WorldWideScience

Sample records for converging stereotactic radiotherapy

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno;

    2014-01-01

    ; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  2. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the procedure performed? • Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using the Gamma Knife Gamma Knife radiosurgery involves four phases: placement of the head ... also a guiding device that makes sure the Gamma Knife beams are focused exactly where the treatment is ...

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  4. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cagney, DN

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy

  5. Stereotactic multiple are radiotherapy. IV--Haemangioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, P R; Chakrabarti, K B; Doughty, D; Plowman, P N

    1997-04-01

    Our initial experience in the treatment of haemangioblastoma using conventional external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery), by the linear accelerator method, is reported. Six haemangioblastomas in five patients were treated with a mean follow-up of 40 months (range 14-60). Five haemangioblastomas in four patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy, where four showed complete radiological response and the fifth was static. Neurological symptoms and signs improved in those patients. The sixth haemangioblastoma was situated close to the pituitary and optic chiasm, and was treated with conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The lesion showed partial response. No complications were noted in this patient group. This series complements and extends the relatively sparse published literature demonstrating that radiotherapy is an effective option for treating haemangioblastomas. Radiosurgery often lends itself particularly well to these discrete lesions allowing highly focused treatment. For patients with multiple and metachronous cerebellar haemangioblastomas as part of the von Hipple-Lindau syndrome, the data support a policy of conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy to the whole cerebellum of 50-55 Gy followed, after a period of time, by radiosurgery to persisting lesions (patients 3 and 4).

  6. Plan optimization for stereotactic radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. de Pooter (Jacobus Abraham)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCancer is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Next to surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy is one of the most used treatment modalities for cancer. About 50% of the patients with cancer will be treated with radiotherapy during the management of their disease. In radiothera

  7. Preliminary Study of Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    From March 1997 to November 1999, 45 patients with lung cancer were treated by astereotactic radiotherapy, with 15 cases treated by a stereotactic radiotherapy alone, and 30 cases by the external radiotherapy plus stereotactic radiotherapy. The clinical target volume was 1.89-187. 26 cm3 with the median being 18. 17 cm3. The doses of plan target volume (PTV) edge was 16-30 Gy/2-3 times and the doses of center was 120 % to 150 % of PTV edge doses. The overall response rate was 84.4 % (38/45), with 11 complete response (CR) and 27 partial response (PR). This study confirmed that the stereotactic radiotherapy is a safe and effective therapy for lung cancer. For those early-stage patients who can tolerate neither operation nor even conventional radiotherapy for various reasons, it can both achieve therapeutic purpose and improve quality of life.

  8. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with acromegaly: an interim single-centre audit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Anne Stidsholt; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Juhler, M;

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in acromegaly in a retrospective analysis.......To evaluate the effect of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in acromegaly in a retrospective analysis....

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andolino, David L., E-mail: dandolin@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnson, Cynthia S. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Maluccio, Mary [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Kwo, Paul [Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Tector, A. Joseph [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Neves, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Gadia, Rafael; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. PMID:26398758

  12. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea...... and hearing preservation was also investigated....

  13. The Confluence of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy and Tumor Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Eric Finkelstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic radiation approaches are gaining more popularity for the treatment of intracranial as well as extracranial tumors in organs such as the liver and lung. Technology, rather than biology, is driving the rapid adoption of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, also known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, in the clinic due to advances in precise positioning and targeting. Dramatic improvements in tumor control have been demonstrated; however, our knowledge of normal tissue biology response mechanisms to large fraction sizes is lacking. Herein, we will discuss how SABR can induce cellular expression of MHC I, adhesion molecules, costimulatory molecules, heat shock proteins, inflammatory mediators, immunomodulatory cytokines, and death receptors to enhance antitumor immune responses.

  14. A halo-ring technique for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, B.G.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Souhami, L.; Caron, J.-L.; Sixel, K.E. (Montreal General Hospital, PQ (Canada)); Olivier, A. (Montreal Neurological Inst., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1993-06-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has become established as an effective treatment modality for certain non-malignant brain diseases such as arteriovenous malformations. This paper describes an extension of the authors' linear accelerator-based radiosurgical technique to fractionated treatment of intracranial disease. The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy technique expands the use of the modality by sparing normal cells within the treatment volume thus improving the therapeutic ratio. The first treatment is given using a stereotactic frame both for target localization and patient immobilization. The frame is then removed and subsequent treatments use a standard neurosurgical halo-ring for patient immobilization. The halo-ring is left in place on the skull for the duration of the course of treatment. They describe a sensitive and effective technique for checking the rotational beam parameters and collimator alignment which is used immediately prior to treatment to ensure adequate accuracy of dose delivery to the target volume. (author).

  15. Delivery validation of VMAT stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy at commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olding, T.; Alexander, K. M.; Jechel, C.; Nasr, A. T.; Joshi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric validation of two volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) plans was completed as part of the commissioning process of this technique in our clinic. Static and dynamic ion chamber, EBT3 film and leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gel measurements were acquired using a motion phantom with appropriate inserts for each dosimeter. The results show good agreement between measured and calculated plan dose.

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address ...

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamma knife - discharge; Cyberknife - discharge; Stereotactic radiotherapy - discharge; Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy - discharge; Cyclotrons - discharge; Linear accelerator - discharge; Lineacs - ...

  18. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädinger, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Wulf, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3% +/- 2.3% (lung), 95.0% +/- 4.5% (liver), and 92.1% +/- 5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73 +/- 0.09 (lung), 0.77 +/- 0.10 (liver), and 0.70 +/- 0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields.

  19. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Adrenal Gland Metastases: University of Florence Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casamassima, Franco, E-mail: f.casamassima@dfc.unifi.it [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [Department of Radiation-Oncology, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Masciullo, Stefano; Menichelli, Claudia; Masi, Laura [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Meattini, Icro [Department of Radiation-Oncology, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Bonucci, Ivano [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Agresti, Benedetta; Simontacchi, Gabriele [Department of Radiation-Oncology, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Doro, Raffaela [Clinical Radiobiological Institute, University of Florence, Florence (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a retrospective single-institution outcome after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, we treated 48 patients with SBRT for adrenal metastases. The median age of the patient population was 62.7 years (range, 43-77 years). In the majority of patients, the prescription dose was 36 Gy in 3 fractions (70% isodose, 17.14 Gy per fraction at the isocenter). Eight patients were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery and forty patients with multi-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the series of patients was followed up for a median of 16.2 months (range, 3-63 months). At the time of analysis, 20 patients were alive and 28 patients were dead. The 1- and 2-year actuarial overall survival rates were 39.7% and 14.5%, respectively. We recorded 48 distant failures and 2 local failures, with a median interval to local failure of 4.9 months. The actuarial 1-year disease control rate was 9%; the actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rate was 90%. Conclusion: Our retrospective study indicated that SBRT for the treatment of adrenal metastases represents a safe and effective option with a control rate of 90% at 2 years.

  20. Hypofractionation regimens for stereotactic radiotherapy for large brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F; Zhang, Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T C; Mayr, Nina A

    2008-10-01

    To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The alpha/beta ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. A plausible alpha/beta ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens.

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address in this retrospective analysis. Patients who met the INTREPID criteria for best responders were eligible for SRT. A total of 32 eyes of 32 patients were treated. Thereafter, patients were examined monthly for 12 months and received pro re nata IVI of aflibercept or ranibizumab. Outcome measures were: mean number of injections, best-corrected visual acuity, and morphological changes of the outer retina-choroid complex as well as patient safety. Mean number of IVI decreased by almost 50% during the 12 months after SRT compared to the year before, whereas visual acuity increased by one line (logMAR). Morphological evaluation showed that most changes affect outer retinal layers. Stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduced IVI retreatment in nAMD patients under real-life circumstances. Therefore, SRT might be the first step to stop visual loss as a result of IVI undertreatment, which is a major risk. PMID:28033280

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, Joern; Guckenberger, Matthias; Haedinger, Ulrich; Oppitz, Ulrich; Mueller, Gerd; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2006-09-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical results of stereotactic radiotherapy in primary liver tumors and hepatic metastases. Five patients with primary liver cancer and 39 patients with 51 hepatic metastases were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy since 1997. Twenty-eight targets were treated in a 'low-dose'-group with 3x10 Gy (n=27) or 4x7 Gy (n=1) prescribed to the PTV-encl. 65%-isodose. In a 'high-dose'-group patients were treated with 3x12 - 12.5 Gy (n=19; same dose prescription) or 1x26 Gy/PTV-enclosing 80%-isodose (n=9). Median follow-up was 15 months (2-48 months) for primary liver cancer and 15 months (2-85 months) for hepatic metastases. While all primary liver cancers were controlled, nine local failures (3-19 months) of 51 metastases were observed resulting in an actuarial local control rate of 92% after 12 months and 66% after 24 months and later. A borderline significant correlation between dose and local control was observed (p=0.077): the actuarial local control rate after 12 and 24?months was 86% and 58% in the low-dose-group versus 100% and 82% in the high-dose-group. In multivariate analysis high versus low-dose was the only significant factor predicting local control (p=0.0089). Overall survival after 1 and 2 years was 72% and 32% for all patients and was impaired due to systemic progression of disease. No severe acute or late toxicity exceeding RTOG/EORTC-score 2 were observed. Stereotactic irradiation of primary liver cancer and hepatic metastases offers a locally effective treatment without significant complications in patients, who are not amenable for surgery. Patient selection is important, because those with low risk for systemic progression are more likely to benefit from this approach.

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors. Principles and practical guidelines of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzing, Florian [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Klinische Kooperationseinheit Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Brunner, Thomas B. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Radiologische Klinik, Freiburg (Germany); Ernst, Iris; Greve, Burkhard [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie, Muenster (Germany); Baus, Wolfgang W. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Koeln (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias [UniversitaetsSpital Zuerich, Klinik fuer Radio-Onkologie, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    This report of the Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) aims to provide a practical guideline for safe and effective stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of liver tumors. The literature on the clinical evidence of SBRT for both primary liver tumors and liver metastases was reviewed and analyzed focusing on both physical requirements and special biological characteristics. Recommendations were developed for patient selection, imaging, planning, treatment delivery, motion management, dose reporting, and follow-up. Radiation dose constraints to critical organs at risk are provided. SBRT is a well-established treatment option for primary and secondary liver tumors associated with low morbidity. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe Stereotaxie der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) legt hier eine Empfehlung zur sicheren und effektiven Durchfuehrung der SBRT von Lebertumoren vor. Eine Literaturrecherche zur Untersuchung der Evidenz der SBRT sowohl fuer primaere Lebertumore als auch fuer Lebermetastasen wurde durchgefuehrt. Auf dieser Basis werden Empfehlungen fuer technisch-physikalische Voraussetzungen wie auch fuer die taegliche Praxis der Leber-SBRT gegeben. Weiterhin werden radiobiologische Besonderheiten dieses Verfahrens dargestellt. Praktische Vorgaben werden fuer Patientenselektion, Bildgebung, Planung, Applikation, Bewegungsmanagement, Dosisdokumentation und Follow-up gegeben. Dosisempfehlungen fuer die kritischen Risikoorgane werden dargestellt. Die SBRT stellt eine etablierte Behandlungsmethode fuer primaere und sekundaere Lebertumore dar und ist mit niedriger Morbiditaet assoziiert. (orig.)

  4. Efficient and accurate stereotactic radiotherapy using flattening filter free beams and HexaPOD robotic tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, C. R.; Brink, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) high dose rate beam technique was introduced for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Furthermore, a HexaPOD treatment table was introduced for the brain SRS to enable correction of rotational setup errors. 19 filter fl...

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas. Symptomatology, acute and late toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzel, M.; Gross, M.W.; Failing, T.; Strassmann, G.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Gisssen (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Marburg Univ. (Germany); Hamm, K.; Surber, G.; Kleinert, G. [Dept. of Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, Helios Klinikum Erfurt (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Background and purpose: stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is well established in the treatment of skull base meningiomas, but this therapy approach is limited to small tumors only. The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offers an alternative treatment option. This study aims at local control, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and methods: between 1997-2003, 224 patients were treated with SRT (n= 183), hypofractionated SRT (n = 30), and SRS (n = 11). 95/224 were treated with SRT/SRS alone. 129/224 patients underwent previous operations. Freedom from progression and overall survival, toxicity, and symptomatology were evaluated systematically. Additionally, tumor volume (TV) shrinkage was analyzed three-dimensionally within the planning system. Results: the median follow-up was 36 months (range, 12-100 months). Overall survival and freedom from progression for 5 years were 92.9% and 96.9%. Quantitative TV reduction was 26.2% and 30.3% 12 and 18 months after SRT/SRS (p < 0.0001). 95.9% of the patients improved their symptoms or were stable. Clinically significant acute toxicity (CTC III ) was rarely seen (2.5%). Clinically significant late morbidity (III -IV ) or new cranial nerve palsies did not occur. Conclusion: SRT offers an additional treatment option of high efficacy with only few side effects. In the case of large tumor size (> 4 ml) and adjacent critical structures (< 2 mm), SRT is highly recommended. (orig.)

  6. Stability of percutaneously implanted markers for lung stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Bjørnsen Fredberg; Josipovic, Mirjana; Von Der Recke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of complex markers implanted into lung tumors throughout a course of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen patients referred for lung SBRT were prospectively included. Radio-opaque markers were implanted percutaneously, guided...... by computed tomography (CT). Deep inspiration breath-hold CT scans (BHCT) were acquired at planning and on three treatment days. The treatment days' BHCTs were registered to the planning BHCT. Intraobserver uncertainty in both tumor and marker registration was determined. Deviations in the difference between...... tumor and marker-based image registrations of the BHCT scans during treatment quantified the marker stability. Marker position deviation relative to tumor position of less than 2 mm in all three dimensions was considered acceptable for treatment delivery precision. Intra observer uncertainties for image...

  7. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kylie H. [School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S., E-mail: Simon.Lo@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  8. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in pediatric patients: analysis of indications and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Bilal; Mønsted, Anne; Jensen, Josephine Harding

    2010-01-01

    We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications.......We describe indications, outcomes, and risk profiles of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and single fraction "radiosurgery" (SRS) in pediatric patients compared to the adult population and evaluate the causal role of SRS and SRT in inducing new neurological complications....

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy in the liver hilum. Basis for future studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, C.; Messmer, M.B.; Momm, F. [Univ. Hospital Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Becker, G. [Univ. Hospital Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    2012-01-15

    A basis for future trials with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for tumors of the liver hilum should be established. Thus, dosage concepts, planning processes, and dose constraints as well as technical innovations are summarized in this contribution. Methods On the background of our own data, the current literature was reviewed. The use of SBRT in the most common tumors of the liver hilum (pancreatic cancer and Klatskin tumors) was investigated. Dose constraints were calculated in 2 Gy standard fractionation doses. Results A total of 8 pilot or phase I/II studies about SBRT in the liver hilum were identified. In recent years, the SBRT technique has developed very quickly from classical stereotactic body frame radiotherapy to IGRT techniques including gating and tracking systems. In the studies using classical body frame technique, patients experienced considerable toxicities (duodenal ulcer/perforation) as compared to tolerable side effects in IGRT studies (<10% grade 3 and 4 toxicities). Dose constraints for duodenum, liver, kidneys, colon, and spinal cord were derived from the investigated studies. Survival and local tumor control data are very heterogeneous: median survival in these patients with locally advanced pancreatic or Klatskin tumors ranges between 5 and 32 months. Excellent local tumor control rates of about 80% over 24 months were achieved using SBRT. Conclusion Despite a few negative results, SBRT seems to be a promising technique in the treatment of tumors of the liver hilum. Highest precision in diagnostics, positioning, and irradiation as well as strict dose constraints should be applied to keep target volumes as small as possible and side effects tolerable. (orig.)

  10. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  11. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  12. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: From concept to clinical reality. 2011 update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, N; Mornex, F

    2011-10-01

    Only 60% of patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a priori bearing a favorable prognosis, undergo radical resection because of the very frequent co-morbidities occurring in smokers, precluding surgery to be safely performed. Stereotactic radiotherapy consists of the use of multiple radiation microbeams, allowing high doses of radiation to be delivered to the tumour (ranging from 7.5 to 20 Gy per fraction) in a small number of fractions (one to eight on average). Several studies with long-term follow-up are now available, showing the effectiveness of stereotactic radiotherapy to control stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Local control rates are consistently reported to be above 95% with a median survival of 34 to 45 months. Because of these excellent results, stereotactic radiation therapy is now being evaluated in operable patients in several randomized trials with a surgical arm. Ultimately, the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in early-stage tumours leads to hypothesize that it may represent an opportunity for locally-advanced tumors. The specific toxicities of stereotactic radiotherapy mostly correspond to radiation-induced chest wall side effects, especially for peripheral tumours. The use of adapted fractionation schemes has made feasible the use of stereotactic radiotherapy to treat proximal tumours. Overall, from a technical concept to the availability of specific treatment devices and the publication of clinical results, stereotactic radiotherapy represents a model of implementation in thoracic oncology. Copyright © 2011 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, C.; Theodorou, M.; Poullos, N.; Astner, S.T.; Geinitz, H.; Molls, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Stalla, G.K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Muenchen (Germany). Klinische Neuroendokrinologie; Meyer, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Medicine; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Grosu, A.L [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of residual or recurrent pituitary adenomas. Patients and methods: We report on 37 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas treated with FSRT at our department. All patients had previously undergone surgery. Twenty-nine patients had nonfunctioning, 8 had hormone-producing adenoma. The mean total dose delivered by a linear accelerator was 49.4 Gy (range 45-52.2 Gy), 5 x 1.8 Gy weekly. The mean PTV was 22.8 ccm (range 2.0-78.3 ccm). Evaluation included serial imaging tests, endocrinologic and ophthalmologic examination. Results: Tumor control was 91.9 % for a median follow-up time of 57 months (range 2-111 months). Before FSRT partial hypopituitarism was present in 41 % of patients, while 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. After FSRT pituitary function remained normal in 22 %, 43 % had partial pituitary dysfunction, and 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. Visual acuity was stable in 76 % of patients, improved in 19 %, and deteriorated in 5 %. Visual fields remained stable in 35 patients (95 %), improved in one and worsened in 1 patient (2.7 %). Conclusion: FSRT is an effective and safe treatment for recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma. Good local tumor control and preservation of adjacent structures can be reached, even for large tumors. (orig.)

  14. Phase II study on stereotactic body radiotherapy of colorectal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeyer, Morten; Grau, Cai; Der Maase, Hans von [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology; Roe, Henrik; Kiil Berthelsen, Anne; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Ohlhuis, Lars [Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Traberg Hansen, Anders; Petersen, Joergen [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Medical Physics; Nellemann, Hanne [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Surgical resection provides long term survival in approximately 30% of patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) liver metastases. However, only a limited number of patients with CRC-metastases are amendable for surgery. We have tested the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of inoperable patients with CRC-metastases. Sixty-four patients with a total number of 141 CRC-metastases in the liver (n=44), lung (n=12), lymph nodes (n=3), suprarenal gland (n=1) or two organs (n=4) were treated with SBRT with a central dose of 15 Gyx3 within 5-8 days. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. After 2 years, actuarial local control was 86% and 63% in tumor and patient based analysis, respectively. Nineteen percent were without local or distant progression after 2 years and overall survival was 67, 38, 22, 13, and 13% after 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years, respectively. One patient died due to hepatic failure, one patient was operated for a colonic perforation and two patients were conservatively treated for duodenal ulcerations. Beside these, only moderate toxicities such as nausea, diarrhoea and skin reactions were observed. SBRT in patients with inoperable CRC-metastases resulted in high probability of local control and promising survival rate. One toxic death and few severe reactions were observed. For the majority of patients, the treatment related toxicity was moderate.

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for craniopharyngioma adjacent to optic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Nagai, Aiko; Hayashi, Naoki

    2010-06-01

    Craniopharyngioma has benign histological character. However, because of proximity to optic pathways, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus, it may cause severe and permanent damage to such critical structures and can even be life threatening. Total surgical resection is often difficult. This study aims to evaluate treatment results of Novalis stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for craniopharyngioma adjacent to optic pathways. Ten patients (six men, four women) with craniopharyngioma and median age of 56.5 years (range 10-74 years) were treated by SRT using Novalis from July 2006 through March 2009. Median volume of tumor was 7.9 ml (range 1.1-21 ml). Three-dimensional noncoplanar five- or seven-beam SRT or coplanar five-beam SRT with intensity modulation was performed. Total dose of 30-39 Gy in 10-15 fractions (median 33 Gy) was delivered to the target. Ten patients were followed up for 9-36 months (median 25.5 months). Response rate was 80% (8/10), and control rate was 100%. Improvement of neurological symptoms was observed in five patients. No serious complications due to SRT were found. SRT for craniopharyngioma may be a safe and effective treatment. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine long-term tumor control or late complications.

  16. [Stereotactic radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristu, J J; Ciérvide, R; Guridi, J; Moreno, M; Arbea, L; Azcona, J D; Ramos, L I; Zubieta, J L

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a form of external radiotherapy that employs a system of three dimensional coordinates independent of the patient for the precise localisation of the lesion. It also has the characteristic that the radiation beams are conformed and precise, and converge on the lesion, making it possible to administer very high doses of radiotherapy without increasing the radiation to healthy adjacent organs or structures. When the procedure is carried out in one treatment session it is termed radiosurgery, and when administered over several sessions it is termed stereotactic radiotherapy. Special systems of fixing or immobilising the patient (guides or stereotactic frames) are required together with radiotherapy devices capable of generating conformed beams (lineal accelerator, gammaknife, cyberknife, tomotherapy, cyclotrons). Modern stereotactic radiotherapy employs intra-tumoural radio-opaque frames or CAT image systems included in the irradiation device, which make possible a precise localisation of mobile lesions in each treatment session. Besides, technological advances make it possible to coordinate the lesion's movements in breathing with the radiotherapy unit (gating and tracking) for maximum tightening of margins and excluding a greater volume of healthy tissue. Radiosurgery is mainly indicated in benign or malign cerebral lesions less than 3-4 centimetres (arteriovenous malformations, neurinomas, meningiomas, cerebral metastases) and stereotactic radiotherapy is basically administered in tumours of extracraneal localisation that require high conforming and precision, such as inoperable early lung cancer and hepatic metastasis.

  17. RT-01FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOTHERAPY FOR PITUITARY ADENOMA WITH NOVALIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ogura, Kengo; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Hojo, Masato; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Murata, Daiki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy is an available treatment modality for pituitary adenoma. In particular, it is effective for the case unable to be removed with surgery or repeating recurrence. However, hypopituitarism and optic nerve injury associated with radiation therapy become a problem. Novalis® (Brain Lab) is an equipment of radiation to establish the detailed irradiation area, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Retrospectively, we review local control and morbidity following fSRT with Novalis in pituitary adenoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2007 and 2012, 29 patients with pituitary adenoma (9 functioning, 20 non-functioning) received fSRT with Novalis in our institute. Total radiation dose was 50.4-54Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) and prescribed to the gross target volume + 2 mm. The effectiveness of fSRT was evaluated by tumor volume and clinical symptoms on pre- fSRT, and every 1-year. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 59.1 months (20 to 83 months). Tumor regrowth was observed in 2 cases. Progression free survival rate was 93%. New visual field deficit was observed in 1 case, and new pituitary dysfunction were not observed in all patients. CONCLUSION: fSRT with Novalis is safe and effective in the treatment for pituitary adenoma. Although follow-up time is short, any problematic complications were not observed. In the future, fSRT is expected to make for safe and effective treatment in pituitary adenoma impossible to cure surgically.

  18. Renal atrophy after stereotactic body radiotherapy for renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takaya; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Takeda, Ken; Matsushita, Haruo; Umezawa, Rei; Sato, Kiyokazu; Kubozono, Masaki; Ito, Kengo; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Kozumi, Maiko; Takahashi, Noriyoshi; Katagiri, Yu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Jingu, Keiichi

    2016-05-26

    Renal atrophy is observed in an irradiated kidney. The aim of this study was to determine dose-volume histogram parameters and other factors that predict renal atrophy after 10-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A total of 14 patients (11 males, 3 females) who received SBRT for RCC at Tohoku University Hospital between April 2010 and February 2014 were analyzed. The median serum creatinine level was 1.1 mg/dl and two patients had a single kidney. Nine patients were implanted with fiducial markers. The median tumor diameter was 30 mm. SBRT was delivered at 70 Gy in 10 fractions for 7 tumors, at 60 Gy in 10 fractions for 2 tumors, and at 50 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 tumors with 6 and/or 15 MV X-ray using 5 to 8 multi-static beams. Renal atrophy was assessed using post-SBRT CT images after 12-24 months intervals. Correlations were examined by Spearman rank correlation analysis. Differences between two groups were evaluated by the Mann-Whitney test, and pairwise comparisons were made by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The median tumor volume shrunk from 14.8 cc to 10.6 cc (p = 0.12), and the median irradiated kidney volume changed from 160.4 cc to 137.1 cc (p atrophy (p = 0.02). Significant renal atrophic change was observed. Dose distribution of SBRT at 20-30 Gy had a strong correlation with renal atrophy when irradiation was performed in 10 fractions.

  19. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metastatic and Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma and Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Lester, Rachael A.; Grams, Michael P.; Haddock, Michael G.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Arndt, Carola A S; Rose, Peter S.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy has been utilized for metastatic and recurrent osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma (ES), in order to provide palliation and possibly prolong overall or progression-free survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is convenient for patients and offers the possibility of increased efficacy. We report our early institutional experience using SBRT for recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Methods. We reviewed all cases of osteosarcoma or ES treated with ...

  1. Inter- and intrafractional movement of the tumour in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy of NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik R; Hansen, Olfred; Hjelm-Hansen, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine the inter- and intra-fractional respiration induced tumour movements as well as setup accuracy in a stereotactic body frame for stereotactic treatments of NSCLC patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From August 2005 to March 2008, 26 patients with NSCLC...... where given a stereotactic treatment. The patients were scanned with normal and uncoached respiration without use of abdominal compression. Each patient had CT-scans performed at four occasions throughout the treatment: As part of the CT-simulation and before the three radiotherapy treatments. At every...... frame were LR: 1.5 mm, AP: 1.1 mm and CC: 1.7 mm (1 SD). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Consecutive CT scans can be used to evaluate the respiration induced tumour movement. For patients immobilized in a stereotactic body frame, large movements of the tumour are rarely seen within the lung...

  2. Phase-II study on stereotactic radiotherapy of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Sengeløv, Lisa;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and are not amenable for surgery. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be an alternative treatment for patients with locally advanced disease. The effect of SRT was investigated...

  3. Patterns of recurrence and survival after surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage NSCLC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Liseth L.; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Widder, Joachim

    Introduction: Surgery is the standard treatment for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For medically inoperable patients, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has emerged as widely used standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze survival and patterns of tumor

  4. Optimizing dose prescription in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumours using Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Hollander, Miranda; Ubbels, Jan F.; Bolt, Rene A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To define a method of dose prescription employing Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours aiming at a dose as low as possible outside of the PTV. Methods and materials: Six typical T1 lung tumours - three small, three large - were construc

  5. Patterns of recurrence and survival after surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage NSCLC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Liseth L.; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Widder, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Surgery is the standard treatment for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For medically inoperable patients, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has emerged as widely used standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze survival and patterns of tumor recurren

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy for wet age-related macular degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neffendorf JE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available James E Neffendorf, Timothy L Jackson Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Currently, the treatment of choice is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. These require frequent dosing, up to monthly, and impose a substantial burden on patients and the health economy. Ionizing radiation was proposed as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an outpatient-based radiotherapy platform that provides stereotactic application of low energy X-ray to the retina in three highly collimated beams that cross the inferior sclera to overlap at the macula. A randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of 230 patients (INTREPID showed that a single dose of stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduces the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections needed over 2 years. A larger randomized controlled trial (STAR is underway. Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, radiation therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, vascular endothelial growth factor

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation.

  8. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishawi, Muath [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Kim, Bong [Division of Radiology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Moore, William H. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Bilfinger, Thomas V., E-mail: Thomas.bilfinger@stonybrook.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for organ-confined prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diblasio Ferdinand

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved understanding of prostate cancer radiobiology combined with advances in delivery of radiation to the moving prostate offer the potential to reduce treatment-related morbidity and maintain quality of life (QOL following prostate cancer treatment. We present preliminary results following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT treatment for organ-confined prostate cancer. Methods SBRT was performed on 304 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer: 50 received 5 fractions of 7 Gy (total dose 35 Gy and 254 received 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy (total dose 36.25 Gy. Acute and late toxicity was assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaire was used to assess QOL. Prostate-specific antigen response was monitored. Results At a median 30-month (26 - 37 month, range follow-up there were no biochemical failures for the 35-Gy dose level. Acute Grade II urinary and rectal toxicities occurred in 4% of patients with no higher Grade acute toxicities. One Grade II late urinary toxicity occurred with no other Grade II or higher late toxicities. At a median 17-month (8 - 27 month, range follow-up the 36.25 Gy dose level had 2 low- and 2 high-risk patients fail biochemically (biopsy showed 2 low- and 1 high-risk patients were disease-free in the gland. Acute Grade II urinary and rectal toxicities occurred in 4.7% (12/253 and 3.6% (9/253 of patients, respectively. For those patients with a minimum of 12 months follow-up, 5.8% (12/206 had late Grade II urinary toxicity and 2.9% (6/206 had late Grade II rectal toxicities. One late Grade III urinary toxicity occurred; no Grade IV toxicities occurred. For both dose levels at 17 months, bowel and urinary QOL returned to baseline values; sexual QOL decreased by 10%. Conclusions The low toxicity and maintained QOL are highly encouraging. Additional follow-up is needed to determine long-term biochemical control and

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  11. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with vagina carotica protection technique for local residual nasopharyngeal carcinoma after primary radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; HUAN Fu-kui; FANG Hao; WAN Bao; LI Ye-xiong; XIAO Jian-ping; XU Ying-jie; ZHANG Ye; XU Guo-zhen; GAO Li; YI Jun-lin; LUO Jing-wei; HUANG Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Background Local failure of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiotherapy (RT) remains one of the major treatment failures.This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and complications of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) with vagina carotica protection technique for local residual of NPC patients after the primary RT.Methods From August 2006 to August 2010,FSRT with vagina carotica protection technique was applied to 36 patients in our department,the patients aged between 13 and 76 years with a median of 41.3 years,25 of them were male and 11were female.According to 2002 Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) Staging System,the stages before primary radiotherapy were:Ⅱa 2,Ⅱb 5,Ⅲ 18,Ⅳa 7,Ⅳb 4.In the first course of radiotherapy,9 patients received conventional RT,27 patients received intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 20 out of the 36 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy.The total dose in the first course of RT was 69.96-76.90 Gy (median,72.58 Gy).The intervals between the primary RT and FSRT ranged from 12 to 147 days (median,39.8 days).Target volumes ranged from 1.46 to 32.98 cm3 (median,14.94 cm3).The total FSRT doses were 10.0-24.0 Gy (median,16.5 Gy) with 2.0-5.0Gy per fraction.The most common regimen was 15 Gy in 5 fractions of 3 Gy,the irradiation dose to vagina carotica was less than 2 Gy per fraction.Results The median follow-up time was 34 months (range,12-59 months).The 3-year local control rate was 100%;the 3-year overall survival rate was 94.4%;the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 77.8%.In this study,we had one case of cranial nerve injury,two cases of temporal lobe necrosis,and no nasopharyngeal massive hemorrhage was observed.Conclusion FSRT with vagina carotica protection technique is an effective and safe RT regimen for local residual of NPC with reduction of radiation-related neurovascular lesions.

  12. Fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy for pharmacoresistant epilepsy; Fraktionierte, stereotaktisch gefuehrte Radiotherapie der pharmakoresistenten Epilepsie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabenbauer, G.G.; Reinhold, C.; Lambrecht, U.; Sauer, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Kerling, F.; Pauli, E.; Stefan, H. [Neurologische Klinik, Abt. Epileptologie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Mueller, R.G. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Aim: This prospective study evaluated the efficiency of fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy as a treatment of pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients and Methods: Inclusion criteria were patients aged between 17 and 65 years with one-sided temporally located focus, without sufficient epilepsy control by, antiepileptic drugs or neurosurgery. Between 1997 and 1999, two groups of six patients each were treated with 21 Gy (7 times 3 Gy) and 30 Gy (15 times 2 Gy). Study end points were seizure frequency, intensity, seizure length and neuropsychological parameters. Results: All patients experienced a marked reduction in seizure frequency. The mean reduction of seizures was 37% (range 9-77%, i.e. seizures reduced from a monthly mean number of 11.75 to 7.52) at 18 months following radiation treatment and 46% (23-94%, i.e. 0.2-23 seizures per month) during the whole follow-up time. Seizure length was reduced in five out of eleven patients and intensity of seizures in seven out of eleven patients. Conclusion: Radiotherapy was identified as safe and effective for pharmacoresistant epilepsy since a very good reduction of seizure frequency was observed. It is no substitute for regular use of antiepileptic drugs, but means an appropriate alternative for patients with contraindication against neurosurgery or insufficient seizure reduction after neurosurgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte die Effizienz einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (RT) bei therapieresistenter Temporallappenepilepsie. Patienten und Methoden: Einschlusskriterien waren Patienten im Alter von 17 bis 65 Jahren, die weder medikamentoes noch epilepsiechirurgisch anfallsfrei wurden und einen einseitigen Fokus aufwiesen. Zwei Patientenkohorten zu je sechs Patienten wurden zwischen 1997 und 1999 einer fraktionierten, stereotaktisch gefuehrten Radiotherapie mit 21 Gy (7 x 3 Gy) bzw. 30 Gy (15 x 2 Gy) unterzogen. Endpunkte der Untersuchung waren

  13. Klatskin tumor treated by inter-disciplinary therapies including stereotactic radiotherapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Gerhild; Momm, Felix; Schwacha, Henning; Hodapp, Norbert; Usadel, Henning; Geissler, Michael; Barke, Annette; Schmitt-Gräff, Annette; Henne, Karl; Blum, Hubert-E

    2005-08-21

    In view of the poor prognosis of patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCC), there is a need for new therapeutic strategies. Inter-disciplinary therapy seems to be most promising. Radiotherapy is an effective alternative to surgery for hilar CCC (Klatskin tumors) if an adequate radiation dose can be delivered to the liver hilus. Here, we describe a patient for whom we used a stereotactic radiotherapy technique in the context of an inter-disciplinary treatment concept. We report a 45-year-old patient with a locally advanced Klatskin tumor. Explorative laparotomy showed that the tumor was not resectable. A metallic stent was implanted and the patient was treated by stereotactic radiotherapy using a body frame. A total dose of 48 Gy (3X4 Gy/wk) was administered. Therapy was well tolerated. After 32 mo, local tumor recurrence and a chest wall metastasis developed and were controlled by radio-chemotherapy. After more than 56 mo with a good quality of life, the patient died of advanced neoplastic disease. Stereotactic radiotherapy led to a long-term survival of this patient with a locally advanced Klatskin tumor. In the context of inter-disciplinary treatment concepts, this radiotherapy technique is a promising choice of treatment for patients with hilar CCC.

  14. Klatskin tumor treated by inter-disciplinary therapies including stereotactic radiotherapy: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerhild Becker; Hubert E. Blum; Felix Momm; Henning Schwacha; Norbert Hodapp; Henning Usadel; Michael Geiβler; Annette Barke; Annette Schmitt-Gr(a)ff; Karl Henne

    2005-01-01

    In view of the poor prognosis of patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCC), there is a need for new therapeutic strategies. Inter-disciplinary therapy seems to be most promising. Radiotherapy is an effective alternative to surgery for hilar CCC (Klatskin tumors) if an adequate radiation dose can be delivered to the liver hilus. Here,we describe a patient for whom we used a stereotactic radiotherapy technique in the context of an inter-disciplinary treatment concept. We report a 45-year-old patient with a locally advanced Klatskin tumor. Explorative laparotomy showed that the tumor was not resectable. A metallic stent was implanted and the patient was treated by stereotactic radiotherapy using a body frame. A total dose of 48 Gy (3x4 Gy/wk) was administered. Therapy was well tolerated. After 32 mo, local tumor recurrence and a chest wall metastasis developed and were controlled by radio-chemotherapy. After more than 56 mo with a good quality of life, the patient died of advanced neoplastic disease. Stereotactic radiotherapy led to a long-term survival of this patient with a locally advanced Klatskin tumor. In the context of inter-disciplinary treatment concepts, this radiotherapy technique is a promising choice of treatment for patients with hilar CCC.

  15. Early manifestation of communicating hydrocephalus after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for aggressive giant atypical prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Ohe, Naoyuki; Iwama, Toru; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Aggressive giant invasive pituitary adenomas refractory to standard surgical or medical treatment remain a genuine challenge. In addition, communicating hydrocephalus (CH) attributed to malabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) developing after radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas has not been previously reported. Herein, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male presenting with a giant atypical prolactinoma refractory to previous therapies, including pharmacotherapy and repetitive surgery. He underwent image-guided fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in 28 fractions, resulting in early manifestation of CH associated with undisputed, both radiological and hormonal response. He recovered well after a shunt placement, with otherwise favorable consequences such as sustained tumor regression, decreasing prolactin level, and retained visual function for a 22-month follow-up. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy would provide a viable treatment alternative for these refractory cases, while caution should be exercised regarding the possibility of iatrogenic CH.

  16. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics following hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy boost as post-external beam radiotherapy versus conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics between conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy (CF-EBRT) and SBRT boost after whole pelvis EBRT (WP-EBRT) in localized prostate cancer. Methods A total of 77 patients with localized prostate cancer [T-stage, T1–T3; Gleason score (GS) 5–9; PSA 

  17. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  18. Reproducibility and geometric accuracy of the fixster system during hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriksson Roger

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypofractionated radiotherapy has been used for the treatment of AVMs and brain metastases. Hypofractionation necessitates the use of a relocatable stereotactic frame that has to be applied on several occasions. The stereotactic frame needs to have a high degree of reproducibility, and patient positioning is crucial to achieve a high accuracy of the treatment. Methods In this study we have, by radiological means, evaluated the reproducibility of the isocenter in consecutive treatment sessions using the Fixster frame. Deviations in the X, Y and Z-axis were measured in 10 patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Results The mean deviation in the X-axis was 0.4 mm (range -2.1 – 2.1, median 0.7 mm and in the Y-axis -0.3 mm (range -1.4 – 0.7, median -0.2 mm. The mean deviation in the Z-axis was -0.6 (range -1.4 – 1.4, median 0.0 mm. Conclusion There is a high degree of reproducibility of the isocenter during successive treatment sessions with HCSRT using the Fixster frame for stereotactic targeting. The high reducibility enables a safe treatment using hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

  19. Optimal planning strategy among various arc arrangements for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sang Won

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the optimal strategy among various arc arrangements in prostate plans of stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (SBRT-VMAT.

  20. Treatment of brain metastases of renal cell cancer with combined hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrána, David; Študentová, Hana; Matzenauer, Marcel; Vlachová, Zuzana; Cwiertka, Karel; Gremlica, David; Kalita, Ondřej

    2016-06-01

    Renal cell cancer patients with brain metastatic disease generally have poor prognosis. Treatment options include surgery, radiotherapy, targeted therapy or best supportive care with respect to disease burden, patient preference and performance status. In the present case report the radiotherapy technique combining whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing (hippocampal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy HA-WBRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of the brain metastases is performed in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. HA-WBRT was administered to 30 Gy in 10 fractions with sparing of the hippocampal structures and SRT of 21 Gy in 3 fractions to brain metastases which has preceded the HA-WBRT. Two single arc volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) plans were prepared using Monaco planning software. The HA-WBRT treatment plan achieved the following results: D2=33.91 Gy, D98=25.20 Gy, D100=14.18 Gy, D50=31.26 Gy. The homogeneity index was calculated as a deduction of the minimum dose in 2% and 98% of the planning target volume (PTV), divided by the minimum dose in 50% of the PTV. The maximum dose to the hippocampus was 17.50 Gy and mean dose was 11.59 Gy. The following doses to organs at risk (OAR) were achieved: Right opticus Dmax, 31.96 Gy; left opticus Dmax, 30.96 Gy; chiasma D max, 32,76 Gy. The volume of PTV for stereotactic radiotherapy was 3,736 cm3, with coverage D100=20.95 Gy and with only 0.11% of the PTV being irradiated to dose below the prescribed dose. HA-WBRT with SRT represents a feasible technique for radiotherapy of brain metastatic disease, however this technique is considerably demanding on departmental equipment and staff time/experience.

  1. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for skull base tumors: analysis of treatment accuracy using a stereotactic mask fixation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnoli Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT using a stereotactic mask fixation system. Patients and Methods Sixteen patients treated with FSRT were involved in the study. A commercial stereotactic mask fixation system (BrainLAB AG was used for patient immobilization. Serial CT scans obtained before and during FSRT were used to assess the accuracy of patient immobilization by comparing the isocenter position. Daily portal imaging were acquired to establish day to day patient position variation. Displacement errors along the different directions were calculated as combination of systematic and random errors. Results The mean isocenter displacements based on localization and verification CT imaging were 0.1 mm (SD 0.3 mm in the lateral direction, 0.1 mm (SD 0.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 0.3 mm (SD 0.4 mm in craniocaudal direction. The mean 3D displacement was 0.5 mm (SD 0.4 mm, being maximum 1.4 mm. No significant differences were found during the treatment (P = 0.4. The overall isocenter displacement as calculated by 456 anterior and lateral portal images were 0.3 mm (SD 0.9 mm in the mediolateral direction, -0.2 mm (SD 1 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 0.2 mm (SD 1.1 mm in the craniocaudal direction. The largest displacement of 2.7 mm was seen in the cranio-caudal direction, with 95% of displacements Conclusions The results indicate that the setup error of the presented mask system evaluated by CT verification scans and portal imaging are minimal. Reproducibility of the isocenter position is in the best range of positioning reproducibility reported for other stereotactic systems.

