed-loop electronics cooling by implementing single phase impinging jet and mini channels heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bintoro, Jemmy S. [University of Maine, Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology (LASST), ESRB-Barrows, Orono, ME, 04469-5708 (United States); Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar [RMIT University, Bundoora East Campus, P.O. Box 71, Bundoora, Vic. 3083 (Australia); Mochizuki, Masataka [1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports our works in the design and testing of a closed-loop electronics cooling system that adopts bi-technologies: single phase impinging jet and mini channels heat exchanger. The system has the cooling capacity of 200W over a single chip with a hydraulic diameter of 12mm. The equivalent heat flux is 177W/cm{sup 2}. The cooling system maintains the chip's surface temperature below 95{sup o}C maximum when the ambient temperature is 30{sup o}C. De-ionized water is the working fluid of the system. For the impinging jet, two different nozzles are designed and tested. The hydraulic diameters (d{sub N}) are 0.5mm and 0.8mm. The corresponding volume flow rates are 280mL/min and 348mL/min. Mini channels heat exchanger has 6 (six) copper tubes with the inner diameter of 1.27mm and the total length of about 1m. The cooling system has a mini diaphragm pump and a DC electric fan with the maximum power consumptions of 8.4W and 0.96W respectively. The coefficient of performance of the system is 21.4. (author)

  17. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  18. Concept of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the development of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The physical phenomena taking place within a natural draft wet cooling tower are described by the system of conservation law equations along with additional equations. The heat and mass transfer in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill are described by model [1] which is based on the system of ordinary differential equations. Utilization of model [1] of the fill allows us to apply commonly measured fill characteristics as shown by [2].The boundary value problem resulting from the fill model is solved separately. The system of conservation law equations is interlinked with the system of ordinary differential equations describing the phenomena occurring in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill via heat and mass sources and via boundary conditions. The concept of numerical solution is presented for the quasi one dimensional model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The simulation results are shown.

  19. Numerical cooling strategy design for hot rolled dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwanpinij, Piyada; Prahl, Ulrich; Bleck, Wolfgang [RWTH Aachen (DE). Dept. of Ferrous Metallurgy (IEHK); Togobytska, Nataliya; Weiss, Wolf; Hoemberg, Dietmar [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2010-10-21

    In this article, the Mo-Mn dual phase steel and its process parameters in hot rolling are discussed. The process window was derived by combining the experimental work in a hot deformation dilatometer and numerical calculation of process parameters using rate law models for ferrite and martensite transformation. The ferrite formation model is based on the Leblond and Devaux approach while martensite formation is based on the Koistinen- Marburger (K-M) formula. The carbon enrichment during ferrite formation is taken into account for the following martensite formation. After the completion of the parameter identification for the rate law model, the evolution of phases in multiphase steel can be addressed. Particularly, the simulations allow for predicting the preferable degree of retained strain and holding temperature on the run out table (ROT) for the required ferrite fraction. (orig.)

  20. Multifrequency VLA observations of PKS 0745 - 191 - The archetypal 'cooling flow' radio source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-, 20-, 6- and 2-cm VLA observations of the high-radio-luminosity cooling-flow radio source PKS 0745 - 191 are presented. The radio source was found to have a core with a very steep spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5) and diffuse emission with an even steeper spectrum (alpha is approximately -1.5 to -2.3) without clear indications of the jets, hotspots, or double lobes found in the other radio sources of comparable luminosity. It is inferred that the energy to power the radio source comes from the central engine, but the source's structure may be heavily influenced by the past history of the galaxy and the inflowing intracluster medium. It is shown that, while the radio source is energetically unimportant for the cluster as a whole, it is important on the scale of the cooling flow. The mere existence of cosmic rays and magnetic fields within a substantial fraction of the volume inside the cooling radius has important consequences for cooling-flow models.

  1. Influence of Underhood Flow on Engine Cooling Using 1-D And 3-D Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolehovský Ondřej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with numerical simulation of complete cooling system of internal combustion engine (GT-SUITE, which also involves the simulation of flow in underhood using the computationally undemanding simulation. A detailed model of the internal combustion engine is extended to a cooling circuit model which is then coupled to a simplified underhood model which is created with the help of GT-COOL application as a 3-D model and afterwards transferred to a 1-D form. The approaches, one using 1-D solution of arrangement of the heat exchangers and the other 3-D approach using the underhood model, were investigated in two steady states corresponding to various vehicle speeds and engine load. These simulations have shown the inappropriateness of 1-D approach when solving the flow in the heat exchangers in the underhood and helped to explore a relatively undemanding method of flow simulation in the underhood, which enables to detect the interaction between the models of the cooling system and the internal combustion engine and the issue of arrangement of the heat exchangers in the underhood.

  2. Low cryogen inventory, forced flow Ne cooling system with room temperature compression stage and heat recuperation

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A; Wolf, A

    2014-01-01

    We present design and commissioning results of a forced flow cooling system utilizing neon at 30 K. The cryogen is pumped through the system by a room-temperature compression stage. To decouple the cold zone from the compression stage a recuperating counterflow tube-in-tube heat exchanger is used. Commissioning demonstrated successful condensation of neon and transfer of up to 30 W cooling power to the load at 30 K using only 30 g of the cryogen circulating in the system at pressures below 170 kPa.

  3. Decay Phase Cooling and Inferred Heating of M- and X-class Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Daniel F; Milligan, Ryan O; Gallgher, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the cooling of 72 M- and X-class flares is examined using GOES/XRS and SDO/EVE. The observed cooling rates are quantified and the observed total cooling times are compared to the predictions of an analytical 0-D hydrodynamic model. It is found that the model does not fit the observations well, but does provide a well defined lower limit on a flare's total cooling time. The discrepancy between observations and the model is then assumed to be primarily due to heating during the decay phase. The decay phase heating necessary to account for the discrepancy is quantified and found be ~50% of the total thermally radiated energy as calculated with GOES. This decay phase heating is found to scale with the observed peak thermal energy. It is predicted that approximating the total thermal energy from the peak is minimally affected by the decay phase heating in small flares. However, in the most energetic flares the decay phase heating inferred from the model can be several times greater than the peak the...

  4. Decay-phase cooling and inferred heating of M- and X-class solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Milligan, Ryan O. [Solar Physics Laboratory (Code 671), Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    In this paper, the cooling of 72 M- and X-class flares is examined using GOES/XRS and SDO/EVE. The observed cooling rates are quantified and the observed total cooling times are compared with the predictions of an analytical zero-dimensional hydrodynamic model. We find that the model does not fit the observations well, but does provide a well-defined lower limit on a flare's total cooling time. The discrepancy between observations and the model is then assumed to be primarily due to heating during the decay phase. The decay-phase heating necessary to account for the discrepancy is quantified and found be ∼50% of the total thermally radiated energy, as calculated with GOES. This decay-phase heating is found to scale with the observed peak thermal energy. It is predicted that approximating the total thermal energy from the peak is minimally affected by the decay-phase heating in small flares. However, in the most energetic flares the decay-phase heating inferred from the model can be several times greater than the peak thermal energy.

  5. Thermo-fluid dynamics of two-phase flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamoru; Ishii, Mamoru; Ishii, M

    2006-01-01

    Provides a very systematic treatment of two phase flow problems from a theoretical perspectiveProvides an easy to follow treatment of modeling and code devlopemnt of two phase flow related phenomenaCovers new results of two phase flow research such as coverage of fuel cells technology.

  6. Two phase gap cooling of an electrical machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2016-10-04

    An electro-dynamic machine has a rotor and stator with a gap therebetween. The machine has a frame defining a hollow interior with end cavities on axially opposite ends of the frame. A gas circulating system has an inlet that supplies high pressure gas to the frame interior and an outlet to collect gas passing therethrough. A liquid coolant circulating system has an inlet that supplies coolant to the frame interior and an outlet that collects coolant passing therethrough. The coolant inlet and gas inlet are generally located on the frame in a manner to allow coolant from the coolant inlet to flow with gas from the gas inlet to the gap. The coolant outlet and gas outlet are generally located on the frame in a manner to allow the coolant to be separated from the gas with the separated coolant and gas collected for circulation through their respective circulating systems.

  7. Two phase gap cooling of an electrical machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2016-10-04

    An electro-dynamic machine has a rotor and stator with a gap therebetween. The machine has a frame defining a hollow interior with end cavities on axially opposite ends of the frame. A gas circulating system has an inlet that supplies high pressure gas to the frame interior and an outlet to collect gas passing therethrough. A liquid coolant circulating system has an inlet that supplies coolant to the frame interior and an outlet that collects coolant passing therethrough. The coolant inlet and gas inlet are generally located on the frame in a manner to allow coolant from the coolant inlet to flow with gas from the gas inlet to the gap. The coolant outlet and gas outlet are generally located on the frame in a manner to allow the coolant to be separated from the gas with the separated coolant and gas collected for circulation through their respective circulating systems.

  8. Holographic RG flows with nematic IR phases

    CERN Document Server

    Cremonini, Sera; Rong, Junchen; Sun, Kai

    2014-01-01

    We construct zero-temperature geometries that interpolate between a Lifshitz fixed point in the UV and an IR phase that breaks spatial rotations but preserves translations. We work with a simple holographic model describing two massive gauge fields coupled to gravity and a neutral scalar. Our construction can be used to describe RG flows in non-relativistic, strongly coupled quantum systems with nematic order in the IR. In particular, when the dynamical critical exponent of the UV fixed point is z=2 and the IR scaling exponents are chosen appropriately, our model realizes holographically the scaling properties of the bosonic modes of the quadratic band crossing model.

  9. Development of a prototype thermoelectric space cooling system using phase change material to improve the performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongliang

    The thermoelectric cooling system has advantages over conventional vapor compression cooling devices, including compact in size, light in weight, high reliability, no mechanical moving parts, no refrigerant, being powered by direct current, and easily switching between cooling and heating modes. However, it has been long suffering from its relatively high cost and low energy efficiency, which has restricted its usage to niche applications, such as space missions, portable cooling devices, scientific and medical equipment, where coefficient of performance (COP) is not as important as reliability, energy availability, and quiet operation environment. Enhancement of thermoelectric cooling system performance generally relies on two methods: improving thermoelectric material efficiency and through thermoelectric cooling system thermal design. This research has been focused on the latter one. A prototype thermoelectric cooling system integrated with phase change material (PCM) thermal energy storage unit for space cooling has been developed. The PCM thermal storage unit used for cold storage at night, functions as the thermoelectric cooling system's heat sink during daytime's cooling period and provides relatively lower hot side temperature for the thermoelectric cooling system. The experimental test of the prototype system in a reduced-scale chamber has realized an average cooling COP of 0.87, with the maximum value of 1.22. Another comparison test for efficacy of PCM thermal storage unit shows that 35.3% electrical energy has been saved from using PCM for the thermoelectric cooling system. In general, PCM faces difficulty of poor thermal conductivity at both solid and liquid phases. This system implemented a finned inner tube to increase heat transfer during PCM charging (melting) process that directly impacts thermoelectric system's performance. A simulation tool for the entire system has been developed including mathematical models for a single thermoelectric module

  10. Reynolds transport theorem for a two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Francisco J.

    2007-01-01

    Transport equations for one-dimensional (1d), steady, two-phase flow have been proposed based on the fact that if the phases have different velocities, they cannot cover the same distance (the control volume length) in the same time. Thus, working in the same control volume for the two phases, the time scales of the phases have to be different. From this approach, transport balances for 1D, steady, two-phase flow have been already derived, supplying acceptable correlations for two-phase flow. Here, based on the strict application of the Reynolds transport theorem, general transport balances for two-phase flow are suggested.

  11. Phase transformation upon cooling path in Ca2SiO4: Possible geological implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yun-Ting; Kung, Jennifer; Hsu, Han

    2016-04-01

    At the contact metamorphism zone two different Ca2SiO4 phases can be found; calcio-olivine (γ phase) and larnite (β phase). In-situ experiments illustrated the existence of five various polymorphs in Ca2SiO4, i.e., α, α'H, α'L, β and γ. The path of phase transformation and the transformation temperatures are shown as follows. γ → α'L(700° C) → α'H(1100° C) → α (1450° C) α'L → β (680° C) → γ (500° C) Experiments showed that the phase transitions at lower temperature is not reversible and seemed to be complicated; β phase is only stable from 500° C to 680° C upon cooling. To understand the possible mechanism of the β phase being metastable at room temperature, atmosphere condition, we were motivated to investigate the route of phase transition in Ca2SiO4 in different thermal process. Powder samples were synthesized by the solid-state reaction. Pure reagent oxides CaCO3 and SiO2 were mixed in 2:1 stoichiometric mole. Two control factors were designated in the experiments; the sintering temperature of starting materials and the cooling path. The sintering temperature was set within the range of stable phase field of α'L phase (˜900° C) and α'H phase (1300° C). The cooling process was designed in three different routes: 1) the quenched procedure from sintering temperature with rate of 900° C/min and 1300° C/min, 2) the furnace cooling procedure, 3) set a slow cooling rate (0.265 ° C/min). The products were examined for the crystal structure by X-ray powder diffraction. First-principle calculation was also applied to investigate the thermodynamic properties of α'H, β and γ phases. A major finding in this study showed that the γ phase presented in the final product when the sintering temperature was set at the stable field of α'H phase; on the other hand, the β phase would present when the sintering temperature was set within the field of α'L phase. It was noted that the existing phase in the product would be modified by the

  12. Effect of sintering columns on the heat transfer and flow characteristics of the liquid cooling vapor chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naphon, Paisarn; Wiriyasart, Songkran

    2016-09-01

    The results of the heat and flow characteristics of working fluid inside the vapor chamber with different sintering columns of 20, 81, 225 are presented. The vapor chambers with one inlet port and four outlet ports are tested by using water as coolant. Parametric studies including different heat fluxes, number and size of wick columns, and flow rate of coolants on the cooling performance are considered. A three-dimensional heat and mass transfer model for vapor chamber with wick and without sintering plate and sintering columns are developed. The numerical simulation results show the velocity and pressure distribution of liquid and vapor phases of the working fluid inside the vapor chamber. It is found that the number of wick column have an important influence to the velocity and pressure phenomena of working fluid which results in thermal performance of vapor chamber. Reasonable agreement is obtained from the comparison between the measured data and the predicted results.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Reactive Flows in Overexpanded Supersonic Nozzle with Film Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sellam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reignition phenomena occurring in a supersonic nozzle flow may present a crucial safety issue for rocket propulsion systems. These phenomena concern mainly rocket engines which use H2 gas (GH2 in the film cooling device, particularly when the nozzle operates under over expanded flow conditions at sea level or at low altitudes. Consequently, the induced wall thermal loads can lead to the nozzle geometry alteration, which in turn, leads to the appearance of strong side loads that may be detrimental to the rocket engine structural integrity. It is therefore necessary to understand both aerodynamic and chemical mechanisms that are at the origin of these processes. This paper is a numerical contribution which reports results from CFD analysis carried out for supersonic reactive flows in a planar nozzle cooled with GH2 film. Like the experimental observations, CFD simulations showed their ability to highlight these phenomena for the same nozzle flow conditions. Induced thermal load are also analyzed in terms of cooling efficiency and the results already give an idea on their magnitude. It was also shown that slightly increasing the film injection pressure can avoid the reignition phenomena by moving the separation shock towards the nozzle exit section.

  14. Turbine endwall film cooling with combustor-turbine interface gap leakage flow: Effect of incidence angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yuan, Xin

    2013-04-01

    This paper is focused on the film cooling performance of combustor-turbine leakage flow at off-design condition. The influence of incidence angle on film cooling effectiveness on first-stage vane endwall with combustor-turbine interface slot is studied. A baseline slot configuration is tested in a low speed four-blade cascade comprising a large-scale model of the GE-E3Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV). The slot has a forward expansion angle of 30 deg. to the endwall surface. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord and inlet velocity of the free-stream flow is 3.5 × 105 and the testing is done in a four-blade cascade with low Mach number condition (0.1 at the inlet). The blowing ratio of the coolant through the interface gap varies from M = 0.1 to M = 0.3, while the blowing ratio varies from M = 0.7 to M = 1.3 for the endwall film cooling holes. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are obtained using the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique. The results show that with an increasing blowing ratio the film-cooling effectiveness increases on the endwall. As the incidence angle varies from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., at low blowing ratio, the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly near the leading edge suction side area. The case of i = +10 deg. has better film-cooling performance at the downstream part of this region where the axial chord is between 0.15 and 0.25. However, the disadvantage of positive incidence appears when the blowing ratio increases, especially at the upstream part of near suction side region where the axial chord is between 0 and 0.15. On the main passage endwall surface, as the incidence angle changes from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly and the negative incidence appears to be more effective for the downstream part film cooling of the endwall surface where the axial chord is between 0.6 and 0.8.

  15. Free cooling phase-diagram of hard-spheres with short- and long-range interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Briones, J.S.L.; Thornton, A.R.; Luding, S.

    2014-01-01

    We study the stability, the clustering and the phase-diagram of free cooling granular gases. The systems consist of mono-disperse particles with additional non-contact (long-range) interactions, and are simulated here by the event-driven molecular dynamics algorithm with discrete (short-range should

  16. Exploring Inflated Pahohoe Lava Flow Morphologies and the Effects of Cooling Using a New Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth (e.g., Figure 1) indicate that the emplacement process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. Thus, interpretation of emplacement conditions for pahoehoe lava flows on Mars requires fundamentally different models. A new model that implements a simulation approach has recently been developed that allows exploration of a variety of key influences on pahoehoe lobe emplacement (e.g., source shape, confinement, slope). One important factor that has an impact on the final topographic shape and morphology of a pahoehoe lobe is the volumetric flow rate of lava, where cooling of lava on the lobe surface influences the likelihood of subsequent breakouts.

  17. Film-cooled turbine endwall in a transonic flow field; Filmgekuehlte Turbinenplattform in transsonischem Stroemungsfeld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicklas, M.

    2000-11-01

    Aero and thermodynamic measurements at the endwall of a turbine nozzle guide vane were carried out. These investigations are the first where the complete blade passage at the endwall in a transonic flow field is analysed for heat transfer and adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness. The aerodynamic measurements identify an intensive interaction between the coolant air and the secondary flow field. Similarly strong variations in heat transfer and film-cooling effectiveness were found. Analysis of the heat transfer measurements indicates that the heat transfer represents an indispensable tool for the evaluation of platform film-cooling design. On the basis of infrared temperature measurements, a procedure for accurate analysis of heat transfer and film-cooling effectiveness in a complex transonic flow field was developed. This measurement technique combines high accuracy with flexibility of application. These investigations have led to design improvements for film-cooling systems at the platform. (orig.) [German] Aero- und thermodynamische Messungen an einer Plattform eines Turbinenleitrads werden beschrieben. Erstmals wird in einem transsonischen Stroemungsfeld die komplette Seitenwand bezueglich des Waermeuebergangs und der adiabaten Filmkuehleffektivitaet untersucht. Die aerodynamischen Messungen zeigen eine intensive Wechselwirkung der Kuehlluft mit dem Sekundaerstroemungsfeld. Daraus resultierend treten starke Aenderungen des Waermeuebergangs und der Filmkuehleffektivitaet auf. Die Resultate der Waermeuebergangsmessungen zeigen, dass der Waermeuebergang eine wichtige Groesse fuer die Bewertung eines Filmkuehldesigns an einer Plattform darstellt. Ein Messverfahren auf der Grundlage von Infrarot-Temperaturmessungen fuer eine genaue Analyse des Waermeuebergangs und der Filmkuehleffektivitaet in den komplexen Verhaeltnissen einer transsonischen Stroemung wurde entwickelt. Mit der verwendeten Messtechnik wird eine hohe Genauigkeit bei der Ermittlung der quantitativen

  18. Solving the angular momentum problem in the cold feedback mechanism of cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pizzolato, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    We show that cold clumps in the intra--cluster medium (ICM) efficiently lose their angular momentum as they fall in, such that they can rapidly feed the central AGN and maintain a heating feedback process. Such cold clumps are predicted by the cold feedback model, a model for maintaining the ICM in cooling flows hot by a feedback process. The clumps very effectively lose their angular momentum in two channels: the drag force exerted by the ICM and the random collisions between clumps when they are close to the central black hole. We conclude that the angular momentum cannot prevent the accretion of the cold clumps, and the cold feedback mechanism is a viable model for a feedback mechanism in cooling flows. Cold feedback does not suffer from the severe problems of models that are based on the Bondi accretion.

  19. A jet-driven dynamo from jets-inflated bubbles in cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I suggest that the main process that amplifies magnetic fields in cooling flows in clusters and group of galaxies is a jet-driven dynamo (JEDD). The main processes that are behind the JEDD is the turbulence that is formed by the many vortices formed in the inflation processes of bubbles, and the large scale shear formed by the propagating jet. The typical amplification time of magnetic fields by the JEDD is approximately hundred million years. The vortices that create the turbulence are those that also transfer energy from the jets to the intra-cluster medium, by mixing shocked jet gas with the intra-cluster medium gas, and by exciting sound waves. The JEDD model adds magnetic fields to the cyclical behavior of energy and mass in the jet-feedback mechanism (JFM) in cooling flows.

  20. Computational Modelling of Couette Flow of Nanofluids with Viscous Heating and Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwole Daniel Makinde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of viscous heating and convective cooling on Couette flow and heat transfer characteristics of water base nanofluids containing Copper Oxide (CuO and Alumina (Al2O3 as nanoparticles is investigated. It is assumed that the nanofluid flows in a channel between two parallel plates with the channel’s upper plate accelerating and exchange heat with the ambient surrounding following the Newton’s law of cooling, while the lower plate is stationary and maintained at a constant temperature. Using appropriate similarity transformation, the governing Navier-Stokes and the energy equations are reduced to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These equations are solved analytically by regular perturbation method with series improvement technique and numerically by an efficient Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integration technique coupled with shooting method. The effects of the governing parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction, pressure drop and Nusselt number are presented graphically, and discussed quantitatively.

  1. Numerical study of a M-cycle cross-flow heat exchanger for indirect evaporative cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Changhong [Department of the Built Environment, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); School of Civil Engineering, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Zhao, Xudong; Smith, Stefan [Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Riffat, S.B. [Department of the Built Environment, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, numerical analyses of the thermal performance of an indirect evaporative air cooler incorporating a M-cycle cross-flow heat exchanger has been carried out. The numerical model was established from solving the coupled governing equations for heat and mass transfer between the product and working air, using the finite-element method. The model was developed using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) environment and validated by published experimental data. Correlation between the cooling (wet-bulb) effectiveness, system COP and a number of air flow/exchanger parameters was developed. It is found that lower channel air velocity, lower inlet air relative humidity, and higher working-to-product air ratio yielded higher cooling effectiveness. The recommended average air velocities in dry and wet channels should not be greater than 1.77 m/s and 0.7 m/s, respectively. The optimum flow ratio of working-to-product air for this cooler is 50%. The channel geometric sizes, i.e. channel length and height, also impose significant impact to system performance. Longer channel length and smaller channel height contribute to increase of the system cooling effectiveness but lead to reduced system COP. The recommend channel height is 4 mm and the dimensionless channel length, i.e., ratio of the channel length to height, should be in the range 100 to 300. Numerical study results indicated that this new type of M-cycle heat and mass exchanger can achieve 16.7% higher cooling effectiveness compared with the conventional cross-flow heat and mass exchanger for the indirect evaporative cooler. The model of this kind is new and not yet reported in literatures. The results of the study help with design and performance analyses of such a new type of indirect evaporative air cooler, and in further, help increasing market rating of the technology within building air conditioning sector, which is currently dominated by the conventional compression refrigeration technology. (author)

  2. Use of Distribution Devices for Hydraulic Profiling of Coolant Flow in Core Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Satin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In setting up a reactor plant for the transportation-power module of the megawatt class an important task is to optimize the path of flow, i.e. providing moderate hydraulic resistance, uniform distribution of the coolant. Significant contribution to the hydraulic losses makes one selected design of the coolant supplies. It is, in particular, hemispherical or semi-elliptical shape of the supply reservoir, which is selected to reduce its mass, resulting in the formation of torusshaped vortex in the inlet manifold, that leads to uneven coolant velocity at the inlet into the core, the flow pulsations, hydraulic losses.To control the flow redistribution in the core according to the level of energy are used the switchgear - deflectors installed in a hemispherical reservoir supplying coolant to the fuel elements (FE of the core of gas-cooled reactor. This design solution has an effect on the structure of the flow, rate in the cooling duct, and the flow resistance of the collector.In this paper we present the results of experiments carried out on the gas dynamic model of coolant paths, deflectors, and core, comprising 55 fuel rod simulators. Numerical simulation of flow in two-parameter model, using the k-ε turbulence model, and the software package ANSYS CFX v14.0 is performed. The paper demonstrates that experimental results are in compliance with calculated ones.The results obtained suggest that the use of switchgear ensures a coolant flow balance directly at the core inlet, thereby providing temperature reduction of fuel rods with a uniform power release in the cross-section. Considered options to find constructive solutions for deflectors give an idea to solve the problem of reducing hydraulic losses in the coolant paths, to decrease pulsation components of flow in the core and length of initial section of flow stabilization.

  3. Gas phase depletion and flow dynamics in horizontal MOCVD reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Ven, J.; Rutten, G. M. J.; Raaijmakers, M. J.; Giling, L. J.

    1986-08-01

    Growth rates of GaAs in the MOCVD process have been studied as a function of both lateral and axial position in horizontal reactor cells with rectangular cross-sections. A model to describe growth rates in laminar flow systems on the basis of concentration profiles under diffusion controlled conditions has been developed. The derivation of the growth rate equations includes the definition of an entrance length for the concentration profile to developed. In this region, growth rates appear to decrease with the 1/3 power of the axial position. Beyond this region, an exponential decrease is found. For low Rayleigh number conditions, the present experimental results show a very satisfactory agreement with the model without parameter fitting for both rectangular and tapered cells, and with both H 2 and N 2 as carrier gases. Theory also predicts that uniform deposition can be obtained over large areas in the flow direction for tapered cells, which has indeed been achieved experimentally. The influence of top-cooling in the present MOCVD system has been considered in more detail. From the experimental results, conclusions could be drawn concerning the flow characteristics. For low Rayleigh numbers (present study ≲ 700) it follows that growth rate distributions correspond with forced laminar flow characteristics. For relatively high Rayleigh numbers (present work 1700-2800), free convective effects with vortex formation are important. These conclusions are not specific for the present system, but apply to horizontal cold-wall reactors in general. On the basis of the present observations, recommendations for a cell design to obtain large area homogeneous deposition have been formulated. In addition, this work supports the conclusion that the final decomposition of trimethylgallium in the MOCVD process mainly takes place at the hot substrate and susceptor and not in the gas phase.

  4. Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, A.A.

    1976-12-01

    The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  5. The effects of magnetic fields in cold clouds in cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friaça, A. C. S.; Jafelice, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Large masses of absorbing material are inferred to exist in cooling flows in clusters of galaxies from the excess X-ray absorption in the spectra of some X-ray clusters. The absorbing material is probably in the form of cold clouds pressure-confined by the surrounding, hot, X-ray-emitting gas. The cold clouds could remain relatively static until they are destroyed by evaporation or ablation, or give rise to star formation. If the final fate of the clouds is stars, the initial mass function (IMF) of the stars formed over the whole cooling-flow region (r~ 100 kpc) should be biased to low masses, to avoid a very luminous, blue halo for the central galaxy of the cooling flow. However, there is evidence for bright star formation in the innermost (rJeans mass, in establishing a natural mass-scale for star formation. When this new mass-scale is taken into account, we obtain the right variation of the biasing of the IMF with the radius in addition to inhibition of high-mass star formation at large radii. We also demonstrate that magnetic reconnection is a more efficient mechanism than ambipolar diffusion to remove magnetic fields in cold clouds.

  6. A jet-driven dynamo (JEDD) from jets-inflated bubbles in cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soker, Noam

    2017-01-01

    I suggest that the main process that amplifies magnetic fields in cooling flows in clusters and group of galaxies is a jet-driven dynamo (JEDD). The main processes that are behind the JEDD is the turbulence that is formed by the many vortices formed in the inflation processes of bubbles, and the large scale shear formed by the propagating jet. It is sufficient that a strong turbulence exits in the vicinity of the jets and bubbles, just where the shear is large. The typical amplification time of magnetic fields by the JEDD near the jets and bubbles is approximately hundred million years. The amplification time in the entire cooling flow region is somewhat longer. The vortices that create the turbulence are those that also transfer energy from the jets to the intra-cluster medium, by mixing shocked jet gas with the intra-cluster medium gas, and by exciting sound waves. The JEDD model adds magnetic fields to the cyclical behavior of energy and mass in the jet-feedback mechanism (JFM) in cooling flows.

  7. Testing the cooling flow model in the intermediate polar EX Hydrae

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, G J M; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W; Suleimanov, V; .,

    2015-01-01

    We use the best available X-ray data from the intermediate polar EX Hydrae to study the cooling-flow model often applied to interpret the X-ray spectra of these accreting magnetic white dwarf binaries. First, we resolve a long-standing discrepancy between the X-ray and optical determinations of the mass of the white dwarf in EX Hya by applying new models of the inner disk truncation radius. Our fits to the X-ray spectrum now agree with the white dwarf mass of 0.79 M$_{\\odot}$sun determined using dynamical methods through spectroscopic observations of the secondary. We use a simple isobaric cooling flow model to derive the emission line fluxes, emission measure distribution, and H-like to He-like line ratios for comparison with the 496 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observation of EX Hydrae. We find that the H/He ratios are not well reproduced by this simple isobaric cooling flow model and show that while H-like line fluxes can be accurately predicted, fluxes of lower-Z He-like lines are significa...

  8. Droplet Manipulations in Two Phase Flow Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen M. Pit

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though droplet microfluidics has been developed since the early 1980s, the number of applications that have resulted in commercial products is still relatively small. This is partly due to an ongoing maturation and integration of existing methods, but possibly also because of the emergence of new techniques, whose potential has not been fully realized. This review summarizes the currently existing techniques for manipulating droplets in two-phase flow microfluidics. Specifically, very recent developments like the use of acoustic waves, magnetic fields, surface energy wells, and electrostatic traps and rails are discussed. The physical principles are explained, and (potential advantages and drawbacks of different methods in the sense of versatility, flexibility, tunability and durability are discussed, where possible, per technique and per droplet operation: generation, transport, sorting, coalescence and splitting.

  9. Simulation of Cold Flow in a Truncated Ideal Nozzle with Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, K. E.; Ruf, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flow transients during rocket start-up and shut-down can lead to significant side loads on rocket nozzles. The capability to estimate these side loads computationally can streamline the nozzle design process. Towards this goal, the flow in a truncated ideal contour (TIC) nozzle has been simulated using RANS and URANS for a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) aimed to match a series of cold flow experiments performed at the NASA MSFC Nozzle Test Facility. These simulations were performed with varying turbulence model choices and for four approximations of the supersonic film injection geometry, each of which was created with a different simplification of the test article geometry. The results show that although a reasonable match to experiment can be obtained with varying levels of geometric fidelity, the modeling choices made do not fully represent the physics of flow separation in a TIC nozzle with film cooling.

  10. Next steps in two-phase flow: executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPippo, R.

    1980-09-01

    The executive summary includes the following topics of discussion: the state of affairs; the fundamental governing equations; the one-dimensional mixture model; the drift-flux model; the Denver Research Institute two-phase geothermal flow program; two-phase flow pattern transition criteria; a two-fluid model under development; the mixture model as applied to geothermal well flow; DRI downwell instrumentation; two-phase flow instrumentation; the Sperry Research Corporation downhole pump and gravity-head heat exchanger systems; and the Brown University two-phase flow experimental program. (MHR)

  11. Secondary flow and heat transfer coefficient distributions in the developing flow region of ribbed turbine blade cooling passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Peter; McGilvray, Matthew; Gillespie, David R. H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental and numerical study of the development and coupling of aerodynamic flows and heat transfer within a model ribbed internal cooling passage to provide insight into the development of secondary flows. Static instrumentation was installed at the end of a long smooth passage and used to measure local flow features in a series of experiments where ribs were incrementally added upstream. This improves test turnaround time and allows higher-resolution heat transfer coefficient distributions to be captured, using a hybrid transient liquid crystal technique. A composite heat transfer coefficient distribution for a 12-rib-pitch passage is reported: notably the behaviour is dominated by the development of the secondary flow in the passage throughout. Both the aerodynamic and heat transfer test data were compared to numerical simulations developed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics solver. By conducting a number of simulations it was possible to interrogate the validity of the underlying assumptions of the experimental strategy; their validity is discussed. The results capture the developing size and strength of the vortical structures in secondary flow. The local flow field was shown to be strongly coupled to the enhancement of heat transfer coefficient. Comparison of the experimental and numerical data generally shows excellent agreement in the level of heat transfer coefficient predicted, though the numerical simulations fail to capture some local enhancement on both the ribbed and smooth surfaces. Where this was the case, the coupled flow and heat transfer measurements were able to identify missing velocity field characteristics.

  12. A Review On Free Cooling Through Heat Pipe by Using Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.Futane ,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage is renewable source of energy to develop energy storage system, which minimize environmental impact such as ozone depletion and global warming. Thermal energy can be stored as latent heat which is latter use when substance changes from one phase to another phase by either freezing or melting. Now a days need of refrigeration and air conditioning has been increased, which can be achieved by free cooling, for this various substances are use, depending upon required temperature. Phase change materials are one of the substances having low temperature of melting and solidification.

  13. Supercritical supersaturations and ultrafast cooling of the growth solution in liquid-phase epitaxy of semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. V.; Deryagin, N. G.; Tret'yakov, D. N.

    1996-04-01

    A method for accomplishing ultrafast cooling is proposed which makes possible supercritical supersaturations of the growth solution in liquid-phase epitaxy. Growth boat designs providing cooling rates as high as 0268-1242/11/4/025/img1 are considered. The temperatures of contact, 0268-1242/11/4/025/img2, of a GaAs substrate with a Ga-based solution and of a Si substrate with a Sn-based growth solution, calculated for various substrate 0268-1242/11/4/025/img3 and solution temperatures 0268-1242/11/4/025/img4, are in good agreement with experimental values. The maximum attainable supercooling is markedly increased to as high as 0268-1242/11/4/025/img5 for the Ga - As system, when the growth solution is subjected to ultrafast cooling. The prospects of using the method for fabricating heterostructures with a large lattice mismatch are discussed.

  14. Analysis on Non-Uniform Flow in Steam Generator During Steady State Natural Circulation Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susyadi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on non uniform flow behavior among U-tube in steam generator during natural circulation cooling has been conducted using RELAP5. The investigation is performed by modeling the steam generator into multi channel models, i.e. 9-tubes model. Two situations are implemented, high pressure and low pressure cases. Using partial model, the calculation simulates situation similar to the natural circulation test performed in LSTF. The imposed boundary conditions are flow rate, quality, pressure of the primary side, feed water temperature, steam generator liquid level, and pressure in the secondary side. Calculation result shows that simulation using model with nine tubes is capable to capture important non-uniform phenomena such as reverse flow, fill-and-dump, and stagnant vertical stratification. As a result of appropriate simulation of non uniform flow, the calculated steam generator outlet flow in the primary loop is stable as observed in the experiments. The results also clearly indicate the importance of simulation of non-uniform flow in predicting both the flow stability and heat transfer between the primary and secondary side. In addition, the history of transient plays important role on the selection of the flow distribution among tubes. © 2007 Atom Indonesia. All rights reserved

  15. Coupling model and solving approach for performance evaluation of natural draft counter-flow wet cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When searching for the optimum condenser cooling water flow in a thermal power plant with natural draft cooling towers, it is essential to evaluate the outlet water temperature of cooling towers when the cooling water flow and inlet water temperature change. However, the air outlet temperature and tower draft or inlet air velocity are strongly coupled for natural draft cooling towers. Traditional methods, such as trial and error method, graphic method and iterative methods are not simple and efficient enough to be used for plant practice. In this paper, we combine Merkel equation with draft equation, and develop the coupled description for performance evaluation of natural draft cooling towers. This model contains two inputs: the cooling water flow, the inlet cooling water temperature and two outputs: the outlet water temperature, the inlet air velocity, equivalent to tower draft. In this model, we furthermore put forward a soft-sensing algorithm to calculate the total drag coefficient instead of empirical correlations. Finally, we design an iterative approach to solve this coupling model, and illustrate three cases to prove that the coupling model and solving approach proposed in our paper are effective for cooling tower performance evaluation.

