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Sample records for coolant cleanup systems

  1. Coolant clean-up and recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the service life of mechanical seals in a shaft sealing device, eliminate leakages and improve the safety by providing a recycle pump for feeding coolants to a coolant clean-up device upon reactor shut-down and adapting the pump treat only low temperature and low pressure coolants. Constitution: The system is adapted to partially take out coolants from the pipeways of a recycling pump upon normal operation and feed them to a clean-up device. Upon reactor shut-down, the recycle pump is stopped and coolants are extracted by the recycle pump for shut-down into the clean-up device. Since the coolants are not fed to the clean-up device by the recycle pump during normal operation as conducted so far, high temperature and high pressure coolants are not directly fed to the recycle pump, thereby enabling to avoid mechanical problems in the pump. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  3. Coolant cleanup system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Atsushi; Usui, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the electric conductivity of reactor water lower and to minimize the heat loss in the cleanup system by providing a low temperature cleanup system and a high temperature cleanup system together. Constitution: A low temperature cleanup system using ion exchange resins as filter aids and a high temperature cleanup system using inorganic ion exchange materials as filter aids are provided in combination. A part of the reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel is passed through a conductivity meter, one portion of which flows into the high temperature cleanup system having no heat exchanger and filled with inorganic ion exchange materials by way of a first flow rate control valve and the other portion of which flows into the low temperature cleanup system having heat exchangers and filled with the ion exchange materials by way of a second control valve. The first control valve is adjusted so as to flow, for example, about more than 15% of the feedwater flow rate to the high temperature cleanup system and the second control valve is adjusted with its valve opening degree depending on the indication of the conductivity meter so as to flow about 2 - 7 % of the feedwater flow rate into the low temperature cleanup system, to thereby control the electric conductivity to between 0.055 - 0.3 μS/cm. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Coolant clean-up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuburaya, Hirobumi; Akita, Minoru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Okura, Minoru; Tsuji, Akio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure a sufficient urging pressure at the inlet of a coolant clean-up system pump in a nuclear reactor and eliminate radioactive contaminations to the pump. Constitution: Coolant clean-up system (CUW) pump in a nuclear reactor is disposed to the downstream of a filtration desalter and, for compensating the insufficiency of the urging pressure at the pump inlet, the reactor water intake port to the clean-up system is disposed to the downstream of the after-heat removing pump and the heat exchanger. By compensating the net positive suction head (NPSH) of the clean-up system from the residual heat removing system, the problems of insufficient NPSH for the CUW pump upon reactor shut-down can be dissolved and, accordingly, the reactor clean-up system can be arranged in the order of the heat exchanger, clean-up device and pump. Thus, the CUW pump acts on reactor water after cleaned-up in the clean-up device to reduce the radioactivity contamination to the pump. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Reactor coolant cleanup device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to introduce reactor water at high temperature and high pressure as it is, as well as effectively adsorb to eliminate cobalt in reactor water. Constitution: The coolant cleanup device comprises a vessel main body inserted to coolant pipeway circuits in a water cooled reactor power plant and filters contained within the vessel main body. The filters are prepared by coating and baking powder of metal oxides such as manganese ferrite having a function capable of adsorbing cobalt in the coolants onto the surface of supports made of metals or ceramics resistant to strong acids and alkalies in the form of three-dimensional network structure, for example, zircaloy-2, SUS 303 and the zirconia (baking) to form a basic filter elements. The basic filter elements are charged in plurality to the vessel main body. (Kawaiami, Y.)

  6. Improvements of primary coolant shutdown chemistry and reactor coolant system cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudard, G.; Gilles, B.; Mesnage, F.; Cattant, F.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a radiation exposure management program entitled >, EDF aims at decreasing the mass dosimetry of nuclear power plants workers. So, the annual dose per unit, which has improved from 2.44 m.Sv in 1991 to 1.08 in 2000, should target 0.8 mSv in the year 2005 term in order to meet the results of the best nuclear operators. One of the guidelines for irradiation source term reduction is the optimization of operation parameters, including reactor coolant system (RCS) chemistry in operation, RCS shutdown chemistry and RCS cleanup improvement. This paper presents the EDF strategy for the shutdown and start up RCS chemistry optimization. All the shutdown modes have been reviewed and for each of them, the chemical specifications will be fine tuned. A survey of some US PWRs shutdown practices has been conducted for an acid and reducing shutdown chemistry implementation test at one EDF unit. This survey shows that deviating from the EPRI recommended practice for acid and reducing shutdown chemistry is possible and that critical path impact can be minimized. The paper also presents some investigations about soluble and insoluble species behavior and characterization; the study focuses here on 110m Ag, 122 Sb, 124 Sb and iodine contamination. Concerning RCS cleanup improvement, the paper presents two studies. The first one highlights some limited design modifications that are either underway or planned, for an increased flow rate during the most critical periods of the shutdown. The second one focuses on the strategy EDF envisions for filters and resins selection criteria. Matching the study on contaminants behavior with the study of filters and resins selection criteria should allow improving the cleanup efficiency. (authors)

  7. Coolant clean-up system in the primary coolant circuit for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Michio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the quality of coolants at a prescribed level by distillating coolants in the primary coolant circuit for a BWR type reactor to remove impurities therefrom, taking out the condensates from the top of the distillation column and extracting impurities in a concentrated state from the bottom. Constitution: Coolant water for cooling the core is recycled by a recycling pump by way of a recycling pipeway in a reactor. The coolants extracted from an extraction pipeway connected to the recycling pipeway are fed into a distillation column, where distillation is taken place. Impurities in the coolants, that is, in-core corrosion products, fission products generated in the reactor core, etc. are separated by the distillation, concentrated and solidified in the bottom of the distillation column. While on the other hand, condensates removed with the impurities, that is, coolants cleaned-up are recycled to the coolant water for cooling the reactor core. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Coolant cleanup method in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Shigeoki; Takahashi, Sankichi; Izumi, Kenkichi; Motojima, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To effectively adsorb to remove low molecular weight organic substances from iron exchange resins for use in the removal of various radioactive nucleides contained in reactor coolants. Method : Reactor coolants are recycled by a main recyling pump in a nuclear reactor and a portion of the coolants is cooled and, thereafter, purified in a coolant desalter. While on the other hand, high pressure steams generated from the reactor are passed through a turbine, cooled in a condensator, eliminated with claddings or the likes by the passage through a filtration desalter using powderous ion exchange resins and then further passed through a desalter (filled with granular ion exchange resins). For instance, an adsorption and removing device for organic substances (resulted through the decomposition of ion exchange resins) precoated with activated carbon powder or filled with granular activated carbon is disposed at the downstream for each of the desalters. In this way, the organic substances in the coolants are eliminated to prevent the reduction in the desalting performance of the ion exchange resins caused by the formation of complexes between organic substances and cobalt in the coolants, etc. In this way, the coolant cleanup performance is increased and the amount of wasted ion exchange resins can be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  10. Compartmentalized safety coolant injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    A safety coolant injection system for nuclear reactors wherein a core reflood tank is provided to afford more reliable reflooding of the reactor core in the event of a break in one of the reactor coolant supply loops. Each reactor coolant supply loop is arranged in a separate compartment in the containment structure to contain and control the flow of spilled coolant so as to permit its use during emergency core cooling procedures. A spillway allows spilled coolant in the compartment to pass into the emergency water storage tank from where it can be pumped back to the reactor vessel. (author)

  11. Secondary coolant purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiteler, F.Z.; Donohue, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention combines the attributes of volatile chemical addition, continuous blowdown, and full flow condensate demineralization. During normal plant operation (defined as no primary to secondary leakage) condensate from the condenser is pumped through a full flow condensate demineralizer system by the condensate pumps. Volatile chemical additions are made. Dissolved and suspended solids are removed in the condensate polishers by ion exchange and/or filtration. At the same time a continuous blowdown of approximately 1 percent of the main steaming rate of the steam generators is maintained. Radiation detectors monitor the secondary coolant. If these monitors indicate no primary to secondary leakage, the blowdown is cooled and returned directly to the condensate pump discharge. If one of the radiation monitors should indicate a primary to secondary leak, when the temperature of the effluent exiting from the blowdown heat exchanger is compatible with the resin specifications of the ion exchangers, the bypass valve causes the blowdown flow to pass through the blowdown ion exchangers

  12. Development of teleoperated cleanup system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Ho; Park, J. J.; Yang, M. S.; Kwon, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the development of a teleoperated cleanup system for use in a highly radioactive environment of DFDF(DUPIC Fuel Demonstration Facility) at KAERI where direct human access to the in-cell is strictly limited. The teleoperated cleanup system was designed to remotely remove contaminants placed or fixed on the floor surface of the hot-cell by mopping them with wet cloth. This cleanup system consists of a mopping slave, a mopping master and a control console. The mopping slave located at the in-cell comprises a mopping tool with a mopping cloth and a mobile platform, which were constructed in modules to facilitate maintenance. The mopping master that is an input device to control the mopping slave has kinematic dissimilarity with the mopping slave. The control console provides a means of bilateral control flows and communications between the mopping master and the mopping slave. In operation, the human operator from the out-of-cell performs a series of decontamination tasks remotely by manipulating the mopping slave located in-cell via a mopping master, having a sense of real mopping. The environmental and mechanical design considerations, and control systems of the developed teleoperated cleanup system are also described

  13. SNR coolant system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Haas Van Dorsser, A.H.; Mausbeck, H.

    1976-01-01

    The DEBENELUX prototype fast reactor power plant SNR 300 at Kalkar has a loop-type heat transfer system similar to that of the prototype LMFBR plants in the USA and Japan. There exist three 257 MW/sub th/ primary sodium loops, each with a hot leg centrifugal pump and three 85.6 MW/sub th/ intermediate heat exchangers in parallel. From there the heat is transferred to the steam generators via three secondary sodium loops with one cold leg sodium circulating pump in each. At a nominal reactor outlet temperature of 819 0 K and a turbine inlet power of 771 MW/sub th/ super heated steam of 166 bar and 733 0 K is produced, giving rise to a plant rating of 327 MW/sub e/ gross. The primary and secondary loops are described in detail

  14. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  15. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  16. Assessment, Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Assessment, Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) is an online database for Brownfields Grantees to electronically submit data directly to EPA.

  17. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  19. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  20. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  1. Moderator clean-up system in a heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasada, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the fluctuation of the poison concentration in heavy water moderator due to a heavy water clean-up system. Constitution: To a calandria tank filled with heavy water as poison-containing moderators, are connected both end of a pipeway through which heavy water flows and to which a clean-up device is provided. Strongly basic resin is filled within the clean-up device and a cooler is disposed to a pipeway at the upstream of the clean-up device. In this structure, the temperature of heavy water at the inlet of the clean-up device at a constant level between the temperature at the exit of the cooler and the lowest temperature for the moderator to thereby decrease the fluctuation in the poison concentration in the heavy water moderator due to the heavy water clean-up device. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Architecture synthesis basis for the Hanford Cleanup system: First issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.J.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes a set of candidate alternatives proposed to accomplish the Hanford Cleanup system functions defined in a previous work. Development of alternatives is part of a sequence of system engineering activities which lead to definition of all the products which, when completed, accomplish the cleanup mission. The alternative set is developed to functional level four or higher depending on need

  3. Design and operational experience with a portable tritium cleanup system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.L.; Wilson, S.W.; Garcia, F.

    1991-06-01

    We built a portable tritium cleanup system to scavenge tritium from contaminated gases in any tritium-containing system in the LLNL Tritium Facility. The cleanup system uses standard catalytic oxidation of tritium to water followed by water removal with a molecular sieve dryer. The cleanup unit, complete with instrumentation, is contained in a portable cart that is rolled into place and connected to the apparatus to be cleaned. The cleanup systems is effective, low-tech, simple, and reliable. The nominal flow rate of the system is 30 liters/minute, and the decontamination factor is > 1000. In this paper we will show design information on our portable cleanup system, and will discuss our operational experience with it over the past several years

  4. Development of tritium cleanup system for LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Yoichi; Kawano, Takao; Shibuya, Mamoru; Kabutomori, Toshiki

    2000-01-01

    Energy is vital for humans and we have been consuming a large amount of fossil fuel especially from the beginning of the industrial revolution. Nowadays its huge consumption has however come to threaten our life and we have to prepare nonfossil fuels, for instance solar energy, biomass energy, nuclear energy and so on. Fusion energy is an unlimited resource and one of the strongest candidates of the future energy source. At the National Institute for Fusion Science (referred to as 'NIFS' hereafter), we have constructed a new fusion experimental device called large helical device (referred to as 'LHD' hereafter) in 1998. The device will generate a small amount of tritium, as a fusion product. In order to remove it from the exhaust gas, we have designed a tritium cleanup system based on a new concept. This system is mainly composed of a palladium permeater, a decomposer and hydrogen absorbing alloys. It may perfectly recover the tritium from exhaust gas without oxidizing it. This system is applicable for the future needs at fusion power plants. In order to remove tritium discharged from fusion experimental facilities, it is usual to employ a system by which tritiated constituents, in various chemical forms, are entirely converted to a form of water vapor by catalytic oxidation. The water vapor containing tritiated form is then absorbed by molecular sieve (referred to as 'wet system' hereafter). However, in the case of LHD, it is not rational to deliberately convert the discharged tritium into the water vapor, because the tritium discharged from LHD is almost in a form of hydrogen molecules. Moreover, the tritium in the form of water vapor affects the human body 18000 times stronger than that of hydrogen molecules. In accordance with these view points, we have developed another type of tritium cleanup system based on a new concept, in which hydrogen molecules including tritiated ones (HT, DT and T 2 ) found in the exhaust gas of LHD are directly fixed to hydrogen

  5. Calorimetric and reactor coolant system flow uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; McLean, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the quantification of errors associated with the determination of a feedwater flow, secondary power, and Reactor Coolant System (RCS) flow used at the Trojan Nuclear Plant to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. The sources of error in Plant indications and process measurement are identified and tracked, using examples, through the mathematical processes necessary to calculate the uncertainty in the RCS flow measurement. An error of approximately 1.4 percent is calculated for secondary power. This error results, along with the consideration of other errors, in an uncertainty of approximately 3 percent in the RCS flow determination

  6. Natural circulation in reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) natural circulation in a PWR is the buoyancy-driven coolant circulation between the core and the upper-plenum region (in-vessel circulation) with or without a countercurrent flow in the hot leg piping between the vessel and steam generators (ex-vessel circulation). This kind of multidimensional bouyancy-driven flow circulation serves as a means of transferring the heat from the core to the structures in the upper plenum, hot legs, and possibly steam generators. As a result, the RCS piping and other pressure boundaries may be heated to high temperatures at which the structural integrity is challenged. RCS natural circulation is likely to occur during the core uncovery period of the TMLB' accident in a PWR when the vessel upper plenum and hot leg are already drained and filled with steam and possibly other gaseous species. RCS natural circulation is being studied for the Surry plant during the TMLB' accident in which station blackout coincides with the loss of auxiliary feedwater and no operator actions. The effects of the multidimensional RCS natural circulation during the TMLB' accident are discussed

  7. Reactor coolant system and containment aqueous chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fission products released from fuel during reactor accidents can be subject to a variety of environments that will affect their ultimate behavior. In the reactor coolant system (RCS), for example, neutral or reducing steam conditions, radiation, and surfaces could all have an effect on fission product retention and chemistry. Furthermore, if water is encountered in the RCS, the high temperature aqueous chemistry of fission products must be assessed to determine the quantity and chemical form of fission products released to the containment building. In the containment building, aqueous chemistry will determine the longer-term release of volatile fission products to the containment atmosphere. Over the past few years, the principles of physical chemistry have been rigorously applied to the various chemical conditions described above. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge and discusses the future directions of chemistry research relating to the behavior of fission products in the RCS and containment

  8. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs

  9. Standardized sampling system for reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Munson, L.F.; Nelson, J.L.; McDowell, R.L.; Jankowski, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    A three-pronged approach was developed to reach the objectives of acceptable coolant sampling, assessment of occupational exposure from corrosion products, and model development for the transport and buildup of corrosion products. Emphasis is on sampler design

  10. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  11. Recent developments in NRC guidelines for atmosphere cleanup systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains the policy of updating when necessary, its published guidance for the design of engineered safety feature (ESF) and normal ventilation systems. The guidance is disseminated by means of issuing new, or revisions to, existing Regulatory Guides, Standard Review Plans, Branch Technical Positions and Technical Specifications. A revised Regulatory Guide, new Technical Specifications and new Standard Review Plans with Branch Technical Positions for atmosphere cleanup systems are discussed. Regulatory Guide 1.52, ''Design, Testing and Maintenance Criteria for Atmosphere Cleanup System Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants,'' was issued in July 1973. The major comments received from the nuclear industry since the guide was issued, NRC's experience in implementing the guide in recent license applications, status of operating plants in meeting the guidelines and NRC's continuing assessment of operating data and laboratory tests to assure that the guide reflects the latest technology are discussed

  12. Full reactor coolant system chemical decontamination qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Corrosion and wear products are found throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS), or primary loop, of a PWR power plant. These products circulate with the primary coolant through the reactor where they may become activated. An oxide layer including these activated products forms on the surfaces of the RCS (including the fuel elements). The amount of radioactivity deposited on the different surface varies and depends primarily on the corrosion rate of the materials concerned, the amount of cobalt in the coolant and the chemistry of the coolant. The oxide layer, commonly called crud, on the surfaces of nuclear plant systems leads to personnel radiation exposure. The level of the radiation fields from the crud increases with time from initial plant startup and typically levels off after 4 to 6 cycles of plant operation. Thereafter, significant personnel radiation exposure may be incurred whenever major maintenance is performed. Personnel exposure is highest during refueling outages when routine maintenance on major plant components, such as steam generators and reactor coolant pumps, is performed. Administrative controls are established at nuclear plants to minimize the exposure incurred by an individual and the plant workers as a whole.

  13. Shoreline oil cleanup, recovery and treatment evaluation system (SOCRATES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.; Lunel, T.; Sommerville, M.; Tyler, A.; Marshall, I.

    1996-01-01

    A beach cleanup computer system was developed to mitigate the impact of shoreline oiling. The program, entitled SOCRATES, was meant to determine the most suitable cleanup methodologies for a range of different spill scenarios. The development, operation and capabilities of SOCRATES was described, with recent examples of successful use during the Sea Empress spill. The factors which influenced decision making and which were central to the numerical solution were: (1) the volumetric removal rate of oil, (2) area removal rate of oil, (3) length of oil slick removed per hour, (4) volumetric removal rate of oily waste, (5) area of the oil slick, (6) length of the oil slick, (7) volume of liquid emulsion, and (8) length of beach. 14 figs

  14. Evaluation of beach cleanup effects using linear system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Tomoya; Hinata, Hirofumi

    2015-02-15

    We established a method for evaluating beach cleanup effects (BCEs) based on a linear system analysis, and investigated factors determining BCEs. Here we focus on two BCEs: decreasing the total mass of toxic metals that could leach into a beach from marine plastics and preventing the fragmentation of marine plastics on the beach. Both BCEs depend strongly on the average residence time of marine plastics on the beach (τ(r)) and the period of temporal variability of the input flux of marine plastics (T). Cleanups on the beach where τ(r) is longer than T are more effective than those where τ(r) is shorter than T. In addition, both BCEs are the highest near the time when the remnants of plastics reach the local maximum (peak time). Therefore, it is crucial to understand the following three factors for effective cleanups: the average residence time, the plastic input period and the peak time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reactor coolant and associated systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Guide outlines the design requirements for the reactor coolant and associated systems (RCAS) and the features required in order to achieve their safety functions. It covers design considerations for various reactor types and encompasses the safety aspects of the functions of the RCAS both during normal operation and following postulated initiating events, and to some extent also for decommissioning

  16. Development of a reactor-coolant-pump monitoring and diagnostic system. Semi-annual progress report, December 1981-May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.J.; Gabler, H.C.

    1982-10-01

    Reactor coolant (RC) pump seal failures have resulted in excessive leakage of primary coolant into reactor containment buildings. In some cases, high levels of airborne activity and surface contamination following these failures have necessitated extensive cleanup efforts and personnel radiation exposure. Unpredictable pump seal performance has also caused forced outages and frequent maintenance. The quality of operating data has been insufficient to allow proper evaluation of theoretical RC pump seal failure mechanisms. The RC pump monitoring and diagnostic system being developed and installed at Toledo Edison's Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station will examine the relationship between seal failures and three other variables. This report describes system software and hardware development, testing, and installation work performed during the period of December 1981 through May 1982. Also described herein is a parallel effort being conducted by a B and W/Byron Jackson/Utility group to improve pump seal performance

  17. Coolant controls of a PEM fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jong-Woo; Choe, Song-Yul

    When operating the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack, temperatures in the stack continuously change as the load current varies. The temperature directly affects the rate of chemical reactions and transport of water and reactants. Elevated temperature increases the mobility of water vapor, which reduces the ohmic over-potential in the membrane and eases removal of water produced. Adversely, the high temperature might impose thermal stress on the membrane and cathode catalyst and cause degradation. Conversely, excessive supply of coolants lowers the temperature in the stack and reduces the rate of the chemical reactions and water activity. Corresponding parasitic power dissipated at the electrical coolant pump increases and overall efficiency of the power system drops. Therefore, proper design of a control for the coolant flow plays an important role in ensuring highly reliable and efficient operations of the fuel cell system. Herein, we propose a new temperature control strategy based on a thermal circuit. The proposed thermal circuit consists of a bypass valve, a radiator with a fan, a reservoir and a coolant pump, while a blower and inlet and outlet manifolds are components of the air supply system. Classic proportional and integral (PI) controllers and a state feedback control for the thermal circuit were used in the design. In addition, the heat source term, which is dependent upon the load current, was feed-forwarded to the closed loop and the temperature effects on the air flow rate were minimized. The dynamics and performance of the designed controllers were evaluated and analyzed by computer simulations using developed dynamic fuel cell system models, where a multi-step current and an experimental current profile measured at the federal urban driving schedule (FUDS) were applied. The results show that the proposed control strategy cannot only suppress a temperature rise in the catalyst layer and prevent oxygen starvation, but also reduce the

  18. Leak detection system for RBMK coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkashov, Ju.M.; Strelkov, B.P.; Korolev, Yu.V.; Eperin, A.P.; Kozlov, E.P.; Belyanin, L.A.; Vanukov, V.N.

    1996-01-01

    In report the description of an object of the control is submitted, requests to control of leak-tightness and functioning of system are formulated, analysis of a current status on NPP with RBMK is submitted, review of methods of the leak-tightness monitoring, their advantage and defects with reference to conditions and features of a design RBMK is indicated, some results of tests and operation of various monitoring methods are submitted, requests on interaction of operative staff, leak-tightness monitoring system and protection system of reactor are submitted. (author). 11 figs, 1 tab

  19. Leak detection system for RBMK coolant circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkashov, Ju M; Strelkov, B P; Korolev, Yu V; Eperin, A P; Kozlov, E P; Belyanin, L A; Vanukov, V N [Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant, Leningrad (Russian Federation). Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering

    1997-12-31

    In report the description of an object of the control is submitted, requests to control of leak-tightness and functioning of system are formulated, analysis of a current status on NPP with RBMK is submitted, review of methods of the leak-tightness monitoring, their advantage and defects with reference to conditions and features of a design RBMK is indicated, some results of tests and operation of various monitoring methods are submitted, requests on interaction of operative staff, leak-tightness monitoring system and protection system of reactor are submitted. (author). 11 figs, 1 tab.

  20. Primary coolant system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a water quality control system for preventing corrosion and for extending working life of structural materials of a BWR-type reactor. Namely, a sensor group 1 and a sensor group 2 are disposed at different positions such as in a feedwater system, a recycling system, main steam pipes, and a pressure vessel, respectively. Each sensor group can record and generate alarms independently. The sensor group 1 for usual monitoring is connected to a calculation device by way of a switch to confirm that the monitored values are within a proper range by the injection of a water quality moderating agent. The sensor group 2 is caused to stand alone or connected with the calculation device by way of a switch optionally. When abnormality should occur in the sensor group 1, the sensor group 2 determines the limit for the increase/decrease of controlling amount of the moderating agent at a portion where the conditions are changed to the most severe direction by using data base. The moderating agent is injected and controlled based on the controlling amount. The system of the present invention can optionally cope with a new sensor and determination for new water quality standards. Then the evaluation/control accuracy of the entire system can be improved while covering up the errors of each sensor. (I.S.)

  1. Decontamination of CANDU primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettit, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Decontamination of radioactive systems is necessary to reduce personnel radiation exposures and also to reduce exposure during special work. Mechanical decontamination methods are sometimes useful, but most contaminated surfaces are inaccessible, so chemical decontamination often is preferred. The A-P Citrox method will remove most contaminants from CANDU systems, but is costly and long, damages components, and produces large quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The Redox cycling process is fast and inexpensive, produces only solid wastes, but removes small quantities of deposit from Monel only. The CAN-DECON process removes deposits from most materials including fuel cladding and has many other advantages. (author)

  2. New arrangement for the air cleanup system to recover tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Takahashi, Kohsaku; Munakata, Kenzo; Fukada, Satoshi; Kotoh, Kenji; Takeishi, Toshiharu

    1997-01-01

    At present, the standard arrangement of the air cleanup system responsible for emergency tritium recovery from room air is a catalytic oxidation bed with a heater followed by an adsorption bed with a cooler. One disadvantage of this arrangement is that trouble with the heater or the cooler could result in a loss of capacity to recover tritium. Another disadvantage of the catalyst-adsorption-bed arrangement is that tritiated water must be recovered with a high decontamination factor after dilution with a large amount of water vapor in the working atmosphere. The performance of a new arrangement for the air cleanup system, which consists of a precious metal catalyst bed preceded by an adsorption bed without heating equipment, is discussed. According to calculations, most of the tritium released to the room air is recovered in the catalyst bed through oxidation, adsorption, and isotope exchange reaction when the new arrangement is applied. The adsorption bed placed before the catalyst bed dehumidifies the process gas to such a degree that the oxidation reaction of tritium in the catalyst bed is not hindered by water vapor. 15 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of nuclear reactor primary coolant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Macek, R.W.; Thompson, T.R.; Lippert, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The ADINA computer code is utilized to perform mechanical response analysis of pressurized reactor primary coolant systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) loadings. Specifically, three plant analyses are performed utilizing the geometric and material nonlinear analysis capabilities of ADINA. Each reactor system finite element model represents the reactor vessel and internals, piping, major components, and component supports in a single coupled model. Material and geometric nonlinear capabilities of the beam and truss elements are employed in the formulation of each finite element model. Loadings applied to each plant for LOCA dynamic analysis include steady-state pressure, dead weight, strain energy release, transient piping hydraulic forces, and reactor vessel cavity pressurization. Representative results are presented with some suggestions for consideration in future ADINA code development

  4. N13 - based reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Marbaeck, L.; Sandell, S.; Svansson, L.

    1980-05-01

    A system for the monitoring of leakage of coolant from the reactor coolant pressure boundary and auxiliary systems to the reactor containment, based on the detection of the N13 content in the atmosphere, has been tested. N13 is produced from the oxyegen of the reactor water via the recoil photon nuclear process H1 + 016 + He4. The generation of N13 is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. In the US AEC regulatory guide 1.45 has a leakage increase of 4 liter/ min been suggested as the response limit. The experiments carried out in Ringhals indicate, that with the accomplishment of minor improvements in the installation, a 4 liter/min leakage to the containment will give rise to a signal with a random error range of +- 0.25 liter/min, 99.7 % confidence level. (author)

  5. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song Kyu [Korea Power Engineering Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation.

  6. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung; Lee, Song Kyu

    2008-01-01

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation

  7. Vision system for precision alignment of coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, S.; Rao, Y.V.; Valli Kumar; Joshi, D.G.; Chadda, V.K.; Nigam, R.K.; Kayal, J.N.; Panwar, S.; Sinha, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a vision system which has been developed for precision alignment of Coolant Channel Replacement Machine (CCRM) with respect to the front face of the coolant channel under repair/replacement. It has provisions for automatic as well as semi-automatic alignment. A special lighting scheme has been developed for providing illumination to the front face of the channel opening. This facilitates automatic segmentation of the digitized image. The segmented image is analysed to obtain the centre of the front face of the channel opening and thus the extent of misalignment i.e. offset of the camera with respect to the front face of the channel opening. The offset information is then communicated to the PLC to generate an output signal to drive the DC servo motors for precise positioning of the co-ordinate table. 2 refs., 5 figs

  8. Coolant Design System for Liquid Propellant Aerospike Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Miranda; Branam, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engines burn at incredibly high temperatures making it difficult to design an effective coolant system. These particular engines prove to be extremely useful by powering the rocket with a variable thrust that is ideal for space travel. When combined with aerospike engine nozzles, which provide maximum thrust efficiency, this class of rockets offers a promising future for rocketry. In order to troubleshoot the problems that high combustion chamber temperatures pose, this research took a computational approach to heat analysis. Chambers milled into the combustion chamber walls, lined by a copper cover, were tested for their efficiency in cooling the hot copper wall. Various aspect ratios and coolants were explored for the maximum wall temperature by developing our own MATLAB code. The code uses a nodal temperature analysis with conduction and convection equations and assumes no internal heat generation. This heat transfer research will show oxygen is a better coolant than water, and higher aspect ratios are less efficient at cooling. This project funded by NSF REU Grant 1358991.

  9. In-operation diagnostic system for reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Mitsunobu; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Kitahara, Hiromichi; Shimamura, Kazuo; Yasuda, Chiaki; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Kida, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor coolant pump (RCP) is one of the most important rotating machines in the primary loop nuclear power plants. To improve the reliability and of nuclear power plants, a new diagnostic system that enables early detection of RCP faults has been developed. This system is based on continuous monitoring of vibration and other process data. Vibration is an important indicator of mechanical faults providing information on physical phenomena such as changes in dynamic characteristics and excitation forces changes that signal failure or incipient failure. This new system features comparative vibration analysis and simulation to anticipate equipment failure. (author)

  10. Numerical FEM Analyses of primary coolant system at NPP Temelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junek, L.; Slovacek, M.; Ruzek, L.; Moulis, P.

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to inform about the beginning and first steps of implementation of an aging management system at the Temelin NPP. The aging management system is important not only for achieving the current safety level but also for reaching operational reliability of a production unit equipment above the life time assumed by the original design, typically over 40 years. A method to locate the most prominent degradation regions is described. A global shell model of the primary coolant system including all loops and their components - reactor pressure vessel (RPV), steam generator (SG), main coolant pump (MCP), pressurizer, feed water and steam pipelines system is presented. The results of stress-strain analysis on the measured service parameters base are given. Validation of the results is very important and the method to compare the service measurement data with the numerical results is described. The global/local approach is mentioned and discussed. The effects of the complete global system on the individual components under monitoring are transformed into more accurate local spatial models. The local spatial models are used to analyze the gradual lifetime exhaustion of a facility during its service operation. Two spatial local models are presented, viz. feed water nozzle of SG and main coolant piping system T-brunch. The results of analysis of the local spatial models are processed by the neural network computing method, which is also described. The actual gradual damage of the material of the components under monitoring can be obtained based on the analyses performed and on the results from the neural network in combination with the knowledge of the real material characteristics. The procedures applied are included in the DIALIFE diagnostic system

  11. Conceptual design of an emergency tritium clean-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design, build, and operate a facility to demonstrate the operability of the tritium-related subsystems that would be required to successfully develop fusion reactor systems. An emergency tritium clean-up subsystem (ETC) for this facility will be designed to remove tritium from the cell atmosphere if an accident causes the primary and secondary tritium containment to be breached. Conceptually, the ETC will process cell air at the rate of 0.65 actual m 3 /s and will achieve an overall decontamination factor of 10 6 per tritium oxide (T 2 O). Following the maximum credible release of 100 g of tritium, the ETC will restore the cell to opertional status within 24 h without a significant release of tritium to the environment

  12. Experimental Tritium Cleanup System availability analysis from 1984 to 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Taylor, G.L.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives the availability percentage of the Experimental Tritium Cleanup System (ETC) at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), which is a fusion research and technology facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The component failure reports, the numbers of components, and operating times or demands are all given in this report. Sample calculations of the failure rates obtained from these data are given in the appendices. While future fusion experiments might use different or more advanced means to detritiate room air, the analysis of this system gives a data point for an actual detritiation system. Such a data point can be extrapolated for comparison with fault tree results on system designs, or can be used in a Bayesian failure rate analysis for estimating reliability of a new type of system. The nine years of testing operations on TSTA's ETC result in a reasonable average availability value of 92% for the maximal tritium release event. The failure rates for new systems are expected to be lower than for the TSTA ETC, since improvements will be made in the design of the room air detritiation system based on the TSTA system experiences. Nonetheless, these TSTA data should be useful for future fusion reactor design work and safety assessment tasks

  13. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade process control system structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Staffon, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; describes the main control computer hardware and system software features in more detail; and, then, describes the real-time control tasks, and how they interact with each other, and how they interact with the operator interface task

  14. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software

  15. Multi-objective optimization of the reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lei; Yan Changqi; Wang Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Weight and size are important criteria in evaluating the performance of a nuclear power plant. It is of great theoretical value and engineering significance to reduce the weight and volume of the components for a nuclear power plant by the optimization methodology. Purpose: In order to provide a new method for the optimization of nuclear power plant multi-objective, the concept of the non-dominated solution was introduced. Methods: Based on the parameters of Qinshan I nuclear power plant, the mathematical models of the reactor core, the reactor vessel, the main pipe, the pressurizer and the steam generator were built and verified. The sensitivity analyses were carried out to study the influences of the design variables on the objectives. A modified non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm was proposed and employed to optimize the weight and the volume of the reactor coolant system. Results: The results show that the component mathematical models are reliable, the modified non-dominated sorting generic algorithm is effective, and the reactor inlet temperature is the most important variable which influences the distribution of the non-dominated solutions. Conclusion: The optimization results could provide a reference to the design of such reactor coolant system. (authors)

  16. Reactor coolant purification system circulation pumps (CUW pumps)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiaki

    1979-01-01

    Coolant purification equipments for BWRs have been improved, and the high pressure purifying system has become the main type. The quantity of purifying treatment also changed to 2% of the flow rate of reactor feed water. As for the circulation pumps, canned motor pumps are adopted recently, and the improvements of reliability and safety are attempted. The impurities carried in by reactor feed water and the corrosion products generated in reactors and auxiliary equipments are activated by neutron irradiation or affect heat transfer adversely, adhering to fuel claddings are core structures. Therefore, a part of reactor coolant is led to the purification equipments, and returned to reactors after the impurities are eliminated perfectly. At the time of starting and stopping reactors, excess reactor water and the contaminated water from reactors are transferred to main condenser hot wells or waste treatment systems. Thus the prescribed water quality is maintained. The operational modes of and the requirements for the CUW pumps, the construction and the features of the canned motor type CUW pumps are explained. Recently, a pump operated for 11 months without any maintenance has been disassembled and inspected, but the wear of bearings has not been observed, and the high reliability of the pump has been proved. (Kako, I.)

  17. Fuel cleanup system for the tritium systems test assembly: design and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, E.C.; Bartlit, J.R.; Sherman, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A major subsystem of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly is the Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) whose functons are to: (1) remove impurities in the form of argon and tritiated methane, water, and ammonia from the reactor exhaust stream and (2) recover tritium for reuse from the tritiated impurities. To do this, a hybrid cleanup system has been designed which utilizes and will test concurrently two differing technologies - one based on disposable, hot metal (U and Ti) getter beds and a second based on regenerable cryogenic asdorption beds followed by catalytic oxidation of impurities to DTO and stackable gases and freezout of the resultant DTO to recover essentially all tritium for reuse

  18. Real-time reactor coolant system pressure/temperature limit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, D.G.; Schemmel, R.R.; Van Scooter, W.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an system, used in controlling the operating of a nuclear reactor coolant system, which automatically calculates and displays allowable reactor coolant system pressure/temperature limits within the nuclear reactor coolant system based upon real-time inputs. It comprises: means for producing signals representative of real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor cooling system; means for developing pressure and temperature limits relating the real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor coolant system, for normal and emergency operation thereof; means for processing the signals representative of real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor coolant system to perform calculations of a best estimate of signals, check manual inputs against permissible valves and test data acquisition hardware for validity and over/under range; and means for comparing the representative signals with limits for the real-time operating parameters to produce a signal for a real-time display of the pressure and temperature limits and of the real-time operating parameters use an operator in controlling the operation of the nuclear reactor coolant system

  19. Liquid metal coolants for fusion-fission hybrid system: A neutronic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Renato V.A.; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Barros, Graiciany P. [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Based on a work already published by the UFMG Nuclear Engineering Department, it was suggested to use different coolant materials in a fusion-fission system after a fuel burnup simulation, including that one used in reference work. The goal is to compare the neutron parameters, such as the effect multiplication factor and actinide amounts in transmutation layer, for each used coolant and find the best(s) coolant material(s) to be applied in the considered system. Results indicate that the lead and lead-bismuth coolant are the most suitable choices to be applied to cool the system. (author)

  20. Conceptual design of an emergency tritium clean-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been selected to design, build, and operate a facility to demonstrate the operability of the tritium-related subsystems that would be required to successfully develop fusion reactor systems. Basically, these subsystems would consist of the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle and associated environmental control systems. An emergency tritium clean-up subsystem (ETC) for this facility will be designed to remove tritium from the cell atmosphere if an accident causes the primary and secondary tritium containment to be breached. Conceptually, the ETC will process cell air at the rate of 0.65 actual m 3 /s (1385 ACFM) and will achieve an overall decontamination factor of 10 6 for tritium oxide (T 2 O). Following the maximum credible release of 100 g of tritium, the ETC will restore the cell to operational status within 24 h without a significant release of tritium to the environment. The basic process will include compression of the air to 0.35 MPa (3.5 atm) in a reciprocating compressor followed by oxidation of the tritium to T 2 O in a catalytic reactor. The air will be cooled to 275 K (350 0 F) to remove most of the moisture, including T 2 O, as a condensate. The remaining moisture will be removed by molecular sieve dryer beds that incorporate a water-swamping step between beds, allowing greater T 2 O removal. A portion of the detritiated air will be recirculated to the cell; the remainder will be exhausted to the building ventilation stack to maintain a slight negative pressure in the cell. The ETC will be designed for maximum flexibility so that studies can be performed that involve various aspects of room air detritiation

  1. Feeding and purge systems of coolant primary circuit and coolant secondary circuit control of the I sup(123) target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, G.L. de.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Service of IEN (Brazilian-CNEN) detected three faults in sup(123)I target cooling system during operation process for producing sup(123)I: a) non hermetic vessel containing contaminated water from primary coolant circuit; possibility of increasing radioactivity in the vessel due to accumulation of contaminators in cooling water and; situation in region used for personnels to arrange and adjust equipments in nuclear physics area, to carried out maintenance of cyclotron and target coupling in irradiation room. The primary circuit was changed by secondary circuit for target coolant circulating through coil of tank, which receive weater from secondary circuit. This solution solved the three problems simultaneously. (M.C.K.)

  2. Refurbishment of the IEAR1 primary coolant system piping supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A partial replacement of the IEA-R1 piping system was concluded in 2014. This paper presents the study and the structural analysis of the IEA-R1 primary circuit piping supports, considering all the changes involved in the replacement. The IEA-R1 is a nuclear reactor for research purposes designed by Babcox-Willcox that is operated by IPEN since 1957. The reactor life management and modernization program is being conducted for the last two decades and already resulted in a series of changes, especially on the reactor coolant system. This set of components, divided in primary and secondary circuit, is responsible for the circulation of water into the core to remove heat. In the ageing management program that includes regular inspection, some degradation was observed in the primary piping system. As result, the renewing of the piping system was conducted in 2014. Moreover the poor condition of some original piping supports gave rise to the refurbishment of all piping supports. The aim of the present work is to review the design of the primary system piping supports taking into account the current conditions after the changes and refurbishment. (author)

  3. Method for controlling a coolant liquid surface of cooling system instruments in an atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, Kazuo.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To prevent coolant inventory within a cooling system loop in an atomic power plant from being varied depending on loads thereby relieving restriction of varied speed of coolant flow rate to lowering of a liquid surface due to short in coolant. Structure: Instruments such as a superheater, an evaporator, and the like, which constitute a cooling system loop in an atomic power plant, have a plurality of free liquid surface of coolant. Portions whose liquid surface is controlled and portions whose liquid surface is varied are adjusted in cross-sectional area so that the sum total of variation in coolant inventory in an instrument such as a superheater provided with an annulus portion in the center thereof and an inner cylindrical portion and a down-comer in the side thereof comes equal to that of variation in coolant inventory in an instrument such as an evaporator similar to the superheater. which is provided with an overflow pipe in its inner cylindrical portion or down-comer, thereby minimizing variation in coolant inventory of the entire coolant due to loads thus minimizing variation in varied speed of the coolant. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Statistical analysis of the Ft. Calhoun reactor coolant pump system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, Carolyn D.

    1998-01-01

    In engineering science, statistical quality control techniques have traditionally been applied to control manufacturing processes. An application to commercial nuclear power plant maintenance and control is presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach to plant maintenance and control, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) of the Ft. Calhoun nuclear power plant. This research uses capability analysis, Shewhart X-bar, R-charts, canonical correlation methods, and design of experiments to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. The results obtained show that six out of ten parameters are under control specifications limits and four parameters are not in the state of statistical control. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators Such a system would provide operators with ample time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. (author)

  6. Statistical analysis of the Ft. Calhoun reactor coolant pump system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Bimal; Heising, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    In engineering science, statistical quality control techniques have traditionally been applied to control manufacturing processes. An application to commercial nuclear power plant maintenance and control is presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) of the Ft. Calhoun nuclear power plant. This research uses capability analysis, Shewhart X-bar, R charts, canonical correlation methods, and design of experiments to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. The results obtained show that six out of ten parameters are under control specification limits and four parameters are not in the state of statistical control. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with ample time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. (Author)

  7. 2020 Vision for Tank Waste Cleanup (One System Integration) - 12506

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Benton; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. The millions of gallons of waste are a by-product of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. The Cleanup of Hanford's 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical waste stored in 177 large underground tanks represents the Department's largest and most complex environmental remediation project. Sixty percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste is stored in the underground tanks grouped into 18 'tank farms' on Hanford's central plateau. Hanford's mission to safely remove, treat and dispose of this waste includes the construction of a first-of-its-kind Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), ongoing retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks, and building or upgrading the waste feed delivery infrastructure that will deliver the waste to and support operations of the WTP beginning in 2019. Our discussion of the 2020 Vision for Hanford tank waste cleanup will address the significant progress made to date and ongoing activities to manage the operations of the tank farms and WTP as a single system capable of retrieving, delivering, treating and disposing Hanford's tank waste. The initiation of hot operations and subsequent full operations

  8. Conceptual design of the integral test loop (I): Reactor coolant system and secondary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Lee, Seong Je; Kwon, Tae Soon; Moon, Sang Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of the primary coolant system and the secondary system of the Integral Test Loop (ITL) which simulates overall thermal hydraulic phenomena of the primary system of a nuclear power plant during postulated accidents or transients. The design basis for the primary coolant system and secondary system is as follows ; Reference plant: Korean Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP), Height ratio : 1/1, Volume ratio : 1/200, Power scale : Max. 15% of the scaled nominal power, Temperature, Pressure : Real plant conditions. The primary coolant system includes a reactor vessel, which contains a core simulator, a steam generator, a reactor coolant pump simulator, a pressurizer and piping, which consists of two hot legs, four cold legs and four intermediate legs. The secondary system consists of s steam discharge system, a feedwater supply system and a steam condensing system. This conceptual design report describes general configuration of the reference plant, and major function and operation of each system of the plant. Also described is the design philosophy of each component and system of the ITL, and specified are the design criteria and technical specifications of each component and system of the ITL in the report. 17 refs., 43 figs., 51 tabs. (Author)

  9. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND... function of these systems. High point vents are not required for the tubes in U-tube steam generators...

  10. Performance Analysis of Thermoelectric Based Automotive Waste Heat Recovery System with Nanofluid Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Output performance of a thermoelectric-based automotive waste heat recovery system with a nanofluid coolant is analyzed in this study. Comparison between Cu-Ethylene glycol (Cu-EG nanofluid coolant and ethylene glycol with water (EG-W coolant under equal mass flow rate indicates that Cu-EG nanofluid as a coolant can effectively improve power output and thermoelectric conversion efficiency for the system. Power output enhancement for a 3% concentration of nanofluid is 2.5–8 W (12.65–13.95% compared to EG-Water when inlet temperature of exhaust varies within 500–710 K. The increase of nanofluid concentration within a realizable range (6% has positive effect on output performance of the system. Study on the relationship between total area of thermoelectric modules (TEMs and output performance of the system indicates that optimal total area of TEMs exists for maximizing output performance of the system. Cu-EG nanofluid as coolant can decrease optimal total area of TEMs compared with EG-W, which will bring significant advantages for the optimization and arrangement of TEMs whether the system space is sufficient or not. Moreover, power output enhancement under Cu-EG nanofluid coolant is larger than that of EG-W coolant due to the increase of hot side heat transfer coefficient of TEMs.

  11. Systems engineering functions and requirements for the Hanford cleanup mission. First issue, Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    This addendum provides the technical detail of a systems engineering functional analysis for the Hanford cleanup mission. Details of the mission analysis including mission statement, scope, problem statement, initial state definition, and final state definition are provided in the parent document. The functional analysis consists of Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams an definitions, which will be understood by systems engineers, but which may be difficult for others to comprehend. For a more complete explanation of this work, refer to the parent document. The analysis covers the total Hanford cleanup mission including the decomposition levels at which the various Hanford programs or integrated activities are encountered.

  12. Fixed-bed gasifier and cleanup system engineering summary report through Test Run No. 100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, K. Jr.; Headley, L.; Kovach, J.; Stopek, D.

    1984-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of high-pressure, fixed-bed gasification has been advanced by the many refinements developed over the last 5 years. A novel full-flow gas cleanup system has been installed and tested to clean coal-derived gases. This report summarizes the results of tests conducted on the gasifier and cleanup system from its inception through 1982. Selected process summary data are presented along with results from complementary programs in the areas of environmental research, process simulation, analytical methods development, and component testing. 20 references, 32 figures, 42 tables.

  13. RETRAN analysis of inter-system LOCA within the primary coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangadharan, A.; Pratt, G.F.