  2. Fractionated brain stereotactic radiotherapy: assessment of repositioning precision using a thermoforming mask; Radiotherapie stereotaxique cerebrale fractionnee: evaluation de la precision du repositionnement en utilisant un masque thermoformable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barret, A.; Champeaux-Orange, E.; Bouscayrol, H.; Wachter, T. [CHR La Source, Orleans (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a study which aimed at assessing the patient repositioning precision obtained with a support system used during a brain fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and comprising a thermoforming mask (Elektra head mask). The repositioning is assessed by means of scano-graphies and superimposition with the stereotactic frame. A three-dimensional vector has been computed for each patient. The average displacement corresponds to that published in literature. The high quality of the support system allows a non invasive brain stereotactic radiotherapy to be performed which is also comfortable for the patient. Short communication

  3. Predictors of Radiotherapy Induced Bone Injury (RIBI after stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taremi Mojgan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with radiotherapy induced bone injury (RIBI following stereotactic lung radiotherapy. Methods Inoperable patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer, treated with SBRT, who received 54 or 60 Gy in 3 fractions, and had a minimum of 6 months follow up were reviewed. Archived treatment plans were retrieved, ribs delineated individually and treatment plans re-computed using heterogeneity correction. Clinical and dosimetric factors were evaluated for their association with rib fracture using logistic regression analysis; a dose-event curve and nomogram were created. Results 46 consecutive patients treated between Oct 2004 and Dec 2008 with median follow-up 25 months (m (range 6 – 51 m were eligible. 41 fractured ribs were detected in 17 patients; median time to fracture was 21 m (range 7 – 40 m. The mean maximum point dose in non-fractured ribs (n = 1054 was 10.5 Gy ± 10.2 Gy, this was higher in fractured ribs (n = 41 48.5 Gy ± 24.3 Gy (p 0.5, and the volume of the rib receiving at least 25 Gy (V25, were significantly associated with RIBI. As D0.5 and V25 were cross-correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.57, p 0.5 as a representative dose parameter. On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio: 1.121, 95% CI: 1.04 – 1.21, p = 0.003, female gender (odds ratio: 4.43, 95% CI: 1.68 – 11.68, p = 0.003, and rib D0.5 (odds ratio: 1.0009, 95% CI: 1.0007 – 1.001, p  Using D0.5, a dose-event curve was constructed estimating risk of fracture from dose at the median follow up of 25 months after treatment. In our cohort, a 50% risk of rib fracture was associated with a D0.5 of 60 Gy. Conclusions Dosimetric and clinical factors contribute to risk of RIBI and both should be included when modeling risk of toxicity. A nomogram is presented using D0.5, age, and female gender to

  4. Predictors of Radiotherapy Induced Bone Injury (RIBI) after stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with radiotherapy induced bone injury (RIBI) following stereotactic lung radiotherapy. Methods Inoperable patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer, treated with SBRT, who received 54 or 60 Gy in 3 fractions, and had a minimum of 6 months follow up were reviewed. Archived treatment plans were retrieved, ribs delineated individually and treatment plans re-computed using heterogeneity correction. Clinical and dosimetric factors were evaluated for their association with rib fracture using logistic regression analysis; a dose-event curve and nomogram were created. Results 46 consecutive patients treated between Oct 2004 and Dec 2008 with median follow-up 25 months (m) (range 6 – 51 m) were eligible. 41 fractured ribs were detected in 17 patients; median time to fracture was 21 m (range 7 – 40 m). The mean maximum point dose in non-fractured ribs (n = 1054) was 10.5 Gy ± 10.2 Gy, this was higher in fractured ribs (n = 41) 48.5 Gy ± 24.3 Gy (p ribs (D0.5), and the volume of the rib receiving at least 25 Gy (V25), were significantly associated with RIBI. As D0.5 and V25 were cross-correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.57, p rib D0.5 (odds ratio: 1.0009, 95% CI: 1.0007 – 1.001, p rib fracture. Using D0.5, a dose-event curve was constructed estimating risk of fracture from dose at the median follow up of 25 months after treatment. In our cohort, a 50% risk of rib fracture was associated with a D0.5 of 60 Gy. Conclusions Dosimetric and clinical factors contribute to risk of RIBI and both should be included when modeling risk of toxicity. A nomogram is presented using D0.5, age, and female gender to estimate risk of RIBI following SBRT. This requires validation. PMID:22985910

  5. SURVIVAL AND QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER STEREOTACTIC OR 3D-CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY FOR INOPERABLE EARLY-STAGE LUNG CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters

  6. SURVIVAL AND QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER STEREOTACTIC OR 3D-CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY FOR INOPERABLE EARLY-STAGE LUNG CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters afte

  7. Optimization of stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment planning using a multicriteria optimization algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandour, Sarah; Cosinschi, Adrien; Mazouni, Zohra; Pachoud, Marc; Matzinger, Oscar [Riviera-Chablais Hospital, Vevey (Switzerland). Cancer Center, Radiotherapy Dept.

    2016-07-01

    To provide high-quality and efficient dosimetric planning for various types of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for tumor treatment using a multicriteria optimization (MCO) technique fine-tuned with direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). Eighteen patients with lung (n = 11), liver (n = 5) or adrenal cell cancer (n = 2) were treated using SBRT in our clinic between December 2014 and June 2015. Plans were generated using the RayStation trademark Treatment Planning System (TPS) with the VMAT technique. Optimal deliverable SBRT plans were first generated using an MCO algorithm to find a well-balanced tradeoff between tumor control and normal tissue sparing in an efficient treatment planning time. Then, the deliverable plan was post-processed using the MCO solution as the starting point for the DMPO algorithm to improve the dose gradient around the planning target volume (PTV) while maintaining the clinician's priorities. The dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated using dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters, which account for target coverage and the sparing of healthy tissue, as well as the CI100 and CI50 conformity indexes. Using a combination of the MCO and DMPO algorithms showed that the treatment plans were clinically optimal and conformed to all organ risk dose volume constraints reported in the literature, with a computation time of approximately one hour. The coverage of the PTV (D99% and D95%) and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) were similar between the MCO and MCO + DMPO plans, with no significant differences (p > 0.05) for all the SBRT plans. The average CI100 and CI50 values using MCO + DMPO were significantly better than those with MCO alone (p < 0.05). The MCO technique allows for convergence on an optimal solution for SBRT within an efficient planning time. The combination of the MCO and DMPO techniques yields a better dose gradient, especially for lung tumors.

  8. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai; Dai Jiazhong; Pan Li [Departments of Neurosurgery and CyberKnife, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wang Enmin, E-mail: wangem@fudan.edu.cn [Departments of Neurosurgery and CyberKnife, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  9. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas, E-mail: kalishhadas@gmail.com [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Reich, Ehud [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Gal, Lior [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Rappaport, Zvi Harry [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva (Israel); Nissim, Ouzi [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Pfeffer, Raphael [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Spiegelmann, Roberto [Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Stereotactic Radiosurgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Neurosurgery, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  10. The role of stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy for local tumor control of esthesioneuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel, A.; Thilmann, C.; Zuna, I. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Milker-Zabel, S.; Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Schlegel, W. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics; Debus, J. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2002-04-01

    Background: In a retrospective analysis we compared conventional radiotherapy and stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) in patients with esthesioneuroblastoma. Patients and Methods: Between 1991 and 1999 14 patients with esthesioneuroblastoma underwent radiotherapy at our institution. Median follow-up was 30 months (range 12-107 months). Treatment included adjuvant radiotherapy (9), adjuvant radiochemotherapy (3) or radiotherapy alone (2). Eight patients received SCRT with 3-D treatment planning. For comparison a standard three-field plan for these patients and dose-volume histogram analyses were performed. Median total dose was 64 Gy using SCRT and 56 Gy with standard technique. Results: Local tumor control rate was 50% with conventional radiotherapy and 75% with SCRT. Overall survival was 33.3% and 62.5%, respectively. Target coverage could be improved statistically significant (p < 0.05) and dose to critical structures was reduced using SCRT. Greatest differences were seen regarding volume above the 30%-isodose as well as mean dose of brain stem (p < 0.05). A reduction of maximum dose was seen using SCRT as consequence of a more homogeneous treatment. Conclusions: SCRT improves target coverage and sparing of organs at risk. Our clinical data although with low patient numbers suggest that the technical advantage translates into a clinical advantage. The use of SCRT appears to facilitate higher dose prescriptions without risking major acute and late side effects. Thus the risk of complications in this area is minimized. Adjuvant radiotherapy is a save and effective treatment modality for local control of esthesioneuroblastoma. (orig.)

  11. Systematic review of stereotactic radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas; Radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques des gliomes de haut grade: une revue de la litterature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, J.B.; Noel, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre de lutte contre le cancer Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Voirin, J.; Kehrli, P. [Service de neurochirurgie, hopital de Hautepierre, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this literature systematic review was the use of stereotactic radiotherapy in glioma. Research was performed in Medline/PubMed and associated references found in published articles without publication date limit. The quality of series is variable and many biases can be evidenced. Only two randomized trials have been published using stereotactic radiotherapy for up-front treatment. There is a lack of evidence of survival advantages to use this treatment at the time of diagnosis or relapse. There is also insufficient evidence regarding the benefice/harms in the use of stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy for patients with glioma. No recommendations can be formulated. Stereotactic irradiation as boost in primary diagnosed glioma or relapsed tumour is not associated with survival improvement. For relapsed patients, treatment needs to be discussed according to the other treatment options. (authors)

  12. [Cyberknife robotic stereotactic radiotherapy: technical aspects and recent developments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, J; Marcié, S; Marcy, P-Y; Trimaud, R; Angellier, G; Mammar, H; Bondiau, P-Y; Gerard, J-P

    2010-07-01

    Cyberknife (Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, USA) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves the delivery of a small number of large doses of radiation to a target volume using continuously evolving advanced technology. It has emerged as a novel treatment modality for cancer and modified some concepts of cancer treatment. It is indicated in early-stage primary cancer, sometimes as an alternative to surgery. It is also indicated for patients with oligometastatic disease who have relatively long survival with the aim to optimize disease control with a good quality of life. Although there remain some uncertainties regarding the radiobiology of hypofractionation, local control and tolerance have been promising. Indications are increasing under strict quality assurance programs worldwide and prospective clinical evaluation.

  13. Cerebral control and survival after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases; Zerebrale Kontrolle und Ueberleben nach stereotaktischer Strahlentherapie von Hirnmetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Elmar Till

    2014-06-04

    This retrospective study, including 275 patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy due to brain metastases between 2003 and 2008, investigates influencing factors regarding cerebral control and survival, symptomatic effects and a potential benefit for patients older than 70 years. We were able to identify risk factors for remote brain failure which leads to a therapeutic recommendation. Furthermore we confirm a positive symptomatic effect and a benefit of stereotactic readiotherapy for patients over 70 years.

  14. Repositioning accuracy of cerebral fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy using CT scanning; Evaluation par tomodensitometrie du repositionnement en radiotherapie stereotaxique fractionnee cerebrale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, D.; Dubus, F.; Castelain, B.; Delplanque, M.; Lartigau, E. [Centre O.-Lambret, Dept. Universitaire de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France); Pasquier, D. [Centre Galilee, Polyclinique de la Louviere, 59 - Lille (France); Bernier, V.; Buchheit, I. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Kerr, C.; Santoro, I. [Centre Val d' Aurelle, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 34 - Montpellier (France); Huchet, A.; Causse, N. [Hopital Saint-Andre, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Dubus, F.; Castelain, B.; Delplanque, M.; Lartigau, E. [Lille-2 Univ., 59 (France)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of patient repositioning in fractionated cerebral stereotactic radiotherapy using a Brain Lab stereotactic cranial mask in conjunction with standard dental fixation. Patients and methods: Fifty planning and checking CT scans were performed in 25 patients. The check CT scan was performed before or after one of the three sessions of treatment. Co registration to the planning CT scan was used to assess alignment of the iso centre to the reference markers. The relative position of the P.T.V. with regard to iso centre allowed us to determine its total displacement (3-dimensional vector). Results: Mean iso centre translations ({+-} S.D.) taking into account direction were -0.01 {+-} 0.7, -0.2 {+-} 1.3 and 0.07 {+-} 0.5 mm in medio-lateral, cranio caudal and anteroposterior directions respectively. Mean rotations ({+-}S.D.) were -0.02 {+-} 0.6, -0.08 {+-} 0.3 and -0.1 {+-} 0.3 degree in medio-lateral, cranio caudal and anteroposterior axes respectively. Mean overall P.T.V. displacement was 1.8 {+-} 1.5 mm. P.T.V. displacement was smaller than 2 and 3 mm in 19/25 and 23/25 patients respectively. Conclusion: The accuracy of patient positioning using a stereotactic cranial mask system is similar to those reported in the literature and shows a satisfactory reproducibility with a standard dental fixation. (authors)

  15. Optimization of stereotactic radiotherapy treatment delivery technique for base-of-skull meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brenda G; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm3) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm3, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm3, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

  16. 3D quantitative assessment of response to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Chapiro, J. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lin, M. [Philips Research North America, Ultrasound Imaging and Interventions (UII), Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Geschwind, J.F. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, New Haven, CT (United States); Kleinberg, L. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rigamonti, D.; Jusue-Torres, I.; Marciscano, A.E. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, D.M. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-03-15

    To determine clinical outcome of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) after treatment with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by using 3D quantitative response assessment on MRI. This retrospective analysis included 162 patients who underwent radiation therapy for sporadic VS. Measurements on T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (in 2-year post-therapy intervals: 0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10, 10-12 years) were taken for total tumour volume (TTV) and enhancing tumour volume (ETV) based on a semi-automated technique. Patients were considered non-responders (NRs) if they required subsequent microsurgical resection or developed radiological progression and tumour-related symptoms. Median follow-up was 4.1 years (range: 0.4-12.0). TTV and ETV decreased for both the FSRT and SRS groups. However, only the FSRT group achieved significant tumour shrinkage (p < 0.015 for TTV, p < 0.005 for ETV over time). The 11 NRs showed proportionally greater TTV (median TTV pre-treatment: 0.61 cm{sup 3}, 8-10 years after: 1.77 cm{sup 3}) and ETV despite radiation therapy compared to responders (median TTV pre-treatment: 1.06 cm{sup 3}; 10-12 years after: 0.81 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.001). 3D quantification of VS showed a significant decrease in TTV and ETV on FSRT-treated patients only. NR had significantly greater TTV and ETV over time. (orig.)

  17. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma: The McGill University Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Wassia, Rolina; Dal Pra, Alan; Shun, Kitty; Shaban, Ahmed [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Corriveau, Christine [Department of Ophthalmology, Notre Dame Hospital, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Edelstein, Chaim; Deschenes, Jean [Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ruo, Russel; Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.B. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); DeBlois, Francois [Department of Medical Physics, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Shenouda, George, E-mail: george.shenouda@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients diagnosed with juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma and treated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy between April 2003 and December 2009. Patients with small to medium sized lesions (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study classification) located within 2 mm of the optic disc were included. The prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy in 10 fractions. The primary endpoints included local control, enucleation-free survival, and complication rates. Results: The median follow-up was 29 months (range, 1-77 months). There were 31 males and 29 females, with a median age of 69 years (range, 30-92 years). Eighty-four percent of the patients had medium sized lesions, and 16% of patients had small sized lesions. There were four cases of local progression (8%) and three enucleations (6%). Actuarial local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 93% and 86%, respectively. Actuarial enucleation-free survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 94% and 84%, respectively. Actuarial complication rates at 2 and 5 years were 33% and 88%, respectively, for radiation-induced retinopathy; 9.3% and 46.9%, respectively, for dry eye; 12% and 53%, respectively, for cataract; 30% and 90%, respectively, for visual loss [Snellen acuity (decimal equivalent), <0.1]; 11% and 54%, respectively, for optic neuropathy; and 18% and 38%, respectively, for neovascular glaucoma. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy using 60 Gy in 10 fractions is safe and has an acceptable toxicity profile. It has been shown to be an effective noninvasive treatment for juxtapapillary choroidal melanomas.

  18. Dosimetric impact of a change in breathing period on VMAT stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olding, T.; Alexander, KM

    2017-05-01

    The dosimetric impact of a change in breathing period during treatment was assessed for a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) lung plan optimized according to our centre’s planning protocol. Plan delivery was evaluated at three breathing rates ranging from 7 to 23 breaths-per-minute (BPM) against the planning anatomy (15 BPM) calculated dose. Dynamic ion chamber, EBT3 film and Fricke-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) gel measurements were acquired using a motion phantom with appropriate inserts for each dosimeter. The results show good agreement between measured and calculated plan dose within the internal gross tumour volume (IGTV) target.

  19. Frameless high dose rate stereotactic lung radiotherapy: intrafraction tumor position and delivery time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguret, Nicolas; Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2013-06-01

    Intrafraction change in tumor position (Δ) was evaluated for stereotactic lung radiotherapy delivered with flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc therapy. In 140 fractions from 32 patients mean Δ (±SD) was -0.7±1.4 mm (vertical), -0.7±1.3 mm (longitudinal) and +0.2±1.2 mm (lateral) with mean vector 2.1±1.2 mm. Mean delivery time was 4.4±3.4 min (mean beam-on 1.9±0.4 min). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for renal cell cancer and pancreatic cancer. Literature review and practice recommendations of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panje, Cedric; Andratschke, Nikolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias [Zurich University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Brunner, Thomas B. [Freiburg University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Niyazi, Maximilian [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    This report of the Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) aims to provide a literature review and practice recommendations for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of primary renal cell cancer and primary pancreatic cancer. A literature search on SBRT for both renal cancer and pancreatic cancer was performed with focus on prospective trials and technical aspects for clinical implementation. Data on renal and pancreatic SBRT are limited, but show promising rates of local control for both treatment sites. For pancreatic cancer, fractionated SBRT should be preferred to single-dose treatment to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. Motion-compensation strategies and image guidance are paramount for safe SBRT delivery in both tumor entities. SBRT for renal cancer and pancreatic cancer have been successfully evaluated in phase I and phase II trials. Pancreatic SBRT should be practiced carefully and only within prospective protocols due to the risk of severe gastrointestinal toxicity. SBRT for primary renal cell cancer appears a viable option for medically inoperable patients but future research needs to better define patient selection criteria and the detailed practice of SBRT. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) legt eine Zusammenfassung der aktuellen Literatur und daraus resultierende Empfehlungen zur Durchfuehrung der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (SBRT) beim Nierenzellkarzinom und beim Pankreaskarzinom vor. Es erfolgte eine Literaturrecherche zur Evidenz der SBRT beim Nierenzell- und Pankreaskarzinom, wobei der Schwerpunkt auf prospektive Studien und technische Aspekte fuer die klinische Umsetzung gelegt wurde. Fuer die SBRT beim Pankreaskarzinom und Nierenzellkarzinom sind bisher nur wenige Studien veroeffentlicht worden, die jedoch konsistent eine hohe Rate an lokaler Tumorkontrolle

  1. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after stereotactic body radiotherapy as monotherapy or boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after SBRT has not been well characterized. The purpose of the current study is to assess the kinetics of PSA for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with SBRT using Cyberknife as both monotherapy and boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in the absence of androgen deprivation therapy. Methods A tota...

  2. Detecting MLC errors in stereotactic radiotherapy plans with a liquid filled ionization chamber array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Patrick; Seshadri, Venkatakrisnan; Charles, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy demands the use of equipment with the highest resolution and sensitivity available. This study examines the sensitivity of a commercially available liquid-filled ionization chamber array--the Octavius 1000 SRS (PTW, Frieburg, Germany) for detecting small (sub-millimetre) multi-leaf collimator (MLC) alignment errors in static square fields (side length 16-40 mm). Furthermore, the effectiveness of detecting small MLC errors in clinical stereotactic radiotherapy patient plans using the device was also evaluated. The commonly used gamma pass rate metric (of the measurements compared with treatment planning system generated results) was used. The gamma pass rates were then evaluated as a function of MLC position error (MLC error size 0.1-2.5 mm). The detector array exhibited a drop in pass rate between plans without error and those which had MLC errors induced. For example a drop in pass rate of 4.5% (gamma criteria 3%, 1 mm) was observed when a 0.8 mm error was introduced into a 16 mm square field. Furthermore the drop in pass rate increased as the MLC position error increased. This study showed that the Octavius 1000 SRS array could be a useful tool for applications requiring the detection of small geometric delivery uncertainties.

  3. Patient specific quality control for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR): it takes more than one phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, T.; Ungureanu, E.; Antony, R.; Hardcastle, N.; Clements, N.; Ukath, J.; Fox, C.; Lonski, P.; Wanigaratne, D.; Haworth, A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) is an extension of the concepts of Stereotactic Radiosurgery from intracranial procedures to extracranial targets. This brings with it new technological challenges for set-up of a SABR program and continuing quality assurance. Compared with intracranial procedures SABR requires consideration of motion and inhomogeneities and has to deal with a much larger variety of targets ranging from lung to liver, kidney and bone. To meet many of the challenges virtually all advances in modern radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IMRT and IGRT) are used. Considering the few fractions and high doses per fraction delivered to complex targets it is not surprising that patient specific quality control is considered essential for safe delivery. Given the variety of targets and clinical scenarios we employ different strategies for different patients to ensure that the most important aspects of the treatment are appropriately tested, be it steep dose gradients, inhomogeneities or the delivery of dose in the presence of motion. The current paper reviews the different approaches and phantoms utilised at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for SABR QA.

  4. Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy: dosimetry by Fricke gel and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudou, Caroline; Biston, Marie-Claude; Corde, Stéphanie; Adam, Jean-François; Ferrero, Claudio; Estève, François; Elleaume, Hélène

    2004-11-21

    Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSR) consists in loading the tumour with a high atomic number element (Z), and exposing it to monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source (50-100 keV), in stereotactic conditions. The dose distribution results from both the stereotactic monochromatic x-ray irradiation and the presence of the high Z element. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the two-dimensional dose distribution resulting solely from the irradiation geometry, using Monte Carlo simulations and a Fricke gel dosimeter. The verification of a Monte Carlo-based dosimetry was first assessed by depth dose measurements in a water tank. We thereafter used a Fricke dosimeter to compare Monte Carlo simulations with dose measurements. The Fricke dosimeter is a solution containing ferrous ions which are oxidized to ferric ions under ionizing radiation, proportionally to the absorbed dose. A cylindrical phantom filled with Fricke gel was irradiated in stereotactic conditions over several slices with a continuous beam (beam section = 0.1 x 1 cm2). The phantom and calibration vessels were then imaged by nuclear magnetic resonance. The measured doses were fairly consistent with those predicted by Monte Carlo simulations. However, the measured maximum absolute dose was 10% underestimated regarding calculation. The loss of information in the higher region of dose is explained by the diffusion of ferric ions. Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate tool for dosimetry including complex geometries made of heterogeneous materials. Although the technique requires improvements, gel dosimetry remains an essential tool for the experimental verification of dose distribution in SSR with millimetre precision.

  5. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases. Results from three different dose concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrig, A.; Grabenbauer, G.; Sauer, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Dept. of Neurosurgery of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics of the Dept. of Radiation Therapy of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Kleinert, G.; Hamm, K. [Dept. for Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, Helios Klinikum Erfurt (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) with three different dose concepts for irresectable brain metastases not amenable to radiosurgery (SRS) using non-invasive fixation of the skull. Patients and Methods: From 6/2000 to 6/2005, 150 patients with 228 brain metastases were treated at the dedicated stereotactic radiosurgery system Novalis trademark (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany) in two German treatment centers. Three different dose concepts were applied: 5 x 6-7 Gy (A: 72 brain metastases), 10 x 4 Gy (B: 59 brain metastases) and 7 x 5 Gy (C: 97 brain metastases). Median planning target volume (PTV) was 6.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.02-95.97). Results: Rates of complete remission (CR), partial remission (PR), no change (NC) and progressive disease (PD) were 42%, 30%, 21% and 7%, respectively (median follow-up 28 months). Median survival was 16 months. Survival at 6 and 12 months was 83% and 66%, respectively. Side effects were dependent on the PTV and on dose concept (median PTV in case of increasing edema or necrosis: 17 cm{sup 3}, A: 22%, C: 7%). HfSRT with 10 x 4 Gy (B) was well tolerated without side effects. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is an effective and safe treatment. In case of brain metastases > 15 cm{sup 3} (diameter > 3 cm) and concerning toxicity, 10 x 4 Gy seem to be more advantageous than shorter fractionation with higher doses while 5 x 6-7 Gy and 7 x 5 Gy were followed by higher response rates. Further specification of tolerance doses and tolerance according to the different brain regions has to be done. (orig.)

  6. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Verstegen (Naomi); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F.J. Lagerwaard (Frank); M.A. Paul (Marinus); M. Versteegh (Michel); J.J. Joosten (Joris); W. Lastdrager (Willem); E.F. Smit (Egbert); B.J. Slotman (Ben); J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost); S. Senan (Suresh)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence

  7. (18)F-FDG PET during stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung tumours cannot predict outcome : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, Erwin M.; Pruim, Jan; Ubbels, Jan F.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Widder, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) has been used to assess metabolic response several months after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, whether a metabolic response can be observed already during treatment and thus ca

  8. CyberKnife stereotactic radiotherapy as monotherapy for low- to intermediate-stage prostate cancer: Early experience, feasibility, and tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Aluwini (Shafak); P.H. van Rooij (Peter); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa); C.H. Bangma (Chris); W.J. Kirkels (Wim); L. Incrocci (Luca); I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The CyberKnife (CK), a linear accelerator mounted on a robotic device, enables excellent dose conformation to the target and minimizes dose to surrounding normal tissue. It is a very suitable device for performing hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as monotherapy fo

  9. Chest wall pain and rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for peripheral non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voroney, Jon-Paul J; Hope, Andrew; Dahele, Max R; Purdie, Thomas G; Purdy, Thomas; Franks, Kevin N; Pearson, Shannon; Cho, John B C; Sun, Alex; Payne, David G; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony M

    2009-08-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for peripheral non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. With high dose per fraction radiotherapy, late side effects are of possible concern. In our initial cohort of 42 patients treated with 54 to 60 Gy in three fractions, nine patients have rib fracture. The median dose to rib fracture sites was 46 to 50 Gy, depending on the method of dose calculation. We describe a typical case of poststereotactic radiotherapy rib fracture and present dosimetric analysis of patients with rib fracture.

  10. Endocrine and visual function after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of perioptic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Semrau, R.; Mueller, R.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Sturm, V. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To find out whether the use of stereotactic techniques for fractionated radiotherapy reduces toxicity to the endocrine and visual system in patients with benign perioptic tumors. Patients and methods: From 1993 to 2009, 29 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The most frequent tumor types were grade I meningioma (n = 11) and pituitary adenoma (n = 10, 7 nonfunctioning, 3 growth hormone-producing). Patients were immobilized with the GTC frame (Radionics, USA) and the planning target volume (PTV; median 24.7, 4.6-58.6 ml) was irradiated with a total dose of 52.2 Gy (range, 45.0-55.8 Gy) in 1.8-Gy fractions using a linear accelerator (6 MeV photons) equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator. Maximum doses to the optic system and pituitary gland were 53.4 Gy (range, 11.5-57.6 Gy) and 53.6 Gy (range, 12.0-57.9 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 45 months (range, 10-105 months). Local control was achieved in all but 1 patient (actuarial rate 92% at 5 years and 10 years). In 9 of 29 patients (31%), partial remission was observed (actuarial response rate 40% at 5 years and 10 years). In 4 of 26 patients (15%) with at least partial pituitary function, new hormonal deficits developed (actuarial rate 21% at 5 years and 10 years). This rate was significantly higher in patients treated for a larger PTV ( 25 ml: 0% vs. 42% at 5 years and 10 years, p = 0.028). Visual function improved in 4 of 15 patients (27%) who had prior impairment. None of the patients developed treatment-related optic neuropathy, but 2 patients experienced new disease-related visual deficits. Conclusion: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign tumors of the perioptic and sellar region results in satisfactory response and local control rates and does not affect the visual system. The assumption that patients can be spared hypophyseal insufficiency only holds for small tumors. (orig.)

  11. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in prostate cancer: is rapidarc a better solution than cyberknife?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, N D; Dean, C; Muirhead, R

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the management of prostate adenocarcinoma, with encouraging initial biological progression-free survival results. However, the limited literature is dominated by the use of the Cyberknife platform. This led to an international phase III study comparing outcomes for Cyberknife SBRT with both surgery and conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (the PACE study). We aim to compare Cyberknife delivery with Rapidarc, a more widely available treatment platform. The scans of six previous prostate radiotherapy patients with a range of prostate sizes were chosen. The clinical target volume was defined as the prostate gland, with 3 mm added for the Cyberknife planning target volume (PTV) and 5 mm for the Rapidarc PTV. Accuray multiplan v. 4.5 was used for planning with delivery on a Cyberknife VSI system v9.5; Varian Eclipse v10 was used for Rapidarc planning with delivery using a Varian 21EX linear accelerator. Both systems attempted to deliver at least 35 Gy to the PTV in five fractions with PTV heterogeneity delivery time was in favour of Rapidarc. We have shown that there is no discernible dosimetric advantage to choosing Cyberknife over Rapidarc for SBRT delivery in prostate cancer. Given the significant benefits of Rapidarc in terms of availability, planning and delivery time, the authors suggest that phase III trials of SBRT should include Rapidarc or equivalent rotational delivery platforms. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for low grade glioma at McGill University: long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, D; Souhami, L; Olivier, A; Leblanc, R; Podgorsak, E

    2006-02-01

    Small, well-defined, unresectable low-grade gliomas are attractive targets for stereotactic irradiation. Fractionated stereotactic irradiation of these targets has the theoretical benefit of increased normal tissue sparing beyond that provided by the physical characteristics of stereotactic radiosurgery. From July 1987 to November 1992, 21 patients were treated for low-grade glioma at our institution using a hypofractionated regimen of stereotactic radiotherapy. All patients had well-circumscribed, < 40 mm tumors. No patient had had prior radiotherapy. All lesions were histologically proven WHO grade I or II glial tumors. Lesions involved sensitive brain structures and were deemed unresectable. A typical dose of 42 Gy was delivered in 6 fractions over a two-week period using rigid immobilization and a linac-based dynamic stereotactic radiosurgical technique. Patients had a median age of 23 years (9-74) and were predominantly female (60%). Median tumor diameter was 20 mm. With a median follow-up for living patients of 13.3 years, the actuarial 5, 10, and 15-year overall survival rates are 76%, 71%, and 63%, respectively. Treatment was acutely well tolerated although three patients experienced late post-therapy complications. Our results and those of 241 patients treated in nine other institutional series are reviewed. Despite some examples of favorable short-term outcomes, all reported series are highly selected and thus likely biased. The data regarding the use of SRS is limited and, in our opinion, insufficient to claim a clear therapeutic advantage to SRS in the initial management of low-grade glioma. Our own results with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy are similar to those expected with standard therapy.

  13. Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy is associated with greater recurrence-free survival than stereotactic body radiotherapy for clinical stage I lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Lorraine D; Echeverria, Alfredo E; Samuelian, Jason; Mayor, Jessica; Casal, Roberto F; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Omer, Shuab; Preventza, Ourania; Mai, Weiyuan; Chen, George; Simpson, Katherine H; Moghanaki, Drew; Zhu, Angela W

    2017-08-16

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Recent data suggest that in operable patients, stereotactic body radiotherapy produces outcomes comparable to those of surgical resection. In veterans with early non-small cell lung cancer, we compared the outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy and video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. We retrospectively reviewed data from 183 patients (94.0% male) with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (n = 56) or video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (n = 127) from 2009 to 2014. Propensity matching was used to produce more comparable groups. Primary end points were tumor control and overall, recurrence-free, and lung-cancer-specific survival, as estimated by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analysis. Multivariable analysis was used to identify independent predictors. In the overall cohort, the patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy were older than the patients who received video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (median age, 79.5 vs 64 years) and had more comorbidities. In the 37 propensity-matched pairs, the 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 54.3% after stereotactic body radiotherapy and 90.6% after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (P = .0038). Actuarial lung cancer-specific 3-year survival was 78.1% (stereotactic body radiotherapy) versus 93.6% (video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy) (P = .055). One-year overall, 3-year overall, and 3-year recurrence-free survivals were 89.2%, 52.9%, and 38.5% after stereotactic body radiotherapy and 94.6%, 85.7%, and 82.8% after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (P recurrence and poorer survival. In veteran patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy resulted in better disease control and survival than stereotactic body radiotherapy. Although prior reports suggest that stereotactic

  14. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  15. Impact on four dimensional dose accumulation using deformable image registration in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Dong Su; Seong, Cheon Keum; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept of. Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Uijeongbu ST Mary' s Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    This study aims to evaluate the dosimetric effect of four-dimensional dose accumulation (4D dose) compared to 3D dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Currently, SBRTT has been widely used to deliver highly conformal dose to target while sparing normal tissue. So, SBRT need accurate target delineation, dose calculation and motion management techniques such as breath-hold or abdominal compressor. In spite of the benefits about these techniques, there are still deformation and movement which could lead to reduce the probability for tumor control, imprecise prediction of normal tissue complication. 4D dose accumulation which can consider dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy.

  16. Stereotactic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: From concept to clinical reality. 2011 update; Radiotherapie stereotaxique des cancers broncho-pulmonaires non a petites cellules: d'un concept a une realite clinique. Actualites en 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. [Service de pneumologie, hopital Louis-Pradel, hospices civils de Lyon, 28, avenue du Doyen-Jean-Lepine, 69500 Bron (France); UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-Novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite cedex (France); EA 37-38, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-Novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Only 60% of patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a priori bearing a favorable prognosis, undergo radical resection because of the very frequent co-morbidities occurring in smokers, precluding surgery to be safely performed. Stereotactic radiotherapy consists of the use of multiple radiation micro-beams, allowing high doses of radiation to be delivered to the tumour (ranging from 7.5 to 20 Gy per fraction) in a small number of fractions (one to eight on average). Several studies with long-term follow-up are now available, showing the effectiveness of stereotactic radiotherapy to control stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Local control rates are consistently reported to be above 95% with a median survival of 34 to 45 months. Because of these excellent results, stereotactic radiation therapy is now being evaluated in operable patients in several randomized trials with a surgical arm. Ultimately, the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in early-stage tumours leads to hypothesize that it may represent an opportunity for locally-advanced tumors. The specific toxicities of stereotactic radiotherapy mostly correspond to radiation-induced chest wall side effects, especially for peripheral tumours. The use of adapted fractionation schemes has made feasible the use of stereotactic radiotherapy to treat proximal tumours. Overall, from a technical concept to the availability of specific treatment devices and the publication of clinical results, stereotactic radiotherapy represents a model of implementation in thoracic oncology. (authors)

  17. Emerging radiotherapy technology in a developing country: A single Brazilian institution assessment of stereotactic body radiotherapy application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Ynoe Moraes

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: To provide a quantitative profile of the indications and use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT in a developing country oncology-based institution. In addition, to describe the patients' and treatment characteristics, and to provide a temporal analysis. Method: SBRT patients treated from 2007 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated by two independently investigators. Data were stratified and compared in two periods: first experience (FE (May 2007 to April 2011, and following experience (FollowE (May 2011 to April 2015. The following parameters were compared between the groups: total number of treated patients and lesions, treatment site, additional image fusion used, formal protocol adoption, and SBRT planning technique. Results: One hundred and seventy-six (176 patients with 191 lesions were treated: 34 (18% lesions in the FE and 157 (82% lesions in FollowE. The majority of lesions were metastases (60.3%, and lung (60.2% was the most common treatment site, followed by spine (31%, and others (8.8%. An average of 1.4 (±0.6 additional imaging exams for delineation was performed. Conformal 3D radiotherapy planning technique was used in 64.4%, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT in the remaining 35.6% (p=0.0001. Higher rates of curative treatments were observed in FE, as well as more lung lesions, patients ≥ 70 years, 3D conformal, number of additional images and ECOG 0, and all presented p<0.05. The global rate of protocol statement was 79%, lung treatment being the most stated. Conclusion: SBRT application is rapidly increasing in our setting. Treatment sites and planning techniques are becoming more diversified and complex.

  18. Emerging radiotherapy technology in a developing country: A single Brazilian institution assessment of stereotactic body radiotherapy application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Bonifacio, Lorine Arias; Neves-Junior, Wellington Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Arruda, Fernando Freire; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes; Carvalho, Heloisa Andrade, E-mail: fymoraes@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP(Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To provide a quantitative profile of the indications and use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a developing country oncology-based institution. In addition, to describe the patient and treatment characteristics, and to provide a temporal analysis. Method: SBRT patients treated from 2007 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated by two independently investigators. Data were stratified and compared in two periods: first experience (FE) (May 2007 to April 2011), and following experience (FollowE) (May 2011 to April 2015). The following parameters were compared between the groups: total number of treated patients and lesions, treatment site, additional image fusion used, formal protocol adoption, and SBRT planning technique. Results: One hundred and seventy-six (176) patients with 191 lesions were treated: 34 (18%) lesions in the FE and 157 (82%) lesions in FollowE. The majority of lesions were metastases (60.3%), and lung (60.2%) was the most common treatment site, followed by spine (31%), and others (8.8%). An average of 1.4 (±0.6) additional imaging exams for delineation was performed. Conformal 3D radiotherapy planning technique was used in 64.4%, and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the remaining 35.6% (p=0.0001). Higher rates of curative treatments were observed in FE, as well as more lung lesions, patients ≥ 70 years, 3D conformal, number of additional images and ECOG 0, and all presented p<0.05. The global rate of protocol statement was 79%, lung treatment being the most stated. Conclusion: SBRT application is rapidly increasing in our setting. Treatment sites and planning techniques are becoming more diversified and complex. (author)

  19. IMRT with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Malignant Salivary Gland Malignancies : A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana D Karam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with high risk salivary gland malignancies are at increased risk of local failure. We present our institutional experience with dose escalation using hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in a subset of this rare disease. Over the course of 9 years, 10 patients presenting with skull base invasion, gross disease with one or more adverse features, or those treated with adjuvant radiation with three or more pathologic features were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy followed by hypofractionated SBRT boost. Patients presented with variable tumor histologies, and in all but one, the tumors were classified as poorly differentiated high grade. Four patients had gross disease, 3 had gross residual disease, 3 had skull base invasion, and 2 patients had rapidly recurrent disease (≤ 6 months that had been previously treated with surgical resection. The median Stereotactic Radiosurgery boost dose was 17.5 Gy (range 10-30 Gy given in a median of 5 fractions (range 3-6 fractions for a total median cumulative dose of 81.2 Gy (range 73.2-95.6 Gy. The majority of the patients received platinum based concurrent chemotherapy with their radiation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range 12-120 for all patients and 43 months for surviving patients (range 12-120, actuarial 3-year locoregional control, distant control, progression free survival, and overall survival were 88%, 81%, 68%, and 79%, respectively. Only one patient failed locally and two failed distantly. Serious late toxicity included graft ulceration in 1 patient and osteoradionecrosis in another patient, both of which underwent surgical reconstruction. Six patients developed fibrosis. In a subset of patients with salivary gland malignancies with skull base invasion, gross disease, or those treated adjuvantly with three or more adverse pathologic features, hypofractionated SBRT boost to Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy yields good local control rates and

  20. Stereotaxic radio-therapies of hepatic and pulmonary metastases with the 'stereotactic body frame'; Radiotherapies stereotaxiques des metastases hepatiques et pulmonaires avec le 'stereotactic body frame'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, T.; Bouscayrol, H. [CHR d' Orleans, 45 (France)

    2006-11-15

    This treatment is particularly well adapted to pulmonary and hepatic metastases that represent well limited targets for patients tired by previous chemotherapies. The tolerance has been excellent and the results encouraging for patients without any other therapy solution. The use of 'stereotactic body frame' appears as an alternative for the development of stereotaxic radiotherapy in comparison with investment in the dedicated machines. (N.C.)

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardi, Umberto; Badellino, Serena; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Dept. of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) represents a consolidated treatment option for patients with medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The clinical evidence accumulated in the past decade supports its use as an alternative to surgery with comparable survival outcomes. Due to its limited toxicity, SBRT is also applicable to elderly patients with very poor baseline pulmonary function or other severe comorbidities. Recent comparative studies in operable patients raised the issue of the possible use of SBRT also for this subgroup, with quite promising results that still should be fully confirmed by prospective trials with long-term follow-up. Aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the major studies conducted over the years on SBRT and to provide data on the efficacy and toxicity of this radiotherapy technique for stage I NSCLC. Technical aspects and quality of life related issues are also discussed, with the goal to provide information on the current role and limitations of SBRT in clinical practice.

  2. Evaluation of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost in the management of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiral, S; Beyzadeoglu, M; Uysal, B; Oysul, K; Kahya, Y Elcim; Sager, O; Dincoglan, F; Gamsiz, H; Dirican, B; Surenkok, S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost with multileaf collimator technique after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with endometrial cancer. Consecutive patients with endometrial cancer treated using LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT were enrolled in the study. All patients had undergone surgery including total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy ± pelvic/paraortic lymphadenectomy before RT. Prescribed external pelvic RT dose was 45 Gray (Gy) in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated with SBRT boost after pelvic RT. The prescribed SBRT boost dose to the upper two thirds of the vagina including the vaginal vault was 18 Gy delivered in 3 fractions with 1-week intervals. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v3).Between April 2010 and May 2011, 18 patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer were treated with LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT. At a median follow-up of 24 (8-26) months with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and gynecological examination, local control rate of the study group was 100 % with negligible acute and late toxicity.LINAC-based SBRT boost to the vaginal cuff is a feasible gynecological cancer treatment modality with excellent local control and minimal toxicity that may replace traditional brachytherapy boost in the management of endometrial cancer.