  16. Experimental investigations on the cooling of a motorcycle helmet with phase change material (PCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fok S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal comfort of motorcycle helmet during hot weather is important as it can affect the physiological and psychological condition of the rider. This paper examines the use of phase change material (PCM to cool a motorcycle helmet and presents the experimental investigations on the influences of the simulated solar radiation, wind speed, and heat generation rate on the cooling system. The result shows that the PCM-cooled helmet is able to prolong the thermal comfort period compared to a normal helmet. The findings also indicate that the heat generation from the head is the predominant factor that will affect the PCM melting time. Simulated solar radiation and ram-air due to vehicle motion under adiabatic condition can have very little influences on the PCM melting time. The results suggested that the helmet usage time would be influenced by the amount of heat generated from the head. Some major design considerations based on these findings have been included. Although this investigation focuses on the cooling of a motorcyclist helmet, the findings would also be useful for the development of PCM-cooling systems in other applications.

  17. Changes in central retinal artery blood flow after ocular warming and cooling in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Retinal perfusion variability impacts ocular disease and physiology. Aim: To evaluate the response of central retinal artery (CRA blood flow to temperature alterations in 20 healthy volunteers. Setting and Design: Non-interventional experimental human study. Materials and Methods: Baseline data recorded: Ocular surface temperature (OST in °C (thermo-anemometer, CRA peak systolic velocity (PSV and end diastolic velocity (EDV in cm/s using Color Doppler. Ocular laterality and temperature alteration (warming by electric lamp/cooling by ice-gel pack were randomly assigned. Primary outcomes recorded were: OST and intraocular pressure (IOP immediately after warming or cooling and ten minutes later; CRA-PSV and EDV at three, six and nine minutes warming or cooling. Statistical Analysis: Repeated measures ANOVA. Results: (n = 20; μ±SD: Pre-warming values were; OST: 34.5±1.02°C, CRA-PSV: 9.3±2.33cm/s, CRA-EDV: 4.6±1.27cm/s. OST significantly increased by 1.96°C (95% CI: 1.54 to 2.37 after warming, but returned to baseline ten minutes later. Only at three minutes, the PSV significantly rose by 1.21cm/s (95% CI: 0.51to1.91. Pre-cooling values were: OST: 34.5±0.96°C, CRA-PSV: 9.7±2.45 cm/s, CRA-EDV: 4.7±1.12cm/s. OST significantly decreased by 2.81°C (95% CI: -2.30 to -3.37 after cooling, and returned to baseline at ten minutes. There was a significant drop in CRA-PSV by 1.10cm/s (95% CI: -2.05 to -0.15 and CRA-EDV by 0.81 (95% CI: -1.47 to -0.14 at three minutes. At six minutes both PSV (95% CI: -1.38 to -0.03 and EDV (95% CI: -1.26 to -0.02 were significantly lower. All values at ten minutes were comparable to baseline. The IOP showed insignificant alteration on warming (95% CI of difference: -0.17 to 1.57mmHg, but was significantly lower after cooling (95% CI: -2.95 to -4.30mmHg. After ten minutes, IOP had returned to baseline. Conclusion : This study confirms that CRA flow significantly increases on warming and decreases on cooling

  18. Transformation behavior of the γU(Zr,Nb) phase under continuous cooling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komar Varela, C.L., E-mail: cavarela@cnea.gov.ar [Instituto Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gribaudo, L.M. [Gerencia de Materiales, GAEN, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); González, R.O.; Aricó, S.F. [Instituto Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Materiales, GAEN, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-10-15

    The selected alloy for designing a high-density monolithic-type nuclear fuel with U–Zr–Nb alloy as meat and Zry-4 as cladding, has to remain in the γU(Zr,Nb) phase during the whole fabrication process. Therefore, it is necessary to define a range of concentrations in which the γU(Zr,Nb) phase does not decompose under the process conditions. In this work, several U alloys with concentrations between 28.2–66.9 at.% Zr and 0–13.3 at.% Nb were fabricated to study the possible transformations of the γU(Zr,Nb) phase under different continuous cooling conditions. The results of the electrical resistivity vs temperature experiments are presented. For a cooling rate of 4 °C/min a linear regression was determined by fitting the starting decomposition temperature as a function of Nb concentration. Under these conditions, a concentration of 45.3 at.% Nb would be enough to avoid any transformation of the γU(Zr,Nb) phase. In experiments that involve higher cooling conditions, it has been determined that this concentration can be halved.

  19. X-RAY AND OPTICAL EMISSION-LINE FILAMENTS IN THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER 2A 0335+096

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARAZIN, CL; OCONNELL, RW; MCNAMARA, BR

    1992-01-01

    We present a new high-resolution X-ray image of the 2A 0335 + 096 cluster of galaxies obtained with the High Resolution Imager (HRI) aboard the ROSAT satellite. The presence of dense gas having a very short cooling time in the central regions confirms its earlier identification as a cooling flow. Th

  20. X-RAY AND OPTICAL EMISSION-LINE FILAMENTS IN THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER 2A 0335+096

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARAZIN, CL; OCONNELL, RW; MCNAMARA, BR

    1992-01-01

    We present a new high-resolution X-ray image of the 2A 0335 + 096 cluster of galaxies obtained with the High Resolution Imager (HRI) aboard the ROSAT satellite. The presence of dense gas having a very short cooling time in the central regions confirms its earlier identification as a cooling flow. Th

  1. Heating Cold Clumps by Jet-inflated Bubbles in Cooling Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hillel, Shlomi

    2014-01-01

    We simulate the evolution of dense-cool clumps embedded in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of cooling flow clusters of galaxies in response to multiple jet-activity cycles, and find that the main heating process of the clumps is mixing with the hot shocked jets' gas, the bubbles, while shocks have a limited role. We use the PLUTO hydrodynamical code in 2.5 dimensions, i.e., 3D with imposed axisymmetry, to follow the thermal evolution of the clumps. We find that the inflation process of hot bubbles, that appear as X-ray deficient cavities in observations, is accompanied by complicated induced vortices inside and around the bubbles. These vortices induce efficient mixing of the hot bubbles' gas with the ICM and cool clumps, resulting in a substantial increase of the temperature and entropy of the clumps. For the parameters used by us heating by shocks barely competes with radiative cooling, even after 25 consecutive shocks excited during 0.5 Gyr of simulation. Some clumps are shaped to filamentary structure that...

  2. Numerical model of characteristics of a particulate debris bed coolability with single phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Je Whan

    2008-02-15

    Designed on the basis of defense-in-depth concept, liquid metal cooled fast reactor, such as KALIMER-600 (Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor) is unlikely to undergo the HCDA (hypothetical core disruptive accident). Because of its inherent safety features, most of the incidents of abnormal operation end with reactor trip and no further progression. Under a postulated, very low probable core meltdown scenario without reactor trip, however, there exists a possibility of re-criticality and vessel melting and the status of debris generated plays an important role. For this reason, the analysis on the ability of post-accident heat removal (PAHR) should be preceded. As a part of this, single phase flow coolability analysis of the particulate debris bed formed at the top of core catcher has been performed to achieve in-vessel fuel retention. The analysis is based on the Ergun equation and Macdonald's work that describe the phenomena of flow through a porous media with Hardee and Nilson's study of temperature relationship of the debris beds. The forming process of particulate debris bed is described and single phase cooling model with numerical results are presented. The analysis was conducted in the condition of three cases, inner and inner+middle and whole core meltdown case. It was proved that the inner and inner+middle core meltdown case could be cooled down with single phase flow. The whole core meltdown case will need some other management. Also, parameter sensitivity test was done.

  3. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  4. ASTER/AVHRR Data Hybridization to determine Pyroclastic Flow cooling curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reath, K. A.; Wright, R.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Shiveluch Volcano (Kamchatka, Russia) has been in a consistent state of eruption for the past 15 years. During this period different eruption styles have been documented including: sub-plinian events, dome growth and collapse, and subsequent debris flow deposits. For example, on June 25-26, 2009 a pyroclastic debris flow was emplaced and the eruption onset that produced it was recorded by a series of seismic events spanning several hours. However, due to cloud cover, visual confirmation of the exact emplacement time was obscured. Orbital remote sensing was able to image the deposit repeatedly over the subsequent months. ASTER is a high spatial resolution (90m), low temporal resolution (2 - 4 days at the poles, 16 days at the equator) thermal infrared (TIR) sensor on the NASA Terra satellite. AVHRR is a high temporal resolution (minutes to several hours), low spatial resolution (1km) spaceborne TIR sensor on a series of NOAA satellites. Combined, these sensors provide a unique opportunity to fuse high-spatial and high-temporal resolution data to better observe changes on the surface of the deposit over time. For example, ASTER data were used to determine the flow area and to provide several data points for average temperature while AVHRR data were used to increase the amount of data points. Through this method an accurate average cooling rate over a three month period was determined. This cooling curve was then examined to derive several features about the deposit that were previously unknown. The time of emplacement and period of time needed for negligible thermal output were first determined by extrapolating the cooling curve in time. The total amount of heat output and total flow volume of the deposit were also calculated. This volume was then compared to the volume of the dome to calculate the percentage of collapse. This method can be repeated for other flow deposits to determine if there is a consistent correlation between the dome growth rate, the average

  5. Two-phase flow in micro and nanofluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling

    2009-01-01

    This thesis provides experimental data and theoretical analysis on two-phase flow in devices with different layouts of micrometer or nanometer-size channels. A full flow diagram is presented for oil and water flow in head-on microfluidic devices. Morphologically different flow regimes (dripping, jet

  6. On-Chip Flow Control for 2-PhaseNanofluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Kim, Tae Song; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Twek-Dong; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Choo, Jaebm; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel method to control two-phase flow in nanochannels using regulating microchannels connected to the nanochannels. The flow rate inside a nanochannel can be regulated based on the pressure drops along the channel network. Stable flows with flow rates as low as 10-5 µL.min-1 (< pL.s-

  7. The Growth of Black Holes and Bulges at the Cores of Cooling Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rafferty, D A; Nulsen, P E J; Wise, M W

    2006-01-01

    Central cluster galaxies (cDs) in cooling flows are growing rapidly through gas accretion and star formation. At the same time, AGN outbursts fueled by accretion onto supermassive black holes are generating X-ray cavity systems and driving outflows that exceed those in powerful quasars. We show that the resulting bulge and black hole growth follows a trend that is roughly consistent with the slope of the local (Magorrian) relation between bulge and black hole mass for nearby quiescent ellipticals. However, a large scatter suggests that cD bulges and black holes do not always grow in lock-step. New measurements made with XMM, Chandra, and FUSE of the condensation rates in cooling flows are now approaching or are comparable to the star formation rates, alleviating the need for an invisible sink of cold matter. We show that the remaining radiation losses can be offset by AGN outbursts in more than half of the systems in our sample, indicating that the level of cooling and star formation is regulated by AGN feedb...

  8. Optimization of mechanical draft counter flow wet-cooling tower using artificial bee colony algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, R.V., E-mail: ravipudirao@gmail.co [S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, Gujarat State 395 007 (India); Patel, V.K. [S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, Gujarat State 395 007 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} ABC algorithm is used for optimization of counter flow wet-cooling tower. {yields} Minimizing the total annual cost for specific heat duty is the objective function. {yields} Six examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. {yields} The results are compared with the results of GAMS optimization package. {yields} The ABC algorithm can be modified to suit optimization of other thermal systems. -- Abstract: This study explores the use of artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm for design optimization of mechanical draft counter flow wet-cooling tower. Minimizing the total annual cost for specific heat duty requirement is considered as objective function. Three design variables such as water to air mass ratio, mass velocity of water and mass velocity of air are considered for optimization. Evaluations of the cooling tower geometry and performances are based on an adaptive version of Merkel's method. Temperature and enthalpy constraints are included in the optimization procedure. Six examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm. The results of optimization using ABC are validated by comparing with those obtained by using GAMS optimization package. The effect of variation of ABC parameters on the convergence and optimum value of the objective function has also been presented.

  9. Influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout in boiling two-phase upward flow within a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, S.; Fukano, T. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    When a flow obstruction such as a cylindrical spacer is set in a boiling two-phase flow with-in an annular channel, the inner tube of which is used as a heater, the temperature on the surface of the heating tube is severely affected by its existence. In some cases the cylindrical spacer has a cooling effect, and in the other cases it causes the dryout of the cooling water film on the heating surface resulting in the burnout of the heating tube. In the present paper we have focused our attention on the influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout of the heating tube in boiling two-phase flow.

  10. TWO PHASE FLOW SPLIT MODEL FOR PARALLEL CHANNELS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ifeanyichukwu Onwuka

    The equations are solved using the Broyden'smethod ... channel system subjected to a two-phase flow transient, and the results have been very .... system pressure, the heat addition rates inside ... three dimensional flows in the LP.

  11. Compact counter-flow cooling system with subcooled gravity-fed circulating liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Sasaki, A.; Watanabe, H.; Kawahara, T.; Hamabe, M.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2010-11-01

    A liquid nitrogen (LN2) is usually used to keep the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable low temperature. A pump is utilized to circulate LN2 inside the cryopipes. In order to minimize heat leakage, a thermal siphon circulation scheme can be realized instead. Here, we discuss the effectiveness of thermal siphon with counter-flow circulation loop composed of cryogen flow channel and inner cable channel. The main feature of the system is the existence of essential parasitic heat exchange between upwards and downwards flows. Feasibility of the proposed scheme for cable up to 500 m in length has been investigated numerically. Calculated profiles of temperature and pressure show small differences of T and p in the inner and the outer flows at the same elevation, which allows not worrying about mechanical stability of the cable. In the case under consideration the thermal insulating properties of a conventional electrical insulating material (polypropylene laminated paper, PPLP) appear to be sufficient. Two interesting effects were disclosed due to analysis of subcooling of LN2. In case of highly inclined siphon subcooling causes significant increase of temperature maximum that can breakup of superconductivity. In case of slightly inclined siphon high heat flux from outer flow to inner flow causes condensation of nitrogen gas in outer channel. It leads to circulation loss. Results of numerical analyses indicate that counter-flow thermosiphon cooling system is a promising way to increase performance of short-length power transmission (PT) lines, but conventional subcooling technique should be applied carefully.

  12. A mechanical model for phase-separation in debris flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pudasaini, Shiva P

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phase-separation between solid and fluid phases as a mixture mass moves down slope is a long-standing challenge. Here, we propose an extension of the two phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) by including a new mechanism, called separation-flux, that leads to strong phase-separation in avalanche and debris flows while balancing the enhanced solid flux with the reduced fluid flux. The separation flux mechanism is capable of describing the dynamically evolving phase-separation and levee formation in a multi-phase, geometrically three-dimensional debris flow. These are often observed phenomena in natural debris flows and industrial processes that involve the transportation of particulate solid-fluid mixture material. The novel separation-flux model includes several dominant physical and mechanical aspects such as pressure gradients, volume fractions of solid and fluid phases and their gradients, shear-rates, flow depth, material friction, viscosity, material densities, topographic ...

  13. The Evolution of Elliptic Flow Under First Order Phase Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯启春; 王清尚; 刘剑利; 任延宇; 张景波; 霍雷

    2012-01-01

    Elliptic flow for non-central Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200 GeV is investigated with a 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamic model. We analyze the softening effect by the velocity along the axis. The contribution of the elliptic flow from the QGP phase, mixed phase and hadron gas phase is studied. The relation between the sound horizon and evolution of the elliptic flow is discussed.

  14. Using multi-shell phase change materials layers for cooling a lithium-ion battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasehi Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the cooling methods in engineering systems is usage of phase change materials. Phase change materials or PCMs, which have high latent heats, are usually used where high energy absorption in a constant temperature is required. This work presents a numerical analysis of PCMs effects on cooling Li-ion batteries and their decrease in temperature levels during intense discharge. In this study, three PCM shells with different thermo-physical specifications located around a battery pack is examined. The results of each possible arrangement are compared together and the best arrangement leading to the lowest battery temperature during discharge is identified. In addition, the recovery time for the system which is the time required for the PCMs to refreeze is investigated.

  15. Pressure drop and heat transfer of a mercury single-phase flow and an air-mercury two-phase flow in a helical tube under a strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Minoru E-mail: mtakahas@nr.titech.ac.jp; Momozaki, Yoichi

    2000-11-01

    For the reduction of a large magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop of a liquid metal single-phase flow, a liquid metal two-phase flow cooling system has been proposed. As a fundamental study, MHD pressure drops and heat transfer characteristics of a mercury single-phase flow and an air-mercury two-phase flow were experimentally investigated. A strong transverse magnetic field relevant to the fusion reactor conditions was applied to the mercury single-phase flow and the air-mercury two-phase flow in a helically coiled tube that was inserted in the vertical bore of a solenoidal superconducting magnet. It was found that MHD pressure drops of a mercury single-phase flow in the helically coiled tube were nearly equal to those in a straight tube. The Nusselt number at an outside wall was higher than that at an inside wall both in the mercury single-phase flow in the absence and presence of a magnetic field. The Nusselt number of the mercury single-phase flow decreased, increased and again decreased with an increase in the magnetic flux density. MHD pressure drops did not decrease appreciably by injecting air into a mercury flow and changing the mercury flow into the air-mercury two-phase flow. Remarkable heat transfer enhancement did not appear by the air injection. The injection of air into the mercury flow enhanced heat transfer in the ranges of high mercury flow rate and low magnetic flux density, possibly due to the agitation effect of air bubbles. The air injection deteriorated heat transfer in the range of low mercury flow rates possibly because of the occupation of air near heating wall.

  16. A MODEL FOR PREDICTING PHASE INVERSION IN OIL-WATER TWO-PHASE PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jing; LI Qing-ping; YAO Hai-yuan; YU Da

    2006-01-01

    Experiments of phase inversion characteristics for horizontal oil-water two-phase flow in a stainless steel pipe loop (25.7 mm inner diameter,52 m long) are conducted. A new viewpoint is brought forward about the process of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Using the relations between the total free energies of the pre-inversion and post-inversion dispersions, a model for predicting phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow has been developed that considers the characteristics of pipe flow. This model is compared against other models with relevant data of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Results indicate that this model is better than other models in terms of calculation precision and applicability. The model is useful for guiding the design for optimal performance and safety in the operation of oil-water two-phase pipe flow in oil fields.

  17. Micro free-flow IEF enhanced by active cooling and functionalized gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Jacob W; Jensen, Klavs F

    2006-12-01

    Rapid free-flow IEF is achieved in a microfluidic device by separating the electrodes from the focusing region with porous buffer regions. Moving the electrodes outside enables the use of large electric fields without the detrimental effects of bubble formation in the active region. The anode and cathode porous buffer regions, which are formed by acrylamide functionalized with immobilized pH groups, allow ion transport while providing buffering capacity. Thermoelectric cooling mitigates the effects of Joule heating on sample focusing at high field strengths (approximately 500 V/cm). This localized cooling was observed to increase device performance. Rapid focusing of low-molecular-weight p/ markers and Protein G-mouse IgG complexes demonstrate the versatility of the technique. Simulations provide insight into and predict device performance based on a well-defined sample composition.

  18. Numerical investigation of transient heat transfer to hydromagnetic channel flow with radiative heat and convective cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, O. D.; Chinyoka, T.

    2010-12-01

    This present study consists of a numerical investigation of transient heat transfer in channel flow of an electrically conducting variable viscosity Boussinesq fluid in the presence of a magnetic field and thermal radiation. The temperature dependent nature of viscosity is assumed to follow an exponentially model and the system exchanges heat with the ambient following Newton's law of cooling. The governing nonlinear equations of momentum and energy transport are solved numerically using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Solutions are presented in graphical form and given in terms of fluid velocity, fluid temperature, skin friction and heat transfer rate for various parametric values. Our results reveal that combined effect of thermal radiation, magnetic field, viscosity variation and convective cooling have significant impact in controlling the rate of heat transfer in the boundary layer region.

  19. Evidence for a heated gas bubble inside the "cooling flow" region of MKW3s

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzotta, P; Paerels, F B S; Ferrigno, C; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Mewe, R; Forman, W R

    2002-01-01

    We report on the deep Chandra observation of central r=200kpc region of the cluster of galaxies MKW3s which was previously identified as a moderate cooling flow cluster. The Chandra image reveals two striking features -- a 100kpc long and 21kpc wide filament, extending from the center to the south-west and a nearly circular, 50kpc diameter depression 90 kpc south of the X-ray peak. The temperature map shows that the filamentary structure is colder while the surface brightness depression is hotter than the average cluster temperature at any radius. The hot and the cold regions indicate that both cooling and heating processes are taking place in the center of MKW3s. We argue that the surface brightness depression is produced by a heated, low-density gas bubble along the line of sight. We suggest that the heated bubble is produced by short-lived nuclear outbursts from the central galaxy.

  20. RESEARCH ON METHOD TO CALCULATE VELOCITIES OF SOLID PHASE AND LIQUID PHASE IN DEBRIS FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Velocities of solid phase and liquid phase in debris flow are one key problem to research on impact and abrasion mechanism of banks and control structures under action of debris flow. Debris flow was simplified as two-phase liquid composed of solid phase with the same diameter particles and liquid phase with the same mechanical features. Assume debris flow was one-dimension two-phase liquid moving to one direction,then general equations of velocities of solid phase and liquid phase were founded in twophase theory. Methods to calculate average pressures, volume forces and surface forces of debris flow control volume were established. Specially, surface forces were ascertained using Bingham's rheology equation of liquid phase and Bagnold's testing results about interaction between particles of solid phase. Proportional coefficient of velocities between liquid phase and solid phase was put forward, meanwhile, divergent coefficient between theoretical velocity and real velocity of solid phase was provided too. To state succinctly before, method to calculate velocities of solid phase and liquid phase was obtained through solution to general equations. The method is suitable for both viscous debris flow and thin debris flow. Additionally, velocities every phase can be identified through analyzing deposits in-situ after occurring of debris flow. It is obvious from engineering case the result in the method is consistent to that in real-time field observation.

  1. A Mathematical Model for Forecasting Distortion of Workpieces with Phase Transformation on Cooling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiansong YE; Yikang LIU; Yuanjun ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    A temperature phase transformation stress coupled 3D nonlinear mathematical model has been proposed for forecasting distortion of workpieces on the cooling processes in this paper. Moreover, a series of subroutines were developed on the MARC (analysis research corporation) software platform and the simulation result is basically identical with the experimental one that measured on the workpiece shape with LEITZ equipment. This verifies that the mathematical model and method are feasible.

  2. Thermo-Fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamrou

    2011-01-01

    "Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow, Second Edition" is focused on the fundamental physics of two-phase flow. The authors present the detailed theoretical foundation of multi-phase flow thermo-fluid dynamics as they apply to: Nuclear reactor transient and accident analysis; Energy systems; Power generation systems; Chemical reactors and process systems; Space propulsion; Transport processes. This edition features updates on two-phase flow formulation and constitutive equations and CFD simulation codes such as FLUENT and CFX, new coverage of the lift force model, which is of part

  3. Pressure Loss across Tube Bundles in Two-phase Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Woo Gun; Banzragch, Dagdan [Hannam Univ., Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    An analytical model was developed by Sim to estimate the two-phase damping ratio for upward two-phase flow perpendicular to horizontal tube bundles. The parameters of two-phase flow, such as void fraction and pressure loss evaluated in the model, were calculated based on existing experimental formulations. However, it is necessary to implement a few improvements in the formulations for the case of tube bundles. For the purpose of the improved formulation, we need more information about the two-phase parameters, which can be found through experimental test. An experiment is performed with a typical normal square array of cylinders subjected to the two-phase flow of air-water in the tube bundles, to calculate the two-phase Euler number and the two-phase friction multiplier. The pitch-to-diameter ratio is 1.35 and the diameter of cylinder is 18mm. Pressure loss along the flow direction in the tube bundles is measured with a pressure transducer and data acquisition system to calculate the two-phase Euler number and the two-phase friction multiplier. The void fraction model by Feenstra et al. is used to estimate the void fraction of the two-phase flow in tube bundles. The experimental results of the two phase friction multiplier and two-phase Euler number for homogeneous and non-homogeneous two-phase flows are compared and evaluated against the analytical results given by Sim's model.

  4. Dilatometric investigations of phase transformations at heating and cooling of hardened, unalloyed, high-carbon steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pacyna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The reason for writing this paper was to describe the kinetics of phase transformations during continuous heating from hardened state and subsequent cooling of unalloyed high carbon steel.Design/methodology/approach: Dilatometric investigations were performed using a DT 1000 dilatometer of a French company Adamel. Samples after quenching and quenching and sub-quenching in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C were heated up 700 °C at the rate of 0.05 °C/s and subsequent cooled to room temperature at the rate of 0.05 °C/s.Findings: Regardless of heating the hardened high-carbon steel to 700 °C, a small fraction of the retained austenite remained in its structure, and was changing into fresh martensite only during cooling in the temperature range: 280°C-170°C.Research limitations/implications: Schematic presentation of the differential curve of tempering of the hardened high-carbon, unalloyed steel illustrating the phase transformations occurring during heating from hardened state.Practical implications: An observation, that a small fraction of the retained austenite remained in the structure of tempered high-carbon steel, indicates that even unalloyed steel should be tempered two times.Originality/value: Detailed descriptions of kinetics phase transformations during heating from hardened state of unalloyed high carbon steel.

  5. Nonlinear theory of nonstationary low Mach number channel flows of freely cooling nearly elastic granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, Baruch; Fouxon, Itzhak; Vilenkin, Arkady

    2008-02-01

    We employ hydrodynamic equations to investigate nonstationary channel flows of freely cooling dilute gases of hard and smooth spheres with nearly elastic particle collisions. This work focuses on the regime where the sound travel time through the channel is much shorter than the characteristic cooling time of the gas. As a result, the gas pressure rapidly becomes almost homogeneous, while the typical Mach number of the flow drops well below unity. Eliminating the acoustic modes and employing Lagrangian coordinates, we reduce the hydrodynamic equations to a single nonlinear and nonlocal equation of a reaction-diffusion type. This equation describes a broad class of channel flows and, in particular, can follow the development of the clustering instability from a weakly perturbed homogeneous cooling state to strongly nonlinear states. If the heat diffusion is neglected, the reduced equation becomes exactly soluble, and the solution develops a finite-time density blowup. The blowup has the same local features at singularity as those exhibited by the recently found family of exact solutions of the full set of ideal hydrodynamic equations [I. Fouxon, Phys. Rev. E 75, 050301(R) (2007); I. Fouxon,Phys. Fluids 19, 093303 (2007)]. The heat diffusion, however, always becomes important near the attempted singularity. It arrests the density blowup and brings about previously unknown inhomogeneous cooling states (ICSs) of the gas, where the pressure continues to decay with time, while the density profile becomes time-independent. The ICSs represent exact solutions of the full set of granular hydrodynamic equations. Both the density profile of an ICS and the characteristic relaxation time toward it are determined by a single dimensionless parameter L that describes the relative role of the inelastic energy loss and heat diffusion. At L>1 the intermediate cooling dynamics proceeds as a competition between "holes": low-density regions of the gas. This competition resembles Ostwald

  6. Thermal Cracking Analysis during Pipe Cooling of Mass Concrete Using Particle Flow Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipe cooling systems are among the potentially effective measures to control the temperature of mass concrete. However, if not properly controlled, thermal cracking in concrete, especially near water pipes, might occur, as experienced in many mass concrete structures. In this paper, a new numerical approach to simulate thermal cracking based on particle flow code is used to shed more light onto the process of thermal crack propagation and the effect of thermal cracks on thermal fields. Key details of the simulation, including the procedure of obtaining thermal and mechanical properties of particles, are presented. Importantly, a heat flow boundary based on an analytical solution is proposed and used in particle flow code in two dimensions to simulate the effect of pipe cooling. The simulation results are in good agreement with the monitored temperature data and observations on cored specimens from a real concrete gravity dam, giving confidence to the appropriateness of the adopted simulation. The simulated results also clearly demonstrate why thermal cracks occur and how they propagate, as well as the influence of such cracks on thermal fields.

  7. On the quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling self-gravitating gas clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerson, B.; Megged, E. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Institute of Physics; Tajima, T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Two model problems are considered, illustrating the dynamics of quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling, optically thin self-gravitating gas clouds. In the first problem, spherically symmetric flows in an unmagnetized plasma are considered. For a power-law dependence of the radiative loss function on the temperature, a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions is found. The authors concentrate on a constant-mass cloud, one of the cases, when the self-similarity indices are uniquely selected. In this case, the self-similar flow problem can be formally reduced to the classical Lane-Emden equation and therefore solved analytically. The cloud is shown to undergo radiative condensation, if the gas specific heat ratio {gamma} > 4/3. The condensation proceeds either gradually, or in the form of (quasihydrostatic) collapse. For {gamma} < 4/3, the cloud is shown to expand. The second problem addresses a magnetized plasma slab that undergoes quasihydrostatic radiative cooling and condensation. The problem is solved analytically, employing the Lagrangian mass coordinate.

  8. Influence of cooling rate on secondary phase precipitation and proeutectoid phase transformation of micro-alloyed steel containing vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kun; Meng, Lingtao; Liu, Qing; Liu, Bo; Huang, Yunhua

    2016-05-01

    During continuous casting process of low carbon micro-alloyed steel containing vanadium, the evolution of strand surface microstructure and the precipitation of secondary phase particles (mainly V(C, N)) are significantly influenced by cooling rate. In this paper, influence of cooling rate on the precipitation behavior of proeutectoid α-ferrite at the γ-austenite grain boundary and in the steel matrix are in situ observed and analyzed through high temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy. The relationship between cooling rate and precipitation of V(C, N) from steel continuous casting bloom surface microstructure is further studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive spectrometer. Relative results have shown the effect of V(C, N) precipitation on α-ferrite phase transformation is mainly revealed in two aspects: (i) Precipitated V(C, N) particles act as inoculant particles to promote proeutectoid ferrite nucleation. (ii) Local carbon concentration along the γ-austenite grain boundaries is decreased with the precipitation of V(C, N), which in turn promotes α-ferrite precipitation.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Sub-cooled Cavitating Flow by Using Bubble Size Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka ITO; Hideki WAKAMATSU; Takao NAGASAKI

    2003-01-01

    A new cavitating model by using bubble size distribution based on mass of bubbles is proposed. Liquid phase is treated with Eulerian framework as a mixture containing minute cavitating bubbles. Vapor phase consists of various sizes of minute vapor bubbles, which is distributed to classes based on their mass. The change of bubble number density for each class was solved by considering the change of bubble mass due to phase change as well as generation of new bubbles due to heterogeneous nucleation. In this method the mass of bubbles is treated as an independent variable, in other word, a new coordinate, and dependant variables are solved in Eulerian framework for spatial coordinates and bubble-mass coordinate. The present method is applied to a cavitating flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle, and the two-phase flow with bubble size distribution and phase change was successfully predicted.

  10. Use of volatile organic solvents in headspace liquid-phase microextraction by direct cooling of the organic drop using a simple cooling capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh; Hajipour, Somayeh

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost and simple cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device for the extraction and determination of 2,6,6-trimethyl-1,3 cyclohexadiene-1-carboxaldehyde (safranal) in Saffron samples, using volatile organic solvents, was fabricated and evaluated. The main part of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction system was a cooling capsule, with a Teflon microcup to hold the extracting organic solvent, which is able to directly cool down the extraction phase while the sample matrix is simultaneously heated. Different experimental factors such as type of organic extraction solvent, sample temperature, extraction solvent temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The optimal conditions were obtained as: extraction solvent, methanol (10 μL); extraction temperature, 60°C; extraction solvent temperature, 0°C; and extraction time, 20 min. Good linearity of the calibration curve (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.01-50.0 μg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.001 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation for 1.0 μg/mL of safranal was 10.7% (n = 6). The proposed cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device was coupled (off-line) to high-performance liquid chromatography and used for the determination of safranal in Saffron samples. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography method and those obtained by a validated ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction procedure.

  11. On the use of a small-scale two-phase thermosiphon to cool high-power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrage, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the steady-state thermal-hydraulic operating characteristics of a small-scale two-phase thermosiphon cooling actual power electronics are presented. Boiling heat transfer coefficients and circulation mass velocities were measured while varying heat load and pressure. Both a plain and augmented riser structure, utilizing micro-fins and reentrant cavities, were simultaneously tested. The boiling heat transfer coefficients increased with both increasing heat load and pressure. The mass velocity increased with increasing pressure while both increasing and then decreasing with increasing heat load. The reentrant cavity enhancement factor, a ratio of the augmented-to-plain riser nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients, ranged from 1 to 1.4. High-speed photography revealed bubbly, slug, churn, wispy-annular and annular flow patterns. The experimental mass velocity and heat transfer coefficient data were compared to an analytical model with average absolute deviations of 16.3 and 26.3 percent, respectively.

  12. Numerical investigation into entropy generation in a transient generalized Couette flow of nanofluids with convective cooling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Mkwizu; O D Makinde; Yaw Nkansah-Gyekye

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the effects of convective cooling on entropy generation in a transient generalized Couette flow of water-based nanofluids containing Copper (Cu) and Alumina (Al2O3) as nanoparticles. Both First and Second Laws of thermodynamics are utilised to analyse the problem. The model partial differential equations for momentum and energy balance are tackled numerically using a semidiscretization finite difference method together with Runge–Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. Graphical results on the effects of parameter variation on velocity, temperature, skin friction, Nusselt number, entropy generation rate, irreversibility ratio and Bejan number are presented and discussed.

  13. Modelling the Effect of Variable Viscosity on Unsteady Couette Flow of Nanofluids with Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmada Omar Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates numerically the effects of variable viscosity on unsteady generalized Couette flow of a water base nanofluid with convective cooling at the moving surface. The Buongiorno model utilized for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The nonlinear governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and nanoparticles concentration are tackled numerically using a semi discretization finite difference method together with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration profiles together with skin friction and Nusselt number are obtained graphically and discussed quantitatively.

  14. Discrimination of micrometre-sized ice and super-cooled droplets in mixed-phase cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Greenaway, R. S.; Field, P.; Johnson, D. W.

    Preliminary experimental results are presented from an aircraft-mounted probe designed to provide in situ data on cloud particle shape, size, and number concentration. In particular, the probe has been designed to facilitate discrimination between super-cooled water droplets and ice crystals of 1-25 μm size within mixed-phase clouds and to provide information on cloud interstitial aerosols. The probe acquires spatial light scattering data from individual particles at throughput rates of several thousand particles per second. These data are logged at 100 ms intervals to allow the distribution and number concentration of each particle type to be determined with 10 m spatial resolution at a typical airspeed of 100 m s -1. Preliminary results from flight data recorded in altocumulus castellanus, showing liquid water phase, mixed phase, and ice phase are presented to illustrate the probe's particle discrimination capabilities.