    1992-01-01

    One example of an inter-system loss of coolant accident is the failure of the tubing within the primary coolant pump (PCP) thermal barrier heat exchanger. Such a failure would result in the entry of primary coolant into the component cooling water (CCW) system. The primary coolant flowrate through the break would rapidly pressurize the CCW system when the relief valves are too small. The piping in the CCW system at Palisades has a low pressure rating. Failures in this system outside the containment boundary could lead to primary coolant release to the atmosphere. RETRAN-02 was used to perform a simulation of the break in the PCP integral heat exchanger. The model included a detailed nodalization of the Byron-Jackson primary coolant pump internals leading up to the CCW system relief valves. Preliminary studies show the need for increased relief capacity in the CCW system. A case was run using a larger relief valve. Critical flow in the system upstream of the relief valves maintains the pressures in those volumes above the CCW design pressure. The pressures downstream from the relief valves and outside containment will be at or below the design pressure. This paper presents the results of the transient analysis

  14. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  15. New cooling system of the FRG-1 two barrier system of the primary coolant cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knop, W.; Schreiner, P.

    2003-01-01

    The GKSS research center operates the swimming pool reactor FRG-1 with a thermal power of 5 MW as national neutron source for neutron scattering experiments and sample irradiation as well. Before changing the primary coolant cycle consisted of the reactor core and the closed piping including pumps, heat exchanger and delay tank. The closed cooling circuit was located underneath the reactor pool, in the so-called radioactive cellar. This piping system served secondary coolant system. Due to the location of the primary coolant cycle below the operation pool a postulated 2-F line break and simultaneous failure of the pool slide gate valve could lead to a falling dry of the total reactor core. the new primary coolant system was built in the beginning 2002 in a partitioned cell all within the radioactive cellar, so that the reactor core remains with water with the assumed incident. Due to the new two barrier-inclusion of the primary circuit only the melting of two fuel plates (from total 252 fuel plates) has to be taken into account. This measure and the core compactness in 2000 with a neutron flux gain of a factor of 2 makes the FRG-1 ready for the next 15 years of reactor operation. (author)

  16. Neutronic Analysis on Coolant Options in a Hybrid Reactor System for High Level Waste Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Hee; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) which is a combination of plasma fusion tokamak as a fast neutron source and a fission reactor as of fusion blanket is another potential candidate. In FFHR, fusion plasma machine can supply high neutron-rich and energetic 14.1MeV (D, T) neutrons compared to other options. Therefore it has better capability in HLW incineration. While, it has lower requirements compared to pure fusion. Much smaller-sized tokamak can be achievable in a near term because it needs relatively low plasma condition. FFHR has also higher safety potential than fast reactors just as ADSR because it is subcritical reactor system. FFHR proposed up to this time has many design concepts depending on the design purpose. FFHR may also satisfy many design requirement such as energy multiplication, tritium production, radiation shielding for magnets, fissile breeding for self-sustain ability also waste transmutation. Many types of fuel compositions and coolant options have been studied. Effect of choices for fuel and coolant was studied for the transmutation purpose FFHR by our team. In this study LiPb coolant was better than pure Li coolant both for neutron multiplication and tritium breeding. However, performance of waste transmutation was reduced with increased neutron absorption at coolant caused by tritium breeding. Also, LiPb as metal coolant has a problem of massive MHD pressure drop in coolant channels. Therefore, in a previous study, waste transmutation performance was evaluated with light water coolant option which may be a realistic choice. In this study, a neutronic analysis was done for the various coolant options with a detailed computation. One of solutions suggested is to use the pressure tubes inside of first wall and second wall In this work, performance of radioactive waste transmutation was compared with various coolant options. On the whole, keff increases with all coolants except for FLiBe, therefore required fusion power is decreased. In

  17. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project -2006 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. This paper presents a status of the coolant stability over the past year as well as results from destructive analyses of hardware removed from the on-orbit system and the current approach to coolant remediation.

  18. Membrane systems and their use in nuclear power plants. Treatment of primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kus, Pavel; Bartova, Sarka; Skala, Martin; Vonkova, Katerina [Research Centre Rez, Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic). Technological Circuits Innovation Dept.; Zach, Vaclav; Kopa, Roman [CEZ a.s., Temelin (Czech Republic). Nuclear Power Plant Temelin

    2016-03-15

    In nuclear power plants, drained primary coolant containing boric acid is currently treated in the system of evaporators and by ion exchangers. Replacement of the system of evaporators by membrane system (MS) will result in lower operating cost mainly due to lower operation temperature. In membrane systems the feed primary coolant is separated into two output streams: retentate and permeate. Retentate stream consists of the concentrated boric acid solution together with other components, while permeate stream consists of purified water. Results are presented achieved by testing a pilot-plant unit of reverse osmosis in nuclear power plant (NPP) Temelin.

  19. Application of expert system to evaluating reactor water cleanup system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuji; Nakamura, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Katsumi; Fushiki, Sumiyuki.

    1991-01-01

    Expert systems employing artificial intelligence (AI) have been developed for finding and elucidating causes of anomalies and malfunctions, presenting pertinent recommendation for countermeasures and for making precautionary diagnosis. On the other hand, further improvements in reliabilities for chemical control are required to promote BWR plant reliability and advancement. Especially, it is necessary to maintain the reactor water purity in high quality to minimize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in primary cooling system, fuel performance degradation and radiation buildup. The reactor water quality is controlled by the reactor water cleanup (RWCU) system. So, it is very important to maintain the RWCU performance, in order to keep good reactor water quality. This paper describes an expert system used for evaluating RWCU system performance in BWR plants. (author)

  20. Design on Hygrometry System of Primary Coolant Circuit of HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yanfei; Zhong Shuoping; Huang Xiaojin

    2014-01-01

    Helium is the primary coolant in HTR-PM. If vapor get into the helium in primary coolant circuit because of some special reasons, such as the broken of steam-generator tube, chemical reaction will take effect between the graphite in reactor core and vapor in primary coolant circuit, and the safety of the reactor operation will be influenced. So the humidity of the helium in primary coolant circuit is one key parameter of HTR-PM to be monitored in-line. Once the humidity is too high, trigger signal of turning off the reactor must be issued. The hygrometry system of HTR-PM is consisting of filter, cooler, hygrometry sensor, flow meter, and some valves and tube. Helium with temperature of 250℃ is lead into the hygrometry system from the outlet of the main helium blower. After measuring, the helium is re-injected back to the primary circuit. No helium loses in this processing, and no other pump is needed. Key factors and calculations in design on hygrometry system of HTR-PM are described. A sample instrument has been made. Results of experiments proves that this hygrometry system is suitable for monitoring the humidity of the primary coolant of HTR-PM. (author)

  1. Phase aberrations and beam cleanup techniques in carbon-dioxide laser fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, V.K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the various carbon dioxide laser fusion systems at Los Alamos from the point of view of an optical designer. The types of phase aberrations present in these systems, as well as the beam cleanup techniques that can be used to improve the beam optical quality, are discussed. As this is a review article, some previously published results are also used where relevant

  2. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  3. System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

    2013-09-10

    A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

  4. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

  5. Solar-wind system powers mountain clean-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    By using a hybrid solar-wind system, the Japanese have tackled the problem of human excrement left by tourists in mountain lodges and in natural parks by installing flush toilets and wastewater treatment plants. The solar array (4.9 kW{sub p}) consists of 76 panels of single-crystal photovoltaic cells each with an output of 64 Wp. The wind turbines (total capacity 2.1 kW) operate whatever the wind strength or direction. Storage batteries prevent any dip in power which would result from low ambient temperatures. The system can still function at temperatures as low as minus 25{sup o}C. Between November and April when the lodge is closed, the waste is decomposed biologically. A block diagram shows the elements of the system, and details of cost are given. The system won the 1999 New Energy Award.

  6. In-Service Inspection system for coolant channels of Indian PHWRS - evolution and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.K.; Singh, M.

    2006-01-01

    In-Service Inspection (ISI) is the most important of all periodic monitoring and surveillance activities for assuring the structural integrity of coolant channels in the life extension and management of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR-CANDU). Indian PHWRs (220 MWe) are characterized by consists by 306 coolant channels in each unit. These channels have to be inspected for various parameters over the operating life of the reactor. ISI of coolant channels necessitated the indigenous development of an inspection system called BARCIS (BARC Channel Inspection System) at Bhabha Atomic Research Center. BARCIS consists of mainly three parts; drive and control unit, special sealing plug and an inspection head carrying various NDT sensors. Five such systems have been built and deployed at various power plants. The paper deals with the development of the BARCIS system for meeting the ISI requirements of coolant channels, development cycle of this system from its conception to evolution to the present state, challenges, data generated and experience gained (ISI of nearly 900 coolant channels has been completed). Prior to BARCIS, pressure tube gauging equipment for pre-service inspection of coolant tubes was developed in 1980. Moreover a tool for ISI of coolant channels in dry condition was developed in 1990. The paper also describes evolution of various contingency procedures and devices developed over the last one decade. Future plans taking into account technological advancement, changes in the scope of inspection due to design and operating experiences and plant layout will also be covered. The paper describes the efforts put in to develop drive and control mechanism to suit the different vault layouts. The drive mechanism is responsible for linear and rotary movement of the inspection head to carry out 100% volumetric inspection. Special emphasis has been laid on the safety devices required during the inspection activity. Special measures for heavy water retention in

  7. Preliminary design of fusion reactor fuel cleanup system by palladium alloy membrane method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Naruse, Yuji

    1981-10-01

    A design of palladium diffuser and Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for D-T fusion reactor is proposed. Feasibility of palladium alloy membrane method is discussed based on the early studies by the authors. Operating conditions of the palladium diffuser are determined experimentally. Dimensions of the diffuser are estimated from computer simulation. FCU system is designed under the feed conditions of Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The system is composed of Pd-diffusers, catalytic oxidizer, freezer and zink beds, and has some advantages in system layout and operation. This design can readily be extended to other conditions of plasma exhaust gases. (author)

  8. A system for cooling electronic elements with an EHD coolant flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanski, M; Kocik, M; Barbucha, R; Garasz, K; Mizeraczyk, J; Kraśniewski, J; Oleksy, M; Hapka, A; Janke, W

    2014-01-01

    A system for cooling electronic components where the liquid coolant flow is forced with ion-drag type EHD micropumps was tested. For tests we used isopropyl alcohol as the coolant and CSD02060 diodes in TO-220 packages as cooled electronic elements. We have studied thermal characteristics of diodes cooled with EHD flow in the function of a coolant flow rate. The transient thermal impedance of the CSD02060 diode cooled with 1.5 ml/min EHD flow was 7.8°C/W. Similar transient thermal impedance can be achieved by applying to the diode a large RAD-A6405A/150 heat sink. We found out that EHD pumps can be successfully applied for cooling electronic elements.

  9. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, H.

    2001-01-01

    JAPC purchased RETRAN, a program for transient thermal hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow system, from the U.S. Electric Power Research Institute in 1992. Since then, JAPC has been utilizing RETRAN to evaluate safety margins of actual plant operation, in coping with troubles (investigating trouble causes and establishing countermeasures), and supporting reactor operation (reviewing operational procedures etc.). In this paper, a result of plant analysis performed on a CVCS reactor primary coolant leakage incident which occurred at JAPC's Tsuruga-2 plant (4-loop PWR, 3423 MWt, 1160 MW) on July 12 of 1999 and, based on the result, we made a plan to modify our operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events in order to make earlier plant shutdown and this reduced primary coolant leakage. (author)

  10. Polonium release from an ATW burner system with liquid lead-bismuth coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.; Yefimov, E.; Pankratov, D.

    1998-04-01

    The authors analyzed polonium release hazards in a conceptual pool-type ATW burner with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Simplified quantitative models are used based on experiments and real NPP experience. They found little Po contamination outside the burner under normal operating conditions with nominal leakage from the gas system. In sudden gas leak and/or coolant spill accidents, the P contamination level can reach above the regulation limit but short exposure would not lead to severe health consequences. They are evaluating and developing mitigation methods

  11. A review of fusion device fuel cleanup systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombra, A.H.; Carney, M.

    1985-01-01

    Design options for a small fusion fuel purification system are assessed by comparing six conceptual system designs based on one of the following: a Zr/Al getter pump for in vacuo applications, a cryogenic molecular sieve adsorber at 77K, a palladium-alloy membrane diffuser, a U-bed reactor at 1170K, a two-compartment cryogenic freezer at 27-50K and 50-300K, a U-bed and non-regenerative Zr/Al gas purifier. The latter system introduces a new concept of fuel purification based on well-established techniques: recovery of purified D 2 -DT-T 2 from a helium carrier gas with the U-bed, followed by the removal of impurities from the carrier gas with the non-regenerative Zr/Al gas purifier. The main advantages of this system are simplicity, safety and relatively small quantity of tritiated waste produced by the process. The tritium in the waste is immobilized as a stable tritide of Zr/Al

  12. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. 1.2. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1981), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1986), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. 1.3. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1981 and 1986, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2000, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included

  13. Phenomena occuring in the reactor coolant system during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) of a nuclear power plant consists of the reactor pressure vessel and the piping and associated components that are required for the continuous circulation of the coolant which is used to maintain thermal equilibrium throughout the system. This paper discusses, how in the event of an accident, the RCS also serves as one of several barriers to the escape of radiotoxic material into the biosphere. The physical and chemical processes occurring within the RCS during normal operation of the reactor are relatively uncomplicated and are reasonably well understood. When the flow of coolant is properly adjusted, the thermal energy resulting from nuclear fission (or, in the shutdown mode, from radioactive decay processes) and secondary inputs, such as pumps, are exactly balanced by thermal losses through the RCS boundaries and to the various heat sinks that are employed to effect the conversion of heat to electrical energy. Because all of the heat and mass fluxes remain sensibly constant with time, mathematical descriptions of the thermophysical processes are relatively straightforward, even for boiling water reactor (BWR) systems. Although the coolant in a BWR does undergo phase changes, the phase boundaries remain well-defined and time-invariant

  14. Characterization of primary coolant purification system samples for assay of spent ion exchanger radionuclide inventor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajin Prasad, S.; Pant, Amar; Sharma, Ranjit; Pal, Sanjit

    2018-01-01

    The primary coolant system water of a research reactor contains various fission and activation products and the water is circulated continuously through ion exchange resin cartridges, to reduce the radioactive ionic impurity present in it. The coolant purification system comprises of an ion exchange cooler, two micro filters, and a battery of six ion exchanger beds, associated valves, piping and instrumentation (Heavy water System Operating manual, 2014). The spent cartridge is finally disposed off as active solid waste which contains predominantly long lived fission and activation products. The heavy water coolant is also used to cool the structural assemblies after passing through primary heat exchanger and a metallic strainer, which accumulates the fission and activation products. When there is a reduction of coolant flow through these strainers, they are removed for cleaning and decontamination. This paper describes the characterization of ion exchange resin samples and liquid effluent generated during ultra sonic decontamination of strainer. The results obtained can be used as a methodology for the assay of the spent ion exchanger cartridges radionuclide inventory, during its disposal

  15. Modular 3-D solid finite element model for fatigue analyses of a PWR coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, Oriol Costa; Cizelj, Leon; Simonovski, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A 3-D model of a reactor coolant system for fatigue usage assessment. ► The performed simulations are a heat transfer and stress analyses. ► The main results are the expected ranges of fatigue loadings. - Abstract: The extension of operational licenses of second generation pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants depends to a large extent on the analyses of fatigue usage of the reactor coolant pressure boundary. The reliable estimation of the fatigue usage requires detailed thermal and stress analyses of the affected components. Analyses, based upon the in-service transient loads should be compared to the loads analyzed at the design stage. The thermal and stress transients can be efficiently analyzed using the finite element method. This requires that a 3-D solid model of a given system is discretized with finite elements (FE). The FE mesh density is crucial for both the accuracy and the cost of the analysis. The main goal of the paper is to propose a set of computational tools which assist a user in a deployment of modular spatial FE model of main components of a typical reactor coolant system, e.g., pipes, pressure vessels and pumps. The modularity ensures that the components can be analyzed individually or in a system. Also, individual components can be meshed with different mesh densities, as required by the specifics of the particular transient studied. For optimal accuracy, all components are meshed with hexahedral elements with quadratic interpolation. The performance of the model is demonstrated with simulations performed with a complete two-loop PWR coolant system (RCS). Heat transfer analysis and stress analysis for a complete loading and unloading cycle of the RCS are performed. The main results include expected ranges of fatigue loading for the pipe lines and coolant pump components under the given conditions.

  16. First Study of Helium Gas Purification System as Primary Coolant of Co-Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piping Supriatna

    2009-01-01

    The technological progress of NPP Generation-I on 1950’s, Generation-II, Generation-III recently on going, and Generation-IV which will be implemented on next year 2025, concept of nuclear power technology implementation not only for generate electrical energy, but also for other application which called cogeneration reactor. Commonly the type of this reactor is High Temperature Reactor (HTR), which have other capabilities like Hydrogen production, desalination, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), etc. The cogeneration reactor (HTR) produce thermal output higher than commonly Nuclear Power Plant, and need special Heat Exchanger with helium gas as coolant. In order to preserve heat transfer with high efficiency, constant purity of the gas must be maintained as well as possible, especially contamination from its impurities. In this report has been done study for design concept of HTR primary coolant gas purification system, including methodology by sampling He gas from Primary Coolant and purification by using Physical Helium Splitting Membrane. The examination has been designed in physical simulator by using heater as reactor core. The result of study show that the of Primary Coolant Gas Purification System is enable to be implemented on cogeneration reactor. (author)

  17. Development and Implementation of the Waste Management Information System to Support Hanford's River Corridor Cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, L M [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, 3070 George Washington Way, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a Waste Information Management System (WMIS) to support the waste designation, transportation, and disposal processes used by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC to support cleanup of the Columbia River Corridor. This waste, primarily consisting of remediated burial sites and building demolition debris, is disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), which is located in the center of the Hanford Site (an approximately 1460 square kilometers site). WMIS uses a combination of bar-code scanning, hand-held computers, and strategic employment of a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag system to track each waste shipment from waste generation to disposal. (authors)

  18. The Analysis of Applying Different Coolants for Cooling Systems in the Office Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Kanapienytė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes air conditioning systems of different coolants on the basis of an example of a typical office building. Depending on the type of a coolant fan coil unit, active chilled beams, variable refrigerant volumes and air cooling systems were designed. The article suggests hydraulic and aerodynamic calculations and evaluates initial investments, energy expenditures and operating costs of the compared systems. Considering economic calculations, the pay-back time of the systems was assessed and the sensitivity analysis of electricity prices was carried out. The results of the conducted investigation show the most appropriate analysed system for office buildings taking into account the efficient use of electricity and initial investments.Article in Lithuanian

  19. Lead coolant test facility systems design, thermal hydraulic analysis and cost estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khericha, Soli, E-mail: slk2@inel.gov [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Harvego, Edwin; Svoboda, John; Evans, Robert [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Dalling, Ryan [ExxonMobil Gas and Power Marketing, Houston, TX 77069 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T and FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed below: Bullet Develop and demonstrate feasibility of submerged heat exchanger. Bullet Develop and demonstrate open-lattice flow in electrically heated core. Bullet Develop and demonstrate chemistry control. Bullet Demonstrate safe operation. Bullet Provision for future testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimated. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 Degree-Sign C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  20. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H2O for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed excel analytical model, HRS O pt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids

  1. Evaluation of CRUDTRAN code to predict transport of corrosion products and radioactivity in the PWR primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    CRUDTRAN code is to predict transport of the corrosion products and their radio-activated nuclides such as cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 in the PWR primary coolant system. In CRUDTRAN code the PWR primary circuit is divided into three principal sections such as the core, the coolant and the steam generator. The main driving force for corrosion product transport in the PWR primary coolant comes from coolant temperature change throughout the system and a subsequent change in corrosion product solubility. As the coolant temperature changes around the PWR primary circuit, saturation status of the corrosion products in the coolant also changes such that under-saturation in steam generator and super-saturation in the core. CRUDTRAN code was evaluated by comparison with the results of the in-reactor loop tests simulating the PWR primary coolant system and PWR plant data. It showed that CRUDTRAN could predict variations of cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 radioactivity with time, plant cycle and coolant chemistry in the PWR plant. (author)

  2. Integrated Mechanical Pulse Jet Coolant Delivery System Performance for Minimal Quantity Lubrication

    OpenAIRE

    Nik Fazli Sapian; Badrul Omar; Mohd Hamdi Abd Shukor

    2010-01-01

    Minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) machining is one of the promising solutions to the requirement for decrease in cutting fluid consumption. This research describes MQL machining in a range of lubricant consumption 2.0ml/h, which is 10–100 times smaller than the consumption usually adopted in industries. MQL machining in this range is called pulse jet coolant delivery system in this research. A specially designed system was used for concentrating small amounts of lubricant onto the cutting in...

  3. Interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) pressure capacity methodology and Davis-Besse results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident resulting from the overpressurization by reactor coolant fluid of a system designed for low-pressure, low-temperature service has been identified as a potential contributor to nuclear power plant risk. In this paper, the methodology developed to assess the probability of failure as a function of internal pressure is presented, and sample results developed for the controlling failure modes and locations of four fluid systems at the Davis-Besse Plant are shown. Included in this evaluation are the tanks, heat exchangers, filters, pumps, valves, and flanged connections for each system. The variability in the probability of failure is included, and the estimated leak rates or leak areas are given for the controlling modes of failure. For this evaluation, all failures are based on quasistatic pressures since the probability of dynamic effects resulting from such causes as water hammer have been initially judged to be negligible for the Davis-Besse plant ISLOCA

  4. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    An expert system for determining the operability of a specified pump is described comprising: a set of pumps of which the specified pump is a member; means for measuring physical parameters representative to the operations condition each pump of said set of pumps; means for acquiring data generated by said measuring means; an artificial-intelligence based inference engine coupled to said data acquiring means where said inference engine applies a sequential probability ratio test to statistically evaluate said acquired data to determine a status for the specified pump and its respective measuring means by continually monitoring and comparing changes in a specific operational parameter signal acquired from a plurality of measurement means; means for transferring said status generated by said interference engine to an output system

  5. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  6. Cold atoms as a coolant for levitated optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Montoya, Cris; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Optically trapped dielectric objects are well suited for reaching the quantum regime of their center-of-mass motion in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment. We show that ground-state cooling of an optically trapped nanosphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold-atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle. Unlike cavity cooling in the resolved-sideband limit, this system requires only a modest cavity finesse and it allows the cooling to be turned off, permitting subsequent observation of strongly coupled dynamics between the atoms and sphere. Nanospheres cooled to their quantum ground state could have applications in quantum information science or in precision sensing.

  7. Integral isolation valve systems for loss of coolant accident protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanuch, David J.; DiFilipo, Paul P.

    2018-03-20

    A nuclear reactor includes a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a reactor pressure vessel having vessel penetrations that exclusively carry flow into the nuclear reactor and at least one vessel penetration that carries flow out of the nuclear reactor. An integral isolation valve (IIV) system includes passive IIVs each comprising a check valve built into a forged flange and not including an actuator, and one or more active IIVs each comprising an active valve built into a forged flange and including an actuator. Each vessel penetration exclusively carrying flow into the nuclear reactor is protected by a passive IIV whose forged flange is directly connected to the vessel penetration. Each vessel penetration carrying flow out of the nuclear reactor is protected by an active IIV whose forged flange is directly connected to the vessel penetration. Each active valve may be a normally closed valve.

  8. Study on primary coolant system depressurization effect factor in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Duan; Cao Xuewu

    2006-01-01

    The progression of high-pressure core melting severe accident induced by very small break loss of coolant accident plus the loss of main feed water and auxiliary feed water failure is studied, and the entry condition and modes of primary cooling system depressurization during the severe accident are also estimated. The results show that the temperature below 650 degree C is preferable depressurization input temperature allowing recovery of core cooling, and the available and effective way to depressurize reactor cooling system and to arrest very small break loss of coolant accident sequences is activating pressurizer relief valves initially, then restoring the auxiliary feedwater and opening the steam generator relief valves. It can adequately reduce the primary pressure and keep the capacity loop of long-term core cooling. (authors)

  9. Reactor primary coolant system pipe rupture study. Progress report No. 33, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase 1), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase 2) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue crack growth rate studies focused on LWR primary piping materials in a simulated BWR primary coolant environment, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in Type 304 stainless steel, (d) support studies to characterize the electrochemical potential behavior of a typical BWR primary water environment and (e) special tests related to simulation of fracture surfaces characteristic of IGSCC field failures

  10. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs

  11. A dynamic model of the reactor coolant system flow for KMRR plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, B.W.; Noh, T.W.; Park, C.; Sim, B.S.; Oh, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    To support computer simulation studies for reactor control system design and performance evaluation, a dynamic model of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and reflector cooling system has been developed. This model is composed of the reactor coolant loop momentum equation, RCS pump dynamic equation, RCS pump characteristic equation, and the energy equation for the coolant inside the various components and piping. The model is versatile enough to simulate the normal steady-state conditions as well as most of the anticipated flow transients without pipe rupture. This model has been successfully implemented as the plant simulation code KMRRSIM for the Korea Multi-purpose Research Reactor and is now under extensive validation testing. The initial stage of validation has been comparison of its result with that of already validated, more detailed reactor system transient codes such as RELAP5. The results, as compared to the predictions by RELAP5 simulation, have been generally found to be very encouraging and the model is judged to be accurate enough to fulfill its intended purpose. However, this model will continue to be validated against other plant's data and eventually will be assessed by test data from KMRR

  12. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Coolant circulation system for a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, R.A.; Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a liquid metal circulation system comprising an electromagnetic pump comprised of: (a) an elongated cylindrical pump support housing; (b) a cylindrical pressure dome structure coaxially situated and supported within the pump support housing, having a closed, hemispherical upper end and an open, cylindrical lower end; (c) a cylindrical pump coaxially situated within the pressure dome structure including: (1) a central core body of laminated transformer steel having six peripherally equally spaced helical grooves on its outer surface extending the entire length of the central core body, (2) a multiplicity of square, ceramic insulated copper wires situated in the helical grooves, (3) electrical leads extending from the terminal ends of the square copper wires through the upper end of the pressure dome structure and to a three-phase low voltage/high amperage power source, (4) an austenitic stainless steel jacket covering the outer surface of the central core body and covering the helically coiled square copper wires, the outer stainless steel jacket and the inner surface of the pressure dome structure defining an annular flow passage

  14. Cleanup and Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Ventilation Systems Using Robotic Tools - 13162

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambon, Frederic; CIZEL, Jean-Pierre; Blanchard, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The UP1 plant reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. Following operating incidents in the eighties, the ventilation system of the continuous dissolution line facility was shut down and replaced. Two types of remote controlled tool carriers were developed to perform the decontamination and dismantling operations of the highly contaminated ventilation duct network. The first one, a dedicated small robot, was designed from scratch to retrieve a thick powder deposit within a duct. The robot, managed and confined by two dedicated glove boxes, was equipped for intervention inside the ventilation duct and used for carrying various cleanup and inspection tools. The second type, consisting of robotic tools developed on the base of an industrial platform, was used for the clean-up and dismantling of the ventilation duct system. Depending on the type of work to be performed, on the shape constraints of the rooms and any equipment to be dismantled, different kinds of robotic tools were developed and installed on a Brokk 40 carrier. After more than ten years of ventilation duct D and D operations at the UP1 plant, a lot of experience was acquired about remote operations. The three main important lessons learned in terms of remote controlled operation are: characterizing the initial conditions as much as reasonably possible, performing non-radioactive full scale testing and making it as simple and modular as possible. (authors)

  15. Cleanup and Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Ventilation Systems Using Robotic Tools - 13162

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia MD (United States); CIZEL, Jean-Pierre [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France); Blanchard, Samuel [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France)

    2013-07-01

    The UP1 plant reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. Following operating incidents in the eighties, the ventilation system of the continuous dissolution line facility was shut down and replaced. Two types of remote controlled tool carriers were developed to perform the decontamination and dismantling operations of the highly contaminated ventilation duct network. The first one, a dedicated small robot, was designed from scratch to retrieve a thick powder deposit within a duct. The robot, managed and confined by two dedicated glove boxes, was equipped for intervention inside the ventilation duct and used for carrying various cleanup and inspection tools. The second type, consisting of robotic tools developed on the base of an industrial platform, was used for the clean-up and dismantling of the ventilation duct system. Depending on the type of work to be performed, on the shape constraints of the rooms and any equipment to be dismantled, different kinds of robotic tools were developed and installed on a Brokk 40 carrier. After more than ten years of ventilation duct D and D operations at the UP1 plant, a lot of experience was acquired about remote operations. The three main important lessons learned in terms of remote controlled operation are: characterizing the initial conditions as much as reasonably possible, performing non-radioactive full scale testing and making it as simple and modular as possible. (authors)

  16. Water quality control device and water quality control method for reactor primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ibe, Eishi; Watanabe, Atsushi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is suitable for preventing defects due to corrosion of structural materials in a primary coolant system of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a concentration measuring means measures the concentration of oxidative ingredients contained in a reactor water. A reducing electrode is disposed along a reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system and reduces the oxidative ingredients. A reducing counter electrode is disposed along the reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system, and electrically connected to the reducing electrode. The reactor structural materials are used as a reference electrode providing a reference potential to the reducing electrode and the reducing counter electrode. A potential control means controls the potential of the reducing electrode relative to the reference potential based on the signals from the concentration measuring means. A stable reference potential in a region where an effective oxygen concentration is stable can be obtained irrespective of the change of operation conditions by using the reactor structural materials disposed to a boiling region in the reactor core as a reference electrode. As a result, the water quality can be controlled at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  17. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls

  18. System approach in the investigation of coolant parametrical oscillations in passive safety injection systems (PSIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskouriakov, K.N.

    2001-01-01

    The use of thermal-hydraulic computer codes is an important part of the work programme for activities in the field of nuclear power plants (NPP) Safety Research as it will enable to define better the test configuration and parameter range extensions and to extrapolate the results of the small scale experiments towards full scale reactor applications. The CATHARE2, RELAP5, the WCOBRA/TRAC, and APROS codes are the estimate thermal hydraulic codes for the evaluation of large and small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). The relatively good agreement experimental data with the calculations have been presented. There was shown also some big mistakes in predicting distribution of flow when two phase are present. Model of parametrical oscillation (P.O.) worked out gives explanation for flow oscillations and indicates that the phenomenon of P.O. appears under certain combination of thermal-hydraulic parameters and structure of heat-removal system. (orig.)

  19. An evaluation of debris mobility within a PWR reactor coolant system during the recirculation mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreychek, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    To provide for the long-term cooling of the nuclear core of a Pressurized Water Rector (PWR) following a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant Accidnet (LOCA), water is drawn from the containment sump and pumped into the reactor coolant system (RCS). It has been postulated that debris from the containment, such as dirt, sand, and paint from containment walls and in-containment equipment, could be carried into the containment sump due to the action of the RCS coolant that escapes from the breach in the piping and then flows to the sump. Once in the sump, this debris could be pumped into the Safety Injection System (SIS) and ultimately the RCS itself, causing the performance of the SIS to be degraded. Of particular interest is the potential for core blockage that may occur due to debris transport into the core region by the recirculating flow. This paper presents a method of evaluating the potential for debris from the sump to form core blockages under recirculating flow conditions following a hypothetical LOCA for a PWR

  20. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A dual passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactors is described, comprising the combination of: a reactor vessel for containing a pool of liquid metal coolant with a core of heat generating fissionable fuel substantially submerged therein, a side wall of the reactor vessel forming an innermost first partition; a containment vessel substantially surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a second partition; a first baffle cylinder substantially encircling the containment vessel in spaced apart relation having an encircling wall forming a third partition; a guard vessel substantially surrounding the containment vessel and first baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a forth partition; a sliding seal at the top of the guard vessel edge to isolate the dual cooling system air streams; a second baffle cylinder substantially encircling the guard vessel in spaced part relationship having an encircling wan forming a fifth partition; a concrete silo substantially surrounding the guard vessel and the second baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation providing a sixth partition; a first fluid coolant circulating flow course open to the ambient atmosphere for circulating air coolant comprising at lent one down comer duct having an opening to the atmosphere in an upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the guard vessel and the first baffle cylinder and at least one riser duct having an opening to the atmosphere in the upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the first baffle cylinder and the containment vessel whereby cooling fluid air can flow from the atmosphere down through the down comer duct and space between the forth and third partitions and up through the space between the third and second partition and the riser duct then out into the atmosphere; and a second fluid coolant circulating flow

  1. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) upgrade graphical interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffon, J.D.; Peters, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    Technology advances in the past few years have prompted an effort at Argonne National Laboratory to replace existing equipment with high performance digital computers and color graphic displays. Improved operation of process systems can be achieved by utilizing state-of-the-art computer technology in the areas of process control and process monitoring. The Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) at EBR-II is the first system to be upgraded with high performance digital equipment. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper describes the main control computer and the operator interface control software

  2. JAERI Fuel Cleanup System (J-FCU) stand-alone tritium test at the TSTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Takumi; Inoue, Masahiko

    1993-03-01

    JAERI designed, fabricated, and installed the JAERI Fuel Cleanup System (J-FCU) as a subsystem of simulated fusion fuel loop at the TSTA. The main function of the J-FCU is to purify and to recover hydrogen isotopes from simulated plasma exhaust while exhausting tritium free impurities. After a lot of deuterium tests, a first tritium test of the J-FCU was performed with one gram of tritium at the TSTA on June 1991. Main purpose of this test was to evaluate the total integrity and function of the J-FCU system with a DT mixture. Through this test, the J-FCU was operated well and its function with tritium was demonstrated. This report describes the detail test results of the J-FCU first tritium test and discuss its functions by stand-alone mode. Residual tritium inventory of the J-FCU system was also discussed. (author)

  3. Design of coolant distribution system (CDS) for ITER PF AC/DC converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Bin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Zhiquan, E-mail: zhquansong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fu, Peng; Xu, Xuesong; Li, Chuan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, Min; Dong, Lin [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Beijing 100862 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • System process and arrangement has been proposed to meet the multiple requirements from the converter system. • Thermal hydraulic analysis model has been developed to size and predict the system operation behavior. • Prototype test has been performed to validate the proposed design methodology. - Abstract: The Poloidal Field (PF) converter unit, playing an essential role in the plasma shape and position control in vertical and horizontal direction, which is an important part of ITER power supply system. As an important subsystem of the converter unit, the coolant distribution system has the function to distribute the cooling water from ITER component cooling water system (CCWS) to its main components at the required flow rate, pressure and temperature. This paper presents the thermal hydraulic design of coolant distribution system for the ITER PF converter unit. Different operational requirements of the PF converter unit regarding flow rate, temperature and pressure have been analyzed to design the system process and arrangement. A thermal-hydraulic analysis model has been built to size the system and predict the flow rate and temperature distribution of the system under the normal operation. Based on the system thermal-hydraulic analysis results, the system pressure profile has been plotted to evaluate the pressure behavior along each client flow path. A CDS prototype for the ITER PF converter has been constructed and some experiments have been performed on it. A good agreement of the flow distribution and temperature behavior between the simulated and test results validate the proposed design methodology.

  4. Recent developments in coolant systems for Indus Accelerator Complex at RRCAT, Indore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Dipankar; Tiwari, Bablu; Pandey, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Scarcity of fresh water forces mankind to explore other possible water sources that can meet the increasing demand of coolants in industries, R and D sectors and other establishments where water is used as coolant. It also becomes a challenge for water chemist to control water chemistry to keep the equipments/devices intact during its operation using water as coolant. Deionised (DI) and soft water have been used as coolants for Indus Accelerator Complex, RRCAT, Indore. DI water is produced and its quality is maintained either by conventional ion exchange method or a hybrid method of membrane separation and ion exchange technique. This requires handling of corrosive chemicals, manpower, space for plant installation, and a long array of water treatment units. CSL has implemented the idea of rain water harvesting to produce DI water after systematic studies in laboratory. The concerning issues are reduced to almost one-fourth by using rain water to produce DI water. The harvesting system has been in use for last three years. Heat is dissipated into air by evaporation of soft water in cooling tower. Requirement of soft water makeup has been estimated to be about 40,000 ltrs. / day (max.) if the machine is operated at its designed specifications. Non-availability of soft water (which circulates in open loop) may lead to shut down like situation and looking for alternate source becomes quite essential. Laboratory studies (water analysis and treatment) on sewage water (available 1,00,000 ltrs/day) from RRCAT colony as a possible source of producing soft water show promising result. (author)

  5. Addition of soluble and insoluble neutron absorbers to the reactor coolant system of TMI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, R.F.; Silverman, J.; Queen, S.P.; Ryan, R.F.; Austin, W.E.

    1984-07-01

    The physical and chemical properties of six elements were studied and combined with cost estimates to determine the feasibility of adding them to the TMI-2 reactor coolant to depress k/sub eff/ to less than or equal to 0.95. Both soluble and insoluble forms of the elements B, Cd, Gd, Li, Sm, and Eu were examined. Criticality calculations were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the absorber concentration required to meet the 0.95 k/sub eff/ criterion. The conclusion reached is that all elements with the exception of boron have overriding disadvantages which preclude their use in this reactor. Solubility experiments in the reactor coolant show that boron solubility is the same as that of boron in pure aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide and boric acid; consequently, solubility is not a limiting factor in reaching the k/sub eff/ criterion. Examination of the effect of pH on sodium requirements and costs for processing to remove radionuclides revealed a sharp dependence; small decreases in pH lead to a large decrease in both sodium requirements and processing costs. Boron addition to meet any contemplated reactor safety requirements can be accomplished with existing equipment; however, this addition must be made with the reactor coolant system filled and pressurized to ensure uniform boron concentration

  6. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  7. High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system risk-based inspection guide: Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shier, W.; Gunther, W.

    1992-10-01

    A review of the operating experience for the High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system at the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station is described in this report. The information for this review was obtained from Pilgrim Licensee Event Reports (LERs) that were generated between 1980 and 1989. These LERs have been categorized into 23 failure modes that have been prioritized based on probabilistic risk assessment considerations. In addition, the results of the Pilgrim operating experience review have been compared with the results of of a similar, industry wide operating experience review. this comparison provides an indication of areas in the Pilgrim HPCI system that should be given increased attention in the prioritization of inspection resources

  8. Lamp system with conditioned water coolant and diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene(PTFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Luis E.; Hackel, Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  9. Conceptual design of primary coolant purification system using cylindrical membrane for nuclear energy system base on HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piping Supriatna

    2011-01-01

    The recent progress of reactor technology design for next generation reactor will be implemented on cogeneration reactor, which the aim of reactor operation not only for generating electrical energy, but also for other application like desalination, industrial manufacturing process, hydrogen production, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), etc. The cogeneration reactor concept developed for generate energy effectively, efficiently and sustainable, which reserve of uranium and thorium nuclear fuel for cogeneration reactor is supply able for world energy demand until next thousand years. The cogeneration reactor produce temperature output higher than commonly Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), and need special Heat Exchanger with helium gas as coolant. In order to preserve heat transfer with high efficiency, constant purity of the gas must be maintained as well as possible, especially contamination from its impurities. In this research has been designed modeling and assessment of primary coolant gas purification system with purify and fill up helium gas continuously, by using Cylindrical Helium Splitting Membrane and helium gas inventory system. The result of flow rate helium assessment for the purification system is 0.844x10 -3 kg/sec, where helium flow rate of reactor primary coolant is 120 kg/sec. The result of study show that the Primary Coolant Gas Purification System is enable to be implemented on Cogeneration Reactor HTGR200C. (author)

  10. Dynamic analysis of the CRBRP clean-up system (three stage aqueous scrubber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyi, R.; Bijlani, C.; Fazekas, P.; Dajani, A.

    1981-01-01

    The CRBRP containment clean-up system design required the determination of the thermal-hydraulic performance of the system during its projected operating cycle. The reduced scale component tests at HEDL provided valuable information about the generic performance of the components; however, due to the limitations of the test facility the exact simulation of the actual CRBRP conditions was not feasible. A computer program was developed to permit dynamic system analysis of the full size air cleaning system. The dynamic system analysis considered the mass and energy balances across each component. In addition to the major filtration system components, the system modeling included the supporting fluid system components such as pumps, tanks and heat exchangers. Variable gas flow, temperature, chemical concentrations, and other system parameters were also modeled. Fission product heat, chemical reaction heat and heat of solution were considered. The analysis results provided sodium hydroxide solution concentrations and temperatures, gas temperatures and other variables at the various components within the air cleaning system for each calculated time interval. The accuracy of the computer modeling was verified by comparing the calculated results with HEDL test data. The comparison indicated a better than +-10% agreement with the test data. The analysis results provided the basis for the selection of the system components

  11. IEA-R1 renewed primary coolant piping system stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A partial replacement of the IEA-R1 piping system was conducted in 2014. The aim of this work is to perform the stress analysis of the renewed primary piping system of the IEA-R1, taking into account the as built conditions and the pipe modifications. The nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 is a pool type reactor designed by Babcox-Willcox, which is operated by IPEN since 1957. The primary coolant system is responsible for removing the residual heat of the Reactor core. As a part of the life management, a regular inspection detected some degradation in the primary piping system. In consequence, part of the piping system was replaced. The partial renewing of the primary piping system did not imply in major piping layout modifications. However, the stress condition of the piping systems had to be reanalyzed. The structural stress analysis of the primary piping systems is now presented and the final results are discussed. (author)

  12. Formation and hydraulic effects of deposits in high temperature sodium coolant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunker, W.

    1976-01-01

    Deposition of sodium impurities in the high temperature (600 0 C), high flow (Reynolds Number approximately equal to 8 x 10 4 ) regions of a sodium coolant circuit is being studied to determine its possible hydraulic effects. Increases in flow impedance (pressure drop/volume flow 2 ) of up to 30 percent have been detected in an annular flow sensor. The apparatus and preliminary results of these tests are presented. Continuing tests are to specifically identify the materials involved and the system conditions under which the formations occur

  13. Seismic analysis of the reactor coolant system of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsoi, L.; Sollogoub, P.

    1986-01-01

    For safety considerations, seismic analyses are performed of the Reactor Coolant System (R.C.S.) of PWR Plants. After a brief description of the R.C.S. and R.C.S. operation, the paper presents the two types of analysis used to determine the effect of earthquake on the R.C.S.: modal spectral analysis and nonlinear time history analysis. The paper finally shows how seismic loadings are combined with other types of loadings and illustrates how the consideration of seismic loads affects R.C.S. design [fr

  14. Phenomena occurring in the reactor coolant system during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) of a nuclear power plant consists of the reactor pressure vessel and the piping and associated components that are required for the continuous circulation of the coolant which is used to maintain thermal equilibrium throughout the system. In the event of an accident, the RCS also serves as one of several barriers to the escape of radiotoxic material into the biosphere. In contrast to normal operating conditions, severe core damage accidents are characterized by significant temporal and spatial variations in heat and mass fluxes, and by eventual geometrical changes within the RCS. Furthermore, the difficulties in describing the system in the severe accident mode are compounded by the occurrence of chemical reactions. These reactions can influence both the thermal and the mass transport behavior of the system. In addition, behavior of the reactor vessel internals and of materials released from the core region (especially the radioactive fission products) in the course of the accident likewise become of concern to the analyst. This report addresses these concerns. 9 refs., 1 tab

  15. Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant: variation in test intervals for high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.F.; Stetkar, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The change in availability of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCIS) due to a change in pump and valve test interval from monthly to quarterly was analyzed. This analysis started by using the HPCIS base line evaluation produced as part of the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The base line evaluation showed that the dominant contributors to the unavailability of the HPCI system are hardware failures and the resultant downtime for unscheduled maintenance. The effect of changing the pump and valve test interval from monthly to quarterly was analyzed by considering the system unavailability due to hardware failures, the unavailability due to testing, and the unavailability due to human errors that potentially could occur during testing. The magnitude of the changes in unavailability affected by the change in test interval are discussed. The analysis showed a small increase in the availability of the HPCIS to respond to loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and a small decrease in the availability of the HPCIS to respond to transients which require HPCIS actuation. In summary, the increase in test interval from monthly to quarterly does not significantly impact the overall HPCIS availability

  16. Radiation leakage monitoring method and device from primary to secondary coolant systems in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Yoshiaki; Umehara, Toshihiro; Yamada, Masataka.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention monitors radiation leaked from any one of primary cooling systems to secondary cooling systems in a plurality of steam generators. That is, radiation monitoring means each corresponding to steam each generators are disposed to the upstream of a position where main steam pipes are joined. With such a constitution, since the detection object of each of radiation monitoring means is secondary coolants before mixing with secondary coolants of other secondary loops or dilution, lowering of detection accuracy can be avoided. Except for the abnormal case, that is, a case neither of radiation leakage nor of background change, the device is adapted as a convenient measuring system only with calculation performance. Once abnormality occurs, a loop having a value exceeding a standard value is identified by a single channel analyzer function. The amount of radiation leakage from the steam generator belonging to the specified loop is monitored quantitatively by a multichannel analyzer function. According to the method of the present invention, since specific spectrum analysis is conducted upon occurrence of abnormality, presence of radiation leakage and the scale thereof can be judged rapidly. (I.S.)

  17. Tritium transport modeling at system level for the EUROfusion dual coolant lithium-lead breeding blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgorri, F. R.; Moreno, C.; Carella, E.; Rapisarda, D.; Fernández-Berceruelo, I.; Palermo, I.; Ibarra, A.

    2017-11-01

    The dual coolant lithium lead (DCLL) breeding blanket is one of the four breeder blanket concepts under consideration within the framework of EUROfusion consortium activities. The aim of this work is to develop a model that can dynamically track tritium concentrations and fluxes along each part of the DCLL blanket and the ancillary systems associated to it at any time. Because of tritium nature, the phenomena of diffusion, dissociation, recombination and solubilisation have been modeled in order to describe the interaction between the lead-lithium channels, the structural material, the flow channel inserts and the helium channels that are present in the breeding blanket. Results have been obtained for a pulsed generation scenario for DEMO. The tritium inventory in different parts of the blanket, the permeation rates from the breeder to the secondary coolant and the amount of tritium extracted from the lead-lithium loop have been computed. Results present an oscillating behavior around mean values. The obtained average permeation rate from the liquid metal to the helium is 1.66 mg h-1 while the mean tritium inventory in the whole system is 417 mg. Besides the reference case results, parametric studies of the lead-lithium mass flow rate, the tritium extraction efficiency and the tritium solubility in lead-lithium have been performed showing the reaction of the system to the variation of these parameters.