  3. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and immunotherapy combinations: turning the future into systemic therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshaw, Richard C; Honeychurch, Jamie; Illidge, Tim M

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is effective at cytoreducing tumours and until relatively recently the focus in radiobiology has been on the direct effects of RT on the tumour. Increasingly, however, the effect of RT on the tumour vasculature, tumour stroma and immune system are recognized as important to the overall outcome. RT is known to lead to the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD), which can generate tumour-specific immunity. However, systemic immunity leading to "abscopal effects" resulting in tumour shrinkage outside of the RT treatment field is rare, which is thought to be caused by the immunosuppressive nature of the tumour microenvironment. Recent advances in understanding the nature of this immunosuppression and therapeutics targeting immune checkpoints such as programmed death 1 has led to durable clinical responses in a range of cancer types including malignant melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. The effects of RT dose and fraction on the generation of ICD and systemic immunity are largely unknown and are currently under investigation. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) provides an opportunity to deliver single or hypofractionated large doses of RT and potentially increase the amount of ICD and the generation of systemic immunity. Here, we review the interplay of RT and the tumour microenvironment and the rationale for combining SABR with immunomodulatory agents to generate systemic immunity and improve outcomes.

  4. Cardiac embolization of an implanted fiducial marker for hepatic stereotactic body radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennessey Hooman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In liver stereotactic body radiotherapy, reduction of normal tissue irradiation requires daily image guidance. This is typically accomplished by imaging a surrogate to the tumor. The surrogate is often an implanted metal fiducial marker. There are few reports addressing the specific risks of hepatic fiducial marker implantation. These risks are assumed to be similar to percutaneous liver biopsies which are associated with a 1-4% complication rate - almost always pain or bleeding. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of such a fiducial marker migrating to the heart. Case presentation An 81-year-old Caucasian man (5 years post-gastrectomy for a gastric adenocarcinoma was referred post-second line palliative chemotherapy for radiotherapy of an isolated liver metastasis. It was decided to proceed with treatment and platinum fiducials were chosen for radiation targeting. Under local anesthesia, three Nester embolization coils (Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA were implanted under computed tomography guidance. Before the placement of each coil, the location of the tip of the delivery needle was confirmed by computed tomography imaging. During the procedure, the third coil unexpectedly migrated through the hepatic vein to the inferior vena cava and lodged at the junction of the vena cava and the right atrium. The patient remained asymptomatic. He was immediately referred to angiography for extraction of the coil. Using fluoroscopic guidance, an EN Snare Retrieval System (Hatch Medical L.L.C., Snellville, GA, USA was introduced through a jugular catheter; it successfully grasped the coil and the coil was removed. The patient was kept overnight for observation and no immediate or delayed complications were encountered due to the migration or retrieval of the coil. He subsequently went on to be treated using the remaining fiducials. Conclusion Implanted fiducial markers are increasingly used for stereotactic

  5. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja, E-mail: barbara.jereczek@ieo.it [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Beltramo, Giancarlo [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, Laura [Radiotherapy Unit, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy); Fodor, Cristiana [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Luigi [Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Gherardi, Federica [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Ascione, Carmen [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); De Cobelli, Ottavio [Department of Urology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [Department of Radiotherapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Milan (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  6. Radiogenic Side Effects After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, Karin [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Gleiss, Andreas [Section of Clinical Biometrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Zehetmayer, Martin, E-mail: martin.zehetmayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate side effects of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy for patients with choroidal melanoma. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at the Medical University of Vienna between 1997 and 2007 with a Linac with 6-MV photon beams in five fractions with 10, 12, or 14 Gy per fraction. Examinations for radiogenic side effects were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and then once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Adverse side effects were assessed using slit-lamp examination, funduscopy, gonioscopy, tonometry, and, if necessary, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Evaluations of incidence of side effects are based on an actuarial analysis. Results: One hundred and eighty-nine (89.2%) and 168 (79.2%) of the tumors were within 3 mm of the macula and the optic disc, respectively. The five most common radiotherapy side effects were retinopathy and optic neuropathy (114 cases and 107 cases, respectively), cataract development (87 cases), neovascular glaucoma (46 cases), and corneal epithelium defects (41 cases). In total, 33.6%, 38.5%, 51.2%, 75.5%, and 77.6% of the patients were free of any radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, cataract, neovascular glaucoma, or corneal epithelium defects 5 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusion: In centrally located choroidal melanoma hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy shows a low to moderate rate of adverse long-term side effects comparable with those after proton beam radiotherapy. Future fractionation schemes should seek to further reduce adverse side effects rate while maintaining excellent local tumor control.

  7. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors: A Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Andrea; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Mans, Anton; Belderbos, Jose S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Damen, Eugene M.F., E-mail: e.damen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques with a limited number of segments for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: For a random selection of 27 patients eligible for SBRT, coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT and coplanar VMAT (using SmartArc) treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle{sup 3} and compared. In addition, film measurements were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the skin dose for the different treatment techniques. Results: Using VMAT, the delivery times could be reduced to an average of 6.6 min compared with 23.7 min with noncoplanar IMRT. The mean dose to the healthy lung was 4.1 Gy for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and 4.2 Gy for coplanar IMRT. The volume of healthy lung receiving >5 Gy and >20 Gy was 18.0% and 5.4% for VMAT, 18.5% and 5.0% for noncoplanar IMRT, and 19.4% and 5.7% for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The dose conformity at 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose of 54 Gy was 1.13 and 5.17 for VMAT, 1.11 and 4.80 for noncoplanar IMRT and 1.12 and 5.31 for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The measured skin doses were comparable for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and slightly greater for coplanar IMRT. Conclusions: Coplanar VMAT for SBRT for early-stage lung cancer achieved plan quality and skin dose levels comparable to those using noncoplanar IMRT and slightly better than those with coplanar IMRT. In addition, the delivery time could be reduced by {<=}70% with VMAT.

  8. Stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation, vestibular function, and local control following primary and salvage radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Florian; Mueller, Jan; Wimmer, Caterina; Goerig, Nicole; Knippen, Stefan; Semrau, Sabine; Fietkau, Rainer; Lettmaier, Sebastian [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Iro, Heinrich; Grundtner, Philipp [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Eyuepoglu, Ilker; Roessler, Karl [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this publication is to present long-term data on functional outcomes and tumor control in a cohort of 107 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) for vestibular schwannoma. Included were 107 patients with vestibular schwannoma (primary or recurrent following resection) treated with stereotactic RT (either fractioned or single-dose radiosurgery) between October 2002 and December 2013. Local control and functional outcomes were determined. Analysis of hearing preservation was limited to a subgroup of patients with complete audiometric data collected before treatment and during follow-up. Vestibular function test (FVT) results could be analyzed in a subset of patients and were compared to patient-reported dizziness. After a mean follow-up of 46.3 months, actuarial local control for the whole cohort was 100% after 2, 97.6% after 5, and 94.1% after 10 years. In patients with primary RT, serviceable hearing was preserved in 72%. Predictors for preservation of serviceable hearing in multivariate analysis were time of follow-up (odds ratio, OR = 0.93 per month; p = 0.021) and pre-RT tumor size (Koos stage I-IIa vs. IIb-IV; OR = 0.15; p = 0.031). Worsening of FVT results was recorded in 17.6% (N = 3). Profound discrepancy of patient-reported dizziness and FVT results was observed after RT. In patients with primary RT, worsening of facial nerve function occurred in 1.7% (N = 1). Stereotactic RT of vestibular schwannoma provides good functional outcomes and high control rates. Dependence of hearing preservation on time of follow-up and initial tumor stage has to be considered. (orig.) [German] Praesentation von Langzeitdaten zu funktionellen Ergebnissen und Tumorkontrolle nach stereotaktischer Radiotherapie (RT) in einer Kohorte von 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom. Zwischen Oktober 2002 und Dezember 2013 wurden 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom (primaer oder rezidiviert nach vorangegangener Resektion) mittels stereotaktischer RT behandelt

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of brain metastases. A report of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, Martin [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Koeln (Germany); Wittig, Andrea [Philips-University Marburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Marburg (Germany); Piroth, Marc Dieter [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Helios-Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Wuppertal (Germany); Treuer, Harald; Ruge, Maximilian [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Koeln (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich [Strahlenzentrum Hamburg, Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Hamburg (Germany); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    This report from the Working Group on Stereotaktische Radiotherapie of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides recommendations for the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) on patients with brain metastases. It considers existing international guidelines and details them where appropriate. The main recommendations are: Patients with solid tumors except germ cell tumors and small-cell lung cancer with a life expectancy of more than 3 months suffering from a single brain metastasis of less than 3 cm in diameter should be considered for SRS. Especially when metastases are not amenable to surgery, are located in the brain stem, and have no mass effect, SRS should be offered to the patient. For multiple (two to four) metastases - all less than 2.5 cm in diameter - in patients with a life expectancy of more than 3 months, SRS should be used rather than whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Adjuvant WBRT after SRS for both single and multiple (two to four) metastases increases local control and reduces the frequency of distant brain metastases, but does not prolong survival when compared with SRS and salvage treatment. As WBRT carries the risk of inducing neurocognitive damage, it seems reasonable to withhold WBRT for as long as possible. A single (marginal) dose of 20 Gy is a reasonable choice that balances the effect on the treated lesion (local control, partial remission) against the risk of late side effects (radionecrosis). Higher doses (22-25 Gy) may be used for smaller (< 1 cm) lesions, while a dose reduction to 18 Gy may be necessary for lesions greater than 2.5-3 cm. As the infiltration zone of the brain metastases is usually small, the GTV-CTV (gross tumor volume-clinical target volume) margin should be in the range of 0-1 mm. The CTV-PTV (planning target volume) margin depends on the treatment technique and should lie in the range of 0-2 mm. Distant brain recurrences fulfilling the aforementioned criteria

  10. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.sapkaroski@gmail.com; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes.

  11. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma. A clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, H.; Muellner, S.; Budach, V. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Departments for Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Wiener, E. [School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Institute for Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Local tumor control and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) were assessed. In all, 250 patients with VS were treated: 190 patients with tumors < 2 cm diameter underwent SRS and 60 patients with tumors >2 to 3.5 cm underwent FSRT. Dose prescription for all cases with SRS (n = 190, 76 %) was 13.5 Gy. For FSRT, mainly two hypofractionated schedules (n = 60, 24 %) with either 7 fractions of 5 Gy (total dose: 35 Gy; n = 35) or 11 fractions of 3.8 Gy (total dose: 41.8 Gy; n = 16) were used. The primary endpoint was local tumor control. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. The median follow-up was 33.8 months. The 3-year local tumor control was 88.9 %. Local control for SRS and FSRT was 88 and 92 %, respectively. For FSRT with 35 and 41.8 Gy, local control was 90 and 100 %, respectively. There were no acute reactions exceeding grade I. In 61 cases (24.4 % of the entire cohort), trigeminal neuralgia was reported prior to treatment. At last follow-up, 16.3 % (10/61) of those patients reported relief of pain. Regarding facial nerve dysfunction, 45 patients (18 %) presented with symptoms prior to RT. At the last follow-up, 13.3% (6/45) of those patients reported a relief of dysesthesia. Using SRS to treat small VS results in good local control rates. FSRT for larger lesions also seems effective. Severe treatment-related complications are not frequent. Therefore, image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy is an appropriate alternative to microsurgery for patients with VS. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten die lokale Kontrolle und die funktionellen Verlaeufe bei Patienten mit einem Vestibularisschwannom (VS), die sich einer linacbasierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (FSRT) unterzogen. Zwischen 1998 und 2008 wurden 250 Patienten mit einem VS behandelt. In dieser Kohorte wurden 190

  12. Comparison of intensity-modulated tomotherapy with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, V S; Oldham, M; Adams, E J; Bedford, J L; Webb, S; Brada, M

    1999-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers the potential to more closely conform dose distributions to the target, and spare organs at risk (OAR). Its clinical value is still being defined. The present study aims to compare IMRT with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for patients with medium size convex-shaped brain tumors. Five patients planned with SCRT were replanned with the IMRT-tomotherapy method using the Peacock system (Nomos Corporation). The planning target volume (PTV) and relevant OAR were assessed, and compared relative to SCRT plans using dose statistics, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) stereotactic radiosurgery criteria. The median and mean PTV were 78 cm3 and 85 cm3 respectively (range 62-119 cm3). The differences in PTV doses for the whole group (Peacock-SCRT +/-1 SD) were 2%+/-1.8 (minimum PTV), and 0.1%+/-1.9 (maximum PTV). The PTV homogeneity achieved by Peacock was 12.1%+/-1.7 compared to 13.9%+/-1.3 with SCRT. Using RTOG guidelines, Peacock plans provided acceptable PTV coverage for all 5/5 plans compared to minor coverage deviations in 4/5 SCRT plans; acceptable homogeneity index for both plans (Peacock = 1.1 vs. SCRT = 1.2); and comparable conformity index (1.4 each). As a consequence of the transaxial method of arc delivery, the optic nerves received mean and maximum doses that were 11.1 to 11.6%, and 10.3 to 15.2% higher respectively with Peacock plan. The maximum optic lens, and brainstem dose were 3.1 to 4.8% higher, and 0.6% lower respectively with Peacock plan. However, all doses remained below the tolerance threshold (5 Gy for lens, and 50 Gy for optic nerves) and were clinically acceptable. The Peacock method provided improved PTV coverage, albeit small, in this group of convex tumors. Although the OAR doses were higher using the Peacock plans, all doses remained within the clinically defined threshold and were clinically acceptable. Further improvements may be

  13. Influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, Karthikeyan; Kadirampatti Mani, Ganesh; Subramani, Vikraman; Karukkupalayam Palaniappan, Karrthick; Uthiran, Mohanraj; Vellengiri, Sennniandavar; Raju, Sambasivaselli; Supe, Sanjay S; Kataria, Tejinder

    2014-09-01

    To study the influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy. The redundancy of modulation for regularly shaped small volume tumors results in creation of many small segments and an increase of monitor units, with a consequent prolongation of treatment and uncertainty in treatment delivery. Six cases each in lung, abdomen and liver were taken for the study. For each case, three VMAT SBRT plans were generated with different penalties on minimum segment width of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm. A comparison was made on the metrics of dose volume histogram, dosimetric indices, monitor units (MUs) and delivery accuracy. The mean reduction of total MUs when compared with 0.5 cm plan was observed as 12.7 ± 6.0% and 17.5 ± 7.2% for 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm of minimum segment width, respectively. The p value showed a significant degradation in dosimetric indices for 1.5 cm plans when compared with 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm plans. The average deviation of measured dose with TPS calculated was 3.0 ± 1.1%, 2.1 ± 0.84% and 1.8 ± 0.9% for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm, respectively. The calculated gamma index with pass criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement was 95.9 ± 2.8%, 96.5 ± 2.6% and 97.8 ± 1.6% as calculated for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm of penalties, respectively. In view of the trade off between delivery efficiency and plan quality, 1 cm minimum segment width plans showed an improvement. VMAT SBRT plans with increased optimal value of minimum segment width showed better plan quality and delivery efficiency for stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  14. Radiobiology of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: what are the optimal fractionation schedules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Miyakawa, Akifumi; Otsuka, Shinya; Iwata, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    In hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), high doses per fraction are usually used and the dose delivery pattern is different from that of conventional radiation. The daily dose is usually given intermittently over a longer time compared with conventional radiotherapy. During prolonged radiation delivery, sublethal damage repair takes place, leading to the decreased effect of radiation. In in vivo tumors, however, this decrease in effect may be counterbalanced by rapid reoxygenation. Another issue related to hypofractionated SRT is the mathematical model for dose evaluation and conversion. The linear–quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) have been suggested to be incorrect when used for hypofractionation. The LQ model overestimates the effect of high fractional doses of radiation. BED is particularly incorrect when used for tumor responses in vivo, since it does not take reoxygenation into account. Correction of the errors, estimated at 5–20%, associated with the use of BED is necessary when it is used for SRT. High fractional doses have been reported to exhibit effects against tumor vasculature and enhance host immunity, leading to increased antitumor effects. This may be an interesting topic that should be further investigated. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is more problematic in hypofractionated SRT, so trials of hypoxia-targeted agents are encouraged in the future. In this review, the radiobiological characteristics of hypofractionated SRT are summarized, and based on the considerations, we would like to recommend 60 Gy in eight fractions delivered three times a week for lung tumors larger than 2 cm in diameter. PMID:27006380

  15. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... with a       central dose of 15 Gy x 3 within 5-8 days. Results: Eight patients (20%)       obtained a complete response, 15 (38%) had a partial response, and 12       (30%) had no change or could not be evaluated. Only 3 patients had a local       recurrence, and the local control rate 2 years after SBRT was 85...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  16. [A review of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for lung metastasis of colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takeshi; Morohashi, Hajime; Hasebe, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Koyama, Motoi; Murata, Akihiko; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for lung metastasis of colon cancer, with particular emphasis on local tumor control. Seven patients with 8 lesions underwent SRT for lung metastasis of colon cancer in our institution between February 2012 and February 2014. We judged the curative effect of SRT on the basis of tumor shrinkage observed on computed tomography (CT) scans. All lung metastases decreased in size, and local recurrence was not observed. SRT is a technique involving three-dimensional radiation, which decreases radiation exposure to neighboring normal tissues. The 2-year local tumor control rate for lung metastasis of colon cancer with SRT is 77.9%, and the 2-year survival rate is 53.7%. Our results, in which all patients achieved local control, suggest that SRT is a minimally aggressive treatment option for lung metastasis of colon cancer in cases where a pneumonectomy is difficult to perform. In the future, results from long-term studies are needed to validate our findings.

  17. Assessing small-volume spinal cord dose for repeat spinal stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Kirby, Neil; Korol, Renee; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-12-01

    Spinal cord biologically effective dose (BED) limits are critical to safe spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivery. In particular, when repeating SBRT to the same site, the problem of adding non-uniform BED distributions within small volumes of spinal cord has yet to be solved. We report a probability-based generalized BED (gBED) model to guide repeat spine SBRT treatment planning. The gBED was formulated by considering the sequential damaging probabilities of repeat spine SBRT treatments. Parameters from the standard linear-quadratic model, such as α/β = 2 Gy for the spinal cord, were applied. We tested the model based on SBRT specific spinal cord tolerance using a simulated and ten clinical repeat SBRT cases. The gBED provides a consistent solution for superimposing non-uniform dose distributions from different fractionation schemes, analogous to the BED for uniform dose distributions. Based on ten clinical cases, the gBED was observed to eliminate discrepancies in the cumulative BED of approximately 5% to 20% within small volumes (e.g. 0.1-2.0 cc) of spinal cord, as compared to a conventional calculation method. When assessing spinal cord tolerance for repeat spinal SBRT treatments, caution should be exercised when applying conventional BED calculations for small volumes of spinal cord irradiated, and the gBED potentially provides more conservative and consistently derived dose surrogates to guide safe treatment planning and treatment outcome modeling.

  18. Practice of stereotactic body radiotherapy in a developing country: Perception, aspiration, and limitation - A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rathod

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is an effective and established modern technology now used more commonly. Radiation oncology personnel's (ROP opinion toward SBRT in the developing countries like India is unknown. Subjects and Methods: A 30 question survey evaluating ROP's profile, technological details, and SBRT's perceptive were seeked. Tata Memorial Center – ROP's email database was used. Results: Survey questionnaire was emailed to 500 ROP's and 224 ROP's were contactable. Majority of the responders were from corporate hospitals and half of responders had experience of 5 or more years of experience in radiation oncology. SBRT was practiced by 70% of responders and the majority had adopted SBRT in 2010 or later. Quick turn around time, high dose delivery and competitive market forces were major factors to adopt SBRT. Lung was the most common site practiced followed by prostate, spine, and liver. All SBRT users were keen to increase SBRT in practice and the majority of non-responders were planning to adapt SBRT in the recent future. Almost half of SBRT users were willing to share data and expertise for training others. Lack of infrastructure was the prime reason for not practicing SBRT. ROP's perceived physics, radiobiology as the biggest challenge in SBRT. International collaboration may be helpful. Conclusion: Use of SBRT is expected to increase in India. Limited experience with lack of infrastructure in public funded centers is a major limitation. Unmet need of infrastructure, training and guidelines is enormous and formulation of Indian SBRT consortium will help reforming at all levels.

  19. Estimate of normal tissue damage in treatment planning for stereotactic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benassi, M. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Begnozzi, L. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Gentile, F.P. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Chiatti, L. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Carpino, S. (Laboratorio Fisica Medica e Sistemi Esperti, C.R.S., Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy))

    1993-10-01

    A personal computer (PC) system was developed to perform treatment planning for radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques of irradiation of the brain may be accomplished with a linear accelerator by performing several non-coplanar arcs of a highly collimated beam focused at a fixed point. The PC system allows the acquisition, reconstruction and the visualization of the target volume from CT or MR images, and then it permits to calculate a three-dimensional (3-D) dose distribution due to small photon beams and to visualize it. The software calculates not only total dose distribution, administered fractionated or in single fraction, but also in NTD2 (normalized total dose) predicted to have a biological effect equivalent to the single irradiation. The choice of the best technique is supported by the dose volume histograms (DVH) calculation and by an estimate of complication probability to the brain normal tissue (NTCP). The algorithm for NTCP calculation is based on two models: The linear quadratic and the logistic. A comparison of three different dose calculations for a typical cerebral target volume is presented to demonstrate the system performances. (orig.)

  20. Retrospective study on therapy options of brain metastases surgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Fortunati, M K S

    2001-01-01

    Background: in the therapy of brain metastases there has been a great progress in the last years. It was shown, that more aggressive therapies can not only extend the survival of the patients, but also improve quality of life. The major question of this study was, whether surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy with the linear accelerator show better results in behalf of the survival. Beside this major question many parameters regarding the patient or his primary cancer were examined. Methods: from the 1st of January 1995 until the 30th of June 2000 233 patients with one or more brain metastases have been treated in the Wagner Jauregg Landesnervenkrankenhaus Oberoesterreich (WJ LNKH OeO). The LINAC has been established on the 1st of July 1997. The patients have been distributed in three groups: 1. LINAC-group: 81 patients have been treated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th of June 2000 with the LINAC. 2. Surgery-group: 81 patients have been operated from the 1st of July 1997 until the 30th June 2000. 3 Co...

  1. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for small lung tumors with a moderate dose. Favorable results and low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncker-Rohr, V.; Nestle, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Momm, F. [Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg (Germany)] [and others

    2013-01-15

    Background: Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SBRT, SABR) is being increasingly applied because of its high local efficacy, e.g., for small lung tumors. However, the optimum dosage is still under discussion. Here, we report data on 45 lung lesions [non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastases] in 39 patients treated between 2009 and 2010 by SABR. Patients and methods: SABR was performed with total doses of 35 Gy (5 fractions) or 37.5 Gy (3 fractions) prescribed to the 60% isodose line encompassing the planning target volume. Three-monthly follow-up CT scans were supplemented by FDG-PET/CT if clinically indicated. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months. Local progression-free survival rates were 90.5% (all patients), 95.0% (NSCLC), and 81.8% (metastases) at 1 year. At 2 years, the respective local progression-free survival rates were 80.5%, 95.0%, and 59.7%. Overall survival rates were 71.1% (all patients), 65.4% (NSCLC), and 83.3% (metastases) at 1 year. Overall survival rates at 2 years were 52.7%, 45.9%, and 66.7%, respectively. Acute side effects were mild. Conclusion: With the moderate dose schedule used, well-tolerated SABR led to favorable local tumor control as in other published series. Standardization in reporting the dose prescription for SABR is needed to allow comparison of different series in order to determine optimum dosage. (orig.)

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  3. [Assessment of overall spatial accuracy in image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy using a spine registration method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hayashi, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung and liver tumors is always performed under image guidance, a technique used to confirm the accuracy of setup positioning by fusing planning digitally reconstructed radiographs with X-ray, fluoroscopic, or computed tomography (CT) images, using bony structures, tumor shadows, or metallic markers as landmarks. The Japanese SBRT guidelines state that bony spinal structures should be used as the main landmarks for patient setup. In this study, we used the Novalis system as a linear accelerator for SBRT of lung and liver tumors. The current study compared the differences between spine registration and target registration and calculated total spatial accuracy including setup uncertainty derived from our image registration results and the geometric uncertainty of the Novalis system. We were able to evaluate clearly whether overall spatial accuracy is achieved within a setup margin (SM) for planning target volume (PTV) in treatment planning. After being granted approval by the Hospital and University Ethics Committee, we retrospectively analyzed eleven patients with lung tumor and seven patients with liver tumor. The results showed the total spatial accuracy to be within a tolerable range for SM of treatment planning. We therefore regard our method to be suitable for image fusion involving 2-dimensional X-ray images during the treatment planning stage of SBRT for lung and liver tumors.

  4. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with linear accelerator for uveal melanoma - preliminary Vienna results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehetmayer, M.; Ruhswurm, I.; Georgopoulos, M. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Vienna Univ. (Austria); Dieckmann, K.; Kren, G.; Poetter, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Vienna Univ (Austria); Kitz, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Vienna Univ. (Austria)

    1999-06-01

    Between June 1997 and February 1998, 21 patients suffering from uveal melanomas have been treated with a sterotactic 6 MeV LINAC (Saturne 43 {sup trademark}, General Electric, France) in conjunction with a stereotactic frame system (BrainLAB {sup trademark}, Germany). Immobilization of the eye was ensured with an optical fixation system which was proven reliable. During radiotherapy, movements of the irradiated eye were controlled on a monitor and documented by video recording. All patients co-operated very well with the optical fixation system. In 1164 measurements, the median value of horizontal deviation of the diseased eye during treatment was 0.3 mm (range: 0 to 1.3 mm). Median vertical deviation was 0.2 mm (range: 0 to 1.2 mm). For all patients, mean tumor prominence before treatment was 6.0{+-}2.2 mm. In 20 patients, the total dose of 70 Gy (at 80%) was delivered in 5 fractions within 10 days. In one patient with a ciliary body tumor, the total dose of 70 Gy was divided into 7 fractions for better sparing of the anterior eye segment. Results: After a follow-up of at least 6 months, local tumor control was seen in all eyes. Mean tumor thickness reduction after 3, 6 and 9 months was 7%, 13% and 31%, respectively. Up to now, only mild subacute side-effects located in the anterior eye segment have been noticed. (orig.)

  5. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: five-year outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment approach for prostate cancer. We present the outcomes for low-risk prostate cancer patients with a median follow-up of 5 years after SBRT. Method and Materials Between Dec. 2003 and Dec. 2005, a pooled cohort of 41 consecutive patients from Stanford, CA and Naples, FL received SBRT with CyberKnife for clinically localized, low-risk prostate cancer. Prescribed dose was 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions. No patient received hormone therapy. Kaplan-Meier biochemical progression-free survival (defined using the Phoenix method and RTOG toxicity outcomes were assessed. Results At a median follow-up of 5 years, the biochemical progression-free survival was 93% (95% CI = 84.7% to 100%. Acute side effects resolved within 1-3 months of treatment completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. No late grade 3 rectal toxicity occurred, and only one late grade 3 genitourinary toxicity occurred following repeated urologic instrumentation. Conclusion Five-year results of SBRT for localized prostate cancer demonstrate the efficacy and safety of shorter courses of high dose per fraction radiation delivered with SBRT technique. Ongoing clinical trials are underway to further explore this treatment approach.

  6. Modeling of Radiation Pneumonitis after Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Bayesian Network Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sangkyu; Jeyaseelan, Krishinima; Faria, Sergio; Kopek, Neil; Brisebois, Pascale; Vu, Toni; Filion, Edith; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Lambert, Louise; Del Vecchio, Pierre; Trudel, Diane; El-Sokhn, Nidale; Roach, Michael; Robinson, Clifford; Naqa, Issam El

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer accompanies a non-negligible risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP). This study presents a Bayesian network (BN) model that connects biological, dosimetric, and clinical RP risk factors. Material and Methods: 43 non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with SBRT with 5 fractions or less were studied. Candidate RP risk factors included dose-volume parameters, previously reported clinical RP factors, 6 protein biomarkers at baseline and 6 weeks post-treatment. A BN ensemble model was built from a subset of the variables in a training cohort (N=32), and further tested in an independent validation cohort (N=11). Results: Key factors identified in the BN ensemble for predicting RP risk were ipsilateral V5, lung volume receiving more than 105% of prescription, and decrease in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) from baseline to 6 weeks. External validation of the BN ensemble model yielded an area under the curve of 0.8. Conclusions: The BN...

  7. Practice of stereotactic body radiotherapy in a developing country: Perception, aspiration, and limitation - A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, S; Munshi, A; Agarwal, J P

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an effective and established modern technology now used more commonly. Radiation oncology personnel's (ROP) opinion toward SBRT in the developing countries like India is unknown. A 30 question survey evaluating ROP's profile, technological details, and SBRT's perceptive were seeked. Tata Memorial Center - ROP's email database was used. Survey questionnaire was emailed to 500 ROP's and 224 ROP's were contactable. Majority of the responders were from corporate hospitals and half of responders had experience of 5 or more years of experience in radiation oncology. SBRT was practiced by 70% of responders and the majority had adopted SBRT in 2010 or later. Quick turn around time, high dose delivery and competitive market forces were major factors to adopt SBRT. Lung was the most common site practiced followed by prostate, spine, and liver. All SBRT users were keen to increase SBRT in practice and the majority of non-responders were planning to adapt SBRT in the recent future. Almost half of SBRT users were willing to share data and expertise for training others. Lack of infrastructure was the prime reason for not practicing SBRT. ROP's perceived physics, radiobiology as the biggest challenge in SBRT. International collaboration may be helpful. Use of SBRT is expected to increase in India. Limited experience with lack of infrastructure in public funded centers is a major limitation. Unmet need of infrastructure, training and guidelines is enormous and formulation of Indian SBRT consortium will help reforming at all levels.

  8. Pseudo-progression after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases: lesion analysis using MRI cine-loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggenraad, Ruud; Bos, Petra; Verbeek-de Kanter, Antoinette; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert; van Santvoort, Jan; Taphoorn, Martin; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-09-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of brain metastasis can lead to lesion growth caused by radiation toxicity. The pathophysiology of this so-called pseudo-progression is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of MRI cine-loops for describing the consecutive events in this radiation induced lesion growth. Ten patients were selected from our department's database that had received SRT of brain metastases and had lesion growth caused by pseudo-progression as well as at least five follow-up MRI scans. Pre- and post SRT MRI scans were co-registered and cine-loops were made using post-gadolinium 3D T1 axial slices. The ten cine loops were discussed in a joint meeting of the authors. The use of cine-loops was superior to evaluation of separate MRI scans for interpretation of events after SRT. There was a typical lesion evolution pattern in all patients with varying time course. Initially regression of the metastases was observed, followed by an enlarging area of new contrast enhancement in the surrounding brain tissue. Analysis of consecutive MRI's using cine-loops may improve understanding of pseudo-progression. It probably represents a radiation effect in brain tissue surrounding the irradiated metastasis and not enlargement of the metastasis itself.

  9. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  10. Perineural spread of cutaneous malignancy to the brain: a review of the literature and five patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, B Zach; Crocker, Ian R; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2005-05-15

    The retrospective analysis was performed to investigate the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) techniques for patients with intracranial perineural spread (PNS) of a primary cutaneous malignancy. Five patients were identified who received SRT from 1993 to 2003 for cutaneous malignancies with intracranial PNS to the cavernous sinus (n = 3) or Meckel's cave (n = 2). Patients were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 2), linear accelerator (linac)-based fractionated SRT (n = 2), or linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 1). The median overall survival (OS) periods from diagnoses of cutaneous malignancy and intracranial PNS were 63.0 months (range, 22.0-102.2 months) and 25.5 months (range, 22.0-55.2 months), respectively. The median OS from SRT was 24.2 months (range, 19.5-53.2 months). One patient was alive and without evidence of disease at 53 months of follow-up. The median durations of local and regional control from SRT were 19.5 months (range, 1.5-53.2 months) and 7.0 months (range, 1.5-53.2 months), respectively. Previous reports generally have recommended that patients with intracranial PNS receive palliative external-beam radiotherapy. Results from the current study suggest that some of these patients may have prolonged survival, or even may be cured. Judicious use of SRT should be considered in their management.

  11. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajaldeen, A [RMIT university, Docklands, Vic (Australia); Ramachandran, P [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Bendigo (Australia); Geso, M [RMIT University, Bundoora, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  12. Successful treatment of hepatic oligometastases with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion-positive lung cancer patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Liu, Mitchell; Sobkin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Local ablative therapy with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy may improve survival in oncogene‐addicted lung cancer patients with extracranial oligometastatic disease treated with targeted therapies. There is limited data on the use of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in this same setting. We present...... a case of an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)‐positive lung cancer patient with hepatic oligometastatic progression who was successfully treated with both stereotactic ablative radiation and RFA while continuing with an ALK inhibitor....

  13. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  14. Tumor shrinkage assessed by volumetric MRI in the long-term follow-up after stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astner, Sabrina T.; Theodorou, Marilena; Dobrei-Ciuchendea, Mihaela; Kopp, Christine; Molls, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Auer, Florian [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor volume reduction in the follow-up of meningiomas after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or linac radiosurgery (RS) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and Methods: In 59 patients with skull base meningiomas, gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-en-hanced MRI before and median 50 months (range 11-92 months) after stereotactic radiotherapy. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6 mm slice thickness without gap (3D-MRI). Results were compared to the reports of diagnostic findings. Results: Mean tumor size of all 59 meningiomas was 13.9 ml (0.8-62.9 ml) before treatment. There was shrinkage of the treated meningiomas in all but one patient. Within a median volumetric follow-up of 50 months (11-95 months), an absolute mean volume reduction of 4 ml (0-18 ml) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared to the volume before radiotherapy was 27% (0-73%). Shrinkage measured by 3D-MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. The mean size reduction was 17%, 23%, and 30% (at < 24 months, 24-48 months, and 48-72 months). Conclusion: By using 3D-MRI in almost all patients undergoing radiotherapy of a meningioma, tumor shrinkage is detected. The data presented here demonstrate that volumetric assessment from 3D-MRI provides additional information to routinely used radiologic response measurements. After FSRT or RS, a mean size reduction of 25-45% can be expected within 4 years. (orig.)

  15. A verification methodology for in vivo dosimetry in stereotactic radiotherapy; Uma metodologia para verificacao dosimetrica in vivo em radioterapia estereotaxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Leonardo L.; Oliveira, Harley F.; Fairbanks, Leandro R., E-mail: leonardo.fis@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Nicolucci, Patricia; Netto, Thomaz G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Departamento de Fisica

    2012-12-15

    Radiotherapy of brain lesions near critical structures requires a high accuracy in the location and dose. The high precision is achieved by the location of the stereotactic apparatus. The accuracy in dose delivery should be accompanied by an accurate quality control in devices that involve the practice, however, still does not guarantee the dose at the time of therapy. The large number of fields and the small size of these conventional methods difficult dosimetry during treatment. The objective of this work was to develop a verification methodology in vivo dosimetry in stereotactic radiotherapy with the aid of the film radiochromic Linear Accelerator with multi leaf collimators Moduleaf. The technique uses film segments radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2, with dimensions of 1x1 cm{sup 2} in area outside the coupled micro-multileaf Moduleaf Siemens. These films were inserted in the region of the central axis of the beam. The films were irradiated and calibrated to obtain the factors that determine the size dependence of the dosimetric field. With these data, we designed a computer program which calculates the density of a film must acquire when subjected to an exposure in this setting. This study evaluated five non-coplanar plans, the first with 15 fields and the other with 25 fields. Before starting the procedure, the film segment is coupled to the device, and after the treatment, the relative density is evaluated and compared with the calculated. The average value of the verification at the time of radiation dosimetry compared with the calculated by the sheet was 1.5%. The data collected in this study showed a satisfactory agreement between measured and calculated by the program in the densitometer. Thus, a methodology was developed to verify in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy and stereotactic linear accelerator collimators Moduleaf. (author)

  16. Experience of an application of stereotactic multiple arc radiotherapy (SMART) to metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramoto, Hideyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kato, Eriko; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Akira; Kikuchi, Yuzo [Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    A highly dose-localizing method of irradiation with linear accelerator, called stereotactic multiple arc radiotherapy (SMART), was applied to six cases of metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer. A custom-made immobilization device was used and fractionated irradiation was given to each case. One of them died of rapid spread of systemic metastases about two months after SMART, and in other cases, the response was not so enough. None of them, however, experienced acute or late toxicity. As a result, we intend a prospective dose-escalation study for searching the appropriate radiation dose. (author)

  17. Lipiodol versus diaphragm in 4D-CBCT-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Mark K.H.; Lee, Venus; Chiang, C.L.; Lee, Francis A.S.; Law, Gilbert; Wong, Frank C.S.; Tung, Stewart Y.; Luk, Hollis [TuenMun Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, TuenMun, Hong Kong (China); Sin, N.Y.; Siu, K.L. [TuenMun Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, TuenMun, Hong Kong (China); Blanck, Oliver [University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Kiel (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of lipiodol as a direct tumor surrogate alternative to the diaphragm surrogate on four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) image guidance for stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas. A total of 29 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) patients treated by stereotactic radiotherapy following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with homogeneous or partial defective lipiodol retention were included. In all, 4-7 pretreatment 4D-CBCT scans were selected for each patient. For each scan, either lipiodol or the diaphragm was used for 4D registration. Resulting lipiodol/diaphragm motion ranges and position errors relative to the reconstructed midventilation images were analyzed to obtain the motion variations, and group mean (ΔM), systematic (Σ), and random (σ) errors of the treatment setup. Of the lipiodolized tumors, 55 % qualified for direct localization on the 4D-CBCT. Significant correlations of lipiodol and diaphragm positions were found in the left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions. ΔM and σ obtained with lipiodol and diaphragm were similar, agreed to within 0.5 mm in the LR and AP, and 0.3 mm in the CC directions, and Σ differed by 1.4 (LR), 1.1 (CC), and 0.6 (AP) mm. Variations of diaphragm motion range > 5 mm were not observed with lipiodol and in one patient with diaphragm. The margin required for the tumor prediction error using the diaphragm surrogate was 6.7 (LR), 11.7 (CC), and 4.1 (AP) mm. Image-guidance combining lipiodol with 4D-CBCT enabled accurate localization of HCC and thus margin reduction. A major limitation was the degraded lipiodol contrast on 4D-CBCT. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war es, das Potential von Lipiodol als direktes Tumorsurrogat alternativ zum Zwerchfellsurrogat fuer die vierdimensionale Cone-beam-Computertomographie (4D-CBCT) in der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie von hepatozellulaeren Karzinomen (HCC

  18. Texture analysis of automatic graph cuts segmentations for detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a treatment for early-stage lung cancer with local control rates comparable to surgery. After SABR, benign radiation induced lung injury (RILI) results in tumour-mimicking changes on computed tomography (CT) imaging. Distinguishing recurrence from RILI is a critical clinical decision determining the need for potentially life-saving salvage therapies whose high risks in this population dictate their use only for true recurrences. Current approaches do not reliably detect recurrence within a year post-SABR. We measured the detection accuracy of texture features within automatically determined regions of interest, with the only operator input being the single line segment measuring tumour diameter, normally taken during the clinical workflow. Our leave-one-out cross validation on images taken 2-5 months post-SABR showed robustness of the entropy measure, with classification error of 26% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.77 using automatic segmentation; the results using manual segmentation were 24% and 0.75, respectively. AUCs for this feature increased to 0.82 and 0.93 at 8-14 months and 14-20 months post SABR, respectively, suggesting even better performance nearer to the date of clinical diagnosis of recurrence; thus this system could also be used to support and reinforce the physician's decision at that time. Based on our ongoing validation of this automatic approach on a larger sample, we aim to develop a computer-aided diagnosis system which will support the physician's decision to apply timely salvage therapies and prevent patients with RILI from undergoing invasive and risky procedures.

  19. Early prediction of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy using second order texture statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Benign radiation-induced lung injury is a common finding following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer, and is often difficult to differentiate from a recurring tumour due to the ablative doses and highly conformal treatment with SABR. Current approaches to treatment response assessment have shown limited ability to predict recurrence within 6 months of treatment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of second order texture statistics for prediction of eventual recurrence based on computed tomography (CT) images acquired within 6 months of treatment, and compare with the performance of first order appearance and lesion size measures. Consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) regions were manually delineated on post-SABR CT images. Automatic consolidation expansion was also investigated to act as a surrogate for GGO position. The top features for prediction of recurrence were all texture features within the GGO and included energy, entropy, correlation, inertia, and first order texture (standard deviation of density). These predicted recurrence with 2-fold cross validation (CV) accuracies of 70-77% at 2- 5 months post-SABR, with energy, entropy, and first order texture having leave-one-out CV accuracies greater than 80%. Our results also suggest that automatic expansion of the consolidation region could eliminate the need for manual delineation, and produced reproducible results when compared to manually delineated GGO. If validated on a larger data set, this could lead to a clinically useful computer-aided diagnosis system for prediction of recurrence within 6 months of SABR and allow for early salvage therapy for patients with recurrence.