  15. Effect of solar radiation on the performance of cross flow wet cooling tower in hot climate of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banooni, Salem; Chitsazan, Ali

    2016-11-01

    In some cities such as Ahvaz-Iran, the solar radiation is very high and the annual-mean-daily of the global solar radiation is about 17.33 MJ m2 d-1. Solar radiation as an external heat source seems to affect the thermal performance of the cooling towers. Usually, in modeling cooling tower, the effects of solar radiation are ignored. To investigate the effect of sunshade on the performance and modeling of the cooling tower, the experiments were conducted in two different states, cooling towers with and without sunshade. In this study, the Merkel's approach and finite difference technique are used to predict the thermal behavior of cross flow wet cooling tower without sunshade and the results are compared with the data obtained from the cooling towers with and without sunshade. Results showed that the sunshade is very efficient and it reduced the outlet water temperature, the approach and the water exergy of the cooling tower up to 1.2 °C, 15 and 1.1 %, respectively and increased the range and the efficiency of the cooling tower up to 29 and 37 %, respectively. Also, the sunshade decreased the error between the experimental data of the cooling tower with sunshade and the modeling results of the cooling tower without sunshade 1.85 % in average.

  16. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Gas Taylor Flows incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. A.; Walsh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the heat transfer characteristics associated with liquid-gas Taylor flows in mini channels incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM). Taylor flows have been shown to result in heat transfer enhancements due to the fluid recirculation experienced within liquid slugs which is attributable to the alternating liquid slug and gas bubble flow structure. Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) also offer significant potential with increased thermal capacity due to the latent heat required to cause phase change. The primary aim of this work was to examine the overall heat transfer potential associated with combining these two novel liquid cooling technologies. By investigating the local heat transfer characteristics, the augmentation/degradation over single phase liquid cooling was quantified while examining the effects of dimensionless variables, including Reynolds number, liquid slug length and gas void fraction. An experimental test facility was developed which had a heated test section and allowed MPCM-air Taylor flows to be subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. Infrared thermography was used to record high resolution experimental wall temperature measurements and determine local heat transfer coefficients from the thermal entrance point. 30.2% mass particle concentration of the MPCM suspension fluid was examined as it provided the maximum latent heat for absorption. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in experimental wall temperatures associated with MPCM-air Taylor flows when compared with the Graetz solution for conventional single phase coolants. Total enhancement in the thermally developed region is observed to be a combination of the individual contributions due to recirculation within the liquid slugs and also absorption of latent heat. Overall, the study highlights the potential heat transfer enhancements that are attainable within heat exchange devices employing MPCM

  17. Variable Gravity Effects on the Cooling Performance of a Single Phase Confined Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Travis; Yerkes, Kirk; Baysinger, Karri; McQuillen, John

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the testing of a spray cooling experiment designed to be flown on NASA's KC-135 Reduced Gravity Testing Platform. Spray cooling is an example of a thermal management technique that may be utilized in high flux heat acquisition and high thermal energy transport concepts. Many researchers have investigated the utility of spray cooling for the thermal management of devices generating high heat fluxes. However, there has been little research addressing the physics and ultimate performance of spray cooling in a variable gravity environment. An experimental package, consisting of a spray chamber coupled to a fluid delivery loop system, was fabricated for variable gravity flight tests. The spray chamber contains two opposing nozzles spraying on target Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) heaters. These heaters are mounted on glass pedestals, which are part of a sump system to remove unconstrained liquid from the test chamber. Liquid is collected in the sumps and returned to the fluid delivery loop. Thermocouples mounted in and around the pedestals are used to determine both the heat loss through the underside of the IT0 heater and the heat extracted by the spray. A series of flight tests were carried out aboard the KC-135, utilizing the ability of the aircraft to produce various gravity conditions. During the flight tests, for a fixed flow rate, heat input was varied at 20, 30, 50, and 80W with variable gravities of 0.01, 0.16, 0.36, and 1.8g. Flight test data was compared to terrestrial baseline data in addition to analytical and numerical solutions to evaluate the heat transfer in the heater and support structure . There were significant differences observed in the spray cooling performance as a result of variable gravity conditions and heat inputs. In general, the Nussult number at the heater surface was found to increase with decreasing gravity conditions for heat loads greater than 30W.

  18. Numerical study of a power transformer cooling by a directed flow; Etude numerique du refroidissement d'un transformateur electrique de puissance par un ecoulement dirige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadim El Wakil; Jacques Padet [Laboratoire de Thermomecanique UTAP, Universite de Reims Champagne Ardenne Faculte des Sciences, B.P. 1039, 51687 Reims, (France); Nelu-Cristian Chereches; Nicolae Taranu [Faculte de Genie Civil, Universite Technique Gh. Asachi de Iasi 38, Lascar Catargi, 700107 Iasi, (Romania)

    2005-07-01

    In this article the fluid flow and the heat transfer by mixed convection are analyzed inside a three - phase power transformer. Avoiding the hot spots in a power transformer is a determining factor for its preservation and its good functioning. In order to ensure an efficient cooling, a directed flow is a good solution inside a multichannel system. The modeling was made on the middle column of the power transformer where the core is wounded around by two windings inside an axisymmetric geometry. The entrance and the exit of the fluid are located respectively at the bottom and at the top of the core axis. Different geometric configurations were conceived and studied in order to improve the heat transfer and the cooling of the power transformer. (authors)

  19. Effect of Cooling Rate on Phase Transformations in a High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Studied from the Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorin, Thomas; Stanford, Nicole; Taylor, Adam; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phase transformation and precipitation in a high-strength low-alloy steel have been studied over a large range of cooling rates, and a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram has been produced. These experiments are unique because the measurements were made from samples cooled directly from the melt, rather than in homogenized and re-heated billets. The purpose of this experimental design was to examine conditions pertinent to direct strip casting. At the highest cooling rates which simulate strip casting, the microstructure was fully bainitic with small regions of pearlite. At lower cooling rates, the fraction of polygonal ferrite increased and the pearlite regions became larger. The CCT diagram and the microstructural analysis showed that the precipitation of NbC is suppressed at high cooling rates, and is likely to be incomplete at intermediate cooling rates.

  20. The Source of Mass Accreted by the Central Black Hole in Cooling Flow Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, N

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the study of the cold-feedback heating in cooling flow clusters. In the cold-feedback model the mass accreted by the central black hole originates in non-linear over-dense blobs of gas residing in an extended region (r ~ 5-30 kpc); these blobs are originally hot, but then cool faster than their environment and sink toward the center. The intra-cluster medium (ICM) entropy profile must be shallow for the blobs to reach the center as cold blobs. I build a toy model to explore the role of the entropy profile and the population of dense blobs in the cold-feedback mechanism. The mass accretion rate by the central black hole is determined by the cooling time of the ICM, the entropy profile, and the presence of inhomogeneities. The mass accretion rate determines the energy injected by the black hole back to the ICM. These active galactic nucleus (AGN) outbursts not only heat the ICM, but also change the entropy profile in the cluster and cause inhomogeneities that are the seeds of future dense blo...

  1. Unsteady-state analysis of a counter-flow dew point evaporative cooling system

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, J.

    2016-07-19

    Understanding the dynamic behavior of the dew point evaporative cooler is crucial in achieving efficient cooling for real applications. This paper details the development of a transient model for a counter-flow dew point evaporative cooling system. The transient model approaching steady conditions agreed well with the steady state model. Additionally, it is able to accurately predict the experimental data within 4.3% discrepancy. The transient responses of the cooling system were investigated under different inlet air conditions. Temporal temperature and humidity profiles were analyzed for different transient and step responses. The key findings from this study include: (1) the response trend and settling time is markedly dependent on the inlet air temperature, humidity and velocity; (2) the settling time of the transient response ranges from 50 s to 300 s when the system operates under different inlet conditions; and (3) the average transient wet bulb effectiveness (1.00–1.06) of the system is observed to be higher than the steady state wet bulb effectiveness (1.01) for our range of study. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Study on dew point evaporative cooling system with counter-flow configuration

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, J.

    2015-12-18

    Dew point evaporative cooling has great potential as a disruptive process for sensible cooling of air below its entering wet bulb temperature. This paper presents an improved mathematical model for a single-stage dew point evaporative cooler in a counter-flow configuration. Longitudinal heat conduction and mass diffusion of the air streams, channel plate and water film, as well as the temperature difference between the plate and water film, are accounted for in the model. Predictions of the product air temperature are validated using three sets of experimental data within a discrepancy of 4%. The cooler’s heat and mass transfer process is analyzed in terms of its cooling capacity intensity, water evaporation intensity, and overall heat transfer coefficient along the channel. Parametric studies are conducted at different geometric and operating conditions. For the conditions evaluated, the study reveals that (1) the saturation point of the working air occurs at a fixed point regardless of the inlet air conditions, and it is mainly influenced by the working air ratio and channel height; (2) the intensity of the water evaporation approaches a minimum at 0.2 to 0.3m from the entrance; (3) the wet channel can be separated into two zones, and the overall heat transfer coefficient is above 100W/(m2·K) after the temperature of water film becomes higher than the working air temperature.

  3. Cooling of a channeled lava flow with non-Newtonian rheology: crust formation and surface radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Santini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results from dynamical and thermal models that describe a channeled lava flow as it cools by radiation. In particular, the effects of power-law rheology and of the presence of bends in the flow are considered, as well as the formation of surface crust and lava tubes. On the basis of the thermal models, we analyze the assumptions implicit in the currently used formulae for evaluation of lava flow rates from satellite thermal imagery. Assuming a steady flow down an inclined rectangular channel, we solve numerically the equation of motion by the finite-volume method and a classical iterative solution. Our results show that the use of power-law rheology results in relevant differences in the average velocity and volume flow rate with respect to Newtonian rheology. Crust formation is strongly influenced by power-law rheology; in particular, the growth rate and the velocity profile inside the channel are strongly modified. In addition, channel curvature affects the flow dynamics and surface morphology. The size and shape of surface solid plates are controlled by competition between the shear stress and the crust yield strength: the degree of crust cover of the channel is studied as a function of the curvature. Simple formulae are currently used to relate the lava flow rate to the energy radiated by the lava flow as inferred from satellite thermal imagery. Such formulae are based on a specific model, and consequently, their validity is subject to the model assumptions. An analysis of these assumptions reveals that the current use of such formulae is not consistent with the model.

  4. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  5. Impact of irrigation flow rate and intrapericardial fluid on cooled-tip epicardial radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryana, Arash; O'Neill, Padraig Gearoid; Pujara, Deep K; Singh, Steve K; Bowers, Mark R; Allen, Shelley L; d'Avila, André

    2016-08-01

    The optimal irrigation flow rate (IFR) during epicardial radiofrequency (RF) ablation has not been established. This study specifically examined the impact of IFR and intrapericardial fluid (IPF) accumulation during epicardial RF ablation. Altogether, 452 ex vivo RF applications (10 g for 60 seconds) delivered to the epicardial surface of bovine myocardium using 3 open-irrigated ablation catheters (ThermoCool SmartTouch, ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF, and FlexAbility) and 50 in vivo RF applications delivered (ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF) in 4 healthy adult swine in the presence or absence of IPF were examined. Ex vivo, RF was delivered at low (≤3 mL/min), reduced (5-7 mL/min), and high (≥10 mL/min) IFRs using intermediate (25-35 W) and high (35-45 W) power. In vivo, applications were delivered (at 9.3 ± 2.2 g for 60 seconds at 39 W) using reduced (5 mL/min) and high (15 mL/min) IFRs. Ex vivo, surface lesion diameter inversely correlated with IFR, whereas maximum lesion diameter and depth did not differ. While steam pops occurred more frequently at low IFR using high power (ThermoCool SmartTouch and ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF), tissue disruption was rare and did not vary with IFR. In vivo, charring/steam pop was not detected. Although there were no discernible differences in lesion size with IFR, surface lesion diameter, maximum diameter, depth, and volume were all smaller in the presence of IPF at both IFRs. Cooled-tip epicardial RF ablation created using reduced IFRs (5-7 mL/min) yields lesion sizes similar to those created using high IFRs (≥10 mL/min) without an increase in steam pop/tissue disruption, whereas the presence of IPF significantly reduces the lesion size. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Peristaltic flow of a reactive viscous fluid through a porous saturated channel and convective cooling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, S.; Hussain, Q.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-07-01

    This article addresses the heat transfer in a peristaltic flow of a reactive combustible viscous fluid through a porous saturated medium. The flow here is induced because of travelling waves along the channel walls. It is assumed that exothermic chemical reactions take place within the channel under the Arrhenius kinetics and the convective heat exchange with the ambient medium at the surfaces of the channel walls follows Newton's law of cooling. The analysis is carried out in the presence of viscous dissipation and without consumption of the material. The governing equations are formulated by employing the long-wavelength approximation. Closed-form solutions for the stream function, axial velocity, and axial pressure gradient are obtained. It is found that the temperature decreases at high Biot numbers, and the Nusselt number increases with increasing reaction parameter. The Biot number and reaction parameter produce the opposite effects on the Nusselt number.

  7. Two-Phase flow instrumentation for nuclear accidents simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monni, G.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the research work performed at the Energy Department of the Politecnico di Torino, concerning the development of two-phase flow instrumentation and of models, based on the analysis of experimental data, that are able to interpret the measurement signals. The study has been performed with particular reference to the design of power plants, such as nuclear water reactors, where the two-phase flow thermal fluid dynamics must be accurately modeled and predicted. In two-phase flow typically a set of different measurement instruments (Spool Piece - SP) must be installed in order to evaluate the mass flow rate of the phases in a large range of flow conditions (flow patterns, pressures and temperatures); moreover, an interpretative model of the SP need to be developed and experimentally verified. The investigated meters are: Turbine, Venturi, Impedance Probes, Concave sensors, Wire mesh sensor, Electrical Capacitance Probe. Different instrument combinations have been tested, and the performance of each one has been analyzed.

  8. Instabilities of uniform filtration flows with phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'Ichev, A. T.; Tsypkin, G. G.

    2008-10-01

    New mechanisms of instability are described for vertical flows with phase transition through horizontally extended two-dimensional regions of a porous medium. A plane surface of phase transition becomes unstable at an infinitely large wavenumber and at zero wavenumber. In the latter case, the unstable flow undergoes reversible subcritical bifurcations leading to the development of secondary flows (which may not be horizontally uniform). The evolution of subcritical modes near the instability threshold is governed by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation. Two examples of flow through a porous medium are considered. One is the unstable flow across a water-bearing layer above a layer that carries a vapor-air mixture under isothermal conditions in the presence of capillary forces at the phase transition interface. The other is the vertical flow with phase transition in a high-temperature geothermal reservoir consisting of two high-permeability regions separated by a low-permeability stratum.

  9. Experimental study of efficiency of solar panel by phase change material cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nicholas Tan Jian; Nan, Wong Jian; Guiping, Cheng

    2017-07-01

    The dependence of efficiency of photovoltaic panels on their temperature during operation is a major concern for developers and users. In this paper, a phase change material (PCM) cooling system was designed for a 60W mono-crystalline solar panel. Tealights candle was selected as the cooling medium. The solar irradiance was recorded using Kipp & Zonen CMP3 pyranometer and Meteon data logger. Temperature distribution on the surface of solar panel, output voltage and output current of solar panel were measured. The average irradiance throughout data collection was found to be 705W/m2 and highest irradiance was 1100 W/m2. The average solar panel temperature was 43.6°C and a maximum temperature of 53°C was at the center of solar panel. Results showed that average power output and efficiency of the solar panel were 44.4W and 15%, respectively. It was found that the higher the solar irradiance, the lower the efficiency of solar panel and the higher the temperature and power output of solar panel. This is due to the fact that high irradiance results in high power input and high solar panel temperature. But high PV panel temperature reduces its power output. Therefore, the increase of power input outweighs that of power output, which leads to the decrease of efficiency of solar panel with the increase of solar irradiance. Compared with solar panel without cooling, the power output and efficiency of solar panel did not increase with PCM cooling. It indicates that Tealights candle as PCM cooling is not efficient in improving the efficiency of solar panel in this study.

  10. Phase Change Material Based Accumulation Panels in Combination with Renewable Energy Sources and Thermoelectric Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Skovajsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the use of modern materials and technologies that can improve the thermal comfort in buildings. The article describes the design and usage of a special accumulation device, which is composed of thermal panels based on phase change materials (PCMs. The thermal panels have an integrated tube heat exchanger and heating foils. The technology can be used as a passive or active system for heating and cooling. It is designed as a “green technology”, so it is able to use renewable energy sources, e.g., photovoltaic (PV panels, solar thermal collectors and heat pumps. Moreover, an interesting possibility is the ability to use thermoelectric coolers. In the research, measurements of the different operating modes were made, and the results are presented in the text. The measurement approves that the technology improves the thermal capacity of the building, and it is possible to use it for active heating and cooling.

  11. Low Reynolds number flow in rectangular cooling channels provided with low aspect ratio pin fins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armellini, Alessandro; Casarsa, Luca [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, 33100 Udine (Italy); Giannattasio, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.giannattasio@uniud.i [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    The flow structures around single heat transfer promoters of different shapes (square, circular, triangular and rhomboidal) have been investigated experimentally by means of a 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. The geometrical configuration and flow conditions considered are typical of real liquid cooling channels. They include low aspect ratio pin fins confined at both ends by the walls of a rectangular channel, water flow at low Reynolds numbers (Re = 800, 1800, 2800), high core flow turbulence and undeveloped boundary layers at the position of the obstacle. In front of the pin fins the high turbulence level is found to promote a strong instability of the horseshoe vortex system that forms at the wall/obstacle junction. In particular, frequent events of break-away of the primary vortices and inrush of core fluid, which are known to enhance the wall heat transfer, are observed in the cases of square and circular pins already from Re = 1800. The near wake downstream of the obstacles appears to be influenced by streamwise oriented vortical structures produced at the wall/obstacle junction. They give rise to spanwise velocity components (up-wash flow) that lead to a three-dimensional mass recirculation behind the pins. The combination of up-wash flows, low Reynolds number and high core flow turbulence gives rise to a competition between the classical alternate vortex shedding and an irregular shedding mode characterized by the decoupling of the shear layers and the absence of well organized primary structures. At Re = 800, the irregular shedding prevails and the mean wake topology is almost insensitive to the obstacle shape. As the Reynolds number is increased, the junction flow structures reduce in size and strength, their effect on the wake flow weakens and the recirculation structures behind the obstacles differentiate significantly according to the pin shape. Besides investigating complex flow structures in geometrical and flow configurations of

  12. Numerical Analysis of Characteristics of a Particulate Debris Bed Coolability with Single Phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jew-han; Chang, Soon-heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chung-ho; Lee, Yong-bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Designed on the basis of defense-in-depth concept, liquid metal cooled reactor, such as KALIMER-600 is unlikely to undergo the hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). However in case of accident, there exists a possibility of re-criticality and vessel melting when core melt-down occurs. For this reason, the analysis on the ability of post-accident heat removal (PAHR) should be preceded. As a part of this, single phase flow coolability analysis of the particulate debris bed formed at the top of core catcher has been performed to achieve in-vessel fuel retention. The forming process of particulate debris bed is described and single phase cooling model with numerical results are presented.

  13. Cerebral effects of scalp cooling and extracerebral contribution to calculated blood flow values using the intravenous 133Xe technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Kastrup, J; Hansen, M

    1986-01-01

    values. With a two-compartmental analysis of the wash-out curves during cooling there was a significant reduction of the CBF indices f1, representing mainly fast blood flow in the grey matter and f2, representing blood flow in the slowly perfused white matter and extracerebral structures. The reduction...

  14. A simple and highly stable free-flow electrophoresis device with thermoelectric cooling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Guo, Cheng-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Shen, Qiao-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Zhang; Li, Jun; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Jin, Xin-Qiao

    2013-12-20

    Complex assembly, inconvenient operations, poor control of Joule heating and leakage of solution are still fundamental issues greatly hindering application of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) for preparative purpose in bio-separation. To address these issues, a novel FFE device was developed based on our previous work. Firstly, a new mechanical structure was designed for compact assembly of separation chamber, fast removal of air bubble, and good anti-leakage performance. Secondly, a highly efficient thermoelectric cooling system was used for dispersing Joule heating for the first time. The systemic experiments revealed the three merits: (i) 3min assembly without any liquid leakage, 80 times faster than pervious FFE device designed by us or commercial device (4h); (ii) 5s removing of air bubble in chamber, 1000-fold faster than a normal one (2h or more) and (iii) good control of Joule heating by the cooling system. These merits endowed the device high stable thermo- and hydro-dynamic flow for long-term separation even under high electric field of 63V/cm. Finally, the developed device was used for up to 8h continuous separation of 5mg/mL fuchsin acid and purification of three model proteins of phycocyanin, myoglobin and cytochrome C, demonstrating the applicability of FFE. The developed FFE device has evident significance to the studies on stem cell, cell or organelle proteomics, and protein complex as well as micro- or nano-particles.

  15. CONTINOUS MULTI-PHASE FLOW REACTOR FOR SMALL AND LARGE FLOW CAPACITIES THAN L/MIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Rawashdeh, Ma'moun; Schouten, Jaap; Nijhuis, T. Alexander; Yue, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Multiphase flow processing in flow reactors holds great promises for diverse applications in fine chemicals and materials synthesis primarily due to its precise control over the flow, mixing and reaction inside or between each phase. Even though, flow reactors have shown superior performance, so far

  16. CONTINOUS MULTI-PHASE FLOW REACTOR FOR SMALL AND LARGE FLOW CAPACITIES THAN L/MIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Rawashdeh, Ma'moun; Schouten, Jaap; Nijhuis, T. Alexander; Yue, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Multiphase flow processing in flow reactors holds great promises for diverse applications in fine chemicals and materials synthesis primarily due to its precise control over the flow, mixing and reaction inside or between each phase. Even though, flow reactors have shown superior performance, so far

  17. Effect of cooling-heating rate on sol-gel transformation of fish gelatin-gum arabic complex coacervate phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Mohammad; Chung, Donghwa

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize influence of different cooling and heating rates on gelation of fish gelatin (FG)-gum arabic (GA) complex coacervate phase using rheological measurements. For the coacervate phase prepared at 10°C, the gelling temperature, melting temperature, gel strength, and stress relaxation decreased with increasing cooling or heating rate, however, no gelation was observed at the highest cooling rate of 0.05°C/min. Similar trends were obtained for the coacervates phase prepared at 30°C, but the gelation did not occur at a cooling rate of 0.033 or 0.05°C/min. The results indicated that rheological properties of FG-GA coacervate gels were highly dependent to the cooling process, where more thermos-stable and stronger gels formed at slower cooling. This was probably because of higher degree of molecular rearrangements, more hydrogen bindings, and formation of greater junction zones into the gel network at slower cooling rates. However, all of the FG-GA coacervate gels obtained at different cooling rates were classified as a weak physical gel.

  18. Measurement of Turbulent Flow Phenomena for the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink; Keith G. Condie; Glenn E. McCreery

    2007-09-01

    Mean velocity field and turbulence data are presented for flow phenomena in a lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR), such as in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept. In preparation for design, safety analyses and licensing, research has begun on readying the computational tools that will be needed to predict the thermal-hydraulics behavior of the reactor design. Fluid dynamics experiments have been designed and built to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and their turbulence models for a typical VHTR plenum geometry in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. This experiment has been proposed as a “Standard Problem” for assessing advanced reactor (CFD) analysis tools. Present results concentrate on the region of the plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered as multiple jets into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. A model of the lower plenum has been fabricated and scaled to the geometric dimensions of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Point Design. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to induce flow features somewhat comparable to those expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. Posts, side walls and end walls are fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The experiments were conducted in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine complex flow characteristics in passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The

  19. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  20. Estimation of flow velocity for a debris flow via the two-phase fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The two-phase fluid model is applied in this study to calculate the steady velocity of a debris flow along a channel bed. By using the momentum equations of the solid and liquid phases in the debris flow together with an empirical formula to describe the interaction between two phases, the steady velocities of the solid and liquid phases are obtained theoretically. The comparison of those velocities obtained by the proposed method with the observed velocities of two real-world debris flows shows that the proposed method can estimate accurately the velocity for a debris flow.

  1. Development of an Efficient Meso- scale Multi-phase Flow Solver in Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taehun [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2015-10-20

    The proposed research aims at formulating a predictive high-order Lattice Boltzmann Equation for multi-phase flows relevant to nuclear energy related application - namely, saturated and sub-cooled boiling in reactors, and liquid- liquid mixing and extraction for fuel cycle separation. An efficient flow solver will be developed based on the Finite Element based Lattice Boltzmann Method (FE- LBM), accounting for phase-change heat transfer and capable of treating multiple phases over length scales from the submicron to the meter. A thermal LBM will be developed in order to handle adjustable Prandtl number, arbitrary specific heat ratio, a wide range of temperature variations, better numerical stability during liquid-vapor phase change, and full thermo-hydrodynamic consistency. Two-phase FE-LBM will be extended to liquid–liquid–gas multi-phase flows for application to high-fidelity simulations building up from the meso-scale up to the equipment sub-component scale. While several relevant applications exist, the initial applications for demonstration of the efficient methods to be developed as part of this project include numerical investigations of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomena in nuclear reactor fuel bundles, and liquid-liquid mixing and interfacial area generation for liquid-liquid separations. In addition, targeted experiments will be conducted for validation of this advanced multi-phase model.

  2. Cooling and spreading of corium during its fall into water in a pressurised water nuclear plant severe accident: description of mechanical and thermal interactions in a three phase flow during spreading of cold or heated spheres in a liquid pool; Refroidissement et dispersion du corium lors de sa chute dans l'eau pendant un accident severe de reacteur nucleaire a eau pressurisee: description des interactions mecaniques et thermiques en ecoulement triphasique lors de la dispersion de spheres solides froides ou chaudes dans un bain liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplat, F

    1998-10-26

    In the frame of nuclear safety studies about corium and water interactions, we address spreading and cooling stage of corium fragments in a liquid pool. Considering the complexity of encountered flow regimes and mechanical and thermal interactions coupling, modelling validation is based on a thermal-hydraulic computer code (MC3D). A bibliographical study shows that classical modelling of three phase flow is based on constitutive laws already established in the case of two phase flow. The present study states a complete analysis of BILLEAU experiments and defines a characterisation method for a sphere cloud. Some complementary QUEOS experiments are also described. Mechanical interaction terms such as added mass, lift and turbulent dispersion have been presented in the frame of a three phase flow and their influence has been tested in numerical simulations of BILLEAU tests. The effect of film vapour overheat, as well as particle diameter evolution have been studied. Moreover a radiative heat transfer modelling developed in Karlsruhe research centre (FZK) has been analysed and completed. Numerical simulations achieved for this study show that mechanical and thermal behaviour of the system are actually coupled. Taking into account lift and turbulent dispersion terms as well as heat transfer modifications all wed better results. This study also presents some considerations about flow regimes identification as a preliminary for studies about numerical diffusion that was already estimated in the present state of the computer code MC3D. (author)

  3. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  4. Renormalization-group theory for cooling first-order phase transitions in Potts models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ning; Zhong, Fan

    2017-03-01

    We develop a dynamic field-theoretic renormalization-group (RG) theory for cooling first-order phase transitions in the Potts model. It is suggested that the well-known imaginary fixed points of the q-state Potts model for q>10/3 in the RG theory are the origin of the dynamic scaling found recently from numerical simulations, apart from logarithmic corrections. This indicates that the real and imaginary fixed points of the Potts model are both physical and control the scalings of the continuous and discontinuous phase transitions, respectively, of the model. Our one-loop results for the scaling exponents are already not far away from the numerical results. Further, the scaling exponents depend on q only slightly, consistent with the numerical results. Therefore, the theory is believed to provide a natural explanation of the dynamic scaling including the scaling exponents and their scaling laws for various observables in the cooling first-order phase transition of the Potts model.

  5. Renormalization-group theory for cooling first-order phase transitions in Potts models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ning; Zhong, Fan

    2017-03-01

    We develop a dynamic field-theoretic renormalization-group (RG) theory for cooling first-order phase transitions in the Potts model. It is suggested that the well-known imaginary fixed points of the q -state Potts model for q >10 /3 in the RG theory are the origin of the dynamic scaling found recently from numerical simulations, apart from logarithmic corrections. This indicates that the real and imaginary fixed points of the Potts model are both physical and control the scalings of the continuous and discontinuous phase transitions, respectively, of the model. Our one-loop results for the scaling exponents are already not far away from the numerical results. Further, the scaling exponents depend on q only slightly, consistent with the numerical results. Therefore, the theory is believed to provide a natural explanation of the dynamic scaling including the scaling exponents and their scaling laws for various observables in the cooling first-order phase transition of the Potts model.

  6. Phase separating colloid polymer mixtures in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, D.; Aarts, D.G.A.L.; Bonn, D.; Imhof, A.

    2008-01-01

    We study the process of phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures in the (spinodal) two-phase region of the phase diagram in shear flow. We use a counter-rotating shear cell and image the system by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. The system is quenched from an initially almost homoge

  7. Phase separating colloid polymer mixtures in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, D.; Aarts, D.; Bonn, D.; Imhof, A.

    2008-01-01

    We study the process of phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures in the (spinodal) two-phase region of the phase diagram in shear flow. We use a counter-rotating shear cell and image the system by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. The system is quenched from an initially almost

  8. Effect of wall cooling on the stability of compressible subsonic flows over smooth humps and backward-facing steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maaitah, Ayman A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Ragab, Saad A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wall cooling on the two-dimensional linear stability of subsonic flows over two-dimensional surface imperfections is investigated. Results are presented for flows over smooth humps and backward-facing steps with Mach numbers up to 0.8. The results show that, whereas cooling decreases the viscous instability, it increases the shear-layer instability and hence it increases the growth rates in the separation region. The coexistence of more than one instability mechanism makes a certain degree of wall cooling most effective. For the Mach numbers 0.5 and 0.8, the optimum wall temperatures are about 80 pct and 60 pct of the adiabatic wall temperature, respectively. Increasing the Mach number decreases the effectiveness of cooling slightly and reduces the optimum wall temperature.

  9. Simulating radiative astrophysical flows with the PLUTO code: A non-equilibrium, multi-species cooling function

    CERN Document Server

    Tesileanu, O; Massaglia, S

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent cooling processes are of paramount importance in the evolution of astrophysical gaseous nebulae and, in particular, when radiative shocks are present. The present work introduces a necessary set of tools that can be used to model radiative astrophysical flows in the optically-thin plasma limit. We aim to provide reliable and accurate predictions of emission line ratios and radiative cooling losses in astrophysical simulations of shocked flows. Moreover, we discuss numerical implementation aspects to ease future improvements and implementation in other MHD numerical codes. The most important source of radiative cooling for our plasma conditions comes from the collisionally-excited line radiation. We evolve a chemical network, including 29 ion species, to compute the ionization balance in non-equilibrium conditions. After a series of validations and tests, typical astrophysical setups are simulated in 1D and 2D, employing both the present cooling model and a simplified one. The influence of the c...

  10. Influence of magmatism on mantle cooling, surface heat flow and Urey ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Tackley, Paul J.

    2012-05-01

    Two-dimensional thermo-chemical mantle convection simulations are used to investigate the influence of melting-inducted differentiation on the thermal evolution of Earth's mantle, focussing in particular on matching the present-day surface heat flow and the 'Urey ratio'. The influence of internal heating rate, initial mantle temperature and partitioning of heat-producing elements into basaltic crust are studied. High initial mantle temperatures, which are expected following Earth's accretion, cause major differences in early mantle thermo-chemical structures, but by the present-day surface heat flux and internal structures are indistinguishable from cases with a low initial temperature. Assuming three different values of mantle heat production that vary by more than a factor of two results in small differences in present-day heat flow, as does assuming different partitioning ratios of heat-producing elements into crust. Indeed, all of the cases presented here, regardless of exact parameters, have approximately Earth's present-day heat flow, with substantial fractions coming from the core and from mantle cooling. As a consequence of the model present-day surface heat flow varying only slightly with parameters, the Urey ratio (the ratio of total heat production to the total surface heat flow) is highly dependent on the amount of internal heat production, and due to the large uncertainty in this, the Urey ratio is considered to be a much poorer constraint on thermal evolution than the heat flow. The range of present-day Urey ratio observed in simulations here is about 0.3 to 0.5, which is consistent with observational and geochemical constraints (Jaupart et al., 2007). Magmatic heat transport contributes an upper bound of 9% to Earth's present-day heat loss but a much higher fraction at earlier times—often more than convective heat loss—so neglecting this causes an overestimation of the Urey ratio. Magmatic heat transport also plays an important role in mantle

  11. Flow visualization study in high aspect ratio cooling channels for rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1993-11-01

    The structural integrity of high pressure liquid propellant rocket engine thrust chambers is typically maintained through regenerative cooling. The coolant flows through passages formed either by constructing the chamber liner from tubes or by milling channels in a solid liner. Recently, Carlile and Quentmeyer showed life extending advantages (by lowering hot gas wall temperatures) of milling channels with larger height to width aspect ratios (AR is greater than 4) than the traditional, approximately square cross section, passages. Further, the total coolant pressure drop in the thrust chamber could also be reduced, resulting in lower turbomachinery power requirements. High aspect ratio cooling channels could offer many benefits to designers developing new high performance engines, such as the European Vulcain engine (which uses an aspect ratio up to 9). With platelet manufacturing technology, channel aspect ratios up to 15 could be formed offering potentially greater benefits. Some issues still exist with the high aspect ratio coolant channels. In a coolant passage of circular or square cross section, strong secondary vortices develop as the fluid passes through the curved throat region. These vortices mix the fluid and bring lower temperature coolant to the hot wall. Typically, the circulation enhances the heat transfer at the hot gas wall by about 40 percent over a straight channel. The effect that increasing channel aspect ratio has on the curvature heat transfer enhancement has not been sufficiently studied. If the increase in aspect ratio degrades the secondary flow, the fluid mixing will be reduced. Analysis has shown that reduced coolant mixing will result in significantly higher wall temperatures, due to thermal stratification in the coolant, thus decreasing the benefits of the high aspect ratio geometry. A better understanding of the fundamental flow phenomena in high aspect ratio channels with curvature is needed to fully evaluate the benefits of this

  12. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms.

  13. A mechanical erosion model for two-phase mass flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pudasaini, Shiva P

    2016-01-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, process-based, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transport. The model is based on the jump in the momentum flux including changes of material and flow properties along the flow-bed interface and enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012). A two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology is introduced and allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process including momentum and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. By rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions or losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent descript...

  14. LIQUID PHASE FLOW ESTIMATION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOW USING INVERSE ANALYSIS AND PARTICLE TRACKING VELOCIMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen; MURAI Yuichi; SASAKI Toshio; YAMAMOTO Fujio

    2004-01-01

    An inverse analysis algorithm is proposed for estimating liquid phase flow field from measurement data of bubble motion. This kind of technology will be applied in future for various estimation of fluid flow in rivers, lakes, sea surface flow, and also microscopic channel flow as the problem-handling in civil, mechanical, electronic, and chemical engineering. The relationship between the dispersion motion and the carrier phase flow is governed and expressed by the translational motion equation of spherical dispersion. The equation consists of all the force components including inertia, added inertia, drag, lift, pressure gradient force and gravity force. Using this equation enables us to estimate the carrier phase flow structure using only the data of the dispersion motion. Whole field liquid flow structure is also estimated using spatial or temporal interpolation method. In order to verify this principle, the Taylor-Green vortex flow, and the Karman vortex shedding from a square cylinder have been chosen. The results show that the combination of the inverse analysis and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) with the spatio-temporal post-processing algorithm could reconstruct well the carrier phase flow of the gas-liquid two-phase flow.