  18. Test of the palladium diffuser in the JAERI Fuel Cleanup System in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Takumi; O-hira, Shigeru

    1993-03-01

    The JAERI Fuel Cleanup System (JFCU) is a major subsystem of the TSTA simulated fusion fuel loop. The palladium diffuser, that accepts simulated plasma exhaust and purifies the hydrogen isotopes mixture for the feed to the Isotope Separation System, was tested with deuterium to investigate the characteristics of the components. Permeation flow rate is a linear function of the difference of the square root of the pressure across the palladium alloy membrane. However at the low pressure region, an impediment on the permeation was observed. It was suspected to be caused by the impurity adsorbed on the surface of the permeated side of the membrane and was reduced by oxidation treatment. (author)

  19. AGING MANAGMENT OF REACTOR COOLANT SYSTEM MECHANICAL COMPONENTS FOR LICENSE RENEWAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUBUDHI, M.; MORANTE, R.; LEE, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) mechanical components that require an aging management review for license renewal include the primary loop piping and associated connections to other support systems, reactor vessel, reactor vessel internals, pressurizer. steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, and all other inter-connected piping, pipe fittings, valves, and bolting. All major RCS components are located inside the reactor building. Based on the evaluation findings of recently submitted license renewal applications for pressurized water reactors, this paper presents the plant programs and/or activities proposed by the applicants to manage the effects of aging. These programs and/or activities provide reasonable assurance that the intended function(s) of these mechanical components will be maintained for the period of extended operation. The license renewal application includes identification of RCS subcomponents that are within the scope of license renewal and are vulnerable to age-related degradation when exposed to environmental and operational conditions. determination of the effects of aging on their intended safety functions. and implementation of the aging management programs and/or activities including both current and new programs. Industry-wide operating experience, including generic communication by the NRC, is part of the aging management review for the RCS components. In addition, this paper discusses time-limited aging analyses associated with neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline region and thermal fatigue

  20. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    In the Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS) reactor primary coolant leakage incident, which occurred in Tsuruga-2 (4-loop PWR, 3,423 MWt, 1,160 MWe) on July 12, 1999, it took about 14 hours before the leakage isolation. The delayed leakage isolation and a large amount of leakage have become a social concern. Effective procedure modification was studied. Three betterments were proposed based on a qualitative analysis to reduce the pressure and temperature of the primary loop as fast as possible by the current plant facilities while maintaining enough subcooling of the primary loop. I analyzed the incident with RETRAN code in order to quantitatively evaluate the leakage reduction when these betterments are adopted. This paper is very new because it created a typical analysis method for PWR plant behavior during plant shutdown procedure which conventional RETRAN transient analyses rarely dealt with. Also the event time is very long. To carry out this analysis successfully, I devised new models such as an Residual Heat Removal System (RHR) model etc. and simplified parts of the conventional model. Based on the analysis results, I confirmed that leakage can be reduced by about 30% by adopting these betterments. Then the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) modified the operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events adopting these betterments. (author)

  1. Design of the JAERI Fuel Cleanup System for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Takumi; Naruse, Yuji; Okuno, Kenji; Carlson, R.V.; Anderson, J.L.

    1993-03-01

    TSTA is operated under the US-Japan collaboration program for the study of fusion fuel cycle technology. A plasma exhaust processing subsystem, JAERI Fuel Cleanup (JFCU) was fabricated in Japan, and installed at the TSTA as a major subsystem of the TSTA loop under the agreement. This process is based on some Japanese developed components, and designed to meet TSTA requirements by both parties. This document describes all the technical and safety features in accordance with the LANL QA format. The process has a capability to process simulated plasma exhaust at the flow rate of 15 mol/h, that is 1/5 for ITER. (author)

  2. Sorters for soil cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Johnson, N.R.; Tomicich, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sorter is a system with conveyor, radiation detectors, and a gate. The system activates the gate based on radiation measurements to sort soil to either clean or contaminated paths. Automatic soil sorters have been perfected for use in the cleanup of plutonium contaminated soil at Johnston Atoll. The cleanup processes soil through a plant which mines plutonium to make soil clean. Sorters at various locations in the plant effectively reduce the volume of soil for mining and they aid in assuring clean soil meets guidelines

  3. Numerical and experimental investigation of surface vortex formation in coolant reservoirs of reactor safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandazis, Peter [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany); Babcsany, Boglarka [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Techniques

    2016-11-15

    The reliable operation of the emergency coolant pumps and passive gravitational injection systems are an important safety issue during accident scenarios with coolant loss in pressurized water reactors. Because of the pressure drop and flow disturbances surface vortices develops at the pump intakes if the water level decreasing below a critical value. The induced swirling flow and gas entrainment lead to flow limitation and to pump failures and damages. The prediction of the critical submergence to avoid surface vortex building is difficult because it depends on many geometrical and fluid dynamical parameters. An alternative and new method has been developed for the investigation of surface vortices. The method based on the combination of CFD results with the analytical vortex model of Burgers and Rott. For further investigation the small scale experiments from the Institute of Nuclear Techniques of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics are used which were inspired from flow limitation problems during the draining of the bubble condenser trays at a VVER type nuclear power plants.

  4. Integral nuclear power reactor with natural coolant circulation. Investigation of passive RHR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoilov, O.B.; Kuul, V.S.; Malamud, V.A.; Tarasov, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a small power (up to 240 MWe) integral PWR for nuclear co-generation power plants has been carried out. The distinctive features of this advanced reactor are: primary circuit arrangement in a single pressure vessel; natural coolant circulation; passive safety systems with self-activated control devices; use of a second (guard) vessel housing the reactor; favourable conditions for the most severe accident management. A passive steam condensing channel has been developed which is activated by the direct action of the primary circuit pressure without an automatic controlling action or manual intervention for emergency cooling of an integral reactor with an in-built pressurizer. In an emergency situation as pressure rises in the reactor a self-activated device blows out non-condensable gases from the condenser tube bundle and returns them in the steam-condensing mode of the operation with the returing primary coolant condensate into the reactor. The thermo-physical test facility is constructed and the experimental development of the steam-condensing channels is performed aiming at the verification of mathematical models for these channels operation in integral reactors both at loss-of-heat removal and LOCA accidents. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of Purex solvent cleanup methods using a mixer-settler system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-11-01

    A test system consisting of three mixer-settlers in series has been used to determine the usefulness of several possible aqueous scrub solutions for cleanup of TBP solvent in fuel reprocessing plants. The simulated solvent that was treated was nominally 0.1 mM zirconium, 0.2 mM uranium, 0.4 mM dibutyl phosphate, and 0.3 mM HNO 3 . Five aqueous scrub solutions - sodium carbonate/tartrate, hydroxylamine/tartaric acid, hydroxylamine/citric acid, hydrazine/oxalic acid, and LiOH/sucrose - were evaluated. The order of effectiveness of these solutions for removal of contaminants was: sodium carbonate/tartrate, hydrazine/oxalic acid, LiOH/sucrose, and the two hydroxylamine solutions. Interfacial crud, which was related to the presence of zirconium and DBP, was observed in all cases except the LiOH/sucrose solution. The recommended system would use sodium carbonate/tartrate. If sodium usage must be minimized, a hydroxylamine-containing scrub followed by a sodium carbonate/tartrate scrub is recommended. 13 references, 11 figures, 21 tables

  6. High Pressure Coolant Injection system risk-based inspection guide for Hatch Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiBiasio, A.M.

    1993-05-01

    A review of the operating experience for the High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system at the Hatch Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2, is described in this report. The information for this review was obtained from Hatch Licensee Event Reports (LERs) that were generated between 1980 and 1992. These LERs have been categorized into 23 failure modes that have been prioritized based on probabilistic risk assessment considerations. In addition, the results of the Hatch operating experience review have been compared with the results of a similar, industry wide operating, experience review. This comparison provides an indication of areas in the Hatch HPCI system that should be given increased attention in the prioritization of inspection resources

  7. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heams, T.J.; Williams, D.A.; Johns, N.A.; Mason, A.; Bixler, N.E.; Grimley, A.J.; Wheatley, C.J.; Dickson, L.W.; Osborn-Lee, I.; Domagala, P.; Zawadzki, S.; Rest, J.; Alexander, C.A.; Lee, R.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The VICTORIA model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident is described. It has been developed by the USNRC to define the radionuclide phenomena and processes that must be considered in systems-level models used for integrated analyses of severe accident source terms. The VICTORIA code, based upon this model, predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions involving fission products, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. Also included is a detailed description of how the model is implemented in VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided

  8. Development of a reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system. Progress report, June 1982-July 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.J.; Sommerfield, G.A.

    1983-12-01

    The quality of operating data has been insufficient to allow proper evaluation of theoretical reactor coolant (RC) pump seal failure mechanisms. The RC pump monitoring and diagnostic system being developed and installed at Toledo Edison's Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station will examine the relationship between seal failures and three other variables: The rotordynamic behavior of the pump shaft and related components, the internal conditions and performance of the seals, and the plant or pump operating environment (controlled by the plant operator). Interrelationships between these areas will be developed during the data collection task, scheduled to begin in October 1983 (for a full fuel cycle at Davis-Besse). This report describes system software and hardware development, testing, and installation work performed during this period. Also described is a parallel effort being conducted by a B and W/Byron Jackson/Utility group to improve pump seal performance

  9. Reactor Primary Coolant System Pipe Rupture Study. Progress report No. 32, July--December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-03-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase I), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase II) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue studies focused on Elastic/Plastic ASME Code Design Rules, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, and (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in T-304 stainless steel. (auth)

  10. Alkali Metal Coolants. Proceedings of the Symposium on Alkali Metal Coolants - Corrosion Studies and System Operating Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-06-15

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 28 November - 2 December 1966. The meeting was attended by 107 participants from 16 countries and two international organizations. Contents: Review papers (2 papers); Corrosion of steels and metal alloys (6 papers); Mass transfer in alkali metal systems, behaviour of carbon (5 papers); Effects of sodium environment on mechanical properties of materials (3 papers); Effect of water leakage into sodium systems (2 papers); Design-and operation of testing apparatus (6 papers); Control, measurements and removal of impurities (13 papers); Corrosion by other alkali metals: NaK, K, Li, Cs (6 papers); Behaviour of fission products (3 papers). Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 6 French and 8 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  11. Alkali Metal Coolants. Proceedings of the Symposium on Alkali Metal Coolants - Corrosion Studies and System Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 28 November - 2 December 1966. The meeting was attended by 107 participants from 16 countries and two international organizations. Contents: Review papers (2 papers); Corrosion of steels and metal alloys (6 papers); Mass transfer in alkali metal systems, behaviour of carbon (5 papers); Effects of sodium environment on mechanical properties of materials (3 papers); Effect of water leakage into sodium systems (2 papers); Design-and operation of testing apparatus (6 papers); Control, measurements and removal of impurities (13 papers); Corrosion by other alkali metals: NaK, K, Li, Cs (6 papers); Behaviour of fission products (3 papers). Each paper is in its original language (32 English, 6 French and 8 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English and one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  12. Robotics in the nuclear environment-inspection and repairs inside the primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Marcel Tortolano

    2005-01-01

    The increase in the lifetime of the power plants and the ageing of materials require the intervention inside the components to carry out controls and possibly repairs in the event of discovered defects. Within this framework, EDF is investigating the feasibility of robotized repairs of the components and pipes of the main primary coolant system of a nuclear power plant. For several years, EDF R and D has engaged projects whose subject of study is the possibility of repairing components such as the main vessel; the pressurizer or the primary coolant pipes with the help of robots and dedicated tools. INTERVENTIONS INSIDE PRIMARY COOLANT PIPES: Studies undertaken by EDF highlighted that certain zones, particularly in pipe connections, can be affected by thermal fatigue which causes crackling defects or crackings. In anticipation of this phenomenon which would affect primary pipes and to avoid their replacements, EDF R and D has been studying the feasibility of examining and repairing these zones using robots. Robotized repair consists in introducing into the pipe while passing by the vessel, a 6 degrees of freedom manipulator mounted on a mobile carrier. This robot implements and carries out the trajectories of the different processes of repair: - Precise localization of the defects, - Elimination (possibly sampling) of the defects by machining, - Control that the defects were eliminated, - Weld metal buildup if the repair cavity is too deep, - Grinding followed by a new control of the surface. These studies and tests were conducted in the laboratory of EDF R and D in Chatou. The sequence of operations included machining by grinding and milling, profilometric control, dye penetrant testing, TIG welding and ultrasonic examinations. The results of the tests, executed on full scale models of components, are satisfactory and show the advantages of robotics compared with classical methods. ROBOTIZED INTERVENTIONS IN THE REACTOR VESSEL: Another difficult issue is the

  13. System for mitigating consequences of loss of coolant accident at nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukrinsky, A.M.; Rzheznikov, J.V.; Shvyryaev, J.V.; Zlatin, D.A.; Kuznetsov, J.A.; Babenko, E.A.; Tatarnikov, V.P.; Lapshin, A.L.; Sanovich, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    The system according to the invention comprises a first room which accommodates a reactor plant and an active-type sprinkler means. As pressure rises in the first room due to a release of steam from the lost coolant, most of the air contained in this first room is driven out through holes provided in walls of the first room in immediate proximity to a floor of the first room, wherefrom it proceeds to a second room through channels and a basin-type condenser accommodated in the second room. The length of the channels is selected so as to form a water seal in these channels to prevent the back-flow of air from the second room to the first room and thus produce rarefaction in the first room. (author)

  14. Analysis of risk reduction methods for interfacing system LOCAs [loss-of-coolant accidents] at PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) predicted that Interfacing System Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (ISL) events were significant contributors to risk even though they were calculated to be relatively low frequency events. However, there are substantial uncertainties involved in determining the probability and consequences of the ISL sequences. For example, the assumed valve failure modes, common cause contributions and the location of the break/leak are all uncertain and can significantly influence the predicted risk from ISL events. In order to provide more realistic estimates for the core damage frequencies (CDFs) and a reduction in the magnitude of the uncertainties, a reexamination of ISL scenarios at PWRs has been performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The objective of this study was to investigate the vulnerability of pressurized water reactor designs to ISLs and identify any improvements that could significantly reduce the frequency/risk of these events

  15. Research on coolant radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jei Won; Kim, W. H.; Park, Y. J.; Im, J. K.; Jung, Y. J.; Jee, K. Y.; Choi, K. C.

    2004-04-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop the technology on the reduction of radioactive material formed in reactor coolant circuit. The contents of this study are composed of the simulation of primary cooling system, chemistry measurement technology in the high-temperature high-pressure environments, and coolant chemistry control technology. The main results are as follows; High-temperature and high-pressure loop system was designed and fabricated, which is to inducing CRUD growth condition on the surface of cladding. The high-temperature pH measurement system was established with YSZ sensing electrode and Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The performance of pH electrode was confirmed in the temperature range 200∼280 .deg. C. Coolant chemistry control technologies such as the neutron irradiation technique of boric acid solution, the evaluation on high-temperature electrochemical behavior of coolant, and the measurement of physicochemical properties of micro-particles were developed. The results of this study can be useful for the understanding of chemical phenomena occurred in reactor coolant and for the study on the reduction of radioactive material in primary coolant, which will be carried out in the next research stage

  16. Single failure effects of reactor coolant system large bore hydraulic snubbers for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.S.; Park, S.H.; Sung, K.K.; Kim, T.W.; Jheon, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    A potential snubber single failure is one of the safety significances identified in General Safety Issue 113 for Large Bore Hydraulic Snubber (LBHS) dynamic qualification. This paper investigates dynamic structural effects of single failures of the steam generator and reactor coolant pump snubbers in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant by performing the time history dynamic analyses for the reactor coolant system under seismic and postulated pipe break events. The seismic input motions considered are the synthesized ground time histories conforming to SRP 3.7.1, and he postulated pipe break input loadings result from steam generator main seam line and feedwater line pipe breaks which govern pipe breaks remaining after applying LBB to the main coolant line and primary side ranch lines equal to and greater than 12 inch nominal pipe size

  17. Modeling and fuzzy control of the engine coolant conditioning system in an IC engine test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Shirazi, Farzad A.; Javaheri, Ahmad; Nava, Ghodrat Hamze

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical and thermodynamical performance of internal combustion engines is significantly affected by the engine working temperature. In an engine test bed, the internal combustion engines are tested in different operating conditions using a dynamometer. It is required that the engine temperature be controlled precisely, particularly in transient states. This precise control can be achieved by an engine coolant conditioning system mainly consisting of a heat exchanger, a control valve, and a controller. In this study, constitutive equations of the system are derived first. These differential equations show the second- order nonlinear time-varying dynamics of the system. The model is validated with the experimental data providing satisfactory results. After presenting the dynamic equations of the system, a fuzzy controller is designed based on our prior knowledge of the system. The fuzzy rules and the membership functions are derived by a trial and error and heuristic method. Because of the nonlinear nature of the system the fuzzy rules are set to satisfy the requirements of the temperature control for different operating conditions of the engine. The performance of the fuzzy controller is compared with a PI one for different transient conditions. The results of the simulation show the better performance of the fuzzy controller. The main advantages of the fuzzy controller are the shorter settling time, smaller overshoot, and improved performance especially in the transient states of the system

  18. Reactor coolant pump seal leakage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.M.; Spencer, J.W.; Morris, D.J.; James, W.; Shugars, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Problems with reactor coolant pump seals have historically accounted for a large percentage of unscheduled outages. Studies performed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have shown that the replacement of coolant pump seals has been one of the leading causes of nuclear plant unavailability over the last ten years. Failures of coolant pump seals can lead to primary coolant leakage rates of 200-500 gallons per minute into the reactor building. Airborne activity and high surface contamination levels following these failures require a major cleanup effort and increases the time and personnel exposure required to refurbish the pump seals. One of the problems in assessing seal integrity is the inability to accurately measure seal leakage. Because seal leakage flow is normally very small, it cannot be sensed directly with normal flow instrumentation, but must be inferred from several other temperature and flow measurements. In operating plants the leakage rate has been quantified with a tipping-bucket gauge, a device which indicates when one quart of water has been accumulated. The tipping-bucket gauge has been used for most rainfall-intensity monitoring. The need for a more accurate and less expensive gauge has been addressed. They have developed a drop-counter precipitation sensor has been developed and optimized. The applicability of the drop-counter device to the problem of measuring seal leakage is being investigated. If a review of system specification and known drop-counter performance indicates that this method is feasible for measuring seal leak rates, a drop-counter gauge will be fabricated and tested in the laboratory. If laboratory tests are successful the gauge will be demonstrated in a pump test loop at Ontario Hydro and evaluated under simulated plant conditions. 3 references, 2 figures

  19. Mold: Cleanup and Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Cleanup and Remediation Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... CDC and EPA on mold cleanup, removal and remediation. Cleanup information for you and your family Homeowner’s ...

  20. IEA-R1 primary and secondary coolant piping systems coupled stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to perform the stress analysis of a coupled primary and secondary piping system of the IEA-R1 based on tridimensional model, taking into account the as built conditions. The nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 is a pool type reactor projected by Babcox-Willcox, which is operated by IPEN since 1957. The operation to 5 MW power limit was only possible after the conduction of life management and modernization programs in the last two decades. In these programs the components of the coolant systems, which are responsible for the water circulation into the reactor core to remove the heat generated inside it, were almost totally refurbished. The changes in the primary and secondary systems, mainly the replacement of pump and heat-exchanger, implied in piping layout modifications, and, therefore, the stress condition of the piping systems had to be reanalyzed. In this paper the structural stress assessment of the coupled primary and secondary piping systems is presented and the final results are discussed. (author)

  1. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1982), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1987), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1982 and 1987, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2004, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included.

  2. A program optimization system for the cleanup of DOE hazardous waste sites an application to FY 1990 funding decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkhofer, M.W.; Jenni, K.E.; Cotton, T.A.; Lehr, J.C.; Longo, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a formal system used by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an aid for allocating funds for cleaning up hazardous waste sites. The system, called the Program Optimization System (POS), is based on multiattribute utility analysis and was developed for DOE's Hazardous Waste and Remedial Actions Division (HWRAD). HWRAD has responsibility for recommending environmental restoration (ER) activities to the Assistant Secretary of Energy. Recently, the POS was used to analyze and recommend funding levels for FY 1990 cleanup activities at DOE defense program facilities

  3. Analysis of loss of coolant accident and emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kiyoharu; Kobayashi, Kenji; Hayata, Kunihisa; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis for the performance evaluation of emergency core cooling system is described, which is the safety protection device to the loss of coolant accidents due to the break of primary cooling pipings of light water reactors. In the LOCA analysis for the performance evaluation of ECCS, it must be shown that a reactor core keeps the form which can be cooled with the ECCS in case of LOCA, and the overheat of the core can be prevented. Namely, the shattering of fuel cladding tubes is never to occur, and for the purpose, the maximum temperature of Zircaloy 2 or 4 cladding tubes must be limited to 1200 deg C, and the relative thickness of oxide film must be below 15%. The calculation for determining the temperature of cladding tubes in case of the LOCA in BWRs and PWRs is explained. First, the primary cooling system, the ECCS and the related installations of BWRs and PWRs are outlined. The code systems for LOCA/ECCS analysis are divid ed into several steps, such as blowdown process, reflooding process and heatup calculation. The examples of the sensitivity analysis of the codes are shown. The LOCA experiments carried out so far in Japan and foreign countries and the LOCA analysis of a BWR with RELAP-4J code are described. The guidance for the performance evaluation of ECCS was established in 1975 by the Reactor Safety Deliberation Committee in Japan, and the contents are quoted. (Kako, I.)

  4. Interfacing systems LOCAs [Loss of Coolant Accidents] at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun; Fitzpatrick, R.; Stoyanov, S.

    1987-01-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) effort towards the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) at Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs).'' For BWRs, intersystem LOCA have typically either not been considered in probabilistic risk analyses, or if considered, were judged to contribute little to the risk estimates because of their perceived low frequency of occurrence. However, recent operating experience indicates that the pressure isolation valves (PIVs) in BWRs may not adequately protect against overpressurization of low pressure systems. The objective of this paper is to present the results of a study which analyzed interfacing system LOCA at several BWRs. The BWRs were selected to best represent a spectrum of BWRs in service using industry operating event experience and plant-specific information/configurations. The results presented here include some possible changes in test requirements/practices as well as an evaluation of their reduction potential in terms of core damage frequency

  5. Review of nuclear power reactor coolant system leakage events and leak detection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokshi, N.C.; Srinivasan, M.; Kupperman, D.S.; Krishnaswamy, P.

    2005-01-01

    In response to the vessel head event at the Davis-Besse reactor, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) formed a Lessons Learned Task Force (LLTF). Four action plans were formulated to respond to the recommendations of the LLTF. The action plans involved efforts on barrier integrity, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), operating experience, and inspection and program management. One part of the action plan on barrier integrity was an assessment to identify potential safety benefits from changes in requirements pertaining to leakage in the reactor coolant system (RCS). In this effort, experiments and models were reviewed to identify correlations between crack size, crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD), and leak rate in the RCS. Sensitivity studies using the Seepage Quantification of Upsets In Reactor Tubes (SQUIRT) code were carried out to correlate crack parameters, such as crack size, with leak rate for various types of crack configurations in RCS components. A database that identifies the leakage source, leakage rate, and resulting actions from RCS leaks discovered in U.S. light water reactors was developed. Humidity monitoring systems for detecting leakage and acoustic emission crack monitoring systems for the detection of crack initiation and growth before a leak occurs were also considered. New approaches to the detection of a leak in the reactor head region by monitoring boric-acid aerosols were also considered. (authors)

  6. The development of robotic system for inspecting and repairing NPP primary coolant system of high-level radioactive environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Ki Ho; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Yong Chil; Lee, Young Kwang; Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jai Wan; Lee, Jae Kyung; Lee, Yong Deok

    1997-07-01

    This project aims at developing a robotic system to automatically handle inspection and maintenance of NPP safety-related facilities in high-level radioactive environment. This robotic system under development comprises two robots depending on application fields - a mobile robot and multi-functional robot. The mobile robot is designed to be used in the area of primary coolant system during the operation of NPP. This robot enables to overcome obstacles and perform specified tasks in unstructured environment. The multi-functional robot is designed for performing inspection and maintenance tasks of steam generator and nuclear reactor vessel during the overhaul periods of NPP. Nuclear facilities can be inspected and repaired all the time by use of both the mobile robot and the multi-functional robot. Human operator, by teleoperation, monitors the movements of such robots located at remote task environment via video cameras and controls those remotely generating desired commands via master manipulator. We summarize the technology relating to the application of the mobile robot to primary coolant system environment, the applicability of the mobile robot through 3D graphic simulation, the design of the mobile robot, the design of its radiation-hardened controller. We also describe the mechanical design, modeling, and control system of the multi-functional robot. Finally, we present the design of the force-reflecting master and the modeling of virtual task environment for a training simulator. (author). 47 refs., 16 tabs., 43 figs.

  7. The development of robotic system for inspecting and repairing NPP primary coolant system of high-level radioactive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Ki Ho; Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Yeoung; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Yong Chil; Lee, Young Kwang; Lee, Yong Bum; Cho, Jai Wan; Lee, Jae Kyung; Lee, Yong Deok.

    1997-07-01

    This project aims at developing a robotic system to automatically handle inspection and maintenance of NPP safety-related facilities in high-level radioactive environment. This robotic system under development comprises two robots depending on application fields - a mobile robot and multi-functional robot. The mobile robot is designed to be used in the area of primary coolant system during the operation of NPP. This robot enables to overcome obstacles and perform specified tasks in unstructured environment. The multi-functional robot is designed for performing inspection and maintenance tasks of steam generator and nuclear reactor vessel during the overhaul periods of NPP. Nuclear facilities can be inspected and repaired all the time by use of both the mobile robot and the multi-functional robot. Human operator, by teleoperation, monitors the movements of such robots located at remote task environment via video cameras and controls those remotely generating desired commands via master manipulator. We summarize the technology relating to the application of the mobile robot to primary coolant system environment, the applicability of the mobile robot through 3D graphic simulation, the design of the mobile robot, the design of its radiation-hardened controller. We also describe the mechanical design, modeling, and control system of the multi-functional robot. Finally, we present the design of the force-reflecting master and the modeling of virtual task environment for a training simulator. (author). 47 refs., 16 tabs., 43 figs

  8. A study of the tritium behavior in coolant and moderator system of heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. P.; Song, S. S.; Chae, K. S. and others [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The objectives of this report is to present a regulatory policy on the environmental impact and personnel exposure by understanding the generation, accumulation, environmental release and management of tritium in heavy water reactors. By estimating the tritium concentration at Wolsong nuclear plant site by estimating and forecasting the generation and accumulation of tritium in coolant and moderator systems at Wolsong unit 1, we will study the management and release of tritium at Wolsong units 3 and 4 which are ready for construction. The major activities of this study are as follows : tritium generation and accumulation in heavy water reactor, a quantitative assessment of the accumulation and release of tritium at Wolsong nuclear plant site, heavy water management at Wolsong nuclear plants. The tritium concentration and accumulation trends in the systems at Wolsong unit 1 was estimated. A quantitative assessment of the tritium accumulation and release for Wolsong 2, 3 and 4 based on data from Wolsong 1 was performed. The tritium removal schemes and its long-term management plan were made.

  9. Direct vessel inclined injection system for reduction of emergency core coolant direct bypass in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang H.; Lee, Jong G.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-01-01

    Multidimensional thermal hydraulics in the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) downcomer during a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) plays a pivotal role in determining the capability of the safety injection system. APR1400 adopts the direct vessel injection (DVI) method for more effective core penetration of the emergency core cooling (ECC) water than the cold leg injection (CLI) method in the OPR1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe). The DVI method turned out to be prone to occasionally lack in efficacious delivery of ECC to the reactor core during the reflood phase of a LBLOCA, however. This study intends to demonstrate a direct vessel inclined injection (DVII) method, one of various ideas with which to maximize the ECC core penetration and to minimize the direct bypass through the break during the reflood phase of a LBLOCA. The 1/7 scaled down THETA (Transient Hydrodynamics Engineering Test Apparatus) tests show that a vertical inclined nozzle angle of the DVII system increases the downward momentum of the injected ECC water by reducing the degree of impingement on the reactor downcomer, whereby lessening the extent of the direct bypass through the break. The proposed method may be combined with other innovative measures with which to ensure an enough thermal margin in the core during the course of a LBLOCA in APR1400

  10. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, J.; Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  11. TRACG-CFD analysis of ESBWR reactor water cleanup shutdown cooling system mixing coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Marquino, W.; Mistreanu, A.; Yang, J., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [General Electric Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, 28401 North Carolina (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The ESBWR is a 1520 nominal [M We] Generation III+ natural circulation boiling water reactor designed to high levels of safety utilizing features that have been successfully used before in operating BWRs, as well as standard features common to A BWR. In September of 2014, the US NRC has certified the ESBWR design for use in the USA. The RWCU/Sdc is an auxiliary system for the ESBWR nuclear island. Basic functions it performs include purifying the reactor coolant during normal operation and shutdown and providing shutdown cooling and cooldown to cold shutdown conditions. The performance of the RWCU system during shutdown cooling is directly related to the temperature of the water removed through the outlets, which is coupled with the vessel and F W temperatures through a thermal mixing coefficient. The complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the BWR downcomer and lower plenum has a great impact on the flow mixing. Only a fine mesh technique like CFD can predict the 3-D temperature distribution in the RPV during shutdown and provide the RWCU/Sdc system inlet temperature. Plant shutdown is an unsteady event by nature and was modeled as a succession of CFD steady-state simulations. It is required to establish the mixing coefficient (which is a function of the heat balance and the core flow) during the operation of the RWCU system in the multiple shutdown cooling modes, and therefore a range of core flows needs to be estimated using quasi steady states obtained with TRACG. The lower end of that range is obtained from a system with minimal power decay heat and core flow; while the higher end corresponds to the power at the beginning of RWCU/Sdc operation when the cooldown is transferred to the RWCU/Sdc after the initial depressurization via the turbine bypass valves. Because the ESBWR RWCU/Sdc return and suction designs provide good mixing, the uniform mixing energy balance was found to be an adequate alternative for deriving the mixing coefficient. The CFD mass flow

  12. Low temperature wetting and cleanup of alkali metal-advanced electrical machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, W.R.; Witkowski, R.E.; Burrow, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    Advanced homopolar electrical machines employing high electrical current density, liquid metal sliprings for current transfer utilize NaK/sub 78/ (78 w/o potassium, 22 w/o sodium) for the conducting fluid. Experiments have been performed to improve alkali metal/oxide clean-up procedures. Studies have also confirmed chemical and materials compatibility between barium doped NaK/sub 78/ and typical machine structural materials. 4 refs

  13. THE PROBLEM OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF THE GEOTHERMAL CIRCULATION SYSTEM IN DIFFERENT MODES OF REINJECTION OF THE COOLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Djavatov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Advanced technologies are crucial for widespread use of geothermal energy to ensure its competitiveness with conventional forms of energy. To date, the basis for the development of geothermal energy is the technology of extracting the heat transfer fluids from the subsoil. There are the following ways to extract the coolant: freeflow; pumping and circular methods. Of greatest interest is the technology to harness the geothermal energy based on geothermal circulatory system (GCS. There is the problem of the right choice of technological parameters for geothermal systems to ensure their effective functioning.Methods. We consider the development of geothermal energy technology based on geothermal circulatory system, as this technology solves the dumping of the waste water containing environmentally harmful substances. In addition to the environmental issues, this technology makes it possible to intensify the process of production and the degree of extraction of thermal resources, which significantly increases the potential for geothermal heat resources in terms of the fuel and energy balance.Findings. Were carried out optimization calculations for Ternairsky deposits of thermal waters. In the calculations, was taken into account the temperature dependence of important characteristics, such as the density and heat capacity of the coolant.Conclusions. There is the critical temperature of the coolant injected, depending on the flow rate and the diameter of the well, ensuring the effective functioning of the geothermal circulatory systems

  14. THE PROBLEM OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF THE GEOTHERMAL CIRCULATION SYSTEM IN DIFFERENT MODES OF REINJECTION OF THE COOLANT

    OpenAIRE

    D. K. Djavatov; A. A. Azizov

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Advanced technologies are crucial for widespread use of geothermal energy to ensure its competitiveness with conventional forms of energy. To date, the basis for the development of geothermal energy is the technology of extracting the heat transfer fluids from the subsoil. There are the following ways to extract the coolant: freeflow; pumping and circular methods. Of greatest interest is the technology to harness the geothermal energy based on geothermal circulatory system (GCS). There i...

  15. Investigation of chloride-release of nuclear grade resin in PWR primary system coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xiaoning; Li Yunde; Li Jinghong; Lin Fangliang

    1997-01-01

    A new preparation technique is developed for making the low-chloride nuclear-grade resin by commercial resin. The chloride remained in nuclear grade resin may release to PWR primary coolant. The amount of released chloride is depended on the concentration of boron, lithium, other anion impurities, and remained chloride concentration in resin

  16. Analysis of the VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark phase 1 with the code system RELAP5/PARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor Hugo Sanchez Espinoza

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: As part of the reactor dynamics activities of FZK/IRS, the qualification of best-estimate coupled code systems for reactor safety evaluations is a key step toward improving their prediction capability and acceptability. The VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 1 represents an excellent opportunity to validate the simulation capability of the coupled code system RELAP5/PACRS regarding both the thermal hydraulic plant response (RELAP5) using measured data obtained during commissioning tests at the Kozloduy nuclear power plant unit 6 and the neutron kinetics models of PARCS for hexagonal geometries. The Phase 1 is devoted to the analysis of the switching on of one main coolant pump while the other three pumps are in operation. It includes the following exercises: (a) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate thermal hydraulic system code with a point kinetics model (b) analysis of the core response for given initial and transient thermal hydraulic boundary conditions using a coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics model and (c) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics. Already before the test, complex flow conditions exist within the RPV e.g. coolant mixing in the upper plenum caused by the reverse flow through the loop-3 with the stopped pump. The test is initiated by switching on the main coolant pump of loop-3 that leads to a reversal of the flow through the respective piping. After about 13 s the mass flow rate through this loop reaches values comparable with the one of the other loops. During this time period, the increased primary coolant flow causes a reduction of the core averaged coolant temperature and thus an increase of the core power. Later on, the power stabilizes at a level higher than the initial power. In this analysis, special attention is paid on the prediction of the spatial asymmetrical core cooling during

  17. Investigations of the VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark phase 1 with the coupled code system RELAP5/PARCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Espinoza, Victor Hugo

    2008-07-01

    As part of the reactor dynamics activities of FZK/IRS, the qualification of best-estimate coupled code systems for reactor safety evaluations is a key step toward improving their prediction capability and acceptability. The VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 1 represents an excellent opportunity to validate the simulation capability of the coupled code system RELAP5/PACRS regarding both the thermal hydraulic plant response (RELAP5) using measured data obtained during commissioning tests at the Kozloduy nuclear power plant unit 6 and the neutron kinetics models of PARCS for hexagonal geometries. The Phase 1 is devoted to the analysis of the switching on of one main coolant pump while the other three pumps are in operation. It includes the following exercises: (a) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate thermal hydraulic system code with a point kinetics model (b) analysis of the core response for given initial and transient thermal hydraulic boundary conditions using a coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics model and (c) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics. Already before the test, complex flow conditions exist within the RPV e.g. coolant mixing in the upper plenum caused by the reverse flow through the loop-3 with the stopped pump. The test is initiated by switching on the main coolant pump of loop-3 that leads to a reversal of the flow through the respective piping. After about 13 s the mass flow rate through this loop reaches values comparable with the one of the other loops. During this time period, the increased primary coolant flow causes a reduction of the core averaged coolant temperature and thus an increase of the core power. Later on, the power stabilizes at a level higher than the initial power. In this analysis, special attention is paid on the prediction of the spatial asymmetrical core cooling during the test and its effects on the

  18. Investigations of the VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark phase 1 with the coupled code system RELAP5/PARCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Espinoza, Victor Hugo

    2008-07-15

    As part of the reactor dynamics activities of FZK/IRS, the qualification of best-estimate coupled code systems for reactor safety evaluations is a key step toward improving their prediction capability and acceptability. The VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 1 represents an excellent opportunity to validate the simulation capability of the coupled code system RELAP5/PACRS regarding both the thermal hydraulic plant response (RELAP5) using measured data obtained during commissioning tests at the Kozloduy nuclear power plant unit 6 and the neutron kinetics models of PARCS for hexagonal geometries. The Phase 1 is devoted to the analysis of the switching on of one main coolant pump while the other three pumps are in operation. It includes the following exercises: (a) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate thermal hydraulic system code with a point kinetics model (b) analysis of the core response for given initial and transient thermal hydraulic boundary conditions using a coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics model and (c) investigation of the integral plant response using a best-estimate coupled code system with 3D-neutron kinetics. Already before the test, complex flow conditions exist within the RPV e.g. coolant mixing in the upper plenum caused by the reverse flow through the loop-3 with the stopped pump. The test is initiated by switching on the main coolant pump of loop-3 that leads to a reversal of the flow through the respective piping. After about 13 s the mass flow rate through this loop reaches values comparable with the one of the other loops. During this time period, the increased primary coolant flow causes a reduction of the core averaged coolant temperature and thus an increase of the core power. Later on, the power stabilizes at a level higher than the initial power. In this analysis, special attention is paid on the prediction of the spatial asymmetrical core cooling during the test and its effects on the

  19. Evaluation of concepts for a NET plasma exhaust clean-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glugla, M.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Rodriguez, R.; Herbrechter, D.; Dinner, P.; Murdoch, D.

    1990-07-01

    The process steps for the off-gas clean-up and direct recovery of the unburned fuel gases deuterium and tritium are, together with the isotope separation and the fuel preparation, the major subsystems within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor. A comparison between process concepts largely based on experimental work at KfK and other process alternatives discussed in the literature is carried out and the various options are evaluated on the basis of the process requirements for NET I. The recovery of most of the unburned hydrogen with a palladium/silver permeator is selected as a first step, common to all seven concepts. The remaining impurity stream is processed either catalytically, with the help of getters, or by oxidation followed by reduction of the produced water. The physicochemical basis of each process alternative is discussed and the corresponding chemical flow sheets (flow diagrams and material flow tables) are presented. Concepts employing getters are unattractive because the produce untolerably high amounts of solid waste. Main drawbacks of process options involving an oxidation step are the non-discriminative oxidation of hydrogen and impurities as well as the non-trivial reduction of the produced highly tritiated water at the required elevated throughput. Advantages of the catalytic process are the production of little solid waste, the low steady state inventory and the comparatively easy scale-up. The catalytic process is therefore considered the most promising option for the development of a fuel clean-up process. (orig./HK) [de

  20. Report on the Survey of the Design Review of New Reactor Applications. Volume 4: Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, Steven; Monninger, John; Nevalainen, Janne; Joyer, Philippe; Koley, Jaharlal; Kawamura, Tomonori; Chung, Yeon-Ki; Haluska, Ladislav; Persic, Andreja; Reierson, Craig; Monninger, John; Choi, Young-Joon; )

    2017-01-01

    At the tenth meeting of the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) Working Group on the Regulation of New Reactors (WGRNR) in March 2013, the Working Group agreed to present the responses to the Second Phase, or Design Phase, of the licensing process survey as a multi-volume text. As such, each report will focus on one of the eleven general technical categories covered in the survey. The general technical categories were selected to conform to the topics covered in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Guide GS-G-4.1. This report provides a discussion of the survey responses related to the Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems category. The Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems category includes the following technical topics: overpressure protection, reactor coolant pressure boundary, reactor vessel, and design of the reactor coolant system. For each technical topic, the member countries described the information provided by the applicant, the scope and level of detail of the technical review, the technical basis for granting regulatory authorisation, the skill sets required and the level of effort needed to perform the review. Based on a comparison of the information provided by the member countries in response to the survey, the following observations were made: - Although the description of the information provided by the applicant differs in scope and level of detail among the member countries that provided responses, there are similarities in the information that is required. - All of the technical topics covered in the survey are reviewed in some manner by all of the regulatory authorities that provided responses. - It is common to consider operating experience and lessons learnt from the current fleet during the review process. - The most commonly and consistently identified technical expertise needed to perform design reviews related to this category are mechanical engineering and materials engineering. The complete survey

  1. SSYST-1. A computer code system to analyse the fuel rod behaviour during a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulden, W.

    1977-08-01

    The modules of the SSYST program system allow the detailed analysis of an LWR fuel rod in the course of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. They provide a tool for considering the interaction between the heat conduction in the fuel rod, heat transfer in the gap, fuel and cladding tube deformation, pressure in the coolant, as well as thermal and fluid dynamics in the cooling channel and for calculating the time and location of ballooning and rod failure, respectively. They can be used both to precalculate the behaviour of fuel rods during LWR accidents and in support of the design of experiments. Depending on the problem to be solved, the individual modules can be easily combined. (orig.) [de

  2. Nonlinear dynamic response analysis in piping system for a loss of coolant accident in primary loop of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiwen; He Feng; Hao Pengfei; Wang Xuefang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the elaborate force and moment analysis with characteristics method and control-volume integrating method for the piping system of primary loop under pressurized water reactor' loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions, the nonlinear dynamic response of this system is calculated by the updated Lagrangian formulation (ADINA code). The piping system and virtual underpinning are specially processed, the move displacement of the broken pipe with time is accurately acquired, which is very important and useful for the design of piping system and virtual underpinning

  3. Amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture in air-blown IGCC systems with cold and hot gas clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffrida, A.; Bonalumi, D.; Lozza, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Hot fuel gas clean-up is a very favorable technology for IGCC concepts. • IGCC net efficiency reduces to 41.5% when realizing post-combustion CO 2 capture. • Complex IGCC layouts are necessary if exhaust gas recirculation is realized. • IGCC performance does not significantly vary with exhaust gas recirculation. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the thermodynamic performance of air-blown IGCC systems with post-combustion CO 2 capture by chemical absorption. Two IGCC technologies are investigated in order to evaluate two different strategies of coal-derived gas clean-up. After outlining the layouts of two power plants, the first with conventional cold gas clean-up and the second with hot gas clean-up, attention is paid to the CO 2 capture station and to issues related to exhaust gas recirculation in combined cycles. The results highlight that significant improvements in IGCC performance are possible if hot coal-derived gas clean-up is realized before the syngas fuels the combustion turbine, so the energy cost of CO 2 removal in an amine-based post-combustion mode is less strong. In particular, IGCC net efficiency as high as 41.5% is calculated, showing an interesting potential if compared to the one of IGCC systems with pre-combustion CO 2 capture. Thermodynamic effects of exhaust gas recirculation are investigated as well, even though IGCC performance does not significantly vary against a more complicated plant layout

  4. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  5. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  6. Unique rod lens/video system designed to observe flow conditions in emergency core coolant loops of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques and equipment are described which are used for video recordings of the single- and two-phase fluid flow tests conducted with the PKL Spool Piece Measurement System designed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and EG and G Inc. The instrumented spool piece provides valuable information on what would happen in pressurized water reactor emergency coolant loops should an accident or rupture result in loss of fluid. The complete closed-circuit television video system, including rod lens, light supply, and associated spool mounting fixtures, is discussed in detail. Photographic examples of test flows taken during actual spool piece system operation are shown

  7. Development of an automated system for CANDU secondary coolant circuit chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J.R.; Stewart, R.B.

    1978-04-01

    This report is a summary of work done to develop a means for automated control of the secondary coolant chemistry of CANDU 600 MW(e) power reactors using on-line analyzers and a minicomputer. The development work was carried out in cooperation with Saskatchewan Power Corporation at Estevan. Results and conclusions of the program are included, as are recommendations for a prototype installation in a domestic CANDU 600 MW steam generator. (author)

  8. Results of tritium experiments on ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium diffusers for application to fusion reactor fuel cleanup systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Tritium tests at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly have demonstrated that ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium alloy diffuser developed in Japan are possible components for a fusion reactor fuel cleanup system. Both components have been successfully operated with tritium for over a year. A failure of the first electrolysis cell was most likely the result of an over voltage on the ceramic. A simple circuit was developed to eliminate this mode of failure. The palladium diffusers tubes exhibited some degradation of mechanical properties as a result of the build up of helium from the tritium decay, after 450 days of operation with tritium, however the effects were not significant enough to affect the performance. New models of the diffuser and electrolysis cell, providing higher flow rates and more tritium compatible designs are currently being tested with tritium. 8 refs., 5 figs

  9. Coupling a system code with computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of complex coolant reactivity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotto, D.

    2011-11-01

    The current doctoral research is focused on the development and validation of a coupled computational tool, to combine the advantages of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in analyzing complex flow fields and of state-of-the-art system codes employed for nuclear power plant (NPP) simulations. Such a tool can considerably enhance the analysis of NPP transient behavior, e.g. in the case of pressurized water reactor (PWR) accident scenarios such as Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) and boron dilution, in which strong coolant flow asymmetries and multi-dimensional mixing effects strongly influence the reactivity of the reactor core, as described in Chap. 1. To start with, a literature review on code coupling is presented in Chap. 2, together with the corresponding ongoing projects in the international community. Special reference is made to the framework in which this research has been carried out, i.e. the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) project STARS (Steady-state and Transient Analysis Research for the Swiss reactors). In particular, the codes chosen for the coupling, i.e. the CFD code ANSYS CFX V11.0 and the system code US-NRC TRACE V5.0, are part of the STARS codes system. Their main features are also described in Chap. 2. The development of the coupled tool, named CFX/TRACE from the names of the two constitutive codes, has proven to be a complex and broad-based task, and therefore constraints had to be put on the target requirements, while keeping in mind a certain modularity to allow future extensions to be made with minimal efforts. After careful consideration, the coupling was defined to be on-line, parallel and with non-overlapping domains connected by an interface, which was developed through the Parallel Virtual Machines (PVM) software, as described in Chap. 3. Moreover, two numerical coupling schemes were implemented and tested: a sequential explicit scheme and a sequential semi-implicit scheme. Finally, it was decided that the coupling would be single

  10. Loss-of-Coolant and Loss-of-Flow Accidents in the SEAFP first wall/blanket cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic analysis of three Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) and three Loss-of-Flow Accidents (LOFAs) in the first wall/blanket cooling system of the SEAFP reactor design. The analyses deal with the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviour inside the cooling systems and the temperature development inside the nuclear components. As it appears, the temperature increase in the first wall Be-coating is limited to 30 K when an emergency plasma shutdown is initiated within 10 s following pump trip. (orig.)

  11. Loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accidents in the SEAFP first wall/blanket cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic analysis of three Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) and three Loss-of-Flow Accidents (LOFAs) in the first wall/blanket cooling system of the SEAFP reactor design. The analyses deal with the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviour inside the cooling systems and the temperature development inside the nuclear components. As it appears, the temperature increase in the first wall Be-coating is limited to 30 K when an emergency plasma shutdown is initiated within 10 s following pump trip. (orig.)

  12. March 28, 1979 plus 42 months, or a status report on the TMI-2 cleanup program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckamp, Herman

    1982-01-01

    The author gives a general overview of the TMI-2 cleanup program, including regulatory, financial, and public or political aspects. He reviews some of the major technical accomplishments, including the controlled venting of krypton, processing of more than half a million gallons of water from the auxiliary building using the EPICOR-II process, decontamination of over 600,000 gallons of water from the containment building using the submerged demineralizer system, processing of water from the reactor coolant system, and manned entries into the containment building. Cleaning up after a major reactor accident is expensive, not only because of the hostile physical environment in which the work must be carried out, but also because of regulatory, political and public acceptance constraints. The technological ingredients of a cleanup program exist, but the task of assembling those ingredients, ensuring a balance between cost, schedule and risk, and selling the resulting program to regulators and the public is a demanding one

  13. Research on Coolant Radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Yeong Keong; Kim, W. H.; Yeon, J. W.; Jung, Y. J.; Choi, K. C.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.; Cho, Y. H.