  20. Effect of Acuros XB algorithm on monitor units for stereotactic body radiotherapy planning of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rao F; Villarreal-Barajas, Eduardo; Lau, Harold; Liu, Hong-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a curative regimen that uses hypofractionated radiation-absorbed dose to achieve a high degree of local control in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the presence of heterogeneities, the dose calculation for the lungs becomes challenging. We have evaluated the dosimetric effect of the recently introduced advanced dose-calculation algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), for SBRT of NSCLC. A total of 97 patients with early-stage lung cancer who underwent SBRT at our cancer center during last 4 years were included. Initial clinical plans were created in Aria Eclipse version 8.9 or prior, using 6 to 10 fields with 6-MV beams, and dose was calculated using the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) as implemented in Eclipse treatment planning system. The clinical plans were recalculated in Aria Eclipse 11.0.21 using both AAA and AXB algorithms. Both sets of plans were normalized to the same prescription point at the center of mass of the target. A secondary monitor unit (MU) calculation was performed using commercial program RadCalc for all of the fields. For the planning target volumes ranging from 19 to 375cm(3), a comparison of MUs was performed for both set of algorithms on field and plan basis. In total, variation of MUs for 677 treatment fields was investigated in terms of equivalent depth and the equivalent square of the field. Overall, MUs required by AXB to deliver the prescribed dose are on an average 2% higher than AAA. Using a 2-tailed paired t-test, the MUs from the 2 algorithms were found to be significantly different (p algorithms.

  1. Teflon cylindrical phantom for delivery quality assurance of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Danielle W; Kakakhel, Ali; Starin, Ross; Snyder, Michael

    2014-01-06

    At our institution the standard delivery quality assurance (DQA) procedure for tomotherapy plans is accomplished with a water equivalent phantom, EDR2 film, and ion chamber point-dose measurements. Most plans deliver at most 5 Gy to the dose plane; however, recently a stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) protocol has produced plans delivering upwards of 12 Gy to the film plane. EDR2 film saturates at a dose of ~ 7 Gy, requiring a modification of our DQA procedure for SBRT plans. To reduce the dose to the film plane and accommodate a possible move to SBRT using Varian RapidArc, a Teflon phantom has been constructed and tested. Our Teflon phantom is cylindrical in shape and of a similar design to the standard phantom. The phantom was MVCT scanned on the TomoTherapy system with images imported into the TomoTherapy and Varian Eclipse planning systems. Phantom images were smoothed to reduce artifacts for treatment planning purposes. Verification SBRT plans were delivered with film and point-dose benchmarked against the standard procedure. Verification tolerance criteria were 3% dose difference for chamber measurements and a gamma pass rate > 90% for film (criteria: 3 mm DTA, 3% dose difference, 10% threshold). The phantom sufficiently reduced dose to the film plane for DQA of SBRT plans. Both planning systems calculated accurate point doses in phantom, with the largest differences being 2.4% and 4.4% for TomoTherapy and Rapid Arc plans. Measured dose distributions correlated well with planning system calculations (γ 95%). These results were comparable to the standard phantom. The Teflon phantom appears to be a potential option for SBRT DQA. Preliminary data show that the planning systems are capable of calculating point doses in the Teflon, and the dose to the film plane is reduced sufficiently to allow for a direct measured DQA without the need for dose rescaling.

  2. Predictor of Severe Gastroduodenal Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Abdominopelvic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mskim@kcch.re.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul Koo; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Sang Yeob; Lee, Kyung-Nam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Han [CyberKnife Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Chul Ju; Yang, Ki Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Bum [Department of General Surgery, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the predictors for the development of severe gastroduodenal toxicity (GDT) in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2011, 202 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies were treated with curative-intent SBRT. Among these patients, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 40 patients with the eligibility criteria as follows: 3 fractionations, follow-up period {>=}1 year, absence of previous radiation therapy (RT) history or combination of external-beam RT and the presence of gastroduodenum (GD) that received a dose higher than 20% of prescribed dose. The median SBRT dose was 45 Gy (range, 33-60 Gy) with 3 fractions. We analyzed the clinical and dosimetric parameters, including multiple dose-volume histogram endpoints: V{sub 20} (volume of GD that received 20 Gy), V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, and D{sub max} (the maximum point dose). The grade of GDT was defined by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4.0, and GDT {>=}grade 3 was defined as severe GDT. Results: The median time to the development of severe GDT was 6 months (range, 3-12 months). Severe GDT was found in 6 patients (15%). D{sub max} was the best dosimetric predictor for severe GDT. D{sub max} of 35 Gy and 38 Gy were respectively associated with a 5% and 10% probability of the development of severe GDT. A history of ulcer before SBRT was the best clinical predictor on univariate analysis (P=.0001). Conclusions: We suggest that D{sub max} is a valuable predictor of severe GDT after SBRT using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. A history of ulcer before SBRT should be carefully considered as a clinical predictor, especially in patients who receive a high dose to GD.

  3. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1-2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85-6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Induction Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreas Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Anand, E-mail: amahadev@bidmc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Miksad, Rebecca; Goldstein, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan; Bullock, Andrea; Buchbinder, Elizabeth [Department of Medical Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep [Department of Interventional Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kent, Tara; Vollmer, Charles; Callery, Mark [Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used successfully to treat patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, many patients develop metastatic disease soon after diagnosis and may receive little benefit from such therapy. We therefore retrospectively analyzed a planned strategy of initial chemotherapy with restaging and then treatment for those patients with no evidence of metastatic progression with SBRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} per week for 3 weeks then 1 week off) until tolerance, at least six cycles, or progression. Patients without metastases after two cycles were treated with SBRT (tolerance-based dose of 24-36 Gy in 3 fractions) between the third and fourth cycles without interrupting the chemotherapy cycles. Results: Eight of the 47 patients (17%) were found to have metastatic disease after two cycles of gemcitabine; the remaining 39 patients received SBRT. The median follow-up for survivors was 21 months (range, 6-36 months). The median overall survival for all patients who received SBRT was 20 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. The local control rate was 85% (33 of 39 patients); and 54% of patients (21 of 39) developed metastases. Late Grade III toxicities such as GI bleeding and obstruction were observed in 9% (3/39) of patients. Conclusion: For patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer, this strategy uses local therapy for those who are most likely to benefit from it and spares those patients with early metastatic progression from treatment. SBRT delivers such local therapy safely with minimal interruption to systemic chemotherapy, thereby potentially improving the outcome in these patients.

  5. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in low- and intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) takes advantage of low α/β ratio of prostate cancer to deliver a large dose in few fractions. We examined clinical outcomes of SBRT using CyberKnife for the treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Materials and Methods This study was based on a retrospective analysis of the 33 patients treated with SBRT using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer (27.3% in low-risk and 72.7% in intermediate-risk). Total dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy were administered. The acute and late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was monitored. Results Thirty-three patients with a median 51 months (range, 6 to 71 months) follow-up were analyzed. There was no biochemical failure. Median PSA nadir was 0.27 ng/mL at median 33 months and PSA bounce occurred in 30.3% (n = 10) of patients at median at median 10.5 months after SBRT. No grade 3 acute toxicity was noted. The 18.2% of the patients had acute grade 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicities and 21.2% had acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. After follow-up of 2 months, most complications had returned to baseline. There was no grade 3 late GU and GI toxicity. Conclusion Our experience with SBRT using CyberKnife in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer demonstrates favorable efficacy and toxicity. Further studies with more patients and longer follow-up duration are required. PMID:27306777

  6. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Progression of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During the Interval Before Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, Taro, E-mail: taro8864@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shibamoto, Yuta; Baba, Fumiya [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa [Radiosurgery Center, Nagoya Kyoritsu Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Ayakawa, Shiho [Department of Radiology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kawai, Tatsuya; Takemoto, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Ogino, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between waiting time (WT) and disease progression in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung adenocarcinoma (AD) or squamous cell carcinoma (SQ). Methods and Materials: 201 patients with Stage I AD or SQ undergoing SBRT between January 2004 and June 2010 were analyzed. The WT was defined as the interval between diagnostic computed tomography before referral and computed tomography for treatment planning or positioning before SBRT. Tumor size was measured on the slice of the longest tumor diameter, and tumor volume was calculated from the longest diameter and the diameter perpendicular to it. Changes in tumor volume and TNM stage progression were evaluated, and volume doubling time (VDT) was estimated. Results: The median WT was 42 days (range, 5-323 days). There was a correlation between WT and rate of increase in volume in both AD and SQ. The median VDTs of AD and SQ were 170 and 93 days, respectively. Thirty-six tumors (23%) did not show volume increase during WTs >25 days. In 41 patients waiting for {<=}4 weeks, no patient showed T stage progression, whereas in 25 of 120 (21%) patients waiting for >4 weeks, T stage progressed from T1 to T2 (p = 0.001). In 10 of 110 (9.1%) T1 ADs and 15 of 51 (29%) T1 SQs, T stage progressed (p = 0.002). N stage and M stage progressions were not observed. Conclusion: Generally, a WT of {<=}4 weeks seems to be acceptable. The WT seems to be more important in SQ than in AD.

  8. Migration of implanted markers for image-guided lung tumor stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Eclov, Neville C W; Yu, Yao; Rao, Aarti K; Dieterich, Sonja; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Sze, Daniel Y; Loo, Billy W; Kothary, Nishita; Maxim, Peter G

    2013-03-04

    The purpose of this study was to quantify postimplantation migration of percutaneously implanted cylindrical gold seeds ("seeds") and platinum endovascular embolization coils ("coils") for tumor tracking in pulmonary stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). We retrospectively analyzed the migration of markers in 32 consecutive patients with computed tomography scans postimplantation and at simulation. We implanted 147 markers (59 seeds, 88 coils) in or around 34 pulmonary tumors over 32 procedures, with one lesion implanted twice. Marker coordinates were rigidly aligned by minimizing fiducial registration error (FRE), the root mean square of the differences in marker locations for each tumor between scans. To also evaluate whether single markers were responsible for most migration, we aligned with and without the outlier causing the largest FRE increase per tumor. We applied the resultant transformation to all markers. We evaluated migration of individual markers and FRE of each group. Median scan interval was 8 days. Median individual marker migration was 1.28 mm (interquartile range [IQR] 0.78-2.63 mm). Median lesion FRE was 1.56 mm (IQR 0.92-2.95 mm). Outlier identification yielded 1.03 mm median migration (IQR 0.52-2.21 mm) and 1.97 mm median FRE (IQR 1.44-4.32 mm). Outliers caused a mean and median shift in the centroid of 1.22 and 0.80 mm (95th percentile 2.52 mm). Seeds and coils had no statistically significant difference. Univariate analysis suggested no correlation of migration with the number of markers, contact with the chest wall, or time elapsed. Marker migration between implantation and simulation is limited and unlikely to cause geometric miss during tracking.

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy of primary and metastatic renal lesions for patients with only one functioning kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedman, Christer; Sandstroem, P.; Wersaell, Peter (Dept. of General Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)); Karlsson, Kristin; Rutkowska, Eva; Lax, Ingmar (Dept. of Hospital Physics, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)); Blomgren, H. (Malzoni Radiosurgery Inst., Agropoli (Italy))

    2008-11-15

    Background. About 2% of patients with a carcinoma in one kidney develop either metastases or a new primary tumor in the contralateral kidney. Often, renal cancers progress rapidly at peripheral sites and a metastasis to the second kidney may not be the patient's main problem. However, when an initial renal cancer is more indolent yet spreads to the formerly unaffected kidney or a new primary tumor forms there, local treatment may be needed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been demonstrated as a valuable treatment option for tumors that cause local symptoms. Presented here is a retrospective analysis of patients in whom SBRT was used to control primary or metastatic renal disease. Patients and methods. Seven patients with a mean age of 64 (44-76) were treated for metastases from a malignant kidney to its contralateral counterpart. Dose/fractionation schedules varied between 10 Gyx3 and 10 Gyx4 depending on target location and size, given within one week. Follow-up times for patients who remained alive were 12, 52 and 66 months and for those who subsequently died were 10, 16, 49 and 70 months. Results. Local control, defined as radiologically stable disease or partial/complete response, was obtained in six of these seven patients and regained after retreatment in the one patient whose lesion progressed. Side effects were generally mild, and in five of the seven patients, kidney function remained unaffected after treatment. In two patients, the creatinine levels remained moderately elevated at approximately 160 mumol/L post treatment. At no time was dialysis required. Conclusion. These results indicate that SBRT is a valuable alternative to surgery and other options for patients with metastases from a cancer-bearing kidney to the remaining kidney and provides local tumor control with satisfactory kidney function

  10. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  11. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy to the rat hippocampus. Determination of dose response and tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Roedel, F.; Grabenbauer, G.; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center; Jeske, I.; Bluemcke, I. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Hess, A. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology; Ganslandt, O. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Brune, K. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Doerenkamp Professor for Innovations in Animal and Consumer Protection

    2007-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) on adult rat brain tissue (necrosis, impact on blood-brain barrier, signal changes on high-field magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). Material and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats underwent MRI and CT scanning of the brain and respective images were introduced into the Novalis trademark radiosurgery device (BrainLab, Feldkirchen, Germany). All animals (body weight 350 g) were irradiated weekly with doses of 2 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals), 3 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals) and 4 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals), targeted to the left hippocampus after image-guided positioning. 4.7-T T2-weighted MRI scanning was performed in each animal. Animals were sacrificed 8, 12, and 16 weeks after hfSRT and brains were immersion-fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for subsequent histopathologic analysis. Results: In concordance with isodose distributions, pathologic signal hyperintensities in MRI were recorded from 4 x 10 Gy after 8 weeks, 3 x 10 Gy after 12 weeks, while 2 x 10 Gy induced slight detectable alterations only after 16 weeks. Subsequent histopathologic analysis revealed hippocampal cell necrosis with significantly earlier and stronger occurrence for higher doses (40 Gy > 30 Gy > 20 Gy). Pial microvessel permeability also increased after 40 Gy, whereas 30 Gy induced moderate changes. Conclusion: Conclusion: Partial-brain irradiation with hfSRT (Novalis trademark System) was successfully adopted for small animals and histopathologic analysis confirmed its repositioning accuracy. The neuropathologic effects correlated with dose and observation time. The approach will be further developed for quality assurance in hfSRT of normal brain tissue, as well as novel treatment modalities in epileptic rats and orthotopic tumor models. (orig.)

  12. Stereotactic radiotherapy of the prostate: fractionation and utilization in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Josph P.; Schwartz, David; Shao, Meng; Osborn, Virginia; Schreiber, David [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Choi, Kwang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To analyze the utilization and fractionation of extreme hypofractionation via stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of prostate cancer. Data was analyzed on men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between 2004–2012 and treated with definitive-intent radiation therapy, as captured in the National Cancer Database. This database is a hospital-based registry that collects an estimated 70% of all diagnosed malignancies in the United States. There were 299,186 patients identified, of which 4,962 (1.7%) were identified as receiving SBRT as primary treatment. Of those men, 2,082 had low risk disease (42.0%), 2,201 had intermediate risk disease (44.4%), and 679 had high risk disease (13.7%). The relative utilization of SBRT increased from 0.1% in 2004 to 4.0% in 2012. Initially SBRT was more commonly used in academic programs, though as time progressed there was a shift to favor an increased absolute number of men treated in the community setting. Delivery of five separate treatments was the most commonly utilized fractionation pattern, with 4,635 patients (91.3%) receiving this number of treatments. The most common dosing pattern was 725 cGy × 5 fractions (49.6%) followed by 700 cGy × 5 fractions (21.3%). Extreme hypofractionation via SBRT is slowly increasing acceptance. Currently 700-725 cGy × 5 fractions appears to be the most commonly employed scheme. As further long-term data regarding the safety and efficacy emerges, the relative utilization of this modality is expected to continue to increase.

  13. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in low- and intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) takes advantage of low α/β ratio of prostate cancer to deliver a large dose in few fractions. We examined clinical outcomes of SBRT using CyberKnife for the treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. This study was based on a retrospective analysis of the 33 patients treated with SBRT using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer (27.3% in low-risk and 72.7% in intermediate-risk). Total dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy were administered. The acute and late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was monitored. Thirty-three patients with a median 51 months (range, 6 to 71 months) follow-up were analyzed. There was no biochemical failure. Median PSA nadir was 0.27 ng/mL at median 33 months and PSA bounce occurred in 30.3% (n = 10) of patients at median at median 10.5 months after SBRT. No grade 3 acute toxicity was noted. The 18.2% of the patients had acute grade 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicities and 21.2% had acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. After follow-up of 2 months, most complications had returned to baseline. There was no grade 3 late GU and GI toxicity. Our experience with SBRT using CyberKnife in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer demonstrates favorable efficacy and toxicity. Further studies with more patients and longer follow-up duration are required.

  14. Risk for surgical complications after previous stereotactic body radiotherapy of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Johannes; Cho, John B C; Fahim, Daniel K; Gerszten, Peter C; Flickinger, John C; Grills, Inga S; Jawad, Maha; Kersh, Ronald; Letourneau, Daniel; Mantel, Frederick; Sahgal, Arjun; Shin, John H; Winey, Brian; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2017-09-11

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for vertebral metastases has emerged as a promising technique, offering high rates of symptom relief and local control combined with low risk of toxicity. Nonetheless, local failure or vertebral instability may occur after spine SBRT, generating the need for subsequent surgery in the irradiated region. This study evaluated whether there is an increased incidence of surgical complications in patients previously treated with SBRT at the index level. Based upon a retrospective international database of 704 cases treated with SBRT for vertebral metastases, 30 patients treated at 6 different institutions were identified who underwent surgery in a region previously treated with SBRT. Thirty patients, median age 59 years (range 27-84 years) underwent SBRT for 32 vertebral metastases followed by surgery at the same vertebra. Median follow-up time from SBRT was 17 months. In 17 cases, conventional radiotherapy had been delivered prior to SBRT at a median dose of 30 Gy in median 10 fractions. SBRT was administered with a median prescription dose of 19.3 Gy (range 15-65 Gy) delivered in median 1 fraction (range 1-17) (median EQD2/10 = 44 Gy). The median time interval between SBRT and surgical salvage therapy was 6 months (range 1-39 months). Reasons for subsequent surgery were pain (n = 28), neurological deterioration (n = 15) or fracture of the vertebral body (n = 13). Open surgical decompression (n = 24) and/or stabilization (n = 18) were most frequently performed; Five patients (6 vertebrae) were treated without complications with vertebroplasty only. Increased fibrosis complicating the surgical procedure was explicitly stated in one surgical report. Two durotomies occurred which were closed during the operation, associated with a neurological deficit in one patient. Median blood loss was 500 ml, but five patients had a blood loss of more than 1 l during the procedure. Delayed wound healing was reported in two

  15. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Kieyin [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Gagliardi, Frank [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Alqathami, Mamdooh [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Ackerly, Trevor [William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Geso, Moshi, E-mail: moshi.geso@rmit.edu.au [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery

  16. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT), appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer Materials and methods A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Results Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%). Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months). Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%), of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Conclusion Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present. PMID:21995807

  17. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Ryo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT, appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT for primary lung cancer Materials and methods A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Results Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%. Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months. Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%, of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Conclusion Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present.

  18. [Nationwide implementation of stereotactic radiotherapy: the challenges of initial training and continuing professional education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibault, J-E; Denis, F; Marchesi, V; Lisbona, A; Noël, G; Mahé, M A

    2014-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a rapidly growing advanced treatment technique that delivers high radiation dose with great precision. The implementation of stereotactic body radiation therapy should be associated with a specific initial training and continuing professional education for radiation oncologists and medical physicists. The creation of a French stereotactic body radiation therapy group gathering radiation oncologists (SFRO and AFCOR) and medical physicists (SFPM) is mandatory in order to create dedicated national guidelines, prospective databases and to promote clinical trials in this field. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. SU-E-T-282: Dose Measurements with An End-To-End Audit Phantom for Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R; Artschan, R [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Thwaites, D [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Report on dose measurements as part of an end-to-end test for stereotactic radiotherapy, using a new audit tool, which allows audits to be performed efficiently either by an onsite team or as a postal audit. Methods: Film measurements have been performed with a new Stereotactic Cube Phantom. The phantom has been designed to perform Winston Lutz type position verification measurements and dose measurements in one setup. It comprises a plastic cube with a high density ball in its centre (used for MV imaging with film or EPID) and low density markers in the periphery (used for Cone Beam Computed Tomography, CBCT imaging). It also features strategically placed gold markers near the posterior and right surfaces, which can be used to calculate phantom rotations on MV images. Slit-like openings allow insertion of film or other detectors.The phantom was scanned and small field treatment plans were created. The fields do not traverse any inhomogeneities of the phantom on their paths to the measurement location. The phantom was setup at the delivery system using CBCT imaging. The calculated treatment fields were delivered, each with a piece of radiochromic film (EBT3) placed in the anterior film holder of the phantom. MU had been selected in planning to achieve similar exposures on all films. Calibration films were exposed in solid water for dose levels around the expected doses. Films were scanned and analysed following established procedures. Results: Setup of the cube showed excellent suitability for CBCT 3D alignment. MV imaging with EPID allowed for clear identification of all markers. Film based dose measurements showed good agreement for MLC created fields down to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm. Conclusion: An end-to-end audit phantom for stereotactic radiotherapy has been developed and tested.

  20. Case report of a near medical event in stereotactic radiotherapy due to improper units of measure from a treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, D J; Li, S; Jarvis, L A; Hartford, A C

    2011-07-01

    The authors hereby notify the Radiation Oncology community of a potentially lethal error due to improper implementation of linear units of measure in a treatment planning system. The authors report an incident in which a patient was nearly mistreated during a stereotactic radiotherapy procedure due to inappropriate reporting of stereotactic coordinates by the radiation therapy treatment planning system in units of centimeter rather than in millimeter. The authors suggest a method to detect such errors during treatment planning so they are caught and corrected prior to the patient positioning for treatment on the treatment machine. Using pretreatment imaging, the authors found that stereotactic coordinates are reported with improper linear units by a treatment planning system. The authors have implemented a redundant, independent method of stereotactic coordinate calculation. Implementation of a double check of stereotactic coordinates via redundant, independent calculation is simple and accurate. Use of this technique will avoid any future error in stereotactic treatment coordinates due to improper linear units, transcription, or other similar errors. The authors recommend an independent double check of stereotactic treatment coordinates during the treatment planning process in order to avoid potential mistreatment of patients.

  1. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located stage I NSCLC. A multicenter analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanne, Daniel H.; Nestle, Ursula; Grosu, Anca L. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Freiburg (Germany); Allgaeuer, Michael [Barmherzige Brueder, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Regensburg (Germany); Andratschke, Nicolaus; Molls, Michael [TU Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Appold, Steffen [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden (Germany); Dieckmann, Ute [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Wien, Univ. Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wien (Austria); Ernst, Iris [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Muenster (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute [LMU Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Holy, Richard [Universitaetsklinikum Aachen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Aachen (Germany); Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard [Medizinischen Universitaet Innsbruck, Univ. Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Innsbruck (Austria); Semrau, Sabine [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Strahlenklinik Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Wittig, Andrea [Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Marburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-08-27

    The purpose of this work is to analyze patterns of care and outcome after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located, early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to address the question of potential risk for increased toxicity in this entity. A total of 90 patients with centrally located NSCLC were identified among 613 cases in a database of 13 German and Austrian academic radiotherapy centers. The outcome of centrally located NSCLC was compared to that of cases with peripheral tumor location from the same database. Patients with central tumors most commonly presented with UICC stage IB (50 %), while the majority of peripheral lesions were stage IA (56 %). Average tumor diameters were 3.3 cm (central) and 2.8 cm (peripheral). Staging PET/CT was available for 73 and 74 % of peripheral and central tumors, respectively. Biopsy was performed in 84 % (peripheral) and 88 % (central) of cases. Doses varied significantly between central and peripheral lesions with a median BED{sub 10} of 72 Gy and 84 Gy, respectively (p < 0.001). Fractionation differed as well with medians of 5 (central) and 3 (peripheral) fractions (p < 0.001). In the Kaplan-Meier analysis, 3-year actuarial overall survival was 29 % (central) and 51 % (peripheral; p = 0.004) and freedom from local progression was 52 % (central) and 84 % (peripheral; p < 0.001). Toxicity after treatment of central tumors was low with no grade III/IV and one grade V event. Mortality rates were 0 and 1 % after 30 and 60 days, respectively. Local tumor control in patients treated with SBRT for centrally located, early-stage NSCLC was favorable, provided ablative radiation doses were prescribed. This was, however, not the case in the majority of patients, possibly due to concerns about treatment-related toxicity. Reported toxicity was low, but prospective trials are needed to resolve the existing uncertainties and to establish safe high-dose regimens for this cohort of patients. (orig.) [German] Ziel

  2. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer : a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Louie, Alexander V.; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry; McRae, Stephen E.; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Carpenter, Larry S.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Roth, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3 tria

  3. Translational and rotational intra- and inter-fractional errors in patient and target position during a short course of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours enables setup correction based on tumour position. The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy with daily soft tissue matching to bony anatomy matching and evaluate...

  4. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer : a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Louie, Alexander V.; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry; McRae, Stephen E.; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Carpenter, Larry S.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Roth, Jack A.

    Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3

  5. Impact of Introducing Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer : A Population-Based Time-Trend Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palma, David; Visser, Otto; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Belderbos, Jose; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with high local control rates. The impact of introducing SBRT in patients 75 years of age or older was studied using a population-based cancer registry. Methods The Amsterdam Cancer Registry wa

  6. Residual F-18-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically

  7. Adjuvant or radical fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with pituitary functional and nonfunctional macroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Damien C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFRT for patients with pituitary macroadenoma (PMA. Methods and Materials Between March 2000 and March 2009, 27 patients (male to female ratio, 1.25 with PMA underwent SFRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy. Mean age of the patients was 56.5 years (range, 20.3 - 77.4. In all but one patient, SFRT was administered for salvage treatment after surgical resection (transphenoidal resection in 23, transphenoidal resection followed by craniotomy in 2 and multiple transphenoidal resections in another patient. In 10 (37% patients, the PMAs were functional (3 ACTH-secreting, 3 prolactinomas, 2 growth hormone-secreting and 2 multiple hormone-secretion. Three (11.1% and 9 (33.3% patients had PMA abutting and compressing the optic chiasm, respectively. Mean tumor volume was 2.9 ± 4.6 cm3. Eighteen (66.7% patients had hypopituitarism prior to SFRT. The mean follow-up period after SFRT was 72.4 ± 37.2 months. Results Tumor size decreased for 6 (22.2% patients and remained unchanged for 19 (70.4% other patients. Two (7.4% patients had tumor growth inside the prescribed treatment volume. The estimated 5-year tumor growth control was 95.5% after SFRT. Biochemical remission occurred in 3 (30% patients with functional PMA. Two patients with normal anterior pituitary function before SFRT developed new deficits 25 and 65 months after treatment. The 5-year survival without new anterior pituitary deficit was thus 95.8%. Five patients with visual field defect had improved visual function and 1 patient with no visual defect prior to SFRT, but an optic chiasm abutting tumor, had a decline in visual function. The estimated 5-year vision and pituitary function preservation rates were 93.2% and 95.8%, respectively. Conclusions SFRT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with PMA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. In this study, approximately 1

  8. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Robinson, Cliff G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  9. Clinical introduction of Monte Carlo treatment planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Masai, Norihisa; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Kouichi; Sasaki, Junichi; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-01-06

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and optimized dose definitions in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients. We used a retrospective patient review and basic virtual phantom to determine dose prescriptions. Fifty-three patients underwent SBRT. A basic virtual phantom had a gross tumor volume (GTV) of 10.0 mm with equivalent water density of 1.0 g/cm3, which was surrounded by equivalent lung surrounding the GTV of 0.25 g/cm3. D95 of the planning target volume (PTV) and D99 of the GTV were evaluated with different GTV sizes (5.0 to 30.0 mm) and different lung densities (0.05 to 0.45 g/cm3). Prescribed dose was defined as 95% of the PTV should receive 100% of the dose (48 Gy/4 fractions) using pencil beam (PB) calculation and recalculated using MC calculation. In the patient study, average doses to the D95 of the PTV and D99 of the GTV using the MC calculation plan were 19.9% and 10.2% lower than those by the PB calculation plan, respectively. In the phantom study, decreased doses to the D95 of the PTV and D99 of the GTV using the MC calculation plan were accompanied with changes GTV size from 30.0to 5.0 mm, which was decreased from 8.4% to 19.6% for the PTV and from 17.4%to 27.5% for the GTV. Similar results were seen with changes in lung density from 0.45 to 0.05 g/cm3, with doses to the D95 of the PTV and D99 of the GTV were decreased from 12.8% to 59.0% and from 7.6% to 44.8%, respectively. The decrease in dose to the PTV with MC calculation was strongly dependent on lung density. We suggest that dose definition to the GTV for lung cancer SBRT be optimized using MC calculation. Our current clinical protocol for lung SBRT is based on a prescribed dose of 44 Gy in 4 fractions to the GTV using MC calculation.

  10. Prescription dose and fractionation predict improved survival after stereotactic radiotherapy for brainstem metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeman Jonathan E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brainstem metastases represent an uncommon clinical presentation that is associated with a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited given the unacceptable risks associated with surgical resection in this location. However, without local control, symptoms including progressive cranial nerve dysfunction are frequently observed. The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery (SRT/SRS of brainstem metastases. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 38 tumors in 36 patients treated with SRT/SRS between February 2003 and December 2011. Treatment was delivered with the Cyberknife™ or Trilogy™ radiosurgical systems. The median age of patients was 62 (range: 28–89. Primary pathologies included 14 lung, 7 breast, 4 colon and 11 others. Sixteen patients (44% had received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to SRT/SRS; ten had received prior SRT/SRS at a different site (28%. The median tumor volume was 0.94 cm3 (range: 0.01-4.2 with a median prescription dose of 17 Gy (range: 12–24 delivered in 1–5 fractions. Results Median follow-up for the cohort was 3.2 months (range: 0.4-20.6. Nineteen patients (52% had an MRI follow-up available for review. Of these, one patient experienced local failure corresponding to an actuarial 6-month local control of 93%. Fifteen of the patients with available follow-up imaging (79% experienced intracranial failure outside of the treatment volume. The median time to distant intracranial failure was 2.1 months. Six of the 15 patients with distant intracranial failure (40% had received previous WBRT. The actuarial overall survival rates at 6- and 12-months were 27% and 8%, respectively. Predictors of survival included Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA score, greater number of treatment fractions, and higher prescription dose. Three patients experienced acute treatment-related toxicity consisting of

  11. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke [Division of Clinical Radiology Service, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and those derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude

  12. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Soh, Hendrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  13. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Foote, Matthew [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.letourneau@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1-T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins {+-} 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9 Degree-Sign to 1.6 Degree-Sign , respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image

  14. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieler, F; Wenz, F; Abo-Madyan, Y; Schweizer, B; Polednik, M; Herskind, C; Giordano, F A; Mai, S

    2016-11-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49°/0.18 ± 0.20°/0.05 ± 0.36° and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT.

  15. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C. [Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  16. CyberKnife Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy as an Option of Treatment for Patients With Prostate Cancer Having Oligometastatic Lymph Nodes: Single-Center Study Outcome Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Miszczyk, Leszek; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy on prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Our material consisted of 18 patients with 31 metastatic lymph nodes irradiated between 2011 and 2014 using CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Patients were irradiated using fraction dose varied from 6 to 15 Gy (median 10), to the total dose of 24 to 45 Gy (median 30). Irradiated lymph node size varied from 0.4 to 4.0 cm. In all, 9 patients had single lymph node metastasis and 9 patients had metastases of 2 to 4 lymph nodes. Prostate-specific antigen concentration before radiotherapy varied from 0.01 to 15.58 (mean 6.97; median 4.66). All patients at the time of radiotherapy and follow-up received androgen deprivation therapy. Mann-Whitney U, Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used in statistical analysis. We obtained the following results: after CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, prostate-specific antigen concentration dropped in majority of cases and during the last control varied from 0.00 to 258.00 (median 2.5), and was lower in patients without dissemination to other organs (P = .01). Complete regression was found in 12 lesions, stable disease in 13, and progression in 4. In 7 patients, the dissemination to other organs occurred. Our results allow us to conclude that CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of prostate cancer lymph node oligometastases gives good local control and relatively good prostate-specific antigen response.

  17. Daily-diary Evaluated Side Effects of Dose-escalation Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer Using the Stereotactic Beamcath Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, Per; Bergstroem, Per; Loefroth, Per-Olov; Franzen, Lars; Henriksson, Roger; Widmark, Anders [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate self-assessed late side effects in patients with prostate cancer treated with frameless stereotactic dose-escalation radiotherapy using BeamCath, a new technique that has been developed for accurate positioning of the prostate at treatment set-up, and in which a specially designed urethral catheter containing high-density fiducial markers is used. The method was tested in the first 104 patients in a Scandinavian dose-escalation study with doses up to 76 Gy. Side effects were reported in a daily diary and evaluated at the start of treatment (baseline) and at 1-year follow-up. The patients were compared with those treated with conventional (n=53) and conformal techniques (n=175). Dose-escalation radiotherapy (76 Gy) decreased urinary frequency, urgency and starting problems at 1-year in comparison with baseline. The dose-escalation therapy did not induce any increase in gastrointestinal side effects in comparison with the effect of conformal therapy h70 Gy at the 1-year follow-up, apart from a slight increase in rectal mucus in the 76 Gy group. All groups, except patients receiving the 74 Gy with smaller fields, reported a slight increase in gastrointestinal toxicity at 1-year compared with baseline. Dose-escalation radiotherapy of prostate cancer using the BeamCath technique did not induce any significant increase in late side effects in comparison with conformal technique.

  18. Adaptive fractionated stereotactic Gamma Knife radiotherapy of meningioma using integrated stereotactic cone-beam-CT and adaptive re-planning (a-gkFSRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieler, F.; Wenz, F.; Abo-Madyan, Y.; Schweizer, B.; Polednik, M.; Herskind, C.; Giordano, F.A.; Mai, S. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) allows frameless stereotactic treatment using a combination of cone beam computer tomography (CBCT), a thermoplastic mask system, and an infrared-based high-definition motion management (HDMM) camera system for patient tracking during treatment. We report on the first patient with meningioma at the left petrous bone treated with adaptive fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (a-gkFSRT). The first patient treated with Gamma Knife Icon at our institute received MR imaging for preplanning before treatment. For each treatment fraction, a daily CBCT was performed to verify the actual scull/tumor position. The system automatically adapted the planned shot positions to the daily position and recalculated the dose distribution (online adaptive planning). During treatment, the HDMM system recorded the intrafractional patient motion. Furthermore, the required times were recorded to define a clinical treatment slot. Total treatment time was around 20 min. Patient positioning needed 0.8 min, CBCT positioning plus acquisition 1.65 min, CT data processing and adaptive planning 2.66 min, and treatment 15.6 min. The differences for the five daily CBCTs compared to the reference are for rotation: -0.59 ± 0.49 /0.18 ± 0.20 /0.05 ± 0.36 and for translation: 0.94 ± 0.52 mm/-0.08 ± 0.08 mm/-1.13 ± 0.89 mm. Over all fractions, an intrafractional movement of 0.13 ± 0.04 mm was observed. The Gamma Knife Icon allows combining the accuracy of the stereotactic Gamma Knife system with the flexibility of fractionated treatment with the mask system and CBCT. Furthermore, the Icon system introduces a new online patient tracking system to the clinical routine. The interfractional accuracy of patient positioning was controlled with a thermoplastic mask and CBCT. (orig.) [German] Das Gamma Knife Icon (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Schweden) ermoeglicht die stereotaktische Behandlung von Patienten mittels Cone-beam-Computertomographie (CBCT

  19. Adjuvant therapy after resection of brain metastases. Frameless image-guided LINAC-based radiosurgery and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemme, J.; Aebersold, D.M.; Pica, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Abu-Isa, J.; Beck, J.; Raabe, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neurosurgery; Kottke, R.; Wiest, R. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neuroradiology; Malthaner, M.; Schmidhalter, D. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Medical Radiation Physics

    2013-09-15

    Background: Tumor bed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after resection of brain metastases is a new strategy to delay or avoid whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) and its associated toxicities. This retrospective study analyzes results of frameless image-guided linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy (SHRT) as adjuvant treatment without WBRT. Materials and methods: Between March 2009 and February 2012, 44 resection cavities in 42 patients were treated with SRS (23 cavities) or SHRT (21 cavities). All treatments were delivered using a stereotactic LINAC. All cavities were expanded by {>=} 2 mm in all directions to create the clinical target volume (CTV). Results: The median planning target volume (PTV) for SRS was 11.1 cm{sup 3}. The median dose prescribed to the PTV margin for SRS was 17 Gy. Median PTV for SHRT was 22.3 cm{sup 3}. The fractionation schemes applied were: 4 fractions of 6 Gy (5 patients), 6 fractions of 4 Gy (6 patients) and 10 fractions of 4 Gy (10 patients). Median follow-up was 9.6 months. Local control (LC) rates after 6 and 12 months were 91 and 77 %, respectively. No statistically significant differences in LC rates between SRS and SHRT treatments were observed. Distant brain control (DBC) rates at 6 and 12 months were 61 and 33 %, respectively. Overall survival (OS) at 6 and 12 months was 87 and 63.5 %, respectively, with a median OS of 15.9 months. One patient treated by SRS showed symptoms of radionecrosis, which was confirmed histologically. Conclusion: Frameless image-guided LINAC-based adjuvant SRS and SHRT are effective and well tolerated local treatment strategies after resection of brain metastases in patients with oligometastatic disease. (orig.)

  20. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, Nobuhide, E-mail: wakai@naramed-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara 634-8522 (Japan); Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hasegawa, Masatoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara 634-8522 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (−3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (“V” shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were −1.1 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± 1 SD) and −0.2 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to −1.0 ± 0.4 and −0.3 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were −0.9 ± 0.6, −1.1 ± 0.8, and −2.1 ± 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared

  1. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Higashimura, Kyoji [Division of Clinical Radiology Service, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: m-nkmr@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuo, Yukinori; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Methods: Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ±3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ±3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124–358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42–94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5–9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. Conclusions: In the

  2. Long-term outcome of moderate hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Draghini, Lorena; Casale, Michelina; Arcidiacono, Fabio; Anselmo, Paola; Trippa, Fabio; Giorgi, Cesare [Hospital, Radiotherapy Oncology Centre, Terni (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate long-term results of moderate hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hFSRT) for intracranial meningiomas. In all, 77 consecutive patients with 80 lesions were included. Median age was 65 years (range 23-82 years), male/female ratio was 21/56, and the median Karnofsky performance status was 90 (range 60-100). In 31 lesions (39 %), diagnosis was based upon clinical and radiological data; 37 lesions were histologically proven as World Health Organization (WHO) grade I and 12 grade II meningiomas. Median treatment volume was 23 cc. Prescribed doses were 45 Gy in 15 fractions of 3 Gy (15 x 3 Gy) or 42 Gy in 14 fractions of 3 Gy (14 x 3 Gy). After a median follow-up of 56 months, 49 (61 %) lesions received 14 x 3 Gy and 31 (39 %) 15 x 3 Gy. Local control (LC) rate remained unchanged at 84 % at 5 and 10 years. Overall survival and disease-specific survival (DSS) were 76 and 93 % at 5 years, 72 and 89 % at 10 years, respectively. With univariate analysis, previous surgery and WHO grade II tumor were negative prognostic factors for LC and DSS. With multivariate analysis only tumor grade was an independent prognostic factor for LC. No clinically significant acute and/or late toxicities were observed. Moderate hFSRT was effective and safe with an excellent tolerance profile. It can be an alternative treatment option for patients with recurrent or inoperable large meningiomas. The low number of fractions administered with hFSRT led to reduce treatment-related discomfort for patients. Grade II tumor and previous surgery were negative prognosis factors. (orig.) [German] Untersucht wurden die Langzeitergebnisse von moderater hypofraktionierter stereotaktischer Strahlentherapie (hFSRT) bei intrakraniellen Meningeomen. Es wurden 77 konsekutive Patienten mit 80 Laesionen ausgewaehlt. Das durchschnittliche Alter betrug 65 Jahre (Spanne 23-82 Jahre), das Verhaeltnis Maenner/Frauen lag bei 21/56, der mediane Karnofsky-Index betrug 90 (Spanne 60

  3. Effectiveness of stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein and/or inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Xi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To report the feasibility, efficacy, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for the treatment of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT and/or inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis (IVCTT in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-one patients treated with SBRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT for HCC with PVTT/IVCTT between July 2010 and May 2012 were analyzed. Of these, 33 had PVTT and 8 had IVCTT. SBRT was designed to target the tumor thrombosis and deliver a median total dose of 36 Gy (range, 30-48 Gy in six fractions during two weeks. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 10.0 months. At the time of analysis, 15 (36.6% achieved complete response, 16 (39.0% achieved partial response, 7 (17.1% patients were stable, and three (7.3% patients showed progressive disease. No treatment-related Grade 4/5 toxicity was seen within three months after SBRT. One patient had Grade 3 elevation of bilirubin. The one-year overall survival rate was 50.3%, with a median survival of 13.0 months. The only independent predictive factor associated with better survival was response to radiotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: VMAT-based SBRT is a safe and effective treatment option for PVTT/IVCTT in HCC. Prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted to validate the role of SBRT in these patients.