  15. Acoustics of two-phase pipe flows

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk, van, Nico M.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic signals that are recorded in oil pipelines contain information about the flow. In order to extract this information from the pressure recordings, detailed knowledge about the transmission properties of sound waves in the pipes is required.

  16. Critical transport velocity in two-phase, horizontal pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerville, D. (U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD (US))

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on the suspension of solid particles or entrainment of liquid droplets in two- phase flow. Theoretical and empirical relationships have been derived for both instances without any consideration to the similarities between the two. However, a general relation for two-phase flow is desirable since there are systems that cannot be readily defined due to the dual (solid/liquid) nature of the transported material, such as colloids, pulp, slurries, and sludge. Using turbulence theory, one general equation can be derived to predict critical transport velocities for two-phase horizontal flow.

  17. Marriage à-la-MOND: Baryonic dark matter in galaxy clusters and the cooling flow puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2008-05-01

    I start with a brief introduction to MOND phenomenology and its possible roots in cosmology—a notion that may turn out to be the most far reaching aspect of MOND. Next I discuss the implications of MOND for the dark matter (DM) doctrine: MOND's successes imply that baryons determine everything. For DM this would mean that the puny tail of leftover baryons in galaxies wags the hefty DM dog. This has to occur in many intricate ways, and despite the haphazard construction history of galaxies—a very tall order. I then concentrate on galaxy clusters in light of MOND, which still requires some yet undetected cluster dark matter, presumably in some baryonic form (CBDM). This CBDM might contribute to the heating of the X-ray emitting gas and thus alleviate the cooling flow puzzle. MOND, qua theory of dynamics, does not directly enter the microphysics of the gas; however, it does force a new outlook on the role of DM in shaping the cluster gas dynamics: MOND tells us that the cluster DM is not cold dark matter, is not so abundant, and is not expected in galaxies; it is thus not subject to constraints on baryonic DM in galaxies. The mass in CBDM required in a whole cluster is, typically, similar to that in hot gas, but is rather more centrally concentrated, totally dominating the core. The CBDM contribution to the baryon budget in the universe is thus small. Its properties, deduced for isolated clusters, are consistent with the observations of the "bullet cluster". Its kinetic energy reservoir is much larger than that of the hot gas in the core, and would suffice to keep the gas hot for many cooling times. Heating can be effected in various ways depending on the exact nature of the CBDM, from very massive black holes to cool, compact gas clouds.

  18. On intermittent flow characteristics of gas–liquid two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaker, Jignesh; Banerjee, Jyotirmay, E-mail: jbaner@gmail.com

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Unified correlations for intermittent flow characteristics are developed. • Influence of inflow conditions on intermittent flow characteristics is analysed. • Developed correlations can be used for effective design of piping components. - Abstract: Flow visualisation experiments are reported for intermittent regime of gas–liquid two-phase flow. Intermittent flow characteristics, which include plug/slug frequency, liquid plug/slug velocity, liquid plug/slug length, and plug/slug bubble length are determined by image processing of flow patterns captured at a rate of 1600 frames per second (FPS). Flow characteristics are established as a function of inlet superficial velocity of both the phases (in terms of Re{sub SL} and Re{sub SG}). The experimental results are first validated with the existing correlations for slug flow available in literature. It is observed that the correlations proposed in literature for slug flow do not accurately predict the flow characteristics in the plug flow regime. The differences are clearly highlighted in this paper. Based on the measured database for both plug and slug flow regime, modified correlations for the intermittent flow regime are proposed. The correlations reported in the present paper, which also include plug flow characteristics will aid immensely to the effective design and optimization of operating conditions for safer operation of two-phase flow piping systems.

  19. Phase Transitions in Two-Dimensional Traffic Flow Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, J A; Molera, J M; Cuesta, José A; Martinez, Froilán C; Molera, Juan M

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: We introduce two simple two-dimensional lattice models to study traffic flow in cities. We have found that a few basic elements give rise to the characteristic phase diagram of a first-order phase transition from a freely moving phase to a jammed state, with a critical point. The jammed phase presents new transitions corresponding to structural transformations of the jam. We discuss their relevance in the infinite size limit.

  20. Phase Transitions in Two-Dimensional Traffic Flow Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A; Molera, Juan M; Escuela, Angel Sánchez; 10.1103/PhysRevE.48.R4175

    2009-01-01

    We introduce two simple two-dimensional lattice models to study traffic flow in cities. We have found that a few basic elements give rise to the characteristic phase diagram of a first-order phase transition from a freely moving phase to a jammed state, with a critical point. The jammed phase presents new transitions corresponding to structural transformations of the jam. We discuss their relevance in the infinite size limit.

  1. NUMERICAL CALCULATION OF THREE-STREAM MIXING FLOW WITH WALL COOLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGSuo-fang; LILi-guo; WUGuo-chuan

    2004-01-01

    The flow and the temperature in the threestream mixing flow of the lobed nozzle mixer-ejector with double-wall diffuser are numerically investigated. The domain of computation is divided into sub-domalns according to the shapes of the double-plate and lobed nozzle. The three-dimensional body-fitted coordinated grids are generated respectively in these sub-domains by solving Lapalace's equations. Grids are dense on the boundaries and orthogonal at the lobe. The grids of all sub-domains compose the whole grid of the domain. In order to avoid the divergence of the computation as the serious non-orthogonality of the grid from the lobe, the co-located grid, SIMPLEC and Chen-Kim modified k-εturbulence model are applied. The great viscosity, the linear and simultaneous cooperation under-relaxation factors are used to solve the coupling of the fluid and solid. Results show that the air is ejected into the double wall section to form the cooling flow. The wall temperature of the double-wall diffuser is lower than that of the single-wall diffuser. The average wall temperature goes down as the diffuser angle increases at the range of 0~5°,otherwise, the result at the range of 5~10°is opposite.

  2. Cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device based on thermoelectric cooling of metal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Shokouh Hosseinzadeh; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-04-03

    A new cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device was designed and constructed based on thermoelectric cooling. A three-stage thermoelectric cooler (TEC) was used for cooling a copper rod coated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) hollow fiber, which served as the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The copper rod was mounted on a commercial SPME plunger and exposed to the cold surface of the TEC, which was enclosed in a small aluminum box. A heat sink and a fan were used to dissipate the generated heat at the hot side of the TEC. By applying an appropriate dc voltage to the TEC, the upper part of the copper rod, which was in contact to the cold side of the TEC, was cooled and the hollow fiber reached a lower temperature through heat transfer. A thermocouple was embedded in the cold side of the TEC for indirect measurement of the fiber temperature. The device was applied in quantitative analysis of off-flavors in a rice sample. Hexanal, nonanal, and undecanal were chosen as three off-flavors in rice. They were identified according to their retention times and analyzed by GC-flame ionization detection instrument. Headspace extraction conditions (i.e., temperature and time) were optimized. Standard addition calibration graphs were obtained at the optimized conditions and the concentrations of the three analytes were calculated. The concentration of hexanal was also measured using a conventional solvent extraction method (697+/-143ng/g) which was comparable to that obtained from the cold fiber SPME method (644+/-8). Moreover, the cold fiber SPME resulted in better reproducibility and shorter analysis time. Cold fiber SPME with TEC device can also be used as a portable device for field sampling.

  3. Influence mechanism on flow and heat transfer characteristics for air-cooled steam condenser cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei Feng; Dai, Yi Ping; Li, Mao Qing; Ma, Qing Zhong

    2012-09-01

    Air-cooled steam condensers (ACSCs) have been extensively utilized to reject waste heat in power industry to save water resources. However, ACSC performance is so sensitive to ambient wind that almost all the air-cooled power plants in China are less efficient compared to design conditions. It is shown from previous research that the influence of ambient wind on the cell performance differs from its location in the condenser. As a result, a numerical model including two identical ACSC cells are established, and the different influence on the performance of the cells is demonstrated and analyzed through the computational fluid dynamics method. Despite the great influence from the wind speeds, similar cell performance is obtained for the two cells under both windless and wind speed conditions when the wind parallels to the steam duct. Fan volumetric effectiveness which characterizes the fan performance, as well as the exchanger heat transfer rate, drops obviously with the increasing wind speed, and performance difference between the exchanger pair in the same A-frame also rises continuously. Furthermore, different flow and heat transfer characteristics of the windward and leeward cell are obtained at different wind angles, and ambient wind enhances the performance of the leeward cell, while that of the windward one changes little.

  4. A study on fluid flow simulation in the cooling systems of machine tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, I.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims analysing the type of coolants and the correct choice of that as well as the dispensation in the processing area to control the temperature resulted from the cutting operation and the choose of the cutting operating modes. A high temperature in the working area over a certain amount can be harmful in terms of the quality of resulting surface and that could have some influences on the life of the cutting tool. The coolant chosen can be a combination of different cooling fluids in order to achieve a better cooling of the cutting area at the same time for carrying out the proper lubrication of that area. The fluid flow parameters of coolant can be influenced by the nature of the fluid or fluids used, the geometry of the nozzle used which generally has a convergent-divergent geometry in order to achieve a better dispersion of the coolant / lubricant on the area to be processed. A smaller amount of fluid is important in terms of the economy lubricant, because they are quite expensive. A minimal amount of lubricant may have a better impact on the environment and the health of the operator because the coolants in contact with overheated machined surface may develop a substantial amount of these gases that are not always beneficial to health.

  5. Study of two-phase flows in reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tirthankar

    Study of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is extremely important. One of the major applications of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is in the design of active thermal control systems for future space applications. Previous space crafts were characterized by low heat generation within the spacecraft which needed to be redistributed within the craft or rejected to space. This task could easily have been accomplished by pumped single-phase loops or passive systems such as heat pipes and so on. However with increase in heat generation within the space craft as predicted for future missions, pumped boiling two-phase flows are being considered. This is because of higher heat transfer co-efficients associated with boiling heat transfer among other advantages. Two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions also find important applications in space propulsion as in space nuclear power reactors as well as in many other life support systems of space crafts. Two-fluid model along with Interfacial Area Transport Equation (IATE) is a useful tool available to predict the behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. It should be noted that considerable differences exist between two-phase flows under reduced and normal gravity conditions especially for low inertia flows. This is because due to suppression of the gravity field the gas-liquid two-phase flows take a considerable time to develop under reduced gravity conditions as compared to normal gravity conditions. Hence other common methods of analysis applicable for fully developed gas-liquid two-phase flows under normal gravity conditions, like flow regimes and flow regime transition criteria, will not be applicable to gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. However the two-fluid model and the IATE need to be evaluated first against detailed experimental data obtained under reduced gravity conditions. Although lot of studies

  6. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging of closed cracks using global preheating and local cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Koji; Ino, Yoshihiro; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-10-01

    Closed cracks are the main cause of underestimation in ultrasonic inspection, because the ultrasound transmits through the crack. Specifically, the measurement of closed-crack depth in coarse-grained materials, which are highly attenuative due to linear scatterings at the grains, is the most difficult issue. To solve this problem, we have developed a temporary crack opening method, global preheating and local cooling (GPLC), using tensile thermal stress, and a high-selectivity imaging method, load difference phased array (LDPA), based on the subtraction of phased array images between different stresses. To demonstrate our developed method, we formed a closed fatigue crack in coarse-grained stainless steel (SUS316L) specimen. As a result of applying it to the specimen, the high-selectivity imaging performance was successfully demonstrated. This will be useful in improving the measurement accuracy of closed-crack depths in coarse-grained material.

  7. Correlations for predicting single phase and two-phase flow pressure drop in pebble bed flow channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Bofeng, E-mail: bfbai@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu Maolong; Lv Xiaofei; Yan Junjie [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yan Xiao; Xiao Zejun [Lab of Bubble Physics and Natural Circulation, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2011-12-15

    An experimental study was conducted on the pressure drop of the single phase and the air-water two-phase flow in the bed of rectangular cross sections densely filled with uniform spheres. Three kinds of glass spheres with different equivalent diameters (3 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm) were used for the establishment of the test sections. The Reynolds number in the experiment ranged from a dozen to thousands for the single-phase flow and from hundreds to tens of thousands for the two-phase flow. In the present flow-regime model, the bed was subdivided into a near-wall region and a central region in order to take the wall effect into account to improve the prediction at low tube-to-particle diameter ratios. Improved correlations are obtained based on the previous study to consider the single-phase flow pressure drops for finite pebble beds with spherical particles and nonspherical particles by fitting the coefficients of that equation to both the database and the present experiment. The correlation is consistent with the observed physical behavior which explains its comparatively good agreement with the experimental data. A new empirical correlation for the prediction of two-phase flow pressure drops was proposed based on the gas phase relative permeability as a function of the gas phase saturation and the void fraction. The correlation fit well for both experimental data of spherical particles and nonspherical particles.

  8. Modeling of skin cooling, blood flow, and optical properties in wounds created by electrical shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Jordan, Marion H.; Jeng, James C.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-02-01

    High voltage electrical injuries may lead to irreversible tissue damage or even death. Research on tissue injury following high voltage shock is needed and may yield stage-appropriate therapy to reduce amputation rate. One of the mechanisms by which electricity damages tissue is through Joule heating, with subsequent protein denaturation. Previous studies have shown that blood flow had a significant effect on the cooling rate of heated subcutaneous tissue. To assess the thermal damage in tissue, this study focused on monitoring changes of temperature and optical properties of skin next to high voltage wounds. The burns were created between left fore limb and right hind limb extremities of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by a 1000VDC delivery shock system. A thermal camera was utilized to record temperature variation during the exposure. The experimental results were then validated using a thermal-electric finite element model (FEM).

  9. Viscoelastic Effects on the Entropy Production in Oscillatory Flow between Parallel Plates with Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Vázquez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer problem of a zero-mean oscillatory flow of a Maxwell fluid between infinite parallel plates with boundary conditions of the third kind is considered. With these conditions, the amount of heat entering or leaving the system depends on the external temperature as well as on the convective heat transfer coefficient. The local and global time-averaged entropy production are computed, and the consequences of convective cooling of the plates are also assessed. It is found that the global entropy production is a minimum for certain suitable combination of the physical parameters. For a discrete set of values of the oscillatory Reynolds number, the extracted heat from one of the plates shows maxima.

  10. Buoyancy Effects on Unsteady MHD Flow of a Reactive Third-Grade Fluid with Asymmetric Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirivanhu Chinyoka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the combined effects of buoyancy force and asymmetrical convective cooling on unsteady MHD channel flow and heat transfer characteristics of an incompressible, reactive, variable viscosity and electrically conducting third grade fluid. The chemical kinetics in the flow system is exothermic and the asymmetric convective heat transfers at the channel walls follow the Newton’s law of cooling. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations governing the problem are derived and solved numerically using a semi-implicit finite difference scheme. Graphical results are presented and physical aspects of the problem are discussed with respect to various parameters embedded in the system.

  11. Time dependent two phase flows in Magnetohydrodynamics: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Time dependent two phase flows in Magnetohydrodynamics: A Greens function approach. BK Jha, HM Jibril ...

  12. Gravity Independence of Microchannel Two-Phase Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Most of the amassed two-phase flow and heat transfer knowledge comes from experiments conducted in Earth’s gravity. Space missions span varying gravity levels,...

  13. Design and Analysis of Phase Change Material based thermal energy storage for active building cooling: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin .D. Patil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials (PCMs are "latent" thermal storage materials. They use chemical bonds to store and release heat. The thermal energy transfer occurs when a material changes from a solid to a liquid orfrom a liquid to a solid form. This is called a change in state or "phase." Initially, these solid-liquid PCMs perform like conventional storage materials; their temperature rises as they absorb solar heat. Unlike conventional heat storage materials, when PCMs reach the temperature at which they change phase (their melting point, they absorb large amounts of heat without getting hotter. When the ambient temperature in the space around the PCM material drops, the Phase Change Material solidifies, releasing its stored latent heat. PCMs absorb and emit heat while maintaining a nearly constant temperature. Within the human comfort and electronic-equipment tolerance range of 20°C to 35°C, latent thermal storage materials are very effective.They can be used for equalization of day & night temperature and for transport of refrigerated products. In the proposed project heat of fusion of Cacl2. 6H2o as PCM is used for cooling water during night and this cooled water is used as circulating medium trough fan coil unit, air trough FCU will get cooled by transferring heat to water and fresh & cool air will be thrown in a room. In the proposed project FREE COOLING & ACTIVE BUILDING COOLING concepts of Thermal Energy Storage are used in combine

  14. Dynamic Modeling of Phase Crossings in Two-Phase Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren; Veje, Christian; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    of the variables and are usually very slow to evaluate. To overcome these challenges, we use an interpolation scheme with local refinement. The simulations show that the method handles crossing of the saturation lines for both liquid to two-phase and two-phase to gas regions. Furthermore, a novel result obtained...... in this work, the method is stable towards dynamic transitions of the inlet/outlet boundaries across the saturation lines. Results for these cases are presented along with a numerical demonstration of conservation of mass under dynamically varying boundary conditions. Finally we present results...

  15. Two-Phase Flow Simulations for PTS Investigation by Means of Neptune_CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Moretti

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations of pressurized thermal shock (PTS phenomena through Neptune_CFD module are presented aiming at two-phase models validation against experimental data. Because of PTS complexity, only some thermal-hydraulic aspects were considered. Two different flow configurations were studied, occurring when emergency core cooling (ECC water is injected in an uncovered cold leg of a pressurized water reactor (PWR—a plunging water jet entering a free surface, and a stratified steam-water flow. Some standard and new implemented models were tested: modified turbulent k-ε models with turbulence production induced by interfacial friction, models for the drag coefficient, and interfacial heat transfer models. Quite good agreement with experimental data was achieved with best performing models for both test cases, even if a further improvement in phase change modelling would be suitable for nuclear technology applications.

  16. Collapse of Flow: Probing the Order of the Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Stöcker, Horst

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the present collective flow signals for the phase transition to the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and the collective flow as a barometer for the equation of state (EoS). We emphasize the importance of the flow excitation function from 1 to $50 A$ GeV: here the hydrodynamic model has predicted the collapse of the $v_1$-flow at $\\sim 10 A$ GeV and of the $v_2$-flow at $\\sim 40 A$ GeV. In the latter case, this has recently been observed by the NA49 collaboration. Since hadronic rescattering models predict much larger flow than observed at this energy, we interpret this observation as potential evidence for a first order phase transition at high baryon density $\\rho_B$.

  17. Three-phase flow of submarine gas hydrate pipe transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立; 徐海良; 杨放琼

    2015-01-01

    In the hydraulic transporting process of cutter-suction mining natural gas hydrate, when the temperature−pressure equilibrium of gas hydrate is broken, gas hydrates dissociate into gas. As a result, solid−liquid two-phase flow (hydrate and water) transforms into gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow (methane, hydrate and water) inside the pipeline. The Euler model and CFD-PBM model were used to simulate gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow. Numerical simulation results show that the gas and solid phase gradually accumulate to the center of the pipe. Flow velocity decreases from center to boundary of the pipe along the radial direction. Comparison of numerical simulation results of two models reveals that the flow state simulated by CFD-PBM model is more uniform than that simulated by Euler model, and the main behavior of the bubble is small bubbles coalescence to large one. Comparison of numerical simulation and experimental investigation shows that the values of flow velocity and gas fraction in CFD-PBM model agree with experimental data better than those in Euler model. The proposed PBM model provides a more accurate and effective way to estimate three-phase flow state of transporting gas hydrate within the submarine pipeline.

  18. The Formation of Counter-Rotating Vortex Pair and the Nature of Liftoff-Reattachment in Film-Cooling Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ming Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the formation of the Counter-Rotating Vortex Pair (CRVP has been attributed to three main sources: the jet-mainstream shear layer where the jet meets with the mainstream flow right outside the pipe, the in-tube boundary layer developing along the pipe wall, and the in-tube vortices associated with the tube inlet vorticity; whereas the liftoff-reattachment phenomenon occurring in the main flow along the plate right downstream of the jet has been associated with the jet flow trajectory. The jet-mainstream shear layer has also been demonstrated to be the dominant source of CRVP formation, whereby the shear layer disintegrates into vortex rings that deform as the jet convects downstream, becoming a pair of CRVPs flowing within the jet and eventually turning into the main flow direction. These traditional findings are assessed qualitatively and quantitatively for film-cooling flow in gas turbines by simulating numerically the flow and evaluating the extent to which the traditional flow phenomena are taking place particularly for CRVP and for flow liftoff-reattachment. To this end, three flow simulation cases are used; they are referred to as 1—the baseline case; 2—the free-slip in-tube wall case (FSIT; and 3—the unsteady flow case. The baseline case is a typical film-cooling case. The FSIT case is used to assess the in-tube boundary layer. Cases 1 and 2 are simulated using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS, whereas Case 3 solves a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES model. It is concluded that decreasing the strength of the CRVP, which is the case for e.g., shaped holes, provides high cooling performance, and the liftoff-reattachment phenomenon was thus found to be strongly influenced by the entrainment caused by the CRVP, rather than the jet flow trajectory. These interpretations of the flow physics that are more relevant to gas turbine cooling flow are new and provide a physics-based guideline for designing new film-cooling

  19. Structural and phase transformations in iron-based alloy obtained in conditions of high cooling rate crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevskaya, Zh. G.; Khimich, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    The production of parts by selective electron beam melting (SEBM) is accompanied by the formation of nonequilibrium structures. This is caused by the crystallization of alloys with high cooling rates. To evaluate the influence of cooling rate on the process of structural and phase transformations in the Fe-8Si-5Al-2C alloy, the electron beam melting of plasma coating was carried out. The dendritic structure was formed in the molten pool. The distance between dendritic branches of the second order was 2-5 µm. This corresponds to the cooling rate of about 103 K/s. The electron microscopy has shown that dendrites were formed by α-phase, while γ-phase was localized between α-phase crystals in form of intercalations. The secondary phases (intermetallic, aluminum and iron carbosilicides, aluminates and iron carboaluminates) are of sub-micron size and located in the α- and γ-phase boundary intersections or within the grains of the main phase. The microhardness of the alloy increases twofold. This suggests that complex hardening by solid-solution and dispersed hardening by the secondary phase particles occurs during crystallization with the above-mentioned cooling rate.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics model for predicting flow of viscous fluids in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers and internal cooling coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly; Humphrey

    1998-03-01

    Considerable debate has occurred over the use of hydrofoil impellers in large-scale fermentors to improve mixing and mass transfer in highly viscous non-Newtonian systems. Using a computational fluid dynamics software package (Fluent, version 4.30) extensive calculations were performed to study the effect of impeller speed (70-130 rpm), broth rheology (value of power law flow behavior index from 0.2 to 0.6), and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall (6-18 in.) on flow near the perimeter of a large (75-m3) fermentor equipped with A315 impellers. A quadratic model utilizing the data was developed in an attempt to correlate the effect of A315 impeller speed, power law flow behavior index, and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall on the average axial velocity in the coil bank-wall region. The results suggest that there is a potential for slow or stagnant flow in the coil bank-wall region which could result in poor oxygen and heat transfer for highly viscous fermentations. The results also indicate that there is the potential for slow or stagnant flow in the region between the top impeller and the gas headspace when flow through the coil bank-wall region is slow. Finally, a simple guideline was developed to allow fermentor design engineers to predict the degree of flow behind a bank of helical cooling coils in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers.

  1. Phase field modeling and simulation of three-phase flow on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Phase field models are widely used to describe the two-phase system. The evolution of the phase field variables is usually driven by the gradient flow of a total free energy functional. The generalization of the approach to an N phase (N ≥ 3) system requires some extra consistency conditions on the free energy functional in order for the model to give physically relevant results. A projection approach is proposed for the derivation of a consistent free energy functional for the three-phase Cahn-Hilliard equations. The system is then coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations to describe the three-phase flow on solid surfaces with moving contact line. An energy stable scheme is developed for the three-phase flow system. The discrete energy law of the numerical scheme is proved which ensures the stability of the scheme. We also show some numerical results for the dynamics of triple junctions and four phase contact lines.

  2. Two-Phase Flow in Circular Secondary Sedimentation Tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Matko, T. I. R.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to optimise a numerical model to predict the flow in circular secondary sedimentation tanks. The numerical models in the literature were reviewed and the new opportunities for research were identified. Single-phase flow characteristics of two circular sedimentation tanks were investigated using the CFD program, CFX-F3D. The flow in the circular clarifiers were modelled in two dimensions (axial and radial) and using the standard k-E turbule...

  3. Two Phase Flow Mapping and Transition Under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, Masood; Chao, David F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, recent microgravity two-phase flow data for air-water, air-water-glycerin, and air- water-Zonyl FSP mixtures are analyzed for transition from bubbly to slug and from slug to annular flow. It is found that Weber number-based maps are inadequate to predict flow-pattern transition, especially over a wide range of liquid flow rates. It is further shown that slug to annular flow transition is dependent on liquid phase Reynolds number at high liquid flow rate. This effect may be attributed to growing importance of liquid phase inertia in the dynamics of the phase flow and distribution. As a result a new form of scaling is introduced to present data using liquid Weber number based on vapor and liquid superficial velocities and Reynolds number based on liquid superficial velocity. This new combination of the dimensionless parameters seem to be more appropriate for the presentation of the microgravity data and provides a better flow pattern prediction and should be considered for evaluation with data obtained in the future. Similarly, the analysis of bubble to slug flow transition indicates a strong dependence on both liquid inertia and turbulence fluctuations which seem to play a significant role on this transition at high values of liquid velocity. A revised mapping of data using a new group of dimensionless parameters show a better and more consistent description of flow transition over a wide range of liquid flow rates. Further evaluation of the proposed flow transition mapping will have to be made after a wider range of microgravity data become available.

  4. Critical Regimes of Two-Phase Flows with a Polydisperse Solid Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Barsky, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    This book brings to light peculiarities of the formation of critical regimes of two-phase flows with a polydisperse solid phase. A definition of entropy is formulated on the basis of statistical analysis of these peculiarities. The physical meaning of entropy and its correlation with other parameters determining two-phase flows are clearly defined. The interrelations and main differences between this entropy and the thermodynamic one are revealed. The main regularities of two-phase flows both in critical and in other regimes are established using the notion of entropy. This parameter serves as a basis for a deeper insight into the physics of the process and for the development of exhaustive techniques of mass exchange estimation in such flows. The book is intended for graduate and postgraduate students of engineering studying two-phase flows, and to scientists and engineers engaged in specific problems of such fields as chemical technology, mineral dressing, modern ceramics, microelectronics, pharmacology, po...

  5. Elimination of numerical diffusion in 1 - phase and 2 - phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamaeki, M. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1997-07-01

    The new hydraulics solution method PLIM (Piecewise Linear Interpolation Method) is capable of avoiding the excessive errors, numerical diffusion and also numerical dispersion. The hydraulics solver CFDPLIM uses PLIM and solves the time-dependent one-dimensional flow equations in network geometry. An example is given for 1-phase flow in the case when thermal-hydraulics and reactor kinetics are strongly coupled. Another example concerns oscillations in 2-phase flow. Both the example computations are not possible with conventional methods.

  6. Self-organizing maps applied to two-phase flow on natural circulation loop studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Leonardo F.; Cunha, Kelly de P.; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Rocha, Marcelo da S.; Masotti, Paulo H.F.; Mesquita, Roberto N. de, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Two-phase flow of liquid and gas is found in many closed circuits using natural circulation for cooling purposes. Natural circulation phenomenon is important on recent nuclear power plant projects for heat removal on 'loss of pump power' or 'plant shutdown' accidents. The accuracy of heat transfer estimation has been improved based on models that require precise prediction of pattern transitions of flow. Self-Organizing Maps are trained to digital images acquired on natural circulation flow instabilities. This technique will allow the selection of the more important characteristics associated with each flow pattern, enabling a better comprehension of each observed instability. This periodic flow oscillation behavior can be observed thoroughly in this facility due its glass-made tubes transparency. The Natural Circulation Facility (Circuito de Circulacao Natural - CCN) installed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, is an experimental circuit designed to provide thermal hydraulic data related to one and two phase flow under natural circulation conditions. (author)

  7. 3-Dimensional numerical study of cooling performance of a heat sink with air-water flow through mini-channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Sambit; Majumder, Abhik; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-07-01

    The present microelectronics market demands devices with high power dissipation capabilities having enhanced cooling per unit area. The drive for miniaturizing the devices to even micro level dimensions is shooting up the applied heat flux on such devices, resulting in complexity in heat transfer and cooling management. In this paper, a method of CPU processor cooling is introduced where active and passive cooling techniques are incorporated simultaneously. A heat sink consisting of fins is designed, where water flows internally through the mini-channel fins and air flows externally. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for large set of Reynolds number in laminar region using finite volume method for both developing flows. The dimensions of mini-channel fins are varied for several aspect ratios such as 1, 1.33, 2 and 4. Constant temperature (T) boundary condition is applied at heat sink base. Channel fluid temperature, pressure drop are analyzed to obtain best cooling option in the present study. It has been observed that as the aspect ratio of the channel decreases Nusselt number decreases while pressure drop increases. However, Nusselt number increases with increase in Reynolds number.

  8. Beyond optical molasses: 3D raman sideband cooling of atomic cesium to high phase-space density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman; Vuletic; Chin; Chu

    2000-01-17

    We demonstrate a simple, general purpose method to cool neutral atoms. A sample containing 3x10(8) cesium atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap is cooled and simultaneously spin polarized in 10 ms at a density of 1.1x10(11) cm (-3) to a phase space density nlambda(3)(dB) = 1/500, which is almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than attainable in free space with optical molasses. The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even at densities where the mean lattice site occupation is close to unity.

  9. A Development of Technical Specification of a Research Reactor with Plate Fuels Cooled by Upward Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sujin; Kim, Jeongeun; Kim, Hyeonil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The contents of the TS(Technical Specifications) are definitions, safety limits, limiting safety system settings, limiting conditions for operation, surveillance requirements, design features, and administrative controls. TS for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) have been developed since many years until now. On the other hands, there are no applicable modernized references of TS for research reactors with many differences from NPPs in purpose and characteristics. Fuel temperature and Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) are being used as references from the thermal-hydraulic analysis point of view for determining whether the design of research reactors satisfies acceptance criteria for the nuclear safety or not. Especially for research reactors using plate-type fuels, fuel temperature and critical heat flux, however, are very difficult to measure during the reactor operation. This paper described the outline of main contents of a TS for open-pool research reactor with plate-type fuels using core cooling through passive systems, where acceptance criteria for nuclear safety such as CHF and fuel temperature cannot be directly measured, different from circumstances in NPPs. Thus, three independent variables instead of non-measurable acceptance criteria: fuel temperature and CHF are considered as safety limits, i.e., power, flow, and flow temperature.

  10. Paleo-heat flows, radioactive heat generation, and the cooling and deformation history of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Javier; López, Valle; Egea-González, Isabel

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of lithospheric strength for Mercury, based on the depth of thrust faults associated with large lobate scarps (which were most probably formed previously to ˜3 Ga) or on the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere supporting a broad rise in the northern smooth plains (whose formation is poorly constrained, but posterior to 3.8 Ga), serve as a basis for the calculation of paleo-heat flows, referred to the time when these structures were formed. The so-obtained paleo-heat flows can give information on the Urey ratio (Ur), the ratio between the total radioactive heat production and the total surface heat loss. By imposing the condition Ur Urey ratio was lower, and the cooling more intense, than when most of large lobate scarps were formed. Thus, because largest lobate scarps deform older terrains (suggesting more intense contraction early in the mercurian history), we conclude that the northern rise was formed previously to 3 Ga. If the age of other smooth plains large wavelength deformations is similar, then tectonic activity in Mercury would have been limited in the last 3 billion of years.

  11. Large eddy simulation of cooling flows in underground subway station according to different PSD operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Sung Huk; Koo, Dong Hoe [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) method is applied to systematically investigate the cooling fluid flow and the temperature distribution under the operating of air conditioning in the deeply underground subway station. The Shin-Gum-Ho subway station in Seoul which is the 8{sup th} floor and 43.6 m deep is selected for this analysis. The entire station is covered for simulation. The ventilation mode for air conditioning is kept as ordinary state. Different operating conditions for Platform screen door (PSD) are applied. First one is PSD is completely close and second one is PSD is regularly open and close which imitate the actual circumstances in the platform. The ventilation diffusers are modeled as 95 square shapes in the lobby and 222 squares in the platform. The temperature variations and flow behaviors are numerically simulated after operating of air conditioning for the whole station and the calculated results are compared with experimental data. LES method solves the momentum and thermal equations. Werner-Wengle wall law is applied to viscous sub layers for near wall resolution. The total grid numbers are 7.5 million and the whole domain is divided to 22 blocks. Multi blocks are computed in parallel using MPI. The results show the temperature difference in the platform between PSD-close and PSD-regularly open and close cases is 3-4 .deg. C.

  12. Two-phase nozzle flow and the subcharacteristic condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linga, Gaute; Aursand, Peder; Flåtten, Tore

    2015-01-01

    We consider nozzle flow models for two-phase flow with phase transfer. Such models are based on energy considerations applied to the frozen and equilibrium limits of the underlying relaxation models. In this paper, we provide an explicit link between the mass flow rate predicted by these models a...... leakage of CO2 is presented, indicating that the frozen and equilibrium models provide significantly different predictions. This difference is comparable in magnitude to the modeling error introduced by applying simple ideal-gas/incompressible-liquid equations-of-state for CO2....

  13. Heat transfer characteristics of coconut oil as phase change material to room cooling application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad, M.; Harmen

    2017-03-01

    Thermal comfort in a room is one of human needs in the workplace and dwellings, so that the use of air conditioning system in tropical countries is inevitable. This equipment has an impact on the increase of energy consumption. One method of minimizing the energy use is by using the phase change material (PCM) as thermal energy storage. This material utilizes the temperature difference between day and night for the storage and release of thermal energy. PCM development on application as a material for air cooling inlet, partitioning and interior needs to be supported by the study of heat transfer characteristics when PCM absorbs heat from ambient temperature. This study was conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics on coconut oil as a phase change material. There are three models of experiments performed in this research. Firstly, an experiment was conducted to analyze the time that was needed by material to phase change by varying the temperature. The second experiment analyzed the heat transfer characteristics of air to PCM naturally convection. The third experiment analyzed the forced convection heat transfer on the surface of the PCM container by varying the air velocity. The data of experimental showed that, increasing ambient air temperature resulted in shorter time for phase change. At temperatures of 30°C, the time for phase change of PCM with the thickness of 8 cm was 1700 min, and it was stable at temperatures of 27°C. Increasing air temperature accelerated the phase change in the material. While for the forced convection heat transfer, PCM could reduce the air temperature in the range of 30 to 35°C at about 1 to 2°C, with a velocity of 1-3 m/s.

  14. Experimental study of two phase flow in inclined channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Goon Cherl; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Sang Won [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Local two-phase flow parameters were measured to investigate the internal flow structures of steam-water boiling flow in an inclined channel. The vapor phase local flow parameters, such as void fraction, bubble frequency, vapor velocity, interfacial area concentration and chord length, were measured, using two conductivity probe method, and local liquid phase velocity was measured by pitot tube. In order to investigate the effects of channel inclination on two phase flow structure, the experiments were conducted for three angles of inclination; 0 degree(vertical), 30 degree and 60 degree. The experimental flow conditions were confined to the liquid superficial velocities less than 1.4 m/sec and nearly atmospheric pressure, and the flow regime was limited to the subcooled boiling. Using the measured distributions of the local phasic parameters, correlations for the drift-flux parameters such as distribution parameter and drift velocity were proposed. Those correlations were compared with the available correlation applicable to the inclined channel by the calculation of average void fraction using the present data. 44 refs., 4 tabs., 88 figs. (author)

  15. Two Phase Flow and Space-Based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John

    1999-01-01

    A reduced gravity environment offers the ability to remove the effect of buoyancy on two phase flows whereby density differences that normally would promote relative velocities between the phases and also alter the shape of the interface are removed. However, besides being a potent research tool, there are also many space-based technologies that will either utilize or encounter two-phase flow behavior, and as a consequence, several questions must be addressed. This paper presents some of these technologies missions. Finally, this paper gives a description of web-sites for some funding.