    2007-06-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop a method for reducing radioactive materials formed in the reactor coolant circuit. This second stage research was categorized into the following three subgroups: the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical variation at high temperatures and pressures, the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures, and the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. First, in the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical change at high temperatures and pressures, the technique for measuring coolant chemistry such as pH, conductivity and Eh was developed to be appropriate for the high temperature and pressure condition. The coolant chemistry measuring system including the self-devised high temperature pH sensor can be applied to the field of nuclear reactor and contribute on a large scale in the automation of the coolant chemistry control and the establishment of the real-time on-line measuring technique. Secondly, the dissociation constant of water and the solubility of metal oxides were measured in the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, in the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD, the careful investigation of the deposition phenomena of micro particles on the cladding surface showed that subcooled boiling and the dissolved hydrogen are the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. In addition, the basis was provided for the construction of a new particle behavior model in the reactor coolant circuit

  14. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the status of Environmental Management's (EM's) cleanup program and a direction forward to complete achievement of the 2006 vision. Achieving the 2006 vision results in significant benefits related to accomplishing EM program objectives. As DOE sites accelerate cleanup activities, risks to public health, the environment, and worker safety and health are all reduced. Finding more efficient ways to conduct work can result in making compliance with applicable environmental requirements easier to achieve. Finally, as cleanup activities at sites are completed, the EM program can focus attention and resources on the small number of sites with more complex cleanup challenges. Chapter 1 describes the process by which this report has been developed and what it hopes to accomplish, its relationship to the EM decision-making process, and a general background of the EM mission and program. Chapter 2 describes how the site-by-site projections were constructed, and summarizes, for each of DOE's 11 Operations/Field Offices, the projected costs and schedules for completing the cleanup mission. Chapter 3 presents summaries of the detailed cleanup projections from three of the 11 Operations/Field Offices: Rocky Flats (Colorado), Richland (Washington), and Savannah River (South Carolina). The remaining eight Operations/Field Office summaries are in Appendix E. Chapter 4 reviews the cost drivers, budgetary constraints, and performance enhancements underlying the detailed analysis of the 353 projects that comprise EM's accelerated cleanup and closure effort. Chapter 5 describes a management system to support the EM program. Chapter 6 provides responses to the general comments received on the February draft of this document

  15. Behaviour of radiation fields in the Spanish PWR by the changes in coolant chemistry and primary system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llovet, R.; Fernandez Lillo, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Spanish PWR Owners Group established a program to evaluate the behavior of ex-core radiation fields and discriminate the effects of changes in coolant chemistry and primary system materials. Data from Vandellos, Asco, Almaraz and Trillo NPPs were analyzed Vandellos 2 was chosen as the lead plant and its data were thoroughly studied. The dose-rates evolution could be explained at each plant as a consequence of this sucessful program.Actions derived from the developed knowledge on this field have produced the stabilization or even reduction of radiation fields at these plants

  16. High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) System Risk-Based Inspection Guide for Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.; DiBiasio, A.; Gunther, W.

    1993-09-01

    The High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system has been examined from a risk perspective. A System Risk-Based Inspection Guide (S-RIG) has been developed as an aid to HPCI system inspections at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1, 2 and 3. The role of. the HPCI system in mitigating accidents is discussed in this S-RIG, along with insights on identified risk-based failure modes which could prevent proper operation of the system. The S-RIG provides a review of industry-wide operating experience, including plant-specific illustrative examples to augment the PRA and operational considerations in identifying a catalogue of basic PRA failure modes for the HPCI system. It is designed to be used as a reference for routine inspections, self-initiated safety system functional inspections (SSFIs), and the evaluation of risk significance of component failures at the nuclear power plant

  17. High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) System Risk-Based Inspection Guide for Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.; DiBiasio, A.; Gunther, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system has been examined from a risk perspective. A System Risk-Based Inspection Guide (S-RIG) has been developed as an aid to HPCI system inspections at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1, 2 and 3. The role of. the HPCI system in mitigating accidents is discussed in this S-RIG, along with insights on identified risk-based failure modes which could prevent proper operation of the system. The S-RIG provides a review of industry-wide operating experience, including plant-specific illustrative examples to augment the PRA and operational considerations in identifying a catalogue of basic PRA failure modes for the HPCI system. It is designed to be used as a reference for routine inspections, self-initiated safety system functional inspections (SSFIs), and the evaluation of risk significance of component failures at the nuclear power plant.

  18. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Egashira, Yasuo; Shimada, Fumie; Igarashi, Noboru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To save a low temperature reactor water clean-up system indispensable so far and significantly simplify the system by carrying out the reactor water clean-up solely in a high temperature reactor water clean-up system. Constitution: The reactor water clean-up device comprises a high temperature clean-up pump and a high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. The high temperature adsorption device is filled with amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents, or amphoteric ion adsorbing inorganic adsorbents and anionic adsorbing inorganic adsorbents. The reactor water clean-up device introduces reactor water by the high temperature clean-up pump through a recycling system to the high temperature adsorption device for inorganic adsorbents. Since cations such as cobalt ions and anions such as chlorine ions in the reactor water are simultaneously removed in the device, a low temperature reactor water clean-up system which has been indispensable so far can be saved to realize the significant simplification for the entire system. (Seki, T.)

  19. The state of immune system in children of participants of Chornobyl accident clean-up at the final state of sexual maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlyakhova, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    The changes in the immune system involving all links of the immunity are three times more frequent in children whose fathers participated in Chornobyl accident clean-up. Disorders of humoral and phagocyte links are gender-dependent. Significant difference in the level of immunological parameters depending on the year of the father's stay in the zone was not revealed.

  20. The functional state of the cardiovascular system in adolescents aged 16-18 born from the parents who participated in Chornobyl accident clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenjev, M.M.; Kostenko, T.O.; Borisko, G.O.; Kalmikova, N.V.; Cherevatova, S. Kh.; Bondarenko, V.L.

    2010-01-01

    The state of the cardiovascular system of the adolescents aged 16-18 born from the parents who participated in Chornobyl accident clean-up was characterized by a high incidence of myocardium bioelectric activity disorders, presence of congenital small heart defects, widening of the left ventricle cavity, reduction of contractile function and myocardium tolerance to physical load.

  1. Safety analysis of increase in heat removal from reactor coolant system with inadvertent operation of passive residual heat removal at no load conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Ge; Cao, Xuewu [School of Mechanical and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    The advanced passive pressurized water reactor (PWR) is being constructed in China and the passive residual heat removal (PRHR) system was designed to remove the decay heat. During accident scenarios with increase of heat removal from the primary coolant system, the actuation of the PRHR will enhance the cooldown of the primary coolant system. There is a risk of power excursion during the cooldown of the primary coolant system. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the thermal hydraulic behavior of the reactor coolant system (RCS) at this condition. The advanced passive PWR model, including major components in the RCS, is built by SCDAP/RELAP5 code. The thermal hydraulic behavior of the core is studied for two typical accident sequences with PRHR actuation to investigate the core cooling capability with conservative assumptions, a main steam line break (MSLB) event and inadvertent opening of a steam generator (SG) safety valve event. The results show that the core is ultimately shut down by the boric acid solution delivered by Core Makeup Tank (CMT) injections. The effects of CMT boric acid concentration and the activation delay time on accident consequences are analyzed for MSLB, which shows that there is no consequential damage to the fuel or reactor coolant system in the selected conditions.

  2. Reactor coolant system hydrostatic test and risk analysis for the first AP1000 unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hongjun; Yan Xiuping

    2013-01-01

    The cold hydrostatic test scheme of the primary coolant circuit, of the first AP1000 unit was described. Based on the up-stream design documents, standard specifications and design technical requirements, the select principle of test boundary was identified. The design requirements for water quality, pressure, temperature and temporary hydro-test pump were proposed. A reasonable argument for heating and pressurization rate, and cooling and depressurization rate was proposed. The possible problems and risks during the hydrostatic test were analyzed. This test scheme can provide guidance for the revisions and implementations of the follow-up test procedures. It is a good reference for hydrostatic tests of AP1000 units in the future in China. (authors)

  3. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heams, T J [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, D A; Johns, N A; Mason, A [UKAEA, Winfrith, (England); Bixler, N E; Grimley, A J [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wheatley, C J [UKAEA, Culcheth (England); Dickson, L W [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Osborn-Lee, I [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Domagala, P; Zawadzki, S; Rest, J [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Alexander, C A [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Lee, R Y [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The VICTORIA model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident is described. It has been developed by the USNRC to define the radionuclide phenomena and processes that must be considered in systems-level models used for integrated analyses of severe accident source terms. The VICTORIA code, based upon this model, predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions involving fission products, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. Also included is a detailed description of how the model is implemented in VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided.

  4. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor coolant system and systems decontamination. Summary status report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information relating to the decontamination and restoration of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor coolant system and other plant systems. Data have been collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources and entered in a computerized data system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which can be used in planning for recovery from a loss of coolant event similar to that experienced by the Three Mile Island Unit 2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains a summary of radiation exposures, manpower, and time spent in radiation areas during the referenced period. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are not included. Computer reports included are: A chronological listing of all activities related to decomtamination and restoration of the reactor coolant system and other plant systems for the period of April 5, 1979, through December 19, 1984; a summary of labor and exposures by department for the same time period; and summary reports for each major task undertaken in connection with this specific work scope during the referenced time period

  5. Experimental study on thermal-hydraulic behaviors of a pressure balanced coolant injection system for a passive safety light water reactor JPSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Takashi; Watanabe, Hironori; Araya, Fumimasa; Nakajima, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Iwamura, Takamichi; Murao, Yoshio

    1998-02-01

    A conceptual design study of a passive safety light water reactor JPSR has been performed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI. A pressure balanced coolant injection experiment has been carried out, with an objective to understand thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a passive coolant injection system which has been considered to be adopted to JPSR. This report summarizes experimental results and data recorded in experiment run performed in FY. 1993 and 1994. Preliminary experiments previously performed are also briefly described. As the results of the experiment, it was found that an initiation of coolant injection was delayed with increase in a subcooling in the pressure balance line. By inserting a separation device which divides the inside of core make-up tank (CMT) into several small compartments, a diffusion of a high temperature region formed just under the water surface was restrained and then a steam condensation was suppressed. A time interval from an uncovery of the pressure balance line to the initiation of the coolant injection was not related by a linear function with a discharge flow rate simulating a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) condition. The coolant was injected intermittently by actuation of a trial fabricated passive valve actuated by pressure difference for the present experiment. It was also found that the trial passive valve had difficulties in setting an actuation set point and vibrations noises and some fraction of the coolant was remained in CMT without effective use. A modification was proposed for resolving these problems by introducing an anti-closing mechanism. (author)

  6. Detection of stress corrosion cracks in reactor pressure vessel and primary coolant system anchor studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, G.M.; Joshi, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    Under Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) contract No. 2179-2, southwest Research Institute is continuing work on the use of the cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) for inspecting stud bolts. Also being evaluated is the application of the CGWT to the inspection of reactor coolant pump shafts. Data have been collected for stud bolts ranging from 16 to 112 inches (40.6 to 285 cm) in length, and from 1 to 4.5 inches (2.54 to 11.4 cm) in diameter. For each bolt size, tests were conducted to determine the smallest detectable notch, the effect of thread noise, and the amount of detectable simulated corrosion. The ratio of reflected longitudinal signals to mode-converted signals was analyzed with respect to bolt diameter, bolt length, and frequency parameters. The results of these test showed the following: (1) The minimum detectable notch in the threaded region was approximately 0.05 inch (1.3 mm) for all stud bolts evaluated. (2) Thread noise could easily be detected, but the level of noise was below the minimum detectable notch signal. (3) For carbon steel, optimum transducer frequency was 5 MHz, using a transducer whose face had an impedance that matched the steel surface. (4) Simulated corrosion of 15% reduced diameter could be detected

  7. RF DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket, coolant and energy transformation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.; Leshukov, A.; Poliksha, V.; Popov, A.; Strebkov, Yu.; Borisov, A.; Shatalov, G.; Demidov, V.; Kapyshev, V.

    2004-01-01

    RF DEMO-S reactor is a prototype of commercial fusion reactors for further generation. A blanket is the main element unit of the reactor design. The segment structure is the basis of the ceramic blanket. The segments mounting/dismounting operations are carried out through the vacuum vessel vertical port. The inboard/outboard blanket segment is the modules welded design, which are welded by back plate. The module contains the back plate, the first wall, lateral walls and breeding zone. The 9CrMoVNb steel is used as structural material. The module internal space formed by the first wall, lateral walls and back plate is used for breeding zone arrangement. The breeding zone design based upon the poloidal BIT (Breeder Inside Tube) concept. The beryllium is used as multiplier material and the lithium orthosilicate is used as breeder material. The helium at 0.1 MPa is used as purge gas. The cooling is provided by helium at 10 MPa. The coolant supply/return to the blanket modules are carrying out on the two independent circuits. The performed investigations of possible transformation schemes of DEMO-S blanket heat power into the electricity allowed to make a conclusion about the preferable using of traditional steam-turbine facility in the secondary circuit. (author)

  8. A study on fission product retention capability in a sodium coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, K.; Kubo, S.; Hashiguchi, Y.; Itooka, S.; Akatsu, Y.; Miyagi, K.; Wakamatsu, M.; Endo, H.; Tachino, T.

    1992-01-01

    Three kinds of separate model tests have been performed using water and air, focusing on the transport behavior of FP gas bubbles from subassembly outlets into a cover gas region, to study the dominant processes regarding the retention for volatiles ejected with inert gas into sodium after fuel failures. In the case that whole fuel pin failures occurring coherently in a subassembly were assumed, a periodic formation of globules was observed at the subassembly outlet. The globules rapidly broke up into small bubbles of less than 10 mm in mean diameter. The small bubbles at the top region had a tendency to be coalesced during rising through the upper plenum. As the coolant flow rate increased, bubble deformation and breakup were accelerated, but the bubble transport time did not vary remarkably. It is expected that bubbles in sodium would play in a similar way as in the water test, and the importance of the bubble behavior for the retention capability of volatiles has been confirmed. (author)

  9. THYDE-P2 code: RCS (reactor-coolant system) analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Yoshiro; Hirano, Masashi; Sato, Kazuo

    1986-12-01

    THYDE-P2, being characterized by the new thermal-hydraulic network model, is applicable to analysis of RCS behaviors in response to various disturbances including LB (large break)-LOCA(loss-of-coolant accident). In LB-LOCA analysis, THYDE-P2 is capable of through calculation from its initiation to complete reflooding of the core without an artificial change in the methods and models. The first half of the report is the description of the methods and models for use in the THYDE-P2 code, i.e., (1) the thermal-hydraulic network model, (2) the various RCS components models, (3) the heat sources in fuel, (4) the heat transfer correlations, (5) the mechanical behavior of clad and fuel, and (6) the steady state adjustment. The second half of the report is the user's mannual for the THYDE-P2 code (version SV04L08A) containing items; (1) the program control (2) the input requirements, (3) the execution of THYDE-P2 job, (4) the output specifications and (5) the sample problem to demonstrate capability of the thermal-hydraulic network model, among other things. (author)

  10. International Space Station Active Thermal Control Sub-System On-Orbit Pump Performance and Reliability Using Liquid Ammonia as a Coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Richard D.; Jurick, Matthew; Roman, Ruben; Adamson, Gary; Bui, Chinh T.; Laliberte, Yvon J.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) contains two Active Thermal Control Sub-systems (ATCS) that function by using a liquid ammonia cooling system collecting waste heat and rejecting it using radiators. These subsystems consist of a number of heat exchangers, cold plates, radiators, the Pump and Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS), and the Pump Module (PM), all of which are Orbital Replaceable Units (ORU's). The PFCS provides the motive force to circulate the ammonia coolant in the Photovoltaic Thermal Control Subsystem (PVTCS) and has been in operation since December, 2000. The Pump Module (PM) circulates liquid ammonia coolant within the External Active Thermal Control Subsystem (EATCS) cooling the ISS internal coolant (water) loops collecting waste heat and rejecting it through the ISS radiators. These PM loops have been in operation since December, 2006. This paper will discuss the original reliability analysis approach of the PFCS and Pump Module, comparing them against the current operational performance data for the ISS External Thermal Control Loops.

  11. Major weapon system environmental life-cycle cost estimating for Conservation, Cleanup, Compliance and Pollution Prevention (C3P2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Wesley; Thurston, Marland; Hood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    The Titan 4 Space Launch Vehicle Program is one of many major weapon system programs that have modified acquisition plans and operational procedures to meet new, stringent environmental rules and regulations. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Defense (DOD) mandate to reduce the use of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) is just one of the regulatory changes that has affected the program. In the last few years, public environmental awareness, coupled with stricter environmental regulations, has created the need for DOD to produce environmental life-cycle cost estimates (ELCCE) for every major weapon system acquisition program. The environmental impact of the weapon system must be assessed and budgeted, considering all costs, from cradle to grave. The Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) has proposed that organizations consider Conservation, Cleanup, Compliance and Pollution Prevention (C(sup 3)P(sup 2)) issues associated with each acquisition program to assess life-cycle impacts and costs. The Air Force selected the Titan 4 system as the pilot program for estimating life-cycle environmental costs. The estimating task required participants to develop an ELCCE methodology, collect data to test the methodology and produce a credible cost estimate within the DOD C(sup 3)P(sup 2) definition. The estimating methodology included using the Program Office weapon system description and work breakdown structure together with operational site and manufacturing plant visits to identify environmental cost drivers. The results of the Titan IV ELCCE process are discussed and expanded to demonstrate how they can be applied to satisfy any life-cycle environmental cost estimating requirement.

  12. Determination of an optimum reactor coolant system average temperature within the licensed operating window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaulez, F.; Basic, I.; Vrbanic, I.

    2003-01-01

    The Krsko modernization power uprate analyses have been performed in such a way as to cover plant operation in a range of average reactor coolant temperatures (Tavg) of 301.7 deg C to 307.4 deg C, with steam generator tube plugging levels of up to 5%. The upper bound is temporarily restricted to 305.7 deg C, as long as Zirc-4 fuel is present in the core. (It is, however,acceptable to operate at 307.4 deg C with a few Zirc-4 assemblies, if meeting certain conditionsand subjected to a corrosion and rod internal pressure evaluation in the frame of the cyclespecificnuclear core design.) The Tavg optimization method takes into account two effects, that are opposed to each other: the impact of steam pressure on the electrical power output versus the impact of Tavg on the cost of reactor fuel. The positive economical impact of a Tavg increase through the increase in MWe output is around 6 to 8 times higher than the corresponding negative impact on the fuel cost. From this perspective, it is desirable to have Tavg as high as possible. This statement is not affected by a change in the relationship between steam pressure and Tavg level. However, there are also other considerations intervening in the definition of the optimum. This paper discusses the procedure for selection of optimal Tavg for the forthcoming cycle in relation to the impacts of change in Tavg level and/or variations of the steam pressure versus Tavg relationship. (author)

  13. Application of EnviroTRADE information system for the cleanup of the former Soviet Union (FSU) site at Komarom Base, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matalucci, R.V.; Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.; Kuperberg, J.M.; Biczo, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    During a NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) held in Visegrad, Hungary, June 21-23, 1994, portions of contamination data from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) site at Komarom, Hungary were used to demonstrate the international EnviroTRADE Information System as a tool to assist with the identification of alternative cleanup measures for contaminated sites. The NATO ARW was organized and conducted by the joint Florida State University and the Technical University of Budapest, Center for Hungarian-American Environmental Research, Studies, and Exchanges (CHAERSE). The purpose of the workshop was to develop a strategy for the identification and selection of appropriate low-cost and innovative site remediation technologies and approaches for a typical abandoned FSU site. The EnviroTRADE information system is a graphical, photographical, and textual environmental management tool under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a part of the cleanup program of the nuclear weapons complex. EnviroTRADE provides a single, powerful, multi-purpose, multi-user, multi-media, and interactive computer information system for worldwide environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM). Graphical, photographic, and textual data from the Komarom FSU site were entered into EnviroTRADE. These data were used to make comparative evaluations of site characterization and remediation technologies that might be used to clean up primarily hydrocarbon contamination in the groundwater and soil. Available Hydrogeological and geological features, contaminated soil profiles, and topographical maps were included in the information profiles. Although EnviroTRADE is currently only partially populated (approximately 350 technologies for cleanup are included in the database), the utility of the information system to evaluate possible options for cleanup of the Komarom site has been demonstrated

  14. Novel Cleanup Agents Designed Exclusively for Oil Field Membrane Filtration Systems Low Cost Field Demonstrations of Cleanup Agents in Controlled Experimental Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Burnett; Harold Vance

    2007-08-31

    The goal of our project is to develop innovative processes and novel cleaning agents for water treatment facilities designed to remove fouling materials and restore micro-filter and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane performance. This project is part of Texas A&M University's comprehensive study of the treatment and reuse of oilfield brine for beneficial purposes. Before waste water can be used for any beneficial purpose, it must be processed to remove contaminants, including oily wastes such as residual petroleum hydrocarbons. An effective way of removing petroleum from brines is the use of membrane filters to separate oily waste from the brine. Texas A&M and its partners have developed highly efficient membrane treatment and RO desalination for waste water including oil field produced water. We have also developed novel and new cleaning agents for membrane filters utilizing environmentally friendly materials so that the water from the treatment process will meet U.S. EPA drinking water standards. Prototype micellar cleaning agents perform better and use less clean water than alternate systems. While not yet optimized, the new system restores essentially complete membrane flux and separation efficiency after cleaning. Significantly the amount of desalinated water that is required to clean the membranes is reduced by more than 75%.

  15. Retrieval System for Calcined Waste for the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, Randy L.; Johnston, Beau A.; Lower, Danielle E. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC. The Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the conceptual approach to retrieve radioactive calcine waste, hereafter called calcine, from stainless steel storage bins contained within concrete vaults. The retrieval system will allow evacuation of the granular solids (calcine) from the storage bins through the use of stationary vacuum nozzles. The nozzles will use air jets for calcine fluidization and will be able to rotate and direct the fluidization or displacement of the calcine within the bin. Each bin will have a single retrieval system installed prior to operation to prevent worker exposure to the high radiation fields. The addition of an articulated camera arm will allow for operations monitoring and will be equipped with contingency tools to aid in calcine removal. Possible challenges (calcine bridging and rat-holing) associated with calcine retrieval and transport, including potential solutions for bin pressurization, calcine fluidization and waste confinement, are also addressed. The Calcine Disposition Project has the responsibility to retrieve, treat, and package HLW calcine. The calcine retrieval system has been designed to incorporate the functions and technical characteristics as established by the retrieval system functional analysis. By adequately implementing the highest ranking technical characteristics into the design of the retrieval system, the system will be able to satisfy the functional requirements. The retrieval system conceptual design provides the means for removing bulk calcine from the bins of the CSSF vaults. Top-down vacuum retrieval coupled with an articulating camera arm will allow for a robust, contained process capable of evacuating bulk calcine from bins and transporting it to the processing facility. The system is designed to fluidize, vacuum, transport and direct the calcine from its current location to the CSSF roof-top transport lines. An articulating camera arm, deployed through an adjacent access riser, will work in conjunction with the

  16. Coolant leakage detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely detect the coolant leakage at a time when the leakage amount is still low in the intra-reactor inlet pipeway of FBR type reactor. Constitution: Outside of the intra-reactor inlet piping for introducing coolants at low temperature into a reactor core, an outer closure pipe is furnished. The upper end of the outer closure pipe opens above the liquid level of the coolants in the reactor, and a thermocouple is inserted to the opening of the upper end. In such a structure, if the coolants in the in-reactor piping should leak to the outer closure pipe, coolants over-flows from the opening thereof, at which the thermocouple detects the temperature of the coolants at a low temperature, thereby enabling to detect the leakage of the coolants at a time when it is still low. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Carbon Formation and Metal Dusting in Hot-Gas Cleanup Systems of Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, Peter F.; Judkins, Roddie R.; DeVan, Jackson H.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-12-31

    There are several possible materials/systems degradation modes that result from gasification environments with appreciable carbon activities. These processes, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, include carbon deposition, carburization, metal dusting, and CO disintegration of refractories. Carbon formation on solid surfaces occurs by deposition from gases in which the carbon activity (a sub C) exceeds unity. The presence of a carbon layer CO can directly affect gasifier performance by restricting gas flow, particularly in the hot gas filter, creating debris (that may be deposited elsewhere in the system or that may cause erosive damage of downstream components), and/or changing the catalytic activity of surfaces.

  18. Possibility of soil clean-up from 137Cs in coast part of drainage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlin, Yh.V.; Barinov, A.S.; Prozorov, L.B.; Kropotov, V.N.; Chujkov, V.Yh.; Shcheglov, M.Yh.; Bakanov, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The net of drainage canals is used for the collection of the surface ground waters on the radioactive waste storage at the MosNPO RADON. The soils of the drainage system were contaminated by 137-Cs migrating in the direction of the common flow. A unique technology was elaborated permitting to extract 137 Cs from soil 90% and to concentrate 137-Cs on the selective inorganic sorbent (nickel ferrocyanide). This technology combines electrokinetics, membrane and sorption methods of the contaminated media cleaning

  19. Cleanups in My Community

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Cleanups in My Community (CIMC) is a public web application that enables integrated access through maps, lists and search filtering to site-specific information EPA...

  20. Carbon formation and metal dusting in hot-gas cleanup systems of coal gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1995-11-01

    The product gas resulting from the partial oxidation of Carboniferous materials in a gasifier is typically characterized by high carbon and sulfur, but low oxygen, activities and, consequently, severe degradation of the structural and functional materials can occur. The objective of this task was to establish the potential risks of carbon deposition and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes by examining the current state of knowledge regarding these phenomena, making appropriate thermochemical calculations for representative coal gasifiers, and addressing possible mitigation methods. The paper discusses carbon activities, iron-based phase stabilities, steam injection, conditions that influence kinetics of carbon deposition, and influence of system operating parameters on carbon deposition and metal dusting.

  1. Enabling cleanup technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditmars, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Technology transfer in the environmental restoration, or cleanup, area has been challenging. While there is little doubt that innovative technologies are needed to reduce the times, risks, and costs associated with the cleanup of federal sites, particularly those of the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Defense, the use of such technologies in actual cleanups has been relatively limited. There are, of course, many reasons why technologies do not reach the implementation phase or do not get transferred from developing entities to the user community. For example, many past cleanup contracts provided few incentives for performance that would compel a contractor to seek improvement via technology applications. While performance-based contracts are becoming more common, they alone will not drive increased technology applications. This paper focuses on some applications of cleanup methodologies and technologies that have been successful and are illustrative of a more general principle. The principle is at once obvious and not widely practiced. It is that, with few exceptions, innovative cleanup technologies are rarely implemented successfully alone but rather are implemented in the context of enabling processes and methodologies. And, since cleanup is conducted in a regulatory environment, the stage is better set for technology transfer when the context includes substantive interactions with the relevant stakeholders. Examples of this principle are drawn from Argonne National Laboratory's experiences in Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Programs (ASAPs), Precise Excavation, and the DOE Technology Connection (TechCon) Program. The lessons learned may be applicable to the continuing challenges posed by the cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactive contaminants and unexploded ordnance (UXO) at federal sites

  2. A system for the discharge of gas bubbles from the coolant flow of a nuclear reactor cooled by forced circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markfort, D.; Kaiser, A.; Dohmen, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor cooled by forced circulation the gas bubbles carried along with the coolant flow are separated before entering the reactor core or forced away into the external zones. For this purpose the coolant is radially guided into a plenum below the core and deflected to a tangential direction by means of flow guide elements. The flow runs spirally downwards. On the bubbles, during their dwell time in this channel, the buoyant force and a force towards the axis of symmetry of the tank are exerted. The major part of the coolant is directed into a radial direction by means of a guiding apparatus in the lower section of the channel and guided through a chimney in the plenum to the center of the reactor core. This inner chimney is enclosed by an outer chimney for the core edge zones through which coolant with a small share of bubbles is taken away. (RW) [de

  3. RCSLK9: reactor coolant system leak rate determination for PWRs. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, D.C.; Woodruff, R.W.; Holland, R.A.

    1984-12-01

    RCSLK9 is a computer program that was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary cooling system for any pressurized water reactor. From system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the cooling system and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report of the results. For initial application of the program at a reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and stores it for future use. RCSLK9 is written for use on the IBM PC

  4. Clean-up system for pool water in pressure suppression chamber and operation method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-09-17

    Pool water in a pressure suppression chamber of a BWR type reactor is sucked by a pump of an after-heat removing system. The pool water pressurized here is sent to the pressure suppression chamber by way of a heat exchanger and a test line backwarding pipeline to stir the pool water in the pressure suppression chamber. Further, the pool water pressurized by the pump is sent to the pressure suppression chamber by way of a filtration desalting device and an exit pipe to purify the pool water. Upon cleaning of pipelines before the start of a periodical test, the pool water sucked by the pump is sent to the filtration desalting device and recovered to the pressure suppression chamber. This can reduce the amount of impurities carried to the suppression chamber. After the cleaning of the pipelines, pool water is passed through the test line backwarding pipeline, so that the pool water can be stirred at the same time. (I.N.)

  5. Experimental verification of integrated pressure suppression systems in fusion reactors at in-vessel loss-of-coolant events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, K.; Akimoto, H.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated ICE (Ingress-of-Coolant Event) test facility was constructed to demonstrate that the ITER safety design approach and design parameters for the ICE events are adequate. Major objectives of the integrated ICE test facility are: to estimate the performance of an integrated pressure suppression system; to obtain the validation data for safety analysis codes; and to clarify the effects of two-phase pressure drop at a divertor and the direct-contact condensation in a suppression tank. A scaling factor between the test facility and ITER-FEAT is around 1/1600. The integrated ICE test facility simulates the ITER pressure suppression system and mainly consists of a plasma chamber, vacuum vessel, simulated divertor, relief pipe and suppression tank. From the experimental results it was found quantitatively that the ITER pressure suppression system is very effective to reduce the pressurization due to the ICE event. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the analytical results of the TRAC-PF1 code can simulate the experimental results with high accuracy. (author)

  6. Effects of secondary containment air cleanup system leakage on the accident offsite dose as determined during preop tests of the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaes, L.J.; Nass, S.A.; Proctor, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Sequoyah Nuclear Plant has two secondary containments. One is the annular region between the primary containment and the shield building surrounding the primary containment. The second is the auxiliary building secondary containment enclosure which is potentially subject to direct airborne radioactivity. Two air cleanup systems are provided to serve these areas. The emergency gas treatment system (EGTS) serves the annulus between the primary containment and the shield building, and the auxiliary building gas treatment system (ABGTS) serves the area inside of the auxiliary building secondary containment enclosure. The major function served by these air cleanup systems is that of controlling and processing airborne contamination released in these areas during any accident up to a design basis accident. This is accomplished by (1) creating a negative pressure in the areas served to ensure that no unprocessed air is released to the atmosphere, (2) providing filtration units to process all air exhausted from the secondary containment spaces, and (3) providing a low-leakage enclosure to limit exhaust flows. Offsite dose effects due to secondary containment release rates, bypass leakage, and duct and damper leakages are presented and parameter variations are considered. For the EGTS, a recirculation system, the most important parameter is the total inleakage of the system which causes an increase in both whole body (gamma) and thyroid (iodine) doses. For the ABGTS, a once-through system, the most important paramter is the inleakage which bypasses the filters resulting in an increase in the thyroid dose only. Actual preoperational test data are utilized. Problems encountered during the preop test are summarized. Solutions incorporated to bring the EGTS and ABGTS air cleanup systems within the test acceptance criteria required to meet offsite dose limitations are discussed and the resultant calculated offsite dose is presented

  7. Experimental investigations of flow distribution in coolant system of Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilić, M.; Schlindwein, G., E-mail: georg.schlindwein@kit.edu; Meyder, R.; Kuhn, T.; Albrecht, O.; Zinn, K.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Experimental investigations of flow distribution in HCPB TBM are presented. • Flow rates in channels close to the first wall are lower than nominal ones. • Flow distribution in central chambers of manifold 2 is close to the nominal one. • Flow distribution in the whole manifold 3 agrees well with the nominal one. - Abstract: This paper deals with investigations of flow distribution in the coolant system of the Helium-Cooled-Pebble-Bed Test Blanket Module (HCPB TBM) for ITER. The investigations have been performed by manufacturing and testing of an experimental facility named GRICAMAN. The facility involves the upper poloidal half of HCPB TBM bounded at outlets of the first wall channels, at outlet of by-pass pipe and at outlets of cooling channels in breeding units. In this way, the focus is placed on the flow distribution in two mid manifolds of the 4-manifold system: (i) manifold 2 to which outlets of the first wall channels and inlet of by-pass pipe are attached and (ii) manifold 3 which supplies channels in breeding units with helium coolant. These two manifolds are connected with cooling channels in vertical/horizontal grids and caps. The experimental facility has been built keeping the internal structure of manifold 2 and manifold 3 exactly as designed in HCPB TBM. The cooling channels in stiffening grids, caps and breeding units are substituted by so-called equivalent channels which provide the same hydraulic resistance and inlet/outlet conditions, but have significantly simpler geometry than the real channels. Using the conditions of flow similarity, the air pressurized at 0.3 MPa and at ambient temperature has been used as working fluid instead of HCPB TBM helium coolant at 8 MPa and an average temperature of 370 °C. The flow distribution has been determined by flow rate measurements at each of 28 equivalent channels, while the pressure distribution has been obtained measuring differential pressure at more than 250 positions. The

  8. HANARO secondary coolant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Duk.

    1998-02-01

    In this report, the basic theory for management of water quality, environmental factors influencing to the coolant, chemicals and its usage for quality control of coolant are mentioned, and water balance including the loss rate by evaporation (34.3 m 3 /hr), discharge rate (12.665 m 3 /hr), concentration ratio and feed rate (54.1 m 3 /hr) are calculated at 20 MW operation. Also, the analysis data of HANSU Limited for HANARO secondary coolant (feed water and circulating coolant) - turbidity, pH, conductivity, M-alkalinity, Ca-hardness, chloride ion, total iron ion, phosphoric ion and conversion rate are reviewed. It is confirmed that the feed water has good quality and the circulating coolant has been maintained within the control specification in general, but some items exceeded the control specification occasionally. Therefore it is judged that more regular discharge of coolant is needed. (author). 6 refs., 17 tabs., 18 figs

  9. Compendium of ECCS [Emergency Core Cooling Systems] research for realistic LOCA [loss-of-coolant accidents] analysis: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    In the United States, Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) are required for light water reactors (LWRs) to provide cooling of the reactor core in the event of a break or leak in the reactor piping or an inadvertent opening of a valve. These accidents are called loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), and they range from small leaks up to a postulated full break of the largest pipe in the reactor cooling system. Federal government regulations provide that LOCA analysis be performed to show that the ECCS will maintain fuel rod cladding temperatures, cladding oxidation, and hydrogen production within certain limits. The NRC and others have completed a large body of research which investigated fuel rod behavior and LOCA/ECCS performance. It is now possible to make a realistic estimate of the ECCS performance during a LOCA and to quantify the uncertainty of this calculation. The purpose of this report is to summarize this research and to serve as a general reference for the extensive research effort that has been performed. The report: (1) summarizes the understanding of LOCA phenomena in 1974; (2) reviews experimental and analytical programs developed to address the phenomena; (3) describes the best-estimate computer codes developed by the NRC; (4) discusses the salient technical aspects of the physical phenomena and our current understanding of them; (5) discusses probabilistic risk assessment results and perspectives, and (6) evaluates the impact of research results on the ECCS regulations. 736 refs., 412 figs., 66 tabs

  10. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  11. Experimental study of hydrodynamics of target system construction with liquid metallic coolant on water models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.; Davidov, D.; Khokhlov, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper is about experimental study of hydrodynamics of target system construction with a spherical beam window (membrane). The visualization of current and current velocity fields in energy release area was considered. The findings are used to optimize the geometrical characteristics of target system. Also report contains the information about functioning accelerator-driven system, description it principle circuit and description of basic requirements what the target design should satisfy. (authors)

  12. Analysis of a simulated small break in the semiscale system under loss-of-coolant accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartmill, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    The Semiscale Mod-1 experimental program conducted by EG and G Idaho, Inc., is part of the overall U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research and development program to investigate the behavior of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) system during an hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The Semiscale Mod-1 program is intended to provide transient thermal-hydraulic data from a simulated LOCA using a small-scale experimental nonnuclear system. The Semiscale Mod-1 program is a major contributor of experimental data that provide a means of evaluating the adequacy of overall system analytical models as well as the models of the individual system components. Selected experimental data produced by this program will also be used to aid other DOE and NRC sponsored experimental programs, such as the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) program in optimizing test series, selecting test parameters, and evaluating test results. The Semiscale Mod-1 tests are performed with an experimental system which simulates the principal features of a nuclear plant but which is smaller in volume. Nuclear heating is simulated in the tests by a core composed of an array of electrically heated rods. The core is contained in a pressure vessel which also includes a downcomer, lower plenum, and upper plenum. The Semiscale system piping is arranged such that the intact loop represents three loops of a four-loop nuclear plant, and the broken loop represents the fourth loop. In the present configuration the intact loop contains an active steam generator and pump, and the broken loop contains passive simulators for the steam generator and pump

  13. Mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mathematical model of reactor coolant pump is described in this paper. It is based on correlations for centrifugal reactor coolant pumps. This code is one of the elements needed for the simulation of the whole NPP primary system. In subroutine developed according to this model we tried in every possible detail to incorporate plant specific data for Krsko NPP. (author)

  14. Transmutation performance analysis on coolant options in a hybrid reactor system design for high level waste incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong-Hee; Siddique, Muhammad Tariq; Kim, Myung Hyun, E-mail: mhkim@khu.ac.kr

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Waste transmutation performance was compared and analyzed for seven different coolant options. • Reactions of fission and capture showed big differences depending on coolant options. • Moderation effect significantly affects on energy multiplication, tritium breeding and waste transmutation. • Reduction of radio-toxicities of TRUs showed different trend to coolant choice from performance of waste transmutation. - Abstract: A fusion–fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) is one of the most attractive candidates for high level waste transmutation. The selection of coolant affects the transmutation performance of a FFHR. LiPb coolant, as a conventional coolant for a FFHR, has problems such as reduction in neutron economic and magneto-hydro dynamics (MHD) pressure drop. Therefore, in this work, transmutation performance is evaluated and compared for various coolant options such as LiPb, H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, Na, PbBi, LiF-BeF{sub 2} and NaF-BeF{sub 2} applicable to a hybrid reactor for waste transmutation (Hyb-WT). Design parameters measuring performance of a hybrid reactor were evaluated by MCNPX. They are k{sub eff}, energy multiplication factor, neutron absorption ratio, tritium breeding ratio, waste transmutation ratio, support ratio and radiotoxicity reduction. Compared to LiPb, H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O are not suitable for waste transmutation because of neutron moderation effect. Waste transmutation performances with Na and PbBi are similar to each other and not different much from LiPb. Even though molten salt such as LiF-BeF{sub 2} and NaF-BeF{sub 2} is good for avoiding MHD pressure drop problem, waste transmutation performance is dropped compared with LiPb.

  15. Preliminary design concept of HYPER cooling system using Pb-Bi coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Nam Il; Song, Tae Y.; Park, Won S.; Kim, Chang H

    2001-09-01

    The present study focuses on providing the basic concept of HYPER's cooling system based on simple and fundamental calculations. The system operating temperature was preliminarily determined as 340/510 .deg. C. The total system flow rate of HYPER is {approx} 40,000kg/sec and the flow velocity in the core is preliminarily designed to be {approx}1.5 m/sec. For hot conditions of HYPER core, the simple analytic calculation predicted that the maximum temperature of the cladding outer surface is 634 .deg. C, which is below the design limit, 650 .deg. C. However, the SLTHEN code modified for HYPER's subchannel analysis predicted that the maximum temperature of the cladding outer surface in the same conditions is higher than the design limit by 4.7 .deg. C. The comparison with the results of the analytic model and additional sensitivity calculations showed that the modified SLTHEN code can reasonably simulate the heat transfer between subchannels of the HYPER core and be used effectively for thermal hydraulic design of the HYPER core in conceptual design stage. A forced circulation is inevitable during a full power condition since natural circulation is not sufficient to cool the core with reasonable system pressure drop and reasonable system height. However, a natural circulation can be an excellent method for decay heat removal when the height difference between the core and the heat exchanger is above 10 m. In order to avoid high pressure loads on the vessel, loop configuration was chosen. The simplification of cooling system and high system efficiency were attained by removing independent target cooling system and intermediate heat transport system. A superheated rankle cycle was chosen since it is technically matured and its thermal efficiency is reasonably high.

  16. Investigation of a hydrogen mitigation system during large break loss-of-coolant accident for a two-loop pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehjourian, Mehdi; Rahgoshay, Mohmmad; Jahanfamia, Gholamreza [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sayareh, Reza [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kerman Graduate University of Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirani, Amir Saied [Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen release during severe accidents poses a serious threat to containment integrity. Mitigating procedures are necessary to prevent global or local explosions, especially in large steel shell containments. The management of hydrogen safety and prevention of over-pressurization could be implemented through a hydrogen reduction system and spray system. During the course of the hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident in a nuclear power plant, hydrogen is generated by a reaction between steam and the fuel-cladding inside the reactor pressure vessel and also core concrete interaction after ejection of melt into the cavity. The MELCOR 1.8.6 was used to assess core degradation and containment behavior during the large break loss-of-coolant accident without the actuation of the safety injection system except for accumulators in Beznau nuclear power plant. Also, hydrogen distribution in containment and performance of hydrogen reduction system were investigated.

  17. Development of a large lithium coolant system for operation under vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolowith, R.; Schwartz, K.E.; Meadows, G.E.; Berg, J.D.

    1983-11-01

    Argon and vacuum systems for the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) were tested to demonstrate vacuum-break capability, vacuum pumping performance, and vacuum sensor compatibility with a hostile liquid metal vapor/aerosol environment. Mechanical, diffusion and cryogenic vacuum pumps were evaluated. High-vacuum levels in the 10 -3 Pa range were achieved over a 270 0 C flowing lithium system. Ionization, thermal conductivity, capacitance manometer, and compound-type pressure sensors were evaluated to determine the effects of this potentially deleterious environment. Screening elbows were evaluated as pressure sensor protective devices. A dual-purpose vacuum-level/nitrogen partial-pressure sensor was evaluated as a means of detecting air in-leakage. Several types of static mechanical vacuum seals were also evaluated. Measurements of the vapor/aerosol generation were made at several system locations and operating conditions

  18. Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P

    2013-10-08

    Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

  19. Comparison between MAAP and ECART predictions of radionuclide transport throughout a French standard PWR reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervouet, C.; Ranval, W.; Parozzi, F.; Eusebi, M.

    1996-04-01

    In the framework of a collaboration agreement between EDF and ENEL, the MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program) and ECART (ENEL Code for Analysis of radionuclide Transport) predictions about the fission product retention inside the reactor cooling system of a French PWR 1300 MW during a small Loss of Coolant Accident were compared. The volatile fission products CsI, CsOH, TeO 2 and the structural materials, all of them released early by the core, are more retained in MAAP than in ECART. On the other hand, the non-volatile fission products, released later, are more retained in ECART than in MAAP, because MAAP does not take into account diffusion-phoresis: in fact, this deposition phenomenon is very significant when the molten core vaporizes the water of the vessel lower plenum. Centrifugal deposition in bends, that can be modeled only with ECART, slightly increases the whole retention in the circuit if it is accounted for. (authors). 18 refs., figs., tabs

  20. Effects of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident on a Mark I Boiling Water Reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water-reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident could be particularly severe, it is used as a principal theoretical basis for design. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests that simulate LOCA conditions has been completed on a 1 / 5 -scale Mark I BWR pressure-suppression system. Results from these tests are used to quantify the vertical-loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamics phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variation of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell-pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the 1 / 5 -scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings that are invariant. These groupings show that, if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor and occurs in a time reduced by the square root of the scale factor

  1. Loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accident in the ITER-EDA first wall/blanket cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the analysis of the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour inside the first wall/blanket cooling system and the resulting temperature response inside the first wall and blanket of the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - Engineering Design Activities) reactor design during a: - Loss-of-coolant accident caused by a reputure of the pump suction pipe; - loss-of-flow accident caused by a trip of the recirculation pump. (orig.).

  2. Loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accident in the ITER-EDA first wall/blanket cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the analysis of the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour inside the first wall/blanket cooling system and the resulting temperature response inside the first wall and blanket of the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - Engineering Design Activities) reactor design during a: - Loss-of-coolant accident caused by a reputure of the pump suction pipe; - loss-of-flow accident caused by a trip of the recirculation pump. (orig.)

  3. Primary system hydraulic characteristics after modification of reactor coolant pumps' impeller wheels at Bohunice NPP executed in 2012 and 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansky, Jozef; Zavodsky, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A coolant flow through the reactor is usually determined after annual outages at Slovak NPP (VVER 440) in two distinct ways. First method is determination on the basis of the secondary system parameters - measurement of thermal balances. The value achieved by this method is used as the input parameter in the Table of allowed reactor operation modes. The second method draws from the primary system parameters - measurement of primary system hydraulic characteristics. Flow nozzles used for the measurement of feed water flow behind high pressure heaters were replaced at both Bohunice Units during outages in 2008. The feed water flow behind high pressure heaters is one of the main parameters used for the determination of coolant flow through the reactor by the first method. Compared to the measurement executed during previous fuel cycles, the calculated coolant flow through the reactor decreased considerably after the change of flow nozzles. The imaginary change of coolant flow through the reactor at Unit 3 was -1,6 %; and at Unit 4 -2,6 %. This change was not proved by the parallel measurement of primary system hydraulic characteristics. Later it was found out that the original flow nozzles used for 25 years were substantially deposited (original inner diameter of the nozzles was reduced by about 0,6-0,9 mm). Therefore feed water flow measurement was untrustworthy within the recent years. On the findings stated above, Bohunice NPP has decided to increase coolant flow through the reactor by changing the reactor coolant pumps impeller wheels. The modification of impellers wheels is planned within years 2012 to 2014. During the outages in 2013 two impeller wheels were replaced at both units. Nowadays Unit 4 is operated with all 6 new impeller wheels and Unit 3 with four new impeller wheels. Modification of last two impeller wheels at Unit 3 will be performed during the outage in 2014. On account of impeller wheels modification, non-standard measurement of PS hydraulic

  4. Operating experience with an on-line vibration control system for PWR main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, J.; Stegemann, D.; Vortriede, A.