  4. Single versus multiple session stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastasis: the risk-benefit ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Kristin J; Sahgal, Arjun; Foote, Matthew; Knisely, Jonathan; Gerszten, Peter C; Chao, Samuel T; Suh, John H; Sloan, Andrew E; Chang, Eric L; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2015-01-01

    Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy represents an important advancement in the management of spinal metastases that allows precise delivery of ablative doses of radiation therapy with excellent local control. Although the technique is being increasingly used in clinical practice, the optimal fractionation schedule remains uncertain. In this perspective paper, we review radiobiologic principles that support the use of multiple- versus single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy schedules and clinical data supporting the multiple-fraction approach. Specifically, we suggest that there may be a local control benefit of fractionation, while helping to limit the risk of toxicities such as vertebral body fracture, pain flare and radiation myelopathy. We conclude with future directions and the need for future study on this important topic.

  5. Efficiency of Stereotactic Conformal Radiotherapy in Lung Metastases with Active Breathing Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yu. Anikeeva, PhD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty four patients with lung metastases underwent radiosurgery treatment between October 2010 and December 2012. Stereotactic conformal high-dose radiation therapy with Active Breathing Control (ABC was conducted using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique. The median overall follow-up was 18 months (range 6-24 months, overall survival was 75%, and local control rate was 92%. The median time to progression was 4 months (range 1-18 months.There have been no cases of leucopenia, radiation esophagitis, mediastinitis or severe acute radiation pneumonitis. The late radiation effects Grade 2, according to the LENT SOMA scales, was observed in one patient (4%. The results of this study indicate that the usage of the stereotactic high-dose radiation therapy with ABC is safe and effective in the treatment of lung metastases.

  6. A Phase I Trial of an Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Karen Kelly, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California...Checkpoint Inhibitor Plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...checkpoint inhibitor MPDL3280A (atezolizumab) in early stage inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. The trial is comprised of a traditional 3 + 3 phase I

  7. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M.; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D.; BERNARD, MARK E.; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A.; Steven A Burton; Dwight E Heron

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were max...

  8. Treatment plan technique and quality for single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of multiple lung lesions with volumetric modulated arc therapy or intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kimmen eQuan; Karen Mann Xu; Ron eLalonde; Horne, Zachary D.; BERNARD, MARK E.; Chuck eMcCoy; David Anthony Clump; Steven eBurton; Dwight E Heron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with 2 or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter VMAT radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose...

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Ayakawa Shiho; Oda Kyota; Ikeya-Hashizume Chisa; Tomita Natsuo; Shibamoto Yuta; Baba Fumiya; Ogino Hiroyuki; Sugie Chikao

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrenc...

  10. Dosimetric consequences of tumor volume changes after kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography for non-operative lung cancer during adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Hu; Ximing Xu; Guangjin Yuan; Wei Ge; Liming Xu; Aihua Zhang; Junjian Deng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate tumor volume changes with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) and their dosimetric consequences for non-operative lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods Eighteen patients with non-operative lung cancer who received IMRT consisting of 1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction and five fractions per week or stereotactic radiotherapy with 5-8 Gy/fraction and three fractions a week were studied. kV-CBCT was performed once per week during IMRT and at every fraction during stereotactic radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured on the kV-CBCT images, and adaptive treatment plans were created using merged kV-CBCT and primary planning computed tomogra-phy image sets. Tumor volume changes and dosimetric parameters, including the minimum dose to 95%(D95) or 1% (D1) of the planning target volume (PTV), mean lung dose (MLD), and volume of lung tissue that received more than 5 (V5), 10 (V10), 20 (V20), and 30 (V30) Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The average maximum change in GTV observed during IMRT or fractionated stereotactic radio-therapy was -25.85% (range, -13.09% --56.76%). The D95 and D1 of PTV for the adaptive treatment plans in all patients were not significantly different from those for the initial or former adaptive treatment plans. In patients with tumor volume changes of >20% in the third or fourth week of treatment during IMRT, adap-tive treatment plans offered clinically meaningful decreases in MLD and V5, V10, V20, and V30; however, in patients with tumor volume changes of 20% in the third or fourth week of treatment.

  11. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for comprehensive treatment of oligometastatic tumors (SABR-COMET: Study protocol for a randomized phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma David A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has emerged as a new treatment option for patients with oligometastatic disease. SABR delivers precise, high-dose, hypofractionated radiotherapy, and achieves excellent rates of local control. Survival outcomes for patients with oligometastatic disease treated with SABR appear promising, but conclusions are limited by patient selection, and the lack of adequate controls in most studies. The goal of this multicenter randomized phase II trial is to assess the impact of a comprehensive oligometastatic SABR treatment program on overall survival and quality of life in patients with up to 5 metastatic cancer lesions, compared to patients who receive standard of care treatment alone. Methods After stratification by the number of metastases (1-3 vs. 4-5, patients will be randomized between Arm 1: current standard of care treatment, and Arm 2: standard of care treatment + SABR to all sites of known disease. Patients will be randomized in a 1:2 ratio to Arm 1:Arm 2, respectively. For patients receiving SABR, radiotherapy dose and fractionation depends on the site of metastasis and the proximity to critical normal structures. This study aims to accrue a total of 99 patients within four years. The primary endpoint is overall survival, and secondary endpoints include quality of life, toxicity, progression-free survival, lesion control rate, and number of cycles of further chemotherapy/systemic therapy. Discussion This study will provide an assessment of the impact of SABR on clinical outcomes and quality of life, to determine if long-term survival can be achieved for selected patients with oligometastatic disease, and will inform the design of a possible phase III study. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446744

  12. Integral Dose and Radiation-Induced Secondary Malignancies: Comparison between Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Arienzo, Marco; Masciullo, Stefano G.; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Osti, Mattia F.; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED) on the target (BED = 76Gy10). Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR) was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002), secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001). This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged. PMID:23202843

  13. Potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Reinhold [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiology, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Geworski, Lilli [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department for Radiation Safety and Medical Physics, Hannover (Germany); Wurm, Reinhard [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Department for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV{sub CT/MRI} was 22({+-}19)cm{sup 3}; GTV{sub PET} was 23({+-}20)cm{sup 3}. Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9({+-}10)cm{sup 3} and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7({+-}11)cm{sup 3}). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15({+-}14)cm{sup 3}. The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV{sub CT/MRI} and GTV{sub PET} accounted to 16({+-}15)cm{sup 3} (93%, p < 0.001). In a subgroup of seven patients with multiple meningiomas, PET showed a total of 19 lesions; nine of them were not recognizable by CT or MRI. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration

  14. Correlation between heterogeneity index (HI) and gradient index (GI) for high dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, B.; Durmus, I. F.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate between Heterogeneity Index (HI) and Gradient Index (GI) correlation for high dose Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) / Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using Versa HD® lineer accelerator. Nine patients with single metastasis were used in this study. Patient's treatment planning were performed using Monaco5.1® Treatment planning system (TPS) with non-coplanar 6MV Flattening filter free (FFF) beams by partial Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) tecnique for each patient. We determined three different size of metastasis catagory which are less than 1cc, between 1cc and 5cc and larger than 5cc volume. Also, three different HI were calculated for each patients. These are 1.10, 1.20 and 1.30. Mean GI was determined 8.57±2.2 for 1.10 HI, 7.23±1.7 for 1.20 HI and 6.0±1.1 for 1.30 HI for less than 1cc metastasis. Then GI was determined 4.77±0.4 for 1.10 HI, 4.37±0.3 for 1.20 HI and 3.97±0.3 for 1.30 HI for between 1cc and 5cc metastasis. Finally, GI was determined 4.00±0.5 for 1.10 HI,3.63±0.5 for 1.20 HI and 3.27±0.4 for 1.30 HI for larger than 5cc metastasis. These results show that GI depends on significantly size and HI of metastasis especially for less than 1cc.

  15. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients. PMID:23391264

  16. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nambu Atsushi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT. The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41, and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  17. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-02-07

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1-10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  18. Critical structure sparing in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for central lung lesions: helical tomotherapy vs. volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helical tomotherapy (HT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT are both advanced techniques of delivering intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Here, we conduct a study to compare HT and partial-arc VMAT in their ability to spare organs at risk (OARs when stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR is delivered to treat centrally located early stage non-small-cell lung cancer or lung metastases. METHODS: 12 patients with centrally located lung lesions were randomly chosen. HT, 2 & 8 arc (Smart Arc, Pinnacle v9.0 plans were generated to deliver 70 Gy in 10 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV. Target and OAR dose parameters were compared. Each technique's ability to meet dose constraints was further investigated. RESULTS: HT and VMAT plans generated essentially equivalent PTV coverage and dose conformality indices, while a trend for improved dose homogeneity by increasing from 2 to 8 arcs was observed with VMAT. Increasing the number of arcs with VMAT also led to some improvement in OAR sparing. After normalizing to OAR dose constraints, HT was found to be superior to 2 or 8-arc VMAT for optimal OAR sparing (meeting all the dose constraints (p = 0.0004. All dose constraints were met in HT plans. Increasing from 2 to 8 arcs could not help achieve optimal OAR sparing for 4 patients. 2/4 of them had 3 immediately adjacent structures. CONCLUSION: HT appears to be superior to VMAT in OAR sparing mainly in cases which require conformal dose avoidance of multiple immediately adjacent OARs. For such cases, increasing the number of arcs in VMAT cannot significantly improve OAR sparing.

  19. MagicPlate-512: A 2D silicon detector array for quality assurance of stereotactic motion adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petasecca, M., E-mail: marcop@uow.edu.au; Newall, M. K.; Aldosari, A. H.; Fuduli, I.; Espinoza, A. A.; Porumb, C. S.; Guatelli, S.; Metcalfe, P.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Illawarra Health Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Booth, J. T.; Colvill, E. [School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Duncan, M.; Cammarano, D. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carolan, M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Health Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Oborn, B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Perevertaylo, V. [SPA-BIT, Kiev 02232 (Ukraine); Keall, P. J. [School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spatial and temporal resolutions are two of the most important features for quality assurance instrumentation of motion adaptive radiotherapy modalities. The goal of this work is to characterize the performance of the 2D high spatial resolution monolithic silicon diode array named “MagicPlate-512” for quality assurance of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking technique for motion compensation. Methods: MagicPlate-512 is used in combination with the movable platform HexaMotion and a research version of radiofrequency tracking system Calypso driving MLC tracking software. The authors reconstruct 2D dose distributions of small field square beams in three modalities: in static conditions, mimicking the temporal movement pattern of a lung tumor and tracking the moving target while the MLC compensates almost instantaneously for the tumor displacement. Use of Calypso in combination with MagicPlate-512 requires a proper radiofrequency interference shielding. Impact of the shielding on dosimetry has been simulated by GEANT4 and verified experimentally. Temporal and spatial resolutions of the dosimetry system allow also for accurate verification of segments of complex stereotactic radiotherapy plans with identification of the instant and location where a certain dose is delivered. This feature allows for retrospective temporal reconstruction of the delivery process and easy identification of error in the tracking or the multileaf collimator driving systems. A sliding MLC wedge combined with the lung motion pattern has been measured. The ability of the MagicPlate-512 (MP512) in 2D dose mapping in all three modes of operation was benchmarked by EBT3 film. Results: Full width at half maximum and penumbra of the moving and stationary dose profiles measured by EBT3 film and MagicPlate-512 confirm that motion has a significant impact on the dose distribution. Motion

  20. Combination effects of tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer using CyberKnife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Hoon-Sik; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin

    2015-09-08

    We have investigated the combined effect of tissue heterogeneity and its variation associated with geometric error in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. The treatment plans for eight lung cancer patients were calculated using effective path length (EPL) correction and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, with both having the same beam configuration for each patient. These two kinds of plans for individual patients were then subsequently recalculated with adding systematic and random geometric errors. In the ordinary treatment plans calculated with no geometric offset, the EPL calculations, compared with the MC calculations, largely overestimated the doses to PTV by ~ 21%, whereas the overestimation were markedly lower in GTV by ~ 12% due to relatively higher density of GTV than of PTV. When recalculating the plans for individual patients with assigning the systematic and random geometric errors, no significant changes in the relative dose distribution, except for overall shift, were observed in the EPL calculations, whereas largely altered in the MC calculations with a consistent increase in dose to GTV. Considering the better accuracy of MC than EPL algorithms, the present results demonstrated the strong coupling of tissue heterogeneity and geometric error, thereby emphasizing the essential need for simultaneous correction for tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in SBRT of lung cancer.

  1. Investigation of optimal beam margins for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung-cancer using Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Wang, L; Li, J; Luo, W; Feigenberg, S J; Ma, C-M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)

    2007-07-21

    This work investigated the selection of beam margins in lung-cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with 6 MV photon beams. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to systematically and quantitatively study the dosimetric effects of beam margins for different lung densities (0.1, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35 and 0.5 g cm{sup -3}), planning target volumes (PTVs) (14.4, 22.1 and 55.3 cm{sup 3}) and numbers of beam angles (three, six and seven) in lung-cancer SBRT in order to search for optimal beam margins for various clinical situations. First, a large number of treatment plans were generated in a commercial treatment planning system, and then recalculated using Monte Carlo simulations. All the plans were normalized to ensure that 95% of the PTV at least receives the prescription dose and compared quantitatively. Based on these plans, the relationships between the beam margin and quantities such as the lung toxicity (quantified by V{sub 20}, the percentage volume of the two lungs receiving at least 20 Gy) and the maximum target (PTV) dose were established for different PTVs and lung densities. The impact of the number of beam angles on the relationship between V{sub 20} and the beam margin was assessed. Quantitative information about optimal beam margins for lung-cancer SBRT was obtained for clinical applications.

  2. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for primary and secondary intrapulmonary tumors. First results of a phase I/II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Sauer, R.; Grabenbauer, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U.; Mueller, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and side effects of dose escalation in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) for intrapulmonary tumors with the Novalis trademark system (BrainLAB AG, Heimstetten, Germany). Patients and methods: from 07/2003 to 01/2005, 21 patients/39 tumors were treated with 5 x 7 Gy (n = 21; total dose 35 Gy) or 5 x 8 Gy (n = 18; total dose 40 Gy). There were three cases of primary lung cancer, the remainder were metastases. Median gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were 2.89 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.15-67.94 cm{sup 3}) and 25.75 cm{sup 3} (range, 7.18-124.04 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Results: rates of complete remission, partial remission, no change, and progressive disease were 51%, 33%, 3%, and 13%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity occurred, nearly all patients had grade 1 initially. One grade 3 toxicity, i.e., dyspnea, was documented for a period of 6 months after therapy. Radiosurgery quality assurance guidelines could be met. Conclusion: hfSRT of primary and secondary lung tumors using a schedule of five fractions at 7-8 Gy each was well tolerated. Further dose escalation is planned. (orig.)

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy for spinal intradural metastases developing within or adjacent to the previous irradiation field--report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Nakazawa, Hisato; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Tsugawa, Takahiko

    2013-08-01

    Results of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for spinal intradural metastases developing inside or adjacent to the previous external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) field are shown in 3 cases. One case of spinal intramedullary metastasis and two cases of intradural extramedullary metastases were treated using a Novalis shaped-beam SRT. Case 1 developed an intramedullary metastatic tumor in the C1 spinal medulla inside the previous whole brain EBRT field and another lesion adjacent to the field in the C2 spinal medulla. Case 2 developed intradural extramedullary metastasis around C6-8 inside the previous EBRT field for the primary lung adenocarcinoma. Case 3 developed multiple spinal intradural extramedullary metastatic deposits after surgical resection and following whole brain EBRT for brain metastasis. We delivered 24 to 36 Gy in 5 to 12 fractions. The treated tumors were stable or decreased in size until the patients' death from the primary cancer (10, 22, and 5 months). Neurological symptoms were stable or improved in all 3 patients. Palliative SRT using Novalis is expected to be safe and effective even if the patient develops spinal intradural metastases within or adjacent to the previous irradiation field.

  4. The incidence of radiation necrosis following stereotactic radiotherapy for melanoma brain metastases: the potential impact of immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Zagar, Timothy M; Deal, Allison; Moschos, Stergios J; Ewend, Matthew G; Sasaki-Adams, Deanna; Lee, Carrie B; Collichio, Frances A; Fried, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-07-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is the standard treatment for patients with limited number of brain metastases. In the past few years, newer immunotherapies (immune checkpoint inhibitors) have been proven to prolong survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. The safety of the combination of SRT and immunotherapy for brain metastases is unknown. We retrospectively identified patients with melanoma brain metastases treated with SRT between 2007 and 2015. Patients who did not have at least 3 months of follow-up with imaging after SRT were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were compared between patients who were treated with or without immunotherapy. A total of 58 patients were included; of these, 29 were treated with SRT and immunotherapy. MAPK inhibitors (BRAF, MEK inhibitors) were used more often in the immunotherapy group (nine vs. two patients). There was a higher incidence of intracranial complications in patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT. Eight patients had radiation necrosis; all occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy. Nine patients had hemorrhage, of which seven occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy (P=0.08). However, patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT had a significant overall survival advantage compared with SRT without immunotherapy (15 vs. 6 months, P=0.0013). Patients treated with SRT and immunotherapy have a higher incidence/risk of intracranial complications, but a longer overall survival.

  5. High symptom improvement and local tumor control using stereotactic radiotherapy when given early after diagnosis of meningioma. A multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compter, I.; Houben, R.M.A.; Bosmans, G.; Baumert, B.G. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology (MAASTRO); Zaugg, K.; Buescher, C. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Clinic and Policlinic of Radiation-Oncology; Dings, J.T.A. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Anten, M.M.H.M.E. [Maastricht Univ. Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The goal of the present study was to analyze long-term results of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with a meningioma. Methods and materials: A total of 72 patients treated between 1996 and 2008 in MAASTRO clinic (n = 45) and University Hospital Zurich (n = 27) were included. SRT was given as primary treatment (n = 46), postoperatively (n = 19) or at recurrence (n = 7); 49 tumours (68%) were located in the skull base. Median total dose was 54 Gy. Results: Median follow-up was 4.13 years (range 0.66-11 years). The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 92 and 79% for grade 0 and I meningioma. Progression-free survival for grade 0 and I was 95% at 3 and 5 years, and 40% for grade II and III at 3 years. In 98.4% of patients, clinical symptoms were stable or improved. The majority of symptoms improved within 24 months after SRT. Local control is significantly better if patients are irradiated immediately after diagnosis compared to a watchful waiting policy (p = 0.017). Grade IV toxicity was low (4.2%, n = 3) Conclusion: SRT is an effective treatment with high local and clinical control. Early SRT resulted in better outcome than late treatment at progression. (orig.)

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Small Lung Tumors in the University of Tokyo Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideomi Yamashita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our work on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for primary and metastatic lung tumors will be described. The eligibility criteria for SBRT, our previous SBRT method, the definition of target volume, heterogeneity correction, the position adjustment using four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT immediately before SBRT, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT method for SBRT, verifying of tumor position within internal target volume (ITV using in-treatment 4D-CBCT during VMAT-SBRT, shortening of treatment time using flattening-filter-free (FFF techniques, delivery of 4D dose calculation for lung-VMAT patients using in-treatment CBCT and LINAC log data with agility multileaf collimator, and SBRT method for centrally located lung tumors in our institution will be shown. In our institution, these efforts have been made with the goal of raising the local control rate and decreasing adverse effects after SBRT.

  7. Survival and prognostic factors in patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Oettingen, Gorm von; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background. Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) of brain metastases is used with good effect around the world, but no consensus exists regarding which prognostic factors that are related to favourable or unfavourable prognosis after the treatment. A better definition of these factors...... months and median time to clinical cerebral progression was eight months. The multivariate analysis revealed age ≥ 65 years, Performance Status ≥ 2, extracranial metastases and size of metastasis > 20 mm as independent prognostic factors related to shorter survival. No factors were independently related...... to clinical cerebral progression. Conclusion. We identified four prognostic factors related to survival after SRT for brain metastases. The grouping of patients by these factors is useful to determine the level of treatment. We discourage the delivery of SRT to patients with 3-4 unfavourable prognostic...

  8. Evaluation of the peripheral dose in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Betta, Erika; Fariselli, Laura; Bergantin, Achille; Locatelli, Federica; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Broggi, Sara; Fumagalli, Maria Luisa [Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Medical Physics, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, 20133 Milano (Italy); CyberKnife Centre, Centro Diagnostico Italiano, 20147 Milano (Italy); Division of Medical Physics, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto S. Raffaele, 20132 Milano (Italy); Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Medical Physics, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to compare peripheral doses absorbed during stereotactic treatment of a brain lesion delivered using different devices. These data were used to estimate the risk of stochastic effects. Methods: Treatment plans were created for an anthropomorphic phantom and delivered using a LINAC with stereotactic cones and a multileaf collimator, a CyberKnife system (before and after a supplemental shielding was applied), a TomoTherapy system, and a Gamma Knife unit. For each treatment, 5 Gy were prescribed to the target. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted roughly in the position of the thyroid, sternum, upper lung, lower lung, and gonads. Results: Mean doses ranged from of 4.1 (Gamma Knife) to 62.8 mGy (LINAC with cones) in the thyroid, from 2.3 (TomoTherapy) to 30 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the sternum, from 1.7 (TomoTherapy) to 20 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the upper part of the lungs, from 0.98 (Gamma Knife) to 15 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the lower part of the lungs, and between 0.3 (Gamma Knife) and 10 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the gonads. Conclusions: The peripheral dose absorbed in the sites of interest with a 5 Gy fraction is low. Although the risk of adverse side effects calculated for 20 Gy delivered in 5 Gy fractions is negligible, in the interest of optimum patient radioprotection, further studies are needed to determine the weight of each contributor to the peripheral dose.

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I and II lung cancer: A study of 33 patients; Radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques dans les cancers bronchiques de stades I et II: resultats d'une serie de 33 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champeaux-Orange, E.; Wachter, T.; Bouscayrol, H. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, CHR d' Orleans-La Source, 14, avenue de l' Hopital, 45100 Orleans (France); Barillot, I. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S. Kaplan, hopital Bretonneau, CHRU de Tours, 2, boulevard Tonnelle, 37044 Tours cedex 9 (France); Centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S. Kaplan, universite Francois-Rabelais, CHRU de Tours, 2, boulevard Tonnelle, 37000 Tours (France)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose. - Surgery is the main treatment of early stage non small cell lung cancer. However, in inoperable patients, the treatment is usually conventional radiotherapy. Results are poor and acute toxicity is severe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy provides better results in terms of local control and toxicity. Our purpose was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients with primary lung tumours treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy using a stereotactic body frame at the Orleans Regional Hospital. Patients and methods. - Between June 2000 and December 2007, 33 patients with stage I and II non small cell lung cancer were treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy. Breathing control was obtained by passive diaphragm control. Two CT-scans were performed 1 week apart to determine the accuracy of patient repositioning and define target volumes. Five or six fields were set up to achieve a conformal dose distribution. According to tumour size, a total of 50 or 40 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions. Results. - Mean patient age was 70 years. Median follow-up was 25 months. Ten patients with a complete response are still alive. Eight patients have died from local progression, eight from metastasis, and six from co-morbidity. Median disease-free survival was 22.6 months. No acute toxicity up to grade II (CTC AE 3.0) was observed. None of the patients still alive has developed any complications. Conclusion. - In patients who cannot undergo radical surgery, stereotactic body radiation therapy using a stereotactic body frame is well-tolerated and seems to be an efficient treatment method. (authors)

  10. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga S., E-mail: igrills@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  11. SU-E-T-320: Dosimetric Evaluation of Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy Plans Using Jaws-Only Collimation On a LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, N; Kim, A; Schaum, J; Bermudez, M; Driscoll, K; Holowinski, C; Yang, C; Chen, Y; Sheth, N [Bayonne Medical Center, Bayonne, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetry of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) plans using jaws-only collimation on linac that meets appropriate TG-142 tolerances. Methods: Seventeen spherical targets were generated in the center of a head phantom with diameters ranging from 8 mm to 40 mm. Plans balanced treatment time with dose gradient and conformity using 13 static fields and 3 couch angles: 9 non-opposed and coplanar fields and 4 non-coplanar fields. The symmetrical jaws field size was target diameter plus 2 mm. The prescription (Rx) was 7 Gy per fraction to the 80% isodose line. Two plans were created for each target: one kept the collimator at 0° (C0), one adjusted the collimator angle 40° for each field to create a 360° sweep over the 9 coplanar fields (CR).Conformity of the Rx to the target was evaluated using a ratio of Rx to target volume (PITV). Heterogeneity was determined using a ratio of maximum dose to Rx dose. Falloff was scored using CGIg: the difference of effective radii of spheres equal to half and full Rx volumes. Results: All plans met RTOG SRS criteria for conformity and heterogeneity. The use of collimator rotation improved conformity by 3.2% on average, the mean PITV was 1.7±0.1 for C0 plans and 1.6±0.1 for CR. Mean heterogeneity was 1.25±0.0 for both C0 and CR. The mean CGIg was 75.9±16.4 for C0 plans and 74.4±17.0 for CR; with a mean dose falloff degradation of 2.5% by CR. Conclusion: Clinically acceptable SRT plans for spherical targets were created using jaws-only collimation with static fields. The addition of sweeping collimator rotation improves conformity at the expense of gradient. This technique can expand the availability of SRT to patients especially to those who cannot travel to a facility with a dedicated stereotactic radiosurgery machine.

  12. Treatment planning system and dose delivery accuracy in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy using Elekta body frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawod, Tamer; Bremer, Michael; Karstens, Johann H.; Werner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the photon beam transmission through the Elekta Stereotactic Body Frame (ESBF) and treatment couch, to determine the dose calculations accuracy of the MasterPlan Treatment Planning System (TPS) using Pencil Beam (PBA) and Collapsed Cone (CCA) algorithms during the use of Elekta Stereotactic Body Frame (ESBF), and to demonstrate a simple calculation method to put this transmission into account during the treatment planning dose calculations. The dose was measured at the center of an in-house custom-built inhomogeneous PMMA thorax phantom with and without ‘the frame + treatment couch’. The phantom was CT-imaged inside the ESBF and planned with multiple 3D-CRT fields using PBA and CCA for photon beams of energies 6 MV and 10 MV. There were two treatment plans for dose calculations. In the first plan, the ‘frame + couch’ were included in the body contour and, therefore, included in the TPS dose calculations. In the second plan, the ‘frame + couch’ were not included in the body contour and, therefore, not included in the calculations. Transmission of the ‘frame + couch’ was determined by the ratio of the dose measurements with the ‘frame + couch’ to the measurements without them. To validate the accuracy of the calculation model, plans with and without the ‘frame + couch’ surrounding the phantoms were compared with their corresponding measurements. The transmission of the ‘frame + couch’ varies from 90.23-97.54% depending on the energy, field size, the angle of the beams and whether the beams also intercept them. The validation accuracy of the Pencil Beam (PBA) and Collapsed Cone (CCA) algorithms were within 5.33% and 4.04% respectively for the individual measurements for all gantry angles under this study. The results showed that both PBA and CCA algorithms can calculate the dose to the target within 4.25% and 1.95% of the average measured value. The attenuation caused by the ESBF and couch must be

  13. Oligo-recurrence predicts favorable prognosis of brain-only oligometastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy: a multi-institutional study of 61 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Inoue, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Jingu, Keiichi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-08-19

    To investigate the prognostic value of oligo-recurrence in patients with brain-only oligometastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Patients treated with SRS or SRT for brain-only NSCLC oligometastases in 6 high-volume institutions in Japan between 1996 and 2008 were reviewed. Eligible patients met 1), 2), and 4) or 1), 3), and 4) of the following: 1) NSCLC with 1 to 4 brain metastases on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) treated with SRS or SRT; 2) control of the primary lesions (thorax) at the time of SRS or SRT for brain metastases (patients meeting this criterion formed the oligo-recurrence group); 3) with SRS or SRT for brain metastases, concomitant treatment for active primary lesions (thorax) with curative surgery or curative stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), or curative chemoradiotherapy (sync-oligometastases group); and 4) Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70. The median overall survival (OS) of all 61 patients was 26 months (95 % CI: 17.5-34.5 months). The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 60.7 and 15.7 %, respectively. Stratified by oligostatus, the sync-oligometastases group achieved a median OS of 18 months (95 % CI: 14.8-21.1 months) and a 5-year OS of 0 %, while the oligo-recurrence group achieved a median OS of 41 months (95 % CI: 27.8-54.2 months) and a 5-year OS of 18.6 %. On multivariate analysis, oligo-recurrence was the only significant independent factor related to a favorable prognosis (hazard ratio: 0.253 (95 % CI: 0.082-0.043) (p = 0.025). The presence of oligo-recurrence can predict a favorable prognosis of brain-only oligometastases in patients with NSCLC treated with SRS or SRT.

  14. Synthetic CT for MRI-based liver stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Lianli; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue; Balter, James M.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for generating MRI-derived synthetic CT volumes (MRCTs) is demonstrated in support of adaptive liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Under IRB approval, 16 subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma were scanned using a single MR pulse sequence (T1 Dixon). Air-containing voxels were identified by intensity thresholding on T1-weighted, water and fat images. The envelope of the anterior vertebral bodies was segmented from the fat image and fuzzy-C-means (FCM) was used to classify each non-air voxel as mid-density, lower-density, bone, or marrow in the abdomen, with only bone and marrow classified within the vertebral body envelope. MRCT volumes were created by integrating the product of the FCM class probability with its assigned class density for each voxel. MRCTs were deformably aligned with corresponding planning CTs and 2-ARC-SBRT-VMAT plans were optimized on MRCTs. Fluence was copied onto the CT density grids, dose recalculated, and compared. The liver, vertebral bodies, kidneys, spleen and cord had median Hounsfield unit differences of less than 60. Median target dose metrics were all within 0.1 Gy with maximum differences less than 0.5 Gy. OAR dose differences were similarly small (median: 0.03 Gy, std:0.26 Gy). Results demonstrate that MRCTs derived from a single abdominal imaging sequence are promising for use in SBRT dose calculation.

  15. Halo ring supporting the Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic frame for fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, S; Scielzo, G; Grillo Ruggieri, F; Bistolfi, F; Ravegnani, M; Andreussi, L

    1994-01-01

    The authors describe a new instrumentation for repositioning of the Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) stereotaxic system, useful for precise fractionated radiotherapy. A lucite ring is fixed to the patient's skull with four screws. Another ring, partially open, is then firmly connected co-axially to the lower part of the first one with four spacer-bars. The fixture permits an exact repositioning of the B.R.W. stereotaxic system, placing the target point in the linear accelerator isocenter. The preliminary technical results obtained in five children are reported and the fixture performance, advantages, and perspectives are discussed.

  16. WE-E-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Renal Sympathetic Ablation for the Treatment of Refractory Hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxim, P; Wheeler, M; Loo, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Maguire, P [Cyberheart, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy as a novel treatment for patients with refractory hypertension in a swine model. Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, substantially increasing the risk of ischemic stroke, ischemic heart disease, and kidney failure. Methods: High-resolution computed tomography (CT) images of anesthetized pigs were acquired and treatment plans for each renal artery and nerve were developed using our clinically implemented treatment planning system. Stereotactic radiotherapy, 40Gy in single fraction was delivered bilaterally to the renal nerves using a state-of-the-art medical linear accelerator under image guidance utilizing dynamic conformal arcs. Dose to nearby critical organs was evaluated by dosevolume histogram analysis and correlated to toxicity data obtained through follow up pathology analysis. The animals were observed for six months with serial measurements of blood pressure, urine analysis, serum laboratories, and overall clinical and behavioral status. Results: All animals survived to the follow-up point without evidence of renal dysfunction (stable serum creatinine), skin changes, or behavioral changes that might suggest animal discomfort. Plasma norepinephrine levels (ng/ml) were followed monthly for 6 months. The average reduction observed was 63%, with the median reduction at 73.5%. Microscopic evaluation 4–6 weeks after treatment showed evidence of damage to the nerves around treated renal arteries. Considerable attenuation in pan neurofilament expression by immunohistochemistry was observed with some vacuolar changes indicative of injury. There was no histological or immunohistochemical evidence of damage to nearby spinal cord or spinal nerve root structures. Conclusion: Our preclinical studies have shown stereotactic radiotherapy to the renal sympathetic plexus to be safe and effective in reducing blood pressure, thus this approach holds great

  17. Radiotherapy for brain metastases from renal cell cancer. Should whole-brain radiotherapy be added to stereotactic radiosurgery? Analysis of 88 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Henzel, Martin; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Hamm, Klaus; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele [Dept. for Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases in patients with renal cell cancer (RCC). Patients and methods: 88 patients were treated with either SRS (n = 51) or SRS + WBRT (n = 17) for one to three lesions, or with WBRT (n = 20) for more than three brain metastases. Overall survival (OS), intracerebral control (IC) and local control (LC) were retrospectively analyzed. Six potential prognostic factors were assessed: age, gender, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation. Results: The median times for OS, IC, and LC from the time of diagnosis were 11, 9, and 10 months. The median OS times for SRS, SRS + WBRT, and WBRT were 12, 16, and 2 months. Addition of WBRT to the SRS improved IC (p = 0.032) but not OS (p = 0.703). On multivariate analyses, improved OS was associated with the absence of extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001) and RPA class (p = 0.04), and IC with treatment (p = 0.019). SRS provided a 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year LC probability of 81%, 78%, and 55%, respectively. No association between LC and any of the potential prognostic factors was observed. The results of the subgroup analyses, regarding treatment modality, were similar to the entire cohort, particularly for RPA class I patients. Conclusion: Addition of WBRT to SRS offers better IC and should be considered for RCC patients with one to three brain metastases, especially in RPA class I group. SRS offers excellent LC rates, while WBRT should be reserved for patients with multiple metastases and poor prognosis. (orig.)

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Monotherapy or Post-External Beam Radiotherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Technique, Early Toxicity, and PSA Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbari, Siavash [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian K. [Biostatistics and Computational Biology Core, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Kaprealian, Tania; Hsu, I-Chow; Ma Lijun; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Shiao, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Shinohara, Katsuto [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Gottschalk, Alexander R., E-mail: AGottschalk@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been established as an excellent monotherapy or after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) boost treatment for prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, dosimetric studies have demonstrated the potential for achieving similar dosimetry with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) compared with HDR brachytherapy. Here, we report our technique, PSA nadir, and acute and late toxicity with SBRT as monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa using HDR brachytherapy fractionation. Patients and Methods: To date, 38 patients have been treated with SBRT at University of California-San Francisco with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with SBRT monotherapy (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 fractions), and 18 were treated with SBRT boost (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions) post-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy. PSA nadir to date for 44 HDR brachytherapy boost patients with disease characteristics similar to the SBRT boost cohort was also analyzed as a descriptive comparison. Results: SBRT was well tolerated. With a median follow-up of 18.3 months (range, 12.6-43.5), 42% and 11% of patients had acute Grade 2 gastrourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively, with no Grade 3 or higher acute toxicity to date. Two patients experienced late Grade 3 GU toxicity. All patients are without evidence of biochemical or clinical progression to date, and favorably low PSA nadirs have been observed with a current median PSA nadir of 0.35 ng/mL (range, <0.01-2.1) for all patients (0.47 ng/mL, range, 0.2-2.1 for the monotherapy cohort; 0.10 ng/mL, range, 0.01-0.5 for the boost cohort). With a median follow-up of 48.6 months (range, 16.4-87.8), the comparable HDR brachytherapy boost cohort has achieved a median PSA nadir of 0.09 ng/mL (range, 0.0-3.3). Conclusions: Early results with SBRT monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa demonstrate acceptable PSA response and minimal toxicity. PSA nadir with SBRT boost

  19. A two dimensional silicon detectors array for quality assurance in stereotactic radiotherapy: MagicPlate-512

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldosari, A. H.; Petasecca, M., E-mail: marcop@uow.edu.au; Espinoza, A.; Newall, M.; Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Alshaikh, S.; Alrowaili, Z. A.; Weaver, M.; Metcalfe, P.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carolan, M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Perevertaylo, V. [SPA-BIT, KIEV 02232 (Ukraine)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Silicon diode arrays are commonly implemented in radiation therapy quality assurance applications as they have a number of advantages including: real time operation (compared to the film) and high spatial resolution, large dynamic range and small size (compared to ionizing chambers). Most diode arrays have detector pitch that is too coarse for routine use in small field applications. The goal of this work is to characterize the two-dimensional monolithic silicon diode array named “MagicPlate-512” (MP512) designed for QA in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radio surgery (SRS). Methods: MP512 is a silicon monolithic detector manufactured on ap-type substrate. An array contains of 512 pixels with size 0.5 × 0.5 mm{sup 2} and pitch 2 mm with an overall dimension of 52 × 52 mm{sup 2}. The MP512 monolithic detector is wire bonded on a printed circuit board 0.5 mm thick and covered by a thin layer of raisin to preserve the silicon detector from moisture and chemical contamination and to protect the bonding wires. Characterization of the silicon monolithic diode array response was performed, and included pixels response uniformity, dose linearity, percent depth dose, output factor, and beam profiling for beam sizes relevant to SBRT and SRS and depth dose response in comparison with ionization chamber. Results: MP512 shows a good dose linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.998) and repeatability within 0.2%. The measured depth dose response for field size of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} agreed to within 1.3%, when compared to a CC13 ionization chamber for depths in PMMA up to 30 cm. The output factor of a 6 MV Varian 2100EX medical linac beam measured by MP512 at the isocenter agrees to within 2% when compared to PTW diamond, Scanditronix point EDD-2 diode and MOSkin detectors for field sizes down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}. An over response of 4% was observed for square beam size smaller than 1 cm when compared to EBT3 films, while the beam profiles (FWHM) of MP

  20. Radiobiological modeling analysis of the optimal fraction scheme in patients with peripheral non-small cell lung cancer undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bao-Tian Huang; Jia-Yang Lu; Pei-Xian Lin; Jian-Zhou Chen; De-Rui Li; Chuang-Zhen Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the optimal fraction scheme (FS) in patients with small peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with the 4 × 12 Gy scheme as the reference. CT simulation data for sixteen patients diagnosed with primary NSCLC or metastatic tumor with a single peripheral lesion ≤3 cm were used in this study. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed based on ten different FS of 1 × 25 Gy, 1 × 30 Gy, 1 × 34 Gy...

  1. Lacrimal Sac Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma with Metastases to the Cavernous Sinus Following Dacryocystorhinostomy Treated with Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C.P. Roos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We report a very good outcome in a 44-year-old woman in whom cancer was missed as the cause of nasolacrimal duct obstruction and dacryocystitis and which was deemed inoperable after spreading to the cavernous sinus. Case Report: The patient was referred to our unit 12 months following uneventful right dacryocystorhinostomy for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. This had been complicated by the formation of a significant canthal swelling 6 months later, which had been excised at that time. The symptom of nasolacrimal duct obstruction and scar recurrence prompted the referral to our unit. Examination and biopsy confirmed a malignancy. Despite extensive surgery, including concurrent radical neck dissection and parotidectomy, within 6 months, her mucoepidermoid carcinoma was found to have spread to the cavernous sinus, restricting blood flow from the carotid and causing an abducens nerve palsy. Though deemed inoperable at first, Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery was sought as treatment for her disease, resulting in a good outcome 4 years after surgery. Conclusion: Experience from this case suggests the importance of considering malignancy as a cause in young patients when presenting with nasolacrimal duct obstruction. In such cases, and perhaps for all patients, biopsy specimens should be submitted as many tumours are found incidentally at the time of dacryocystorhinostomy. Whilst the external approach to dacryocystorhinostomy may identify abnormal anatomy intraoperatively, prompting biopsy, this is less likely with an endonasal approach where osteotomy precedes sac visualisation. The endonasal approach may therefore be less appropriate in such cases where malignancy is suspected as osteotomy may aid in the spread.

  2. CyberKnife robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastic cancer. A prospective evaluation of 95 patients/118 lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Bossi-Zanetti, I.; Mauro, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Milan Univ. (Italy); Beltramo, G.; Bianchi, L.C. [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, L. [Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy). Radiotherapy Unit; Fodor, C. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fossati, P.; Orecchia, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Milan Univ. (Italy); Baroni, G. [National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Bioengineering

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, USA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for oligometastic cancer patients. Patients and methods: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients with a total of 118 lesions underwent CBK-SRT (median dose 24 Gy in 3 fractions). Inclusion criteria: adult patients with limited volume cancer; suitability for SRT but not for other local therapies. Primary diagnoses included breast, lung, head and neck, gastrointestinal and other malignancies. Prostate cancer patients were excluded. Concomitant systemic therapy was given in 40 % of cases and median follow-up was 12 months. Toxicity and tumor response were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) Scale and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors RECIST. Results: Toxicity was rare and observed mainly in patients with comorbidities or uncontrolled cancer. Out of 87 evaluable lesions, complete radiological response, partial response, stabilization and progressive disease were observed in 15 (17 %), 25 (29 %), 34 (39 %) and 13 (15 %) lesions, respectively. Upon restricting the analysis to lesions treated with CBK-SRT alone (no concomitant therapy), response- and local control (LC) rates remained similar. Actuarial 3-year in-field progression-free survival- (i.e. LC), progression-free survival- (PFS) and overall-survival (OS) rates were 67.6, 18.4, and 31.2 %, respectively. LC was reduced in cases of early recurrence. OS- and cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were significantly lower in patients treated for visceral lesions. Failures were predominantly out-field. Conclusion: CBK-SRT is a feasible therapeutic approach for oligometastastic cancer patients that provides long-term in-field tumor control with a low toxicity profile. Further investigations should focus on dose escalation and optimization of the combination with systemic therapies. (orig.)