  16. Legionnaires' Disease Bacterium in power-plant cooling systems: Phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, S.W.; Solomon, J.A.; Gough, S.B.; Tyndall, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1983-06-01

    A survey was undertaken of the distribution, density, viability, and infectivity of Legionnaires' Disease Bacteria (Legionella) in power plant cooling systems. Water samples were collected during each of the four seasons at various locations within each of nine power plants and from ambient waters at each site. Measurements of a number of physical and chemical characteristics were made, and Legionella profiles (density, viability, and infectivity for guinea pigs) were obtained. Legionella were detected in nearly all samples. Water from closed-cycle cooling systems frequently had lower densities of Legionella than the ambient water. Nonetheless, infectious Legionella, as defined by their isolation from inoculated guinea pigs, were significantly more likely to be found in samples from the plant-exposed water of closed-cycle plants than in samples from once-through plants or in ambient samples. A new species (L. oakridgensis) was initially isolated from two of the sites, and it has since been found to have a widespread distribution. Two other organisms found to cause illness in guinea pigs may also be new species. Phase II of the project involves investigating possible cause/effect relationships between physicochemical variables and Legionella. This work may contribute toward eventual control techniques for this pathogen.

  17. Weakly doped InP layers prepared by liquid phase epitaxy using a modulated cooling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukovskyi, R.; Mykhashchuk, Y.; Kost, Y.; Krukovskyi, S.; Saldan, I.

    2017-04-01

    Epitaxial structures based on InP are widely used to manufacture a number of devices such as microwave transistors, light-emitting diodes, lasers and Gunn diodes. However, their temporary instability caused by heterogeneity of resistivity along the layer thickness and the influence of various external or internal factors prompts the need for the development of a new reliable technology for their preparation. Weak doping by Yb, Al and Sn together with modulation of the cooling rate applied to prepare InP epitaxial layers is suggested to be adopted within the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) method. The experimental results confirm the optimized conditions created to get a uniform electron concentration in the active n-InP layer. A sharp profile of electron concentration in the n+-InP(substrate)/n-InP/n+-InP epitaxial structure was observed experimentally at the proposed modulated cooling rate of 0.3 °С-1.5 °С min-1. The proposed technological method can be used to control the electrical and physical properties of InP epitaxial layers to be used in Gunn diodes.

  18. Phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L

    2009-11-01

    Based on empirical and numerical analyses of vehicular traffic, the physics of spatiotemporal phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads is revealed. The complex dynamics of moving jams observed in single vehicle data measured by video cameras on American highways is explained by the nucleation-interruption effect in synchronized flow, i.e., the spontaneous nucleation of a narrow moving jam with the subsequent jam dissolution. We find that (i) lane changing, vehicle merging from on-ramps, and vehicle leaving to off-ramps result in different traffic phases-free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jams-occurring and coexisting in different road lanes as well as in diverse phase transitions between the traffic phases; (ii) in synchronized flow, the phase transitions are responsible for a non-regular moving jam dynamics that explains measured single vehicle data: moving jams emerge and dissolve randomly at various road locations in different lanes; (iii) the phase transitions result also in diverse expanded general congested patterns occurring at closely located bottlenecks.

  19. Characterization of horizontal air–water two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Ran; Kim, Seungjin, E-mail: skim@psu.edu

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A visualization study is performed to develop flow regime map in horizontal flow. • Database in horizontal bubbly flow is extended using a local conductivity probe. • Frictional pressure drop analysis is performed in horizontal bubbly flow. • Drift flux analysis is performed in horizontal bubbly flow. - Abstract: This paper presents experimental studies performed to characterize horizontal air–water two-phase flow in a round pipe with an inner diameter of 3.81 cm. A detailed flow visualization study is performed using a high-speed video camera in a wide range of two-phase flow conditions to verify previous flow regime maps. Two-phase flows are classified into bubbly, plug, slug, stratified, stratified-wavy, and annular flow regimes. While the transition boundaries identified in the present study compare well with the existing ones (Mandhane et al., 1974) in general, some discrepancies are observed for bubbly-to-plug/slug, and plug-to-slug transition boundaries. Based on the new transition boundaries, three additional test conditions are determined in horizontal bubbly flow to extend the database by Talley et al. (2015a). Various local two-phase flow parameters including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble velocity, and bubble Sauter mean diameter are obtained. The effects of increasing gas flow rate on void fraction, bubble Sauter mean diameter, and bubble velocity are discussed. Bubbles begin to coalesce near the gas–liquid layer instead of in the highly packed region when gas flow rate increases. Using all the current experimental data, two-phase frictional pressure loss analysis is performed using the Lockhart–Martinelli method. It is found that the coefficient C = 24 yields the best agreement with the data with the minimum average difference. Moreover, drift flux analysis is performed to predict void-weighted area-averaged bubble velocity and area-averaged void fraction. Based on the current database, functional

  20. Impacts of Ventilation Ratio and Vent Balance on Cooling Load and Air Flow of Naturally Ventilated Attics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Shen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of ventilation ratio and vent balance on cooling load and air flow of naturally ventilated attics are studied in this paper using an unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD model. Buoyancy-driven turbulent ventilations in attics of gable-roof residential buildings are simulated for typical summer conditions. Ventilation ratios from 1/400 to 1/25 combined with both balanced and unbalanced vent configurations are investigated. The modeling results show that the air flows in the attics are steady and exhibit a general streamline pattern that is qualitatively insensitive to the variations in ventilation ratio and vent configuration. The predicted temperature fields are characterized by thermal stratification, except for the soffit regions. It is demonstrated that an increase in ventilation ratio will reduce attic cooling load. Compared with unbalanced vent configurations, balanced attic ventilation is shown to be the optimal solution in both maximizing ventilating flow rate and minimizing cooling load for attics with ventilation ratio lower than 1/100. For attics with ventilation ratios greater than 1/67, a configuration of large ridge vent with small soffit vent favors ventilating air flow enhancement, while a configuration of small ridge vent with large soffit vent results in the lowest cooling energy consumption.

  1. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  2. Mathematical modeling of disperse two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Morel, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book develops the theoretical foundations of disperse two-phase flows, which are characterized by the existence of bubbles, droplets or solid particles finely dispersed in a carrier fluid, which can be a liquid or a gas. Chapters clarify many difficult subjects, including modeling of the interfacial area concentration. Basic knowledge of the subjects treated in this book is essential to practitioners of Computational Fluid Dynamics for two-phase flows in a variety of industrial and environmental settings. The author provides a complete derivation of the basic equations, followed by more advanced subjects like turbulence equations for the two phases (continuous and disperse) and multi-size particulate flow modeling. As well as theoretical material, readers will discover chapters concerned with closure relations and numerical issues. Many physical models are presented, covering key subjects including heat and mass transfers between phases, interfacial forces and fluid particles coalescence and breakup, a...

  3. Mathematical model of two-phase flow in accelerator channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.Ф. Нікулін

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  The problem of  two-phase flow composed of energy-carrier phase (Newtonian liquid and solid fine-dispersed phase (particles in counter jet mill accelerator channel is considered. The mathematical model bases goes on the supposition that the phases interact with each other like independent substances by means of aerodynamics’ forces in conditions of adiabatic flow. The mathematical model in the form of system of differential equations of order 11 is represented. Derivations of equations by base physical principles for cross-section-averaged quantity are produced. The mathematical model can be used for estimation of any kinematic and thermodynamic flow characteristics for purposely parameters optimization problem solving and transfer functions determination, that take place in  counter jet mill accelerator channel design.

  4. Experimental Assessment of the Two-Phase Flow in a Large Inclined Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Song, Ki Won; Revankar, Shripad T; Park, Hyun Sun [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In order to assess the cooling performance of the core catcher system, a model facility has been constructed in POSTECH using scaling analysis. This facility consists of horizontal, inclined and vertical section. To investigate the flow parameters in each section, the instrumentation is developed to measure two-phase characteristics such as local void fraction, bubble velocity and bubble size. To date, there has been a considerable amount of research conducted on the internal structure of two-phase flow in pipe. However, the number of attempts made on the experiment regarding large inclined channels has been still limited. One of the reasons for this lack of data is the difficulty in constructing experimental facility. In this paper, the parameters of the flow in the inclined section are presented. The inclined channel is 10 degree from the horizontal with the rectangular cross section of 300 cm{sup 2}. The distributions of local parameters are evaluated through the data of double sensor conductivity probes installed at different locations along the inclined section. The data sets of the structure of two-phase flow in an inclined large channel was acquired. The air was injected through the metal foam installed on the top surface wall of the inclined section. Water level was kept below the top of the inclined section so the amount of water was fixed during the experiment. 9 probes set up at the different locations to get the data of local two-phase parameters. The measurement at each location was conducted in 5 minutes to determine the mean value of each parameter. The result of local void fraction profiles at different locations indicates that the void distribution primarily changes along the height of the inclined section. The slug flow occurs in the channel which results in most bubbles attached to the top surface wall. This fact explains the high local void fraction near the top wall and its rapid decline towards the bottom wall of the inclined section. The

  5. A Preliminary Heat Flow Model for Cooling a Batholith near Ica, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L. U.; Clausen, B. L.; Molano, J. C.; Martinez, A. M.; Poma, O.

    2014-12-01

    This research models the cooling of a suite in the Linga Super-unit located at the north end of the Arequipa segment in the Cretaceous Peruvian Coastal Batholith. The monzogabbro to granite Linga suite is approximately 50 km long and 15 km wide, with an estimated vertical extent of about 5 km originally intruded to a depth of 3 km. The emplacement was in andesitic volcanics on the west and the Pampahuasi diorite Super-unit on the east and has incorporated earlier gabbroic bodies. The Linga suite is thought to be the result of a sequence of three pulses: an elongate unit to the west then two elliptical units to the northeast and southeast. The data for modeling comes from field observations on internal and external contacts, some well-defined magma chamber walls and roof, pendant and stoped blocks, magma chamber zoning, the nature and distribution of enclaves and xenoliths, magmatic fabric, evidences of magma mingling, rock porosity, mineralogical associations in metamorphic aureoles, extensive mineralization and brecciated conduits, and the types of hydrothermal alteration varying with distance from contacts. More than forty hand samples, thin sections, and geochemical analyses were used to estimate water content, magma and country rock temperature, liquid density, and viscosity. Further data will come from: zircon U-Pb ages for country rock and magma batch timeframes, fluid inclusions for magma pressure and temperature, and δ18O data for source of hydrothermal fluids. Simple heat conduction calculations using MATLAB and HEAT 3D for a single tabular intrusion estimated a cooling time to solidus of about 300 k.y. More complex modeling includes magma convection and multiple intrusions. Extensive veining and pervasive alteration suggested the use of HYDROTHERM to model possible additional heat flow effects from hydrothermal fluids. Extensive propylitic and significant potassic alteration were observed and, with TerraSpec infrared spectroscopy to identify

  6. Face cooling with mist water increases cerebral blood flow during exercise: Effect of changes in facial skin blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiki eMiyazawa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial cooling (FC increases cerebral blood flow (CBF at rest and during exercise; however, the mechanism of this response remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to test our hypothesis that FC causes facial vasoconstriction that diverts skin blood flow (SkBFface towards the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean at rest and to a greater extent during exercise. Nine healthy young subjects (20 ± 2 yrs. underwent 3 minutes of FC by fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cold water (~4˚C at rest and during steady-state exercise (heart rate of 120 bpm. We focused on the difference between the averaged data acquired from 1 min immediately before FC and last 1 min of FC. SkBFface, MCA Vmean and MAP were higher during exercise than at rest. As hypothesized, FC decreased SkBFface at rest (-32 ± 4 % and to a greater extent during exercise (-64 ± 10%, P=0.012. Although MCA Vmean was increased by FC (Rest, +1.4 ± 0.5 cm/s; Exercise, +1.4 ± 0.6 cm/s, the amount of the FC-evoked changes in MCA Vmean at rest and during exercise differed among subjects. In addition, changes in MCA Vmean with FC did not correlate with concomitant changes in SkBFface (r=0.095, P=0.709. MAP was also increased by FC (Rest, +6.2 ± 1.4 mmHg; Exercise, +4.2 ± 1.2 mmHg. These findings suggest that the FC induced increase in CBF during exercise could not be explained only by change in SkBFface.

  7. Ultrafast cooling and heating scenarios for the laser-induced phase transition in CuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsvik, Johan; Mentink, Johan H.; Lorenzana, José

    2016-10-01

    The multiferroic compound CuO exhibits low-temperature magnetic properties similar to antiferromagnetic iron oxides, while the electronic properties have much more in common with the high-Tc cuprate superconductors. This suggests novel possibilities for the ultrafast optical excitation of magnetism. On the basis of atomistic spin dynamics simulations, we study the effect of phonon-assisted multimagnon absorption and photodoping on the spin dynamics in the vicinity of the first-order phase transition from collinear to spin-spiral magnetic order. Similar as in recent experiments, we find that for both excitations the phase transition can proceed on the picosecond timescale. Interestingly, however, these excitation mechanisms display very distinct dynamics. Following photodoping, the spin system first cools down on subpicosecond time scales, which we explain as an ultrafast magnetocaloric effect. Opposed to this, following phonon-assisted multimagnon excitation, the spin systems rapidly heats up and subsequently evolves to the noncollinear phase even under the influence of isotropic exchange interactions alone.

  8. Two-phase flow patterns for flow condensation in small-diameter tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two-phase flow patterns have been observed visually to investigate the effects of tube diameter, mass flux and tube inclination on flow condensation in small-diameter tubes. For horizontal or inclined small-diameter tubes, gravity-domination is decreased by shear stress and surface tension on phase change interface, which weakens the stratification of condensate and vapor flow due to the action of gravity perpendicular to flow direction. As decreasing the tube diameter from 5.79 mm to 2.18 mm, the annular or sub-annular flows become prevailing in flow regime map. The existing flow regime maps for macro scale cannot predict the experimental data in the present study.

  9. One-heater flow-through polymerase chain reaction device by heat pipes cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Liao, Ming Huei; Li, Kun Tze; Shen, Chia Ming

    2015-01-01

    the cooling module that has been designed for a PCR device. The unique architecture utilized in this flow-through PCR device is well applied to a low-cost PCR system.

  10. Velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Meyapin, Yannick; Gisclon, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    In the present study we investigate analytically the process of velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows. We begin our exposition by considering the so-called six equations two-phase model [Ishii1975, Rovarch2006]. This model assumes each phase to possess its own velocity and energy variables. Despite recent advances, the six equations model remains computationally expensive for many practical applications. Moreover, its advection operator may be non-hyperbolic which poses additional theoretical difficulties to construct robust numerical schemes |Ghidaglia et al, 2001]. In order to simplify this system, we complete momentum and energy conservation equations by relaxation terms. When relaxation characteristic time tends to zero, velocities and energies are constrained to tend to common values for both phases. As a result, we obtain a simple two-phase model which was recently proposed for simulation of violent aerated flows [Dias et al, 2010]. The preservation of invariant regions and incompressible li...

  11. Conceptual design of a 20-kA current lead using forced-flow cooling and Ag-alloy-sheathed Bi-2223 high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Reinhard; Hull, John R.

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS's), consisting of Bi-2223 HTS tapes sheathed with Ag alloys are proposed for a 20-kA current lead for the planned stellarator WENDELSTEIN 7-X. Forced-flow He cooling is used, and 4-K He cooling of the whole lead as well as 60-K He cooling of the copper part of the lead, is discussed. Power consumption and behavior in case of loss of He flow are given.

  12. Phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.

    2009-11-01

    Based on empirical and numerical analyses of vehicular traffic, the physics of spatiotemporal phase transitions in traffic flow on multilane roads is revealed. The complex dynamics of moving jams observed in single vehicle data measured by video cameras on American highways is explained by the nucleation-interruption effect in synchronized flow, i.e., the spontaneous nucleation of a narrow moving jam with the subsequent jam dissolution. We find that (i) lane changing, vehicle merging from on-ramps, and vehicle leaving to off-ramps result in different traffic phases—free flow, synchronized flow, and wide moving jams—occurring and coexisting in different road lanes as well as in diverse phase transitions between the traffic phases; (ii) in synchronized flow, the phase transitions are responsible for a non-regular moving jam dynamics that explains measured single vehicle data: moving jams emerge and dissolve randomly at various road locations in different lanes; (iii) the phase transitions result also in diverse expanded general congested patterns occurring at closely located bottlenecks.

  13. An experimental study of single-phase and two-phase flows in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Peter Mang-Yu

    Recent literature on pressure drop and flow rate measurements in microchannels indicate that both the liquid and gas flow may deviate significantly from convention. Thus, an evaluation was made of the friction factor constant for laminar flow and critical Reynolds number for the laminar-to-turbulent flow transition. Experiments were performed to study the single-phase flow behaviour of water or nitrogen gas through a 100 mum circular microchannel. The liquid flow data were well predicted by the conventional friction factor equations for larger channels, and the critical Reynolds number was close to tradition. For single-phase gas flow, the measured friction factor agreed with theory if the effect of compressibility was considered. Rarefaction did not contribute to the experimental results. The effect of scaling on two-phase flow was investigated to identify micro-scale phenomena. Experiments were conducted with a mixture of nitrogen gas and water in circular channels of 530--50 mum diameter. The two-phase flow was characterized by the flow patterns, void fraction, and frictional pressure drop. In the 530 and 250 mum channels, the flow characteristics were typical of those obtained in minichannels. In the 100 and 50 mum channels, the flow behaviour was unconventional---the occurrence of slug flow dominated, the void fraction-volumetric quality relationship departed from tradition, and mass flux no longer influenced the two-phase frictional multiplier. Unique to these channels, the slug flow exhibited a ring-shaped liquid film or serpentine-like gas core. The sizing effect indicates that the critical diameter for a microchannel lies between 250 and 100 mum. A new model is proposed to expose physical insight into the observed flow patterns. To investigate the effect of channel geometry on two-phase microchannel flow, the same experiment was conducted in a 96 mum square microchannel and the data were compared with those obtained in the 100 mum circular microchannel

  14. A Virtual Reality Technique for Multi-phase Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Eric; Sherman, William; Auman, Aric; Navarro, Christopher

    2004-04-01

    A virtual reality (VR) technique has been developed to allow user immersion (stereo-graphic rendering, user tracking and object interactivity) in generic unsteady three-dimensional multi-phase flow data sets. This article describes the structure and logic used to design and construct a VR technique that employs a multi-phase flow-field computed a priori as an input (i.e. simulations are conducted beforehand with a researcher's multi-phase CFD code). The input field for this flow visualization is divided into two parts: the Eulerian three-dimensional grid nodes and velocities for the continuous fluid properties (specified using conventional TECLOT data format) and the Lagrangian time-history trajectory files for the dispersed fluid. While tracking the dispersed phase trajectories as animated spheres of adjustable size and number, the continuous-phase flow can be simultaneously rendered with velocity vectors, iso-contour surfaces and planar flood-contour maps of different variables. The geometric and notional view of the combined visualization of both phases is interactively controlled throughout a user session. The resulting technique is demonstrated with a 3-D unsteady data set of Lagrangian particles dispersing in a Eulerian description of a turbulent boundary layer, stemming from a direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  15. Investigation of the falling water flow with evaporation for the passive containment cooling system and its scaling-down criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Li, Junming; Li, Le

    2017-09-01

    Falling water evaporation cooling could efficiently suppress the containment operation pressure during the nuclear accident, by continually removing the core decay heat to the atmospheric environment. In order to identify the process of large-scale falling water evaporation cooling, the water flow characteristics of falling film, film rupture and falling rivulet were deduced, on the basis of previous correlation studies. The influences of the contact angle, water temperature and water flow rates on water converge along the flow direction were then numerically obtained and results were compared with the data for AP1000 and CAP1400 nuclear power plants. By comparisons, it is concluded that the water coverage fraction of falling water could be enhanced by either reducing the surface contact angle or increasing the water temperature. The falling water flow with evaporation for AP1000 containment was then calculated and the feature of its water coverage fraction was analyzed. Finally, based on the phenomena identification of falling water flow for AP1000 containment evaporation cooling, the scaling-down is performed and the dimensionless criteria were obtained.

  16. Comparative Effectiveness of Different Phase Change Materials to Improve Cooling Performance of Heat Sinks for Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hasan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper thermo-physically characterizes salt hydrate, paraffin wax and milk fat as phase change materials (PCMs. The three PCMs are compared in terms of improving heat sink (HS performance for cooling electronic packaging. An experimental study is carried out on commercially available finned HS with and without PCM under natural ventilation (NV and forced ventilation (FV at different heat loads (4 W to 10 W. The results indicate that integration of all of the PCMs into the HS improves its cooling performance; however, milk fat lags behind the other two PCMs in terms of cooling produced. A three-dimensional pressure-based conjugate heat transfer model has been developed and validated with experimental results. The model predicts the parametric influence of PCM melting range, thermal conductivity and density on HS thermal management performance. The HS cooling performance improves with increased density and conductivity while it deteriorates with the wider melting range of the PCMs.

  17. Comparison between Normal and HeII Two-phase Flows at High Vapor Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Van Weelderen, R; Rousset, B; Thibault, P; Wolf, P E

    2006-01-01

    We present results on helium co-current two-phase flow experiments at high vapor velocity obtained with the use of the new CEA/SBT 400 W/1.8 K refrigerator [1]. For vapor velocities larger than typically 4 m/s, a mist of droplets develops from the bulk liquid interface accompanied by an increase in heat transfer at the wall. Experiments were conducted in a 10 m long, 40 mm I.D. straight pipe, both in helium II and in helium I to compare these two situations. The respective roles of vapor density, vapor velocity and liquid level on atomization were systematically investigated. Light scattering experiments were performed to measure sizes, velocities and interfacial areas of droplets in a complete cross section. In-house-made heat transfer sensors located in the mist allowed us to deduce an upper value of the extra cooling power of the dispersed phase. The practical interest of atomized flow for cooling large cryogenic facilities is discussed by considering the balance between increase in heat transfer and press...

  18. Noise-Induced Phase Transition in Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIKe-Ping; GAOZi-You

    2004-01-01

    One of the dynamic phases of the traffic flow is the traffic jam. It appears in traffic flow when the vehicle density is larger than the critical value. In this paper, a new method is presented to investigate the traffic jam when the vehicle density is smaller than the critical value. In our method, we introduce noise into the traffic system after sufficient transient time. Under the effect of noise, the traffic jam appears, and the phase transition from free to synchronized flow occurs in traffic flow. Our method is tested for the deterministic NaSch traffic model. The simulation results demonstrate that there exist a broad range of lower densities at which the noise effect leading to traffic jam can be observed.

  19. Marriage \\`a-la-MOND: Baryonic dark matter in galaxy clusters and the cooling flow puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2007-01-01

    I start with a brief introduction to MOND phenomenology and its possible roots in cosmology--a notion that may turn out to be the most far reaching aspect of MOND. Next I discuss the implications of MOND for the dark matter (DM) doctrine: MOND's successes imply that baryons determine everything. For DM this would mean that the puny tail of leftover baryons in galaxies wags the hefty DM dog. This has to occur in many intricate ways, and despite the haphazard construction history of galaxies--a very tall order. I then concentrate on galaxy clusters in light of MOND, which still requires some yet undetected cluster dark matter, presumably in some baryonic form (CBDM). This CBDM might contribute to the heating of the x-ray emitting gas and thus alleviate the cooling-flow puzzle. MOND, qua theory of dynamics, does not directly enter the microphysics of the gas; however, it does force a new outlook on the role of DM in shaping the cluster gasdynamics: MOND tells us that the cluster DM is not cold dark matter, is no...

  20. Analysis of Fractional Flow for Transient Two-Phase Flow in Fractal Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ting; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Dai, Xiaolu; Wu, Jinsui

    2016-03-01

    Prediction of fractional flow in fractal porous medium is important for reservoir engineering and chemical engineering as well as hydrology. A physical conceptual fractional flow model of transient two-phase flow is developed in fractal porous medium based on the fractal characteristics of pore-size distribution and on the approximation that porous medium consist of a bundle of tortuous capillaries. The analytical expression for fractional flow for wetting phase is presented, and the proposed expression is the function of structural parameters (such as tortuosity fractal dimension, pore fractal dimension, maximum and minimum diameters of capillaries) and fluid properties (such as contact angle, viscosity and interfacial tension) in fractal porous medium. The sensitive parameters that influence fractional flow and its derivative are formulated, and their impacts on fractional flow are discussed.

  1. Exact Integral Solutions for Two-Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, David B.; Sunada, Daniel K.

    1990-03-01

    Exact integral solutions for the horizontal, unsteady flow of two viscous, incompressible fluids are derived. Both one-dimensional and radial displacements are calculated with full consideration of capillary drive and for arbitrary capillary-hydraulic properties. One-dimensional, unidirectional displacement of a nonwetting phase is shown to occur increasingly like a shock front as the pore-size distribution becomes wider. This is in contrast to the situation when an inviscid nonwetting phase is displaced. The penetration of a nonwetting phase into porous media otherwise saturated by a wetting phase occurs in narrow, elongate distributions. Such distributions result in rapid and extensive penetration by the nonwetting phase. The process is remarkably sensitive to the capillary-hydraulic properties that determine the value of knw/kw at large wetting phase saturations, a region in which laboratory measurements provide the least resolution. The penetration of a nonwetting phase can be expected to be dramatically affected by the presence of fissures, worm holes, or other macropores. Calculations for radial displacement of a nonwetting phase resident at a small initial saturation show the displacement to be inefficient. The fractional flow of the nonwetting phase falls rapidly and, for a specific example, becomes 1% by the time one pore volume of water has been injected.

  2. Reducing Pumping Power in Hydronic Heating and Cooling Systems with Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Kristoffer Jason

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are being used increasingly in a variety of thermal transfer and thermal storage applications. This thesis presents the results of a laboratory study into the feasibility of improving the performance of hydronic heating and cooling systems by adding microcapsules filled with a PCM to the water used as heat transport media in these systems. Microencapsulated PCMs (MPCMs) increase the heat carrying capacity of heat transport liquids by absorbing or releasing heat at a constant temperature through a change of phase. Three sequences of tests and their results are presented: 1) Thermal cycling tests conducted to determine the melting temperatures and extent of supercooling associated with the MPCMs tested. 2) Hydronic performance tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped through a fin-and-tube, air-to-liquid heat exchanger and their thermal transfer performance compared against that of ordinary water. 3) Mechanical stability tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped in a continuous loop in order to gauge the extent of rupture due to pumping. It is shown that slurries consisting of water and MPCMs ˜ 14-24 mum in diameter improve thermal performance and offer the potential for power savings in the form of reduced pumping requirements. In addition, it is shown that while slurries of MPCMs 2-5 mum in diameter appear to exhibit better mechanical stability than slurries of larger diameter MPCMs, the smaller MPCMs appear to reduce the thermal performance of air-to-liquid heat exchangers.

  3. The development of advanced cooling methods for high-power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, T. J.; Ciaccio, M. P.; Downing, R. S.; Smith, W. G.

    1990-10-01

    Consideration is given to various technologies developed to meet the difficult cooling requirements of high-density power electronics equipment for the aerospace industry. Topics discussed include liquid impingement cooling, compact high-density cooler, integrally cooled semiconductor, high heat flux cold plane, immersion cooling, modular reflux cooler, and forced-flow two-phase cooling systems. It is concluded that the new technologies are capable of providing the temperature control necessary to maintain desired electronic reliabilities using high-conductance cooling approaches.

  4. Two-phase Flow Distribution in Heat Exchanger Manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Vist, Sivert

    2004-01-01

    The current study has investigated two-phase refrigerant flow distribution in heat exchange manifolds. Experimental data have been acquired in a heat exchanger test rig specially made for measurement of mass flow rate and gas and liquid distribution in the manifolds of compact heat exchangers. Twelve different manifold designs were used in the experiments, and CO2 and HFC-134a were used as refrigerants.

  5. Computational methods for two-phase flow and particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Wen Ho

    2013-01-01

    This book describes mathematical formulations and computational methods for solving two-phase flow problems with a computer code that calculates thermal hydraulic problems related to light water and fast breeder reactors. The physical model also handles the particle and gas flow problems that arise from coal gasification and fluidized beds. The second part of this book deals with the computational methods for particle transport.

  6. One-phase flow in porous media with hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, N.D.; Brokate, M.; El Behi-Gornostaeva, E.G., E-mail: elena.gornostaeva@ma.tum.de

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of one phase flow through a porous medium showing a hysteretic relation between the capillary pressure and the saturation of the phase. The flow model used is based on mass conservation principle and Darcy's law. Boundary conditions of Neumann and Signorini type are imposed. The hysteretic relation between the capillary pressure and the saturation is described by a Preisach hysteresis operator. A numerical algorithm for the treatment of the arising system of equations is proposed. Results of numerical simulations are presented.

  7. Stochastic analysis of particle-fluid two-phase flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper is devoted to exploring approaches to understanding the stochastic characteristics of particle-fluid two-phase flow. By quantifying the forces dominating the particle motion and modelling the less important and/or unclear forces as random forces, a stochastic differential equation is proposed to describe the complex behavior of a particle motion. An exploratory simulation has shown satisfactory agreement with phase doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) measurements, which indicates that stochastic analysis is a potential approach for revealing the details of particle-fluid flow phenomena.

  8. Two-phase flow boiling in small channels: A brief review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhavi V Sardeshpande; Vivek V Ranade

    2013-12-01

    Boiling flows are encountered in a wide range of industrial applications such as boilers, core and steam generators in nuclear reactors, petroleum transportation, electronic cooling and various types of chemical reactors. Many of these applications involve boiling flows in conventional channels (channel size ≥ 3 mm). The key design issues in two phase flow boiling are variation in flow regimes, occurrence of dry out condition, flow instabilities, and understanding of heat transfer coefficient and vapor quality. This paper briefly reviews published experimental and modeling work in these areas. An attempt is made to provide a perspective and to present available information on boiling in small channels in terms of channel size, flow regimes, heat transfer correlations, pressure drop, critical heat flux and film thickness. An attempt is also made to identify strengths and weaknesses of published approaches and computational models of boiling in small channels. The presented discussion and results will provide an update on the state-of-the-art and will be useful to identify and plan further research in this important area.

  9. Legionnaires' disease bacteria in power plant cooling systems: Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.; Christensen, S.W.; Solomon, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    Legionnaires' Disease Bacteria (Legionella) are a normal component of the aquatic community. The study investigated various environmental factors that affect Legionella profiles in power plant cooling waters. The results indicate that each of the four factors investigated (incubation temperature, water quality, the presence and type of associated biota, and the nature of the indigenous Legionella population) is important in determining the Legionella profile of these waters. Simple predictive relationships were not found. At incubation temperatures of 32/sup 0/ and 37/sup 0/C, waters from a power plant where infectious Legionella were not observed stimulated the growth of stock Legionella cultures more than did waters from plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent. This observation is consistent with Phase I results, which showed that densities of Legionella were frequently reduced in closed-cycle cooling systems despite the often higher infectivity of Legionella in closed-cycle waters. In contrast, water from power plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent supported the growth of indigenous Legionella pneumophila at 42/sup 0/C, while water from a power plant where infectious Legionella were absent did not support growth of indigenous Legionella. Some Legionella are able to withstand a water temperature of 85/sup 0/C for several hours, thus proving more tolerant than was previously realized. Finally, the observation that water from two power plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent usually supported the growth of Group A Legionella at 45/sup 0/C indicates the presence, of soluble Legionella growth promoters in these waters. This test system could allow for future identification and control of these growth promoters and, hence, of Legionella. 25 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of three-phase incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H.; Shi, B. C.; Chai, Z. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on multicomponent phase-field theory we intend to develop an efficient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating three-phase incompressible flows. In this model, two LB equations are used to capture the interfaces among three different fluids, and another LB equation is adopted to solve the flow field, where a new distribution function for the forcing term is delicately designed. Different from previous multiphase LB models, the interfacial force is not used in the computation of fluid velocity, which is more reasonable from the perspective of the multiscale analysis. As a result, the computation of fluid velocity can be much simpler. Through the Chapman-Enskog analysis, it is shown that the present model can recover exactly the physical formulations for the three-phase system. Numerical simulations of extensive examples including two circular interfaces, ternary spinodal decomposition, spreading of a liquid lens, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are conducted to test the model. It is found that the present model can capture accurate interfaces among three different fluids, which is attributed to its algebraical and dynamical consistency properties with the two-component model. Furthermore, the numerical results of three-phase flows agree well with the theoretical results or some available data, which demonstrates that the present LB model is a reliable and efficient method for simulating three-phase flow problems.

  11. Laboratory and field trials of Coriolis mass flow metering for three-phase flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibiao; Henry, Manus; Tombs, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A new three-phase flow metering technology is discussed in this paper, which combines Coriolis mass flow and water cut readings and without applying any phase separation [1]. The system has undergone formal laboratory trials at TUV NEL (National Engineering Laboratory), UK and at VNIIR (National Flow Laboratory), Kazan, Russia; a number of field trials have taken place in Russia. Laboratory trial results from the TUV NEL will be described in detail. For the 50mm (2") metering system, the total liquid flow rate ranged from 2.4 kg/s up to 11 kg/s, the water cut ranged from 0% to 100%, and the gas volume fraction (GVF) from 0 to 50%. In a formally observed trial, 75 test points were taken at a temperature of approximately 40 °C and with a skid inlet pressure of approximately 350 kPa. Over 95% of the test results fell within the desired specification, defined as follows: the total (oil + water) liquid mass flow error should fall within ± 2.5%, and the gas mass flow error within ± 5.0%. The oil mass flow error limit is ± 6.0% for water cuts less than 70%, while for water cuts between 70% and 95% the oil mass flow error limit is ± 15.0%. These results demonstrate the potential for using Coriolis mass flow metering combined with water cut metering for three-phase (oil/water/gas) measurement.

  12. Comparative study of Nusselt number for a single phase fluid flow using plate heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugam Rajasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the plate heat exchangers are used for various applications in the industries for heat exchange process such as heating, cooling and condensation. The performance of plate heat exchanger depends on many factors such as flow arrangements, plate design, chevron angle, enlargement factor, type of fluid used, etc. The various Nusselt number correlations are developed by considering that the water as a working fluid. The main objective of the present work is to design the experimental set-up for a single phase fluid flow using plate heat exchanger and studied the heat transfer performance. The experiments are carried out for various Reynolds number between 500 and 2200, the heat transfer coefficients are estimated. Based on the experimental results the new correlation is developed for Nusselt number and compared with an existing correlation.

  13. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  14. Single phase channel flow forced convection heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartnett, J.P.

    1999-04-01

    A review of the current knowledge of single phase forced convection channel flow of liquids (Pr > 5) is presented. Two basic channel geometries are considered, the circular tube and the rectangular duct. Both laminar flow and turbulent flow are covered. The review begins with a brief overview of the heat transfer behavior of Newtonian fluids followed by a more detailed presentation of the behavior of purely viscous and viscoelastic Non-Newtonian fluids. Recent developments dealing with aqueous solutions of high molecular weight polymers and aqueous solutions of surfactants are discussed. The review concludes by citing a number of challenging research opportunities.