    1996-01-01

    The main circulation pumps are key components of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, because the availability of the main circulation pumps has a direct influence on the availability and electrical output of the entire plant. The on-line automatic vibration control system ASMAS was developed for early failure detection during the normal operation of the main circulation pumps in order to avoid unexpected outages and to establish the possibility of preventive maintenance of the pumps. This system is permanently and successfully operating in three German 1300 MW el NPP's with PWR and has been successfully tested in a 350 MW el NPP with a PWR. (orig.)

  5. Operating experience with an on-line vibration control system for PWR main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, J.; Stegemann, D.; Vortriede, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main circulation pumps are key components of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors (PWRs), because the availability of the main circulation pumps has a direct influence on the availability and electrical output of the entire plant. The on-line automatic vibration control system ASMAS was developed for early failure detection during the normal operation of the main circulation pumps in order to avoid unexpected outages and to establish the possibility of preventive maintenance of the pumps. This system is permanently and successfully operating in three German 1300 MW e1 NPP's with PWR and has been successfully tested in a 350 MW e1 NPP with a PWR. (orig.)

  6. SEAFP cooling system design. Task M8 - water coolant option (final report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubley, P.; Natalizio, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the ex-vessel portions of the outline designs for first wall, blanket and divertor cooling using water as the heat transport fluid. Equipment layout, key components and main system parameters are also described. (author). 7 tabs., 14 figs

  7. Dual coolant blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Schleisiek, K.

    1994-11-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket with helium-cooled first wall ('Dual Coolant Blanket Concept') for a fusion DEMO reactor is described. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. Described are the design of the blankets including the ancillary loop system and the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, compatibility and purification of lead-lithium, tritium control, safety, reliability, and electrically insulating coatings. The remaining open questions and the required R and D programme are identified. (orig.) [de

  8. Examples of Unsafe Act Identification from Simulator Training Records for Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Yeong; Kim, Yochan; Park, Jinkyun; Kim, Seunghwan; Jung, Wondea [Korea Atomic Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Operating procedures such as EOPs (Emergency Operating Procedures) and AOPs (Abnormal Operating Procedures) have been developed to maximize the operator’s performance during emergency/abnormal situations of critical-safety systems. In this regard, it is very important to point out that one of the significant factors causing accidents or incidents is an inappropriate human performance of operating personnel working in the socio-technical systems. A lot of efforts to collect HRA data by using a simulator of NPP have progressed. We developed a standardized guideline to specify how to gather HRA data from simulator training records, and created IGT (Information Gathering Template) specifying what kinds of measures should be observed during the simulations and defined UA (Unsafe Act) and describe the UA identification method under interactions between crew members to suggest a practical UA type classification scheme under a procedure driven operation. We also developed a framework for data collection and analysis to produce HEPs. The framework is named HuREX (Human Reliability data Extraction) system. In this paper, we described a process to identify UAs as well as UA candidates during an AOP/EOP operation with simulator training records. We presented examples of UA candidates and UAs grouped by consequences based on UA identification criteria. Based on this research, we are to achieve insights about the UA pattern and procedure instruction in which UAs occurred frequently. With this result, we are to analyze the root cause of UAs to find a way to reduce UAs.

  9. Cleanup of contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beone, G.; Carbone, A.I.; Zagaroli, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of contaminated areas cleanup, in order to eliminate every possible damage for man safety and environment and to site recovery for some utilization, The first step of cleanup operation is site characterization, that is followed by a pianificazion activity for a better definition of staff qualification, technology to be used, protection and prevention instruments for the risks due to contaminants handling. The second section describes the different remedial technologies for contaminated sites. Remedial technologies may be divided into on-site/off-site and in-situ treatments, according to whether materials (waste, soil, water) are moved to another location or not, respectively. Finally, it is outlined that contaminated areas cleanup is a typical multidisciplinary activity because very different competences are required. (author)

  10. Design and fabrication of magnetic coolant filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, B. N.

    2017-07-01

    Now a day's use of coolants in industry has become dominant because of high production demands. Coolants not only help in speeding up the production but also provide many advantages in the metal working operation. As the consumption of coolants is very high a system is badly in need, so as to recirculate the used coolant. Also the amount of hazardous waste generated by industrial plants has become an increasingly costly problem for the manufactures and an additional stress on the environment. Since the purchase and disposal of the spent cutting fluids is becoming increasingly expensive, fluid recycling is a viable option for minimizing the cost. Separation of metallic chips from the coolants by using magnetic coolant separation has proven a good management and maintenance of the cutting fluid. By removing the metallic chips, the coolant life is greatly extended, increases the machining quality and reduces downtime. Above being the case, a magnetic coolant filter is developed which utilizes high energy permanent magnets to develop a dense magnetic field along a narrow flow path into which the contaminated coolant is directed. The ferromagnetic particles captured and aligned by the dense magnetic field, from the efficient filter medium. This enables the unit to remove ferromagnetic particles from the coolant. Magnetic coolant filters use the principle of magnetic separation to purify the used coolant. The developed magnetic coolant separation has the capability of purifying 40 litres per minute of coolant with the size of the contaminants ranging from 1 µm to 30 µm. The filter will be helpful in saving the production cost as the cost associated with the proposed design is well justified by the cost savings in production. The magnetic field produced by permanent magnets will be throughout the area underneath the reservoir. This produces magnetic field 30mm above the coolant reservoir. Very fine particles are arrested without slip. The magnetic material used will not

  11. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  12. Interfacing systems LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents): Pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Reactor and Plant Safety Issues Branch, Division of Reactor and Plant Systems, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC in order to provide a technical basis for the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing LOCA at LWRs.'' This report deals with pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A parallel report was also accomplished for boiling water reactors. This study focuses on three representative PWRs and extrapolates the plant-specific findings for their generic applicability. In addition, a generic analysis was performed to investigate the cost-benefit aspects of imposing a testing program that would require some minimum level of leak testing of the pressure isolation valves on plants that presently have no such requirements. 28 refs., 31 figs., 64 tabs

  13. Analysis of a Natural Circulation in the Reactor Coolant System Following a High Pressure Severe Accident at APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Chul; Cho, Yong Jin; Park, Jae Hong; Cho, Song Won

    2011-01-01

    Under a high temperature and pressure condition during a severe accident, hot leg pipes or steam generator tubes could fail due to creep rupture following natural circulation in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) unless depressurization of the system is performed at a proper time. Natural circulation in the RCS can be a multi-dimensional circulation in the reactor vessel, a partial loop circulation of two-phase flow from the core up to steam generators (SGs), or circulation in the total loop. It can delay the reactor vessel failure time by removing heat from the reactor core. This natural phenomenon can be hardly simulated with a single flow path model for the hot spots of the RCS, since it cannot deal with the counter-current flow. Thus it may estimate accident progression faster than reality, which may cause troubles for optimized implementation of severe accident management strategies. An earlier damage in the RCS other than the reactor pressure vessel may make subsequent behaviors of hydrogen or fission products in the containment quite different from the single reactor vessel failure. Therefore, a RCS model which treats natural circulation is needed to evaluate the RCS response and the safety depressurization strategy in a best-estimate way. The aim of this study is to develop a detailed model which allows natural circulation between the reactor vessel and steam generators through hot legs, based on the existing APR1400 RCS model. The station blackout sequence was selected to be the representative high-pressure scenario. Sensitivity study on the effect of node configuration of the upper plenum and addition of cross flow paths from the upper plenum to the hot legs were carried out. This model is described herein and representative calculation results are presented

  14. National demonstration of full reactor coolant system (RCS) chemical decontamination at Indian Point 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trovato, S.A.; Parry, J.O. [Consolidated Edison Co., New York, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Key to the safe and efficient operation of the nation`s civilian nuclear power plants is the performance of maintenance activities within regulations and guidelines for personnel radiation exposure. However, maintenance activities, often performed in areas of relatively high radiation fields, will increase as the nation`s plant age. With the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) lowering the allowable radiation exposure to plant workers in 1994 and considering further reductions and regulations in the future, it is imperative that new techniques be developed and applied to reduce personnel exposure. Full primary system chemical decontamination technology offers the potential to be single most effective method of maintaining workers exposure {open_quotes}as low as reasonably achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) while greatly reducing plant operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. A three-phase program underway since 1987, has as its goal to demonstrate that full RCS decontamination is a visible technology to reduce general plant radiation levels without threatening the long term reliability and operability of a plant. This paper discusses research leading to and plans for a National Demonstration of Full RCS Chemical Decontamination at Indian Point 2 nuclear generating station in 1995.

  15. Statistical aspects of the cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, J.J.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Desert Research Institute participated in the Enewetak Atoll Radiological Cleanup by providing data-base management and statistical analysis support for the Department of Energy team. The data-base management responsibilities included both design and implementation of a system for recording (in machine-retrievable form) all radiological measurements made during the cleanup, excluding personnel dosimetry. Statistical analyses were performed throughout the cleanup and were used to guide excavation activities

  16. Environmental compliance and cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the roles of the principal agencies, organizations, and public in environmental compliance and cleanup of the Hanford Site. Regulatory oversight, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the role of Indian tribes, public participation, and CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Activities are all discussed.

  17. Environmental compliance and cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the roles of the principal agencies, organizations, and public in environmental compliance and cleanup of the Hanford Site. Regulatory oversight, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the role of Indian tribes, public participation, and CERCLA Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Activities are all discussed

  18. RELAP5 simulation of a large break Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the hot leg of the primary system in Angra 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the simulation of a large break loss of coolant accident - LBLOCA in the hot leg of the primary loop in Angra 2, with RELAP5/MOD3.2.2g code. This accident is described in the Final Safety Report Analysis of Angra 2 - FSAR and consists basically of the hot leg total break, in loop 20 of the plant. The area considered for the rupture is 4480 cm 2 , which corresponds to 100% of the pipe flow area. Besides, this work also has the objective of verifying the efficiency of the emergency core coolant system - ECCS in case of accidents and transients. The thermal-hydraulic processes inherent to the accident phenomenology, such as hot leg vaporization and consequently core vaporization causing an inappropriate flow distribution in the reactor core, can lead to a reduction in the liquid level, until the ECCS is capable to reflood it

  19. Evaluation of alternate secondary (and tertiary) coolants for the molten-salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelmers, A.D.; Baes, C.F.; Bettis, E.S.; Brynestad, J.; Cantor, S.; Engel, J.R.; Grimes, W.R.; McCoy, H.E.; Meyer, A.S.

    1976-04-01

    The three most promising coolant selections for an MSBR have been identified and evaluated in detail from the many coolants considered for application either as a secondary coolant in 1000-MW(e) MSBR configurations using only one coolant, or as secondary and tertiary coolants in an MSBR dual coolant configuration employing two different coolants. These are, as single secondary coolants: (1) a ternary sodium--lithium--beryllium fluoride melt; (2) the sodium fluoroborate--sodium fluoride eutectic melt, the present reference design secondary coolant. In the case of the dual coolant configuration, the preferred system is molten lithium--beryllium fluoride (Li 2 BeF 4 ) as the secondary coolant and helium gas as the tertiary coolant

  20. Coolant processing device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo; Funakoshi, Toshio; Izumoji, Yoshiaki

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce an entire facility cost by concentrating and isolating tritium accumulated in coolants, removing the tritium out of the system, and returning hydrogen gas generated at a reactor accident to a recombiner in a closed loop by the switching of a valve. Constitution: Coolant from a reactor cooling system processed by a chemical volume control system facility (CVCS) and coolant drain from various devices processed by a liquid waste disposing system facility (LWDS) are fed to a tritium isolating facility, in which they are isolated into concentrated tritium water and dilute tritium water. The concentrated tritium water is removed out of the system and stored. The dilute tritium water is reused as supply water for coolant. If an accident occurs to cause hydrogen to be generated, a closed loop is formed between the containment vessel and the recombiner, the hydrogen is recombined with oxygen in the air of the closed loop to be thus returned to water. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Expression of Cyclin D1 protein and CCN DI with PNKP genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in clean-up worker of Chernobyl accident with different state of immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazika, D.A.; Kubashko, A.V.; Yil'jenko, Yi.M.; Belyajev, O.A.; Pleskach, O.Ya.

    2015-01-01

    The investigate of Cyclin D1+cells levels changes, associated CCND1 and PNKP genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in cleanup workers of Chornobyl accident with different state of immune system in depends on the dose irradiation. Analyzed data of the nuclear controller of cell cycle- Cyclin D1 protein expression changes and related CCND1 and PNKP genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in cleanup workers Chornobyl accident with different status of immune system in remote period after exposure is represented. Reveled changes in expression of Cyclin D1+cells and regulation of related genes may point on possible radiation-associated firm molecular disturbances occurred during elimination of consequences of Chornobyl accident, that could be a potential basis for cell and humoral communicative links breach in immune system result ing in elevation of stochastic effects like oncopathology in cleanup workers of Chornobyl accident in remote peri od after exposure

  2. The sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    2004-01-01

    The sodium is the best appropriate coolant for the fast neutrons reactors technology. Thus the fast neutrons reactors development is intimately bound to the sodium technology. This document presents the sodium as a coolant point of view: atomic structure and characteristics, sodium impacts on the fast neutron reactors technology, chemical properties of the sodium and the consequences, quality control in a nuclear reactor, sodium treatment. (A.L.B.)

  3. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  4. Extended Life Coolant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 06-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Interim Report 3. DATES COVERED ... Corrosion Testing of Traditional and Extended Life Coolants 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hansen, Gregory A. T...providing vehicle specific coolants. Several laboratory corrosion tests were performed according to ASTM D1384 and D2570, but with a 2.5x extended time

  5. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

  6. Coolant channel module CCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, Alois

    2007-01-01

    . This package can be adopted as a general element in the simulation of thermal-hydraulic situations of complex systems consisting of a number of special channels. Such systems can represent different types of steam generators, 3D nuclear reactor cores with special attention to the calculation of the mass flow distribution into different parallel channels after non-symmetric perturbations, each of them distinguished by their key numbers. The resulting set of equations can be combined with other ODE-s and constitutive equations from additional parts of such a comprehensive model. The complete system of equations can then (outside of the CCM) be solved by applying appropriate integration routines. Verification and validation test runs over a wide application range have yielded very satisfactory results demonstrating therefore in a convincing way the quality of the CCM. This approach offers an alternative to the currently dominant 'Separate-Phase Models' where each phase within a coolant channel is treated separately. The advantages and disadvantages of these two approaches are discussed in this paper

  7. Louisiana's statewide beach cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Dianne M.; Holmes, Joseph C.

    1989-01-01

    Litter along Lousiana's beaches has become a well-recognized problem. In September 1987, Louisiana's first statewide beach cleanup attracted about 3300 volunteers who filled 16,000 bags with trash collected along 15 beaches. An estimated 800,173 items were gathered. Forty percent of the items were made of plastic and 11% were of polystyrene. Of all the litter collected, 37% was beverage-related. Litter from the oil and gas, commercial fishing, and maritime shipping industries was found, as well as that left by recreational users. Although beach cleanups temporarily rid Louisiana beaches of litter, the real value of the effort is in public participation and education. Civic groups, school children, and individuals have benefited by increasing their awareness of the problems of trash disposal.

  8. Vent clearing during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident in Mark I boiling-water-reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The response of the pressure-suspension containment system of Mark I boiling-water reactors to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is being studied. This response is a design basis for light-water nuclear reactors. Part of the study is being carried out on a 1 / 5 -scale experimental facility that models the pressure-suppression containment system of the Peach Bottom 2 nuclear power plant. The test series reported here focused on the initial or air-clearing phase of a hypothetical LOCA. Measured forces, measured pressures, and the hydrodynamic phenomena (observed with high-speed cameras) show a logical interrelationship

  9. Coolant leakage detecting device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Katsunori; Ishihara, Yoshinao.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges an amount of leakage of primary coolants of a PWR power plant at high speed. Namely, a mass of coolants contained in a pressurizer, a volume controlling tank and loop regions is obtained based on a preset relational formula and signals of each of process amount, summed up to determine the total mass of coolants for every period of time. The amount of leakage for every period of time is calculated by a formula of Karman's filter based on the total mass of the primary coolants for every predetermined period of time, and displays it on CRT. The Karman's filter is formed on every formula for several kinds of states formed based on the preset amount of the leakage, to calculate forecasting values for every mass of coolants. An adaptable probability for every preset leakage amount is determined based on the difference between the forecast value and the observed value and the scattering thereof. The adaptable probability is compared with a predetermined threshold value, which is displayed on the CRT. This device enables earlier detection of leakage and identification of minute leakage amount as compared with the prior device. (I.S.)

  10. Design and instrumentation of an automotive heat pump system using ambient air, engine coolant and exhaust gas as a heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoz, M.; Direk, M.; Yigit, K.S.; Canakci, M.; Alptekin, E.; Turkcan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Because the amount of waste heat used for comfort heating of the passenger compartment in motor vehicles decreases continuously as a result of the increasing engine efficiencies originating from recent developments in internal combustion engine technology, it is estimated that heat requirement of the passenger compartment in vehicles using future generation diesel engines will not be met by the waste heat taken from the engine coolant. The automotive heat pump (AHP) system can heat the passenger compartment individually, or it can support the present heating system of the vehicle. The AHP system can also be employed in electric vehicles, which do not have waste heat, as well as vehicles driven by a fuel cell. The authors of this paper observed that such an AHP system using ambient air as a heat source could not meet the heat requirement of the compartment when ambient temperature was extremely low. The reason is the decrease in the amount of heat taken from the ambient air as a result of low evaporating temperatures. Furthermore, the moisture condensed from air freezed on the evaporator surface, thus blocking the air flow through it. This problem can be solved by using the heat of engine coolant or exhaust gases. In this case, the AHP system can have a higher heating capacity and reuse waste heat. (author)

  11. Boron analyses in the reactor coolant system of French PWR by acid-base titration ([B]) and ICP-MS (10B atomic %): key to NPP safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouvet, Fabien; Roux, Sylvie; Carabasse, Stephanie; Felgines, Didier

    2012-09-01

    Boron is widely used by Nuclear Power Plants and especially by EDF Pressurized Water Reactors to ensure the control of the neutron rate in the reactor coolant system and, by this way, the fission reaction. The Boron analysis is thus a major factor of safety which enables operators to guarantee the permanent control of the reactor. Two kinds of analyses carried out by EDF on the Boron species, recently upgraded regarding new method validation standards and developed to enhance the measurement quality by reducing uncertainties, will be discussed in this topic: Acid-Base titration of Boron and Boron isotopic composition by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer - ICP MS. (authors)

  12. Comparison of the Aerospace Systems Test Reactor loss-of-coolant test data with predictions of the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper compares the predictions of the revised 3D-AIRLOCA computer code to those data available from the Aerospace Systems Test Reactor's (ASTR's) loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) tests run in 1964. The theoretical and experimental hot-spot temperature responses compare remarkably well. In the thirteen cases studied, the irradiation powers varied from 0.4 to 8.87 MW; the irradiation times were 300, 1540, 1800, and 10 4 s. The degrees of agreement between the data and predictions provide an experimental validation of the 3D-AIRLOCA code

  13. Comparison of the aerospace systems test reactor loss-of-coolant test data with predictions of the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper compares the predictions of the revised 3D-AIRLOCA computer code to those data available from the Aerospace Systems Test Reactor's (ASTR's) loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) tests run in 1964. The theoretical and experimental hot-spot temperature responses compare remarkably well. In the thirteen cases studied, the irradiation powers varied from 0.4 to 8.87 MW; the irradiation times were 300, 1540, 1800, and 10 4 s. The degrees of agreement between the data and predictions provide an experimental validation of the 3D-AIRLOCA code. (author)

  14. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 105: Interfacing system loss-of-coolant accident in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    An interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) involves failure or improper operation of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) that compose the boundary between the reactor coolant system and low-pressure rated systems. Some ISLOCAs can bypass containment and result in direct release of fission products to the environment. A cost/benefit evaluation, using three PWR analyses, calculated the benefit of two potential modifications to the plants. Alternative 1 is improved plant operations to optimize the operator's performance and reduce human error probabilities. Alternative 2 adds pressure sensing devices, cabling, and instrumentation between two PIVs to provide operators with continuous monitoring of the first PIV. These two alternatives were evaluated for the base case plants (Case 1) and for each plant, assuming the plants had a particular auxiliary building design in which severe flooding would be a problem if an ISLOCA occurred. The auxiliary building design (Case 2) was selected from a survey that revealed a number of designs with features that provided less than optimal resistance to ECCS equipment loss caused by a ISLOCA-induced environment. The results were judged not to provide sufficient basis for generic requirements. It was concluded that the most viable course of action to resolve Generic Issue 105 is licensee participation in individual plant examinations (IPEs)

  15. Analysis of water hammer-structure interaction in piping system for a loss of coolant accident in primary loop of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiwen; Yang Jinglong; He Feng; Wang Xuefang

    2000-01-01

    The conventional analysis of water hammer and dynamics response of structure in piping system is divided into two parts, and the interaction between them is neglected. The mechanism of fluid-structure interaction under the double-end break pipe in piping system is analyzed. Using the characteristics method, the numerical simulation of water hammer-structure interaction in piping system is completed based on 14 parameters and 14 partial differential equations of fluid-piping cell. The calculated results for a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in primary loop of pressurized water reactor show that the waveform and values of pressure and force with time in piping system are different from that of non-interaction between water hammer and structure in piping system, and the former is less than the later

  16. Vent clearing during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident in a Mark I boiling-water reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    In this test series, drywell pressurization rate, drywell overpressure, downcomer submergence, and overall vent system loss coefficient were varied to quantify the primary load sensitivities in the pressure suppression system. Extensive tests were conducted on a unique three-dimensional 1/5 scale model of the pressure suppression system a MARK-I BWR. They were focused on the initial or air cleaning phase of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident. As a result of the complete measurement system employed including multiple high speed cameras, the logical interrelationship between measured forces, measured pressures, and the hydrodynamic phenomena observed in high speed photographic pictures were established. The quantitative values from the 1/5 scale experiments can be applied to full scale plants using established scaling laws. (author)

  17. Analyzing the loss of coolant accident in PWR nuclear reactors with elevation change in cold leg by RELAP5/MOD3.2 system code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheshtpaz, H.; Alison, C.

    2006-01-01

    As, the Russian designed VVER-1000 reactor of the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant by taking into account the change from German technology to that of Russian technology, and with the design of elevation change in the cold legs has been developed; therefore safety assessment of these systems for loss of coolant accident in elevation change in the cold legs and comparison results for non change elevation in the cold legs for a typical reactor (normal design of nuclear reactors) is the main important factor to be considered for the safe operation. In this article, the main objective is the simulation of the loss of coolant accident scenario by the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code in two different cases; first, the elevation change in the cold legs, and the second, non change in it. After comparing and analyzing these two code calculations the results have been generalized for a new design feature of Bushehr reactor. The design and simulation of the elevation change in the cold legs process with RELAP5/MOD3.2 code for PWR reactor is performed for the first time in the country, where it is introducing several important results in this respect

  18. The analysis of mechanical behaviour of reactor coolant system layout scheme with 60 degree angle for the second phase project of Qinshan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ruhong

    1993-01-01

    For the reactor coolant system of the second phase project of Qinshan NPP, the layout scheme with two loops and an angle of 60 degree is adopted. In this scheme, two loops are connected to reactor pressure vessel (RPV), and the angle included between the inlet and outlet nozzles of the RPV is 60 degree in a same loop. The issues involved in the analysis of mechanical behaviour of piping system to demonstrate the validity of such a scheme are described briefly in the paper, including the modelling technique adopted in establishing mathematical model, the methods used for structural analysis of piping system, stress and fatigue analysis in piping fittings. A brief description of the calculation results are given and the feasibility and rationality are discussed

  19. Application of the Severe Accident Code ATHLET-CD. Coolant injection to primary circuit of a PWR by mobile pump system in case of SBLOCA severe accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobst, Matthias; Wilhelm, Polina; Kliem, Soeren; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactor Safety

    2017-06-01

    The improvement of the safety of nuclear power plants is a continuously on-going process. The analysis of transients and accidents is an important research topic, which significantly contributes to safety enhancements of existing power plants. In case of an accident with multiple failures of safety systems, core uncovery and heat-up can occur. In order to prevent the accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences of severe accidents, different accident management measures can be applied. By means of numerical analyses performed with the compute code ATHLET-CD, the effectiveness of coolant injection with a mobile pump system into the primary circuit of a PWR was studied. According to the analyses, such a system can stop the melt progression if it is activated prior to 10 % of total core is molten.

  20. Application of the Severe Accident Code ATHLET-CD. Coolant injection to primary circuit of a PWR by mobile pump system in case of SBLOCA severe accident scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobst, Matthias; Wilhelm, Polina; Kliem, Soeren; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav

    2017-01-01

    The improvement of the safety of nuclear power plants is a continuously on-going process. The analysis of transients and accidents is an important research topic, which significantly contributes to safety enhancements of existing power plants. In case of an accident with multiple failures of safety systems, core uncovery and heat-up can occur. In order to prevent the accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences of severe accidents, different accident management measures can be applied. By means of numerical analyses performed with the compute code ATHLET-CD, the effectiveness of coolant injection with a mobile pump system into the primary circuit of a PWR was studied. According to the analyses, such a system can stop the melt progression if it is activated prior to 10 % of total core is molten.

  1. An on-line pressurizer surveillance system design to prevent small-break loss-of-coolant accidents through power-operated relief valves using a microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Chang, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    A small-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) caused by a stuck-open power-operated relief valve is one of the important contributors to nuclear power plant risk. A pressurizer surveillance system was designed to use a microcomputer to prevent the malfunction of the system; the effect of this improvement has been assessed through probabilistic risk assessment. The microcomputer diagnoses the malfunction of the system by a process-checking method and automatically performs the backup action related to each malfunction. This improvement means that we can correctly diagnose ''spurious opening,'' ''failure to reclose,'' and ''small-break LOCA,'' which are difficult for operators to diagnose quickly and correctly, and by taking automatic backup action one can reduce the probability of human error

  2. ENVIRONMENTALLY REDUCING OF COOLANTS IN METAL CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veijo KAUPPINEN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained environment is a global problem. In metal industries the use of coolant has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. It is said that the use of coolant forms approximately 8 - 16 % of the total production costs.The traditional methods that use coolants are now obviously becoming obsolete. Hence, it is clear that using a dry cutting system has great implications for resource preservation and waste reduction. For this purpose, a new cooling system is designed for dry cutting. This paper presents the new eco-friendly cooling innovation and the benefits gained by using this method. The new cooling system relies on a unit for ionising ejected air. In order to compare the performance of using this system, cutting experiments were carried out. A series of tests were performed on a horizontal turning machine and on a horizontal machining centre.

  3. Design of a molten heavy-metal coolant and target for fast-thermal accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyamurthy, P.; Degwekar, S.B.; Nema, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerator Driven sub-critical Systems (ADS) have evoked considerable interest in recent years. The Energy Amplifier concept developed by C. Rubbia and others at CERN incorporates a buoyancy driven, lead-coolant primary system for extracting the heat generated in the fast reactor as well as that in neutron spallation target. In earlier publications, our BARC group has proposed a one-way coupled booster reactor system which could be operated at proton beam currents as low as 1-2 mA for a power output of 750 MW th . Here, the basic idea is to have a fast booster reactor zone of low power (- 100 MW th ) which is separated by a large gap from the main thermal reactor zone. In this arrangement, the spallation neutron source feeds neutrons to the fast reactor zone where neutrons are further multiplied. Further in this system, the neutrons from the booster region enter the main reactor but very few neutrons from main reactor return to booster, thus ensuring one-way coupling. In earlier work, several possible configurations of the booster and thermal regions were presented. In the present work, we describe an engineering design particularly with respect to thermal hydraulics of lead/lead-bismuth eutectic coolant also acting as spallation neutron source. This hybrid ADS reactor consists of fast and thermal reactor zones producing about 100 MW th and 650 MW th respectively. The scheme of the system is shown. The fast core consists of 48 hexagonal fuel bundles each containing 169 fuel pins of 8.2 mm diameter arranged in 11.4 mm triangular array pitch. The average thermal power per fuel pin is about 13.46 kw. However, due to neutron flux peaking effect, the maximum fuel pin power can be up to 2.5 times this average power. The thermal reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and coolant similar to a typical CANDU type Indian PHWR except for fuel composition. Though the gap between fast and thermal zones essentially provides one way coupling of neutron flux, a thermal

  4. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-06-07

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  5. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  6. Main coolant pump testing at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartlen, R.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes Ontario Hydro Research Division's experience with a computerized data acquisition and analysis system for monitoring mechanical vibration in reactor coolant pumps. The topics covered include bench-marking of the computer system and the coolant pumps, signatures of normal and malfunctioning pumps, analysis of data collected by the monitoring system, simulation of faults, and concerns that have been expressed about data interpretation, sensor types and locations, alarm/shutdown limits and confirmation of nondestructive examination testing. This presentation consists of overheads only

  7. On-Line Coolant Chemistry Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LM Bachman

    2006-01-01

    Impurities in the gas coolant of the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) can provide valuable indications of problems in the reactor and an overall view of system health. By monitoring the types and amounts of these impurities, much can be implied regarding the status of the reactor plant. However, a preliminary understanding of the expected impurities is important before evaluating prospective detection and monitoring systems. Currently, a spectroscopy system is judged to hold the greatest promise for monitoring the impurities of interest in the coolant because it minimizes the number of entry and exit points to the plant and provides the ability to detect impurities down to the 1 ppm level

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of behaviour of boiling water reactor coolant on the basis of solubility in Fe3O4-H2O-O2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarembo, V.I.; Slobodov, A.A.; Kritskij, V.G.; Puchkov, L.V.; Sedov, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic analysis of the behaviour of boiling water reactor coolant on the basis of solubility in Fe 3 O 4 -H 2 O-O 2 system is performed for the purpose of establishing the iron existence forms in non-sedimentated suspended corrosion product particles as well as iron concentration of corrosion origin in power plants. It is shown that the iron solubility in the considered system with temperature variation occurs through the maximum at 423 K. Below this temperature the crystal Fe(OH) 3 is responsible for its value, at higher temperatures - magnetite. The growth of equilibrium oxygen concentration from 0.1 to 1000 μg/kg H 2 O only slightly increases the magnetite solubility

  9. Thermohydraulic behavior in a primary cooling system during a loss-of-coolant accident of a light-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamune, Hiroji; Shiba, Masayoshi; Adachi, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Norio; Okubo, Kaoru

    1975-12-01

    With ROSA-I (Rig of Safety Assessment - I), 61 runs of the LWR blowdown experiment have been carried out under the conditions: model reactor type, BWR and PWR; reactor core, none, no-heating and heating; rupture position, upper and lower pressure vessel nozzle; initial discharge pressure, 40, 70 and 100 kg/cm 2 G; and rupture diameter, 25, 50, 70, 100 and 125 mm. The purpose was to obtain the data of thermal and hydrodynamic behavior in the reactor pressure vessel during a blowdown, including in-vessel pressure, coolant temperature, discharge flow rate, model fuel rod surface temperature and shock wave. Analysis was also made with the codes RELAP-2 and -3 developed by NRTS of the United States, to verify the calculation model used. In addition, the results of calculation with the shockwave analysis code DEPCO developed in JAERI were compared with those by experiment. The experimental facility ROSA-I and the results obtained with it and also the analyses made in this connection, are described in detail. (auth.)

  10. Eye pathologies of Chernobyl clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglite, A.; Ozola, G.; Curbakova, E.

    1998-01-01

    Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs have become the most significant pathologies of Chernobyl clean-up workers during the last four years. The aim of this work was to evaluate the incidence of eye disorders among Chernobyl clean-up workers to provide more information for health specialists. During the last 10 years, the most common eye pathology has been angiopathia retinae, followed by myopia and cataracta. Statistical analyses showed that the clean-up workers have higher risk to develop angiopathia retinae than the control group. (author)

  11. U Plant Geographic Zone Cleanup Prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romine, L.D.; Leary, K.D.; Lackey, M.B.; Robertson, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as 'cleanup items') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) [1] was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will

  12. Corrosion and flow resistance of metal filter elements used in the cleanup of syngas from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Dahlin; E. Carl Landham; Xiaofeng Guan [Southern Research Institute, Wilsonville, AL (United States). Power Systems Development Facility

    2008-07-01

    At the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), a variety of filter elements and failsafes are being tested for the cleanup of coal-generated syngas from the Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) Transport Gasifier. Thus far, no evidence of corrosion or plugging has been found in the HR-160 failsafes or sinterned metal fiber elements. However, a progressive corrosion and increase in pressure drop has been noted in the iron aluminide elements. The corrosion was first detected as reddish-brown spots of iron oxide after about 2,000 to 3,000 hours of syngas exposure. As the corrosion progressed, the spots of iron oxide merged to form a continuous scale after about 5,000 to 5,500 hours of exposure. With additional exposure, a black scale containing iron sulfide also appeared, and localized areas of sulfidation and plugging were noted in element cross sections. These effects have not resulted in any significant reduction in tensile strength, but a gradual increase in the clean element pressure drop has been noted. Flow test results suggest that there is an interaction between the corroded filter surface and the dustcake that effectively increases the residual cake flow resistance and baseline pressure drop. 10 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, S. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, A. D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, M. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  14. LWR primary coolant pipe rupture test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitoshi, Shyoji

    1978-01-01

    The rupture test rig for primary coolant pipes is constructed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to verify the reliability of the primary coolant pipes for both PWRs and BWRs. The planned test items consisted of reaction force test, restraint test, whip test, jet test and continuous release test. A pressure vessel of about 4 m 3 volume, a circulating pump, a pressurizer, a heater, an air cooler and the related instrumentation and control system are included in this test rig. The coolant test condition is 160 kg/cm 2 g, 325 deg C for PWR test, and 70 kg/cm 2 g, saturated water and steam for BWR test, 100 ton of test load for the ruptured pipe bore of 8B Schedule 160, and 20 lit/min. discharge during 20 h for continuous release of coolant. The maximum pit internal pressure was estimated for various pipe diameters and time under the PWR and BWR conditions. The spark rupturing device was adopted for the rupture mechanics in this test rig. The computer PANAFACOM U-300 is used for the data processing. This test rig is expected to operate in 1978 effectively for the improvement of reliability of LWR primary coolant pipes. (Nakai, Y.)

  15. Boiling water reactor liquid radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The standard sets forth minimum design, construction and performance requirements with due consideration for operation of the liquid radioactive waste processing system for boiling water reactor plants for routine operation including design basis fuel leakage and design basis occurrences. For the purpose of this standard, the liquid radioactive waste processing system begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary, at the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems and at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material. The system terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse. The standard does not include the reactor coolant clean-up system, fuel pool clean-up system, sanitary waste system, any nonaqueous liquid system or controlled area storm drains

  16. Assessment of the integration of a He-cooled divertor system in the power conversion system for the dual-coolant blanket concept (TW2-TRP-PPCS12D8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, P.; Kruessmann, R.; Malang, S.; Reimann, G.

    2002-12-01

    Application of a helium-cooled divertor together with the dual-coolant blanket concept is considered favourable for achieving a high thermal efficiency of the power plant due to its relatively high coolant outlet temperature. A new FZK He-cooled modular divertor concept with integrated pin arrays (HEMP) is introduced. Its main features and function are described in detail. The result of the thermalhydraulic analysis shows that the HEMP divertor concept has the potential of resisting, a heat flow density of at least 10-15 MW/m 2 at a reachable heat transfer coefficient of approx. 60 kW/m 2 K and a reasonable pumping power. Integration of this divertor concept into the power conversion system using a closed Brayton gas turbine system with three-stage compression leads to a net efficiency of the blanket/divertor cycle of about 43%. (orig.)

  17. Iron crud supply device to reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Takao.

    1993-01-01

    In a device for supplying iron cruds into reactor coolants in a BWR type power plant, a system in which feed water containing iron cruds is supplied to the reactor coolants after once passing through an ion exchange resin is disposed. As a result, iron cruds having characteristics similar with those of naturally occurring iron cruds in the plant are obtained and they react with ionic radioactivity, to form composite oxides. Then, iron cruds having high performance of being secured to the surface of a fuel cladding tube can be supplied to the reactor coolants, thereby enabling to greatly reduce the density of reactor water ionic radioactivity. In its turn, dose rate on the surface of pipelines can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce operators' radiation exposure dose in the plant. Further, contamination of a condensate desalting device due to iron cruds can be prevented, and further, the density of the iron cruds supplied can easily be controlled. (N.H.)

  18. Simulation of a large break loss of coolant (LBLOCA), without actuation of the emergency injection systems (ECCS) for a BWR-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Lopez M, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the analysis of scenario for the loss of coolant case was realized with break at the bottom of a recirculation loop of a BWR-5 with containment type Mark II and a thermal power of 2317 MWt considering that not have coolant injection. This in order to observe the speed of progression of the accident, the phenomenology of the scenario, the time to reach the limit pressure of containment venting and the amount of radionuclides released into the environment. This simulation was performed using the MELCOR code version 2.1. The scenario posits a break in one of the shear recirculation loops. The emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (Rcic) have not credit throughout the event, which allowed achieve greater severity on scenario. The venting of the primary containment was conducted via valve of 30 inches instead of the line of 24 inches of wet well, this in order to have a larger area of exhaust of fission products directly to the reactor building. The venting took place when the pressure in the primary containment reached the 4.5 kg/cm 2 and remained open for the rest of the scenario to maximize the amount released of radionuclides to the atmosphere. The safety relief valves were considered functional they do not present mechanical failure or limit their ability to release pressure due to the large number of performances in safety mode. The results of the analysis covers about 48 hours, time at which the accident evolution was observed; behavior of level, pressure in the vessel and the fuel temperature profile was analyzed. For progression of the scenario outside the vessel, the pressure and temperature of the primary containment, level and temperature of the suppression pool, the hydrogen accumulation in the container and the radionuclides mass released into the atmosphere were analyzed. (Author)

  19. Comparative design study of FR plants with various coolants. 1. Studies on Na coolant FR, Pb-Bi coolant FR, gas coolant FR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomura, Mamoru; Shimakawa, Yoshio; Hori, Toru; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Kida, Masanori; Kasai, Shigeo; Ichimiya, Masakazu

    2001-01-01

    In Phase I of the Feasibility Studies on the Commercialized Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle System, plant designs on FR were performed with various coolants. This report describes the plant designs on FR with sodium, lead-bismuth, CO 2 gas and He gas coolants. A construction cost of 0.2 million yen/kWe was set up as a design goal. The result is as follows: The sodium reactor has a capability to obtain the goal, and lead-bismuth and gas reactors may satisfy the goal with further improvements. (author)

  20. Radiation cleanup of vacuum systems (radiation-induced outgassing). Progress report, September 15, 1976--September 14, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, J.N.

    1977-06-01

    A stainless steel-304 vacuum system has been designed and constructed to study radiation-induced outgassing when this material is exposed to cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The system is pumped with an ion pump and sorption roughing pump. No foreign materials have been introduced except for copper seals at the flanges. An analytical model has been developed which predicts the outgassing from SS-304 to be 8.27 x 10 -12 torr-liters/(cm 2 )(sec) per megarad/hr. Extrapolation of existing data for aluminum suggests a lower value of 1.0 x 10 -12 torr-liters/(cm 2 )(sec) per megarad/hr. Experiments to determine the value are currently in progress

  1. Innovative technologies for soil cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for soil cleanup. In this context, soil cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal primarily with the vadose zone and with relatively shallow, near-surface contamination of soil or rock materials. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in soil cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the sits-specific technical challenges presented by each sold contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After cataloging a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, Dynamic Underground Stripping, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising soil cleanup technology that is now being field tested

  2. Innovative technologies for groundwater cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for groundwater cleanup. In this context, groundwater cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal with contaminants in ground water or that may move from the vadose zone into ground water. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in groundwater cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the site-specific technical challenges presented by each groundwater contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After reviewing a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, the Microbial Filter method, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising in situ groundwater cleanup technology that is now being readied for field testing

  3. BWR reactor water cleanup system flexible wedge gate isolation valve qualification and high energy flow interruption test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Steele, R. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the results of research performed to develop technical insights for the NRC effort regarding Generic Issue 87, ''Failure of HPCI Steam Line Without Isolation.'' Volume III of this report contains the data and findings from the original research performed to assess the qualification of the valves and reported in EGG-SSRE-7387, ''Qualification of Valve Assemblies in High Energy BWR Systems Penetrating Containment.'' We present the original work here to complete the documentation trail. The recommendations contained in Volume III of this report resulted in the test program described in Volume I and II. The research began with a survey to characterize the population of normally open containment isolation valves in those process lines that connect to the primary system and penetrate containment. The qualification methodology used by the various manufacturers identified in the survey is reviewed and deficiencies in that methodology are identified. Recommendations for expanding the qualification of valve assemblies for high energy pipe break conditions are presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. World Record Earned Value Management System Certification for Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 13181

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Ray; Hirschy, Anita [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR), East Tennessee Technology Park D and D and Environmental Remediation Project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    On projects that require Earned Value Management (EVMS) Certification, it is critical to quickly prepare for and then successfully obtain certification. This is especially true for government contracts. Projects that do poorly during the review are subject to financial penalties to their company and they lose creditability with their customer creating problems with the project at the outset. At East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), we began preparing for Department of Energy (DOE) certification early during proposal development. Once the contract was awarded, while still in transition phase from the previous contractor to our new company, we immediately began reviewing the project controls systems that were in place on the project and determined if any replacements needed to be made immediately. The ETTP contract required the scheduling software to be upgraded to Primavera P6 and we determined that no other software changes would be done prior to certification. Next, preparation of the Project Controls System Description (PCSD) and associated procedures began using corporate standards as related to the project controls systems. During the transition phase, development was started on the Performance Measurement Baseline which is the resource loaded schedule used to measure our performance on the project and which is critical to good Earned Value Management of the project. Early on, and throughout the baseline review, there was positive feedback from the Department of Energy that the quality of the new baseline was good. Having this superior baseline also contributed to our success in EVMS certification. The combined companies of URS and CH2M Hill had recent experience with certifications at other Department of Energy sites and we were able to capitalize on that knowledge and experience. Generic PCSD and procedures consistent with our co-operations approach to Earned Value Management were available to us and were easily tailorable to the specifics of our contract

  5. World Record Earned Value Management System Certification for Cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA - 13181

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, Ray; Hirschy, Anita

    2013-01-01

    On projects that require Earned Value Management (EVMS) Certification, it is critical to quickly prepare for and then successfully obtain certification. This is especially true for government contracts. Projects that do poorly during the review are subject to financial penalties to their company and they lose creditability with their customer creating problems with the project at the outset. At East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), we began preparing for Department of Energy (DOE) certification early during proposal development. Once the contract was awarded, while still in transition phase from the previous contractor to our new company, we immediately began reviewing the project controls systems that were in place on the project and determined if any replacements needed to be made immediately. The ETTP contract required the scheduling software to be upgraded to Primavera P6 and we determined that no other software changes would be done prior to certification. Next, preparation of the Project Controls System Description (PCSD) and associated procedures began using corporate standards as related to the project controls systems. During the transition phase, development was started on the Performance Measurement Baseline which is the resource loaded schedule used to measure our performance on the project and which is critical to good Earned Value Management of the project. Early on, and throughout the baseline review, there was positive feedback from the Department of Energy that the quality of the new baseline was good. Having this superior baseline also contributed to our success in EVMS certification. The combined companies of URS and CH2M Hill had recent experience with certifications at other Department of Energy sites and we were able to capitalize on that knowledge and experience. Generic PCSD and procedures consistent with our co-operations approach to Earned Value Management were available to us and were easily tailorable to the specifics of our contract

  6. Sodium hydroxide injection passivation work for the reactor water clean-up system in a new ABWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Tung-Jen; Lu, Ju-Huang

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have identified that Co-58 and Co-60 as the primary source of radiation build up on out-of-core components in new BWR plants. The deposition rate of Co on stainless steel and carbon steel is shown to be controlled mainly by the thickness of oxide films and its morphology formed through pretreatment. The passivation treatment was implemented accordingly at Lungmen unit 1 in an ABWR plant in September 2010. It is determined that the passivation conditions should be maintained at the temperature of 180∼230 deg. C, pH of 8.0∼8.5 and dissolved oxygen content over 400 ppb. The films would provide effective protection against radioactive deposition. The application of the pre-filming process on piping before the pre-operation is done during the flow induced vibration test (FIV) period. The protectiveness of stable magnetite can be increased by the pH control under the specific condition. The pre-filming control process and evaluation of passivation effectiveness is discussed in detail based on the surface analysis of the passivated specimens. Many efforts have been devoted to sodium hydroxide injection method for pH control of the system through the filter demineralizer under smooth operation. A comparison of test specimens on the properties of oxide film formed between laboratory and in-plant tests through alkaline treatment are also shown in this report. (authors)

  7. Structural analysis of the as-built IEA-R1 primary coolant piping system using a complete three dimensional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Martins, Lucas B.; Marcolin, Gabriel; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    IEA-R1 is an open pool type research reactor, moderated by light water and upgraded from 2 MW to 5 MW of operating power level. Heat generated in the reactor core is removed by a coolant system divided in two circuits, primary and secondary, composed by pumps, piping, heat exchangers, cooling tower, and some other auxiliary components. The 5 MW operating power level is now possible due to a modernization program started in 1996. As a part of the modernization program, ageing assessment studies recommend the replacement of one of the two heat exchangers in the circuit. To manage this replacement, modifications in the layout of the primary and secondary piping and supporting systems were performed, based on preliminary stress analysis study. Then, the aim of this work is to present the final stress analysis of the primary circuit. To reach this and taking the modifications of the primary into account, a 3D model of the whole circuit, in the as-built condition, was made. Stress results and discussions are shown. (author)

  8. Oil spills and their cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.

    1995-01-01

    Oil spills are an unfortunately common occurrence in the world's seas and can have extensive damaging environmental consequences. This article examines various methods of cleaning up oil spills, evaluates their effectiveness in various situations, and identifies areas where, current methods being inadequate, further research is needed. Containment, mechanical removal, shoreline cleanup, chemical treating agents, in situ burning, natural recovery and enhanced bioremediation are all assessed. The cleanup method must be selected to match environmental conditions. Results are good in quiet, sheltered waters, but need extensive development in open waters and high seas. (UK)

  9. Device for preventing coolant in a reactor from being lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent all of coolant from being lost from the core at the time of failure in rupture of pipe in a recirculation system to cool the core with the coolant remained within the reactor. Structure: A valve, which will be closed when a water level of the coolant within the core is in a level less than a predetermined level, is provided on a recirculating water outlet nozzle in a pressure vessel to thereby prevent the coolant from being lost when the pipe is broken, thus cooling the core by means of reduced-pressure boiling of coolant remained within the core and boiling due to heat, and restraining core reactivity by means of void produced at that time. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Comparison of three small-break loss-of-coolant accident tests with different break locations using the system-integrated modular advanced reactor-integral test loop facility to estimate the safety of the smart design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Bae

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Three small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA tests with safety injection pumps were carried out using the integral-effect test loop for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor, i.e., the SMART-ITL facility. The types of break are a safety injection system line break, shutdown cooling system line break, and pressurizer safety valve line break. The thermal–hydraulic phenomena show a traditional behavior to decrease the temperature and pressure whereas the local phenomena are slightly different during the early stage of the transient after a break simulation. A safety injection using a high-pressure pump effectively cools down and recovers the inventory of a reactor coolant system. The global trends show reproducible results for an SBLOCA scenario with three different break locations. It was confirmed that the safety injection system is robustly safe enough to protect from a core uncovery.