  3. Radiomics versus physician assessment for the early prediction of local cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Johnson, Carol; Palma, David A.; Rodrigues, George; Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Yeung, Timothy P. C.; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has recently become a standard treatment option for patients with early-stage lung cancer, which achieves local control rates similar to surgery. Local recurrence following SABR typically presents after one year post-treatment. However, benign radiological changes mimicking local recurrence can appear on CT imaging following SABR, complicating the assessment of response. We hypothesize that subtle changes on early post- SABR CT images are important in predicting the eventual incidence of local recurrence and would be extremely valuable to support timely salvage interventions. The objective of this study was to extract radiomic image features on post-SABR follow-up images for 45 patients (15 with local recurrence and 30 without) to aid in the early prediction of local recurrence. Three blinded thoracic radiation oncologists were also asked to score follow-up images as benign injury or local recurrence. A radiomic signature consisting of five image features demonstrated a classification error of 24%, false positive rate (FPR) of 24%, false negative rate (FNR) of 23%, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.85 at 2-5 months post-SABR. At the same time point, three physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury for overall errors of 34-37%, FPRs of 0-4%, and FNRs of 100%. These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence which are not typically considered by physicians. We aim to develop a decision support system which could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of patients with local recurrence following SABR.

  4. Identification of the suitable leaf margin for liver stereotactic body radiotherapy with flattening filter-free beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Nishimura, Hideki; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okayama, Takanobu

    2017-07-12

    The purpose of this study is to identify the suitable leaf margin for liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with flattening filter-free (FFF) beams, as compared with that with flattening filter (FF) beams. SBRT treatment planning for 10 patients with liver cancer was performed using 10-MV FFF and FF beams obtained from a Varian TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linear accelerator. Each plan was generated with the leaf margin to the planning target volume (PTV) ranging from -3 to 5 mm. The prescription dose at D95 (dose covering 95% of the volume) was 48 Gy in 4 fractions to the PTV. The following dosimetric parameters were evaluated quantitatively: homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), gradient index (GI), the normal liver receiving a dose greater than or equal to 20 Gy (V20), and the mean normal liver dose. The HI for FFF and FF beams increased as the leaf margin decreased. The leaf margins that achieved the best CI and GI were 0.1 and -0.3 mm for FFF beams, and 0.1 and -0.9 mm for FF beams. The liver V20 and the mean liver dose reached their minimum values at leaf margins of -0.8 and 0.0 mm for FFF beams, and -0.8 and 0.0 mm for FF beams. The suitable leaf margin for SBRT planning did not differ significantly for FFF and FF beams. Our data showed that, for both FFF and FF beams, a leaf margin of 0 or -1 mm was optimal for liver SBRT planning in terms of both target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognostic Factors for Survival in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent Brain Metastases After Prior Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, Jorge A. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Sneed, Penny K., E-mail: psneed@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lamborn, Kathleen R. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Denduluri, Sandeep [Department of Radiology, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Nakamura, Jean L.; Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); McDermott, Michael W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prognostic factors for survival after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for new, progressive, or recurrent brain metastases (BM) after prior whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Patients treated between 1991 and 2007 with Gamma Knife SRS for BM after prior WBRT were retrospectively reviewed. Potential prognostic factors were analyzed overall and by primary site using univariate and stepwise multivariate analyses and recursive partitioning analysis, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), primary tumor control, extracranial metastases, number of BM treated, total SRS target volume, and interval from WBRT to SRS. Results: A total of 310 patients were analyzed, including 90 breast, 113 non-small-cell lung, 31 small-cell lung, 42 melanoma, and 34 miscellaneous patients. The median age was 56, KPS 80, number of BM treated 3, and interval from WBRT to SRS 8.1 months; 76% had controlled primary tumor and 60% had extracranial metastases. The median survival was 8.4 months overall and 12.0 vs. 7.9 months for single vs. multiple BM treated (p = 0.001). There was no relationship between number of BM and survival after excluding single-BM patients. On multivariate analysis, favorable prognostic factors included age <50, smaller total target volume, and longer interval from WBRT to SRS in breast cancer patients; smaller number of BM, KPS >60, and controlled primary in non-small-cell lung cancer patients; and smaller total target volume in melanoma patients. Conclusions: Among patients treated with salvage SRS for BM after prior WBRT, prognostic factors appeared to vary by primary site. Although survival time was significantly longer for patients with a single BM, the median survival time of 7.9 months for patients with multiple BM seems sufficiently long for salvage SRS to appear to be worthwhile, and no evidence was found to support the use of a cutoff for number of BM appropriate for salvage SRS.

  6. Predictive factors of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in primary and metastatic lung tumors treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy

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    Kim, Kang Pyo; Lee, Jeong Shim; Cho, Yeona; Chung, Seung Yeun; Lee, Jason Joon Bock; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Although stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is widely used therapeutic technique, predictive factors of radiation pneumonitis (RP) after SABR remain undefined. We aimed to investigate the predictive factors affecting RP in patients with primary or metastatic lung tumors who received SABR. From 2012 to 2015, we reviewed 59 patients with 72 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated with SABR, and performed analyses of clinical and dosimetric variables related to symptomatic RP. SABR was delivered as 45–60 Gy in 3–4 fractions, which were over 100 Gy in BED when the α/β value was assumed to be 10. Tumor volume and other various dose volume factors were analyzed using median value as a cutoff value. RP was graded per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.03. At the median follow-up period of 11 months, symptomatic RP was observed in 13 lesions (12 patients, 18.1%), including grade 2 RP in 11 lesions and grade 3 in 2 lesions. Patients with planning target volume (PTV) of ≤14.35 mL had significantly lower rates of symptomatic RP when compared to others (8.6% vs. 27%; p = 0.048). Rates of symptomatic RP in patients with internal gross tumor volume (iGTV) >4.21 mL were higher than with ≤4.21 mL (29.7% vs. 6.1%; p = 0.017). The incidence of symptomatic RP following treatment with SABR was acceptable with grade 2 RP being observed in most patients. iGTV over 4.21 mL and PTV of over 14.35 mL were significant predictive factors related to symptomatic RP.

  7. SU-E-J-199: Evaluation of Motion Tracking Effects On Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Abdominal Targets

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    Monterroso, M; Dogan, N; Yang, Y [University Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of respiratory motion on the delivered dose distribution of CyberKnife motion tracking-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of abdominal targets. Methods: Four patients (two pancreas and two liver, and all with 4DCT scans) were retrospectively evaluated. A plan (3D plan) using CyberKnife Synchrony was optimized on the end-exhale phase in the CyberKnife's MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS), with 40Gy prescribed in 5 fractions. A 4D plan was then created following the 4D planning utility in the MultiPlan TPS, by recalculating dose from the 3D plan beams on all 4DCT phases, with the same prescribed isodose line. The other seven phases of the 4DCT were then deformably registered to the end-exhale phase for 4D dose summation. Doses to the target and organs at risk (OAR) were compared between 3D and 4D plans for each patient. The mean and maximum doses to duodenum, liver, spinal cord and kidneys, and doses to 5cc of duodenum, 700cc of liver, 0.25cc of spinal cord and 200cc of kidneys were used. Results: Target coverage in the 4D plans was about 1% higher for two patients and about 9% lower in the other two. OAR dose differences between 3D and 4D varied among structures, with doses as much as 8.26Gy lower or as much as 5.41Gy higher observed in the 4D plans. Conclusion: The delivered dose can be significantly different from the planned dose for both the target and OAR close to the target, which is caused by the relative geometry change while the beams chase the moving target. Studies will be performed on more patients in the future. The differences of motion tracking versus passive motion management with the use of internal target volumes will also be investigated.

  8. The effectiveness of a pneumatic compression belt in reducing respiratory motion of abdominal tumors in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, D Michael; Zatcky, Joan; Goodman, Karyn; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal compression using a pneumatic abdominal compression belt developed in-house has been used to reduce respiratory motion of patients undergoing hypo-fractionated or single fraction stereotactic radio-ablative therapy for abdominal cancers. The clinical objective of belt usage was to reduce the cranial-caudal (CC) respiratory motion of the tumor to 5 mm or less during both CT simulation and treatment. A retrospective analysis was done to determine the effectiveness of the device and associated clinical procedures to reduce the CC respiratory motion of the tumor. 42 patients treated for tumors in the liver (30), adrenal glands (6), pancreas (3) and lymph nodes (3) using high dose hypofractionated radiotherapy between 2004 and the present were eligible for analysis. All patients had 2-3 radiopaque fiducial markers implanted near the tumor prior to simulation, or had clips from prior surgery. Integral to the belt is an inflatable air bladder that is positioned over the abdomen. The pneumatic pressure was set to a level in consultation with the patient. The CC motion was measured fluoroscopically with and without pneumatic pressure. Pneumatic pressure was used at all treatments to reduce to CC motion to that achieved at simulation. The mean CC motion with the belt in place, but no additional air pressure was 11.4 mm with a range of 5-20 mm. With the pressure applied, the mean CC motion was reduced to 4.4 mm with a range of 1-8 mm (P-value pneumatic compression belt and associated clinical procedures was found to result in a significant and frequently substantial reduction in the CC motion of the tumor.

  9. The Technique, Resources and Costs of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Dose Regimens and Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharieff, Waseem; Greenspoon, Jeffrey N; Dayes, Ian; Chow, Tom; Wright, James; Lukka, Himu

    2016-02-01

    Robotic system has been used for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of prostate cancer. Arc-based and fixed-gantry systems are used for hypofractionated regimens (10-20 fractions) and the standard regimen (39 fractions); they may also be used to deliver SBRT. Studies are currently underway to compare efficacy and safety of these systems and regimens. Thus, we describe the technique and required resources for the provision of robotic SBRT in relation to the standard regimen and other systems to guide investment decisions. Using administrative data of resource volumes and unit prices, we computed the cost per patient, cost per cure and cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) of four regimens (5, 12, 20 and 39 fractions) and three delivery systems (robotic, arc-based and fixed-gantry) from a payer's perspective. We performed sensitivity analyses to examine the effects of daily hours of operation and in-room treatment delivery times on cost per patient. In addition, we estimated the budget impact when a robotic system is preferred over an arc-based or fixed-gantry system. Costs of SBRT were $6333/patient (robotic), $4368/patient (arc-based) and $4443/patient (fixed-gantry). When daily hours of operation were varied, the cost of robotic SBRT varied from $9324/patient (2 hours daily) to $5250/patient (10 hours daily). This was comparable to the costs of 39 fraction standard regimen which were $5935/patient (arc-based) and $7992/ patient (fixed-gantry). In settings of moderate to high patient volume, robotic SBRT is cost effective compared to the standard regimen. If SBRT can be delivered with equivalent efficacy and safety, the arc-based system would be the most cost effective system.

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy combined with transarterial chemoembolization for huge (≥10 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nan Bao; Lv, Guang Ming; Chen, Zhong Hua

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for huge (≥10 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Between May, 2006 and December, 2012, 72 patients with huge HCCs were treated by SBRT following incomplete TACE. The median total dose of 35.6 Gy was delivered over 12-14 days with a fractional dose of 2.6-3.0 Gy and 6 fractions per week. The patients were classified into those with tumor encapsulation (group A, n=33) and those without tumor encapsulation (group B, n=39). The clinical outcomes of tumor response, overall cumulative survival and toxicities/complications were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 72 patients, CR, PR, SD and PD were achieved in 6 (8.3%), 51 (70.8%), 9 (12.5%) and 6 patients (8.3%), respectively, within a median follow-up of 18 months. The objective response rate was 79.1%. The overall cumulative 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates and the median survival time were 38, 12 and 3% and 12.2 months, respectively. In group A, the overall cumulative 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 56, 21 and 6%, respectively, with a median survival of 19 months; in group B, the overall cumulative 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 23, 4 and 0%, respectively, with a median survival of 10.8 months (P=0.023). The treatment was well tolerated, with no severe radiation-induced liver disease and no reported > grade 3 toxicity. Tumor encapsulation was found to be a significant prognostic factor for survival. In conclusion, the combination of SBRT and TACE was shown to be a safe and effective treatment option for patients with unresectable huge HCC.

  11. Feasibility Study of Automated Framework for Estimating Lung Tumor Locations for Target-Based Patient Positioning in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yoshidome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the feasibility of an automated framework for estimating the lung tumor locations for tumor-based patient positioning with megavolt-cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. Methods. A lung screening phantom and ten lung cancer cases with solid lung tumors, who were treated with SBRT, were employed to this study. The locations of tumors in MV-CBCT images were estimated using a tumor-template matching technique between a tumor template and the MV-CBCT. Tumor templates were produced by cropping the gross tumor volume (GTV regions, which were enhanced by a Sobel filter or a blob structure enhancement (BSE filter. Reference tumor locations (grand truth were determined based on a consensus between a radiation oncologist and a medical physicist. Results. According to the results of the phantom study, the average Euclidean distances of the location errors in the original, Sobel-filtered, and BSE-filtered images were 2.0 ± 4.1 mm, 12.8 ± 9.4 mm, and 0.4 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. For clinical cases, these were 3.4 ± 7.1 mm, 7.2 ± 11.6 mm, and 1.6 ± 1.2 mm, respectively. Conclusion. The feasibility study suggests that our proposed framework based on the BSE filter may be a useful tool for tumor-based patient positioning in SBRT.

  12. A Feasibility Study of a Tilted Head Position in Helical Tomotherapy for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Intracranial Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoonsun; Yoon, Hong In; Ha, Jin Sook; Kim, Seijoon; Lee, Ik Jae

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we evaluated the feasibility of placing patients in a tilted head position as part of routine clinical practice for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of intracranial tumors using helical tomotherapy (HT), by assessing its dosimetric benefit and setup accuracy. We reviewed treatment plans of four cases that were to receive FSRT for brain lesions in normal and head-tilted positions. These patients underwent two computed tomography (CT) scans: first in the normal supine position and then in the supine position with the head tilted at a 458 angle. Two separate HT plans for each position were generated in these four patients, using the same planning parameters. Plans were compared for target conformity and dose homogeneity. Maximum and average doses to critical organs, including normal brain, brain stem, optic chiasm, optic nerves, and the eyes, were considered. To evaluate setup accuracy, patient movement during treatment was assessed by post-treatment megavoltage CT scans. Both HT plans achieved similar conformal and homogeneous dose coverage to the target. Head-tilted HT delivered lower average and maximum doses to critical organs in the cases where the tumor was located on the same plane with critical organs, particularly when they were not directly attached. Placement in the head-tilted position without a mouthpiece allowed for increased patient movement during treatment, while use of a mouthpiece reduced patient movement to even less than that observed for normal setup in the supine position. This pilot study showed that placement in a tilted head position for FSRT of intracranial tumors using HT may be of clinical use, but depends on the tumor location.

  13. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

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    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Postmus, Douwe [Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  14. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases

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    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tseng, Chia-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Radiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, B.C. John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lee, Young K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Department of Radiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. Methods and Materials: From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (P<.01). No radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or cases of myelopathy were observed. Conclusion: A second course of spine SBRT, most often with 30 Gy in 4 fractions, for spinal metastases that failed initial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option.

  15. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolamide for glioblastoma in good performance status elderly patients – early results of a phase II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eFloyd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks (Standard RT with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS >70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1-3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65-87 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7-32 months, 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated radiotherapy course, radiosurgery boost and

  16. [Improved patient repositioning accuracy by integrating an additional jaw fixation into a high precision face mask system in stereotactic radiotherapy of the head].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatta, Eric; Liesenfeld, Susie-Maria; Bank, Priska; Wurm, Reinhard; Günther, Robert; Wiezorek, Tilo; Wendt, Thomas G

    2003-08-01

    For high precision radiotherapy of the neurocranium a precise, reproducible positioning technique is the basic prerequisite. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of a modification of the commercially available stereotactical BrainLab-head mask system on accuracy in patient positioning during fractionated radiotherapy. 29 patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy of the head. Immobilization was provided by a two layer thermoplastic mask system (BrainLab). 18 of these patients received an additional custom made fixation either of the upper jaw (OKF) or of the mandibula (UKF). The positioning accuracy was assessed by measurements of the shifting of anatomical landmarks in relation to the rigid mask system on biplanar simulator films using a digital imaging system. Before each measurement a fine adjustment of the simulator to an optical ring system was performed. The reference radiographs were done just before CT-planning. During a 2-7 weeks lasting course of radiotherapy displacement measurements in relation to the reference images for all three dimensions (z, y and x) were done once a week. In 29 patients 844 measurements were analyzed. An additional jaw fixation improves the reproducibility of patient positioning significantly in all three spatial dimensions. The standard deviation in lateral direction (x) was 0.6 mm with jaw fixation vs. 0.7 mm without jaw fixation (p jaw fixation can be acquired. The variability of positioning can be reduced especially in the z-direction. A further reduction of the safety margin around the target volume--especially in benign tumors--is possible by improved fixation technique.

  17. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Real-life efficacy and morphological evaluation of the outer retina-choroid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address in this retrospective analysis.Patients who met the INTREPID criteria for best responders were eligible for SRT. A total of 32 eyes of 32 patients were treated. Thereafter, patients were examined monthly for 12 months and received pro re nata IVI of aflibercept or ranibizumab. Outcome measures were: mean number of injections, best-corrected visual acuity, and morphological changes of the outer retina-choroid complex as well as patient safety.Mean number of IVI decreased by almost 50% during the 12 months after SRT compared to the year before, whereas visual acuity increased by one line (logMAR). Morphological evaluation showed that most changes affect outer retinal layers.Stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduced IVI retreatment in nAMD patients under real-life circumstances. Therefore, SRT might be the first step to stop visual loss as a result of IVI undertreatment, which is a major risk.

  18. Hypofractionated image-guided breath-hold SABR (Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy of liver metastases – clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boda-Heggemann Judit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR is a non-invasive therapy option for inoperable liver oligometastases. Outcome and toxicity were retrospectively evaluated in a single-institution patient cohort who had undergone ultrasound-guided breath-hold SABR. Patients and methods 19 patients with liver metastases of various primary tumors consecutively treated with SABR (image-guidance with stereotactic ultrasound in combination with computer-controlled breath-hold were analysed regarding overall-survival (OS, progression-free-survival (PFS, progression pattern, local control (LC, acute and late toxicity. Results PTV (planning target volume-size was 108 ± 109cm3 (median 67.4 cm3. BED2 (Biologically effective dose in 2 Gy fraction was 83.3 ± 26.2 Gy (median 78 Gy. Median follow-up and median OS were 12 months. Actuarial 2-year-OS-rate was 31%. Median PFS was 4 months, actuarial 1-year-PFS-rate was 20%. Site of first progression was predominantly distant. Regression of irradiated lesions was observed in 84% (median time to detection of regression was 2 months. Actuarial 6-month-LC-rate was 92%, 1- and 2-years-LC-rate 57%, respectively. BED2 influenced LC. When a cut-off of BED2 = 78 Gy was used, the higher BED2 values resulted in improved local control with a statistical trend to significance (p = 0.0999. Larger PTV-sizes, inversely correlated with applied dose, resulted in lower local control, also with a trend to significance (p-value = 0.08 when a volume cut-off of 67 cm3 was used. No local relapse was observed at PTV-sizes 3 and BED2 > 78 Gy. No acute clinical toxicity > °2 was observed. Late toxicity was also ≤ °2 with the exception of one gastrointestinal bleeding-episode 1 year post-SABR. A statistically significant elevation in the acute phase was observed for alkaline-phosphatase; in the chronic phase for alkaline-phosphatase, bilirubine, cholinesterase and C

  19. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases from lung cancer. Evaluation of indications and predictors of local control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Takeaki [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo (Japan); Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka (Japan); Yamada, Kazunari; Isogai, Kenta; Tonosaki, Yoshihiro [Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka (Japan); Harada, Aya [Kobe Minimum Invasive Cancer Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo (Japan); Demizu, Yusuke [Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hyogo (Japan); Miyawaki, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kenji; Ejima, Yasuo; Sasaki, Ryohei [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain metastases (BMs) from lung cancer, and to explore prognostic factors associated with local control (LC) and indication. We evaluated patients who were treated with linac-based HSRT for BMs from lung cancer. Lesions treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the same patients during the same periods were analysed and compared with HSRT in terms of LC or toxicity. There were 53 patients with 214 lesions selected for this analysis (HSRT: 76 lesions, SRS: 138 lesions). For HSRT, the median prescribed dose was 35 Gy in 5 fractions. The 1-year LC rate was 83.6 % in HSRT; on multivariate analysis, a planning target volume (PTV) of <4 cm{sup 3}, biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) of ≥51 Gy, and adenocarcinoma were significantly associated with better LC. Moreover, in PTVs ≥ 4 cm{sup 3}, there was a significant difference in LC between BED{sub 10} < 51 Gy and ≥ 51 Gy (p = 0.024). On the other hand, in PTVs < 4 cm{sup 3}, both HSRT and SRS had good LC with no significant difference (p = 0.195). Radiation necrosis emerged in 5 of 76 lesions (6.6 %) treated with HSRT and 21 of 138 (15.2 %) lesions treated with SRS (p = 0.064). Linac-based HSRT was safe and effective for BMs from lung cancer, and hence might be particularly useful in or near an eloquent area. PTV, BED{sub 10}, and pathological type were significant prognostic factors. Furthermore, in BMs ≥ 4 cm{sup 3}, a dose of BED ≥ 51 Gy should be considered. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Toxizitaet einer hypofraktionierten stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (HSRT) zur Behandlung von Hirnmetastasen (HM) eines Lungenkarzinoms und Erforschung von mit der lokalen Kontrolle (LK) und der Indikation assoziierten Prognosefaktoren. Analysiert wurden Daten von Patienten (n = 53), die sich einer Linearbeschleuniger-basierten HSRT unterzogen (mit HSRT behandelte Laesionen n = 76; Median der

  20. Monte Carlo evaluation of tissue heterogeneities corrections in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; McClinton, Christopher; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Saleh, Habeeb; Jiang, Hongyu; Lominska, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate Monte Carlo computed dose distributions with the X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and compare to heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm. This study includes 10 head and neck cancer patients who underwent SRT re-irradiation using heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm for dose calculation. Prescription dose was 24-40 Gy in 3-5 fractions (treated 3-5 fractions per week) with at least 95% of the PTV volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose. A stereotactic head and neck localization box was attached to the base of the thermoplastic mask fixation for target localization. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) were contoured on the 3D CT images. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the GTV with 0 to 5 mm uniform expansion; PTV ranged from 10.2 to 64.3 cc (average=35.0±17.5 cc). OARs were contoured on the 3D planning CT and consisted of spinal cord, brainstem, optic structures, parotids, and skin. In the BrainLab treatment planning system (TPS), clinically optimal SRT plans were generated using hybrid planning technique (combination of 3D conformal noncoplanar arcs and nonopposing static beams) for the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator consisting of high-definition multileaf collimators (HD-MLCs: 2.5 mm leaf width at isocenter) and 6 MV-SRS (1000 MU/min) beam. For the purposes of this study, treatment plans were recomputed using XVMC algorithm utilizing identical beam geometry, multileaf positions, and monitor units and compared to the corresponding clinical PB-hete plans. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions show small decreases (D100 and D10 of the GTV were lower by about 2% and ranged between -0.8 and 3.1%. For the spinal cord, both the maximal dose difference and the dose to 0.35 cc of the structure were higher by an average of 4.2% (ranged 1.2 to -13

  1. Observation of the therapeutic efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in 44 cases of retroperitoneal metastatic tumor%X线立体定向放射治疗44例腹膜后转移癌近期疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席青松; 于世英; 胡广原

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of stereotactic radiotherapy for retroperitoneal metastatic tumor.Methods: From August 1997 to October 2004,44 patients with retroperitoneal metastatic tumors were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy.The planning target volume was encompassed by 90%-95% isodose line.Fractional dose was from 6 Gy to 8 Gy,and they were treated 2-3 times per-week and 4-8 times in all.The total radiation doses of PTV were from 32 Gy to 48 Gy.Results: After the radiotherapy,the pain was obviously relieved in 81.8% patients.Three months after completion of radiotherapy passed and then,abdominal CT was performed to evaluate the results.The whole effective rate was 81.8% [CR 27.7% (12/44)and PR 54.5% (24/44)],and six months after radiotherapy,CR was 27.7% (12/44) and PR was 59.1% (26/44).The middle survival time was 12 months.Conclusion: It is suggested that stereotactic radiotherapy for retroperitoneal metastatic tumor is a safe and effective method.

  2. Dummy run for a phase II study of stereotactic body radiotherapy of T1-T2      N0M0 medical inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djärv, Emma; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia

    2006-01-01

    In forthcoming multicentre studies on stereotactic body radiotherapy       (SBRT) compliance with volume and dose prescriptions will be mandatory to       avoid unnecessary heterogeneity bias. To evaluate compliance in a       multicentre setting we used two cases from an ongoing phase II study o...

  3. Evaluation of a Monte Carlo calculation algorithm for clinical use extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT); Evaluacion de un algoritmo de calculo Monte Carlo de uso clinico para radioterapia esterotaxica extracraneal (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila, J.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2013-07-01

    At present it is not common to find commercial planning systems that incorporate dose calculation algorithms to do based on Monte Carlo [1,2] photons This paper summarizes the process followed in the evaluation of a dose calculation algorithm for MC beams of 6 MV photons from an accelerator dedicated to radiosurgery (SRS), cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and extracranial (SBRT). (Author)

  4. QUALITY ASSURANCE OF 4D-CT SCAN TECHNIQUES IN MULTICENTER PHASE III TRIAL OF SURGERY VERSUS STEREOTACTIC RADIOTHERAPY (RADIOSURGERY OR SURGERY FOR OPERABLE EARLY STAGE (STAGE 1A) NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CANCER [ROSEL] STUDY)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; van Lieshout, Maarten; Schuring, Danny; van Heumen, Marielle J. T.; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Widder, Joachim; van der Heide, Uulke A.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scanning techniques in institutions participating in a Phase III trial of surgery vs. stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All 9 centers performed a 4D-CT scan of a motion phantom (

  5. A new treatment method for brain diseases. Stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirato, Hiroki (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with stereotactic radiosurgery, a novel medical treatment technique for brain diseases. It is the most sophisticated modality that allows the functional preservation. Recently, CT scan and MRI scan have dramatically changed the diagnostic accuracy of tumor localization in the brain. A device named stereotactic head fixation system makes it possible to localize deep-seated brain diseases with an accuracy of 1-1.5 mm. Using multiple convergent narrow beams of high-energy X-ray, a stereotactic head frame, and a three dimensional computer graphics of CT images, patients with deep-seated nidus can be treated without any complications. Normal tissues would not receive large doses but the center of the nidus is irradiated heavily because of the convergence of X-ray beams. Thus stereotactic radiosurgery is more accurate, effective, and less toxic than conventional radiotherapy and is safer and more effective than surgery for many brain diseases. Small arteriovenous malformation in the brain, which is a fetal disease, and small acoustic neurinomas, in which surgery often causes facial nerve palsy and hearing loss, are presented as good candidates for radiosurgery. For metastatic brain tumors, stereotactic radiosurgery makes such patients free from neurological symptoms, such as difficulty in walking and speaking, in a few days. (N.K.).

  6. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A; Palma, David A; Haasbeek, Cornelis J A; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D

    2014-03-01

    Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2-5 month and 5-8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2-5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79-0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%-77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively. Texture measures of the GGO appearance

  7. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattonen, Sarah A. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Palma, David A. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); Ward, Aaron D., E-mail: aaron.ward@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. Methods: A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). Results: For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2–5 month and 5–8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2–5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79–0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%–77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taremi, Mojgan, E-mail: mojgan.taremi@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Pearson, Shannon [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, Sharon [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Purdie, Thomas [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brade, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

  9. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  10. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutaf, Yildirim D.; Yi, Byong Yong; Prado, Karl; D' Souza, Warren D.; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Zhang Jin [Xcision Medical Systems, Columbia, Maryland 21045 (United States); Yu, Cedric X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 and Xcision Medical Systems, Columbia, Maryland 21045 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A dedicated stereotactic gamma irradiation device, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign from Xcision Medical Systems, was developed specifically to treat small breast cancers. This study presents the first evaluation of dosimetric and geometric characteristics from the initial prototype installed at University of Maryland Radiation Oncology Department. Methods: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign stereotactic radiotherapy device is an assembly of a hemi-spherical source carrier containing 36 {sup 60}Co sources, a tungsten collimator, a dynamically controlled patient support table, and the breast immobilization system which also functions as a stereotactic frame. The source carrier contains the sources in six columns spaced longitudinally at 60 Degree-Sign intervals and it rotates together with the variable-size collimator to form 36 noncoplanar, concentric arcs focused at the isocenter. The patient support table enables motion in three dimensions to position the patient tumor at the focal point of the irradiation. The table moves continuously in three cardinal dimensions during treatment to provide dynamic shaping of the dose distribution. The breast is immobilized using a breast cup applying a small negative pressure, where the immobilization cup is embedded with fiducials also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the breast. Geometric and dosimetric evaluations of the system as well as a protocol for absorbed dose calibration are provided. Dosimetric verifications of dynamically delivered patient plans are performed for seven patients using radiochromic films in hypothetical preop, postop, and target-in-target treatment scenarios. Results: Loaded with 36 {sup 60}Co sources with cumulative activity of 4320 Ci, the prototype GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign unit delivers 5.31 Gy/min at the isocenter using the largest 2.5 cm diameter collimator. Due to the noncoplanar beam arrangement and dynamic dose shaping features, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign device is found to deliver

  11. Chest wall and rib irradiation and toxicities of early-stage lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Tarun; Biswas, Tithi; Yao, Min; Zhang, Yuxia; Kim, Ellen; Ellis, Rodney J; Lo, Simon S; Machtay, Mitchell

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the chest wall and rib toxicities in primary lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife-based stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this study, data were collected from the 118 patients, of which 25 patients who had longer follow-up (mean: 21.9 months) were considered. Studied parameters were maximum point dose, doses to 1-100 cm(3) of chest wall and 1-10 cm(3) of ribs. Three patients developed chest wall pain (grade I). 25 studied patients, on average, received 27.7 Gy to 30 cm(3) of chest wall and 50.4 Gy to 1 cm(3) of rib. Nine patients had more than 30 Gy dose to 30 cm(3) of chest wall. No rib bone fracture was found. No correlations of chest wall pain and volume of irradiation were found.

  12. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for dumbbell-shaped hypoglossal schwannomas: Two cases of long-term follow-up and a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Lou, Jinrong; Qiu, Shujun; Guo, Yutian; Pan, Mianshun

    2016-01-01

    Cases of hypoglossal schwannoma are extremely rare. Historically, microsurgical resection has been the standard treatment, but it may not always be feasible; thus, it is crucial to investigate alternative treatments. We herein present the cases of two patients, both of whom presented with tongue deviation and hemiatrophy, accompanied by headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dumbbell-shaped tumor originating from the hypoglossal nerve that was adjacent to the cranial base in each patient. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used to treat the tumors, with a total dose of 30 Gy in 3-Gy fractions delivered to the planning target volume. Several months later, the tumors had significantly decreased in size and the symptoms of the two patients had gradually improved. PMID:27446582

  13. Monte Carlo evaluation of tissue heterogeneities corrections in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; McClinton, Christopher; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Saleh, Habeeb; Jiang, Hongyu; Lominska, Christopher

    2016-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to generate Monte Carlo computed dose distributions with the X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and compare to heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm. This study includes 10 head and neck cancer patients who underwent SRT re-irradiation using heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm for dose calculation. Prescription dose was 24-40 Gy in 3-5 fractions (treated 3-5 fractions per week) with at least 95% of the PTV volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose. A stereotactic head and neck localization box was attached to the base of the thermoplastic mask fixation for target localization. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) were contoured on the 3D CT images. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the GTV with 0 to 5 mm uniform expansion; PTV ranged from 10.2 to 64.3 cc (average = 35.0±17.5 cc). OARs were contoured on the 3D planning CT and consisted of spinal cord, brainstem, optic structures, parotids, and skin. In the BrainLab treatment planning system (TPS), clinically optimal SRT plans were generated using hybrid planning technique (combination of 3D conformal nonco-planar arcs and nonopposing static beams) for the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator consisting of high-definition multileaf collimators (HD-MLCs: 2.5 mm leaf width at isocenter) and 6 MV-SRS (1000 MU/min) beam. For the purposes of this study, treatment plans were recomputed using XVMC algorithm utilizing identical beam geometry, multileaf positions, and monitor units and compared to the corresponding clinical PB-hete plans. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions show small decreases (< 1.5%) in calculated dose for D99, Dmean, and Dmax of the PTV coverage between the two algorithms. However, the average target volume encompassed by the prescribed percent dose (Vp) was about 2.5% less with XVMC vs. PB-hete and

  14. Chest wall volume receiving >30 Gy predicts risk of severe pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Neal E; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H; Sheng, Ke; Schefter, Tracey E; Kavanagh, Brian D; Larner, James M

    2010-03-01

    To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >or=20, >or=30, >or=40, >or=50, and >or=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R(2) = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm(3) was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm(3) receiving 30 Gy. The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm(3), if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. SU-E-QI-21: Iodinated Contrast Agent Time Course In Human Brain Metastasis: A Study For Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeid, L; Esteve, F; Adam, J [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, La Tronche, Isere (France); Tessier, A; Balosso, J [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, La Tronche, Isere (France)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT) is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of heavy elements in tumors with stereotactic irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays from a synchrotron source. Phase I/II clinical trials on brain metastasis are underway using venous infusion of iodinated contrast agents. The radiation dose enhancement depends on the amount of iodine in the tumor and its time course. In the present study, the reproducibility of iodine concentrations between the CT planning scan day (Day 0) and the treatment day (Day 10) was assessed in order to predict dose errors. Methods: For each of days 0 and 10, three patients received a biphasic intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agent (40 ml, 4 ml/s, followed by 160 ml, 0.5 ml/s) in order to ensure stable intra-tumoral amounts of iodine during the treatment. Two volumetric CT scans (before and after iodine injection) and a multi-slice dynamic CT of the brain were performed using conventional radiotherapy CT (Day 0) or quantitative synchrotron radiation CT (Day 10). A 3D rigid registration was processed between images. The absolute and relative differences of absolute iodine concentrations and their corresponding dose errors were evaluated in the GTV and PTV used for treatment planning. Results: The differences in iodine concentrations remained within the standard deviation limits. The 3D absolute differences followed a normal distribution centered at zero mg/ml with a variance (∼1 mg/ml) which is related to the image noise. Conclusion: The results suggest that dose errors depend only on the image noise. This study shows that stable amounts of iodine are achievable in brain metastasis for SSRT treatment in a 10 days interval.

  16. Minimal Inter-Fractional Fiducial Migration during Image-Guided Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using SuperLock Nitinol Coil Fiducial Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Rong

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is being increasingly used for the treatment of patients with lung cancer or lung metastasis who are medically unfit to undergo resection. In order to improve accuracy and confidence in targeting tumors, many centers rely on fiducial implantation. We evaluated the migration of a novel fiducial marker specifically designed for lung tissue implanted via electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB.We retrospectively quantified the individual and group migrations of SuperLock nitinol coil fiducials for 15 patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, in order to evaluate the reliability of using these fiducials as a target surrogate for cases where tumors cannot be clearly delineated on cone beam CTs (CBCTs. For each fraction, we compared the individual and group migrations of the fiducials between the planning CT and the acquired CBCT. The group migration was defined as the distance between the centroids of the fiducial group and GTV.A total of 16 lung targets were included in our study for these 15 patients (one patient with two targets. Of 55 fiducials placed, we observed a 100% retention rate. The mean individual migration was 1.87 mm (range, 0.63-5.25 mm with a standard deviation of 1.26 mm. The mean group migration was 1.94 mm (range, 0.03-6.19 mm with a standard deviation of 1.45 mm. Overall, there was minimal change in the relative locations of the markers with respect to each other, as well as to the target.We found that the SuperLock nitinol coil fiducial marker positions are stable throughout the radiation treatment, and can be used as a reliable surrogate to target, and to avoid geometric misses during gated treatments.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metachronous Multisite Oligo-Recurrence: A Long-Surviving Case with Sequential Oligo-Recurrence in Four Different Organs Treated Using Locally Radical Radiotherapy and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Onishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for oligometastases represents a recent trend in radiation oncology. While abundant data are available regarding the use of SBRT for the treatment of lung or liver oligometastases from various retrospective series and prospective trials, relatively little information has been accumulated for the treatment of oligometastases at sites other than the lungs and liver, particularly for sequential oligometastases in multiple organs. Oligometastases with primary lesions controlled is called “oligo-recurrence.” We describe herein the case of a lung cancer patient who developed repeated oligo-recurrence at multiple sites that were each controlled by radical radiotherapy and achieved long-term survival and discuss the merits of locally aggressive radiotherapy for this type of disease condition with reviewing the literature. Although further investigation should be undertaken to clarify the benefits, objectives, and methods of SBRT for the treatment of oligometastases, we believe utilization of SBRT may be worthwhile for patients with remote metastases who hope for treatment to acquire better local control and possible longer survival.

  18. Comparison of 3D and 4D Monte Carlo optimization in robotic tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Mark K.H. [Tuen Mun Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Hong Kong (S.A.R) (China); Werner, Rene [The University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Computational Neuroscience, Hamburg (Germany); Ayadi, Miriam [Leon Berard Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); Blanck, Oliver [University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany)

    2014-09-20

    To investigate the adequacy of three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo (MC) optimization (3DMCO) and the potential of four-dimensional (4D) dose renormalization (4DMC{sub renorm}) and optimization (4DMCO) for CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) radiotherapy planning in lung cancer. For 20 lung tumors, 3DMCO and 4DMCO plans were generated with planning target volume (PTV{sub 5} {sub mm}) = gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 5 mm, assuming 3 mm for tracking errors (PTV{sub 3} {sub mm}) and 2 mm for residual organ deformations. Three fractions of 60 Gy were prescribed to ≥ 95 % of the PTV{sub 5} {sub mm}. Each 3DMCO plan was recalculated by 4D MC dose calculation (4DMC{sub recal}) to assess the dosimetric impact of organ deformations. The 4DMC{sub recal} plans were renormalized (4DMC{sub renorm}) to 95 % dose coverage of the PTV{sub 5} {sub mm} for comparisons with the 4DMCO plans. A 3DMCO plan was considered adequate if the 4DMC{sub recal} plan showed ≥ 95 % of the PTV{sub 3} {sub mm} receiving 60 Gy and doses to other organs at risk (OARs) were below the limits. In seven lesions, 3DMCO was inadequate, providing < 95 % dose coverage to the PTV{sub 3} {sub mm}. Comparison of 4DMC{sub recal} and 3DMCO plans showed that organ deformations resulted in lower OAR doses. Renormalizing the 4DMC{sub recal} plans could produce OAR doses higher than the tolerances in some 4DMC{sub renorm} plans. Dose conformity of the 4DMC{sub renorm} plans was inferior to that of the 3DMCO and 4DMCO plans. The 4DMCO plans did not always achieve OAR dose reductions compared to 3DMCO and 4DMC{sub renorm} plans. This study indicates that 3DMCO with 2 mm margins for organ deformations may be inadequate for Cyberknife-based lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Renormalizing the 4DMC{sub recal} plans could produce degraded dose conformity and increased OAR doses; 4DMCO can resolve this problem. (orig.) [German] Untersucht wurde die Angemessenheit einer dreidimensionalen (3-D) Monte

  19. Long-Term Tumor Control despite Late Pseudoprogression on 18F-FDG-PET following Extremely Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Retropharyngeal Lymph Node Metastasis from Esthesioneuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ohtakara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG-PET is a valuable adjunct to conventional imaging for evaluating treatment response following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for head and neck malignancies (HNM. The effect of treatment-related inflammation is generally deemed negligible after 12 weeks following conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. Herein, we describe an unusual case showing pseudoprogression on 18F-FDG-PET 2 years after SBRT for retropharyngeal lymph node metastasis (RPLNm from esthesioneuroblastoma. A 36-year-old man presented with right RPLNm 32 months after the diagnosis of esthesioneuroblastoma associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone production. The RPLNm was treated with SBRT in 2 fractions over 8 days using dynamic conformal arcs with concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide. Although follow-up MRI showed sustained lesion regression, the early/delayed maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax values on dual-time-point 18F-FDG-PET obtained 1 and 2 years after SBRT were 7.7/8.3 and 8.5/10.1, respectively, suggesting local progression. Despite no subsequent focal or systemic treatment, the SUVmax values gradually decreased thereafter over a period of 4 years (3.3/3.4 at 76 months. MRI obtained 7 years after SBRT revealed sustained tumor regression. No obvious relevant toxicities have occurred. Thus, caution should be exercised in the interpretation of the SUVmax change following ablative irradiation for HNM.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of MRI-based HDR brachytherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with advanced cervical cancer: A virtual brachytherapy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otahal, Bretislav; Dolezel, Martin; Cvek, Jakub; Simetka, Ondrej; Klat, Jaroslav; Knybel, Lukas; Molenda, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Hlavka, Ales; Feltl, David

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the treatment plans of 3D image-guided brachytherapy (BT) and stereotactic robotic radiotherapy with online image guidance – CyberKnife (CK) in patients with locally advanced cervix cancer. Methods and materials Ten pairs of plans for patients with locally advanced inoperable cervical cancer were created using MR based 3D brachytherapy and stereotaxis CK. The dose that covers 98% of the target volume (HR CTV D98) was taken as a reference and other parameters were compared. Results Of the ten studied cases, the dose from D100 GTV was comparable for both devices, on average, the BT GTV D90 was 10–20% higher than for CK. The HR CTV D90 was higher for CK with an average difference of 10–20%, but only fifteen percent of HR CTV (the peripheral part) received a higher dose from CK, while 85% of the target volume received higher doses from BT. We found a significant organ-sparing effect of CK compared to brachytherapy (20–30% lower doses in 0.1 cm3, 1 cm3, and 2 cm3). Conclusion BT remains to be the best method for dose escalation. Due to the significant organ-sparing effect of CK, patients that are not candidates for BT could benefit from stereotaxis more than from classical external beam radiotherapy. PMID:25337413

  1. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. A retrospective analysis of 74 patients treated in the Klinikum rechts der Isar Munich; Die hypofraktionierte, stereotaktische Strahlentherapie von Lebermetastasen. Eine retrospektive Analyse von 74 Patienten des Klinikums rechts der Isar Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heppt, Franz Johannes

    2013-06-12

    Purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of liver metastases and prognostic factors for local control and overall survival. From 2000 to 2009 74 patients with 91 metastases were treated at the Department for Radiation Therapy and Oncology (TU Muenchen). With an observed local control rate of 75% after 1 year, SBRT proved as an effective local treatment option. Unfortunately, systemic tumor progression still dominates long term survival in many patients.