  15. Flow Rate of He Ⅱ Liquid-Vapor Phase Separator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingen YU; Qing LI; Qiang LI; Zhengyu LI

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for superfluld (He Ⅱ) flow through porous plug liquid-vapor phase separators.Tests have been performed on seven porous plugs with different thicknesses or different permeabilities. The temperature was measured from 1.5K to 1.9K. Two flow regions were observed in small and large pressure and temperature differences regions respectively. The experimental data are compared with theoretical predictions.The performance and applicability of the basic theory are discussed. Hysteresis of the flow rate is also observed and discussed.

  16. Performance of a 10-kJ SMES model cooled by liquid hydrogen thermo-siphon flow for ASPCS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makida, Y.; Shintomi, T.; Hamajima, T.; Ota, N.; Katsura, M.; Ando, K.; Takao, T.; Tsuda, M.; Miyagi, D.; Tsujigami, H.; Fujikawa, S.; Hirose, J.; Iwaki, K.; Komagome, T.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new electrical power storage and stabilization system, called an Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and hydrogen energy storage, converged on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. A small 10- kJ SMES system, in which a BSCCO coil cooled by liquid hydrogen was installed, was developed to create an experimental model of an ASPCS. The SMES coil is conductively cooled by liquid hydrogen flow through a thermo-siphon line under a liquid hydrogen buffer tank. After fabrication of the system, cooldown tests were carried out using liquid hydrogen. The SMES coil was successfully charged up to a nominal current of 200 A. An eddy current loss, which was mainly induced in pure aluminum plates pasted onto each pancake coils for conduction cooling, was also measured.

  17. Effect of cooling rate during solidification on the hard phases of M23C6-type of cast CoCrMo alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alvarez-Vera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural morphology of CoCrMo alloy by control of the cooling rate during the solidification was investigated. Samples were obtained using both an induction furnace for slow cooling rate and electric arc furnace for fast cooling rate. Microstructural characterizations were performed with metallographic techniques. It was found that the difference between the formation temperature of hard secondary phases of M23C6-type carbides determine the reduction of carbide size by increasing the cooling rate.

  18. Local Gas Phase Flow Characteristics of a Gas—Liquid—Solid Three—Phase Reversed Flow Jet Loop Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENJianping; ChenYunlin; 等

    2002-01-01

    The local gas-phase flow characteristics such as local gas holdup (εg), local bubble velocity (Vb) and local bubble mean diameter(db) at a specified point in a gas-liquid-solid three-phase reversed flow jet loop reactor was experimentally investigated by a five-point conductivity probe. The effects of gas jet flow rate, liquid jet flow rate, solid loading, nozzle diameter and axial position on the local εg,Vb and db profiles were discussed. The presence of solids at low solid concentrations not only increased the local εg and Vb, but also decreased the local db. The optimum solid olading for the maximum local εg and Vb together with the minimum local db was 0.16×10-3m3, corresponding to a solid volume fraction,εS=2.5%.

  19. Statistical descriptions of polydisperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Disperse two-phase flows are flows containing two non-miscible phases where one phase is present as a set of discrete elements dispersed in the second one. These discrete elements, or 'particles', can be droplets, bubbles or solid particles having different sizes. This situation encompasses a wide range of phenomena, from nano-particles and colloids sensitive to the molecular fluctuations of the carrier fluid to inertia particles transported by the large-scale motions of turbulent flows and, depending on the phenomenon studied, a broad spectrum of approaches have been developed. The aim of the present article is to analyze statistical models of particles in turbulent flows by addressing this issue as the extension of the classical formulations operating at a molecular or meso-molecular level of description. It has a three-fold purpose: (1) to bring out the thread of continuity between models for discrete particles in turbulent flows (above the hydrodynamical level of description) and classical mesoscopic formulations of statistical physics (below the hydrodynamical level); (2) to reveal the specific challenges met by statistical models in turbulence; (3) to establish a methodology for modeling particle dynamics in random media with non-zero space and time correlations. The presentation is therefore centered on organizing the different approaches, establishing links and clarifying physical foundations. The analysis of disperse two-phase flow models is developed by discussing: first, approaches of classical statistical physics; then, by considering models for single-phase turbulent flows; and, finally, by addressing current formulations for discrete particles in turbulent flows. This brings out that particle-based models do not cease to exist above the hydrodynamical level and offer great interest when combined with proper stochastic formulations to account for the lack of equilibrium distributions and scale separation. In the course of this study, general results

  20. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in inclined channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-08-01

    Linear stability of the stratified gas-liquid and liquid-liquid plane-parallel flows in the inclined channels is studied with respect to all wavenumber perturbations. The main objective is to predict the parameter regions in which the stable stratified configuration in inclined channels exists. Up to three distinct base states with different holdups exist in the inclined flows, so that the stability analysis has to be carried out for each branch separately. Special attention is paid to the multiple solution regions to reveal the feasibility of the non-unique stable stratified configurations in inclined channels. The stability boundaries of each branch of the steady state solutions are presented on the flow pattern map and are accompanied by the critical wavenumbers and the spatial profiles of the most unstable perturbations. Instabilities of different nature are visualized by the streamlines of the neutrally stable perturbed flows, consisting of the critical perturbation superimposed on the base flow. The present analysis confirms the existence of two stable stratified flow configurations in a region of low flow rates in the countercurrent liquid-liquid flows. These configurations become unstable with respect to the shear mode of instability. It was revealed that in slightly upward inclined flows the lower and middle solutions for the holdup are stable in the part of the triple solution region, while the upper solution is always unstable. In the case of downward flows, in the triple solution region, none of the solutions are stable with respect to the short-wave perturbations. These flows are stable only in the single solution region at low flow rates of the heavy phase, and the long-wave perturbations are the most unstable ones.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Two-phase flow with Phase Change Using the Level-set Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongying; Lou, Jing; Pan, Lunsheng; Yap, Yitfatt

    2016-11-01

    Multiphase flow with phase change is widely encountered in many engineering applications. A distinct feature involves in these applications is the phase transition from one phase to another due to the non-uniform temperature distribution. Such kind of process generally releases or absorbs large amount of energy with mass transfer happened simultaneously. It demands great cautions occasionally such as the high pressure due to evaporation. This article presents a numerical model for simulation of two-fluid flow with phase change problem. In these two fluids, one of them changes its state due to phase change. Such a problem then involves two substances with three phases as well as two different interfaces, i.e. the interface between two substances and the interface of one substance between its two phases. Two level-set functions are used to capture the two interfaces in the current problem. The current model is validated against one-dimensional and two-dimensional liquid evaporation. With the code validated, it is applied to different phase change problems including (1) a falling evaporating droplet and the rising of one bubble and (2) two-fluid stratified flow with solidification of one fluid. Comparisons on the bubble and droplet topologies, flow and temperature fields are made for the first case between the falling evaporating droplet and the falling droplet without evaporation. For the second demonstration case, the effect of the superheated temperature on the solidification process is investigated.

  2. A study of optimum cowl shapes and flow port locations for minimum drag with effective engine cooling, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. R.; Smetana, F. O.

    1980-01-01

    The listings, user's instructions, sample inputs, and sample outputs of two computer programs which are especially useful in obtaining an approximate solution of the viscous flow over an arbitrary nonlifting three dimensional body are provided. The first program performs a potential flow solution by a well known panel method and readjusts this initial solution to account for the effects of the boundary layer displacement thickness, a nonuniform but unidirectional onset flow field, and the presence of air intakes and exhausts. The second program is effectually a geometry package which allows the user to change or refine the shape of a body to satisfy particular needs without a significant amount of human intervention. An effort to reduce the cruise drag of light aircraft through an analytical study of the contributions to the drag arising from the engine cowl shape and the foward fuselage area and also that resulting from the cooling air mass flowing through intake and exhaust sites on the nacelle is presented. The programs may be effectively used to determine the appropriate body modifications or flow port locations to reduce the cruise drag as well as to provide sufficient air flow for cooling the engine.

  3. Equivalence of two models in single-phase multicomponent flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yuanqing

    2016-02-28

    In this work, two models to simulate the single-phase multicomponent flow in reservoirs are introduced: single-phase multicomponent flow model and two-phase compositional flow model. Because the single-phase multicomponent flow is a special case of the two-phase compositional flow, the two-phase compositional flow model can also simulate the case. We compare and analyze the two models when simulating the single-phase multicomponent flow, and then demonstrate the equivalence of the two models mathematically. An experiment is also carried out to verify the equivalence of the two models.

  4. Metal temperatures and coolant flow in a wire cloth transpiration cooled turbine vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental heat transfer investigation was conducted on an air-cooled turbine vane made from wire-wound cloth material and supported by a central strut. Vane temperature data obtained are compared with temperature data from two full-coverage film-cooled vanes made of different laminated construction. Measured porous-airfoil temperatures are compared with predicted temperatures.

  5. Flow-induced phase separation in polymer solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moel, K. de; Flikkema, E.; Szleifer, I.; Brinke, G. ten

    1998-01-01

    A correct description of phase behaviour in polymer solutions requires a coupling between configurational statistics and thermodynamics. The effect of flow-induced chain deformation on the polymer-solvent interaction energy depends on the concentration and on the polymer architecture. It will be dem

  6. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of three-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhizhua; Salinas, Pablo; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional three-phase flow problems, such as droplet impact on a gas-liquid interface and bubble rising through a liquid-liquid interface. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is employed here to study three-phase flow problems, which can modify and adapt unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of multiphase problems and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a `volume of fluid' type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method and second-order finite element methods, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation, minimising the spurious velocities often found in such flow simulations. The surface tension coefficient decomposition method has been employed to deal with surface tension pairing between different phases via a compositional approach. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of three-phase flows are presented to demonstrate the ability of this method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  7. Numerical simulation of two-phase flow in offshore environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, Rik

    2008-01-01

    Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Flow in Offshore Environments Rik Wemmenhove Weather conditions on full sea are often violent, leading to breaking waves and lots of spray and air bubbles. As high and steep waves may lead to severe damage on ships and offshore structures, there is a great need for

  8. Phase-locked flux-flow Josephson oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ustinov, A. V.; Mygind, Jesper; Oboznov, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    . The dependence of the amplitude of the phase-locked step on external magnetic field and microwave power has been measured. The observed zero-crossing steps have potential application in Josephson voltage standards. A simple model for the flux-flow as determined by the microwave driven boundary gate at the edge...

  9. Numerical Model for the Analysis of Coolability of a Particulate Debris Bed with Single Phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, C. H.; Jeong, H. Y.; Chang, W. P.; Kwon, Y. M.; Lee, Y. B

    2008-01-15

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. Accordingly, Numerical model development for the Analysis of coolability of a particulate debris bed with single phase flow was carried out for in-vessel retention of the core debris.

  10. Revaluation of a Coolability of a Packed Debris Bed with a Single Phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chungho; Suk, S. D.; Jeong, H. Y.; Kwon, Y. M.; Lee, Y. B

    2008-09-15

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double-fault initiators such as ATWS events without coolant boiling or fuel melting. However, for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may be worth due consideration of triple-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to core melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will be required as a design requirement for the future design of sodium cooled fast reactor. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. Accordingly, evaluation of coolability of a packed debris bed with single phase flow was carried out for proof of the in-vessel retention of the core debris.

  11. Three-Phase Unbalanced Load Flow Tool for Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirok, Erhan; Kjær, Søren Bækhøj; Sera, Dezso;

    2012-01-01

    This work develops a three-phase unbalanced load flow tool tailored for radial distribution networks based on Matlab®. The tool can be used to assess steady-state voltage variations, thermal limits of grid components and power losses in radial MV-LV networks with photovoltaic (PV) generators where...... most of the systems are single phase. New ancillary service such as static reactive power support by PV inverters can be also merged together with the load flow solution tool and thus, the impact of the various reactive power control strategies on the steady-state grid operation can be simply...... investigated. Performance of the load flow solution tool in the sense of resulting bus voltage magnitudes is compared and validated with IEEE 13-bus test feeder....

  12. Noise-Induced Phase Transition in Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; GAO Zi-You

    2004-01-01

    One of the dynamic phases of the traffic flow is the traffic jam. It appears in traffic flow when the vehicledensity is larger than the critical value. In this paper, a new method is presented to investigate the traffic jam when thevehicle density is smaller than the critical value. In our method, we introduce noise into the traffic system after sufficienttransient time. Under the effect of noise, the traffic jam appears, and the phase transition from tree to synchronized flowoccurs in traffic flow. Our method is tested for the deterministic NaSch traffic model. The simulation results demonstratethat there exist a broad range of lower densities at which the noise effect leading to traffic jam can be observed.

  13. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  14. Extensional Flow-Induced Dynamic Phase Transitions in Isotactic Polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianzhu; Wang, Zhen; Su, Fengmei; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Ali, Sarmad; Li, Xiangyang; Li, Liangbin

    2016-09-01

    With a combination of fast extension rheometer and in situ synchrotron radiation ultra-fast small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) is studied at temperatures below and above the melting point of α crystals (Tmα). A flow phase diagram of iPP is constructed in strain rate-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline shish, α and α&β coexistence regions, based on which the kinetic and dynamic competitions among these four phases are discussed. Above Tmα , imposing strong flow reverses thermodynamic stabilities of the disordered melt and the ordered phases, leading to the occurrence of FIC of β and α crystals as a dynamic phase transition. Either increasing temperature or stain rate favors the competiveness of the metastable β over the stable α crystals, which is attributed to kinetic rate rather than thermodynamic stability. The violent competitions among four phases near the boundary of crystal-melt may frustrate crystallization and result in the non-crystalline shish winning out.

  15. Heat Flow Characteristics of a Newly-Designed Cooling System with Multi-Fans and Thermal Baffle in the Wheel Loader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidai Liao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional cooling case, there is usually one fan in charge of heat transfer and airflow for all radiators. However, this seems to be inappropriate, or even insufficient, for modern construction machinery, as its overall heat flow density is increasing but thermal distribution is becoming uneven. In order to ensure that the machine works in a better condition, this paper employs a new cooling system with multiple fans and an independent cooling region. Based on the thermal flow and performance requirements, seven fans are divided into three groups. The independent cooling region is segregated from the engine region by a thermal baffle to avoid heat flowing into the engine region and inducing an overheat phenomenon. The experiment validates the efficiency of the new cooling system and accuracy of simulation. After validation, the simulation then analyzes heat transfer and flow characteristics of the cooling system, changing with different cross-sections in different axis directions, as well as different distances of the fan central axes. Finally, thermal baffles are set among the fan groups and provided a better cooling effect. The research realizes a multi-fan scheme with an independent cooling region in a wheel loader, which is a new, but high-efficiency, cooling system and will lead to a new change of various configurations and project designs in future construction machinery.

  16. Advanced Pumps and Cold Plates for Two-Phase Cooling Loops Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced instruments used for earth science missions require improved cooling systems to remove heat from high power electronic components and maintain tight...

  17. Advanced Pumps and Cold Plates for Two-Phase Cooling Loops Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced instruments used for earth science missions require improved cooling systems to remove heat from high power electronic components and maintain tight...

  18. Rapid cooled lens cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, David M.; Hsu, Ike C.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes the optomechanical design, thermal analysis, fabrication, and test evaluation processes followed in developing a rapid cooled, infrared lens cell. Thermal analysis was the key engineering discipline exercised in the design phase. The effect of thermal stress on the lens, induced by rapid cooling of the lens cell, was investigated. Features of this lens cell that minimized the thermal stress will be discussed in a dedicated section. The results of thermal analysis on the selected lens cell design and the selection of the flow channel design in the heat exchanger will be discussed. Throughout the paper engineering drawings, illustrations, analytical results, and photographs of actual hardware are presented.

  19. Simulation of cooling channel rheocasting process of A356 aluminum alloy using three-phase volume averaging model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Wang; B.Pustal; M. Abondano; T. Grimmig; A. B(u)hrig-Polaczek; M. Wu; A. Ludwig

    2005-01-01

    The cooling channel process is a rehocasting method by which the prematerial with globular microstructure can be produced to fit the thixocasting process. A three-phase model based on volume averaging approach is proposed to simulate the cooling channel process of A356 Aluminum alloy. The three phases are liquid, solid and air respectively and treated as separated and interacting continua, sharing a single pressure field. The mass, momentum, enthalpy transport equations for each phase are solved. The developed model can predict the evolution of liquid, solid and air fraction as well as the distribution of grain density and grain size. The effect of pouring temperature on the grain density, grain size and solid fraction is analyzed in detail.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION FOR THE EFFECT OF ROTATION ON THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLOW FIELD IN FILM-COOLED TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Feng; ZHU Xiaocheng; DU Zhaohui

    2007-01-01

    An experimental investigation of three-dimensional flow field in a film-cooled turbine model is carried out by using particle image velocimeter (PIV) in a low-speed wind tunnel. The effects of different blowing ratios (M=1.5, 2) on the flow field are studied. The experimental results reveal the classical phenomena of the formation of kidney vortex pair and secondary flow in wake region behind the jet hole. And the changes of the kidney vortex pair and the wake at different locations away from the hole on the suction and pressure sides are also studied. Compared with the flow field in stationary cascade, there are centrifugal force and Coriolis force existing in the flow field of rotating turbine, and these forces bring the radial velocity in the jet flow. The effect of rotation on the flow field of the pressure side is more distinct than that on the suction side from the measured flow fields in Y-Z plane and radial velocity contours. The increase of blowing ratio makes the kidney vortex pair and the secondary flow in the wake region stronger and makes the range of the wake region enlarged.

  1. Solutal Marangoni instability in layered two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Picardo, Jason R; Pushpavanam, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the instability of layered two-phase flows caused by the presence of a soluble surfactant (or a surface active solute) is studied. The fluids have different viscosities, but are density matched to focus on Marangoni effects. The fluids flow between two flat plates, which are maintained at different solute concentrations. This establishes a constant flux of solute from one fluid to the other in the base state. A linear stability analysis is performed, using a combination of asymptotic and numerical methods. In the creeping flow regime, Marangoni stresses destabilize the flow, provided a concentration gradient is maintained across the fluids. One long wave and two short wave Marangoni instability modes arise, in different regions of parameter space. A well-defined condition for the long wave instability is determined in terms of the viscosity and thickness ratios of the fluids, and the direction of mass transfer. Energy budget calculations show that the Marangoni stresses that drive long and shor...

  2. Influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout in boiling two-phase upward flow within a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, S.; Fukano, T. E-mail: fukanot@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2003-10-01

    When a flow obstruction such as a cylindrical spacer is set in a boiling two-phase flow within an annular channel, the inner tube of which is used as a heater, the temperature on the surface of the heating tube is severely affected by its existence. In some cases, the cylindrical spacer has a cooling effect, and in the other cases it causes the dryout of the cooling water film on the heating surface resulting in the burnout of the heating tube. In the present paper, we have focused our attention on the influence of a flow obstacle on the occurrence of burnout of the heating tube in boiling two-phase flow. The results are summarized as follows: - When the heat flux approaches the burnout condition, the wall temperature on the heating tube fluctuates with a large amplitude. And once the wall temperature exceeds the Leidenfrost temperature, the burnout occurs without exception. - The trigger of dryout of the water film which causes the burnout is not the nucleate boiling but the evaporation of the base film between disturbance waves. - The burnout never occurs at the downstream side of the spacer. This is because the dryout area downstream of the spacer is rewetted easily by the disturbance waves.

  3. Flow visualization study of inverted U-bend two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, M.; Kim, S.B.; Lee, R.

    1986-12-01

    A hot-leg U-bend experiment was performed. The experimental condition simulated the two-phase flow in a B and W primary loop during a small break loss of coolant accident or during some other abnormal transients. The loop design was based on the scaling criteria developed previously and the loop was operated either in a natural circulation mode or in a forced circulation mode using nitrogen gas and water. The two-phase flow regimes at the hot-leg were identified on the basis of visual observation. The phase separation at the top of the inverted U-bend was observed at low gas flow rate. The void fractions were measured using differential pressure transducers and compared with the prediction from the drift-flux model. The natural circulation flow interruption occurred in two different modes, namely, quasi-periodic and semi-permanent modes. This phenomenon is mainly dependent on the difference in the hydrostatic head in the riser and downcomer, and the flow regime at hot-leg. Besides this flow interruption phenomenon, dynamic flow instabilities of considerable amplitudes have been observed.

  4. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  5. Measurements and computational analysis of heat transfer and flow in a simulated turbine blade internal cooling passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Louis M.; Thurman, Douglas R.; Simonyi, Patricia S.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Poinsatte, Philip E.

    1993-01-01

    Visual and quantitative information was obtained on heat transfer and flow in a branched-duct test section that had several significant features of an internal cooling passage of a turbine blade. The objective of this study was to generate a set of experimental data that could be used to validate computer codes for internal cooling systems. Surface heat transfer coefficients and entrance flow conditions were measured at entrance Reynolds numbers of 45,000, 335,000, and 726,000. The heat transfer data were obtained using an Inconel heater sheet attached to the surface and coated with liquid crystals. Visual and quantitative flow field results using particle image velocimetry were also obtained for a plane at mid channel height for a Reynolds number of 45,000. The flow was seeded with polystyrene particles and illuminated by a laser light sheet. Computational results were determined for the same configurations and at matching Reynolds numbers; these surface heat transfer coefficients and flow velocities were computed with a commercially available code. The experimental and computational results were compared. Although some general trends did agree, there were inconsistencies in the temperature patterns as well as in the numerical results. These inconsistencies strongly suggest the need for further computational studies on complicated geometries such as the one studied.

  6. Two-Phase Flow Hydrodynamics in Superhydrophobic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kimberly; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel; Iverson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces promote drop-wise condensation and droplet removal leading to the potential for increased thermal transport. Accordingly, great interest exists in using superhydrophobic surfaces in flow condensing environments, such as power generation and desalination. Adiabatic air-water mixtures were used to gain insight into the effect of hydrophobicity on two-phase flows and the hydrodynamics present in flow condensation. Pressure drop and onset of various flow regimes in hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic mini (0.5 x 10 mm) channels were explored. Data for air/water mixtures with superficial Reynolds numbers from 20-200 and 250-1800, respectively, were obtained. Agreement between experimentally obtained pressure drops and correlations in literature for the conventional smooth control surfaces was better than 20 percent. Transitions between flow regimes for the hydrophobic and hydrophilic channels were similar to commonly recognized flow types. However, the superhydrophobic channel demonstrated significantly different flow regime behavior from conventional surfaces including a different shape of the air slugs, as discussed in the presentation.

  7. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (Phase O). Volume 1: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRW Systems Group, Redondo Beach, CA.

    The purpose of this study was to establish the technical and economic feasibility of using solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings. Five selected building types in 14 selected cities were used to determine loads for space heating, space cooling and dehumidification, and domestic service hot water heating. Relying on existing and…

  8. Precipitation of α2 Phase in α+β Solution-Treated and Air-cooled Ti-Al-Sn-Zr-Mo-Si-Nd Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A series of Ti-Al-Sn-Zr-Mo-Si-Nd alloys with various content of Al were solution treated in α+β phase field and air-cooled.The precipitation of α2 phase in cooling was investigated by transmission electron microscopic analysis.The precipitation characteristic of α2 phase was discussed. The precipitation of α2 phase would proceed by the nucleation and growth of α2 phase dependent on the diffusion of Al atoms. And a comparison on the difference of precipitation of α2 phase was carried out under the conditions of air-cooling and quenching in water.The investigation showed that the air-cooling and even quenching could supply enough time for the precipitation and growth of α2 phase when Al content reached a certain value even though far away from the stoichiometric composition of TisAl.

  9. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A.; Vitoshkin, H.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-04-01

    Linear stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels to arbitrary wavenumber disturbances is studied. The problem is reduced to Orr-Sommerfeld equations for the stream function disturbances, defined in each sublayer and coupled via boundary conditions that account also for possible interface deformation and capillary forces. Applying the Chebyshev collocation method, the equations and interface boundary conditions are reduced to the generalized eigenvalue problems solved by standard means of numerical linear algebra for the entire spectrum of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors. Some additional conclusions concerning the instability nature are derived from the most unstable perturbation patterns. The results are summarized in the form of stability maps showing the operational conditions at which a stratified-smooth flow pattern is stable. It is found that for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the stratified flow with a smooth interface is stable only in confined zone of relatively low flow rates, which is in agreement with experiments, but is not predicted by long-wave analysis. Depending on the flow conditions, the critical perturbations can originate mainly at the interface (so-called "interfacial modes of instability") or in the bulk of one of the phases (i.e., "shear modes"). The present analysis revealed that there is no definite correlation between the type of instability and the perturbation wavelength.

  10. Anisotropic stress accumulation in cooling lava flows and resulting fracture patterns: Insights from starch-water desiccation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Robert W. D.; Lescinsky, David T.

    2009-09-01

    Desiccation of starch-water slurries is a useful analog for the production of polygonal fractures/columnar joints in cooling lava flows. When left to dry completely, a simple mixture of 1:1 starch and water will produce columns that appear remarkably similar to natural columnar joints formed in cooled lava flows. Columns form when the accumulation of isotropic stress exceeds the tensile strength of a material, at which point a fracture forms and advances through the material perpendicular to the desiccating surface. Individual fractures will initially form orthogonal to the desiccation surface but will quickly evolve into a hexagonal fracture network that advances incrementally through the material. However, some fracture patterns found within natural lava flows are not hexagonal ( Lodge and Lescinsky, 2009-this issue), but rather have fracture lengths that are much longer than the distance to adjacent fractures. These fractures are commonly found at lava flows that have interacted with glacial ice during emplacement. The purpose of this study is to utilize starch analog experiments to better understand the formation of these fractures and the stress regimes responsible for their non-hexagonal patterns. To simulate anisotropic conditions during cooling, the starch slurry was poured into a container with a movable wall that was attached to a screw-type jack. The jack was then set to slowly extend or retract while the slurry desiccated. This resulted in either a decrease or increase in the chamber cross-sectional area thus creating compressional or extensional regimes. Decreasing chamber area (DCA) experiments resulted in fractures with larger lengths parallel to the direction of wall movement (also direction of compression). It also caused localized thrust faulting and curved column development. Increasing chamber area (ICA) experiments produced a zone of horizontal column development along the expanding margin (produced when the wall detached from the sample

  11. Flow regime development analysis in adiabatic upward two-phase flow in a vertical annulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia, J. Enrique [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Construccion, Universitat Jaume I, Campus de Riu Sec, Castellon 12071 (Spain); Ozar, Basar [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States); Jeong, Jae-Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Dukjin, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hibiki, Takashi [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States); Ishii, Mamoru, E-mail: ishii@purdue.ed [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    In this work radial and axial flow regime development in adiabatic upward air-water two-phase flow in a vertical annulus has been investigated. Local flow regimes have been identified using conductivity probes and neural networks techniques. The inner and outer diameters of the annulus are 19.1 mm and 38.1 mm, respectively. The equivalent hydraulic diameter of the flow channel, D{sub H}, is 19.0 mm and the total length is 4.37 m. The flow regime map includes 1080 local flow regimes identifications in 72 flow conditions within a range of 0.01 m/s < < 30 m/s and 0.2 m/s < < 3.5 m/s where and are, respectively, superficial gas and liquid velocities. The local flow regime has been classified into four categories: bubbly, cap-slug, churn-turbulent and annular flows. In order to study the radial and axial development of flow regime the measurements have been performed at five radial locations. The three axial positions correspond to z/D{sub H} = 52, 149 and 230, where z represents the axial position. The flow regime indicator has been chosen as some statistical parameters of local bubble chord length distributions and self-organized neural networks have been used as mapping system. This information has been also used to compare the results given by the existing flow regime transition models. The local flow regime is characterized basically by the void fraction and bubble chord length. The radial development of flow regime shows partial and complete local flow regime combinations. The radial development is controlled by axial location and superficial liquid velocity. The radial flow regime transition is always initiated in the center of the flow channel and it is propagated towards the channel boundaries. The axial development of flow regime is observed in all the flow maps and it is governed by superficial liquid velocity and radial location. The prediction results of the models are compared for each flow regime transition.

  12. Phase transformations in an AISI 410S stainless steel observed in directional and laser-induced cooling regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The applications of the chromium ferritic stainless steel AISI 410S have been considerably increased in the last years in many technical fields as chemical industries and oil or gas transportation. However, the phase transformation temperatures are, currently, unknown for this alloy. The aim of this work is to determine the alpha to gamma transformation temperatures of the AISI 410S alloy in different cooling conditions and to analyze them using continuous cooling theory. In order to achieve different cooling rates and thermal conditions, two complementary techniques were used: Bridgman furnace crystal growth and laser remelting technique. The measured solidification temperature was around 1730 and 1750 K. Plate-like and dendritic austenite precipitates were obtained in solid-state phase using growth rates between 5 and 10 µm/s in directional growth experiments. Only plate-like austenite phase was observed in the experiments using growth rates above 100 µm/s. The appearance of dendrites, with the consequent segregation of the elements, can be previously determined by the microstructure modeling currently proposed. Massive austenite can be produced from 0.3 to 10 mm/s rates at temperatures between 1100-1300 K. The structure might be less sensitive to corrosion because this phase is produced without microsegregation.

  13. Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae Gyun; Jeon, Wan Ho [Technical Research Lab., CEDIC Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Minorikawa, Gaku [Dept. of f Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Hosei University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The recent development of small and lightweight rack mount servers and computers has resulted in the decrease of the size of cooling fans. However, internal fans still need to achieve a high performance to release the heat generated from interior parts, and they should emit low noise. On the contrary, measurement data, such as flow properties and flow visualizations, cannot be obtained easily when cooling fans are small. Thus, a numerical analysis approach is necessary for the performance evaluation and noise reduction of small cooling fans. In this study, the noise of a small cooling fan used for computers or servers was measured and then compared with the aeroacoustic noise result based on a numerical analysis. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved to predict the unsteady flow field and surface pressure fluctuation according to the blades and casing surface used. The simplified Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation was used to predict aeroacoustic noise by assuming that a dipole is the major cause of fan noise. Results of the aeroacoustic noise analysis agreed well with that of the experiment, and a tonal noise whose frequency was lower than the first blade passing frequency could be identified in the noise spectrum. This phenomenon is caused by the shape of the bell mouth. A coherence analysis was performed to examine the correlation between the shape of the cooling fan and the noise.

  14. Non-equilibrium model of two-phase porous media flow with phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Fu, X.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    The efficient simulation of multi-phase multi-component flow through geologic porous media is challenging and computationally intensive, yet quantitative modeling of these processes is essential in engineering and the geosciences. Multiphase flow with phase change and complex phase behavior arises in numerous applications, including enhanced oil recovery, steam injection in groundwater remediation, geologic CO2 storage and enhanced geothermal energy systems. A challenge of multiphase compositional simulation is that the number of existing phases varies with position and time, and thus the number of state variables in the saturation-based conservation laws is a function of space and time. The tasks of phase-state identification and determination of the composition of the different phases are performed assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we investigate a thermodynamically consistent formulation for non-isothermal two-phase flow, in systems where the hypothesis of instantaneous local equilibrium does not hold. Non-equilibrium effects are important in coarse-scale simulations where the assumption of complete mixing in each gridblock is not realistic. We apply our model to steam injection in water-saturated porous media.

  15. Shock wave of vapor-liquid two-phase flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangju ZHAO; Fei WANG; Hong GAO; Jingwen TANG; Yuexiang YUAN

    2008-01-01

    The shock wave of vapor-liquid two-phase flow in a pressure-gain steam injector is studied by build-ing a mathematic model and making calculations. The results show that after the shock, the vapor is nearly com-pletely condensed. The upstream Mach number and the volume ratio of vapor have a great effect on the shock. The pressure and Mach number of two-phase shock con-form to the shock of ideal gas. The analysis of available energy shows that the shock is an irreversible process with entropy increase.

  16. SIMULATION OF LOW-CONCENTRATION SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOW BASED ON TWO-PHASE FLOW THEORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Low concentration sediment-laden flow is usually involved in water conservancy, environmental protection, navigation and so on. In this article, a mathematical model for low-concentration sediment-laden flow was suggested based on the two-phase flow theory, and a solving scheme for the mathematical model in curvilinear grids was worked out. The observed data in the Zhang River in China was used for the verification of the model, and the calculated results of the water level, velocity and river bed deformation are in agreement with the observed ones.

  17. Dynamics of a two-phase flow through a minichannel: Transition from churn to slug flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Grzegorz; Litak, Grzegorz; Mosdorf, Romuald; Rysak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    The churn-to-slug flow bifurcations of two-phase (air-water) flow patterns in a 2mm diameter minichannel were investigated. With increasing a water flow rate, we observed the transition of slugs to bubbles of different sizes. The process was recorded by a digital camera. The sequences of light transmission time series were recorded by a laser-phototransistor sensor, and then analyzed using the recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). Due to volume dependence of bubbles velocities, we observed the formation of periodic modulations in the laser signal.

  18. Flow frictional characteristics of microencapsulated phase change material suspensions flowing through rectangular minichannels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO; Yu; Frank; Dammel; Peter; Stephan; LIN; Guiping

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the laminar flow frictional characteristics of suspensions with microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) in water flowing through rectangular copper minichannels. The MEPCM was provided at an average particle size of 4.97 μm, and was mixed with distilled water to form suspensions with various mass concentrations ranging from 0 to 20%. The experiment was performed to explore the effect of MEPCM mass concentration on friction factor and pressure drop in the minichannels. The Reynolds number ranged from 200 to 2000 to provide laminar and transitional flows. It was found that the experimental data for the suspensions with 0 and 5% concentration agree well with the existing theoretical data for an incompressible, fully developed, laminar Newtonian flow. For the suspensions with mass concentrations higher than 10%, there is an obvious increase in friction factor and pressure drop in comparison with laminar Newtonian flow.

  19. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.

    1992-09-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the economic resource requirements for development and use of computer codes for analyzing thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited for two-phase flow analysis in nuclear reactors than the two-fluid model, because of the latter`s closure problem. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost.

  20. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.

    1992-01-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the economic resource requirements for development and use of computer codes for analyzing thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited for two-phase flow analysis in nuclear reactors than the two-fluid model, because of the latter's closure problem. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost.

  1. Instantaneous power flow determination for single-phase UPFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrucky, B.; Drozdy, S.; Pokorny, M.; Pavlanin, R. [Zilina Univ., Zilina (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01

    The parallel shunt active filter in a unified power flow conditioner (UPFC) can filter and compensate the reactive power of basic and higher current harmonics. This paper reported on a study in which a new theory of orthogonal transform was used to control a single-phase UPFC system and transform it into a two-axes system. In addition to estimating the load current phase shifts, the study also determined the instantaneous active and reactive powers. The new theory is based on the premise that ordinary single-phase quantity can be complemented by a virtual fictitious phase so that both of them will create an orthogonal system, as is usual in three-phase systems. The theory uses efficient methods of analysis, such as time-sub-optimal determination of fundamental harmonics; average- and/or root-mean-square values; or instantaneous reactive power methods. The load current phase shift can be used to compensate for voltage drops. This paper outlined a practical application of the method in a case of active and reactive power determination for single-phase UPFC. It also presented some examples of the successful simulation experiments results focused on regulation output voltage of UPFC. 9 refs., 13 figs., 1 appendix.