  11. Comparison of three small-break loss-of-coolant accident tests with different break locations using the system-integrated modular advanced reactor-integral test loop facility to estimate the safety of the smart design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hwang; Ryu, Sung Uk; Yi, Sung Jae; Park, Hyun Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok [Dept. of Precision Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Three small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) tests with safety injection pumps were carried out using the integral-effect test loop for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), i.e., the SMART-ITL facility. The types of break are a safety injection system line break, shutdown cooling system line break, and pressurizer safety valve line break. The thermal–hydraulic phenomena show a traditional behavior to decrease the temperature and pressure whereas the local phenomena are slightly different during the early stage of the transient after a break simulation. A safety injection using a high-pressure pump effectively cools down and recovers the inventory of a reactor coolant system. The global trends show reproducible results for an SBLOCA scenario with three different break locations. It was confirmed that the safety injection system is robustly safe enough to protect from a core uncovery.

  12. On line monitoring of temperatures of coolant channels by thermal imaging in a laboratory set-up fabricated for the detection of leakage of coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S; Ghosh, J K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiometallurgy Div.; Patel, R J [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Refuelling Technology Division

    1994-12-31

    Leakage from coolant channels in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) increases the temperatures of the faulty channels. Measurement of temperatures of the coolant channels is, therefore, one way to detect the leaking channel. Thermal imaging technique offers a unique means for this detection providing a fast, non-contact, on-line measurement. An experiment was carried out for the detection of leakage of coolants through the seal plugs of the coolant channels in PHWR using an experimental setup under the simulated conditions of temperature and pressure of the coolant channels inside the reactor and using an infrared imaging system. The experimental details and the observations have been presented. 7 figs.

  13. On line monitoring of temperatures of coolant channels by thermal imaging in a laboratory set-up fabricated for the detection of leakage of coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Ghosh, J.K.; Patel, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Leakage from coolant channels in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) increases the temperatures of the faulty channels. Measurement of temperatures of the coolant channels is, therefore, one way to detect the leaking channel. Thermal imaging technique offers a unique means for this detection providing a fast, non-contact, on-line measurement. An experiment was carried out for the detection of leakage of coolants through the seal plugs of the coolant channels in PHWR using an experimental setup under the simulated conditions of temperature and pressure of the coolant channels inside the reactor and using an infrared imaging system. The experimental details and the observations have been presented. 7 figs

  14. Loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the Savannah River new production reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, K.J.; Pryor, R.J.

    1990-11-01

    This document contains the loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. Included in this document are descriptions of the primary system, reactor vessel, and loss-of-coolant accident computer input models, the results of the cold leg and hot leg loss-of-coolant accident analyses, and the results of sensitivity calculations for the cold leg loss-of-coolant accident. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Recycling Facilities - Land Recycling Cleanup Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Land Recycling Cleanup Location Land Recycling Cleanup Locations (LRCL) are divided into one or more sub-facilities categorized as media: Air, Contained Release or...

  16. Improving the ALUeS diagnostic system for determining the coolant leak place from the WWER-440 primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markosyan, G.R.; Petrosyan, V.G.; Shakhverdyan, S.V.; Aslanyan, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The new algorithm for localizing the leakage from the WWER-440 primary circuit, intended for operation in the Siemens ALUeS system, is proposed. The results of the algorithm realization in the leakage control system (the ALUeS system copy), installed at the Armenian NPP power unit-2, are presented. The leakage localization algorithm proposed was tested in other experiments. The leakage position in the majority of cases is determined exactly. Small (up to 5 m) deviations, the cause whereof were incorrect readings of the transducers, were observed [ru

  17. Advisory group meeting on design and performance of reactor and subcritical blanket systems with lead and lead-bismuth as coolant and/or target material. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Design and Performance of Reactor and Sub-critical Blanket Systems with Lead and Lead-Bismuth as Coolant and/or Target Material was to provide a forum for international information exchange on all the topics relevant to Pb and Pb/Bi cooled critical and sub-critical reactors. In addition, the AGM aimed at: (1) finding ways and means to improve international co-ordination efforts in this area; (2) obtaining advice from the Member States with regard to the activities to be implemented in this area by the IAEA, in order to best meet their needs; and (3) laying out the plans for an effective co-ordination and support of the R and D activities in this area. The AGM stressed that nuclear energy is a realistic solution to satisfy the energy demand, considering the limited resources of fossil fuel, its uneven distribution in the world and the impact of its use on the planet, and taking into account the expected doubling of the world population in the 21st century and tripling of the electricity demand (especially in the developing countries). However, the AGM concluded that the development of an innovative nuclear technology meeting the following requirements must be pursued: (a) deterministic exclusion of any severe accident; (b) proliferation resistance; (c) cost competitiveness with alternative energy sources; (d) sustainable fuel supply; and (e) solution of the radioactive waste management problem

  18. Heat and fluid flow in accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3. Behaviour of high pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) based on thermodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the process of Accident of Fukushima Nuclear Plants, an accident scenario of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3 is analyzed from the data open to the public. Phase equilibrium process model was introduced in which the vapor and water are at saturation point in the vessels. The present accident scenario assumes that the high pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) did not worked properly, but the steam in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) leaked through the turbine of HPCI to the suppression chamber since 12/3/2011 12:35. It is assumed that the Tsunami flooded the torus room where the suppression chamber was placed. Proposed accident scenario agrees with the data of the plant parameters obtained just after the accident. It is estimated that the water injection by HPIC was stopped since around at 13/3 19:00 and the water level in RPV decreased since then. It is estimated that the RPV broke at 14/3 8:55 and water could injected from fire engines due to the depression due to the rupture of RPV. There was little water left in RPV at the time of the rupture. If the present scenario is correct, the behavior that operators in the plant stopped HPCI at 13/3 2:42 did not affect seriously on the RPV rupture. If HPCI was working properly until the operators stopped it, the plant parameters obtained in the accident cannot be explained. (author)

  19. Design of the reactor coolant system and associated systems in nuclear power plants. Safety guide (Spanish Edition); Diseno del sistema de refrigeracion del reactor y los sistemas asociados en las centrales nucleares. Guia de seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for establishing safety standards for nuclear power plants. The basic requirements for the design of safety systems for nuclear power plants are established in the Safety Requirements publication, Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1 on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, which it supplements. This Safety Guide describes how the requirements for the design of the reactor coolant system (RCS) and associated systems in nuclear power plants should be met. This publication is a revision and combination of two previous Safety Guides, Safety Series No. 50-SG-D6 on Ultimate Heat Sink and Directly Associated Heat Transport Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (1982), and Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13 on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (1987), which are superseded by this new Safety Guide. The revision takes account of developments in the design of the RCS and associated systems in nuclear power plants since the earlier Safety Guides were published in 1982 and 1987, respectively. The other objectives of the revision are to ensure consistency with Ref., issued in 2004, and to update the technical content. In addition, an appendix on pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) has been included.

  20. Composition and concentration of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant of the reactor primary cooling system of the Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; La Gamma, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Fernandez, Alberto N.; Allemandi, Walter; Manera, Raul; Rosales, Hugo

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants type PWR and PHWR (pressurized water reactor and pressurized heavy water reactor) have three coolant circuits which only exchange energy among them. The primary circuit, whose coolant extracts the reactor energy, the secondary circuit or water-steam cycle and the tertiary circuit which could be lake, river or sea water. The chemistry of the primary and secondary coolants is carefully controlled with the aim of minimizing the corrosion of structural materials. However, very low rates of corrosion are inevitable and one of the consequences of the corrosion processes is the presence of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant from where several problems associated with mass transfer arisen. In this way radioactive nuclides are transported out of the core to the steam generators, hydraulic resistance increases and heat transfer capability degrades. In the present paper some alternative techniques are proposed for the quantification of both, the particulate and soluble matter present in the coolant and their correspondent composition. Some results are also included and discussed. (author)

  1. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A review of French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all occurred leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by the compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  2. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all actual leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  3. Development of a coupled containment-reactor coolant system methodology for the analysis of IRIS small break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfredini, Antonio; Oriolo, Francesco; Paci, Sandro; Oriani, Luca

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to identify the most relevant physical phenomena for the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) containment system and the development of an integrated methodology for the simultaneous safety analysis of both the reactor and containment with available computer codes. Specific objectives are: (a) to assess the limitations of the lumped parameter codes on predictions of complex situations; (b) to identify alternatives to classical containment analysis techniques. The characteristic features of an integral reactor like IRIS present a much greater challenge to code developers than conventional, loop type PWRs. In particular, the integral primary system and the containment are strongly coupled during postulated accident conditions and thus an integrated simulation of both systems is required to obtain a reliable phenomenological representation. The comparison of the results obtained in the application of two containment codes (GOTHIC and integrated FUMO) on 'ad hoc' IRIS related benchmarks will also be described. These preliminary calculations were used to test the IRIS containment concept and cooling strategies, at the same time highlighting the most relevant issues that require a more refined investigation. Finally, this activity allowed to perform more refined calculations, in progress at the moment, aimed at showing that the IRIS safety systems and containment design solutions perform their intended functions. (author)

  4. Development of lead-bismuth coolant technology for nuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Kin-ya; Kitano, Teruaki; Ono, Mikinori

    2004-01-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth is a promising material as a future fast reactor coolant or an intensive neutron source material for accelerator driven transmutation system (ADS). To develop nuclear plants and their installations using lead-bismuth coolant for practical use, both coolant technologies, inhabitation process of steels and quality control of coolant, and total operation system for liquid lead-bismuth plants are required. Based on the experience of liquid metal coolant, Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. (MES) has completed the liquid lead-bismuth forced circulation loop and has acquired various engineering data on main components including economizer. As a result of tis operation, MES has developed key technologies of lead-bismuth coolant such as controlling of oxygen content in lead-bismuth and a purification of lead-bismuth coolant. MES participated in the national project, ''The Development of Accelerator Driven Transmutation System'', together with JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and started corrosion test for beam window of ADS. (author)

  5. Assessment of chemical processes for the post-accident decontamination of reactor-coolant systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.F.; Card, C.J.; Divine, J.R.

    1983-02-01

    Previously used chemical decontamination processes and potentially useful new decontamination processes were examined for the usefulness following a reactor accident. Both generic fuel damage accidents and the accident at TMI-2 were considered. A total of fourteen processes were evaluated. Process evaluation included data in the following categories: technical description of the process, recorded past usage, effectiveness, process limitation, safety consideration, and waste management. These data were evaluated, and cost considerations were presented along with a description of the applicability of the process to TMI-2 and development and demonstration needs. Specific recommendations regarding a primary-system decontamination development program to support TMI-2 recovery were also presented

  6. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  7. Test of the scroll pump in the JAERI Fuel Cleanup System in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly. JFCU scroll pump test and result, JFCU stand alone tritium test 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takumi; Konishi, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Ohira, Shigeru [and others

    1993-03-01

    In the JAERI Fuel Cleanup System (JFCU), major subsystem of the TSTA simulated fusion fuel loop, a Normetex Scroll pump is used to pump out hydrogen isotope gases from the palladium diffuser. The characteristics of the pump was measured with hydrogen isotopes and helium, in a closed loop. Compression ratio and ultimate pressure were strongly affected by the delivery pressure and the species of the gas. Particularly with H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, additional metal bellows pump was proved to be needed to satisfy the process requirement. For hydrogen isotopes, pumping characteristics improves with the mass of the gas and similar pumping capability was obtained with pure T{sub 2} and helium. (author).

  8. Triboengineering problems of lead coolant in innovative fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Novozhilova, O.O.; Shumilkov, A.I.; Lvov, A.V.; Bokova, T.A.; Makhov, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Models of experimental sites for research of processes tribology in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Highlights: • The contact a pair of heavy liquid metal coolant for reactors on fast neutrons. • The hydrostatic bearings main circulation pumps. • Oxide coating and degree of wear of friction surfaces in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Abstract: So far, there are plenty of works dedicated to studying the phenomenon of friction. However, there are none dedicated to functioning of contact pairs in heavy liquid-metal coolants for fast neutron, reactor installations (Kogaev and Drozdov, 1991; Modern Tribology, 2008; Drozdov et al., 1986). At the Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University, such research is conducted in respect to friction, bearings of main circulating pumps, interaction of sheaths of neutron absorber rods with their covers, of the reactor control and safety system, refueling systems, and interaction of coolant flows with, channel borders. As a result of experimental studies, the characteristic of friction pairs in the heavy, liquid metal coolant shows the presence dependences of oxide film on structural materials of the wear. The inapplicability of existing calculation methods for assessing the performance of the bearing nodes, in the heavy liquid metal coolant is shown

  9. Device for preventing coolant outflow in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Mochizuki, Keiichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent outflow of coolant from a reactor vessel even in an occurrence of leaking trouble at a low position in a primary cooling system or the like in the reactor vessel. Structure: An inlet at the foremost end of a coolant inlet pipe inserted into a reactor vessel is arranged at a level lower than a core, and a check valve is positioned at a level higher than the core in a rising portion of the inlet. In normal condition, the check valve is pushed up by discharge pressure of a main circulating pump and remains closed, and hence, producing no flow loss of coolant, sodium. However, when a trouble such as rupture occurs at the lower position in the primary cooling system, the attractive force for allowing the coolant to back-flow outside the reactor vessel and the load force of the coolant within the reactor vessel cause the check valve to actuate, as a consequence of which a liquid level of the coolant downwardly moves to the position of the check valve to intake the cover gases into a gas intake, thereby cutting off a flow passage of the coolant to stop outflow thereof. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT PROPERTIES OF THE COOLANT RECOVERY SYSTEM HEAT LOSSES OF COMBINED COMPRESSOR-POWER PLANT ON ITS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusha V.L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of theoretical analysis of the effectiveness of an ideal thermodynamic cycle internal combustion engine combined with an external utilization of exhaust heat. The influence of the properties of the coolant circuit of utilization on its operational parameters and characteristics of the power plant.

  11. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 coolant transient (V1000CT) benchmark for assessing coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics system codes for VVER-1000 RIA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K.; Aniel, S.; Royer, E.; Kolev, N.; Groudev, P.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the two phases of the OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark labeled as V1000CT. This benchmark is based on a data from the Bulgarian Kozloduy NPP Unit 6. The first phase of the benchmark was designed for the purpose of assessing neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic modeling for a VVER-1000 reactor, and specifically for their use in analyzing reactivity transients in a VVER-1000 reactor. Most of the results of Phase 1 will be compared against experimental data and the rest of the results will be used for code-to-code comparison. The second phase of the benchmark is planned for evaluation and improvement of the mixing computational models. Code-to-code and code-to-data comparisons will be done based on data of a mixing experiment conducted at Kozloduy-6. Main steam line break will be also analyzed in the second phase of the V1000CT benchmark. The results from it will be used for code-to-code comparison. The benchmark team has been involved in analyzing different aspects and performing sensitivity studies of the different benchmark exercises. The paper presents a comparison of selected results, obtained with two different system thermal-hydraulics codes, with the plant data for the Exercise 1 of Phase 1 of the benchmark as well as some results for Exercises 2 and 3. Overall, this benchmark has been well accepted internationally, with many organizations representing 11 countries participating in the first phase of the benchmark. (authors)

  12. Minimizing secondary coolant blowdown in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. C.; Woo, J. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Cho, Y. G.; Lim, N. Y.

    2000-01-01

    There is about 80m 3 /h loss of the secondary cooling water by evaporation, windage and blowdown during the operation of HANARO, 30MW research reactor. The evaporation and the windage is necessary loss to maintain the performance of cooling tower, but the blowdown is artificial lose to get rid of the foreign material and to maintain the quality of the secondary cooling water. Therefore, minimizing the blowdown loss was studied. It was confirmed, through the relation of the number of cycle and the loss rate of secondary coolant, that the number of cycle is saturated to 12 without blowdown because of the windage loss. When the secondary coolant is treated by high Ca-hardness treatment program (the number of cycle > 10) to maintain the number of cycle around 12 without blowdown, only the turbidity exceeds the limit. By adding filtering system it was confirmed, through the relation of turbidity and filtering rate of secondary cooling water, that the turbidity is reduced below the limit (5 deg.) by 2% of filtering rate without blowdown. And it was verified, through the performance test of back-flow filtering unit, that this unit gets rid of foreign material up to 95% of the back-flow and that the water can be reused as coolant. Therefore, the secondary cooling water can be treated by the high Ca-hardness program and filter system without blowdown

  13. Effect of parameter variation of reactor coolant pump on loss of coolant accident consequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Gaojian; Huang Daishun; Gao Yingxian; He Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analyses were carried out on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II to study the consequence of the loss of coolant accident when the homologous characteristic curves and free volumes of the reactor coolant pump changed. Two different pumps used in the analysis were 100D (employed on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II) and ANDRITZ. The thermal characteristics in the large break LOCA accident were analyzed using CATHRE GB and CONPATE4, and the reactor coolant system hydraulics load during blow-clown phase of LOCA accident was analyzed using ATHIS and FORCET. The calculated results show that the homologous characteristic curves have great effect on the thermal characteristics of reactor core during the reflood phase of the large break LOCA accident. The maximum cladding surface temperatures are quite different when the pump's homologous characteristic curves change. On the other hand, the pump's free volume changing results in the variation of the LOCA rarefaction wave propagation, and therefore, the reactor coolant system hydraulic load in LOCA accident would be different. (authors)

  14. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  15. Reactor coolant pump transportation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noce, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an incident, which occurred on August 27, 1991, in which a Reactor Coolant Pump motor en route from Surry Power Station to Westinghouse repair facilities struck the overpass at the junction of Interstate 64 and Jefferson Avenue in Newport News, Virginia. The transport container that housed the reactor coolant pump motor failed to clear the overpass. The force of the impact dislodged the container and motor from the truck bed, and it landed on the acceleration land and road shoulder. Upon impact, the container broke open and exposed the reactor coolant pump motor. Incidental radioactively contaminated water that remained in the motor coolers drained onto the road, contaminating the aggregate as well as the underlying gravel

  16. Computer-aided cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Jones, B.

    1994-01-01

    In late 1992, the remedial investigation of operable unit 2 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Superfund site in Fernald, Ohio was in trouble. Despite years of effort--including an EPA-approved field-investigation work plan, 123 soil borings, 51 ground-water-monitoring wells, analysis of more than 650 soil and ground-water samples, and preparation of a draft remedial-investigation (RI) report--it was not possible to conclude if contaminated material in the unit was related to ground-water contamination previously detected beneath and beyond the site boundary. Compounding the problem, the schedule for the RI, feasibility study and record of decision for operable unit 2 was governed by a DOE-EPA consent agreement stipulating penalties of up to $10,000 per week for not meeting scheduled milestones--and time was running out. An advanced three-dimensional computer model confirmed that radioactive wastes dumped at the Fernald, Ohio Superfund site had contaminated ground water, after years of previous testing has been inconclusive. The system is now being used to aid feasibility and design work on the more-than-$1 billion remediation project

  17. A tritium vessel cleanup experiment in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caorlin, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Owens, D.K.; Voorhees, D.; Mueller, D.; Ramsey, A.T.; La Marche, P.H.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    A simple tritium cleanup experiment was carried out in TFTR following the initial high power deuterium-tritium discharges in December 1993. A series of 34 ohmic and deuterium neutral beam fueled shots was used to study the removal of tritium implanted into the wall and limiters. A very large plasma was created in each discharge to ''scrub'' an area as large as possible. Beam-fueled shots at 2.5 to 7.5 MW of injected power were used to monitor tritium concentration levels in the plasma by detection of DT-neutrons. The neutron signal decreased by a factor of 4 during the experiment, remaining well above the expected T-burnup level. The amount of tritium recovered at the end of the cleanup was about 8% of the amount previously injected with high power DT discharges. The experience gained suggests that measurements of tritium inventory in the torus are very difficult to execute and require dedicated systems with overall accuracy of 1%

  18. Transient behaviour of main coolant pump in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delja, A.

    1986-01-01

    A basic concept of PWR reactor coolant pump thermo-hydraulic modelling in transient and accident operational condition is presented. The reactor coolant pump is a component of the nuclear steam supply system which forces the coolant through the reactor and steam generator, maintaining design heat transfer condition. The pump operating conditions have strong influence on the flow and thermal behaviour of NSSS, both in the stationary and nonstationary conditions. A mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump is formed by using dimensionless homologous relations in the four-quadrant regimes: normal pump, turbine, dissipation and reversed flow. Since in some operational regimes flow of mixture, liquid and steam may occur, the model has additional correction members for two-phase homologous relations. Modular concept has been used in developing computer program. The verification is performed on the simulation loss of offsite power transient and obtained results are presented. (author)

  19. Comparison of three small-break loss-of-coolant accident tests with different break locations using the system-integrated modular advanced reactor-integral test loop facility to estimate the safety of the smart design

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang Bae; Dong Eok Kim; Sung-Uk Ryu; Sung-Jae Yi; Hyun-Sik Park

    2017-01-01

    Three small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) tests with safety injection pumps were carried out using the integral-effect test loop for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), i.e., the SMART-ITL facility. The types of break are a safety injection system line break, shutdown cooling system line break, and pressurizer safety valve line break. The thermal–hydraulic phenomena show a traditional behavior to decrease the temperature and pressure whereas the local phenomena are s...

  20. Research of impact of kind resuperheat and structure of system regenerative feed water to thermodynamic efficiency of cycle with steam-coolant reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maykova Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first key problems of modern nuclear reactors are inability of closed nuclear cycle, problems with spent nuclear fuel, poor effectiveness of nuclear fuel and heat-exchange equipment usage. Dealing with problems consists in usage of fast-neutron reactors with steam coolant. Scientific men analyzed neutron-physical processes in steam-cooled fast reactor and consulted that creation of the reactor is viable. In consequence of low steam activation a single-loop steam cycle may be create. The cycle is easy and fool-proof. Core thermomechanical equipment has mastered and has relatively low metal content. Results of calculation are showing that nuclear unit with steam-coolant fast neutron reactor is more efficient than widely used unit with reactor VVER. Usage of simple scheme with four regenerative feedwater heaters the absolute efficiency ratio is more than 43%.

  1. Accelerated cleanup risk reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, R.B.; Aines, R.M.; Blake, R.G.; Copeland, A.B.; Newmark, R.L.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1998-01-01

    well was 'capped'. Our results show the formation of an inclined gas phase during injection and a fast collapse of the steam zone within an hour of terminating steam injection. The majority of destruction occurs during the collapse phase, when contaminant laden water is drawn back towards the well. Little to no noncondensible gasses are created in this process, removing any possibility of sparging processes interfering with contaminant destruction. Our models suggest that the thermal region should be as hot and as large as possible. To have HPO accepted, we need to demonstrate the in situ destruction of contaminants. This requires the ability to inexpensively sample at depth and under high temperatures. We proved the ability to implies monitoring points at depths exceeding 150 feet in highly heterogeneous soils by use of cone penetrometry. In addition, an extractive system has been developed for sampling fluids and measuring their chemistry under the range of extreme conditions expected. We conducted a collaborative field test of HPO at a Superfund site in southern California where the contaminant is mainly creosote and pentachlorophenol. Field results confirm the destruction of contaminants by HPO, validate our field design from simulations, demonstrate that accurate field measurements of the critical fluid parameters can be obtained using existing monitoring wells (and minimal capital cost) and yield reliable cost estimates for future commercial application. We also

  2. Cleanup of radioactivity contamination in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso

    1994-01-01

    Environmental radioactivity cleanup is needed under a large scale accident in a reactor or in an RI irradiation facility which associates big disperse of radioactivities. Here, the fundamental concept including a radiation protection target, a period classification, planning, an information data base, etc. Then, the methods and measuring instruments on radioactivity contamination and the cleanup procedure are explained. Finally, the real site examples of accidental cleanup are presented for a future discussion. (author)

  3. HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the ∼200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the

  4. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in

  5. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated

  6. Historical research in the Hanford site waste cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, Michele S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will acquaint the audience with role of historical research in the Hanford Site waste cleanup - the largest waste cleanup endeavor ever undertaken in human history. There were no comparable predecessors to this massive waste remediation effort, but the Hanford historical record can provide a partial road map and guide. It can be, and is, a useful tool in meeting the goal of a successful, cost-effective, safe and technologically exemplary waste cleanup. The Hanford historical record is rich and complex. Yet, it poses difficult challenges, in that no central and complete repository or data base exists, records contain obscure code words and code numbers, and the measurement systems and terminology used in the records change many times over the years. Still, these records are useful to the current waste cleanup in technical ways, and in ways that extend beyond a strictly scientific aspect. Study and presentations of Hanford Site history contribute to the huge educational and outreach tasks of helping the Site's work force deal with 'culture change' and become motivated for the cleanup work that is ahead, and of helping the public and the regulators to place the events at Hanford in the context of WWII and the Cold War. This paper traces historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, and acquaints the audience with the generation of the major waste streams of concern in Hanford Site cleanup today. It presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. The earliest, 1940s knowledge base, assumptions and calculations about radioactive and chemical discharges, as discussed in the memos, correspondence and reports of the original Hanford Site (then Hanford Engineer Works) builders and operators, are reviewed. The growth of knowledge, research efforts, and subsequent changes in Site waste disposal policies and practices are traced. Examples of the strengths and limitations of the

  7. Sodium as a reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, S.B.G.

    1989-01-01

    This work is related to the use of sodium as a reactor coolant, to the advantages and problems related to its use, its mechanical, thermophysics, eletronical, magnetic and nuclear properties. It is mainly a bibliographic review, with the aim of gathering the necessary information to persons initiating in the study of sodium and also as reference source. (author) [pt

  8. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corractive measures taken are also described

  9. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  10. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M.; Baynes, P.A.

    1995-06-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies

  11. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I.

    2001-01-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR

  12. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after Academician A.I. Leipusky, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR.

  13. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, O. A. M.

    2014-11-01

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  14. Development of an administrative record system and information repository system to support environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, B.S.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an administrative record (AR) file system for the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This paper will focus on the background of the AR system and its implementation at the Hanford Site; the types of documents to be included in an AR file; the management system used to develop and implement the AR system; the unique characteristics of the AR system and the role of the information repositories. The objective of this session is to present the methodology used in developing an AR and information repository system so that common hurdles from various sites can be addressed and resolved similarly. Therefore unnecessary effort does not have to be put forth to resolve the same issues over and over again. The concepts described can be applied to all federal facility sites with a minimum amount of modification and revision. 9 refs

  15. Reliability of reactor plant water cleanup pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Carolina Power and Light Company's Brunswick 2 nuclear plant experienced a high reactor water cleanup pump-failure rate until inlet temperature and flow were reduced and mechanical modifications were implemented. Failures have been zero for about one year, and water cleanup efficiency has increased

  16. Specificities of reactor coolant pumps units with lead and lead-bismuth coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Anotonenkov, M.A.; Bokov, P.A.; Baranova, V.S.; Kustov, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis results of impact of lead and lead-bismuth coolants specific properties on the coolants flow features in flow channels of the main and auxiliary circulating pumps are presented. Impossibility of cavitation initiation in flow channels of vane pumps pumping lead and lead-bismuth coolants was demonstrated. The experimental research results of discontinuity of heavy liquid metal coolant column were presented and conditions of gas cavitation initiation in coolant flow were discussed. Invalidity of traditional calculation methods of water and sodium coolants circulation pumps calculations for lead and lead-bismuth coolants circulation pumps was substantiated [ru

  17. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.

    2007-01-01

    The primary mission of the Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division is to propose, to develop and to evaluate solutions for a safe, acceptable and sustainable management of radioactive waste. The Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division programme consists in research, studies, development and demonstration aiming to realise the objective of Agenda 21 on sustainable development in the field of radioactive waste and rehabilitation on radioactively contaminated sites. Indeed, it participates in the realisation of an objective which is to ensure that radioactive wastes are safely managed, transported, stored and disposed of, with a view to protecting human health and the environment, within a wider framework of an interactive and integrated approach to radioactive waste management and safety. We believe that nuclear energy will be necessary for the sustainable development of mankind in the 21st century, but we well understand that it would not be maintained if it is not proven that within benefits of nuclear energy a better protection of the environment is included. Although the current waste management practices are both technically and from the environmental point of view adequate, efforts in relation of future power production and waste management technologies should be put on waste minimisation. Therefore, the new and innovative reactors, fuel cycle and waste management processes and installations should be designed so that the waste generation can be kept in minimum. In addition to the design, the installations should be operated so as to create less waste; consideration should be given e.g. to keeping water chemistry clean and other quality factors. SCK-CEN in general and the Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division in particular are present in international groups preparing the development of innovative nuclear reactors, as Generation 4 and INPRO. Because performance assessments are often black boxes for the public, demonstration is needed for the acceptation of

  18. Buying time: Franchising hazardous and nuclear waste cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a private franchise approach to long-term custodial care, monitoring and eventual cleanup of hazardous and nuclear waste sites. The franchise concept could be applied to Superfund sites, decommissioning commercial reactors and safeguarding their wastes and to Department of Energy sites. Privatization would reduce costs by enforcing efficient operations and capital investments during the containment period, by providing incentives for successful innovation and by sustaining containment until the cleanup`s net benefits exceed its costs. The franchise system would also permit local governments and citizens to demand and pay for more risk reduction than provided by the federal government. In principle, they would have the option of taking over site management. The major political drawback of the idea is that it requires society to be explicit about what it is willing to pay for now to protect current and future generations. Hazardous waste sites are enduring legacies of energy development. Abandoned mines, closed refineries, underground storage tanks and nuclear facilities have often become threats to human health and water quality. The policy of the United States government is that such sites should quickly be made nonpolluting and safe for unrestricted use. That is, the policy of the United States is prompt cleanup. Orphaned commercial hazardous waste sites are addressed by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Superfund program. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Three Mile Island Cleanup: experiences, waste disposal, and environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.; Opelka, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    These papers were presented in a two-session symposium during the American Institute of Chemical Engineers 1981 Summer National meeting in Detroit, Michigan, August 16-19, 1981. The cleanup activities described included the venting of the gases, mostly krypton-85, from the reactor containment building and several entries of personnel into the containment building to determine the physical conditions and the levels of radiation and radioactive contamination. Results of the latest process development tests of the flowsheet for the submerged Demineralizer Water Treatment System for decontaminating the water in the containment building were presented. The status of existing knowledge of radiation effects on ion exchange materials used in radioactive waste management were reviewed. A program to demonstrate incorporation of the loaded zeolite into a glass as a final waste form was also described. The generation, classification, treatment, and disposal of solid waste forms resulting from the cleanup were discussed with special consideration of the ion exchange media used for cleanup of liquids with relatively high radionuclide concentrations. The radiological, socioeconomic, and psychological impacts of the cleanup were evaluated. This work formed the basis for the recent issuance by the NRC of a programmatic environmental impact statement relative to decontamination and disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from the accidents

  20. Trace organics in AGR coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.; Green, L.O.; Johnson, P.A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Several analytical techniques have been employed in previous studies of the stable organic compounds arising from the radiolysis of methane/carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide coolants. The majority of this early information was collected from the Windscale AGR prototype. Analyses were also carried out on the liquors obtained from the WAGR humidryers. Three classes of compound were found in the liquors; aliphatic acids in the aqueous phase and methyl ketones and aromatic hydrocarbons in the oily phase. Acetic acid was found to be the predominant carboxylic acid. This paper outlines the major findings from a recent analytical survey of coolants taken over a wide range of dose rate, pressure, temperature and composition, from materials testing reactor facilities, WAGR and CAGR. (author)

  1. EDF PWRs primary coolant purification strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressier, Frederic; Mascarenhas, Darren; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Bretelle, Jean-Luc; Ranchoux, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    In order to achieve a good physico-chemical quality of the primary coolant fluid, the primary water is continuously treated by the Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS). This system is composed of a treatment chain containing filters and ion-exchange resins. In the EDF design, an upstream filter is placed before the resin so as to prevent it from being saturated with insoluble particles. Then, the fluid passes through several resin beds (up to 3 depending on the configuration) and again through a downstream filter that prevents resin fines dissemination into the reactor coolant. Much work has been conducted in the last 5 years on the homogenisation of products and usage on French EDF NPP primary coolant treatment, while taking into account the compromise between source term reduction, liquid and solid waste, and buying and disposal costs. Two national markets have been created, and two operational documents for chemists on site have been published: a filtration guideline and an ion-exchange resin guideline. Both documents give general information about the products used, how are they characterized and selected for national market (technical requirements, standards and tests), how they should be used and what are the change-out criteria. They are also periodically updated based on feedback from sites. The positive impact on resin and filter lifetime (extension of some, limitation of others), homogenisation of products and usage will be presented. Moreover, EDF is constantly in the process of improving the current purification methods, as well as researching the use of existing and novel technologies. In this field, recent experiments on short loading of resin during reactor shutdown has been tested on site with success. In addition, work is done on silica free filters, filter consumption and filter chemical release. An overview of these optimization methods will be given. (authors)

  2. Multi-state reliability for coolant pump based on dependent competitive failure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Yanlong; Cai Qi; Zhao Xinwen; Chen Ling

    2013-01-01

    By taking into account the effect of degradation due to internal vibration and external shocks. and based on service environment and degradation mechanism of nuclear power plant coolant pump, a multi-state reliability model of coolant pump was proposed for the system that involves competitive failure process between shocks and degradation. Using this model, degradation state probability and system reliability were obtained under the consideration of internal vibration and external shocks for the degraded coolant pump. It provided an effective method to reliability analysis for coolant pump in nuclear power plant based on operating environment. The results can provide a decision making basis for design changing and maintenance optimization. (authors)

  3. Effect of emergency core cooling system flow reduction on channel temperature during recirculation phase of large break loss-of-coolant accident at Wolsong unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seon Oh; Cho, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Joong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    The feasibility of cooling in a pressurized heavy water reactor after a large break loss-of-coolant accident has been analyzed using Multidimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety-KINS Standard code during the recirculation phase. Through evaluation of sensitivity of the fuel channel temperature to various effective recirculation flow areas, it is determined that proper cooling of the fuel channels in the broken loop is feasible if the effective flow area remains above approximately 70% of the nominal flow area. When the flow area is reduced by more than approximately 25% of the nominal value, however, incipience of boiling is expected, after which the thermal integrity of the fuel channel can be threatened. In addition, if a dramatic reduction of the recirculation flow occurs, excursions and frequent fluctuations of temperature in the fuel channels are likely to be unavoidable, and thus damage to the fuel channels would be anticipated. To resolve this, emergency coolant supply through the newly installed external injection path can be used as one alternative means of cooling, enabling fuel channel integrity to be maintained and permanently preventing severe accident conditions. Thus, the external injection flow required to guarantee fuel channel coolability has been estimated.

  4. Effect of emergency core cooling system flow reduction on channel temperature during recirculation phase of large break loss-of-coolant accident at Wolsong unit 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Oh Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of cooling in a pressurized heavy water reactor after a large break loss-of-coolant accident has been analyzed using Multidimensional Analysis of Reactor Safety-KINS Standard code during the recirculation phase. Through evaluation of sensitivity of the fuel channel temperature to various effective recirculation flow areas, it is determined that proper cooling of the fuel channels in the broken loop is feasible if the effective flow area remains above approximately 70% of the nominal flow area. When the flow area is reduced by more than approximately 25% of the nominal value, however, incipience of boiling is expected, after which the thermal integrity of the fuel channel can be threatened. In addition, if a dramatic reduction of the recirculation flow occurs, excursions and frequent fluctuations of temperature in the fuel channels are likely to be unavoidable, and thus damage to the fuel channels would be anticipated. To resolve this, emergency coolant supply through the newly installed external injection path can be used as one alternative means of cooling, enabling fuel channel integrity to be maintained and permanently preventing severe accident conditions. Thus, the external injection flow required to guarantee fuel channel coolability has been estimated.

  5. Enhancing aquifer cleanup with reinjection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, W.F.; Ziagos, J.; Rice, D. Jr.; Krauter, P.; Nichols, E.

    1992-09-01

    Injection of water or steam, with or without chemical surfactants, is a common petroleum industry technique to enhance product recovery. In the geothermal industry, reinjection (reinjection is used to mean the injection of ground water that was previously injected) of heat- depleted subsurface fluids is commonly used to maintain reservoir pressure, thus prolonging field productivity. The use reinjection in ground-water remediation projects allows for the application of both traditional production field management and a variety of additional enhancements to the cleanup process. Development of the ideas in this paper was stimulated by an initial suggestion by Dr. Jacob Bear (personal discussions, 1990--1991) that reinjected water might be heated to aid the desorption process

  6. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km 2 Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal

  7. Primary coolant recycling device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru; Tokiwai, Moriyasu

    1998-01-01

    A primary coolants (liquid sodium) recycling device comprises a plurality of recycling pumps. The recycling pumps are operated while using, as a power source, electric power generated by a thermoelectric power generation system by utilizing heat stored in the coolants. The thermoelectric power generation system comprises a thermo-electric conversion module, heat collecting heat pipes as a high temperature side heat conduction means and heat dissipating pipes as a low temperature side heat conduction means. The heat of coolants is transferred to the surface of the high temperature side of each thermo-electric conversion elements of the thermal power generation system by the heat collecting heat pipes. The heat on the low temperature side of each of the thermo-electric conversion elements is removed by the heat dissipating pipes. Accordingly, temperature difference is caused between both surfaces of the thermo-electric conversion elements. Even upon loss of a main power source due to stoppage of electricity, electric power is generated by utilizing heat of coolants, so that the recycling pumps circulate coolants to cool a reactor core continuously. (I.N.)

  8. Design technology development of the main coolant pump for an integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. I.

    2004-01-01

    All of the reactor coolant pump currently used in commercial nuclear power plant were imported from foreign country. Now, the developing program of design technology for the reactor coolant pump will be started in a few future by domestic researchers. At this stage, the design technology of the main coolant pump for an integral reactor is developed based on the regulation of domestic nuclear power plant facilities. The main coolant pump is a canned motor axial pump, which accommodates all constraints required from the integral reactor system. The main coolant pump does not have mechanical seal device because the rotor of motor and the shaft of impeller are the same one. There is no flywheel on the rotating shaft of main coolant pump so that the coastdown duration time is short when the electricity supply is cut off

  9. Impedance calculations for power cables to primary coolant pump motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegerhorst, K.B.

    1977-01-01

    The LOFT primary system motor generator sets are located in Room B-239 and are connected to the primary coolant pumps by means of a power cable. The calculated average impedance of this cable is 0.005323 ohms per unit resistance and 0.006025 ohms per unit reactance based on 369.6 kVA and 480 volts. The report was written to show the development of power cable parameters that are to be used in the SICLOPS (Simulation of LOFT Reactor Coolant Loop Pumping System) digital computer program as written in LTR 1142-16 and also used in the pump coastdowns for the FSAR Analysis

  10. Sloshing of coolant in a seismically isolated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.; Guildys, J.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    During a seismic event, the liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel has sloshing motion which is a low-frequency phenomenon. In a reactor system incorporated with seismic isolation, the isolation frequency usually is also very low. There is concern on the potential amplification of sloshing motion of the liquid coolant. This study investigates the effects of seismic isolation on the sloshing of liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel of a liquid metal cooled reactor. Based on a synthetic ground motion whose response spectra envelop those specified by the NRC Regulator Guide 1.60, it is found that the maximum sloshing wave height increases from 18 in. to almost 30 in. when the system is seismically isolated. Since higher sloshing wave may introduce severe impact forces and thermal shocks to the reactor closure and other components within the reactor vessel, adequate design considerations should be made either to suppress the wave height or to reduce the effects caused by high waves

  11. Automated surveillance of reactor coolant pump performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    An artificial intelligence based expert system has been developed for continuous surveillance and diagnosis of centrifugal-type reactor coolant pump (RCP) performance and operability. The expert system continuously monitors digitized signals from a variety of physical variables (speed, vibration level, motor power, discharge pressure) associated with RCP performance for annunciation of the incipience or onset of off-normal operation. The system employs an extremely sensitive pattern-recognition technique, the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for rapid identification of pump operability degradation. The sequential statistical analysis of the signal noise has been shown to provide the theoretically shortest sampling time to detect disturbances and thus has the potential of providing incipient fault detection information to operators sufficiently early to avoid forced plant shutdowns. The sensitivity and response time of the expert system are analyzed in this paper using monte carlo simulation techniques

  12. Thorium Fuel Utilization Analysis on Small Long Life Reactor for Different Coolant Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    A small power reactor and long operation which can be deployed for less population and remote area has been proposed by the IAEA as a small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Beside uranium utilization, it can be used also thorium fuel resources for SMR as a part of optimalization of nuclear fuel as a “partner” fuel with uranium fuel. A small long-life reactor based on thorium fuel cycle for several reactor coolant types and several power output has been evaluated in the present study for 10 years period of reactor operation. Several key parameters are used to evaluate its effect to the reactor performances such as reactor criticality, excess reactivity, reactor burnup achievement and power density profile. Water-cooled types give higher criticality than liquid metal coolants. Liquid metal coolant for fast reactor system gives less criticality especially at beginning of cycle (BOC), which shows liquid metal coolant system obtains almost stable criticality condition. Liquid metal coolants are relatively less excess reactivity to maintain longer reactor operation than water coolants. In addition, liquid metal coolant gives higher achievable burnup than water coolant types as well as higher power density for liquid metal coolants.

  13. The installation welding of pressure water reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Feng

    2010-01-01

    Large pressure water reactor nuclear power plants are constructing in our country. There are three symmetry standard loops in reactor coolant system. Each loop possesses a steam generator and a primary poop, in which one of the loops is equipped with a pressurizer. These components are connected with reactor pressure vessel by installation welding of the coolant piping. The integrity of reactor coolant pressure boundary is the second barrier to protect the radioactive substance from release to outside, so the safe operation of nuclear power plant is closely related to the quality of coolant piping installation welding. The heavy tube with super low carbon content austenitic stainless steel is selected for coolant piping. This kind of material has good welding behavior, but the poor thermal conductivity, the big liner expansion coefficient and the big welding deformation will cause bigger welding stress. To reduce the welding deformation, to control the dimension precision, to reduce the residual stress and to ensure the welding quality the installation sequence should be properly designed and the welding technology should be properly controlled. (authors)

  14. Power reactors and sub-critical blanket systems with lead and lead-bismuth as coolant and/or target material. Utilization and transmutation of actinides and long lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    High level radioactive waste disposal is an issue of great importance in the discussion of the sustainability of nuclear power generation. The main contributors to the high radioactivity are the fission products and the minor actinides. The long lived fission products and minor actinides set severe demands on the arrangements for safe waste disposal. Fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS) are under development in Member States to reduce the long term hazard of spent fuel and radioactive waste, taking advantage of their incineration and transmutation capability. Important R and D programmes are being undertaken in many Member States to substantiate this option and advance the basic knowledge in this innovative area of nuclear energy development. The conceptual design of the lead cooled fast reactor concept BREST-OD-300, as well as various other conceptual designs of lead/lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors have been developed to meet enhanced safety and non-proliferation requirements, aiming at both energy production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Some R and D studies indicate that the use of lead and lead-bismuth coolant has some advantages in comparison with existing sodium cooled fast reactor systems, e.g.: simplified design of fast reactor core and BOP, enhanced inherent safety, and easier radwaste management in related fuel cycles. Moreover, various ADS conceptual designs with lead and lead-bismuth as target material and coolant also have been pursued. The results to date are encouraging, indicating that the ADS has the potential to offer an option for meeting the challenges of the back end fuel cycle. During the last decade, there have been substantial advances in several countries with their own R and D programme in the fields of lead/lead-bismuth cooled critical and sub-critical concepts. coolant technology, and experimental validation. In this context, international exchange of information and experience, as well as international

  15. Chemistry of liquid metal coolants and sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasekaran, T.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for the current generation fast breeder reactors. When sodium contains low levels of dissolved non-metallic impurities, it is highly compatible with structural steels. When the dissolved oxygen level is high, corrosion and mass transfer in sodium-steel circuits are enhanced and this involves formation of NaxMyOz type of species (M = alloying components in steels). Experience has shown that this enhancement of corrosion in a sodium circuit with all austenitic steel structural materials would not be encountered if oxygen level in sodium is below ~ 5ppm. For understanding this observation, a complete knowledge on the phase diagrams of Na-M-O systems and the thermochemical data of all relevant NaxMyOz compounds is essential. This presentation would highlight the work carried out at IGCAR on the chemistry of liquid sodium and heavy liquid metal coolants. Work carried out on various sensors for their use in these liquid metal circuits would be described and their current status would be discussed

  16. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  17. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  18. Coolant inlet device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Iwabuchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji.

    1969-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a coolant inlet device for liquid-metal cooled reactors which employs a coolant distributor serving also as a supporting means for the reactor core. The distributor is mounted within the reactor vessel so as to slide horizontally on supporting lugs, and is further slidably connected via a junction pipe to a coolant inlet conduit protruding through the floor of the vessel. The distributor is adapted to uniformly disperse the highly pressured coolant over the reactor core so as to reduce the stresses sustained by the reactor vessel as well as the supporting lugs. Moreover, the slidable nature of the distributor allows thermal shock and excessive coolant pressures to be prevented or alleviated, factors which posed major difficulties in conventional coolant inlet devices. (Owens, K. J.)

  19. The 1994 loss of coolant incident at Pickering NGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlebois, P R; Clarke, T R; Goodman, R M; McEwan, W F [Ontario Hydro, Pickering, ON (Canada). Pickering Generating Station; Cuttler, J M [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Fracture of the rubber diaphragm in a liquid relief valve initiated events leading to a loss of coolant in Unit 2, on December 10. The valve failed open, filling the bleed condenser. The reactor shut itself down. When pressure recovered, two spring-loaded safety relief valves opened and one of them chattered. The shock and pulsations cracked the inlet pipe to the chattering valve, and the subsequent loss of coolant triggered the emergency core cooling system. The incident was terminated by operator action. No abnormal radioactivity was released. The four reactor units of Pickering A remained shut down until the corrective actions were completed in April/May 1995. (author). 4 figs.