  2. Chest Wall Pain and Rib Fracture after Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Peripheral Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voroney, Jon-Paul J; Hope, Andrew; Dahele, Max R; Purdy, Thomas; Franks, Kevin N; Pearson, Shannon; Cho, John B. C; Sun, Alex; Payne, David G; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony M

    2009-01-01

    .... With high dose per fraction radiotherapy, late side effects are of possible concern. In our initial cohort of 42 patients treated with 54 to 60 Gy in three fractions, nine patients have rib fracture...

  3. SU-E-T-547: A Method to Correlate Treatment Planning Issue with Clinical Analysis for Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K; Jung, E; Newton, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Lanham, MD (United States); John R Marsh Cancer Center, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Cornell, D [John R Marsh Cancer Center, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Able, A [Associates In Medical Physics, Lanham, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the algorithms and calculation setting effect and contribution weighing on prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) based SBRT were evaluated for clinical analysis. Methods: A low risk prostate patient under SBRT was selected for the treatment planning evaluation. The treatment target was divided into low dose prescription target volume (PTV) and high Dose PTV. Normal tissue constraints include urethra and femur head, and rectum was separated into anterior, lateral and posterior parts. By varying the constraint limit of treatment plan calculation setting and algorithms, the effect on dose coverage and normal tissue dose constraint parameter carried effective comparison for the nominal prescription and constraint. For each setting, their percentage differences to the nominal value were calculated with geometric mean and harmonic mean. Results: In the arbitrary prostate SBRT case, 14 variables were selected for this evaluation by using nominal prescription and constraint. Six VMAT planning settings were anisotropic analytic algorithm stereotactic beam with and without couch structure in grid size of 1mm and 2mm, non stereotactic beam, Acuros algorithm . Their geometry means of the variable sets for these plans were 112.3%, 111.9%, 112.09%, 111.75%, 111.28%, and 112.05%. And the corresponding harmonic means were 2.02%, 2.16%, 3.15%, 4.74%, 5.47% and 5.55%. Conclusions: In this study, the algorithm difference shows relatively larger harmonic mean between prostate SBRT VMAT plans. This study provides a methodology to find sensitive combined variables related to clinical analysis, and similar approach could be applied to the whole treatment procedure from simulation to treatment in radiotherapy for big clinical data analysis.

  4. Convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Brun; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Schiøler, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Convergence trends between the WAN Internet area, characterized by best effort service provision, and the real time LAN domain, with requirements for guaranteed services, are identified and discussed. A bilateral evolution is identified, where typical bulk service applications from WAN...

  5. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Ruysscher, Dirk de [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aurora, CO (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [German] Fuer fruehe und lokal fortgeschrittene Stadien des nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (NSCLC) wurden Behandlungsleitlinien publiziert

  6. TU-G-BRA-01: Assessing Radiation-Induced Reductions in Regional Lung Perfusion Following Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGurk, R; Green, R; Lawrence, M [NC Cancer Hospital, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Schreiber, E; Das, S; Zagar, T; Marks, L [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheikh, A; McCartney, W; Rivera, P [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose-dependent nature of radiation therapy (RT)-induced lung injury following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT is unclear. We herein report preliminary results of a prospective study assessing the magnitude of RT-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion following hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT. Methods: Four patients undergoing hypo-fractionated stereotactic lung RT (SBRT: 12 Gy x 4 fractions or 10 Gy x 5 fractions) had a pre-treatment SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) perfusion scan providing a 3D map of regional lung perfusion. Scans were repeated 3–6 months post-treatment. Pre- and post SPECT scans were registered to the planning CT scan (and hence the 3D dose data). Changes in regional perfusion (counts per cc on the pre-post scans) were computed in regions of the lung exposed to different doses of radiation (in 5 Gy intervals), thus defining a dose-response function. SPECT scans were internally normalized to the regions receiving <5 Gy. Results: At 3 months post-RT, the changes in perfusion are highly variable. At 6 months, there is a consistent dose-dependent reduction in regional perfusion. The average percent decline in regional perfusion was 10% at 15–20 Gy, 20% at 20–25 Gy, and 30% at 25–30 Gy representing a relatively linear dose response with an approximate 2% reduction per Gray for doses in excess of 10 Gy. There was a subtle increase in perfusion in the lung receiving <10 Gy. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic RT appears to cause a dose-dependent reduction in regional lung perfusion. There appears to be a threshold effect with no apparent perfusion loss at doses <10 Gy, though this might be in part due to the normalization technique used. Additional data is needed from a larger number of patients to better assess this issue. This sort of data can be used to assist optimizing RT treatment plans that minimize the risk of lung injury. Partly supported by the NIH (CA69579) and the Lance Armstrong

  7. Differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung cancer: characterization of 18F-FDG PET/CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Naomi; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Hamamoto, Yasushi; Ochi, Takashi; Sakai, Shinya; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Kajihara, Makoto; Teramoto, Norihiro; Yamashita, Motohiro; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2013-04-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), also known as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), is now a standard treatment option for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer or oligometastatic lung tumor who are medically inoperable or medically operable but refuse surgery. When mass-like consolidation is observed on follow-up CT after SABR, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate tumor recurrence from SABR-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we evaluated the role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation fibrosis after SABR. Between June 2006 and June 2009, 130 patients received SABR for stage I non-small cell lung cancer or metastatic lung cancer at our institution. Fifty-nine patients of them were imaged with FDG-PET/CT after SABR. There were a total of 137 FDG-PET/CT scans for retrospective analysis. The FDG uptake in the pulmonary region was assessed qualitatively using a 3-point scale (0, none or faint; 1, mild; or 2, moderate to intense), and the shape (mass-like or non mass-like) was evaluated. For semi-quantitative analysis, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) was calculated. Sixteen of 59 patients had local failure. In recurrent tumor, the combination of intensity grade 2 and mass-like shape was most common (21/23; 91%). By contrast, in cases of radiation fibrosis, the combination of intensity grade 0 or 1 and non mass-like shape was most common (48/59; 81%). The SUV(max) of tumor recurrence after 12 months was significantly higher than that of radiation fibrosis (8.0 ± 3.2 vs. 2.1 ± 0.9, p recurrence showed the SUV(max) > 4.5 at diagnosis of local failure. At ≥12 months after SABR, these two variables, the combination of intensity 2 and mass-like FDG uptake or SUV(max) > 4.5 acquired a significant high predictive value of local recurrence, finding sensitivity 100% and specificity 100% for both of them. The

  8. Volumetric Modulated Arc-Based Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Selected Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Dosimetric Report and Early Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Sai; Srinivas, Chilukuri; Ramalingam, K.; Babaiah, M.; Swamy, S. Thirumalai; Arun, G.; Kathirvel, M.; Ashok, S. [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.fogliata-cozzi@eoc.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Nicolini, Giorgia [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Rao, K. Srinivasa; Reddy, T. Pratap; Amit, Jotwani [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, with a dosimetric and clinical feasibility study, RapidArc (a volumetric modulated arc technique) for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were subject to multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography) to determine nidus and target volumes, as well as involved organs at risk (optical structures, inner ear, brain stem). Plans for multiple intensity-modulated arcs with a single isocenter were optimized for a fractionation of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed to assess plan quality. Delivery parameters were reported to appraise technical features of RapidArc, and pretreatment quality assurance measurements were carried out to report on quality of delivery. Results: Average size of AVM nidus was 26.2 cm{sup 3}, and RapidArc plans provided complete target coverage with minimal overdosage (V{sub 100%} = 100% and V{sub 110%} < 1%) and excellent homogeneity (<6%). Organs at risk were highly spared. The D{sub 1%} to chiasm, eyes, lenses, optic nerves, and brainstem (mean {+-} SD) was 6.4 {+-} 8.3, 1.9 {+-} 3.8, 2.3 {+-} 2.2, 0.7 {+-} 0.9, 4.4 {+-} 7.2, 12.2 {+-} 9.6 Gy, respectively. Conformity index (CI{sub 95%}) was 2.2 {+-} 0.1. The number of monitor units per gray was 277 {+-} 45, total beam-on time was 2.5 {+-} 0.3 min. Planning vs. delivery {gamma} pass rate was 98.3% {+-} 0.9%. None of the patients developed acute toxicity. With a median follow-up of 9 months, 3 patients presented with deterioration of symptoms and were found to have postradiation changes but responded symptomatically to steroids. These patients continue to do well on follow-up. One patient developed headache and seizures, which was attributed to intracranial bleed, confirmed on imaging. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be

  9. Convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  10. Fractionated vs. single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation and patients' self-reported outcome based on an established questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Fischer, Hanna; Vogel, Marco M.E.; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Neuherberg (Germany); Oechsner, Markus [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Bier, Henning [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Munich (Germany); Meyer, Bernhard [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) has been established as a valid treatment alternative in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimal fractionation. Hearing preservation may be the primary goal for patients with VS, followed by maintenance of quality of life (QoL). From 2002 to 2015, 184 patients with VS were treated with radiosurgery (RS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). A survey on current symptoms and QoL was conducted between February and June 2016. Median follow-up after RT was 7.5 years (range 0-14.4 years). Mean overall survival (OS) after RT was 31.1 years, with 94 and 87% survival at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 13.3 years, with 5- and 10-year PFS of 92%. Hearing could be preserved in RS patients for a median of 36.3 months (range 2.3-13.7 years). Hearing worsened in 17 (30%) cases. Median hearing preservation for FSRT was 48.7 months (range 0.0-13.8 years); 29 (23%) showed hearing deterioration. The difference in hearing preservation was not significant between RS and FSRT (p = 0.3). A total of 123/162 patients participated in the patient survey (return rate 76%). The results correlate well with the information documented in the patient files for tinnitus and facial and trigeminal nerve toxicity. Significant differences appeared regarding hearing impairment, gait uncertainty, and imbalance. These data confirm that RS and FSRT are comparable in terms of local control for VS. RS should be reserved for smaller lesions, while FSRT can be offered independently of tumor size. Patient self-reported outcome during follow-up is of high value. The established questionnaire could be validated in the independent cohort. (orig.) [German] Die stereotaktische Radiotherapie (RT) wurde als gueltige Behandlungsalternative bei Patienten mit Vestibularisschwannom (VS) etabliert. Diskussionen ueber die optimale Fraktionierung laufen jedoch. Der Erhalt von Hoervermoegen

  11. Long-term outcome and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer: the importance of boost volume assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to report the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT as a boost treatment for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods Between March 2004 and July 2007, 26 patients with locally advanced, medically inoperable head and neck cancer or gross residual tumors in close proximity to critical structures following head and neck surgery were treated with SBRT as a boost treatment. All patients were initially treated with standard external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. SBRT boost was prescribed to the median 80% isodose line with a median dose of 21 (range 10–25 Gy in 2–5 (median, 5 fractions. Results The median follow-up after SBRT was 56 (range 27.6 − 80.2 months. The distribution of treatment sites in 26 patients was as follows: the nasopharynx, including the base of the skull in 10 (38.5%; nasal cavity or paranasal sinus in 8 (30.8%; periorbit in 4 (15.4%; tongue in 3 (11.5%; and oropharyngeal wall in 1 (3.8%. The median EBRT dose before SBRT was 50.4 Gy (range 39.6 − 70.2. The major response rate was 100% with 21 (80.8% complete responses (CR. Severe (grade ≥ 3 late toxicities developed in 9 (34.6% patients, and SBRT boost volume was a significant parameter predicting severe late complication. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that a modern SBRT boost is a highly efficient tool for local tumor control. However, we observed a high frequency of serious late complications. More optimized dose fractionation schedule and patient selection are required to achieve excellent local control without significant late morbidities in head and neck boost treatment.

  12. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, Gilmer, E-mail: gilmer.valdes@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Robinson, Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Morel, Delphine [Department of Biomedical Engineering, AIX Marseille 2 University, Marseille (France); Department of Medical Physics, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France); Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  13. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the novalis image-guided system: preliminary results regarding efficacy and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Naoki; Kosaki, Katsura; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuzuya, Teiji; Utsunomiya, Setsuo

    2010-12-01

    www.tcrt.org The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the Novalis image-guided radiotherapy system. After preliminarily treating liver tumors using the Novalis system from July 2006, we started a protocol-based study in February 2008. Eighteen patients (6 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and 12 with metastatic liver tumor) were treated with 55 or 50 Gy, depending upon their planned dose distribution and liver function, delivered in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Four non-coplanar and three coplanar static beams were used. Patient age ranged from 54 to 84 years (median: 72 years). The Child-Pugh classification was Grade A in 17 patients and Grade B in 1. Tumor diameter ranged from 12 to 35 mm (median: 23 mm). Toxicities were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 4.0, and radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was defined by Lawrence's criterion. The median follow-up period was 14.5 months. For all patients, the 1-year overall survival and local control rates were 94% and 86%, respectively. A Grade 1 liver enzyme change was observed in 5 patients, but no RILD or chronic liver dysfunction was observed. SBRT using the Novalis image-guided system is safe and effective for treating primary and metastatic liver tumors. Further investigation of SBRT for liver tumors is warranted. In view of the acceptable toxicity observed with this protocol, we have moved to a new protocol to shorten the overall treatment time and escalate the dose.

  14. Quality assurance for a multicenter Phase II study of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma ≤5 cm: a planning dummy run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jang, Won Il; Kim, Kum Bae; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Kim, Woo Chul; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Eun Seog; Choi, Chul Won; Chang, A Ram; Jo, Sunmi; Kim, Jin-Young

    2017-06-01

    The Korean Radiation Oncology Group (12-02) investigated the outcome of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma ≤5 cm using 60 Gy in three fractions. To evaluate dosimetric differences and compliance in a multicenter trial, a planning dummy run procedure was performed. All six participating institutions were provided the contours of two dummy run cases. Plans were performed following the study protocol to cover the planning target volume with a minimum of 90% of the prescription dose and to satisfy the constraints for organs at risk. We assessed the institutional variations in plans using dose-volume histograms. Different planning techniques were applied: static intensity-modulated radiotherapy in two institutions, CyberKnife in two institutions and RapidArc in two institutions. The conformity index of all 12 plans was ≤1.2. In terms of the planning target volume coverage, all participants followed our study protocol. For the second dummy run case, located in Segment 8 near the heart, the minimum dose of the planning target volume (D99%: dose covering 99% of the planning target volume) was variable because there was no mention of constraints of D99% of the planning target volume in the study protocol. As an important organ at risk, the normal liver volumes receiving plans were >700 ml. Dosimetric parameters showed acceptable compliance with the study protocol. However, we found the possibility of underdose to the planning target volume if the hepatocellular carcinoma lesion was located near organs at risk such as the heart. Based on this dummy run, we will conduct individual case reviews to minimize the effects of study protocol deviation.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Local Control Prediction Using Different Biophysical Models for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Tian Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The consistency for predicting local control (LC data using biophysical models for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT treatment of lung cancer is unclear. This study aims to compare the results calculated from different models using the treatment planning data. Materials and Methods. Treatment plans were designed for 17 patients diagnosed with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using 5 different fraction schemes. The Martel model, Ohri model, and the Tai model were used to predict the 2-year LC value. The Gucken model, Santiago model, and the Tai model were employed to estimate the 3-year LC data. Results. We found that the employed models resulted in completely different LC prediction except for the Gucken and the Santiago models which exhibited quite similar 3-year LC data. The predicted 2-year and 3-year LC values in different models were not only associated with the dose normalization but also associated with the employed fraction schemes. The greatest difference predicted by different models was up to 15.0%. Conclusions. Our results show that different biophysical models influence the LC prediction and the difference is not only correlated to the dose normalization but also correlated to the employed fraction schemes.

  16. Dummy run for a phase II study of stereotactic body radiotherapy of T1-T2 N0M0 medical inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djärv, Emma; Nyman, Jan; Baumann, Pia;

    2006-01-01

    In forthcoming multicentre studies on stereotactic body radiotherapy       (SBRT) compliance with volume and dose prescriptions will be mandatory to       avoid unnecessary heterogeneity bias. To evaluate compliance in a       multicentre setting we used two cases from an ongoing phase II study......,       prescribing doses and creating dose plans. Volumes and doses of the 12       dose plans were evaluated according to the study protocol. For the two       patients the GTV volume range was 24 to 39 cm3 and 26 to 41 cm3,       respectively. The PTV volume range was 90 to 116 cm3, and 112 to 155 cm3......,       respectively. For all plans the margin between CTV and PTV in all       directions followed in detail the protocol. The prescribed dose was for       all centres 45 Gy/3 fractions (isocentre dose about 66 Gy). The mean GTV       doses ranged from 63 to 67 Gy and from 63 to 68 Gy, respectively...

  17. A dose-response relationship for time to bone pain resolution after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bony metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Dept. of Radiology, Section of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States); Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Blanco, Angel I.; Butler, E. Brian [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital/The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States)], email: bteh@tmhs.org; Lo, Simon S. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland (United States); Amato, Robert J. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Oncology, Univ. of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Background. To investigate the utility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of painful renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone metastases, and for a possible dose effect on time to symptom relief. Material and methods. Eighteen patients with 24 painful osseous lesions from metastatic RCC were treated with SBRT. The most common treatment regimens were 24 Gy in 3 fractions and 40 Gy in 5 fractions. The times from treatment to first reported pain relief and time to symptom recurrence were evaluated. Median follow-up was 38 weeks (1-156 weeks). Results. Seventy-eight percent of all patients had pain relief. Patients treated with a BED > 85 Gy achieved faster and more durable pain relief compared to those treated with a BED < 85 Gy. There was decrease in time to pain relief after a change in treatment regimen to 8 Gy x 5 fractions (BED = 86). There was only one patient with grade 1 skin toxicity. No neurological or other toxicity was observed. Conclusions. SBRT can safely and effectively treat painful RCC bony metastases. There appears to be a relationship between radiation dose and time to stable pain relief.

  18. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, H.; Egashira, Y.; Shioyama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshidome, S.; Anai, S.; Nomoto, S.; Honda, H.; Toyofuku, F.; Higashida, Y.; Onizuka, Y.; Terashima, H.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 × 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s-1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  19. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, H; Egashira, Y; Shioyama, Y; Nakamura, K; Yoshidome, S; Anai, S; Nomoto, S; Honda, H; Toyofuku, F; Higashida, Y; Onizuka, Y; Terashima, H

    2009-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 x 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s(-1) by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 +/- 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  20. Contribution of 18F-Fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography to Target Volume Delineation in Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Malignant Cranial Base Tumours: First Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Graf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased amino acid uptake has been demonstrated in intracerebral tumours and head and neck carcinomas of squamous cell origin. We investigated the potential impact of using 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET-PET/CT in addition to conventional imaging for gross tumour volume (GTV delineation in stereotactic radiotherapy of skull base tumours. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive patients with cranial base tumours (10 with squamous cell histology, 4 others. All patients underwent a FET-PET/CT examination in addition to contrast-enhanced CT and 11 patients underwent MRI. All tumours and histologic types showed increased FET uptake. The GTV was defined by all voxels showing hyperintensity in MRI or CT (GTVMRI/CT or enhancement in PET (GTVPET, forming a GTVcomposite that was used for the initial treatment fields. An additional volume of infiltrative growth outside the GTVMRI/CT of about 1.0 ± 2 cm3 (5% of the conventional volume was demonstrated by FET-PET only (GTVPETplus with significant enlargement (>10% of GTVMRI/CT in three patients. From existing data, we found correlation between cellular density and the standardized uptake value (SUV of FET. We were able to substantially reduce the volume of escalated radiation dose (GTVboost by 11 ± 2 cm3 (24% of the conventional volume.

  1. Comparison of Dosimetric Performance among Commercial Quality Assurance Systems for Verifying Pretreatment Plans of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Flattening-Filter-Free Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of different commercial quality assurance (QA) systems for the pretreatment verification plan of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique using a flattening-filter-free beam. The verification for 20 pretreatment cancer patients (seven lung, six spine, and seven prostate cancers) were tested using three QA systems (EBT3 film, I’mRT MatriXX array, and MapCHECK). All the SBRT-VMAT plans were optimized in the Eclipse (version 11.0.34) treatment planning system (TPS) using the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm and were delivered to the Varian TrueBeam® accelerator equipped with a high-definition multileaf collimator. Gamma agreement evaluation was analyzed with the criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement (2%/2 mm) or 3%/3 mm. The highest passing rate (99.1% for 3%/3 mm) was observed on the MapCHECK system while the lowest passing rate was obtained on the film. The pretreatment verification results depend on the QA systems, treatment sites, and delivery beam energies. However, the delivery QA results for all QA systems based on the TPS calculation showed a good agreement of more than 90% for both the criteria. It is concluded that the three 2D QA systems have sufficient potential for pretreatment verification of the SBRT-VMAT plan. PMID:27709851

  2. {sup 18}F-FDG PET during stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung tumours cannot predict outcome: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegman, Erwin M.; Ubbels, Jan F.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Widder, Joachim [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Pruim, Jan [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Groen, Harry J.M. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Pulmonology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) has been used to assess metabolic response several months after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, whether a metabolic response can be observed already during treatment and thus can be used to predict treatment outcome is undetermined. Ten medically inoperable patients with FDG PET-positive lung tumours were included. SBRT consisted of three fractions of 20 Gy delivered at the 80% isodose at days 1, 6 and 11. FDG PET was performed before, on day 6 immediately prior to administration of the second fraction of SBRT and 12 weeks after completion of SBRT. Tumour metabolism was assessed semi-quantitatively using the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and SUV{sub 70%}. After the first fraction, median SUV{sub max} increased from 6.7 to 8.1 (p = 0.07) and median SUV{sub 70%} increased from 5.7 to 7.1 (p = 0.05). At 12 weeks, both median SUV{sub max} and median SUV{sub 70%} decreased by 63% to 3.1 (p = 0.008) and to 2.5 (p = 0.008), respectively. SUV increased during treatment, possibly due to radiation-induced inflammation. Therefore, it is unlikely that {sup 18}F-FDG PET during SBRT will predict treatment success. (orig.)

  3. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F; Higashida, Y; Onizuka, Y; Terashima, H [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Egashira, Y [Department of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Shioyama, Y; Nomoto, S; Honda, H [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Nakamura, K [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, 8-19-1, Nanakuma, Jyonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Yoshidome, S; Anai, S [Division of Radiology, Department of Medical Technology, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)], E-mail: arimura@shs.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 x 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s{sup -1} by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 {+-} 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  4. Convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Ramjee

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main conclusions which can be drawn from the discussions on Future Communication Systems and lessons on Unpredictable Future of Wireless Communication Systems. Future systems beyond the third generation are already under discussions in international bodies, such as ITU, WW...... and R&D programmes worldwide. The incoming era is characterized by the convergence of networks and access technology and the divergence of applications. Future mobile communication systems should bring something more than only faster data or wireless internet access....

  5. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  6. Salvage stereotactic body radiotherapy for locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beant Singh Gill

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Locally-recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (LR-NSCLC remains challenging treat, particularly in patients having received prior radiotherapy. Heterogeneous populations and varied treatment intent in existing literature result in significant limitations in evaluating efficacy of lung re-irradiation. In order to better establish the impact of re-irradiation in patients with LR-NSCLC following high-dose radiotherapy, we report outcomes for patients treated with prior sublobar resection and brachytherapy that subsequently underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT.Methods: A retrospective review of patients initially treated with sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy, who later developed LR-NSCLC along the suture line, was performed. Patients received salvage SBRT with curative intent. Dose and fractionation was based on tumor location and size, with a median prescription dose of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (range 20-60 Gy in 1-4 fractions.Results: Thirteen consecutive patients were identified with median follow-up of 2.1 years (range 0.7-5.6 years. Two in-field local failures occurred at 7.5 and 11.1 months, resulting in 2-year local control of 83.9% (95% CI 63.5-100.0%. Two-year disease-free survival and overall survival estimates were 38.5% (95% CI 0.0-65.0% and 65.8% (95% CI, 38.2-93.4%. Four patients (31% remained disease-free at last follow-up. All but one patient who experienced disease recurrence developed isolated or synchronous distant metastases. Only one patient (7.7% developed grade ≥3 toxicity, consisting of grade 3 esophageal stricture following a centrally located recurrence previously treated with radiofrequency ablation.Conclusion: Despite high local radiation doses delivered to lung parenchyma previously with I125 brachytherapy, re-irradiation with SBRT for LR-NSCLC results in excellent local control with limited morbidity, allowing for potential disease cure in a subset of patients.

  7. Potential interest of a development of a radiotherapy scheme in stereotactic conditions with dose escalation focused on the tumour in the case of prostate cancers with a favourable prognostic; Interet potentiel de developper un schema de radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques avec escalade de dose focalisee dans la tumeur dans les cancers de prostate de pronostic favorable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, O.; De Bari, B. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Udrescu, C.; Sotton, M.P.; Jalade, P. [Service de physique medicale, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Rouviere, O. [Service de radiologie urologique, hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Bouffard-Vercelli, J. [Service de radiologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2010-10-15

    Irradiation in stereotactic conditions is an irradiation technique used in the case of low risk prostate cancer. Several fractionations have already been assessed. Recent advances in MRI technology allowed a more precise visualization of macroscopic tumours in the prostate and therefore offer the possibility of a focal increase of irradiation dose in the tumour. The authors report a study aiming at assessing the interest of developing an original scheme of radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions with a focal increase of irradiation. Dosimetric scanographies of nine patients have been used. The prostate and the tumour have been contoured. Two planning target volumes have been determined. For each patient, an intensity-modulated conformation radiotherapy plan has been optimized with three different dose levels. As a result, the authors notice that the dose increase in the prostate significantly limits the doses received by the rectum and the bladder. Short communication

  8. Malignant melanoma and radiotherapy: past myths, excellent local control in 146 studied lesions at Georgetown University, and improving future management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jahanshahi, Pooya; Nasr, Nadim; Unger, Keith; Batouli, Ali; Gagnon, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    .... We conducted a retrospective study of all patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy at Georgetown University Hospital from May 2002 through November 2008...

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer: Non-invasive real-time tumor tracking; Radiotherapie stereotaxique de carcinomes bronchiques primitifs: suivi non invasif de la cible en temps reel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibault, J.E.; Prevost, B.; Mirabel, X.; Lacornerie, T.; Dubus, F.; Lartigau, E. [Departement universitaire de radiotherapie, universite Lille 2, CyberKnife Nord-Ouest, centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France); Dansin, E. [Departement d' oncologie generale, centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiation therapy using the CyberKnife{sup R} has been introduced in France in 2006. Two treatment modalities are currently available: the first one (Synchrony{sup R}) is a real-time fiducial-based target tracking system, while the other (Xsight Lung Tracking [XLT] System{sup R}) is completely fiducial-free. Patients and methods: Sixty-eight patients were treated for a pulmonary tumor between June 2007 and November 2009. Since august 2008, the XLT System{sup R} was used for 26 patients. We report the necessary conditions for the XLT System (position, laterality and size of the tumor), the toxicity and outcome of this treatment. Results: Twenty-two patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 6 months (min = 3; max = 16). Local control rate was 100%. The main toxicity was grade grade 1 pulmonary alveolitis (27%). No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. Conclusion: The high local control rate and low toxicity obtained with the CyberKnife{sup R} XLT System{sup R} suggest that such treatment is an alternative for inoperable patients. (authors)

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Treatment for Organ Confined Low and Intermediate Risk Prostate Carcinoma, a Seven Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Jay Katz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT takes advantage of the prostate’s low α/β ratio to deliver a large radiation dose in few fractions. Initial studies on small groups of low-risk patients support SBRT’s potential for clinical efficacy while limiting treatment-related morbidity and maintained quality of life (QOL. This prospective study expands upon prior studies to further evaluate SBRT efficacy for a large patient population with organ confined, low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: 477 patients with prostate cancer received CyberKnife SBRT. The median age was 68.6 years and the median PSA was 5.3 ng/ml. 324 patients were low-risk (PSA 10, or Gleason 3+4 with PSA <10; n=106 had a significantly higher bDFS than patients with high intermediate-risk (Gleason 3+4 with PSA 10-20 or Gleason 4+3; n=47, with bDFS of 93.5% versus 79.3%, respectively. For the low and low intermediate-risk groups, there was no difference in median PSA nadir or biochemical disease control between doses of 35 and 36.25 Gy. Conclusions: CyberKnife SBRT produces excellent biochemical control rates. Median PSA levels compare f

  11. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is considered a success. In some tumors, like acoustic neuromas, a temporary enlargement may be observed following ... spots on the back of your head. A box-shaped head frame will be attached to your ...

  12. The impact of microsurgery, stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of meningiomas depending on different localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimolong, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Meningiomas are the most common benign intracranial neoplasms with a slow growth presented as the intracranial lesion. These tumors are without any symptoms for a long time. At the time of diagnosis it is frequently an asymptomatic tumor. In that case the therapist may well suggest a wait-and-see strategy. The therapy of meningiomas focuses firstly on the microsurgical treatment. Volume reduction can be achieved immediately after treatment. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an important non-invasive treatment option for recurrent tumors or meningiomas with partial resection. The technical equipment for the stereotactic radiosurgery is a cost intensive investment. In this context the high precision of the intervention, presented as a low invasiveness of the treatment, is an important factor. The aim of this assessment is to identify the chances and limitations of the diverse treatment options and to estimate their outcome for different localisations of meningiomas. Methods: In December 2007 a systematic literature search was conducted using the most relevant medical databases. The whole strategy and the used search terms were documented. The literature search was supplemented with an internet and literature based hand search on law, ethics and economics. Primary studies and systematic reviews which report relevant outcomes are included in this analysis. The current assessment is based on the available evidence that was found at the time of the literature search. Results: A total of 31 publications for the medical focus of assessment and three reports from the economical hand search were included. In general, it is not possible to identify neither randomised clinical trials or prospective, contrasting cohort studies nor studies summarising results from such studies. The results presented in the literature published by surgeons strongly vary regarding localisation of meningiomas. Publications not differentiating between the

  13. Assessment of Monte Carlo algorithm for compliance with RTOG 0915 dosimetric criteria in peripheral lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; McClinton, Christopher; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Parvesh; Wang, Fen

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Monte Carlo-generated dose distributions with the X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of peripheral lung cancer patients using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with non-protocol dose-volume normalization and to assess plan outcomes utilizing RTOG 0915 dosimetric compliance criteria. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) currently require radiation dose to be calculated using tissue density heterogeneity corrections. Dosimetric criteria of RTOG 0915 were established based on superposition/convolution or heterogeneities corrected pencil beam (PB-hete) algorithms for dose calculations. Clinically, more accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based algorithms are now routinely used for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) dose calculations. Hence, it is important to determine whether MC calculations in the delivery of lung SBRT can achieve RTOG standards. In this report, we evaluate iPlan generated MC plans for peripheral lung cancer patients treated with SBRT using dose-volume histogram (DVH) normalization to determine if the RTOG 0915 compliance criteria can be met. This study evaluated 20 Stage I-II NSCLC patients with peripherally located lung tumors, who underwent MC-based SBRT with heterogeneity correction using X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm (Brainlab iPlan version 4.1.2). Total dose of 50 to 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions was delivered to the planning target vol-ume (PTV) with at least 95% of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100% ≥ 95%). The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of 4D CT scans. The PTV included the ITV plus 5 mm uniform margin applied to the ITV. The PTV ranged from 11.1 to 163.0 cc (mean = 46.1 ± 38.7 cc). Organs at risk (OARs) including ribs were delineated on mean intensity projection (MeanIP) images of 4D CT scans. Optimal clinical MC SBRT plans were

  14. Treatment of acromegaly patients with risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy. High local control and low toxicity in a pooled series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Kinfe, Thomas; Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [Mediclin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with acromegaly. In total 35 patients (16 men/19 women, mean age 54 years) were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk). The mean tumor volume was 3.71 ccm (range: 0.11-22.10 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 21 patients were treated with SRS and 12 patients with SRT, 2 patients received both consecutively. The median follow-up (FU) reached 8 years with a 5-year overall survival (OS) of 87.3 % [confidence interval (CI): 70.8-95.6 %] and 5-year local control rate of 97.1 % (CI: 83.4-99.8 %). Almost 80 % (28/35) presented tumor shrinkage during FU. Endocrinological cure was achieved in 23 % and IGF-1 normalization with reduced medication was achieved in 40 % of all patients. An endocrinological response was generally achieved within the first 3 years, but endocrinological cure can require more than 8 years. A new adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism occurred in 13 patients (46.4 %). A new visual field disorder and a new oculomotor palsy occurred in 1 patient, respectively. Patients with occurrence of visual/neurological impairments had a longer FU (p = 0.049). Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system. The timing and rate of endocrine improvements are difficult to predict. One has to accept an unavoidable rate of additional adrenocorticotropic hypopituitarism in the long term. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung dieser Arbeit ist die Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit Akromegalie aus 2 Zentren. Insgesamt 35 Patienten (16

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pulmonary Metastases From Soft-Tissue Sarcomas: Excellent Local Lesion Control and Improved Patient Survival

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    Dhakal, Sughosh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Corbin, Kimberly S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Milano, Michael T.; Philip, Abraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Sahasrabudhe, Deepak [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Jones, Carolyn [Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic/Foregut, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Constine, Louis S., E-mail: louis_constine@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with pulmonary metastases (PM) from soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) have historically been treated with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Since 2001, we have treated PM with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We postulated that SBRT for PM from STS would yield excellent local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with PM from STS, diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 at University of Rochester, were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received multimodality treatment comprising of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation. SBRT used the Novalis ExacTrac patient positioning platform, vacuum bag immobilization, and relaxed end-expiratory breath hold techniques. Results: Leiomyosarcoma (23%), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (19%), and synovial sarcoma (15%) were the most common histologies. Forty-eight percent initially presented with PM, whereas 52% developed PM at a median of 0.7 (0.3-7.3) years after initial diagnosis. Median follow-up from diagnosis of PM was 0.9 (0.3-7.3) years. Fifteen patients underwent SBRT to 74 lesions. Median number of lesions treated was 4 (1-16) per patient and 3.5 (1-6) per session. Preferred dose and fractionation was 50 Gy in 5 Gy fractions. Three-year LC was 82%. No patients experienced Grade {>=}3 toxicity. Median OS was 2.1 (0.8-11.5) years for patients treated with SBRT, and 0.6 (0.1-7.8) years for those who never received SBRT (p = 0.002). Conclusions: SBRT provides excellent LC of PM and may extend OS. SBRT should be considered for all patients with PM from STS, particularly those who are not surgical candidates. Further investigation is warranted to establish criteria for the use of SBRT for STS patients with PM.

  16. Comparison of quality of life after stereotactic body radiotherapy and surgery for early-stage prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Alan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the long-term efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT becomes established and other prostate cancer treatment approaches are refined and improved, examination of quality of life (QOL following prostate cancer treatment is critical in driving both patient and clinical treatment decisions. We present the first study to compare QOL after SBRT and radical prostatectomy, with QOL assessed at approximately the same times pre- and post-treatment and using the same validated QOL instrument. Methods Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with either radical prostatectomy (n = 123 Spanish patients or SBRT (n = 216 American patients. QOL was assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC grouped into urinary, sexual, and bowel domains. For comparison purposes, SBRT EPIC data at baseline, 3 weeks, 5, 11, 24, and 36 months were compared to surgery data at baseline, 1, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Differences in patient characteristics between the two groups were assessed using Chi-squared tests for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. Generalized estimating equation (GEE models were constructed for each EPIC scale to account for correlation among repeated measures and used to assess the effect of treatment on QOL. Results The largest differences in QOL occurred in the first 1–6 months after treatment, with larger declines following surgery in urinary and sexual QOL as compared to SBRT, and a larger decline in bowel QOL following SBRT as compared to surgery. Long-term urinary and sexual QOL declines remained clinically significantly lower for surgery patients but not for SBRT patients. Conclusions Overall, these results may have implications for patient and physician clinical decision making which are often influenced by QOL. These differences in sexual, urinary and bowel QOL should be closely considered in selecting the right treatment

  17. SU-C-BRB-06: Dosimetric Impact of Breast Contour Reconstruction Errors in GammaPod Stereotactic Radiotherapy

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    Niu, Y [Xcision Medical Systems LLC, Columbia, MD (United States); Becker, S; Mutaf, Y [University Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yu, C [Xcision Medical Systems LLC, Columbia, MD (United States); University Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The first GammaPod™ unit, a dedicated prone stereotactic treatment device for early stage breast cancer, has been installed and commissioned at University of Maryland School of Medicine. The objective of this study was to investigate potential dosimetric impact of inaccurate breast contour. Methods: In GammaPod treatments, patient’s beast is immobilized by a breast cup device (BCID) throughout the entire same-day imaging and treatment procedure. 28 different BICD sizes are available to accommodate patients with varying breast sizes. A mild suction helps breast tissue to conform to the shape of the cup with selected size. In treatment planning, dose calculation utilizes previously calculated dose distributions for available cup geometry rather than the breast shape from CT image. Patient CT images with breast cups indicate minor geometric discrepancy between the matched shape of the cup and the breast contour, i.e., the contour size is larger or smaller. In order to investigate the dosimetric impact of these discrepancies, we simulated such discrepancies and reassessed the dose to target as well as skin. Results: In vicinity of skin, hot/cold spots were found when matched cup size was smaller/larger than patient’s breast after comparing the corrected dose profiles from Monte Carlo simulation with the planned dose from TPS. The overdosing/underdosing of target could yield point dose differences as large as 5% due to these setup errors (D95 changes within 2.5%). Maximal skin dose was overestimated/underestimated up to 25%/45% when matched cup size was larger/smaller than real breast contour. Conclusion: The dosimetric evaluation suggests substantial underdosing/overdosing with inaccurate cup geometry during planning, which is acceptable for current clinical trial. Further studies are needed to evaluate such impact to treating small volume close to skin.

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayakawa Shiho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrences of NSCLC. Tumor movement was measured with fluoroscopy under breath holding, free breathing on a couch, and free breathing in the BodyFIX system. SpO2 levels were measured with a finger pulseoximeter under each condition. The delivered dose was 44, 48 or 52 Gy, depending on tumor diameter, in 4 fractions over 10 or 11 days. Results By using the BodyFIX system, respiratory tumor movements were significantly reduced compared with the free-breathing condition in both craniocaudal and lateral directions, although the amplitude of reduction in the craniocaudal direction was 3 mm or more in only 27% of the patients. The average SpO2 did not decrease by using the system. At 3 years, the local control rate was 80% for all lesions. Overall survival was 76%, cause-specific survival was 92%, and local progression-free survival was 76% at 3 years in primary NSCLC patients. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis developed in 7 patients. Conclusion Respiratory tumor movement was modestly suppressed by the BodyFIX system, while the SpO2 level did not decrease. It was considered a simple and effective method for SBRT of lung tumors. Preliminary results were encouraging.

  19. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

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    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  20. SU-E-T-290: Dosimetric Accuracy of Acuros XB and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Small Lung Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Amy S; Yang, Y; Bush, K; Fahimian, B; Hsu, A [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of dose calculation for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of small lesions critically depends on the proper modeling of the lateral scatter in heterogeneous media. In recent years, grid-based Boltzman solvers such as Acuros XB (AXB) have been introduced for enhanced modeling of radiation transport in heterogeneous media. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric impact of dose calculation between AXB and convolution-superposition algorithms such as analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for small lesion sizes and different beam energies. Methods: Five lung SABR VMAT cases with GTV ranged from 0.8cm to 2.5cm in diameter were studied. For each case, doses were calculated by AAA, AXB (V11031) and Monte Carlo simulation (MC) with the same plan parameters for 10MV and 6MV. The dose calculation accuracy were evaluated by comparing DVHs and dose distributions with MC as the benchmark. The accuracy of calculated dose was also validated by EBT3 film measurement with a field size of 3cmx3cm in a thorax phantom. Results: For 10MV and GTV less than 1cm, dose calculated by AXB agrees well with MC compared to AAA. Dose difference calculated with AXB and AAA could be up to 30%. For GTV greater than 2cm, calculation results of AXB and AAA agree within 5% in GTV. For 6MV, the difference between calculated doses by AXB and AAA is less 10% for GTV less than 1cm. Based on film measurements, lung dose was overestimated 10% and 20% by AAA for 6MV and 10MV. Conclusion: Lateral scatter and transport is modeled more accurately by AXB than AAA in heterogeneous media, especially for small field size and high energy beams. The accuracy depends on the assigned material in calculation. If grid-based Boltzman solvers or MC are not available for calculation, lower energy beams should be used for treatment.