  2. Measuring two phase flow parameters using impedance cross-correlation flow meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamedsalih, Y.; Lucas, G.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an impedance cross correlation flow meter which can be used in solids-water pipe flows to measure the local solids volume fraction distribution and the local solids velocity distribution. The system is composed of two arrays of electrodes, separated by an axial distance of 50 mm and each array contains eights electrodes mounted over the internal circumference of the pipe carrying the flow. Furthermore every electrode in each array can be selected to be either"excitation", "measurement" or "earth". Changing the electrode configuration leads to a change in the electric field, and hence in the region of the flow cross section which is interrogated. The local flow velocity in the interrogated region is obtained by cross correlation between the two electrode arrays. Additionally, the local solids volume fraction can be obtained from the mean mixture conductivity in the region under interrogation. The system is being integrated with a microcontroller to measure the velocity distribution of the solids and the volume fraction distribution of the solids in order to create a portable flow meter capable of measuring the multi-phase flow parameters without the need of a PC to control it. Integration of the product of the local solids volume fraction and the local solids velocity in the flow cross section enables the solids volumetric flow rate to be determined.

  3. Cold molecular gas in the Perseus cluster core - Association with X-ray cavity, Halpha filaments and cooling flow -

    CERN Document Server

    Salomé, P; Crawford, C; Edge, A C; Erlund, M; Fabian, A C; Hatch, N A; Johnstone, R M; Sanders, J S; Wilman, R J

    2006-01-01

    Cold molecular gas has been recently detected in several cooling flow clusters of galaxies where huge optical nebulosities often stand. These optical filaments are tightly linked to the cooling flow and to the related phenomena, like the rising bubbles of relativistic plasma, fed by the radio jets. We present here a map in the CO(2-1) rotational line of the cold molecular gas associated with some Halpha filaments surrounding the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster: NGC 1275. The map, extending to about 50 kpc (135 arcsec) from the center of the galaxy, has been made with the 18-receiver array HERA, at the focus of the IRAM 30m telescope. Although most of the cold gas is concentrated to the center of the galaxy, the CO emission is also clearly associated to the extended filaments conspicuous in ionised gas and could trace a possible reservoir fueling the star formation there. Some of the CO emission is also found where the X-ray gas could cool down more efficiently: at the rims of the central X-ray cavity (w...

  4. Experimental study of the effects of a transversal air-flow deflector in electronics air-cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebay, M.; Arfaoui, A.; Padet, J.; Ben Maad, R.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the influence of a transversal flow deflector on the cooling of a heated block mounted on a flat plate. The deflector is inclined and therefore it guides the air flow to the upper surface of the block. This configuration is simulating the air-cooling of a rectangular integrated circuit or a current converter mounted on an electronic card. The electronic component is assumed dissipating low heat power, as such, air forced convection is still a sufficient cooling way even without fan or heat sink on the component. The measurements are given by hot and cold wires anemometers and by an InfraRed camera. The results give details of the effects of the deflection on the hydrodynamic and the thermal fields on and over the block for different inclination angles. They show that the deviation caused by the deflector may significantly enhance the heat transfer from the component. Deflection is also able to avoid local overheating of the electronic component. Optimum heat transfer rate and homogenised temperature are shown to be obtained with an inclination angle α=30°.

  5. Experimental investigations of flow distribution in coolant system of Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilić, M.; Schlindwein, G., E-mail: georg.schlindwein@kit.edu; Meyder, R.; Kuhn, T.; Albrecht, O.; Zinn, K.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Experimental investigations of flow distribution in HCPB TBM are presented. • Flow rates in channels close to the first wall are lower than nominal ones. • Flow distribution in central chambers of manifold 2 is close to the nominal one. • Flow distribution in the whole manifold 3 agrees well with the nominal one. - Abstract: This paper deals with investigations of flow distribution in the coolant system of the Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module (HCPB TBM) for ITER. The investigations have been performed by manufacturing and testing of an experimental facility named GRICAMAN. The facility involves the upper poloidal half of HCPB TBM bounded at outlets of the first wall channels, at outlet of by-pass pipe and at outlets of cooling channels in breeding units. In this way, the focus is placed on the flow distribution in two mid manifolds of the 4-manifold system: (i) manifold 2 to which outlets of the first wall channels and inlet of by-pass pipe are attached and (ii) manifold 3 which supplies channels in breeding units with helium coolant. These two manifolds are connected with cooling channels in vertical/horizontal grids and caps. The experimental facility has been built keeping the internal structure of manifold 2 and manifold 3 exactly as designed in HCPB TBM. The cooling channels in stiffening grids, caps and breeding units are substituted by so-called equivalent channels which provide the same hydraulic resistance and inlet/outlet conditions, but have significantly simpler geometry than the real channels. Using the conditions of flow similarity, the air pressurized at 0.3 MPa and at ambient temperature has been used as working fluid instead of HCPB TBM helium coolant at 8 MPa and an average temperature of 370 °C. The flow distribution has been determined by flow rate measurements at each of 28 equivalent channels, while the pressure distribution has been obtained measuring differential pressure at more than 250 positions. The

  6. Three-Phase Load Flow for Unbalanced Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yih-Ping

    Traditionally, transmission systems are assumed to be balanced in power system analysis. A single phase positive sequence circuit is used in transmission system load flow analysis to simplify the study. However, when untransposed transmission lines are used in a power system due to economic considerations, space limitation; or when large unbalanced load is on the system; or when an unbalance contingency occurs on the system, this assumption may not hold true. The unbalance condition in some isolated systems are so precarious that disaster can result. One such incident occurred on a generator unit of the third nuclear power plant of Taipower in 1985. In that particular case, the turbine blades were broken and a spark ignited the liquid hydrogen when the blade vibration resonated with the 120.5 Hz rotor current. One cause of this rotor current generation is system unbalance. The unbalanced three-phase load flow program is needed in today's power system analysis. An advanced three-phase unbalanced transmission load flow program, capable of locating the unbalanced problem of large electric network systems, was proposed to be developed and tested in this research. Features of this program include simultaneous power flow of multiple voltage levels on an individual phase basis; PV bus generator, cogenerator, transformer simulation, and load modeling. It is found that delta-grounded wye step-up transformer reduces the convergence speed greatly. When too many delta-grounded wye step-up transformers exist in a large scale system and a quick approximate result of the unbalance conditions is needed, these step-up transformers can be substituted by grounded-wye to grounded-wye type transformers. This is tested on a Taipower system case which included 345KV, 161KV and 69KV feeders, network transformers, 34 PV bus generators and 188 three-phase buses. Impending unbalance problems in Taipower system were located. When not too many delta-grounded wye type transformers are in the

  7. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques.

  8. Flow regime transition criteria for two-phase flow in a vertical annulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia, J. Enrique, E-mail: bolivar@emc.uji.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Construccion, Universitat Jaume I., Campus de Riu Sec, 12071 Castellon (Spain); Hibiki, Takashi [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Flow regime transition model is presented for two-phase flows in a vertical annulus. > The transition criteria is easy to be implemented in computational codes. > Final equations do not need experimental input. > New developed model shows better predicting capabilities than existing correlations. > New developed model shows good predicting capabilities in boiling flow. - Abstract: In this work, a new flow regime transition model is proposed for two-phase flows in a vertical annulus. Following previous works, the flow regimes considered are bubbly (B), slug (S) or cap-slug (CS), churn (C) and annular (A). The B to CS transition is modeled using the maximum bubble package criteria of small bubbles. The S to C transition takes place for small annulus perimeter flow channels and it is assumed to occur when the mean void fraction over the entire region exceeds that over the slug-bubble section. If the annulus perimeter is larger that the distorted bubble limit the cap-slug flow regime will be considered since in these conditions it is not possible to distinguish between cap and partial-slug bubbles. The CS to C transition is modeled using the maximum bubble package criteria. However, this transition considers the coalescence of cap and spherical bubbles in order to take into account the flow channel geometry. Finally, the C to A transition is modeled assuming two different mechanisms, (a) flow reversal in the liquid film section along large bubbles; (b) destruction on liquid slugs or large waves by entrainment or deformation. In the S to C and C to A flow regime transitions the annulus flow channel is considered as a rectangular flow channel with no side walls. In all the modeled transitions the drift-flux model is used to obtain the final correlations. The final equations for every flow regime transition are easy to be implemented in computational codes and not experimental input is needed. The prediction accuracy of the newly developed model has been

  9. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels

    CERN Document Server

    Barmak, Ilya; Ullmann, Amos; Brauner, Neima; Vitoshkin, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Linear stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels to arbitrary wavenumber disturbances is studied. The problem is reduced to Orr-Sommerfeld equations for the stream function disturbances, defined in each sublayer and coupled via boundary conditions that account also for possible interface deformation and capillary forces. Applying the Chebyshev collocation method, the equations and interface boundary conditions are reduced to the generalized eigenvalue problems solved by standard means of numerical linear algebra for the entire spectrum of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors. Some additional conclusions concerning the instability nature are derived from the most unstable perturbation patterns. The results are summarized in the form of stability maps showing the operational conditions at which a stratified-smooth flow pattern is stable. It is found that for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems the stratified flow with smooth interface is stable only in confined zone of relatively lo...

  10. Two-phase flow instability in a parallel multichannel system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Suxia

    2009-01-01

    The two-phase flow instabilities observed in through parallel multichannel can be classified into three types, of which only one is intrinsic to parallel multichannel systems. The intrinsic instabilities observed in parallel multichannel system have been studied experimentally. The stable boundary of the flow in such a parallel-channel system are sought, and the nature of inlet flow oscillation in the unstable region has been examined experimentally under various conditions of inlet velocity, heat flux, liquid temperature, cross section of channel and entrance throttling. The results show that parallel multichannel system possess a characteristic oscillation that is quite independent of the magnitude and duration of the initial disturbance, and the stable boundary is influenced by the characteristic frequency of the system as well as by the exit quality when this is low, and upon raising the exit quality and reducing the characteristic frequency, the system increases its instability, and entrance throttling effectively contributes to stabilization of the system.

  11. Stochastic Rotation Dynamics simulations of wetting multi-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Brinkmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Multi-color Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRDmc) has been introduced by Inoue et al. [1,2] as a particle based simulation method to study the flow of emulsion droplets in non-wetting microchannels. In this work, we extend the multi-color method to also account for different wetting conditions. This is achieved by assigning the color information not only to fluid particles but also to virtual wall particles that are required to enforce proper no-slip boundary conditions. To extend the scope of the original SRDmc algorithm to e.g. immiscible two-phase flow with viscosity contrast we implement an angular momentum conserving scheme (SRD+mc). We perform extensive benchmark simulations to show that a mono-phase SRDmc fluid exhibits bulk properties identical to a standard SRD fluid and that SRDmc fluids are applicable to a wide range of immiscible two-phase flows. To quantify the adhesion of a SRD+mc fluid in contact to the walls we measure the apparent contact angle from sessile droplets in mechanical equilibrium. For a further verification of our wettability implementation we compare the dewetting of a liquid film from a wetting stripe to experimental and numerical studies of interfacial morphologies on chemically structured surfaces.

  12. Flow-induced structured phase in nonionic micellar solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiel, Joshua J; Tonggu, Lige; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Zhao, Ya; Pozzo, Danilo C; Wang, Liguo; Shen, Amy Q

    2013-12-17

    In this work, we consider the flow of a nonionic micellar solution (precursor) through an array of microposts, with focus on its microstructural and rheological evolution. The precursor contains polyoxyethylene(20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80) and cosurfactant monolaurin (ML). An irreversible flow-induced structured phase (NI-FISP) emerges after the nonionic precursor flows through the hexagonal micropost arrays, when subjected to strain rates ~10(4) s(-1) and strain ~10(3). NI-FISP consists of close-looped micellar bundles and multiconnected micellar networks as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). We also conduct small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements in both precursor and NI-FISP to illustrate the structural transition. We propose a potential mechanism for the NI-FISP formation that relies on the micropost arrays and the flow kinematics in the microdevice to induce entropic fluctuations in the micellar solution. Finally, we show that the rheological variation from a viscous precursor solution to a viscoelastic micellar structured phase is associated with the structural evolution from the precursor to NI-FISP.

  13. [Measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase-contrast MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, T; Shishido, F; Koga, M; Ikehira, H; Kimura, F; Yoshida, K

    1997-07-01

    The development of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging(P-C MRI) provides a noninvasive method for measurement of volumetric blood flow(VFR). The VFR of the left and right internal carotid arteries and basilar artery were measured using P-C MRI, and total cerebral blood flow(tCBF) was calculated by summing up the VFR values in three vessels. We investigated the changes in these blood flows as influenced from age, head size, height, weight, body surface area and handedness. Moreover, regional CBF(rCBF) was measured by combining with the single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) of 123I. The blood flows were 142 +/- 58 mL/ min(mean +/- SD) in the basilar artery, 229 +/- 86 mL/min in the left, 223 +/- 58 mL/min in the right internal carotid artery, and tCBF was 617 +/- 128 mL/min(Ref. Magn Resn Imaging 14:P. 1143, 1996). Significant increases were observed in head-size-related change of VFR in the basilar artery and height-related change of tCBF. The value of rCBF was easily acquired in combination with SPECT. Phase-contrast MRI is useful for a noninvasive and rapid analysis of cerebral VFR and has potential for clinical use.

  14. Maximum principle for the optimal control of an ablation-transpiration cooling system with free final time and phase constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing SUN; Baozhu GUO

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an optimal control problem of an ablation-transpiration cooling control system with Stefan-Signorini boundary condition.As the continuation of the authors'previous paper,the Dubovits Rii-Milyutin functional approach is again adopted in investigation of the Pontryagin's maximun principle of the system.The necessary optimality condition is presented for the problem with free final horizon and phase constraints.

  15. A novel electronic cooling concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnappan, R.; Beam, J. E.

    Advanced electrical power conditioning systems for the More Electric Aircraft Initiative involve high currents and high voltages with the attendant waste heat generation and cooling problems. The use of solid state switching devices such as MCTs for these systems will result in power dissipation of several hundred Watts per square centimeter. Conventional forced air or low velocity single phase fluid cooling is inadequate to handle the waste heat dissipation of these high power devices. More advanced and innovative methods of cooling which can use fluids available in the aircraft and also easy to package are sought. A new approach called 'venturi flow cooling concept' is described. It is shown that localized cooling up to 200 W/sq cm is possible at the venturi throat region where the MCTs can be mounted. PAO coolant with Pr = 56 at 40 C can be conveniently used in aircraft.

  16. Magneto-Hydrodynamic Flow in a Two-Dimensional Inclined Rectangular Enclosure Heated and Cooled on Adjacent Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N Kherief

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady, laminar, natural-convection flow in the presence of a magnetic field in an inclined rectangular enclosure heated from one side and cooled from the adjacent side was considered. The governing equations were solved numerically for the stream function, vorticity and temperature using the finite-volume method for various Grashof and Hartman numbers and inclination angles and magnetic field directions. The results show that the orientation and the strength and direction of the magnetic field have significant effects on the flow and temperature fields. Counterclockwise inclination induces the formation of multiple eddies inside the enclosure significantly affecting the temperature field. Circulation inside the enclosure and therefore the convection become stronger as the Grashof number increases while the magnetic field suppresses the convective flow and the heat transfer rate.

  17. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  18. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  19. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  20. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  1. Analysis of Heat Transfer in Berman Flow of Nanofluids with Navier Slip, Viscous Dissipation, and Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Makinde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer characteristics of a Berman flow of water based nanofluids containing copper (Cu and alumina (Al2O3 as nanoparticles in a porous channel with Navier slip, viscous dissipation, and convective cooling are investigated. It is assumed that the exchange of heat with the ambient surrounding takes place at the channel walls following Newton’s law of cooling. The governing partial differential equations and boundary conditions are converted into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate similarity transformations. These equations are solved analytically by regular perturbation methods with series improvement technique and numerically using an efficient Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration technique coupled with shooting scheme. The effects of the governing parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction, pressure drop, and Nusselt numbers are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively.

  2. Inflow performance relationship curves in two-phase and three-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukarno, P.

    1986-01-01

    This research investigates inflow performance relationship IPR curves for two and three-phase flow conditions, using a one-dimensional, three-phase cylindrical reservoir simulator. Using the simulator, a new method for predicting future IPR curves was developed. IPR curves for two-phase flow conditions from a well producing from low permeability formations are also presented. The purpose of this investigation is to predict the IPR curves at pseudo-steady state conditions using flowing test data obtained during the transient period. The new equations have also been applied to data from the simulator with good agreement. Three-phase IPR curves are also determined by using the simulator, and seven different hypothetical three-phase reservoir cases were studied. Three-hundred and eighty five data points were collected using 5 different values of water cut. Regression analysis techniques were applied to the data points and the new equations for predicting the three-phase IPR curves were developed. Comparison of the new equations to results from the simulator show excellent agreement.

  3. THE LINEAR HOMOGENEOUS FLOW MODEL FOR TWO-PHASE FLOW INSTABILITY IN BOILING CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents liner homogeneous model describing two-phase flow instability. Dimensionless parameter η was derived by using the linear homogeneous model. Using parameter η the stability of a system could be easily judged. The calculated results agree with the experimental data well.

  4. Three-phase flow simulations in discrete fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, S.; Niessner, J.; Matthai, S. K.; Helmig, R.

    2006-12-01

    Fractures are often the key conduits for fluid flow in otherwise low permeability rocks. Their presence in hydrocarbon reservoirs leads to complex production histories, unpredictable coupling of wells, rapidly changing flow rates, possibly early water breakthrough, and low final recovery. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a combination of finite volume and finite element discretization is well suited to model incompressible, immiscible two-phase flow in 3D discrete fracture networks (DFN) representing complexly fractured rocks. Such an approach has been commercialized in Golder Associates' FracMan Reservoir Edition software. For realistic reservoir simulations, however, it would be desirable if a third compressible gas phase can be included which is often present at reservoir conditions. Here we present the extension of an existing node-centred finite volume - finite element (FEFV) discretization for the efficient and accurate simulations of three-component - three-phase flow in geologically realistic representations of fractured porous media. Two possible types of fracture networks can be used: In 2D, they are detailed geometrical representations of fractured rock masses mapped in field studies. In 3D, they are geologically constrained, stochastically generated discrete fracture networks. Flow and transport can be simulated for fractures only or for fractures and matrix combined. The governing equations are solved decoupled using an implicit-pressure, explicit-saturation (IMPES) approach. Flux and concentration terms can be treated with higher-order accuracy in the finite volume scheme to preserve shock fronts. The method is locally mass conservative and works on unstructured, spatially refined grids. Flash calculations are carried out by a new description of the Black-Oil model. Capillary and gravity effects are included in this formulation. The robustness and accuracy of this formulation is shown in several applications. First, grid convergence is

  5. Large power diode laser of phase-change cooling%基于相变冷却的大功率二极管激光器技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高松信; 武德勇; 曹宏章; 王宏; 李弋; 杨波; 刘军; 唐淳

    2011-01-01

    By combining the methods of spray cooling heat transfer and micro-grooves phase change heat transfer, we design a heat sink based on throttle microgrooves phase change cooling theory. It has been proved by experiments that the vaporization rate of the coolant in the microgrooves of the cooler had reached 70%. The cooling efficiency increased rapidly while the coolant flow became smaller and the thermal management unit lighter. At the same time, we investigated the packaging of laser diode stacks with back surface cooling heat sink. Using the new technique of compound heat sink, AuSn alloy solder and the multi inter-face soldering, we completed the packaging of quasi-continuous wave(QCW) 3 kW laser diode stacks, with a packing spacing of 1.3 mm. It has been proved by experiments that this unit stacks device achieved a 3. 01 kW peak output power with duty cycle 10%, and the HWFM of spectrum is smaller than 3. 5 nm. The flow rate of the coolant R134a is 110 mL/min, which is about 10 times lower than that of water.%设计了一种基于相变冷却方式工作的大功率二极管激光器,该激光器的散热器是基于节流式喷射微槽道相变冷却的原理,使冷却液在微槽中的气化率达到了70%,大幅度提高了冷却效果,减小了冷却液流量,在同样制冷功率条件下,冷却液流量仅为水冷方式的1/10.利用相变冷却器进行了背冷式半导体激光器叠阵封装工艺的研究,采用复合热沉与AuSn硬焊料结合的新型封装工艺,完成了准连续3 kW叠阵的封装.实验测试表明,单元叠阵的输出功率达到3.01 kW,占空比10%,封装间距为1.3 mm,光谱宽度小于3.5 nm.最大功率输出时所需R134a冷却液的流量仅为110 mL/min.

  6. A continuum theory for two-phase flows of particulate solids: application to Poiseuille flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsorno, Davide; Varsakelis, Christos; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2015-11-01

    In the first part of this talk, we present a novel two-phase continuum model for incompressible fluid-saturated granular flows. The model accounts for both compaction and shear-induced dilatancy and accommodates correlations for the granular rheology in a thermodynamically consistent way. In the second part of this talk, we exercise this two-phase model in the numerical simulation of a fully-developed Poiseuille flow of a dense suspension. The numerical predictions are shown to compare favorably against experimental measurements and confirm that the model can capture the important characteristics of the flow field, such as segregation and formation of plug zones. Finally, results from parametric studies with respect to the initial concentration, the magnitude of the external forcing and the width of the channel are presented and the role of these physical parameters is quantified. Financial Support has been provided by SEDITRANS, an Initial Training Network of the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme

  7. Mathematical models for two-phase stratified pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biberg, Dag

    2005-06-01

    The simultaneous transport of oil, gas and water in a single multiphase flow pipe line has for economical and practical reasons become common practice in the gas and oil fields operated by the oil industry. The optimal design and safe operation of these pipe lines require reliable estimates of liquid inventory, pressure drop and flow regime. Computer simulations of multiphase pipe flow have thus become an important design tool for field developments. Computer simulations yielding on-line monitoring and look ahead predictions are invaluable in day-to-day field management. Inaccurate predictions may have large consequences. The accuracy and reliability of multiphase pipe flow models are thus important issues. Simulating events in large pipelines or pipeline systems is relatively computer intensive. Pipe-lines carrying e.g. gas and liquefied gas (condensate) may cover distances of several hundred km in which transient phenomena may go on for months. The evaluation times associated with contemporary 3-D CFD models are thus not compatible with field applications. Multiphase flow lines are therefore normally simulated using specially dedicated 1-D models. The closure relations of multiphase pipe flow models are mainly based on lab data. The maximum pipe inner diameter, pressure and temperature in a multiphase pipe flow lab is limited to approximately 0.3 m, 90 bar and 60{sup o}C respectively. The corresponding field values are, however, much higher i.e.: 1 m, 1000 bar and 200{sup o}C respectively. Lab data does thus not cover the actual field conditions. Field predictions are consequently frequently based on model extrapolation. Applying field data or establishing more advanced labs will not solve this problem. It is in fact not practically possible to acquire sufficient data to cover all aspects of multiphase pipe flow. The parameter range involved is simply too large. Liquid levels and pressure drop in three-phase flow are e.g. determined by 13 dimensionless parameters

  8. Transition to turbulence in pipe flow as a phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Mukund; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    In pipe flow, turbulence first arises in the form of localized turbulent patches called puffs. The flow undergoes a transition to sustained turbulence via spatio-temporal intermittency, with puffs splitting, decaying and merging in the background laminar flow. However, the due to mean advection of the puffs and the long timescales involved (~107 advective time units), it is not possible to study the transition in typical laboratory set-ups. So far, it has only been possible to indirectly estimate the critical point for the transition. Here, we exploit the stochastic memoryless nature of the puff decay and splitting processes to construct a pipe flow set-up, that is periodic in a statistical sense. It then becomes possible to study the flow for sufficiently long times and characterize the transition in detail. We present measurements of the turbulent fraction as a function of Reynolds number which in turn allows a direct estimate of the critical point. We present evidence that the transition has features of a phase transition of second order.

  9. CFD simulations of moderator flow inside Calandria of the Passive Moderator Cooling System of an advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Eshita [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 India (India); Nayak, Arun K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CFD simulations in the Calandria of an advanced reactor under natural circulation. • Under natural convection, majority of the flow recirculates within the Calandria. • Maximum temperature is located at the top and center of the fuel channel matrix. • During SBO, temperature inside Calandria is stratified. - Abstract: Passive systems are being examined for the future Advanced Nuclear Reactor designs. One of such concepts is the Passive Moderator Cooling System (PMCS), which is designed to remove heat from the moderator in the Calandria vessel passively in case of an extended Station Black Out condition. The heated heavy-water moderator (due to heat transferred from the Main Heat Transport System (MHTS) and thermalization of neutrons and gamma from radioactive decay of fuel) rises upward due to buoyancy, gets cooled down in a heat exchanger and returns back to Calandria, completing a natural circulation loop. The natural circulation should provide sufficient cooling to prevent the increase of moderator temperature and pressure beyond safe limits. In an earlier study, a full-scale 1D transient simulation was performed for the reactor including the MHTS and the PMCS, in the event of a station blackout scenario (Kumar et al., 2013). The results indicate that the systems remain within the safe limits for 7 days. However, the flow inside a geometry like Calandria is quite complex due to its large size and inner complexities of dense fuel channel matrix, which was simplified as a 1D pipe flow in the aforesaid analysis. In the current work, CFD simulations are performed to study the temperature distributions and flow distribution of moderator inside the Calandria vessel using a three-dimensional CFD code, OpenFoam 2.2.0. First, a set of steady state simulation was carried out for a band of inlet mass flow rates, which gives the minimum mass flow rate required for removing the maximum heat load, by virtue of prediction of hot spots inside the Calandria

  10. Phase distribution in horizontal gas-liquid two-phase bubbly flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    An investigation on phase distribution in air-water two-phaseflow in horizontal circular channel was conducted by using the double-sensor resistivity probe. The variations of phase distribution with variations ofgas and liquid volumetric fluxes were analyzed and the present data werecompared with some of other researcher's data and existing models. It wasfound there exists more complicated phase distribution pattern in horizontalflow system than in vertical flow. The radial local void fraction profilesare similar at the same measurement angle with various gas and liquid flowrates. However, an asymmetric profile can be observed at a given slice ofthe pipe cross-section.

  11. A study of optimum cowl shapes and flow port locations for minimum drag with effective engine cooling, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. R.; Smetana, F. O.

    1980-01-01

    The contributions to the cruise drag of light aircraft arising from the shape of the engine cowl and the forward fuselage area and also that resulting from the cooling air mass flow through intake and exhaust sites on the nacelle were analyzed. The methods employed for the calculation of the potential flow about an arbitrary three dimensional body are described with modifications to include the effects of boundary layer displacement thickness, a nonuniform onset flow field (such as that due to a rotating propeller), and the presence of air intakes and exhausts. A simple, reliable, largely automated scheme to better define or change the shape of a body is also presented. A technique was developed which can yield physically acceptable skin friction and pressure drag coefficients for isolated light aircraft bodies. For test cases on a blunt nose Cessna 182 fuselage, the technique predicted drag reductions as much as 28.5% by body recontouring and proper placements and sizing of the cooling air intakes and exhausts.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Two-Phase Two-Component Flow with Disappearing Nonwetting Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Neumann, Rebecca; Ippisch, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a recently discussed new technology, aimed at allowing an ongoing use of fossil fuels while preventing the produced CO2 to be released to the atmosphere. CSS can be modeled with two components (water and CO2) in two phases (liquid and CO2). To simulate the process, a multiphase flow equation with equilibrium phase exchange is used. One of the big problems arising in two-phase two-component flow simulations is the disappearance of the nonwetting phase, which leads to a degeneration of the equations satisfied by the saturation. A standard choice of primary variables, which is the pressure of one phase and the saturation of the other phase, cannot be applied here. We developed a new approach using the pressure of the nonwetting phase and the capillary pressure as primary variables. One important advantage of this approach is the fact that we have only one set of primary variables that can be used for the biphasic as well as the monophasic case. We implemented this new choice o...

  13. Numerical flow analyses of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Moshfeghi, M. [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W. [VS Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    We investigated flow characteristics in a hydraulic coupling at different charged water conditions and speed ratios. Hence, simulations were performed for three-dimensional two-phase flow by using the VOF method. The realizable k-ε turbulence model was adopted. To resolve the interaction of passing blades of the primary and secondary wheels, simulations were conducted in the unsteady framework using a sliding grid technique. The results show that the water-air distribution inside the wheel is strongly dependent upon both amount of charged water and speed ratio. Generally, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel, forming a toroidal shape wrapped by the circulating water. The results also show that at high speed ratios, the solid-body-like rotation causes dry areas on the periphery of the wheels and, hence, considerably decreases the circulating flow rate and the transmitted torque. Furthermore, the momentum transfer was investigated through the concept of a mass flux triangle based on the local velocity multiplied by the local mixture density instead of the velocity triangle commonly used in a single-phase turbomachine analysis. Also, the mass fluxes along the radius of the coupling in the partially charged and fully charged cases were found to be completely different. It is shown that the flow rate at the interfacial plane and also the transmitted torque are closely related and are strongly dependent upon both the amount of charged water and speed ratio. Finally, a conceptual categorization together with two comprehensive maps was provided for the torque transmission and also circulating flow rates. These two maps in turn exhibit valuable engineering information and can serve as bases for an optimal design of a hydraulic coupling.

  14. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  15. Frontal subcutaneous blood flow, and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures during scalp cooling in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Friberg, L; Gaardsting, O

    1985-01-01

    Cooling of the scalp has been found to prevent hair loss following cytostatic treatment, but in order to obtain the hair preserving effect the subcutaneous temperature has to be reduced below 22 degrees C. In order to establish the relationship between epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures d...

  16. Single-Sided Digital Microfluidic (SDMF Devices for Effective Coolant Delivery and Enhanced Two-Phase Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yong Park

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital microfluidics (DMF driven by electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD has recently been attracting great attention as an effective liquid-handling platform for on-chip cooling. It enables rapid transportation of coolant liquid sandwiched between two parallel plates and drop-wise thermal rejection from a target heating source without additional mechanical components such as pumps, microchannels, and capillary wicks. However, a typical sandwiched configuration in DMF devices only allows sensible heat transfer, which seriously limits heat rejection capability, particularly for high-heat-flux thermal dissipation. In this paper, we present a single-sided digital microfluidic (SDMF device that enables not only effective liquid handling on a single-sided surface, but also two-phase heat transfer to enhance thermal rejection performance. Several droplet manipulation functions required for two-phase cooling were demonstrated, including continuous droplet injection, rapid transportation as fast as 7.5 cm/s, and immobilization on the target hot spot where heat flux is locally concentrated. Using the SDMF platform, we experimentally demonstrated high-heat-flux cooling on the hydrophilic-coated hot spot. Coolant droplets were continuously transported to the target hot spot which was mitigated below 40 K of the superheat. The effective heat transfer coefficient was stably maintained even at a high heat flux regime over ~130 W/cm2, which will allow us to develop a reliable thermal management module. Our SDMF technology offers an effective on-chip cooling approach, particularly for high-heat-flux thermal management based on two-phase heat transfer.

  17. Experimental and numerical investigation on two-phase flow instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruspini, Leonardo Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Two-phase flow instabilities are experimentally and numerically studied within this thesis. In particular, the phenomena called Ledinegg instability, density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations are investigated. The most important investigations regarding the occurrence of two-phase flow instabilities are reviewed. An extensive description of the main contributions in the experimental and analytical research is presented. In addition, a critical discussion and recommendations for future investigations are presented. A numerical framework using a hp-adaptive method is developed in order to solve the conservation equations modelling general thermo-hydraulic systems. A natural convection problem is analysed numerically in order to test the numerical solver. Moreover, the description of an adaptive strategy to solve thermo-hydraulic problems is presented. In the second part of this dissertation, a homogeneous model is used to study Ledinegg, density wave and pressure drop oscillations phenomena numerically. The dynamic characteristics of the Ledinegg (flow excursion) phenomenon are analysed through the simulation of several transient examples. In addition, density wave instabilities in boiling and condensing systems are investigated. The effects of several parameters, such as the fluid inertia and compressibility volumes, on the stability limits of Ledinegg and density wave instabilities are studied, showing a strong influence of these parameters. Moreover, the phenomenon called pressure drop oscillations is numerically investigated. A discussion of the physical representation of several models is presented with reference to the obtained numerical results. Finally, the influence of different parameters on these phenomena is analysed. In the last part, an experimental investigation of these phenomena is presented. The designing methodology used for the construction of the experimental facility is described. Several simulations and a non

  18. CSCM Navier-Stokes thermal/aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic nozzle flows with slot injection and wall cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codding, William H.; Lombard, C. K.; Yang, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Conservative Supra-Characteristic Method (CSCM) Navier-Stokes solver is applied to ascertain the problems inherent in the design of a nominal Mach 14 nozzle for NASA-Ames' 3.5-ft Hypersonic Wind Tunnel; attention is given to the effects of boundary layer cooling systems on the aerodynamic redesign of the nozzle throat region. Complete nozzle flowfields are calculated with and without slot injection of either hot or cold fluid into the boundary layer just upstream of the throat, as well as with alternatively adiabatic and cold walls. The CSCM method is capable of resolving subtle differences in the flows.

  19. Local cooling reduces skin ischemia under surface pressure in rats: an assessment by wavelet analysis of laser Doppler blood flow oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Lee, Bernard; Liao, Fuyuan; Foreman, Robert D

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of local cooling on skin blood flow response to prolonged surface pressure and to identify associated physiological controls mediating these responses using the wavelet analysis of blood flow oscillations in rats. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three protocols, including pressure with local cooling (Δt = -10 °C), pressure with local heating (Δt = 10 °C) and pressure without temperature changes. Pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The 3 h loading period was divided into non-overlapping 30 min epochs for the analysis of the changes of skin blood flow oscillations using wavelet spectral analysis. The wavelet amplitudes and powers of three frequencies (metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic) of skin blood flow oscillations were calculated. The results showed that after an initial loading period of 30 min, skin blood flow continually decreased under the conditions of pressure with heating and of pressure without temperature changes, but maintained stable under the condition of pressure with cooling. Wavelet analysis revealed that stable skin blood flow under pressure with cooling was attributed to changes in the metabolic and myogenic frequencies. This study demonstrates that local cooling may be useful for reducing ischemia of weight-bearing soft tissues that prevents pressure ulcers.

  20. Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow in Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Beñat; Afonso, Juan Carlos; Zlotnik, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow (MPMCRF) controls a number of important complex geodynamic/geochemical problems, such as melt generation and percolation, metasomatism, rheological weakening, magmatic differentiation, ore emplacement, and fractionation of chemical elements, to name a few. These interacting processes occur over very different spatial and temporal scales and under very different physico-chemical conditions. Therefore, there is a strong motivation in geodynamics for investigating the equations governing MPMCRF, their mathematical structure and properties, and the numerical techniques necessary to obtain reliable and accurate results. In this contribution we present results from a novel numerical framework to solve multiscale MPMCRF problems in geodynamic contexts. Our approach is based on the effective tracking of the most basic building blocks: internal energy and chemical composition. This is achieved through the combination of rigorous solutions to the conservation equations (mass, energy and momentum) for each dynamic phase (instead of the more common "mixture-type" approach) and the transport equation for the chemical species, within the context of classical irreversible thermodynamics. Interfacial processes such as phase changes, chemical diffusion+reaction, and surface tension effects are explicitly incorporated in the context of ensemble averaging. Phase assemblages, mineral and melt compositions, and all other physical parameters of multi-phase systems are obtained through dynamic free-energy minimization procedures.