  20. Credibility and trust in federal facility cleanups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynes, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    The most important indicator of a well-managed site cleanup effort may no longer be funding or scientific expertise. While support for federal facility cleanup has included appropriations of more than $10 billion annually, these expenditures alone are unlikely to assure progress toward environmental remediation. open-quotes Trustclose quotes is now overwhelmingly mentioned as a prerequisite for progress with site cleanup in DOE's weapons complex. In part, federal budget deficits are forcing participants to focus on factors that build consensus and lead to cost-effective cleanup actions. In some cases, the stakeholders at cleanup sites are making efforts to work cooperatively with federal agencies. A report by 40 representatives of federal agencies, tribal and state governments, associations, and others developed recommendations to create a open-quotes new era of trust and consensus-building that allows all parties to get on with the job of cleaning up federal facilities in a manner that reflects the priorities and concerns of all stakeholders.close quotes Changes are underway affecting how federal agencies work with federal and state regulators reflecting this concept of shared responsibility for conducting cleanup. This paper addresses these changes and provides examples of the successes and failures underway

  1. HARVESTING EMSP RESEARCH RESULTS FOR WASTE CLEANUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Nielson, R. Bruce; Phillips, Ann Marie; Lebow, Scott

    2003-01-01

    The extent of environmental contamination created by the nuclear weapons legacy combined with expensive, ineffective waste cleanup strategies at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites prompted Congress to pass the FY96 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which directed the DOE to: ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research, which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs'', ''develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and'' ''seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective.'' In response, the DOE initiated the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)-a targeted, long-term research program intended to produce solutions to DOE's most pressing environmental problems. EMSP funds basic research to lower cleanup cost and reduce risk to workers, the public, and the environment; direct the nation's scientific infrastructure towards cleanup of contaminated waste sites; and bridge the gap between fundamental research and technology development activities. EMSP research projects are competitively awarded based on the project's scientific, merit coupled with relevance to addressing DOE site needs. This paper describes selected EMSP research projects with long, mid, and short-term deployment potential and discusses the impacts, focus, and results of the research. Results of EMSP research are intended to accelerate cleanup schedules, reduce cost or risk for current baselines, provide alternatives for contingency planning, or provide solutions to problems where no solutions exist

  2. Organic coolant for ARIES-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Sawan, M.; Gierszewski, P.; Hollies, R.; Sharafat, S.; Herring, S.

    1991-04-01

    ARIES-III is a D-He 3 reactor design study. It is found that the organic coolant is well suited for the D-He 3 reactor. This paper discusses the unique features of the D-He 3 reactor, and the reason that the organic coolant is compatible with those features. The problems associated with the organic coolant are also discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Physical properties of organic coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbage, A.G.; Garton, D.A.; Kinneir, J.H.

    1963-03-01

    Density, viscosity, specific heat, vapour pressure and calorific value were measured within the temperature range 100 - 400 deg C for mixtures of Santowax R with pyrolytic high boiler and Santowax R with O.M.R.E. radiolytic high boiler; in addition measurements were made on Santowax OM, X-7 standard, X-7 loop coolant and O.M.R.E. coolant supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The accuracy of the measurements made were density (± 1/4%), viscosity (± 2%), specific heat (± 2%), vapour pressure (± 2%) and calorific value (± 1/2%). Thermal conductivity was calculated from an improved form of the Smiths equation with an accuracy within ± 6%. Equations fitted to the vapour pressure results were used to provide data outside the experimental range for burnout correlation purposes. The general effect of high boiler content on the specific heat and calorific values was small. The differences in physical property values for corresponding values of either pyrolytic or radiolytic high boiler were small for density (0.3%) and specific heat (2%), but quite large for viscosity (70%) with the pyrolytic high boiler mixture giving the higher value. The chemical analysis of all materials was based on gas chromatography and the relationship between this and an earlier distillation method established. (author)

  4. Cleaning of aluminum after machining with coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, B.

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray photoemission spectroscopic study was undertaken to compare the cleaning of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) aluminum extrusion storage ring vacuum chambers after machining with and without water soluble coolants. While there was significant contamination left by the coolants, the cleaning process was capable of removing the residue. The variation of the surface and near surface composition of samples machined either dry or with coolants was negligible after cleaning. The use of such coolants in the machining process is therefore recommended

  5. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This is the tenth in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task I is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task I during the past quarter, analyses were performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. A site visit was made to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to collect ash samples from the filter vessel and to document the condition of the filter vessel with still photographs and videotape. Particulate samples obtained during this visit are currently being analyzed for entry into the Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) data base. Preparations are being made for a review meeting on ash bridging to be held at Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center - Morgantown (DOE/FETC-MGN) in the near future. Most work on Task 2 was on hold pending receipt of additional funds; however, creep testing of Schumacher FT20 continued. The creep tests on Schumacher FT20 specimens just recently ended and data analysis and comparisons to other data are ongoing. A summary and analysis of these creep results will be sent out shortly. Creep

  6. Cleanup of a jet fuel spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesko, Steve

    1996-11-01

    Eaton operates a corporate aircraft hanger facility in Battle Creek, Michigan. Tests showed that two underground storage tanks leaked. Investigation confirmed this release discharged several hundred gallons of Jet A kerosene into the soil and groundwater. The oil moved downward approximately 30 feet and spread laterally onto the water table. Test results showed kerosene in the adsorbed, free and dissolved states. Eaton researched and investigated three clean-up options. They included pump and treat, dig and haul and bioremediation. Jet fuel is composed of readily biodegradable hydrocarbon chains. This fact coupled with the depth to groundwater and geologic setting made bioremediation the low cost and most effective alternative. A recovery well was installed at the leading edge of the dissolved contamination. A pump moved water from this well into a nutrient addition system. Nutrients added included nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Additionally, air was sparged into the water. The water was discharged into an infiltration gallery installed when the underground storage tanks were removed. Water circulated between the pump and the infiltration basin in a closed loop fashion. This oxygenated, nutrient rich water actively and aggressively treated the soils between the bottom of the gallery and the top of the groundwater and the groundwater. The system began operating in August of 1993 and reduced jet fuel to below detection levels. In August of 1995 The State of Michigan issued a clean closure declaration to the site.

  7. Reactor having coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tadashi; Karatsuka, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Hajime.

    1991-01-01

    In a coolant recycling pump for an LMFBR type reactor, vertical grooves are formed to a static portion which surrounds a pump shaft as far as the lower end thereof. Sodium mists present in an annular gap of the pump shaft form a rotational flow, lose its centrifugal force at the grooved portion and are collected positively to the grooved portion. Further, since the rotational flow in the grooved channel is in a state of a cavity flow, the pressure is released in the grooved portion and a secondary eddy current is formed thereby providing a depressurized state. Accordingly, by a synergestic effect of the centrifugal force and the cavity flow, sodium mists can be recovered completely. (T.M.)

  8. Cleanup of large areas contaminated as a result of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The purposes of the report are to provide an overview of the methodology and technology available to clean up contaminated areas and to give preliminary guidance on matters related to the planning, implementation and management of such cleanups. This report provides an integrated overview of important aspects related to the cleanup of very large areas contaminated as a result of a serious nuclear accident, including information on methods and equipment available to: characterize the affected area and the radioactive fallout; stabilize or isolate the contamination; and clean up contaminated urban, rural and forested areas. The report also includes brief sections on planning and management considerations and the transport and disposal of the large volumes of wastes arising from such cleanups. For the purposes of this report, nuclear accidents which could result in the deposition of decontamination over large areas if the outer containment fails badly include: 1) An accident with a nuclear weapon involving detonation of the chemical high explosive but little, if any, nuclear fission. 2) A major loss of medium/high level liquid waste (HLLW) due to an explosion/fire at a storage site for such waste. 3) An accident at a nuclear power plant (NPP), for example a loss of coolant accident, which results in some core disruption and fuel melting. 4) An accident at an NPP involving an uncontrolled reactivity excursion resulting in the violent ejection of a reactor core material and rupture of the containment building. 117 refs, 32 figs, 12 tabs

  9. Reactor coolant flow measurements at Point Lepreau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenciaglia, G.; Gurevich, Y.; Liu, G.

    1996-01-01

    The CROSSFLOW ultrasonic flow measurement system manufactured by AMAG is fully proven as reliable and accurate when applied to large piping in defined geometries for such applications as feedwater flows measurement. Its application to direct reactor coolant flow (RCF) measurements - both individual channel flows and bulk flows such as pump suction flow - has been well established through recent work by AMAG at Point Lepreau, with application to other reactor types (eg. PWR) imminent. At Point Lepreau, Measurements have been demonstrated at full power; improvements to consistently meet ±1% accuracy are in progress. The development and recent customization of CROSSFLOW to RCF measurement at Point Lepreau are described in this paper; typical measurement results are included. (author)

  10. Responses to Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Kim, Hee C.; Chang, Moon H.; Zee, Sung Q.; Kim, Si-Hwan; Lee, Un-Chul

    2004-01-01

    The SMART NSSS adopts the design characteristics of containing most of the primary circuit components, such as the reactor core, main coolant pumps (MCPs), steam generators (SGs), and N 2 gas pressurizer (PZR) in a single leak-tight Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) with a relatively large ratio of the primary coolant inventory to the core power compared to the conventional loop-type PWR. Due to these design characteristics, the SMART can fundamentally eliminate the possibility of Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LBLOCAs), improve the natural circulation capability, and assure a sufficient time to mitigate the possibility of core uncover. Also, SMART adopts inherent safety improving features and passive engineered safety systems such as the substantially large negative moderator temperature coefficients, passive residual heat removal system, emergency core cooling system, and a steel-made leak-tight Safeguard Vessel (SV) housing the RPV. This paper presents the results of the safety analyses using a MARS/SMR code for the instantaneous guillotine ruptures of the major pipelines penetrating the RPV. The analysis results, employing conservative initial/boundary conditions and assumptions, show that the safety systems of the SMART basic design adequately remove the core decay heat without causing core uncover for all the cases of the Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (SBLOCAs). The sensitivity study results with variable SV conditions show that the reduced SV net free volume can shorten the time for reaching the thermal and mechanical equilibrium condition between the RPV and SV. Under these boundary conditions, the primary system inventory loss can be minimized and the core remains covered for a longer period of time without any makeup of the coolant. (authors)

  11. Improvement of Measurement Accuracy of Coolant Flow in a Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Kim, Jong-Bum; Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seoyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, to improve the measurement accuracy of coolant flow in a coolant flow simulator, elimination of external noise are enhanced by adding ground pattern in the control panel and earth around signal cables. In addition, a heating unit is added to strengthen the fluctuation signal by heating the coolant because the source of signals are heat energy. Experimental results using the improved system shows good agreement with the reference flow rate. The measurement error is reduced dramatically compared with the previous measurement accuracy and it will help to analyze the performance of nuclear fuels. For further works, out of pile test will be carried out by fabricating a test rig mockup and inspect the feasibility of the developed system. To verify the performance of a newly developed nuclear fuel, irradiation test needs to be carried out in the research reactor and measure the irradiation behavior such as fuel temperature, fission gas release, neutron dose, coolant temperature, and coolant flow rate. In particular, the heat generation rate of nuclear fuels can be measured indirectly by measuring temperature variation of coolant which passes by the fuel rod and its flow rate. However, it is very difficult to measure the flow rate of coolant at the fuel rod owing to the narrow gap between components of the test rig. In nuclear fields, noise analysis using thermocouples in the test rig has been applied to measure the flow velocity of coolant which circulates through the test loop.

  12. Spent fuel pool cleanup and stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Each of the plutonium production reactors at Hanford had a large water-filled spent fuel pool to provide interim storage of irradiated fuel while awaiting shipment to the separation facilities. After cessation of reactor operations the fuel was removed from the pools and the water levels were drawn down to a 5- to 10-foot depth. The pools were maintained with the water to provide shielding and radiological control. What appeared to be a straightforward project to process the water, remove the sediments from the basin, and stabilize the contamination on the floors and walls became a very complex and time consuming operation. The sediment characteristics varied from pool to pool, the ion exchange system required modification, areas of hard-pack sediments were discovered on the floors, special arrangements to handle and package high dose rate items for shipment were required, and contract problems ensued with the subcontractor. The original schedule to complete the project from preliminary engineering to final stabilization of the pools was 15 months. The actual time required was about 25 months. The original cost estimate to perform the work was $2,651,000. The actual cost of the project was $5,120,000, which included $150,000 for payment of claims to the subcontractor. This paper summarizes the experiences associated with the cleanup and radiological stabilization of the 100-B, -C, -D, and -DR spent fuel pools, and discusses a number of lessons learned items

  13. Cleanup of TMI-2 demineralizer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Thompson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocesium is being removed from Demineralizers A and B (DA and DB by a process that was developed from laboratory tests on small samples of resin from the demineralizers. The process was designed to elute the radiocesium from the demineralizer resins and then to resorb it onto the zeolite ion exchangers contained in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS). The process was also required to limit the maximum cesium activities in the resin eluates (SDS feeds) so that the radiation field surrounding the pipelines would not be excessive. The process consists of 17 stages of batch elution. In the initial stage, the resin is contacted with 0.18 M boric acid. Subsequent stages subject the resin to increasing concentrations of sodium in NaH 2 BO 3 -H 3 BO 3 solution (total B = 0.35 M) and then 1 M sodium hydroxide in the final stages. Results on the performance of the process in the cleanup of the demineralizers at TMI-2 are compared to those obtained from laboratory tests with small samples of the DA and DB resins. To date, 15 stages of batch elution have been completed on the demineralizers at TMI-2 which resulted in the removal of about 750 Ci of radiocesium from DA and about 3300 Ci from DB

  14. Organic coolant in Winnipeg riverbed sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.E.; Acres, O.E.

    1979-03-01

    Between January and May 1977 a prolonged leak of organic coolant occurred from the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment's nuclear reactor, and a minimum of 1450 kg of coolant entered the Winnipeg River and was deposited on the riverbed. The level of radioactivity associated with this coolant was low, contributing less than 0.2 μGy (0.02 mrad) a year to the natural background gamma radiation field from the riverbed. The concentration of coolant in the water samples never exceeded 0.02 mg/L, the lower limit of detection. The mortality of crayfish, held in cages where the riverbed was covered with the largest deposits of coolant, was not significantly different from that in the control cages upstream of the outfall. No evidence of fish kill was found. (author)

  15. Primary coolant circuits in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Masushiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement of a pump for the forcive circulation of primary coolants and avoid the manufacturing difficulty of equipments. Constitution: In primary coolant circuits of an LMFBR type reactor having a recycling path forming a closed loop between a reactor core and a heat exchanger, coolants recycled through the recycling path are made of a magnetic fluid comprising liquid sodium incorporated with fine magnetic powder, and an electromagnet is disposed to the downstream of the heat exchanger. In the above-mentioned structure, since the magnetic fluid as the primary coolants losses its magnetic property when heated in the reactor core but recovers the property at a lower temperature after the completion of the heat exchange, the magnetic fluid can forcively be flown through the recycling path under the effect of the electromagnet disposed to the down stream of the heat exchanger to thereby forcively recycle the primary coolants. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Characterization of plutonium contamination at Maralinga: Dosimetry and cleanup criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Martin, L.J.; Williams, G.A.; Harries, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    An area of South Australia remained contaminated following British atomic tests at Maralinga during 1955-1963. Of importance is the long lived 239 Pu of which some 24 kg was explosively dispersed in several 'minor trials'. The extent, quantities and physical characteristics of the plutonium have been assessed and estimates of dose, dominated by the inhalation pathway in the critical group of Aborigines living a semi-traditional lifestyle, have been made for potential occupants. Dosimetry, together with social and economic factors, underpins the setting of cleanup criteria in terms of activity concentrations averaged over large areas and permissible concentrations of contaminated particles. The possibility of intentional behaviour such as fragment scavenging has also influenced limits on particulate contamination. Rehabilitation of the most contaminated areas is underway, with scraping of surface soil and burial on site completed. Vehicular-mounted radiation detector systems for wide area and particle monitoring have been developed, and procedures established for determining cleanup boundaries and for the verification monitoring to ensure that the cleanup process has met the specified criteria. Data are being obtained for a final dose and health risk assessment of the cleaned up site. (author)

  17. Upgradation of design features of primary coolant pumps of Indian 220 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.S.; Mhetre, S.G.; Manna, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    Evolution in the design features of Primary Coolant Pump (PCP) had started in fifties for catering to stringent specification requirements of reactor coolant systems of larger capacity reactors of various kinds. Primary coolant pumps of PWR and PHWR are employed for circulating radioactive, pressurized hot water in a circuit consisting of reactor (heat source) and steam generator (heat sink). As primary coolant pump capacity decides the station capacity, larger capacity primary coolant pumps have been evolved. Since primary coolant pump pressure containing parts are part of Primary Heat Transport system envelope, the parts are designed, manufactured, inspected and tested in accordance with the applicable system guidelines. Flywheel is mounted on the motor shaft for increasing mass moment of inertia of pump motor rotor to meet the coast down requirements of reactor cooling system under Class-IV electrical power supply failure. Due to limited accessibility of the PCP (PCP installed in shut down accessible area), quick maintenance, condition monitoring, reliable shaft seal system/bearing system aspects have been of great concern to reactor owners and pump manufacturers. In this paper upgradation of design features of RAPS, MAPS and NAPS primary coolant pumps have been covered. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Fuel-Coolant Interactions: Visualization and Mixing Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewen, Eric P.; Bonazza, Riccardo; Corradini, Michael L.; Johannesen, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic X-ray imaging of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI), including quantitative measurement of fuel-coolant volume fractions and length scales, has been accomplished with a novel imaging system at the Nuclear Safety Research Center at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The imaging system consists of visible-light high-speed digital video, low-energy X-ray digital imaging, and high-energy X-ray digital imaging subsystems. The data provide information concerning the melt jet velocity, melt jet configuration, melt volume fractions, void fractions, and spatial and temporal quantification of premixing length scales for a model fuel-coolant system of molten lead poured into a water pool (fuel temperatures 500 to 1000 K; jet diameters 10 to 30 mm; coolant temperatures 20 to 90 deg. C). Overall results indicate that the FCI has three general regions of behavior, with the high fuel-coolant temperature region similar to what might be expected under severe accident conditions. It was observed that the melt jet leading edge has the highest void fraction and readily fragments into discrete masses, which then subsequently subdivide into smaller masses of length scales <10 mm. The intact jet penetrates <3 to 5 jet length/jet diameter before this breakup occurs into discrete masses, which continue to subdivide. Hydrodynamic instabilities can be visually identified at the leading edge and along the jet column with an interfacial region that consists of melt, vapor, and water. This interface region was observed to grow in size as the water pool temperature was increased, indicating mixing enhancement by boiling processes

  19. Coolant voiding analysis following SGTR for an HLMC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Concepts are under development at Argonne National Laboratory for a small, modular, proliferation-resistant nuclear power steam supply system. Of primary interest here is the simplified system design, featuring steam generators that are directly immersed in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant of the primary system. To support the safety case for this design approach, model development and analysis of transient coolant voiding during a postulated guillotine-type steam generator tube rupture event has been carried out. For the current design, the blowdown will occur from the steam generator shell into the ruptured 12.7-mm-inside-diameter tube through which the LBE coolant passes. The steam will expand biaxially in the tube, with a portion of the flow vented upward to eventually expand into the cover-gas region, while the balance of the flow is vented downward as a jet into the surrounding downward-flowing LBE. Coolant freezing is not an issue in this case because of high feedwater temperature in relation to the freezing point of the LBE. The specific objectives of the current work are to (a) determine the penetration behavior of the steam jet into the lower cold-leg region, (b) characterize the resultant void behavior in terms of coherent bubble versus breakup into a size distribution of small bubbles, and (c) characterize the motion of the bubbles with regard to rise to the cover-gas region (via the liner-to-coolant vessel gap) versus downward transport with the flowing LBE and subsequent upflow through the core to the cover-gas region

  20. DOE pursuing accelerated cleanup at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgman, T.

    1996-01-01

    The timing is right, and officials at Fernald are ready to initiate final cleanup actions-at an accelerated pace. open-quotes We have a viable, aggressive plan in place that will reduce the risks associated with the site by accelerating the cleanup schedule, and save a lot of time and money in the process,close quotes said Don Ofte, president of the Fernald Environmental Restoration management Corporation (FERMCO). Ofte is referring to the accelerated cleanup plan that the U.S. Department of Energy has approved to complete the remediation of Fernald in approximately 10 years-instead of 25-30 years-at a cost savings to taxpayers of almost $3 billion. This article describes the scenario at Fernald and politically which has lead to this decision

  1. Technical findings related to Generic Issue 23: Reactor coolant pump seal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Reactor coolant pumps contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized coolant from the reactor coolant system to the containment. These seals have the potential to leak, and a few have degraded and even failed resulting in a small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As a result, ''Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Failure,'' Generic Issue 23 was established. This report summarizes the findings of a technical investigation generated as part of the program to resolve this issue. These technical findings address the various fact-finding issue tasks developed for the action plan associated with the generic issue, namely background information on seal failure, evaluation of seal cooling, and mechanical- and maintenance-induced failure mechanisms. 46 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Performance investigation of an automotive car radiator operated with nanofluid-based coolants (nanofluid as a coolant in a radiator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, K.Y.; Saidur, R.; Kazi, S.N.; Mamun, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Water and ethylene glycol as conventional coolants have been widely used in an automotive car radiator for many years. These heat transfer fluids offer low thermal conductivity. With the advancement of nanotechnology, the new generation of heat transfer fluids called, 'nanofluids' have been developed and researchers found that these fluids offer higher thermal conductivity compared to that of conventional coolants. This study focused on the application of ethylene glycol based copper nanofluids in an automotive cooling system. Relevant input data, nanofluid properties and empirical correlations were obtained from literatures to investigate the heat transfer enhancement of an automotive car radiator operated with nanofluid-based coolants. It was observed that, overall heat transfer coefficient and heat transfer rate in engine cooling system increased with the usage of nanofluids (with ethylene glycol the basefluid) compared to ethylene glycol (i.e. basefluid) alone. It is observed that, about 3.8% of heat transfer enhancement could be achieved with the addition of 2% copper particles in a basefluid at the Reynolds number of 6000 and 5000 for air and coolant respectively. In addition, the reduction of air frontal area was estimated.

  3. HARVESTING EMSP RESEARCH RESULTS FOR WASTE CLEANUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Nielson, R. Bruce; Phillips, Ann Marie; Lebow, Scott

    2003-02-27

    The extent of environmental contamination created by the nuclear weapons legacy combined with expensive, ineffective waste cleanup strategies at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites prompted Congress to pass the FY96 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which directed the DOE to: ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research, which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs'', ''develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and'' ''seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective.'' In response, the DOE initiated the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)-a targeted, long-term research program intended to produce solutions to DOE's most pressing environmental problems. EMSP funds basic research to lower cleanup cost and reduce risk to workers, the public, and the environment; direct the nation's scientific infrastructure towards cleanup of contaminated waste sites; and bridge the gap between fundamental research and technology development activities. EMSP research projects are competitively awarded based on the project's scientific, merit coupled with relevance to addressing DOE site needs. This paper describes selected EMSP research projects with long, mid, and short-term deployment potential and discusses the impacts, focus, and results of the research. Results of EMSP research are intended to accelerate cleanup schedules, reduce cost or risk for current baselines, provide alternatives for contingency planning, or provide solutions to problems where no solutions exist.

  4. Retroactive insurance may fund TMI-2 cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A Pennsylvania task force recommended that nuclear utilities insure their plants with a mandatory national property insurance program. The proposed Nuclear Powerplant Property Damage Insurance Act of 1981 will cover the cleanup costs of onsite damage in excess of $350 million for a single accident ($50 million when private insurance is added on) and a ceiling of two billion dollars. Participation in the insurance pool would be in conjunction with licensing and would permit no grandfathering. Total payout for Three Mile Island-2 would cover 75% of the cleanup costs, the remainder to be apportioned among other parties. The insurance pool will have a $750 million goal supported by utility premiums

  5. SMART core power control method by coolant temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chung Chan; Cho, Byung Oh

    2001-08-01

    SMART is a soluble boron-free integral type pressurized water reactor. Its moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) is strongly negative throughout the cycle. The purpose of this report is how to utilize the primary coolant temperature as a second reactivity control system using the strong negative MTC. The reactivity components associated with reactor power change are Doppler reactivity due to fuel temperature change, moderator temperature reactivity and xenon reactivity. Doppler reactivity and moderator temperature reactivity take effects almost as soon as reactor power changes. On the other hand, xenon reactivity change takes more than several hours to reach an equilibrium state. Therefore, coolant temperature at equilibrium state is chosen as the reference temperature. The power dependent reference temperature line is limited above 50% power not to affect adversely in reactor safety. To compensate transient xenon reactivity, coolant temperature operating range is expanded. The suggested coolant temperature operation range requires minimum control rod motion for 50% power change. For smaller power changes such as 25% power change, it is not necessary to move control rods to assure that fuel design limits are not exceeded

  6. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C 4 F 10 and C 4 F 8 , were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C 4 F 10 mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C 4 F 10 weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd

  7. Validation of an online dual-loop cleanup device with an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry-based system for simultaneous quantitative analysis of urinary benzene exposure biomarkers trans, trans-muconic acid and S-phenylmercapturic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.-C.; Chiung, Y.-M.; Shih, J.-F.; Shih, T.-S.G; Liao, P.-C.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to validate isotope-dilution electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS-MS) method with a dual-loop cleanup device for simultaneous quantitation of two benzene metabolites, trans, trans-muconic acid (ttMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), in human urine. In this study, a pooled blank urine matrix from rural residents was adopted for validation of the analytical method. The calibration curve, detection limit, recovery, precision, accuracy and the stability of sample storage for the system have been characterized. Calibration plots of ttMA and SPMA standards spiked into two kinds of urine matrixes over a wide concentration range, 1/32-8-fold biological exposure indices (BEIs) values, showed good linearity (R > 0.9992). The detection limits in pooled urine matrix for ttMA and SPMA were 1.27 and 0.042 μg g -1 creatinine, respectively. For both of ttMA and SPMA, the intra- and inter-day precision values were considered acceptable well below 25% at the various spiked concentrations. The intra- and inter-day apparent recovery values were also considered acceptable (apparent recovery >90%). The ttMA accuracy was estimated by urinary standard reference material (SRM). The accuracy reported in terms of relative error (RE) was 5.0 ± 2.0% (n = 3). The stability of sample storage at 4 or -20 deg. C were assessed. Urinary ttMA and SPMA were found to be stable for at least 8 weeks when stored at 4 or -20 deg. C. In addition, urine samples from different benzene exposure groups were collected and measured in this system. Without tedious manual sample preparation procedure, the analytical system was able to quantify simultaneously ttMA and SPMA in less than 20 min

  8. Alternative protections for loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    One way to mitigate a small loss of coolant accident (LOCA) is by depressurizing the primary system, in order to turn the accident into a sequence where water is fed to a low pressure system. It can be achieved by two different ways: by incorporating a valve system (ADS - Automatic Depressurization System) to the design, which helps to diminish the pressure, obtaining a bigger LOCA, or by extracting heat from the system. Our analysis is centered in integrated reactors. The first characterization performed was on CAREM reactor. The idea was then to observe its behavior with LOCAs for different thermal power relations, water volume and rupture area. A simple depressurization model is presented, which enables us to find the parameter relationships which characterize this process, from which some particular cases will arise. ADS implementation is then analyzed, giving the criteria for the triggering time. A study on its reliability and the probability of a spurious opening is made, taking into account independent and dependent failures. An analysis on heat extraction as alternative for depressurizing is also made. Finally, the different reasons to choose between ADS or heat extraction as alternative are given, and the meaning of the parameters found are discussed. An alternative to classify LOCAs, instead of the traditional classification, by fracture size, is suggested. (author)

  9. Continuous surveillance of reactor coolant circuit integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Continuous surveillance is important to assuring the integrity of a reactor coolant circuit. It can give pre-warning of structural degradation and indicate where off-line inspection should be focussed. These proceedings describe the state of development of several techniques which may be used. These involve measuring structural vibration, core neutron noise, acoustic emission from cracks, coolant leakage, or operating parameters such as coolant temperature and pressure. Twenty three papers have been abstracted and indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  10. Approaching Environmental Cleanup Costs Liability Through Insurance Principles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corbin, Michael A

    1994-01-01

    .... Applying insurance industry principles to environmental cleanup costs liability will provide a firm foundation to reduce the risk of loss to the taxpayer, reduce cleanup costs, and stimulate private...

  11. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The threedimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat......The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find...... heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system....

  12. Organic coolants and their applications to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.; Hollies, B.

    1986-08-01

    Organic coolants offer a unique set of characteristics for fusion applications. Their advantages include high-temperature (670 K or 400 degrees C) but low-pressure (2 MPa) operation, limited reactivity with lithium and lithium-lead, reduced corrosion and activation, good heat-transfer capabilities, no magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, and an operating temperature range that extends to room temperature. The major disadvantages are decomposition and flammability. However, organic coolants have been extensively studied in Canada, including nineteen years with an operating 60-MW organic-cooled reactor. Proper attention to design and coolant chemistry controlled these potential problems to acceptable levels. This experience provides an extensive data base for design under fusion conditions. The organic fluid characteristics are described in sufficient detail to allow fusion system designers to evaluate organic coolants for specific applications. To illustrate and assess the potential applications, analyses are presented for organic-cooled blankets, first walls, high heat flux components and thermal power cycles. Designs are identified that take advantage of organic coolant features, yet have fluid decomposition related costs that are a small fraction of the overall cost of electricity. For example, organic-cooled first walls make lithium/ferritic steel blankets possible in high-field, high-surface-heat-flux tokamaks, and organic-cooled limiters (up to about 8 MW/m 2 surface heating) are a safer alternative to water cooling for liquid metal blanket concept. Organics can also be used in intermediate heat exchanger loops to provide efficient heat transfer with low reactivity and a large tritium barrier. 55 refs

  13. Radioactive Waste and Clean-up Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.

    2001-01-01

    The main objectives of the Radioactive Waste and Clean-up division of SCK-CEN are outlined. The division's programme consists of research, development and demonstration projects and aims to contribute to the objectives of Agenda 21 on sustainable development in the field of radioactive waste and rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated sites

  14. Flood Cleanup to Protect Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a flood cleanup, the indoor air quality in your home or office may appear to be the least of your problems. However, failure to remove contaminated materials and to reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks.

  15. Evaluation of contaminated groundwater cleanup objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arquiett, C.; Gerke, M.; Datskou, I.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Restoration Program will be responsible for remediating the approximately 230 contaminated groundwater sites across the DOE Complex. A major concern for remediation is choosing the appropriate cleanup objective. The cleanup objective chosen will influence the risk to the nearby public during and after remediation; risk to remedial and non-involved workers during remediation; and the cost of remediation. This paper discusses the trends shown in analyses currently being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories' (ORNL's) Center for Risk Management (CRM). To evaluate these trends, CRM is developing a database of contaminated sites. This paper examines several contaminated groundwater sites selected for assessment from CRM's data base. The sites in this sample represent potential types of contaminated groundwater sites commonly found at an installation within DOE. The baseline risk from these sites to various receptors is presented. Residual risk and risk during remediation is reported for different cleanup objectives. The cost associated with remediating to each of these objectives is also estimated for each of the representative sites. Finally, the general trends of impacts as a function of cleanup objective will be summarized. The sites examined include the Savannah River site, where there was substantial ground pollution from radionuclides, oil, coal stockpiles, and other forms of groundwater contamination. The effects of various types of groundwater contamination on various types of future user is described. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. US nuclear cleanup shows signs of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, R.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's program for dealing with the radioactive and hazardous wastes at its former nuclear weapons production sites and at the national laboratories has been criticized for its expense and slow pace of cleanup. The largest environmental restoration and waste management program in the world faces formidable technical and scientific problems and these, according to numerous investigative committees and commissions, have been compounded by poor management, misuse of technology, and failure to appreciate the need for new basic scientific knowledge to solve many of the cleanup problems. In the past three years, DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM), often spurred by congressional action, has begun to trim costs and accomplish more. New measures have been introduced to improve contract efficiency, better utilize existing remediation technologies, renegotiate compliance agreements, and begin basic research. Environmental Management Assistant Undersecretary Alvin Alm, appointed in May 1996, is seeking to solidify these changes into an ambitious plan to clean up most of DOE's 130 sites by 2006. But there are widespread doubts that EM has the money, skill, and will to turn itself around. There are also concerns that, in the name of efficiency and economy, EM may be negotiating lower cleanup standards and postponing some difficult cleanup tasks. This article discusses these issues. 7 refs

  17. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Recovery Act Funded Cleanups, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Recovery Act Funded Cleanup sites as part of the CIMC web service. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed into law...

  18. Effectiveness of cleanup criteria relative to an accidental nuclear release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    In the event of an accidental nuclear release, the associated long-term radiological risks would result primarily from ground contamination pathways. Cleanup of the contaminated ground surfaces is a necessary step toward reducing the radiological risk to the general population. Ideally, the radiological risk decreases as the level of cleanup effort increases; however, as the cleanup criterion (i.e., the required contaminant concentration after cleanup) becomes more stringent, the cleanup effort may become prohibitively costly. This study examines several factors that are important in determining the effectiveness of the cleanup criteria for selected radionuclides: (a) annual individual dose commitment (mrem/yr), (b) total population environmental dose commitment (person-rem), and (c) total area (km 2 ) requiring cleanup following an accident. To effectively protect the general population, the benefits of cleanup should be weighed against the potentially large increase in cleanup area (and the associated costs) as the cleanup criterion becomes more stringent. The effectiveness of cleanup will vary, depending largely on site-specific parameters such as population density and agricultural productivity as well as on the amount and type of radionuclide released. Determination of an optimum cleanup criterion should account for all factors, including a comprehensive cost/benefit analysis

  19. Fast-Track Cleanup at Closing DoD Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fast-Track Cleanup program strives to make parcels available for reuse as quickly as possible by the transfer of uncontaminated or remediated parcels, the lease of contaminated parcels where cleanup is underway, or the 'early transfer' of contaminated property undergoing cleanup.

  20. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To allow sufficient removal of radioactive substance released in the reactor containment shell upon loss of coolants accidents thus to sufficiently decrease the exposure dose to human body. Constitution: A clean-up system is provided downstream of a heat exchanger and it is branched into a pipeway to be connected to a spray nozzle and further connected by way of a valve to a reactor container. After the end of sudden transient changes upon loss of coolants accidents, the pool water stored in the pressure suppression chamber is purified in the clean-up system and then sprayed in the dry-well by way of a spray nozzle. The sprayed water dissolves to remove water soluble radioactive substances floating in the dry-well and then returns to the pressure suppression chamber. Since radioactive substances in the dry-well can thus removed rapidly and effectively and the pool water can be reused, public hazard can also be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Condition monitoring of main coolant pumps, Dhruva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, V.; Satheesh, C.; Acharya, V.N.; Tikku, A.C.; Mishra, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Dhruva is a 100 MW research reactor with natural uranium fuel, heavy water as moderator and primary coolant. Three Centrifugal pumps circulate the primary coolant across the core and the heat exchangers. Each pump is coupled to a flywheel (FW) assembly in order to meet operational safety requirements. All the 3 main coolant pump (MCP) sets are required to operate during operation of the reactor. The pump-sets are in operation since the year 1984 and have logged more than 1,00,000 hrs. Frequent breakdowns of its FW bearings were experienced during initial years of operation. Condition monitoring of these pumps, largely on vibration based parameters, was initiated on regular basis. Break-downs of main coolant pumps reduced considerably due to the fair accurate predictions of incipient break-downs and timely maintenance efforts. An effort is made in this paper to share the experience

  2. Fatigue management considering LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung Bae; Jin, Tae eun

    2000-01-01

    Design fatigue curve for structural material in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments has been a concern ever since the early 1970's. And, recent fatigue test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of carbon steels, low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. For these reasons, fatigue of major components has been identified as a technical issue remaining to be resolved for life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. In the present paper, results of recent investigations by many organizations are reviewed to provide technical justification to support the development of utility approach regarding the management of fatigue considering LWR coolant environments for the purpose of life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. (author)

  3. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  4. Ninth annual coal-fueled heat engines, advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion, and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Welcoming address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    The market for retrofit and new capacity in the electric utility is expected to be very large: 250 gigawatt (GW) and 500 GW by the year 2030--an amount which equals the presently installed capacity in the US Overseas, the market is even larger exclamation point This large market will be driven by a number of key ''drivers.'' In order for power generation systems to compete in this market, they will have to satisfy the market drivers. This will lead us inevitably to modular, low cost, super clean, efficient, and reliable products which are fuel flexible and can meet either retrofit, repowering, or new capacity applications. I believe clean coal technologies that we are developing will meet these market demands and will penetrate--and eventually dominate--the power generation market of the next century. But for this market penetration and widespread deployment to take place, the products we are jointly developing must be continuously improved. We must together set our goals on a rapid march down the learning curve from the present high ''projected costs'' of these systems to an acceptable market clearing price on the order of $1000 to $1200 per kilowatt (kw) and with heat rates approaching 7500 Btu per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The projected learning curve for integrated gasification combined cycle systems is a good illustration of the aggressive goals we need to achieve

  5. Reactor Coolant Temperature Measurement using Ultrasonic Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, JaeCheon [KEPCO International Nuclear graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, YongSun; Bechue, Nicholas [Krohne Messtechnik GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In NPP, the primary piping temperature is detected by four redundant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detectors) installed 90 degrees apart on the RCS (Reactor Coolant System) piping circumferentially. Such outputs however, if applied to I and C systems would not give balanced results. The discrepancy can be explained by either thermal stratification or improper arrangement of thermo-wells and RTDs. This phenomenon has become more pronounced in the hot-leg piping than in the cold-leg. Normally, the temperature difference among channels is in the range of 1°F in Korean nuclear power Plants. Consequently, a more accurate pipe average temperate measurement technique is required. Ultrasonic methods can be used to measure average temperatures with relatively higher accuracy than RTDs because the sound wave propagation in the RCS pipe is proportional to the average temperature around pipe area. The inaccuracy of RCS temperature measurement worsens the safety margin for both DNBR and LPD. The possibility of this discrepancy has been reported with thermal stratification effect. Proposed RCS temperature measurement system based on ultrasonic technology offers a countermeasure to cope with thermal stratification effect on hot-leg piping that has been an unresolved issue in NPPs. By introducing ultrasonic technology, the average internal piping temperature can be measured with high accuracy. The inaccuracy can be decreased less than ±1℉ by this method.

  6. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  7. On-line real time gamma analysis of primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalechstein, W.; Kupca, S.; Lipsett, J.J.

    1985-10-01

    The evolution of failed fuel monitoring at CANDU power stations is briefly summarized and the design of the latest system for failed fuel detection at a multi-unit power station is described. At each reactor, the system employs a germanium spectrometer combined with a novel spectrum analyzer that simultaneously accumulates the gamma-ray spectrum of the coolant and provides the control room with the concentration of radioisotope activity in the coolant for the gaseous fission products Xe-133, Xe-135, Kr-88 and I-131 in real time and with statistical precision independent of count rate. A gross gamma monitor is included to provide independent information on the level of radioactivity in the coolant and extend the measurement range at very high count rates. A central computer system archives spectra received from all four spectrum analyzers and provides both the activity concentrations and the release rates of specified isotopes. Compared with previous systems the current design offers improvements in that the activity concentrations are updated much more frequently, improved tools are provided for long term surveillance of the heat transport system and the monitor is more reliable and less costly

  8. Coolant Chemistry Control: Oxygen Mass Transport in Lead Bismuth Eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Mueller, G.; Bruzzese, C.; Glass, A.

    2015-01-01

    In lead-bismuth cooled transmutation systems, oxygen, dissolved in the coolant at defined quantities, is required for stable long-term operation by assuring the formation of protective oxide scales on structural steel surfaces. Extracted oxygen must be permanently delivered to the system and distributed in the entire core. Therefore, coolant chemistry control involves detailed knowledge on oxygen mass transport. Beside the different flow regimes a core might have stagnant areas at which oxygen delivery can only be realised by diffusion. The difference between oxygen transport in flow paths and in stagnant zones is one of the targets of such experiments. To investigate oxygen mass transport in flowing and stagnant conditions, a dedicated facility was designed based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD also was applied to define the position of oxygen sensors and ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry transducers for flow measurements. This contribution will present the test facility, design relevant CFD calculations and results of first tests performed. (authors)

  9. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This is the eleventh in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task 1 during the past quarter, analyses were completed on samples obtained during a site visit to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. An additional analysis was performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. A manuscript and poster were prepared for presentation at the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems `97 Conference scheduled for July 22 - 24, 1997. A summary of recent project work covering the mechanisms responsible for ash deposit consolidation and ash bridging in APF`s collecting PFB ash was prepared and presented at FETC-MGN in early July. The material presented at that meeting is included in the manuscript prepared for the Contractor`s Conference and also in this report. Task 2 work during the past quarter included mechanical testing and microstructural examination of Schumacher FT20 and Pall 326 as- manufactured, after 540 hr in service at Karhula, and after 1166 hr in service at

  10. Performance of Helical Coil Heat Recovery Exchanger using Nanofluid as Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Bozorgan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are expected to be a promising coolant condidate in chemical processes for heat transfer system size reduction. This paper focuses on reducing the number of turns in a helical coil heat recovery exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity in a biomass heating plant using γ-Al2O3/n-decane nanofluid as coolant. The nanofluid flows through the tubes and the hot n-hexane flows through the shell. The numerical results show that using nanofluid as coolant in a helical coil heat exchanger can reduce the manufacturing cost of the heat exchanger and pumping power by reducing the number of turns of the coil.

  11. Power supplyer for reactor coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Hiroshi; Okinaka, Yo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a variable voltage/variable frequency static power source (static power source) used as a power source for a coolants recycling pump motor of a nuclear power plant. That is, during lower power operation such as start up or shutdown in which stoppage of the power source gives less effect to a reactor core, power is supplied from a power system, a main power generator connected thereto or a high voltage bus in the plant or a common high voltage bus to the static power source. However, during rated power operation, power is supplied from the output of an axially power generator connected with a main power generator having an extremely great inertia moment to the static power device. With such a constitution, the static power device is not stopped by the lowering of the voltage due to a thunderbolt falling accident or the like to a power-distribution line suddenly occurred in the power system. Accordingly, reactor core flowrate is free from rapid decrease caused by the reduction of rotation speed of the recycling pump. Accordingly, disadvantgages upon operation control in the reactor core is not caused. (I.S.)

  12. Numerical model simulation of atmospheric coolant plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of humid atmospheric coolants on the atmosphere is simulated by means of a three-dimensional numerical model. The atmosphere is defined by its natural vertical profiles of horizontal velocity, temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Effluent discharge is characterised by its vertical velocity and the temperature of air satured with water vapour. The subject of investigation is the area in the vicinity of the point of discharge, with due allowance for the wake effect of the tower and buildings and, where application, wind veer with altitude. The model equations express the conservation relationships for mometum, energy, total mass and water mass, for an incompressible fluid behaving in accordance with the Boussinesq assumptions. Condensation is represented by a simple thermodynamic model, and turbulent fluxes are simulated by introduction of turbulent viscosity and diffusivity data based on in-situ and experimental water model measurements. The three-dimensional problem expressed in terms of the primitive variables (u, v, w, p) is governed by an elliptic equation system which is solved numerically by application of an explicit time-marching algorithm in order to predict the steady-flow velocity distribution, temperature, water vapour concentration and the liquid-water concentration defining the visible plume. Windstill conditions are simulated by a program processing the elliptic equations in an axisymmetrical revolution coordinate system. The calculated visible plumes are compared with plumes observed on site with a view to validate the models [fr

  13. DRUCKFLAMM - Investigation on combustion and hot gas cleanup in pulverized coal combustion systems. Final report; DRUCKFLAMM - Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung und Heissgasreinigung bei der Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, K.R.G.; Benoehr, A.; Schuermann, H.; Stroehle, J.; Klaiber, C.; Kuhn, R.; Maier, J.; Schnell, U.; Unterberger, S.

    2001-07-01

    The ambitions of making energy supply more efficient and less polluting brought forth the development of coal based combined cycle power plants allowing considerable increases in net efficiencies. One of the regarded firing concepts for a coal based combined cycle power plant is represented by the pressurised pulverised coal combustion process which has the highest efficiency potential compared with the other coal based concepts. The fundamental purpose of the project was to gain firm knowledge concerning firing behaviour of coal in a pressurised pulverised coal combustion system. Detailed investigations were carried out in a pressurised entrained flow reactor taking into account fuel conversion and particle behaviour, pollutant formation and material behaviour under conditions of a pressurised pulverised coal firing. During the project's investigations several different measurement techniques were tested and partially also acquired (e.g. a two-colour-pyrometry system to measure simultaneous particle surface temperature and particle diameter of burning fuel particles). Calculation models under pressurised conditions for pressure vessel simulation and better scale-up were developed synchronously with the experimental investigations. The results gained using the pressurised entrained flow reactor show that many combustion mechanisms are influenced by increased pressure, for instance the fuel conversion is intensified and at the same time pollutant emissions decreased. The material investigations show that the ceramic materials used due to the very high combustion temperatures are very sensitive versus slagging and fast temperature changes, therefore further development requirements are needed to fully realise the high durability of ceramics in the pressurised furnace. Concerning the improvement of existing models for furnace simulation under pressurised conditions, a good resemblance can be observed when considering the actual measurement results from the test

  14. Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Howard

    2010-11-30

    This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energy's Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

  15. Evaluation of organic moderator/coolants for fusion breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.B.

    1980-03-01

    Organic coolants have several attractive features for fusion breeder blanket design. Their apparent compatibility with lithium and their ideal physical and nuclear properties allows straight-forward, high performance designs. Radiolytic damage can be reduced to about the same order as comparable fission systems by using multiplier/stripper blanket designs. Tritium recovery from the organic should be straightforward, but additional data is needed to make a better assessment of the economics of the process

  16. Exhaust temperature analysis of four stroke diesel engine by using MWCNT/Water nanofluids as coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandam, M.; Mukesh Kumar, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    There has been a continuous improvement in designing of cooling system and in quality of internal combustion engine coolants. The liquid engine coolant used in early days faced many difficulties such as low boiling, freezing points and inherently poor thermal conductivity. Moreover, the conventional coolants have reached their limitations of heat dissipating capacity. New heat transfer fluids have been developed and named as nanofluids to try to replace traditional coolants. Moreover, many works are going on the application of nanofluids to avail the benefits of them. In this experimental investigation, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5% volume concentrations of multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/water nanofluids have been prepared by two step method with surfactant and is used as a coolant in four stroke single cylinder diesel engine to assess the exhaust temperature of the engine. The nanofluid prepared is characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to confirm uniform dispersion and stability of nanotube with zeta potential analyzer. Experimental tests are performed by various mass flow rate such as 270 300 330 LPH (litre per hour) of coolant nanofluids and by changing the load in the range of 0 to 2000 W and by keeping the engine speed constant. It is found that the exhaust temperature decreases by 10-20% when compared to water as coolant at the same condition.

  17. Assessment of Loss-of-Coolant Effect on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Park, Joo Hwan; Kim, Bong Ghi

    2009-01-01

    A CANDU reactor is a heavy-water-moderated, natural uranium fuelled reactor with a pressure tube. The reactor contains a horizontal cylindrical vessel (calandria) and each pressure tube is isolated from the heavy-water moderator in a calandria. This allows the moderator system to be operated of a high-pressure and of a high-temperature coolant in pressure tube. This causes the pressurized liquid coolant in the channel to void and therefore give rise to a reactivity transient in the event of a break or fault in the coolant circuit. In particular, all CANDU reactors are well known to have a positive void reactivity coefficient and thus this phenomenon may lead to a positive feedback, which can cause a large power pulse. We assess the loss-of-coolant effect by coolant void reactivity versus fuel burnup, four factor parameters for fresh fuel and equilibrium fuel, reactivity change due to the change of coolant density and reactivity change in the case of half- and full-core coolant

  18. Sodium coolant of fast reactors: Experience and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Volchkov, L.G.; Drobyshev, A.V.; Nikulin, M.P.; Kochetkov, L.A.; Alexeev, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    In present report the following subjects are considered: state of the coolant and sodium systems under normal operating condition as well as under decommissioning, disclosing of sodium circuits and liquidation of its consequences, cleaning from sodium and decontamination under repairing works of equipment and circuits. Cleaning of coolant and sodium systems under normal operating conditions and under accident contamination. Cleaning of the equipment under repairing works and during decommissioning from sodium and products of its interaction with water and air. Treatment of sodium waste, taking into account a possibility of sodium fires. It is shown that the state of coolant, cover gas, surfaces of constructive materials which are in contact with them, cleaning systems, formed during installation operation require development of specific technologies. Developed technologies ensured safety operation of sodium cooled installations as in normal operating conditions so in abnormal situations. R and D activities in this field and experience gained provided a solid base for coping with problems arising during decommissioning. Prospective research problems are emphasized where the future efforts should be concentrated in order to improve characteristics of sodium cooled reactors and to make their decommissioning optimal and safe. (author)

  19. Comparison between MAAP and ECART predictions of radionuclide transport throughout a French standard PWR reactor coolant system; Transport des radionucleides dans le circuit primaire d`un REP: comparaison des codes MAAP et ECART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hervouet, C.; Ranval, W. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Parozzi, F.; Eusebi, M. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Rome (Italy)

    1996-04-01

    In the framework of a collaboration agreement between EDF and ENEL, the MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program) and ECART (ENEL Code for Analysis of radionuclide Transport) predictions about the fission product retention inside the reactor cooling system of a French PWR 1300 MW during a small Loss of Coolant Accident were compared. The volatile fission products CsI, CsOH, TeO{sub 2} and the structural materials, all of them released early by the core, are more retained in MAAP than in ECART. On the other hand, the non-volatile fission products, released later, are more retained in ECART than in MAAP, because MAAP does not take into account diffusion-phoresis: in fact, this deposition phenomenon is very significant when the molten core vaporizes the water of the vessel lower plenum. Centrifugal deposition in bends, that can be modeled only with ECART, slightly increases the whole retention in the circuit if it is accounted for. (authors). 18 refs., figs., tabs.

  20. A comparison study on the use of Dowex 1 and TEVA-resin in determination of 99Tc in environmental and nuclear coolant samples in a SIA system with ICP-MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołacińska, Kamila; Samczyński, Zbigniew; Dudek, Jakub; Bojanowska-Czajka, Anna; Trojanowicz, Marek

    2018-07-01

    This work refers to a comparative study of sorbents widely used in determinations of 99 Tc such as TEVA resin and Dowex 1. Despite having a similar functional group of quaternary amines, both materials represent different chromatographic methods-extraction (TEVA resin) and anion exchange (Dowex 1)-which provides a diverse range of their properties significant in determination of 99 Tc in flow conditions. The comparative tests, carried out in a SIA-LOV (Sequential Injection Analysis-Lab-on-Valve) system combined with mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) detection, considered several factors that are crucial from the standpoint of resin´s utility such as sorption capacity, durability, or selectivity, critical in 99 Tc separation from interferences. The developed and optimized analytical procedure based on the application of the TEVA resin provided determinations of 99 Tc at minimum detectable limit (MDL) 6.00 mBq L -1 in 50 min and has been successfully employed in analyses of samples from nuclear industrial and research units (reactor coolant and sewage) as well as from the river surrounding the nuclear reactor. The method proved to be sufficient for routine analysis of water samples in accordance with EPA standards. The reliability of the method was confirmed in the analysis of the BH standard provided by the NPL for inter-laboratory proficiency tests. The 99 Tc recovery for all real samples was evaluated as 80-100%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cleanup around an old waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergaast, G.; Moffett, D.; Lawrence, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    42,500 m 3 of contaminated soil were removed from off-site areas around an old, low-level radioactive waste site near Port Hope, Ontario. The cleanup was done by means of conventional excavation equipment to criteria developed by Eldorado specific to the land use around the company's waste management facility. These cleanup criteria were based on exposure analyses carried out for critical receptors in two different scenarios. The excavated soils, involving eight different landowners, were placed on the original burial area of the waste management facility. Measures were also undertaken to stabilize the soils brought on-site and to ensure that there would be no subsequent recontamination of the off-site areas

  2. GPU seeks new funding for TMI cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utroska, D.

    1982-01-01

    General Public Utilities (GPU) wants approval for annual transfer of money from base rate increases in other accounts to pay for the cleanup at Three Mile Island (TMI) until TMI-1 returns to service or the public utility commission takes further action. This proposal confirms fears of a delay in TMI-1 startup and demonstrates that the January negotiated settlement will produce little funding for TMI-2 cleanup. A review of the settlement terms outlines the three-step process for base rate increases and revenue adjustments after the startup of TMI-1, and points out where controversy and delays due to psychological stress make a new source of money essential. GPU thinks customer funding will motivate other parties to a broad-based cost-sharing agreement

  3. Qualification test of a main coolant pump for SMART pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Jin; Yoon, Eui Soo; Oh, Hyong Woo

    2006-01-01

    SMART Pilot is a multipurpose small capacity integral type reactor. Main Coolant Pump (MCP) of SMART Pilot is a canned-motor-type axial pump to circulate the primary coolant between nuclear fuel and steam generator in the primary system. The reactor is designed to operate under condition of 310 .deg. C and 14.7 MPa. Thus MCP has to be tested under same operating condition as reactor design condition to verify its performance and safety. In present work, a test apparatus to simulate real operating situations of the reactor has been designed and constructed to test MCP. And then functional tests, performance tests, and endurance tests have been carried out upon a prototype MCP. Canned motor characteristics, homologous head/torque curves, coast-down curves, NPSH curves and life-time performance variations were obtained from the qualification test as well as hydraulic performance characteristics of MCP

  4. Evaluation of containment failure and cleanup time for Pu shots on the Z machine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    Between November 30 and December 11, 2009 an evaluation was performed of the probability of containment failure and the time for cleanup of contamination of the Z machine given failure, for plutonium (Pu) experiments on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Due to the unique nature of the problem, there is little quantitative information available for the likelihood of failure of containment components or for the time to cleanup. Information for the evaluation was obtained from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) at the Z machine facility. The SMEs provided the State of Knowledge (SOK) for the evaluation. There is significant epistemic- or state of knowledge- uncertainty associated with the events that comprise both failure of containment and cleanup. To capture epistemic uncertainty and to allow the SMEs to reason at the fidelity of the SOK, we used the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for this evaluation. We quantified two variables: the probability that the Pu containment system fails given a shot on the Z machine, and the time to cleanup Pu contamination in the Z machine given failure of containment. We identified dominant contributors for both the time to cleanup and the probability of containment failure. These results will be used by SNL management to decide the course of action for conducting the Pu experiments on the Z machine.

  5. Development of a matrix approach to estimate soil clean-up levels for BTEX compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbas-White, I.; San Juan, C.

    1993-01-01

    A draft state-of-the-art matrix approach has been developed for the State of Washington to estimate clean-up levels for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in deep soils based on an endangerment approach to groundwater. Derived soil clean-up levels are estimated using a combination of two computer models, MULTIMED and VLEACH. The matrix uses a simple scoring system that is used to assign a score at a given site based on the parameters such as depth to groundwater, mean annual precipitation, type of soil, distance to potential groundwater receptor and the volume of contaminated soil. The total score is then used to obtain a soil clean-up level from a table. The general approach used involves the utilization of computer models to back-calculate soil contaminant levels in the vadose zone that would create that particular contaminant concentration in groundwater at a given receptor. This usually takes a few iterations of trial runs to estimate the clean-up levels since the models use the soil clean-up levels as ''input'' and the groundwater levels as ''output.'' The selected contaminant levels in groundwater are Model Toxic control Act (MTCA) values used in the State of Washington

  6. Design criteria of primary coolant chemistry in SMART-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Seon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2005-01-01

    SMART-P differs significantly from commercially designed PWRs. Materials inventories used in SMART-P differ from that at PWRs. All surfaces of the primary circuit with the primary coolant are either made from or plated with stainless steel. The material of steam generator (SG) is also different from that of the standard material of the commercially operating PWRs: titanium alloy for the steam generator tubes. Also, SMART-P primary coolant technology differs from that in PWRs: ammonia is used as a pH raising agent and hydrogen formed due to radiolytic processes is kept in specific range by ammonia dosing. Nevertheless, main objectives of the SMART-P primary coolant are the same as at PWRs: to assure primary system pressure boundary integrity, fuel cladding integrity and to minimize out-of-core radiation buildup. The objective of this work is to introduce the design criteria for the primary water chemistry for SMART-P from the viewpoint of the system characteristics and the chemical design concept

  7. The operating reliability of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grancy, W.

    1996-01-01

    There is a strong tendency among operating companies and manufacturers of nuclear power stations to further increase safety and operating availability of the plant and of its components. This applies also and particularly to reactor coolant pumps for the primary circuit of nuclear power stations of the type PWR. For 3 decades, ANDRITZ has developed and built such pumps and has attached great importance to the design of the complete pump rotor and of its essential surrounding elements, such as bearing and shaft seal. Apart from questions connected with design functioning of the pump there is one question of top priority: the operating reliability of the reactor coolant pump. The pump rotor (together with the rotor of the drive motor) is the only component within the primary system that permanently rotates at high speed during operation of the reactor plant. Many questions concerning design and configuration of such components cannot be answered purely theoretically, or they can only be answered partly. Therefore comprehensive development work and testing was necessary to increase the operating reliability of the pump rotor itself and of its surrounding elements. This contribution describes the current status of development and, as a focal point, discusses shaft sealing solutions elaborated so far. In this connection also a sealing system will be presented which aims for the first time at using a two-stage mechanical seal in reactor coolant pumps

  8. Accelerating cleanup. Paths to closure Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.

    1998-01-01

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE's national strategy, the Richland Operations Office's Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established

  9. Cleanup standards and pathways analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Remediation of a radioactively contaminated site requires that certain regulatory criteria be met before the site can be released for unrestricted future use. Since the ultimate objective of remediation is to protect the public health and safety, residual radioactivity levels remaining at a site after cleanup must be below certain preset limits or meet acceptable dose or risk criteria. Release of a decontaminated site requires proof that the radiological data obtained from the site meet the regulatory criteria for such a release. Typically release criteria consist of a composite of acceptance limits that depend on the radionuclides, the media in which they are present, and federal and local regulations. In recent years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a pathways analysis model to determine site-specific soil activity concentration guidelines for radionuclides that do not have established generic acceptance limits. The DOE pathways analysis computer code (developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the DOE) is called RESRAD (Gilbert et al. 1989). Similar efforts have been initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and use dose-related criteria based on genetic pathways analyses rather than simplistic numerical limits on residual radioactivity. The focus of this paper is radionuclide contaminated soil. Cleanup standards are reviewed, pathways analysis methods are described, and an example is presented in which RESRAD was used to derive cleanup guidelines

  10. Prioritization of environmental cleanup problems at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    New technologies and scientific research are needed to clean up the Hanford Site. However, there is insufficient funding to develop every technology that is identified or to undertake every scientific research project that is proposed. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) must focus its resources on science and technology (S ampersand T) that will have the most significant impacts on the overall cleanup effort. Hanford has recognized the importance of identifying and prioritizing its most critical problems and the most promising solutions to them. Hanford cleanup will require numerous decisions about technology development and implementation, which will be complicated because there are substantial uncertainties about the risks and the costs of new technologies. Further, the choice of a specific technology for a specific application must be evaluated with respect to multiple (and often conflicting) objectives (e.g., risk reduction, increasing effectiveness, cost reduction, increasing public acceptability, regulatory compliance). This paper provides an overview of the decision analysis methodology that was used to prioritize S ampersand T needs for Hanford cleanup

  11. Analysis of a water-coolant leak into a very high-temperature vitrification chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felicione, F. S.

    1998-01-01

    A coolant-leakage incident occurred during non-radioactive operation of the Plasma Hearth Process waste-vitrification development system at Argonne National Laboratory when a stray electric arc ruptured az water-cooling jacket. Rapid evaporation of the coolant that entered the very high-temperature chamber pressurized the normally sub-atmospheric system above ambient pressure for over 13 minutes. Any positive pressurization, and particularly a lengthy one, is a safety concern since this can cause leakage of contaminants from the system. A model of the thermal phenomena that describe coolant/hot-material interactions was developed to better understand the characteristics of this type of incident. The model is described and results for a variety of hypothetical coolant-leak incidents are presented. It is shown that coolant leak rates above a certain threshold will cause coolant to accumulate in the chamber, and evaporation from this pool can maintain positive pressure in the system long after the leak has been stopped. Application of the model resulted in reasonably good agreement with the duration of the pressure measured during the incident. A closed-form analytic solution is shown to be applicable to the initial leak period in which the peak pressures are generated, and is presented and discussed

  12. Graphite beds for coolant filtration at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heathcock, R.E.; Lacy, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature filtration will be provided for new Ontario Hydro CANDU heat transport systems. Filtration has been shown to effectively reduce the concentration of circulating corrosion products in our heat transport systems, hence, minimizing the processes of activity transport. This paper will present one option we have for this application; Deep Bed Granular Graphite Filters. The filter system is described by discussing pertinent aspects of its development programme. The compatibility of the filter and the heat transport coolant are demonstrated by results from loop tests, both out- and in-reactor, and by subsequent results from a large filter installation in the NPD NGS heat transport system. (author)

  13. Loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.; Wendel, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Currently in the conceptual design stage, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) will operate at a high heat flux, a high mass flux, an a high degree of coolant subcooling. Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses using RELAP5 have been performed as part of an early evaluation of ANSR safety issues. This paper discusses the RELAP5 ANSR conceptual design system model and preliminary LOCA simulation results. Some previous studies were conducted for the preconceptual design. 12 refs., 7 figs

  14. Analysis of three ex-vessel loss-of-coolant accidents in the first wall cooling system of NET/ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1993-01-01

    An ex-vessel LOCA may be caused by a rupture of a cooling pipe located outside the vacuum vessel. No plasma shutdown and no other counteractions have been assumed in order to study the worst case conditions of the accidents. The next three ex-vessel LOCAs in the primary cooling system of the first wall have been analysed: 1. a large break ex-vessel LOCA caused by a rupture of the cold leg (inner diameter 0.314 m) of the main circuit; 2. an intermediate break ex-vessel LOCA caused by a rupture of a sector inlet feeder (inner diameter 0.158 m); 3. an intermediate break ex-vessel LOCA caused by a rupture of the surge line (inner diameter 0.180 m) of the pressurizer. The analyses have been performed using the thermal-hydraulic system analysis code RELAP5/MOD3. In the first two scenarios, melting in the first wall starts about 90 s after break initiation. In the third scenario, melting in the first wall start about 323 s after break initiation. Special emphasis has been paid to the characteristics of the break flows, the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the cooling system, and the temperature development in the first wall. (orig.)

  15. Fault diagnosis of main coolant pump in the nuclear power station based on the principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Junting; Xu Mi; Wang Guizeng

    2003-01-01

    The fault diagnosis method based on principal component analysis is studied. The fault character direction storeroom of fifteen parameters abnormity is built in the simulation for the main coolant pump of nuclear power station. The measuring data are analyzed, and the results show that it is feasible for the fault diagnosis system of main coolant pump in the nuclear power station

  16. Nuclear reactor of pressurized liquid coolant type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor comprises a vertical concrete pressure vessel, a bell-housing having an open lower end and disposed coaxially with the interior of the pressure vessel so as to delimit therewith a space filled with gas under pressure for the thermal insulation of the internal vessel wall, a pressurizing device for putting the coolant under pressure within the bell-housing and comprising a volume of control gas in contact with a large free surface of coolant in order that an appreciable variation in volume of liquid displaced within the coolant circuit inside the bell-housing should correspond to a small variation in pressure of the control gas. 9 claims, 3 drawing figures

  17. Limits to fuel/coolant mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Moses, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor explosion process involves the mixing of fuel with coolant prior to the explosion. A number of analysts have identified limits to the amount of fuel/coolant mixing that could occur within the reactor vessel following a core melt accident. Past models are reviewed and a sim plified approach is suggested to estimate the upper limit on the amount of fuel/coolant mixing pos sible. The approach uses concepts first advanced by Fauske in a different way. The results indicat that water depth is an important parameter as well as the mixing length scale D /SUB mix/ , and for large values of D /SUB mix/ the fuel mass mixed is limited to <7% of the core mass

  18. Personnel contamination protection techniques applied during the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The severe damage to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core and the subsequent discharge of reactor coolant to the reactor and auxiliary buildings resulted in extremely hostile radiological environments in the TMI-2 plant. High fission product surface contamination and radiation levels necessitated the implementation of innovative techniques and methods in performing cleanup operations while assuring effective as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) practices. The approach utilized by GPU Nuclear throughout the cleanup in applying protective clothing requirements was to consider the overall health risk to the worker including factors such as cardiopulmonary stress, visual and hearing acuity, and heat stress. In applying protective clothing requirements, trade-off considerations had to be made between preventing skin contaminations and possibly overprotecting the worker, thus impacting his ability to perform his intended task at maximum efficiency and in accordance with ALARA principles. The paper discusses the following topics: protective clothing-general use, beta protection, skin contamination, training, personnel access facility, and heat stress

  19. Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA): Study of CAREM Reactor Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Gimenez, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the neutronic and thermohydraulic response of CAREM25 reactor and the safety systems involved in a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA).This parametric analysis considers several break diameters (1/2inch, 3/4inch, 1inch, 1.1/2inch and 2inches) in the vapor zone of the Reactor Pressure Vessel.For each accidental sequence, the successful operation of the following safety systems is modeled: Second Safety System (SSS), Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) and Safety Injection System (SIS). Availability of only one module is postulated for each system.On the other hand, the unsuccessful operation of all safety systems is postulated for each accidental sequence.In both cases the First Shutdown System (FSS) actuates, and the loss of Steam Generator secondary flow and Chemical and Control of Volume System (CCVS) unavailability are postulated.Maximum loss of coolant flow, reactor power and time for safety systems operation are analyzed, as well as its set point parameters.We verified that safety systems are dimensioned to satisfy the 48 hours cooling criteria

  20. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  1. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  2. Simulation of small break loss of coolant accident using relap 5/ MOD 2 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of relap 5 / MOD 2/Cycle 36.05 best estimate computer code capabilities in predicting the thermohydraulic response of a PWR following a small break loss of coolant accident is presented. The experimental data base for the evaluation is the results of Test S-N H-3 performed in the semi scale MOD-2 c Test facility which modeled a 0.5% small break loss of coolant accident with an accompanying failure of the high pressure injection emergency core cooling system. A conclusion was reached that the code is capable of making small break loss of coolant accident calculations efficiently. However, some of the small break loss of coolant accident related phenomena were not properly predicted by the code, suggesting a need for code improvement.9 fig., 3 tab

  3. Theoretical studying the stability of steady-state regime of a channel with a coolant condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savikhin, O.G.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the boiling channel stability theory, the channel steady-state stability with the coolant condensation is studied. Condensable coolants are used in the NPP steam-separator superheaters as well as in cryogenic technique. Under certain conditions the coolant flow rate and temperature fluctuations may be excited in the parallel channel system with coolant condensation, which produce a sufficient effect on the heat exchange equipment operation reliability. To describe unsteady processes of heat and mass transfer in the channel, a homogeneous two-phase flow one dimensional model is used. The results obtained allow one to make a conclusion concerning the effect of some parameters on condensing channel steady-state regime stability: reduction of inlet and outlet unheated communication length, pressure drop increase at the outlet plate and its reduction at the inlet one lead to the increase of stability margin

  4. Coolant-fuel interaction in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors: Structural investigations of The Na-An-O (An = U, Np, Pu) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.L.; Raison, P.E.; Bykov, D.M.; Konings, R.J.; Caciuffo, R.; Cheetham, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to provide Europe with a secure and sustainable electricity supply at a competitive price and to make a significant contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gases emissions. The interest for Sodium-cooled-Fast-spectrum Reactors (SFRs), when compared to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), lies in their more efficient management of plutonium and other actinides as well as their ability to use almost all of the energy in the natural uranium versus 1% utilized in thermal spectrum systems. The high fuel efficiency of fast reactors could greatly dampen concerns about fuel supply. But these reactors have also several drawbacks when compared to PWRs (i.e sodium fire, Na reaction with O2 and H2O, interaction of sodium with oxide fuels). Their development at an industrial scale needs therefore an exhaustive safety assessment that comprises both experimental work and development of sophisticated modelling tools able to describe the reactor behaviour in normal or incidental conditions

  5. Leak detection device for reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Koichiro.

    1990-01-01

    In a light water cooled reactor, if reactor coolants are leaked from pipelines in a pipeline chamber, activated products (N-16) are diffused together to an atmosphere in the pipeline chamber. N-16 is sucked from an extracting tube which is always sucking the atmosphere in the pipeline chamber to a sucking blower. Then, β-rays released from N-16 are monitored by a radiation monitor in a measuring chamber which is radiation-shielded from the pipeline chamber. Accordingly, since the radiation monitor can detect even slight leakage, the slight leakage of reactor coolants in the pipelines can be detected at an early stage. (I.N.)

  6. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  7. Aviation safely management, Valdez oil spill clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesenhahn, M.J.; McKeown, W.L.; Williams, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    The March 24, 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound (PWS) resulted in an unprecedented mobilization of personnel and oil spill clean-up equipment. This paper describes the comprehensive safety management system implemented for aviation operations supporting the clean-up response in PWS and the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Aviation support operations quickly expanded to over 100 aircraft obtained from numerous sources. Beginning with early surveillance flights, aviation operations were subject to comprehensive safety management programs, including safety assessments, minimum flight weather criteria, operational standards and procedures, air carrier qualifications, equipment and procedure audits, and emergency response. Communication networks and flight following procedures were established, arctic survival training was conducted, and a full complement of survival equipment was required. These programs were largely responsible for safety performance of the spill response effort-during the 1989-92 response activities, over 56,000 flight hours, 159,000 equivalent passengers, and 20,000 tons of cargo were handled without an aviation related injury. The programs are applicable to offshore development and operational activities, particularly those located in more remote, severe environments

  8. Specification of matrix cleanup goals in fractured porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, David J; Kueper, Bernard H

    2013-01-01

    Semianalytical transient solutions have been developed to evaluate what level of fractured porous media (e.g., bedrock or clay) matrix cleanup must be achieved in order to achieve compliance of fracture pore water concentrations within a specified time at specified locations of interest. The developed mathematical solutions account for forward and backward diffusion in a fractured porous medium where the initial condition comprises a spatially uniform, nonzero matrix concentration throughout the domain. Illustrative simulations incorporating the properties of mudstone fractured bedrock demonstrate that the time required to reach a desired fracture pore water concentration is a function of the distance between the point of compliance and the upgradient face of the domain where clean groundwater is inflowing. Shorter distances correspond to reduced times required to reach compliance, implying that shorter treatment zones will respond more favorably to remediation than longer treatment zones in which back-diffusion dominates the fracture pore water response. For a specified matrix cleanup goal, compliance of fracture pore water concentrations will be reached sooner for decreased fracture spacing, increased fracture aperture, higher matrix fraction organic carbon, lower matrix porosity, shorter aqueous phase decay half-life, and a higher hydraulic gradient. The parameters dominating the response of the system can be measured using standard field and laboratory techniques. © 2012, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  9. Fission product release into the primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The analytic evaluation of steady state primary coolant activity is discussed. The reported calculations account for temperature dependent fuel failure in two particle types and arbitrary radioactive decay chains. A matrix operator technique implemented in the SUVIUS code is used to solve the simultaneous equations. Results are compared with General Atomic Company's published results

  10. Firms vie to offer DOE a prize-winning recipe for cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Eager to get the most bang for its waste cleanup bucks, the US Department of Energy is conducting its own version of the Pillsbury bake-off. DOE is pitting two environmental contractors, Rust International Corp. and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Co., against each other to come up with the prize-winning recipe for cleaning up some nasty waste problems

  11. Preplanning of early cleanup. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A pre-study 'Pre-planning of early cleanup after fallout of radioactive material' made by Studvik EcoSafe has pointed out the need and request for pre-planning of actions. Based on the pre-study this project was started with the goal to work out guidelines and checklists. Because of the common interest between the Nordic countries NKS is the organization responsible for the project. The results of the project will be a document pointing out what can be planned in advance, including guidelines and checklists, regarding early cleanup actions after a nuclear plant accident in or in the vicinity of the Nordic countries. In this work 'early' means the three first weeks after an accident. The project only deals with questions concerning external radiation. The document shall be usable by persons in charge of planning or decision makers on the appropriate level of organization for each country. The document shall principally be aimed towards persons without professional competence in the field of radiology. The result will be presented for a limited number of generalized environments and fallout situations: urban/suburban/rural (concentrating on urban/suburban); regional differences (in for example house types and constructing material); dry or wet deposition. Five housing environments, ten cleanup actions and wet or dry deposition are treated. For 66 combinations calculations are made and the results are documented as data sheets, each describing the beneficial effects, costs and disadvantages of application of a feasible method for cleaning in the early phase of a specific type of surface in one of five different urban or suburban environments. This data forms the foundation for the recommendations on guidelines, which are the ultimate goal of the EKO-5 project. (EG)

  12. Shoreline clean-up methods : biological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoura, S.T. [Oil Spill Response Limited, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The cleanup of oil spills in shoreline environments is a challenging issue worldwide. Oil spills receive public and media attention, particularly in the event of a coastal impact. It is important to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of cleanup methods when defining the level of effort and consequences that are appropriate to remove or treat different types of oil on different shoreline substrates. Of the many studies that have compared different mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for their effectiveness on various types of oil, biological techniques have received the most attention. For that reason, this paper evaluated the effectiveness and effects of shoreline cleanup methods using biological techniques. It summarized data from field experiments and oil spill incidents, including the Exxon Valdez, Sea Empress, Prestige, Grand Eagle, Nakhodka, Guanabara Bay and various Gulf war oil spills. Five major shoreline types were examined, notably rocky intertidal, cobble/pebble/gravel, sand/mud, saltmarsh, and mangrove/sea-grass. The biological techniques that were addressed were nutrient enrichment, hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria, vegetable oil biosolvents, plants, surf washing, oil-particle interactions and natural attenuation. The study considered the oil type, volume and fate of stranded oil, location of coastal materials, extent of pollution and the impact of biological techniques. The main factors that affect biodegradation of hydrocarbons are the volume, chemical composition and weathering state of the petroleum product as well as the temperature, oxygen availability of nutrients, water salinity, pH level, water content, and microorganisms in the shoreline environment. The interaction of these factors also affect the biodegradation of oil. It was concluded that understanding the fate of stranded oil can help in the development of techniques that improve the weathering and degradation of oil on complex shoreline substrates. 39 refs.

  13. Cleanup criteria for the West Valley demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrott, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is prescribing decontamination and decommissioning (cleanup) criteria for the West Valley Demonstration Project and the West Valley, New York, site. The site is contaminated with various forms of residual radioactive contamination and contains a wide variety of radioactive waste. The NRC is planning to issue cleanup criteria for public comment in Fall 1999. Due to the complexity of the site, and the newness of NRC's cleanup criteria policy, applying NRC's cleanup criteria to this site will be an original regulatory undertaking. (author)

  14. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1999-09-30

    The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

  15. TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Loss of coolant accident at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, R.

    1975-01-01

    A revision is made with regard to the methods of thermohydraulic analysis which are used at present in order to determine the efficiency of the safety systems against loss of coolant at boiling water reactors. The object is to establish a program of work in the INEN so that the personnel in charge of the safety of the nuclear plants in Mexico, be able to make in a near future, independent valuations of the safety systems which mitigate the consequences of the above mentioned accident. (author)

  17. Peaking cladding temperature and break equivalent size of intermediate break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Bangqi

    2012-01-01

    The analysis results of intermediate break loss of coolant accident for the nuclear power plant of million kw level showed to be as following: (1) At the begin of life, the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown with L(X)P. it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 20 cm and 849℃. (2) At the begin of life, the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown without loop. the reactor coolant pumps will be stop after reactor shutdown 10 minutes, it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 10.5 cm and 921℃. (3) At the bur up of 31 GWd/t(EOC1). the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown without loop, the reactor coolant pumps will be stop after reactor shutdown 20 minutes, it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 8 cm and 1145℃. The above analysis results showed that the peaking cladding temperature of intermediate break loss of coolant accident is not only related with the break equivalent size and core bur up, and is closely related with the stop time of coolant pumps because the coolant pumps would drive the coolant from safety system to produce the seal loop in break loop and affect the core coolant flow, results in the fuel cladding temperature increasing or damaging. Therefore, the break spectrum, burn up spectrum, the stop time of coolant pumps and operator action time will need to detail analysis and provide appropriate operating procedure, otherwise the peaking cladding temperature will exceed 1204℃ and threaten the safety of the reactor core when the intermediate break loss of coolant accident occur in some break equivalent size, burn up, stop pumps time and operator action not appropriate. The pressurizer pressure low signal simultaneity containment pressure higher signal were used as the operator manual close the signal of reactor coolant pumps after reactor shutdown of 20 minutes. have successful solved the operator intervention time from 10 minutes

  18. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Can, Levent

    2006-01-01

    .... The overall focus of this study is the build up of induced radioactivity in the coolant of metal cooled reactors as well as the evaluation of other physical and chemical properties of such coolants...

  19. Resting-state FMRI confounds and cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin; Birn, Rasmus M.; Bandettini, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) is to investigate the brain’s functional connections by using the temporal similarity between blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals in different regions of the brain “at rest” as an indicator of synchronous neural activity. Since this measure relies on the temporal correlation of FMRI signal changes between different parts of the brain, any non-neural activity-related process that affects the signals will influence the measure of functional connectivity, yielding spurious results. To understand the sources of these resting-state FMRI confounds, this article describes the origins of the BOLD signal in terms of MR physics and cerebral physiology. Potential confounds arising from motion, cardiac and respiratory cycles, arterial CO2 concentration, blood pressure/cerebral autoregulation, and vasomotion are discussed. Two classes of techniques to remove confounds from resting-state BOLD time series are reviewed: 1) those utilising external recordings of physiology and 2) data-based cleanup methods that only use the resting-state FMRI data itself. Further methods that remove noise from functional connectivity measures at a group level are also discussed. For successful interpretation of resting-state FMRI comparisons and results, noise cleanup is an often over-looked but essential step in the analysis pipeline. PMID:23571418

  20. Efficiency enhancement in IGCC power plants with air-blown gasification and hot gas clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffrida, Antonio; Romano, Matteo C.; Lozza, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Air-blown IGCC systems with hot fuel gas clean-up are investigated. In detail, the gas clean-up station consists of two reactors: in the first, the raw syngas exiting the gasifier and passed through high-temperature syngas coolers is desulfurized by means of a zinc oxide-based sorbent, whereas in the second the sulfided sorbent is duly regenerated. The hot fuel gas clean-up station releases H 2 S-free syngas, which is ready to fuel the combustion turbine after hot gas filtration, and a SO 2 -laden stream, which is successively treated in a wet scrubber. A thermodynamic analysis of two air-blown IGCC systems, the first with cold fuel gas clean-up and the second with hot fuel gas clean-up, both with a state-of-the-art combustion turbine as topping cycle, shows that it is possible to obtain a really attractive net efficiency (more than 51%) for the second system, with significant improvements in comparison with the first system. Nevertheless, higher efficiency is accomplished with a small reduction in the power output and no sensible efficiency improvements seem to be appreciated when the desulfurization temperature increases. Other IGCC systems, with an advanced 1500 °C-class combustion turbine as the result of technology improvements, are investigated as well, with efficiency as high as 53%. - Highlights: ► Hot fuel gas clean-up is a highly favorable technology for IGCC concepts. ► Significant IGCC efficiency improvements are possible with hot fuel gas clean-up. ► Size reductions of several IGCC components are possible. ► Higher desulfurization temperatures do not sensibly affect IGCC efficiency. ► IGCC efficiency as high as 53% is possible with a 1500°C-class combustion turbine

  1. Fuel-coolant interaction-phenomena under prompt burst conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, H.; Young, M.F.; Reil, K.O.

    1979-01-01

    The Prompt Burst Energetics (PBE) experiments conducted at Sandia Laboratories are a series of in-pile tests with fresh uranium oxide or uranium carbide fuel pins in stagnant sodium. Fuel-coolant-interactions in PBE-9S (oxide/sodium system) and PBE-SG2 (carbide/sodium) have been analyzed with the MURTI parametric FCI code. The purpose is to gain insight into possible FCI scenarios in the experiments and sensitivity of results to input parameters. Results are in approximate agreement for the second (triggered) event in PBE-9S (32 MPa peak) and the initial interaction in PBE-SG2

  2. PUMP: analog-hybrid reactor coolant hydraulic transient model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandia, M.R.

    1976-03-01

    The PUMP hybrid computer code simulates flow and pressure distribution; it is used to determine real time response to starting and tripping all combinations of PWR reactor coolant pumps in a closed, pressurized, four-pump, two-loop primary system. The simulation includes the description of flow, pressure, speed, and torque relationships derived through pump affinity laws and from vendor-supplied pump zone maps to describe pump dynamic characteristics. The program affords great flexibility in the type of transients that can be simulated

  3. Time-dependent coolant velocity measurements in an operating BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbesmeyer, D.; Crowe, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method to measure time-dependent fluid velocities in BWR-bundle elements by noise analysis of the incore-neutron-detector signals is shown. Two application examples of the new method are given. The time behaviour of the fluid velocity in the bundle element during a scheduled power excursion of the plant. The change of power was performed by changing the coolant flow through the core The apparent change of the fluid velocity due to thermal elongation of the helix-drive of the TIP-system. A simplified mathematical model was derived for this elongation to use as a reference to check the validity of the new method. (author)

  4. HTGR-GT primary coolant transient resulting from postulated turbine deblading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, G.J.; Deremer, R.K.

    1980-11-01

    The turbomachine is located within the primary coolant system of a nuclear closed cycle gas turbine plant (HTGR-GT). The deblading of the turbine can cause a rapid pressure equilibration transient that generates significant loads on other components in the system. Prediction of and design for this transient are important aspects of assuring the safety of the HTGR-GT. This paper describes the adaptation and use of the RATSAM program to analyze the rapid fluid transient throughout the primary coolant system during a spectrum of turbine deblading events. Included are discussions of (1) specific modifications and improvements to the basic RATSAM program, which is also briefly described; (2) typical results showing the expansion wave moving upstream from the debladed turbine through the primary coolant system; and (3) the effect on the transient results of different plenum volumes, flow resistances, times to deblade, and geometries that can choke the flow

  5. Review of State Soil Cleanup Levels for Dioxin (December 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final report summarizes a survey of state soil cleanup levels for dioxin and characterizes the science underlying these values. The objective of this project was to summarize existing state cleanup levels for dioxin in soil, together with their scientific bases where availa...

  6. Diabetes mellitus morbidity in Chernobyl clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstaya, E.V.; Ermakova, D.P.; Glinskaya, T.N.

    2016-01-01

    Acute and total diabetes mellitus morbidity in Chernobyl clean-up workers was examined during 1995-2014 period. During all the period of investigations levels of acute and total morbidity were higher in clean-up workers, than in total Belarusian population. (authors)

  7. Cleanup Verification Package for the 107-D5 Trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corpuz, F.M.; Fancher, J.D.; Blumenkranz, D.B.

    1998-03-01

    This document presents the results of remedial action objectives performed at the 107-D5 Sludge Trench, located at the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The 107-D5 Sludge Trench is also identified in the Hanford Waste Information Data System as Waste Site 100-D-4 (site code). The selected remedial action was (1) excavation of the site to the extent required to meet specified soil cleanup levels, (2) disposal of contaminated excavation materials at the Environmental Restoration and Disposal Facility at the 200 Area of the Hanford Site, and (3) backfilling the site with clean soil to adjacent grade elevations

  8. Soil, groundwater cleanup takes the gamble out of casino operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Colorado's rich stores of gold and silver sparked development of towns like Black Hawk and Central City in the 1890s. Today, these communities are the homes of limited-stakes gaming operations. However casino operators are discovering that having gold and silver underground in the form of tailings is not as desirable as collecting it aboveground in slot machines. A unique environmental engineering approach allowed construction of two new casinos and reclamation of the tailings, as well as cleanup of petroleum-saturated soils and groundwater. A treatment system was designed and constructed to treat groundwater at the Black Hawk site. The most economical alternative for disposing treated groundwater was to discharge it into nearby North Clear Creek. An NPDES permit was obtained requiring treatment of the groundwater for petroleum, heavy metals and pH before discharging it

  9. Revised Mark 22 coolant temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Coolant temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 charge published previously are non-conservative because of the neglect of a significant mechanism which has a positive contribution to reactivity. Even after correcting for this effect, dynamic tests made on a Mark VIB charge in the early 60's suggest the results are still non-conservative. This memorandum takes both of these sources of information into account in making a best estimate of the prompt (coolant plus metal) temperature coefficient. Although no safety issues arise from this work (the overall temperature coefficient still strongly contributes to reactor stability), it is obviously desirable to use best estimates for prompt coefficients in limits and other calculations

  10. Freeform Deposition Method for Coolant Channel Closeout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Reynolds, David Christopher (Inventor); Walker, Bryant H. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating a coolant channel closeout jacket on a structure having coolant channels formed in an outer surface thereof. A line of tangency relative to the outer surface is defined for each point on the outer surface. Linear rows of a metal feedstock are directed towards and deposited on the outer surface of the structure as a beam of weld energy is directed to the metal feedstock so-deposited. A first angle between the metal feedstock so-directed and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 20-90.degree.. The beam is directed towards a portion of the linear rows such that less than 30% of the cross-sectional area of the beam impinges on a currently-deposited one of the linear rows. A second angle between the beam and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 5-65 degrees.

  11. CAREM-25: considerations about primary coolant chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Iglesias, Alberto M.; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Villegas, Marina

    2000-01-01

    World operating experience, in conjunction with basic studies has been modifying chemistry specifications for the primary coolant of water cooled nuclear reactors along with the reactor type and structural materials involved in the design. For the reactor CAREM-25, the following sources of information have been used: 1) Experience gained by the Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA, Argentina); 2) Participation of the Chemistry Department (CNEA) in international cooperation projects; 3) Guidelines given by EPRI, Siemens-KWU, AECL, etc. Given the main objectives: materials integrity, low radiation levels and personnel safety, which are in turn a balance between the lowest corrosion and activity transport achievable and considering that the CAREM-25 is a pressurized vessel integrated reactor, a group of guidelines for the chemistry and additives for the primary coolant have been given in the present work. (author)

  12. Recovery studies for plutonium machining oil coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Baldwin, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Lathe coolant oil, contaminated with plutonium and having a carbon tetrachloride diluent, is generated in plutonium machining areas at Rocky Flats. A research program was initiated to determine the nature of plutonium in this mixture of oil and carbon tetrachloride. Appropriate methods then could be developed to remove the plutonium and to recycle the oil and carbon tetrachloride. Studies showed that the mixtures of spent oil and carbon tetrachloride contained particulate plutonium and plutonium species that are soluble in water or in oil and carbon tetrachloride. The particulate plutonium was removed by filtration; the nonfilterable plutonium was removed by adsorption on various materials. Laboratory-scale tests indicated the lathe-coolant oil mixture could be separated by distilling the carbon tetrachloride to yield recyclable products

  13. Enhancing resistance to burnout via coolant chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, J. P.; Dinh, T. N.; Theofanous, T. G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Boiling Crisis (BC) on horizontal, upwards-facing copper and steel surfaces under the influence of various coolant chemistries relevant to reactor containment waters is considered. In addition to Boric Acid (BA) and TriSodium Phosphate (TSP), pure De-Ionized Water (DIW) and Tap Water (TW) are included in experiments carried out in the BETA facility. The results are related to a companion paper on the large scale ULPU facility.

  14. Reactor coolant pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Richter, G.; Tschoepel, G.

    1975-01-01

    A brake for the pump rotor of a main coolant pump or a shutoff member on the pump are provided in order to prevent excess speeds of the pump rotor. Such excess speeds may occur in PWR type reactors with water at a pressure below, e.g., 150 bars if there is leakage from a coolant line associated with the main coolant pump. As a brake, a centrifugal brake depending upon the pump speed or a brake ring arranged on the pump housing and acting on the pump rotor, which ring would be activated by pressure differentials in the pump, may be used. If the pressure differences between suction and pressure sockets are very small, a controlled hydraulic increase of the pressure force on the brake may also be provided. Furthermore, a turbine brake may be provided. A slide which is automatically movable in closing position along the pump rotor axis is used as a shutoff element. It is of cylindrical configuration and is arranged concentrically with the rotor axis. (DG) [de

  15. Design of automotive engine coolant hoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrishikesh D BACHCHHAV

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we are present the performance of engine coolant hoses (radiator hoses used in passenger cars by checking various physical behaviours such as hose leakage, hose burst, hose collapse or any mechanical damage as studied-thru design guidelines, CFD analysis and product validation testing and also check pressure drop of the hoses when engine will be running. The design term is more likely used for technical part modelling using CAD tool. Later on, we will focus on the transformation of the part design to process design. The process design term is more likely used for "tooling design" for manufacturing of the product using CAD Tool. Then inlet hose carries coolant from engine to radiator inlet tank, then coolant circulated in radiator and passed through radiator outlet tank to water pump of engine with the help of outlet hose. After that …nding any leakage, Burst, damage or collapse of hose and pressure drop of the hose with the help of design checklist, CFD Analysis and product validation testing.

  16. Latvian Chernobyl clean-up workers dynamics of morbidity 15 years of the post radiation period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvagule, T.; Eglite, M.; Bruvere, R.; Gabruseva, N.; Feldmane, G.

    2003-01-01

    Nearly 1.0% of the male population of Latvia were sent (1986-1991) to Chernobyl to assist in the clean-up activities after the nuclear power plant accident (1986). The prevalence of all types of diseases, dynamic of breaking out of the key symptoms and interferon status were evaluated in respect to date of work, duration of work and kind of work in the whole clean-up workers group and in the particular group with seizures of unconsciousness. The disease incidence in clean-up workers from Latvia exceeds that observed in age and sex matched male population. Most had several diseases each and their poly-symptomatic sicknesses exhibited tendency to progress even 10-14 years after the exposure (during 1996-2000). Diseases of nervous, digestive and circulatory system, mental disorders and diseases of muscles and connective tissue were the most frequent. The primary outset of symptoms being low in the first 2-3 years after the work gradually increased during the following 10 years. Leukopenia was predominant in 1990-1993 and leucocytosis in 1997-2000. Ability of leukocytes to produce interferons was significantly decreased. Since the external radiation doses did not exceed 50 centyGy (cGy) there is sufficient reasons to believe that the principal cause of the gradually increased frequency of health problems is the long-life radioisotopes incorporated in the clean-up workers bodies as permanent radiation and toxic compounds source. (authors)

  17. Reactor water clean-up device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Sankichi; Takashima, Yoshie.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently eliminate radioactive materials such as iron oxide and cobalt ions with less heat loss by the use of an electrode assembly applied with a direct current. Constitution: In a reactor water clean-up device adapted to pass reactor water through an electrode assembly comprising at least a pair of anode and cathode applied with a direct current to eliminate various types of ions contained in the reactor water by way of the electrolysis or charge neutralization at the anode, the cathode is constituted with a corrosion resistant grid-like or porous metal plate and a layer to the upper portion of the metal plate filled with a plurality of metal spheres of about 1 - 5 mm diameter, and the anode is made of insoluble porous or spirally wound metal material. (Seki, T.)

  18. Fernald incident underscores DOE cleanup woes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Miscalculations and poor safety planning led to a large release of deadly gas during an error-plagued effort to plug a leaking uranium hexafluoride canister discovered lying in a scrap heap at the Energy Department's Fernald plant last year, according to a DOE investigative report. Investigators with DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health said serious injury was avoided only because the wind happened to blow the toxic cloud of hydrogen fluoride gas away from inadequately protected Fernald workers watching the July 1993 canister-plugging operation at the Ohio plant. The investigators said the 25-minute canister repair effort - captured on videotape - was marked by poor planning by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp. (FERMCO), a Fluor Daniel subsidiary hired by DOE for its cleanup expertise

  19. Saudis map $450 million gulf spill cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Saudi Arabia which has earmarked about $450 million to clean up Persian Gulf beaches polluted by history's worst oil spills, created during the Persian Gulf crisis. Details of the proposed cleanup measures were outlined by Saudi environmental officials at a seminar on the environment in Dubai, OPEC News Agency reported. The seminar was sponsored by the Gulf Area Oil Companies Mutual Aid Organization, an environmental cooperative agency set up by Persian Gulf governments. Meantime, a Saudi government report has outlined early efforts designed to contain the massive oil spills that hit the Saudi coast before oil could contaminate water intakes at the huge desalination plants serving Riyadh and cooling water facilities at Al Jubail

  20. Rocky Flats cleanup receives new deadline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats nuclear weapon plant near Denver narrowly missed a court-ordered shutdown of virtually all cleanup activities when it failed to meet an Aug. 22 deadline for a state permit to store mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes on site. US District Court Judge Lewis Babcock granted a 90-day stay of contempt charges against the US Dept. of Energy, but left open the possibility of civil penalties under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. DOE's problems stem from a lawsuit the Sierra Club won two years ago in which Babcock gave Rocky Flats until Aug. 22 to obtain a RCRA permit or interim status from Colorado to store 600 cu yd of mixed wastes. If DOE failed to do so, the court said it could not generate further hazardous wastes at the site