  1. Phase separating colloid polymer mixtures in shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derks, Didi; Imhof, Arnout [Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Aarts, Dirk G A L [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Bonn, Daniel [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: didi.derks@lps.ens.fr

    2008-10-08

    We study the process of phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures in the (spinodal) two-phase region of the phase diagram in shear flow. We use a counter-rotating shear cell and image the system by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. The system is quenched from an initially almost homogeneous state at very high (200 s{sup -1}) shear rate to a low shear rate {gamma}-dot. A spinodal decomposition pattern is observed. Initially, the characteristic length scale increases linearly with time. As the structure coarsens, the shear imposes a certain length scale on the structure and a clear asymmetry develops. The domains become highly stretched along the flow direction, and the domain width along the vorticity axis reaches a stationary size, which scales as approx. {gamma}-do{sup -0.35}. Furthermore, on quenching from an intermediate (6.7 s{sup -1}) to a low shear rate the elongated structures become Rayleigh unstable and break up into smaller droplets. Still, the system eventually reaches the same steady state as was found from a direct high to low shear rate quench through coarsening.

  2. Thermodynamic performance experiment and cooling number calculation of a counter-flow spray humidifier in the HAT cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhang WANG; Yixing LI; Shilie WENG; Yonghong WANG

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the ther-modynamic performance of a counter-flow spray humidi-fier was conducted on the basis of theoretical analysis of the heat and mass transfer mechanism inside the humidi-fier. Critical parameters such as the temperature and relative humidity of air and the temperature of water at the inlet and outlet were measured. The influence of every measured parameter on the thermal performance of the humidifier was obtained under different experimental conditions. The cooling number, whose variation was also obtained, was calculated according to the measured data. The experimental results show that both the temperature and the temperature increment of outlet humid air and the temperature of outlet water increase with an increase of the water-gas ratio, whereas the cooling number decreases. Under all experimental conditions, the outlet humid air reaches or is close to the saturation level. The lower cooling number is favorable for the system, but it has an optimal value for a certain humidifier.

  3. interThermalPhaseChangeFoam—A framework for two-phase flow simulations with thermally driven phase change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume-of-fluid (VOF approach is a mature technique for simulating two-phase flows. However, VOF simulation of phase-change heat transfer is still in its infancy. Multiple closure formulations have been proposed in the literature, each suited to different applications. While these have enabled significant research advances, few implementations are publicly available, actively maintained, or inter-operable. Here, a VOF solver is presented (interThermalPhaseChangeFoam, which incorporates an extensible framework for phase-change heat transfer modeling, enabling simulation of diverse phenomena in a single environment. The solver employs object oriented OpenFOAM library features, including Run-Time-Type-Identification to enable rapid implementation and run-time selection of phase change and surface tension force models. The solver is packaged with multiple phase change and surface tension closure models, adapted and refined from earlier studies. This code has previously been applied to study wavy film condensation, Taylor flow evaporation, nucleate boiling, and dropwise condensation. Tutorial cases are provided for simulation of horizontal film condensation, smooth and wavy falling film condensation, nucleate boiling, and bubble condensation. Validation and grid sensitivity studies, interfacial transport models, effects of spurious currents from surface tension models, effects of artificial heat transfer due to numerical factors, and parallel scaling performance are described in detail in the Supplemental Material (see Appendix A. By incorporating the framework and demonstration cases into a single environment, users can rapidly apply the solver to study phase-change processes of interest.

  4. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Model for the Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yamoah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is a promising option for next generation reactor technology and has the potential to provide high efficiency and cost effective electricity generation. The reactor unit heat transfer poses a challenge due to the complexity associated with the thermalflow design. Therefore to reliably simulate the flow and heat transport of the pebble bed modular reactor necessitates a heat transfer model that deals with radiation as well as thermal convection and conduction. In this study, a model with the capability to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in the pebble bed modular reactor core has been developed. The developed model was implemented on a personal computer using FORTRAN 95 programming language. Several important fluid flow and heat transfer parameters have been examined: including the pressure drop over the reactor core, the heat transfer coefficient, the Nusselt number and the effective thermal conductivity of the fuel pebbles. Results obtained from the simulation experiments show a uniform pressure in the radial direction for a core to fuel element diameter (D/d ratio>20 and the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The model can adequately account for the flow and heat transfer phenomenon and the loss of pressure through friction in the pebble bed type high temperature nuclear reactor.

  5. A Phase Transition for Circle Maps and Cherry Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Liviana

    2013-07-01

    We study C 2 weakly order preserving circle maps with a flat interval. The main result of the paper is about a sharp transition from degenerate geometry to bounded geometry depending on the degree of the singularities at the boundary of the flat interval. We prove that the non-wandering set has zero Hausdorff dimension in the case of degenerate geometry and it has Hausdorff dimension strictly greater than zero in the case of bounded geometry. Our results about circle maps allow to establish a sharp phase transition in the dynamics of Cherry flows.

  6. A Phase Transition for Circle Maps and Cherry Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Palmisano, Liviana

    2012-01-01

    We study $C^{2}$ weakly order preserving circle maps with a flat interval. The main result of the paper is about a sharp transition from degenerate geometry to bounded geometry depending on the degree of the singularities at the boundary of the flat interval. We prove that the non-wandering set has zero Hausdorff dimension in the case of degenerate geometry and it has Hausdorff dimension strictly greater than zero in the case of bounded geometry. Our results about circle maps allow to establish a sharp phase transition in the dynamics of Cherry flows.

  7. Bubble Generation in a Flowing Liquid Medium and Resulting Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, S. C.; Kamotani, Y.; Bhunia, A.; Ostrach, S.

    1999-01-01

    The present investigation reports a study of bubble generation under reduced gravity conditions, using both a co-flow and a cross-flow configuration. This study may be used in the conceptual design of a space-based thermal management system. Ensuing two-phase flow void fraction can be accurately monitored using a single nozzle gas injection system within a continuous liquid flow conduit, as utilized in the present investigation. Accurate monitoring of void fraction leads to precise control of heat and mass transfer coefficients related to a thermal management system; hence providing an efficient and highly effective means of removing heat aboard spacecraft or space stations. Our experiments are performed in parabolic flight aboard the modified DC-9 Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft at NASA Lewis Research Center, using an air-water system. For the purpose of bubble dispersion in a flowing liquid, we use both a co-flow and a cross-flow configuration. In the co-flow geometry, air is introduced through a nozzle in the same direction with the liquid flow. On the other hand, in the cross-flow configuration, air is injected perpendicular to the direction of water flow, via a nozzle protruding inside the two-phase flow conduit. Three different flow conduit (pipe) diameters are used, namely, 1.27 cm, 1.9 cm and 2.54 cm. Two different ratios of nozzle to pipe diameter (D(sub N))sup * are considered, namely (D(sub N))sup * = 0.1 and 0.2, while superficial liquid velocities are varied from 8 to 70 cm/s depending on flow conduit diameter. It is experimentally observed that by holding all other flow conditions and geometry constant, generated bubbles decrease in size with increase in superficial liquid velocity. Detached bubble diameter is shown to increase with air injection nozzle diameter. Likewise, generated bubbles grow in size with increasing pipe diameter. Along the same lines, it is shown that bubble frequency of formation increases and hence the time to detachment of a

  8. Mysterious ionization in cooling flow filaments: a test with deep COS FUV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant

    2013-10-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph is capable of unraveling a two decade old mystery regarding the filamentary emission line nebulae found in the brightest cluster galaxies {BCGs} of cool core {CC} clusters. These kpc-scale filaments are characterized by elevated H-alpha luminosities and puzzling ionization states that cannot be accounted for by recombination or photionization alone, and are instead excited by an unknown ionization mechanism. The most hotly debated proposed solutions invoke thermal conduction, shocks, or cosmic-ray heating, but progress toward consensus awaits unambiguous spectral discriminants between these models that can only be found in the FUV. We propose deep {9 orbit}, off-nuclear observations of two strategically selected BCGs in well-studied cool core clusters with cross-spectrum archival datasets. We also propose a shorter {5 orbit} on-nuclear observation for one of our targets to assess possible AGN contributions to the spectra. These proposed observations represent critical tests that can unambiguously discriminate between the various candidate ionziation models. Constraining the mechanisms by which CC BCG filaments are excited remains one of the most important roadblocks to a better understanding of cooling from hot ambient medium to cold star forming clouds and filaments, a process important for both galaxy and black hole growth. It is therefore important that, before HST ends its mission and we lose FUV capability, we advance our understanding of this decades old mystery.

  9. Groundwater flow modelling of the excavation and operational phases - Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Urban (Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Lyckeby (Sweden)); Rhen, Ingvar (SWECO Environment AB, Falun (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    As a part of the license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken a series of groundwater flow modelling studies. These represent time periods with different hydraulic conditions and the simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. The modelling study reported here presents calculated inflow rates, drawdown of the groundwater table and upconing of deep saline water for different levels of grouting efficiency during the excavation and operational phases of a final repository at Laxemar. The inflow calculations were accompanied by a sensitivity study, which among other matters handled the impact of different deposition hole rejection criteria. The report also presents tentative modelling results for the duration of the saturation phase, which starts once the used parts of the repository are being backfilled

  10. A Computational Study for the Utilization of Jet Pulsations in Gas Turbine Film Cooling and Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the second part of a three-part final report of research performed under an NRA cooperative Agreement contract. The first part is NASA/CR-2012-217415. The third part is NASA/CR-2012-217417. Jets have been utilized in various turbomachinery applications in order to improve gas turbines performance. Jet pulsation is a promising technique because of the reduction in the amount of air removed from compressor. In this work two areas of pulsed jets applications were computationally investigated using the commercial code Fluent (ANSYS, Inc.); the first one is film cooling of High Pressure Turbine (HPT) blades and second one is flow separation control over Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoil using Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ). Using pulsed jets for film cooling purposes can help to improve the effectiveness and thus allow higher turbine inlet temperature. Effects of the film hole geometry, blowing ratio and density ratio of the jet, pulsation frequency and duty cycle of blowing on the film cooling effectiveness were investigated. As for the low-pressure turbine (LPT) stages, the boundary layer separation on the suction side of airfoils can occur due to strong adverse pressure gradients. The problem is exacerbated as airfoil loading is increased. Active flow control could provide a means for minimizing separation under conditions where it is most severe (low Reynolds number), without causing additional losses under other conditions (high Reynolds number). The effects of the jet geometry, blowing ratio, density ratio, pulsation frequency and duty cycle on the size of the separated region were examined in this work. The results from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation computational approaches were compared with the experimental data.

  11. Numerical Investigation on Supercritical Heat Transfer of RP3 Kerosene Flowing inside a Cooling Channel of Scramjet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical convective heat transfer characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel play a fundamental role in the active cooling technology of scramjet. In this paper, a 2D-axisymmetric numerical study of supercritical heat transfer of RP3 flowing inside the cooling channels of scramjet has been conducted. The main thermophysical properties of RP3, including density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity, are obtained from experimental data, while viscosity is evaluated from a commercial code with a ten-species surrogate. Effects of heat flux, mass flow rate, and inlet temperature on supercritical heat transfer processes have been investigated. Results indicate that when the wall temperature rises above the pseudocritical temperature of RP3, heat transfer coefficient decreases as a result of drastic decrease of the specific heat. The conventional heat transfer correlations, that is, Gnielinski formula, are no longer proper for the supercritical heat transfer of RP3. The modified Jackson and Hall formula, which was proposed for supercritical CO2 and water, gives good prediction except when the wall temperature is near or higher than the pseudocritical temperature.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of axisymmetric plume and base flow of film/dump cooled rocket nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-07-01

    Film/dump cooling a rocket nozzle with fuel rich gas, as in the National Launch System (NLS) Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), adds potential complexities for integrating the engine with the vehicle. The chief concern is that once the film coolant is exhausted from the nozzle, conditions may exist during flight for the fuel-rich film gases to be recirculated to the vehicle base region. The result could be significantly higher base temperatures than would be expected from a regeneratively cooled nozzle. CFD analyses were conduced to augment classical scaling techniques for vehicle base environments. The FDNS code with finite rate chemistry was used to simulate a single, axisymmetric STME plume and the NLS base area. Parallel calculations were made of the Saturn V S-1 C/F1 plume base area flows. The objective was to characterize the plume/freestream shear layer for both vehicles as inputs for scaling the S-C/F1 flight data to NLS/STME conditions. The code was validated on high speed flows with relevant physics. This paper contains the calculations for the NLS/STME plume for the baseline nozzle and a modified nozzle. The modified nozzle was intended to reduce the fuel available for recirculation to the vehicle base region. Plumes for both nozzles were calculated at 10kFT and 50kFT.

  13. Detailed flow and force measurements in a rotated triangular tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Zhang, C.; Mureithi, N. W.; Pamfil, D.

    2005-05-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A detailed knowledge of the characteristics of two-phase cross-flow in tube bundles is required to understand and formulate flow-induced vibration parameters such as damping, fluidelastic instability, and random excitation due to turbulence. An experimental program was undertaken with a rotated-triangular array of cylinders subjected to air/water flow to simulate two-phase mixtures. The array is made of relatively large diameter cylinders (38 mm) to allow for detailed two-phase flow measurements between cylinders. Fiber-optic probes were developed to measure local void fraction. Local flow velocities and bubble diameters or characteristic lengths of the two-phase mixture are obtained by using double probes. Both the dynamic lift and drag forces were measured with a strain gauge instrumented cylinder.

  14. Two-phase flow characteristics of liquid nitrogen in vertically upward 0.5 and 1.0 mm micro-tubes: Visualization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Fu, X.

    2009-10-01

    Application of liquid nitrogen to cooling is widely employed in many fields, such as cooling of the high temperature superconducting devices, cryosurgery and so on, in which liquid nitrogen is generally forced to flow inside very small passages to maintain good thermal performance and stability. In order to have a full understanding of the flow and heat transfer characteristics of liquid nitrogen in micro-tube, high-speed digital photography was employed to acquire the typical two-phase flow patterns of liquid nitrogen in vertically upward micro-tubes of 0.531 and 1.042 mm inner diameters. It was found from the experimental results that the flow patterns were mainly bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow and annular flow. And the confined bubble flow, mist flow, bubble condensation and flow oscillation were also observed. These flow patterns were characterized in different types of flow regime maps. The surface tension force and the size of the diameter were revealed to be the major factors affecting the flow pattern transitions. It was found that the transition boundaries of the slug/churn flow and churn/annular flow of the present experiment shifted to lower superficial vapor velocity; while the transition boundary of the bubbly/slug flow shifted to higher superficial vapor velocity compared to the results of the room-temperature fluids in the tubes with the similar hydraulic diameters. The corresponding transition boundaries moved to lower superficial velocity when reducing the inner diameter of the micro-tubes. Time-averaged void fraction and heat transfer characteristics for individual flow patterns were presented and special attention was paid to the effect of the diameter on the variation of void fraction.

  15. Solutions for a hyperbolic model of multi-phase flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadori Debora

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a model for the flow of an inviscid fluid admitting liquid and vapor phases, as well as a mixture of them. The flow is modeled in one spatial dimension; the state variables are the specific volume, the velocity and the mass density fraction λ of vapor in the fluid. The equation governing the time evolution of λ contains a source term, which enables metastable states and drives the fluid towards stable pure phases. We first discuss, for the homogeneous system, the BV stability of Riemann solutions generated by large initial data and check the validity of several sufficient conditions that are known in the literature. Then, we review some recent results about the existence of solutions, which are globally defined in time, for λ close either to 0 or to 1 (corresponding to almost pure phases. These solutions possibly contain large shocks. Finally, in the relaxation limit, solutions are proved to satisfy a reduced system and the related entropy condition. On discute un modèle pour l’écoulement d’un fluide non visqueux admettant phases liquides et de vapeur, ainsi qu’un mélange d’entre eux. L’écoulement est modélisé dans une dimension spatiale ; les variables d’état sont le volume spécifique, la vitesse et la fraction de densité de masse λ de la vapeur dans le liquide. L’équation régissant l’évolution temporelle de λ contient un terme de source, ce qui permet des états métastables et conduit le fluide vers de phases stables pures. Nous discutons d’abord, pour le système homogène, la stabilité BV des solutions de Riemann générés par des grandes données initiales et vérifions la validité de plusieurs conditions suffisantes qui sont connues dans la littérature. Ensuite, nous passons en revue quelques résultats récents sur l’existence de solutions, qui sont definies pour tous les temps, pour λ soit près de 0 ou de 1 (correspondant à des phases presque pures. Ces solutions sont susceptibles

  16. Multi-phase flow effect on SRM nozzle flow field and thermal protection materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAFQAT Wahab; XIE Kan; LIU Yu

    2009-01-01

    Multi-phase flow effect generated from the combustion of aluminum based com-posite propellant was performed on the thermal protection material of solid rocket motor (SRM) nozzle. Injection of alumina (Al2O3) particles from 5% to 10% was tried on SRM nozzle flow field to see the influence of multiphase flow on heat transfer computations. A coupled, time resolved CFD (computational fluid dynamics) approach was adopted to solve the conjugate problem of multi-phase fluid flow and heat transfer in the solid rocket motor nozzle. The governing equations are discretized by using the finite volume method. Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model was employed. The computation was executed on the dif-ferent models selected for the analysis to validate the temperature variation in the throat in-serts and baking material of SRM nozzle. Comparison for temperatures variations were also carried out at different expansion ratios of nozzle. This paper also characterized the advanced SRM nozzle composites material for their high thermo stability and their high thermo me-chanical capabilities to make it more reliable simpler and lighter.

  17. Droplets Formation and Merging in Two-Phase Flow Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution; and (ii the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of incompressible multiphase flow with phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Soo; Riaz, Amir; Aute, Vikrant

    2017-09-01

    Simulation of multiphase flow with phase change is challenging because of the potential for unphysical pressure oscillations, spurious velocity fields and mass flux errors across the interface. The resulting numerical errors may become critical when large density contrasts are present. To address these issues, we present a new approach for multiphase flow with phase change that features, (i) a smooth distribution of sharp velocity jumps and mass flux within a narrow region surrounding the interface, (ii) improved mass flux projection from the implicit interface onto the uniform Cartesian grid and (iii) post-advection velocity correction step to ensure accurate velocity divergence in interfacial cells. These new features are implemented in combination with a sharp treatment of the jumps in pressure and temperature gradient. A series of 1-D, 2-D, axisymmetric and 3-D problems are solved to verify the improvements afforded by the new approach. Axisymmetric film boiling results are also presented, which show good qualitative agreement with heat transfer correlations as well as experimental observations of bubble shapes.

  19. Phase relations of triadic scale interactions in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; McKeon, Beverley

    2014-11-01

    The quadratic nature of non-linearity in the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations dictates the coupling between scales in a turbulent flow to be of triadic form. An understanding of the triadic coupling affords good insights into the dynamics of turbulence, as demonstrated by Sharma & McKeon (J. Fluid Mech., 2013) through analysis of the NS resolvent operator; a set of three triadically consistent spatio-temporal modes was shown to produce complex structures such as modulating packets of hairpin vortices observed in wall-bounded turbulent flows. Here we interpret Skewness (Sk) of velocity fluctuations and the Amplitude Modulation coefficient (Ram), proposed by Mathis, Hutchins & Marusic (J. Fluid Mech., 2009), to be a measure of the large- and small-scale phase relationship. Through a simple decomposition of scales, both Sk and Ram are shown to be amplitude weighted (and normalized) measures of phase between scales that have direct triadic coupling. An analytical relationship is established between the two quantities and the result is demonstrated using experimental data from canonical and dynamically forced turbulent boundary layers presented in Duvvuri and McKeon (AIAA 2014-2883). The support of AFOSR (Grant No. FA 9550-12-1-0469) and Resnick Institute Graduate Research Fellowship (S.D.) is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Droplets formation and merging in two-phase flow microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed.

  1. Daytime space cooling with phase change material ceiling panels discharged using rooftop photovoltaic/thermal panels and night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Pean, Thibault Quentin; Gennari, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of using photovoltaic/thermal panels for producing cold water through the process of night-time radiative cooling was experimentally examined. The cold water was used to discharge phase change material in ceiling panels in a climatic chamber. Both night-time radiative cooling...... the photovoltaic/thermal varied from 56% to 122%. The phase change material ceiling panels were thus, capable of providing an acceptable thermal environment and the photovoltaic/thermal panels were able to provide most of the required electricity and cold water needed for cooling....

  2. Effect of heating and cooling rate on the kinetics of allotropic phase changes in uranium: A differential scanning calorimetry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Arun Kumar [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Raju, S. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in; Jeyaganesh, B.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Sudha, R.; Ganesan, V. [Materials Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic aspects of allotropic phase changes in uranium are studied as a function of heating/cooling rate in the range 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} K min{sup -1} by isochronal differential scanning calorimetry. The transformation arrest temperatures revealed a remarkable degree of sensitivity to variations of heating and cooling rate, and this is especially more so for the transformation finish (T{sub f}) temperatures. The results obtained for the {alpha} {yields} {beta} and {beta} {yields} {gamma} transformations during heating confirm to the standard Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) model for a nucleation and growth mediated process. The apparent activation energy Q{sub eff} for the overall transformation showed a mild increase with increasing heating rate. In fact, the heating rate normalised Arrhenius rate constant, k/{beta} reveals a smooth power law decay with increasing heating rate ({beta}). For the {alpha} {yields} {beta} phase change, the observed DSC peak profile for slower heating rates contained a distinct shoulder like feature, which however is absent in the corresponding profiles found for higher heating rates. The kinetics of {gamma} {yields} {beta} phase change on the other hand, is best described by the two-parameter Koistinen-Marburger empirical relation for the martensitic transformation.

  3. Particle migration in two-phase, viscoelastic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaensson, Nick; Hulsen, Martien; Anderson, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Particles suspended in creeping, viscoelastic flows can migrate across stream lines due to gradients in normal stresses. This phenomenon has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. However, particle migration in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces is hardly studied. We present results of simulations in 2D and 3D of rigid spherical particles in two-phase flows, where either one or both of the fluids are viscoelastic. The fluid-fluid interface is assumed to be diffuse and is described using Cahn-Hilliard theory. The particle boundary is assumed to be sharp and is described by a boundary-fitted, moving mesh. The governing equations are solved using the finite element method. We show that differences in normal stresses between the two fluids can induce a migration of the particle towards the interface in a shear flow. Depending on the magnitude of the surface tension and the properties of the fluids, particle migration can be halted due to the induced Laplace pressure, the particle can be adsorbed at the interface, or the particle can cross the interface into the other fluid. Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P.O. Box 902, 5600 AX Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

  4. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  5. Phase transformations of under-cooled austenite of new bainitic materials for scissors crossovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pacyna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains CCT diagrams presenting a transformation kinetics of under-cooled austenite from two new bainitic cast steels which the scissors crossovers for heavy-duty railway tracks (min. 230kN/axle at the speed up to 200 km/h are made of. The cooling ranges of UIC60 type railway tracks plot on the CCT diagrams indicate that there is a 100% bainitic structure in the scissors crossovers made of these cast steels as well, but mainly it would be a favourable for cracking resistance lower bainite. The achievable hardness of scissors crossovers made of new materials make it possible to use high–temperature tempering resulting in obtaining of good crack resistance. However one should provide a good quality of castings made.

  6. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  7. Experimental analysis of secondary flow in turbines (with cooling air ejection). Final report; Experimentelle Analyse der Sekundaerstroemungen in Turbinen (mit Kuehlluftausblasung). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langowsky, C. [ed.; Weyer, H.B.

    1997-09-01

    Film cooling is an effective method of blade surface cooling. To satisfy not only the thermal but also the aerodynamic demand of minimum loss production the detailed knowledge of the interaction between the cooling air and the main flow is necessary. In this work the effect of cooling air ejection on the aerodynamics of the cascade flow and its loss production is studied experimentally with varied Blowing ratios and locations. Furthermore the mixing process of the cooling air jets among the influence of the secondary flow is investigated. To be able to analyse the different superimposed effects (radial pressure gradient, secondary flow) various measurement techniques are used. By means of additional numerical flow simulations origins of the experimental indicated effects could be figured out. (orig.) [Deutsch] Filmkuehlung ist eine wirkungsvolle Methode zur Kuehlung der aeusseren Schaufeloberflaeche. Um neben den thermischen auch den aerodynamischen Anspruechen nach einer minimalen Verlustproduktion zu genuegen, ist die genaue Kenntnis der wechselseitigen Beeinflussung von ausgeblasener Kuehlluft und Hauptstroemung notwendig. Gegensteand der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die experimentelle Untersuchung der Auswirkungen der Kuehlluftausblasung auf die Aerodynamik der Hauptstroemung eines filmgekuehlten Turbinenstators und auf dessen Verlustproduktion bei Variation des Ausblaseortes und der Ausblaserate. Desweiteren wurde die Mischungscharakteristik der Kuehlluftstrahlen unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung des Einflusses der Sekundaerstroemung studiert. Um die unterschiedlichen Wirkungen sich ueberlagernder Einfluesse (radialer Druckgradient, Sekundaerstroemung) analysieren zu koennen, wurden verschiedene Messtechniken eingesetzt. Begleitende numerische Simulationen der Stroemungsvorgaenge ermoeglichten Aussagen zu den Ursachen der experimentell aufgedeckten Effekte. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of the solar powered/fuel assisted Rankine cycle cooling system. Phase 1: Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lior, N.; Koai, K.; Yeh, H.

    1985-04-01

    The subject of this analysis is a solar cooling system which consists of a conventional open-compressor chiller, driven by a novel hybrid steam Rankine cycle. Steam is generated by the use of solar energy collected at about 100C, and it is then superheated to about 600C in a fossil-fuel fired superheater. The steam drives a novel counter-rotating turbine, some of the heat from it is regenerated, and it is then condensed. Thermal storage is implemented as an integral part of the cycle, by means of hot-water which is flashed to steam when needed for driving the turbine. For the solar energy input, both evacuated and double-glazed flat-plate collectors were considered. A comprehensive computer program was developed to analyze the operation and performance of the entire power/cooling system. Each component was described by a separate subroutine to compute its performance from basic principles, and special attention was given to the parasitic losses, including pumps, fans and pressure drops in the piping and heat exchangers, and to describe the off-design performance of the components. The thermophysical properties of the fluids used are also described in separate subroutines. Transient simulation of the entire system was performed on an hourly basis over a cooling season in two representative climatic regions (Washington, DC, and Phoenix, AZ) for a number of system configurations.

  9. Line Emission from Cooling Accretion Flows in the Nucleus of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, S; Melia, F; Liu, Siming; Fromerth, Michael J.; Melia, Fulvio

    2002-01-01

    The recent Chandra X-ray observations of the nucleus of M31, combined with earlier VLA radio and HST UV spectral measurements, provide the strictest constraints on the nature of accretion onto the supermassive black hole (called M31* hereafter) in this region. One of the two newly-detected sources within roughly an arcsec of M31* may be its X-ray counterpart. If not, the X-ray flux from the nucleus must be even lower than inferred previously. Some uncertainty remains regarding the origin of the UV excess from the compact component known as P2. In our earlier analysis, we developed a unified picture for the broadband spectrum of this source. Contrary to the `standard' picture in which the infalling plasma attains temperatures in excess of 10^{10} K near the event horizon, the best fit model for M31*, under the assumption that the UV radiation is in fact produced by this source, appears to correspond to a cool branch solution, arising from strong line cooling inside the capture radius. Starting its infall with ...

  10. Simulation of Cooling and Pressure Effects on Inflated Pahoehoe Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Pahoehoe lobes are often emplaced by the advance of discrete toes accompanied by inflation of the lobe surface. Many random effects complicate modeling lobe emplacement, such as the location and orientation of toe breakouts, their dimensions, mechanical strength of the crust, micro-topography and a host of other factors. Models that treat the movement of lava parcels as a random walk have explained some of the overall features of emplacement. However, cooling of the surface and internal pressurization of the fluid interior has not been modeled. This work reports lobe simulations that explicitly incorporate 1) cooling of surface lava parcels, 2) the propensity of breakouts to occur at warmer margins that are mechanically weaker than cooler ones, and 3) the influence of internal pressurization associated with inflation. The surface temperature is interpreted as a surrogate for the mechanic strength of the crust at each location and is used to determine the probability of a lava parcel transfer from that location. When only surface temperature is considered, the morphology and dimensions of simulated lobes are indistinguishable from equiprobable simulations. However, inflation within a lobe transmits pressure to all connected fluid locations with the warmer margins being most susceptible to breakouts and expansion. Simulations accounting for internal pressurization feature morphologies and dimensions that are dramatically different from the equiprobable and temperature-dependent models. Even on flat subsurfaces the pressure-dependent model produces elongate lobes with distinct directionality. Observables such as topographic profiles, aspect ratios, and maximum extents should be readily distinguishable in the field.

  11. On the occurrence of burnout downstream of a flow obstacle in boiling two-phase upward flow within a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Shoji [Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: morisho@ynu.ac.jp; Tominaga, Akira [Ube National College of Technology, Ube 755-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: tominaga@ube-k.ac.jp; Fukano, Tohru [Kurume Institute of University, Fukuoka 830-0052 (Japan)], E-mail: fukanot@cc.kurume-it.ac.jp

    2007-12-15

    If a flow obstacle, such as a spacer is placed in a boiling two-phase flow within a channel, the temperature on the surface of the heating tube is severely affected by the existence of the spacer. Under certain conditions, a spacer has a cooling effect, and under other conditions, the spacer causes dryout of the cooling water film on the heating surface. The burnout mechanism, which always occurs upstream of a spacer, however, remains unclear. In a previous paper [Fukano, T., Mori, S., Akamatsu, S., Baba, A., 2002. Relation between temperature fluctuation of a heating surface and generation of drypatch caused by a cylindrical spacer in a vertical boiling two-phase upward flow in a narrow annular channel. Nucl. Eng. Des. 217, 81-90], we reported that the disturbance wave has a significant effect on dryout and burnout occurrence and that a spacer greatly affects the behavior of the liquid film downstream of the spacer. In the present study, we examined in detail the influences of a spacer on the heat transfer and film thickness characteristics downstream of the spacer by considering the result in steam-water and air-water systems. The main results are summarized as follows: (1)The spacer averages the liquid film in the disturbance wave flow. As a result, dryout tends not to occur downstream of the spacer. This means that large temperature increases do not occur there. However, traces of disturbance waves remain, even if the disturbance waves are averaged by the spacer. (2)There is a high probability that the location at which burnout occurs is upstream of the downstream spacer, irrespective of the spacer spacing. (3)The newly proposed burnout occurrence model can explain the phenomena that burnout does occur upstream of the downstream spacer, even if the liquid film thickness t{sub Fm} is approximately the same before and behind the spacer.

  12. CFD Analysis of Upper Plenum Flow for a Sodium-Cooled Small Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, A.; Hu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Upper plenum flow behavior is important for many operational and safety issues in sodium fast reactors. The Prototype Gen-IV Sodium Fast Reactor (PGSFR), a pool-type, 150 MWe output power design, was used as a reference case for a detailed characterization of upper plenum flow for normal operating conditions. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation was utilized with detailed geometric modeling of major structures. Core outlet conditions based on prior system-level calculations were mapped to approximate the outlet temperatures and flow rates for each core assembly. Core outlet flow was found to largely bypass the Upper Internal Structures (UIS). Flow curves over the shield and circulates within the pool before exiting the plenum. Cross-flows and temperatures were evaluated near the core outlet, leading to a proposed height for the core outlet thermocouples to ensure accurate assembly-specific temperature readings. A passive scalar was used to evaluate fluid residence time from core outlet to IHX inlet, which can be used to assess the applicability of various methods for monitoring fuel failure. Additionally, the gas entrainment likelihood was assessed based on the CFD simulation results. Based on the evaluation of velocity gradients and turbulent kinetic energies and the available gas entrainment criteria in the literature, it was concluded that significant gas entrainment is unlikely for the current PGSFR design.

  13. Numerical methods for two-phase flow with contact lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Clauido

    2012-07-01

    This thesis focuses on numerical methods for two-phase flows, and especially flows with a moving contact line. Moving contact lines occur where the interface between two fluids is in contact with a solid wall. At the location where both fluids and the wall meet, the common continuum descriptions for fluids are not longer valid, since the dynamics around such a contact line are governed by interactions at the molecular level. Therefore the standard numerical continuum models have to be adjusted to handle moving contact lines. In the main part of the thesis a method to manipulate the position and the velocity of a contact line in a two-phase solver, is described. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an explicit finite difference method on a staggered grid. The position of the interface is tracked with the level set method and the discontinuities at the interface are treated in a sharp manner with the ghost fluid method. The contact line is tracked explicitly and its dynamics can be described by an arbitrary function. The key part of the procedure is to enforce a coupling between the contact line and the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the level set method. Results for different contact line models are presented and it is demonstrated that they are in agreement with analytical solutions or results reported in the literature.The presented Navier-Stokes solver is applied as a part in a multiscale method to simulate capillary driven flows. A relation between the contact angle and the contact line velocity is computed by a phase field model resolving the micro scale dynamics in the region around the contact line. The relation of the microscale model is then used to prescribe the dynamics of the contact line in the macro scale solver. This approach allows to exploit the scale separation between the contact line dynamics and the bulk flow. Therefore coarser meshes can be applied for the macro scale flow solver compared to global phase field simulations

  14. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  15. Data center cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  16. Probabilistic physical characteristics of phase transitions at highway bottlenecks: incommensurability of three-phase and two-phase traffic-flow theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Physical features of induced phase transitions in a metastable free flow at an on-ramp bottleneck in three-phase and two-phase cellular automaton (CA) traffic-flow models have been revealed. It turns out that at given flow rates at the bottleneck, to induce a moving jam (F → J transition) in the metastable free flow through the application of a time-limited on-ramp inflow impulse, in both two-phase and three-phase CA models the same critical amplitude of the impulse is required. If a smaller impulse than this critical one is applied, neither F → J transition nor other phase transitions can occur in the two-phase CA model. We have found that in contrast with the two-phase CA model, in the three-phase CA model, if the same smaller impulse is applied, then a phase transition from free flow to synchronized flow (F → S transition) can be induced at the bottleneck. This explains why rather than the F → J transition, in the three-phase theory traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck is governed by an F → S transition, as observed in real measured traffic data. None of two-phase traffic-flow theories incorporates an F → S transition in a metastable free flow at the bottleneck that is the main feature of the three-phase theory. On the one hand, this shows the incommensurability of three-phase and two-phase traffic-flow theories. On the other hand, this clarifies why none of the two-phase traffic-flow theories can explain the set of fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at highway bottlenecks.

  17. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state...

  18. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure of electron beam welded joints of two-phase TiAl-based alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Guoqing; Zhang Binggang; He Jingshan; Feng Jicai

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of the microstructural characterization and phase composition of electron beam welded joint zones of Ti-43Al-9V-0.3Y alloy has been done in this study. The welded seam is mainly composed of B2 phase, the partial γ+α2 two-phase lamellar structure and granular γm phase. And the lanthanon Y existed as YAl2 phase and served as grain refined. The impact of different cooling rates on joint microstructure, fracture characteristic and tensile strength were investigated. The high cooling rate restrained the structural transformation and resulted in the ordering structure. The fracture of the joint was brittle cleavage fracture because the ordering structure went against restraining the crack propagation. With the decrease of cooling rate, the transformation amounts of lamellar structure increased, and the fracture presented the layered and cross-layered characteristic.

  19. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  20. Numerical study of saturation steam/water mixture flow and flashing initial sub-cooled water flow inside throttling devices

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) approach to model this phenomenon inside throttling devices is proposed. To validate CFD results, different nozzle geometries are analyzed, comparing numerical results with experimental data. Two cases are studied: Case 1: saturation steam/water mixture flow inside 2D convergent-divergent nozzle (inlet, outlet and throat diameter of nozzle are 0.1213m, 0.0452m and 0.0191m respectively). In this benchmark, a range of total inle...