  1. Clinical outcome and predictors of survival and pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joe Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR can achieve excellent local control rates in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and has emerged as a standard treatment option for patients who cannot undergo surgery or those with isolated recurrences. However, factors that may predict toxicity or survival are largely unknown. We sought here to identify predictors of survival and pneumonitis after SABR for NSCLC in a relatively large single-institution series. Methods Subjects were 130 patients with stage I NSCLC treated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT –planned, on-board volumetric image–guided SABR to 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Disease was staged by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and scans were obtained again at the second follow-up after SABR. Results At a median follow-up time of 26 months, the 2-year local control rate was 98.5%. The median overall survival (OS time was 60 months, and OS rates were 93.0% at 1 year, 78.2% at 2 years, and 65.3% at 3 years. No patient experienced grade 4–5 toxicity; 15 had radiation pneumonitis (12 [9.3%] grade 2 and 3 [2.3%] grade 3. Performance status, standardized uptake value (SUVmax on staging PET/CT, tumor histology, and disease operability were associated with OS on univariate analysis, but only staging SUVmax was independently predictive on multivariate analysis (P = 0.034. Dosimetric factors were associated with radiation pneumonitis on univariate analysis, but only mean ipsilateral lung dose ≥9.14 Gy was significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.005. Conclusions OS and radiation pneumonitis after SABR for stage I NSCLC can be predicted by staging PET SUVmax and ipsilateral mean lung dose, respectively.

  2. Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for pulmonary Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with lesions in close approximation to the chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. FitzGerald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall pain and discomfort has been recognized as a significant late effect of radiation therapy in historical and modern treatment models. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT is becoming an important treatment tool in oncology care for patients with intrathoracic lesions. For lesions in close approximation to the chest wall including lesions requiring motion management, SBRT techniques can deliver high dose to the chest wall. As an unintended target of consequence, there is possibility of generating significant chest wall pain and discomfort as a late effect of therapy. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the potential role of Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT technologies in decreasing chest wall dose in SBRT treatment of pulmonary lesions in close approximation to the chest wall.Ten patients with pulmonary lesions of various sizes and topography in close approximation to the chest wall were selected for retrospective review. All volumes including target, chest wall, ribs, and lung were contoured with maximal intensity projection maps and four-dimensional computer tomography planning. Radiation therapy planning consisted of static techniques including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy compared to VMAT therapy to a dose of 60Gy in 12Gy fractions. Dose volume histogram to rib, chest wall, and lung were compared between plans with statistical analysis.In all patients dose and volume were improved to ribs and chest wall using VMAT technologies compared to static field techniques. On average, volume receiving 30Gy to the chest wall was improved by 72%;the ribs by 60%. In only one patient did the VMAT treatment technique increase pulmonary volume receiving 20Gy (V20.VMAT technology has potential of limiting radiation dose to sensitive chest wall regions in patients with lesions in close approximation to this structure. This would also have potential value to lesions treated with SBRT in other body regions where targets abut critical

  3. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of the shorter treatment delivery time. Future studies are necessary to assess the clinical outcome and the toxicity.

  4. Comparison of pencil beam–based homogeneous vs inhomogeneous target dose planning for stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral lung tumors through Monte Carlo–based recalculation

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    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro, E-mail: ohtakara@murakami.asahi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Murakami Memorial Hospital, Asahi University, Gifu (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain whether homogeneous target dose planning is suitable for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung cancer under appropriate breath-holding. For 20 peripheral lung tumors, paired dynamic conformal arc plans were generated by only adjusting the leaf margin to the planning target volume (PTV) edge for fulfilling the conditions such that the prescription isodose surface (IDS) encompassing exactly 95% of the PTV (PTV D{sub 95}) corresponds to 95% and 80% IDS, normalized to 100% at the PTV isocenter under a pencil beam (PB) algorithm with radiologic path length correction. These plans were recalculated using the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm under otherwise identical conditions, and then compared. Lesions abutting the parietal pleura or not were defined as edge or island tumors, respectively, and the influences of the target volume and its location relative to the chest wall on the target dose were examined. The median (range) leaf margin required for the 95% and 80% plans was 3.9 mm (1.3 to 5.0) and −1.2 mm (−1.8 to 0.1), respectively. Notably, the latter was significantly correlated negatively with PTV. In the 80% plans, the PTV D{sub 95} was slightly higher under XVMC, whereas the PTV D{sub 98} was significantly lower, irrespective of the dose calculation algorithm used. Other PTV and all gross tumor volume doses were significantly higher, while the lung doses outside the PTV were slightly lower. The target doses increased as a function of PTV and were significantly lower for island tumors than for edge tumors. In conclusion, inhomogeneous target dose planning using smaller leaf margin for a larger tumor volume was deemed suitable in ensuring more sufficient target dose while slightly reducing lung dose. In addition, more inhomogeneous target dose planning using <80% IDS (e.g., 70%) for PTV covering would be preferable for island tumors.

  5. Feasibility report of image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (IG-SBRT) with tomotherapy for early stage medically inoperable lung cancer using extreme hypofractionation

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    Hodge, Wes; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Jaradat, Hazim A.; Orton, Nigel P.; Khuntia, Deepak; Mehta, Minesh P. [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Human Oncology; Traynor, Anne [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Weigel, Tracey [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Surgery

    2006-09-15

    We report on the technical feasibility, dosimetric aspects, and daily image-guidance capability with megavoltage CT (MVCT) of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using helical tomotherapy for medically inoperable T1/2 N0 M0 non-small cell lung cancer. Nine patients underwent treatment planning with 4D-CT in a double vacuum based immobilization system to minimize tumor motion and to define a lesion-specific 4D-motion envelope. Patients received 60 Gy in 5 fractions within 10 days to a PTV defined by a motion envelope plus a 6 mm expansion for microscopic extension and setup error using tomotherapy, with daily pretreatment MVCT image guidance. The primary endpoint was technical feasibility. Secondary endpoints were defining the acute and sub-acute toxicities and tumor response. Forty three of 45 fractions were successfully delivered, with an average delivery time of 22 minutes. MVCT provided excellent tumor visualization for daily image guidance. No significant tumor regression was observed on MVCT in any patient during therapy. Median mean normalized total doses were: tumor 117 Gy{sub 10}; residual lung 9 Gy{sub 3}. Maximum fraction-size equivalent dose values were: esophagus 5 Gy{sub 3}{sup 9}; cord 7 Gy{sub 3}{sup 6}. No patient experienced = grade 2 pulmonary toxicity. 3 complete, 4 partial and 2 stable responses were observed, with <3 months median follow-up. The mean tumor regression is 72%. SBRT using tomotherapy proved to be feasible, safe and free of major technical limitations or acute toxicities. Daily pretreatment MVCT imaging allows for precise daily tumor targeting with the patient in the actual treatment position, and therefore provides for precise image guidance.

  6. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45-60 Gy in 5-10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5-54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm(3) (range, 0.40-9.27 mg/cm(3)). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors.

  7. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.Pham@petermac.org [Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar [Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer in Patients 80 Years and Older: A Multi-center Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Richard J; Patel, Pretesh R; Zhang, Xinyan; Press, Robert H; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Pillai, Rathi N; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Fernandez, Felix G; Force, Seth D; Curran, Walter J; Higgins, Kristin A

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. Despite the limited number of octogenarians and nonagenarians on trials of SBRT, its use is increasingly being offered in these patients, given the aging cancer population, medical fragility, or patient preference. Our purpose was to investigate the efficacy, safety, and survival of patients ≥ 80 years old treated with definitive lung SBRT. Patients who underwent SBRT were reviewed from 2009 to 2015 at 4 academic centers. Patients diagnosed at ≥ 80 years old were included. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed. Recursive partitioning analysis was done to determine a subgroup of patients most likely to benefit from therapy. A total of 58 patients were included, with a median age of 84.9 years (range, 80.1-95.2 years), a median follow-up time of 19.9 months (range, 6.9-64.9 months), a median fraction size of 10.0 Gy (range, 7.0-20.0 Gy), and a median number of fractions of 5.0 (range, 3.0-8.0 fractions). On multivariate analysis, higher Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was associated with higher local recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.92; P patients with KPS ≥ 75 had improved 3-year cancer-specific and overall survival (99.4% and 91.9%, respectively) compared with patients with KPS lung SBRT for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer was efficacious and safe in patients ≥ 80 years old. Patients with a KPS of ≥ 75 derived the most benefit from therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  10. Conformity analysis to demonstrate reproducibility of target volumes for Margin-Intense Stereotactic Radiotherapy for borderline-resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoake, Daniel L P; Robinson, Maxwell; Grose, Derek; McIntosh, David; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Patel, Neel; Partridge, Mike; Mukherjee, Somnath; Hawkins, Maria A

    2016-10-01

    Margin-directed neoadjuvant radiotherapy for borderline-resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) aims to facilitate clear surgical margins. A systematic method was developed for definition of a boost target volume prior to a formal phase-I study. Reference structures were defined by two oncologists and one radiologist, target structures were submitted by eight oncologist investigators and compared using conformity indices. Resultant risk of duodenal bleed (NTCP) was modelled. For GTV, reference volume was 2.1cm(3) and investigator mean was 6.03cm(3) (95% CI 3.92-8.13cm(3)), for boost volume 1.1cm(3) and 1.25cm(3) (1.02-1.48cm(3)). Mean Dice conformity coefficient for GTV was 0.47 (0.38-0.56), and for boost volume was significantly higher at 0.61 (0.52-0.70, p=0.01). Discordance index (DI) for GTV was 0.65 (0.56-0.75) and for boost volume was significantly lower at 0.39 (0.28-0.49, p=0.001). NTCP using reference contours was 2.95%, with mean for investigator contour plans 3.93% (3.63-4.22%). Correlations were seen between NTCP and GTV volume (p=0.02) and NTCP and DI (correlation coefficient 0.83 (0.29-0.97), p=0.01). Better conformity with reference was shown for boost volume compared with GTV. Investigator GTV volumes were larger than reference, had higher DI scores and modelled toxicity risk. A consistent method of target structure definition for margin-directed pancreatic radiotherapy is demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT Cost-Effectiveness Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash eBijlani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and synthesize the current stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT cost-effectiveness research to date across several common SRS and SBRT applications. Methods: This review was limited to comparative economic evaluations of SRS, SBRT and alternative treatments (e.g., other radiotherapy techniques or surgery. Based on PubMed searches using the terms, stereotactic, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, economic evaluation, quality adjusted life year (QALY, cost, cost effectiveness, cost utility and cost analysis, published studies of cost-effectiveness and health economics were obtained. Included were articles in peer-reviewed journals that presented a comparison of costs between treatment alternatives from January 1997 to November 2012. Papers were excluded if they did not present cost calculations, therapeutic cost comparisons, or health economic endpoints. Results: Clinical outcomes and costs of SRS and SBRT were compared to other therapies for treatment of cancer in the brain, spine, lung, prostate and pancreas. Treatment outcomes for SRS and SBRT are usually superior or comparable, and cost-effective, relative to alternative techniques. Conclusion: Based on the review of current SRS and SBRT clinical and health economic literature, from a patient perspective, SRS and SBRT provide patients a clinically-effective treatment option, while from the payer and provider perspective, SRS and SBRT demonstrate cost-savings.

  12. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neuroma. Volume changes and hearing results after 89-month median follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranzinger, Manfred; Fastner, Gerd [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Zehentmayr, Franz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, radART - Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies, Salzburg (Austria); Oberascher, Gerhard [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Merz, Florian; Rahim, Hassan [Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Medical Radiation Protection Unit, Salzburg (Austria); Nairz, Olaf [Clinic Bad Trissl, Oberaudorf (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate toxicity and local control following hypofractionated stereotactic radiation treatment with special focus on changes in tumor volume and hearing capacity. In all, 29 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma were treated between 2001 and 2007 within a prospective radiation protocol (7 x 4 Gy ICRU dose). Median tumor volume was 0.9 ml. Follow-up started at 6 months and was repeated annually with MRI volumetry and audiometry. Hearing preservation was defined as preservation of Class A/B hearing according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (1995). No patient had any intervention after a median imaging follow-up of 89.5 months, one patient showed radiological progression. Transient increase of tumor volume developed in 17/29 patients, whereas 22/29 patients (75.9 %) presented with a volume reduction at last follow-up. A total of 21 patients were eligible for hearing evaluation. Mean pure tone average (PTA) deteriorated from 39.3 to 65.9 dB and mean speech discrimination score (SDS) dropped from 74.3 to 38.1 %. The 5-year actuarial Class A/B hearing preservation rate was 50.0 ± 14.4 %. Radiation increases only minimally, if at all, the hearing deterioration which emerges by observation alone. Presbyacusis is not responsible for this deterioration. Transient tumor enlargement is common. Today radiation of small- and medium-sized acoustic neuroma can be performed with different highly conformal techniques as fractionated treatment or single low-dose radiosurgery with equal results regarding tumor control, hearing preservation, and side effects. Hypofractionation is more comfortable for the patient than conventional regimens and represents a serious alternative to frameless radiosurgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war die Evaluierung der Toxizitaet und der lokalen Tumorkontrolle einer hypofraktionierten stereotaktischen Bestrahlung mit besonderem Augenmerk auf Veraenderungen von Tumorvolumen und

  13. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland and Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    surrounding lung tissue, the V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and V{sub 12.5} {sub Gy} were reduced by 5.5% (p = 0.002) and 4.5% (p < 0.001). These dosimetric improvements in the fall-off were not observed for the X10FFF plans. Differences in sparing of normal tissues were not found to be statistically significant for either of the two FFF beams. Mean beam-on times were 111 s (2SD = 11 s) for X10FFF, 128 s (2SD = 19 s) for X6FFF, and X6FF plans required on average 269 s (2SD = 71 s). While the mean dose rate was 1555 ± 264 and 1368 ± 63 MU/min, for X10FFF and X6FFF, plans using the conventional X6FF were delivered with the constant maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min. Verification of all plans showed acceptable and comparable results for all plans in homogeneous as well as heterogeneous phantoms. Mean GS (3%, 2 mm) using the Delta{sup 4} phantom were 98.9% (2SD = 3.2%), 99.2% (2SD = 2.3%), and 99.2% (2SD = 2.3%) for X6FFF, X6FF, and X10FFF modalities. Verification using a thorax phantom showed GS > 98% in all cases. Conclusions: The use of FFF beams for stereotactic radiation therapy of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients yielded dose distributions qualitatively comparable to flattened beams and significantly reduced treatment delivery time. Utilizing the X6FFF beam improved conformity of dose distribution. On the other hand, X10FFF beam offered a slight improvement in treatment efficiency, and lower skin and peripheral dose. All effects were relatively small.

  14. Distinguishing radiation fibrosis from tumour recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer: A quantitative analysis of CT density changes

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    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Ward, Aaron D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Palma, David A. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: david.palma@lhsc.on.ca; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Background. For patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) can be difficult to differentiate from recurrence. We measured the utility of CT image feature analysis in differentiating RILI from recurrence, compared to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST). Materials and methods. Twenty-two patients with 24 lesions treated with SABR were selected (11 with recurrence, 13 with substantial RILI). On each follow-up CT, consolidative changes and ground glass opacities (GGO) were contoured. For each lesion, contoured regions were analysed for mean and variation in Hounsfi eld units (HU), 3D volume, and RECIST size during follow-up. Results . One hundred and thirtysix CT scans were reviewed, with a median imaging follow-up of 26 months. The 3D volume and RECIST measures of consolidative changes could significantly distinguish recurrence from RILI, but not until 15 months post-SABR; mean volume at 15 months [all values {+-}95% confidence interval (CI)] of 30.1 {+-} 19.3 cm{sup 3} vs. 5.1 {+-} 3.6 cm{sup 3} (p 0.030) and mean RECIST size at 15 months of 4.34 {+-} 1.13 cm vs. 2.63 {+-} 0.84 cm (p =0.028) respectively for recurrence vs. RILI. At nine months post-SABR, patients with recurrence had significantly higher-density consolidative changes (mean at nine months of -96.4 {+-} 32.7 HU vs. -143.2 {+-} 28.4 HU for RILI; p =0.046). They also had increased variability of HU, an image texture metric, measured as the standard deviation (SD) of HU, in the GGO areas (SD at nine months of 210.6 {+-} 14.5 HU vs. 175.1 {+-} 18.7 HU for RILI; p =0.0078). Conclusions. Quantitative changes in mean HU and GGO textural analysis have the potential to distinguish RILI from recurrence as early as nine months post-SABR, compared to 15 months with RECIST and 3D volume. If validated, this approach could allow for earlier detection

  15. SU-E-J-110: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Motion Based On Four-Dimensional Dose Accumulation in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Park, S [Uijeongbu St.Mary’s Hospital, GyeongGi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal region could lead to significant underdosing of target and increased dose to healthy tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of respiratory motion in conventional 3D dose by comparing 4D deformable dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Five patients who had previously treated liver SBRT were included in this study. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images with 10 phases for all patients were acquired on multi-slice CT scanner (Siemens, Somatom definition). Conventional 3D planning was performed using the average intensity projection (AIP) images. 4D dose accumulation was calculated by summation of dose distribution for all phase images of 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR) . The target volume and normal organs dose were evaluated with the 4D dose and compared with those from 3D dose. And also, Index of achievement (IOA) which assesses the consistency between planned dose and prescription dose was used to compare target dose distribution between 3D and 4D dose. Results: Although the 3D dose calculation considered the moving target coverage, significant differences of various dosimetric parameters between 4D and 3D dose were observed in normal organs and PTV. The conventional 3D dose overestimated dose to PTV, however, there was no significant difference for GTV. The average difference of IOA which become ‘1’ in an ideal case was 3.2% in PTV. The average difference of liver and duodenum was 5% and 16% respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose accumulation which can provide dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  16. Ghost marker detection and elimination in marker-based optical tracking systems for real-time tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Guanghua, E-mail: yan@ufl.edu; Li, Jonathan; Huang, Yin; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To propose a simple model to explain the origin of ghost markers in marker-based optical tracking systems (OTS) and to develop retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. Methods: In marker-based OTS, ghost markers are virtual markers created due to the cross-talk between the two camera sensors, which can lead to system execution failure or inaccuracy in patient tracking. As a result, the users have to limit the number of markers and avoid certain marker configurations to reduce the chances of ghost markers. In this work, the authors propose retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. The two camera sensors were treated as mathematical points in space. The authors identified the coplanar within limit (CWL) condition as the necessary condition for ghost marker occurrence. A simple ghost marker detection method was proposed based on the model. Ghost marker elimination was achieved through pattern matching: a ghost marker-free reference set was matched with the optical marker set observed by the OTS; unmatched optical markers were eliminated as either ghost markers or misplaced markers. The pattern matching problem was formulated as a constraint satisfaction problem (using pairwise distances as constraints) and solved with an iterative backtracking algorithm. Wildcard markers were introduced to address missing or misplaced markers. An experiment was designed to measure the sensor positions and the limit for the CWL condition. The ghost marker detection and elimination algorithms were verified with samples collected from a five-marker jig and a nine-marker anthropomorphic phantom, rotated with the treatment couch from −60° to +60°. The accuracy of the pattern matching algorithm was further validated with marker patterns from 40 patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). For this purpose, a synthetic optical marker pattern was created for each patient by introducing ghost markers, marker position

  17. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Derek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); British Columbia Cancer Agency, The Sindi Hawkins Cancer Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna (Canada); Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: Arjun.sahgal@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1 Degree-Sign tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1 Degree-Sign degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1 Degree-Sign . In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 {+-} 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 {+-} 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis ({+-} SD) were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm and 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1 Degree-Sign correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9 Degree-Sign with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15-20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion

  18. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Geoffrey G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Frequently, three-dimensional (3D conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. Methods A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI, which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD. Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Results Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p Conclusion Besides the advantage of faster delivery times, VMAT plans demonstrated better conformity to target, sharper dose fall-off in normal tissues and lower dose to

  19. Treatment plan technique and quality for single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of multiple lung lesions with volumetric modulated arc therapy or intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmen eQuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR of the lung. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with 2 or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter VMAT radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for 4 patients. Conformity index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, gradient index (GI and gradient distance (GD were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs were also recorded. Results: One patient had 4 lesions and the remainder had 2 lesions. Six patients received VMAT and 5 patients received IMRS. For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80-86%. The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7-65.1 Gy. The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm3 (range: 14.90 - 87.38 cm3. For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97-1.53. The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16-1.28. The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16-7.37. The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7-62.0 Gy. The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1-9.3 Gy. The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8-41.3%. There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI, GD, V5, V10 and V20 (lung, heart, trachea, esophagus, and spinal cord between single

  20. Effect of the normalized prescription isodose line on the magnitude of Monte Carlo vs. pencil beam target dose differences for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dandan; Zhang, Qinghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Verma, Vivek; Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Sumin

    2016-07-08

    In lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases, the pencil beam (PB) dose calculation algorithm is known to overestimate target dose as compared to the more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. We investigated whether changing the normalized prescription isodose line affected the magnitude of MC vs. PB target dose differences. Forty-eight patient plans and twenty virtual-tumor phantom plans were studied. For patient plans, four alternative plans prescribed to 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% isodose lines were each created for 12 patients who previously received lung SBRT treatments. Using 6 MV dynamic conformal arcs, the plans were individually optimized to achieve similar dose coverage and conformity for all plans of the same patient, albeit at the different prescription levels. These plans, having used a PB algorithm, were all recalculated with MC to compare the target dose differences. The relative MC vs. PB target dose variations were investigated by comparing PTV D95, Dmean, and D5 loss at the four prescription levels. The MC-to-PB ratio of the plan heterogeneity index (HI) was also evaluated and compared among different isodose levels. To definitively demonstrate the cause of the isodose line dependence, a simulated phantom study was conducted using simple, spherical virtual tumors planned with uniform block margins. The tumor size and beam energy were also altered in the phantom study to investigate the interplay between these confounding factors and the isodose line effect. The magnitude of the target dose overestimation by PB was greater for higher prescription isodose levels. The MC vs. PB reduction in the target dose coverage indices, D95 and V100 of PTV, were found to monotonically increase with increasing isodose lines from 60% to 90%, resulting in more pronounced target dose coverage deficiency at higher isodose prescription levels. No isodose level-dependent trend was observed for the dose errors in the target mean or high dose indices, Dmean or D5. The

  1. SU-E-T-591: Optimizing the Flattening Filter Free Beam Selection in RapidArc-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize the flattening filter free (FFF) beam energy selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer with different fraction schemes. Methods: Twelve patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Plans were designed using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams with the most widely used fraction schemes of 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy, respectively. The plan quality was appraised in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity of the prescribed dose (CI100%), intermediate dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. Results: The 10XFFF beam predicted 1% higher maximum, mean dose to the PTV and 4–5% higher R50% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the three fraction schemes, whereas the CI100% and D2cm was similar. Most importantly, the 6XFFF beam exhibited 3–10% lower dose to all the OARs. However, the 10XFFF beam reduced the beam-on time by 31.9±7.2%, 38.7±2.8% and 43.6±4.0% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy schemes, respectively. Beam-on time was 2.2±0.2 vs 1.5±0.1, 3.3±0.9 vs 2.0±0.5 and 6.3±0.9 vs 3.5±0.4 minutes for the 6XFFF and 10XFFF one in the three fraction schemes. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing in SBRT treatment for stage I lung cancer, but the 10XFFF one provides improved treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation as a function of prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend to use the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy and 3*18 Gy schemes for better OARs sparing. However, for the 1*34 Gy scheme, the 10XFFF beam is recommended to achieve improved treatment efficiency.

  2. SU-E-J-32: Dosimetric Evaluation Based On Pre-Treatment Cone Beam CT for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Does Region of Interest Focus Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnelli, A; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy requires very conformal dose distributions and precise delivery. Prior to treatment, a KV cone-beam CT (KV-CBCT) is registered to the planning CT to provide image-guided positional corrections, which depend on selection of the region of interest (ROI) because of imperfect patient positioning and anatomical deformation. Our objective is to determine the dosimetric impact of ROI selections. Methods: Twelve patients were selected for this study with the treatment regions varied from C-spine to T-spine. For each patient, the KV-CBCT was registered to the planning CT three times using distinct ROIs: one encompassing the entire patient, a large ROI containing large bony anatomy, and a small target-focused ROI. Each registered CBCT volume, saved as an aligned dataset, was then sent to the planning system. The treated plan was applied to each dataset and dose was recalculated. The tumor dose coverage (percentage of target volume receiving prescription dose), maximum point dose to 0.03 cc of the spinal cord, and dose to 10% of the spinal cord volume (V10) for each alignment were compared to the original plan. Results: The average magnitude of tumor coverage deviation was 3.9%±5.8% with external contour, 1.5%±1.1% with large ROI, 1.3%±1.1% with small ROI. Spinal cord V10 deviation from plan was 6.6%±6.6% with external contour, 3.5%±3.1% with large ROI, and 1.2%±1.0% with small ROI. Spinal cord max point dose deviation from plan was: 12.2%±13.3% with external contour, 8.5%±8.4% with large ROI, and 3.7%±2.8% with small ROI. Conclusion: A small ROI focused on the target results in the smallest deviation from planned dose to target and cord although rotations at large distances from the targets were observed. It is recommended that image fusion during CBCT focus narrowly on the target volume to minimize dosimetric error. Improvement in patient setups may further reduce residual errors.

  3. A Phase II Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT for Low-Intermediate-High Risk Prostate Cancer Using Helical Tomotherapy: Dose-volumetric parameters predicting early toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A Macias

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Endpoint: To assess early urinary (GU and rectal (GI toxicities after helical tomotherapy Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT, and to determine their predictive factors.Methods: Since May 2012 forty-five prostate cancer patients were treated with 8 fractions of 5.48 (low risk, 29% or 5.65 Gy (intermediate-high risk, 71% on alternative days over 2.5 weeks. The exclusion criteria were: Gleason score 9-10, PSA >40 ng/mL, cT3b-4, IPSS ≥20 and history of acute urinary retention. During the follow-up a set of potential prognostic factors was correlated with urinary or rectal toxicity.Results: The median follow-up was 13.8 months (2-25 months. There were no grade ≥3 toxicities. Acute grade 2 GU complications were found in a 22.7% of men, but in 2.3% of patients at 1 month, 0% at 6 months and 0% at 12 months. The correspondent figures for grade 2 GI toxicities were: 20.4% (acute, 2.3% (1 month, 3.6% (6 months and 5% (12 months. Acute GI toxicity was significantly correlated with the rectal volume (>15 cm3 receiving 28 Gy, only when expressed as absolute volume. The age (>72 years old was a predictor of GI toxicity after 1 month of treatment. No correlation was found, however, between urinary toxicity and the other analyzed variables. IPSS increased significantly at the time of the last fraction and within the 1st month, returning to the baseline at 6th month. Urinary-related quality of life (IPSS question 8 score, it was not significantly worsen during radiotherapy returning to the baseline levels 1 month after the treatment. At 12 months follow-up patient’s perception of their urinary function improved significantly in comparison with the baseline.Conclusion: Our scheme of 8 fractions on alternative days delivered using helical tomotherapy is well tolerated. We recommend using actual volume instead of percentual volume in the treatment planning, and not to exceed 15 cm3 of rectal volume receiving ≥25 Gy in order to diminish acute GI

  4. Prediction of clinical outcome after stereotactic body radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer using diffusion-weighted MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Yusuke [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori, E-mail: ymatsuo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Umeoka, Shigeaki; Nakamoto, Yuji [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ueki, Nami; Mizowaki, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Togashi, Kaori [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We evaluated DW-MRI and FDG-PET as prognostic factor for NSCLC treated with SBRT. • Lower ADC value was relevant to disease progression after SBRT. • Higher SUV{sub max} was relevant to disease progression after SBRT. • Using both values in combination was a better predictor. - Abstract: Purpose/objectives: To evaluate the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for predicting disease progression (DP) among patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials/methods: Fifteen patients with histologically confirmed stage I NSCLC who underwent pre-treatment DW-MRI and PET and were treated with SBRT were enrolled. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were measured at the target lesion and evaluated for correlations with DP. Results: The median pre-treatment ADC value was 1.04 × 10{sup −3} (range 0.83–1.29 × 10{sup −3}) mm{sup 2}/s, and the median pre-treatment SUV{sub max} was 9.9 (range 1.6–30). There was no correlation between the ADC value and SUV{sub max}. The group with the lower ADC value (≤1.05 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) and that with a higher SUV{sub max} (≥7.9) tended to have poor DP, but neither trend was statistically significant (p = 0.09 and 0.32, respectively). The combination of the ADC value and SUV{sub max} was a statistically significant predictor of DP (p = 0.036). Conclusion: A low ADC value on pre-treatment DW-MRI and a high SUV{sub max} may be associated with poor DP in NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. Using both values in combination was a better predictor.

  5. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao, E-mail: v.r.bollineni@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Widder, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Pruim, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  6. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C; Lee, C [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance in the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.

  7. SU-E-J-182: Reproducibility of Tumor Motion Probability Distribution Function in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Using Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiinoki, T; Hanazawa, H; Park, S; Takahashi, T; Shibuya, K [Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kawamura, S; Uehara, T; Yuasa, Y; Koike, M [Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We aim to achieve new four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) using the next generation real-time tumor-tracking (RTRT) system and flattening-filter-free techniques. To achieve new 4DRT, it is necessary to understand the respiratory motion of tumor. The purposes of this study were: 1.To develop the respiratory motion analysis tool using log files. 2.To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) during stereotactic body RT (SBRT) of lung tumor. Methods: Seven patients having fiducial markers closely implanted to the lung tumor were enrolled in this study. The positions of fiducial markers were measured using the RTRT system (Mitsubishi Electronics Co., JP) and recorded as two types of log files during the course of SBRT. For each patients, tumor motion range and tumor motion PDFs in left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions were calculated using log files of all beams per fraction (PDFn). Fractional PDF reproducibility (Rn) was calculated as Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence between PDF1 and PDFn of tumor motion. The mean of Rn (Rm) was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient’s mean tumor motion range (Am). The change of Rm during the course of SBRT was also evluated. These analyses were performed using in-house developed software. Results: The Rm were 0.19 (0.07–0.30), 0.14 (0.07–0.32) and 0.16 (0.09–0.28) in LR, AP and SI directions, respectively. The Am were 5.11 mm (2.58–9.99 mm), 7.81 mm (2.87–15.57 mm) and 11.26 mm (3.80–21.27 mm) in LR, AP and SI directions, respectively. The PDF reproducibility decreased as the tumor motion range increased in AP and SI direction. That decreased slightly through the course of RT in SI direction. Conclusion: We developed the respiratory motion analysis tool for 4DRT using log files and quantified the range and reproducibility of respiratory motion for lung tumors.

  8. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D; Bernard, Mark E; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A; Burton, Steven A; Heron, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80-86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7-65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm(3) (range: 14.90-87.38 cm(3)). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97-1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16-1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16-7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7-62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1-9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8-41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI, GD, V5, V10

  9. SU-E-T-383: Can Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Mimic the Dose Distribution of High-Dose-Rate Tandem and Ovoids/ring Brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Scanderbeg, D [UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can mimic the dosimetry of tandem and ovoids/ring brachytherapy. Methods: We selected 5 patients treated with 3D-CT based high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 4 tandem and ovoid and 1 tandem and ring case. Manual optimization based on the Manchester system followed by graphical optimization (Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan or Varian BrachyVision) was performed to deliver 6.0 Gy per fraction to a high-risk CTV while maintaining dose to organs at risk (OAR) below the ABS recommendations. For theoretical SBRT plans, CT images and OAR contours from the HDR plans were imported into Eclipse (Varian). The SBRT plan was created to mimic the heterogeneity of HDR plans by using a simultaneous integrated boost technique to match the V100, V150, and V200 isodose volumes from HDR. The OAR Dmax from HDR was used to define the OAR dose constraints for SBRT. Target coverage, dose spill-out, and OAR doses (D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) between the HDR and SBRT plans were compared for significance using a two-tail paired ttest. Results: The mean isodose volumes for HDR vs. SBRT were 29.4 cc vs. 29.0 cc (V200, p = 0.674), 49.2 cc vs. 56.3 cc (V150, p = 0.017), 95.4 cc vs. 127.7 cc (V100, p = 0.001), and 271.9 cc vs. 581.6 cc (V50, p = 0.001). The D2cc to OAR for HDR vs. SBRT was 71.6% vs. 96.2% (bladder, p = 0.002), 69.2% vs. 101.7% (rectum, p = 0.0003), and 56.9% vs. 68.6% (sigmoid, p = 0.004). Conclusion: SBRT with VMAT can provide similar dose target coverage (V200), but dose spill-out and doses to OAR were statistically significantly higher than HDR. This study clearly demonstrated that brachytherapy can not be substituted with SBRT in gynecologic cervical cancer treatment.

  10. Development and evaluation of a clinical model for lung cancer patients using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) within a knowledge-based algorithm for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Karen Chin; Kim, Jinkoo; Reding, Anne; Fraser, Corey; Gordon, James; Ajlouni, Munther; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of a clinical model for lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) within a knowledge-based algorithm for treatment planning, and to evaluate the model performance and applicability to different planning techniques, tumor locations, and beam arrangements. 105 SBRT plans for lung cancer patients previously treated at our institution were included in the development of the knowledge-based model (KBM). The KBM was trained with a combination of IMRT, VMAT, and 3D CRT techniques. Model performance was validated with 25 cases, for both IMRT and VMAT. The full KBM encompassed lesions located centrally vs. peripherally (43:62), upper vs. lower (62:43), and anterior vs. posterior (60:45). Four separate sub-KBMs were created based on tumor location. Results were compared with the full KBM to evaluate its robustness. Beam templates were used in conjunction with the optimizer to evaluate the model's ability to handle suboptimal beam placements. Dose differences to organs-at-risk (OAR) were evaluated between the plans gener-ated by each KBM. Knowledge-based plans (KBPs) were comparable to clinical plans with respect to target conformity and OAR doses. The KBPs resulted in a lower maximum spinal cord dose by 1.0 ± 1.6 Gy compared to clinical plans, p = 0.007. Sub-KBMs split according to tumor location did not produce significantly better DVH estimates compared to the full KBM. For central lesions, compared to the full KBM, the peripheral sub-KBM resulted in lower dose to 0.035 cc and 5 cc of the esophagus, both by 0.4Gy ± 0.8Gy, p = 0.025. For all lesions, compared to the full KBM, the posterior sub-KBM resulted in higher dose to 0.035 cc, 0.35 cc, and 1.2 cc of the spinal cord by 0.2 ± 0.4Gy, p = 0.01. Plans using template beam arrangements met target and OAR criteria, with an increase noted in maximum heart dose (1.2 ± 2.2Gy, p = 0.01) and GI (0.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.01) for the nine

  11. SU-E-T-620: Dosimetric Compliance Study for a New Prostate Protocol of Combined High Dose Rate Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, C; Giaddui, T; Den, R; Harrison, A; Yu, Y [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the adherence of treatment plans of prostate cancer patients with the dosimetric compliance criteria of the new in house phase I trial of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated using this trial. They received one fraction of HDR to 15Gy, followed by external beam(EB) boost of 3.2Gy(Level 1, five patients) or 3.94Gy(level 2, five patients) per fraction for 10 or 7 fractions, respectively, both equivalent to EB treatments of 113.5Gy in 2Gy fractions. The EB plans were either IMRT or VMAT plans. DVH analysis was performed to verify the adherence of treatment plans to the dosimetric criteria of the trial. Results: For Level 1 patients, target coverage were adequate, with CTV V32Gy(%) of 99.0±1.0 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), and PTV V31Gy(%) of 99.6±0.3. PTV V32.9Gy(%) is 1.4±3.1 and PTVmax is 32.9±0.2Gy. Rectum, bladder and femoral heads sparing were well within protocol criteria. For Level 2 patients, CTV V27.6Gy(%) is 98.7±1.8; PTV V26.7Gy(%) is 99.0±1.4. PTV V28.4Gy(%) is 1.3±1.4, with three patients having minor deviation from protocol. Again critical structures were spared compliant to the protocol. The analysis of HDR plans show similar results, with adequate dose coverage to the prostate and sparing of critical structures including urethra and rectum. V100(%) and V90(%) of prostate are 96.0±1.1 and 98.9±0.5. Urethra D10(%) is 113.1±2.9. Rectum V80(cc) is 1.4±0.5. Hotspot in prostate is substantially higher than what the protocol specifies. But the criteria for hotspot are only guidelines, serving to lower the dose to urethra . Conclusion: This new high biological equivalent dose prostate trial has been carried out successfully for ten patients. Based on dosimetric analysis, all HDR and external plans were compliant to the protocol criteria, with only minor deviations.

  12. SU-E-T-659: Quantitative Evaluation of Patient Setup Accuracy of Stereotactic Radiotherapy with the Frameless 6D-ExacTrac System Using Statistical Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeling, V; Jin, H; Hossain, S; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate patient setup accuracy and quantify individual and cumulative positioning uncertainties associated with different hardware and software components of the stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) with the frameless-6D-ExacTrac system. Methods: A statistical model was used to evaluate positioning uncertainties of the different components of SRS/SRT treatment with the BrainLAB 6D-ExacTrac system using the positioning shifts of 35 patients having cranial lesions (49 total lesions treated in 1, 3, 5 fractions). All these patients were immobilized with rigid head-and-neck masks, simulated with BrainLAB-localizer and planned with iPlan treatment planning system. Infrared imaging (IR) was used initially to setup patients. Then, stereoscopic x-ray images (XC) were acquired and registered to corresponding digitally-reconstructed-radiographs using bony-anatomy matching to calculate 6D-translational and rotational shifts. When the shifts were within tolerance (0.7mm and 1°), treatment was initiated. Otherwise corrections were applied and additional x-rays were acquired (XV) to verify that patient position was within tolerance. Results: The uncertainties from the mask, localizer, IR-frame, x-ray imaging, MV and kV isocentricity were quantified individually. Mask uncertainty (Translational: Lateral, Longitudinal, Vertical; Rotational: Pitch, Roll, Yaw) was the largest and varied with patients in the range (−1.05−1.50mm, −5.06–3.57mm, −5.51−3.49mm; −1.40−2.40°, −1.24−1.74°, and −2.43−1.90°) obtained from mean of XC shifts for each patient. Setup uncertainty in IR positioning (0.88,2.12,1.40mm, and 0.64,0.83,0.96°) was extracted from standard-deviation of XC. Systematic uncertainties of the localizer (−0.03,−0.01,0.03mm, and −0.03,0.00,−0.01°) and frame (0.18,0.25,−1.27mm,−0.32,0.18, and 0.47°) were extracted from means of all XV setups and mean of all XC distributions, respectively. Uncertainties in isocentricity of the

  13. Curative Effect Analysis of Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Gamma Knife%伽玛刀立体定向放射治疗疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱超华; 刘恋; 徐子海

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the curative effect of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of non-conventional fractionated gamma knife on tumor, and to introduce the radiobiology model and dose conversion of segmentation scheme adopted. Methods 1 215 patients received SRT of hypofractionated gamma knife from January 2010 to December 2012 were selected as objects, with 327 cases of head and 888 cases of body. After the surrounding of the dose curve of treatment plan to lesion area, we used self software to determine the hypofractionated fractional dose according to the given total dose and treatment times, and evaluated short-term effect according to the followed records. Results Most of the followed success rate of the 1 215 patients were more than 80% according to the disease entity. Treatment of head lesions were better than those of body tumors. The survival situation of benign tumor was closed to the followed success rate, such as the followed success rate of hepatic hemangioma and arteriovenous malformations were 94.7%, 77.3%respectively, and the 3 year survival rate were 94.7%, 72.7% respectively. The overall treatment effect was similar to the general unit reported data, and the treatment of the side effects was clinical accepted. Conclusions The curative effect of SRT of the gamma knife on tumor is effective. Calculate unconventional fractionated radiotherapy by using the software division is feasible.%目的:评价使用非常规分割的伽玛刀立体定向放射治疗肿瘤的疗效,并介绍所采用分割方案的放射生物学模型和剂量转换方式。方法选取2010年1月至2012年12月接受伽玛刀大分割的立体定向放射治疗的1215例患者(头部327例,体部888例)为研究对象。治疗计划的剂量曲线完成对病灶区域的包绕后,按照给定的总剂量和治疗次数,使用自编软件确定大分割的分次剂量,根据随访记录统计评价近期疗效。结果1215例患者按病种的

  14. Quantitative evaluation of patient setup uncertainty of stereotactic radiotherapy with the frameless 6D ExacTrac system using statistical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Vance; Hossain, Sabbir; Jin, Hosang; Algan, Ozer; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Ali, Imad

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate patient setup accuracy and quantify indi-vidual and cumulative positioning uncertainties associated with different hardware and software components of the stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) with the frameless 6D ExacTrac system. A statistical model is used to evaluate positioning uncertainties of the different components of SRS/SRT treatment with the Brainlab 6D ExacTrac system using the positioning shifts of 35 patients having cranial lesions. All these patients are immobilized with rigid head-and-neck masks, simu-lated with Brainlab localizer and planned with iPlan treatment planning system. Stereoscopic X-ray images (XC) are acquired and registered to corresponding digitally reconstructed radiographs using bony-anatomy matching to calculate 6D translational and rotational shifts. When the shifts are within tolerance (0.7 mm and 1°), treatment is initiated. Otherwise corrections are applied and additional X-rays (XV) are acquired to verify that patient position is within tolerance. The uncertain-ties from the mask, localizer, IR -frame, X-ray imaging, MV, and kV isocentricity are quantified individually. Mask uncertainty (translational: lateral, longitudinal, vertical; rotational: pitch, roll, yaw) is the largest and varies with patients in the range (-2.07-3.71 mm, -5.82-5.62 mm, -5.84-3.61 mm; -2.10-2.40°, -2.23-2.60°, and -2.7-3.00°) obtained from mean of XC shifts for each patient. Setup uncer-tainty in IR positioning (0.88, 2.12, 1.40 mm, and 0.64°, 0.83°, 0.96°) is extracted from standard deviation of XC. Systematic uncertainties of the frame (0.18, 0.25, -1.27mm, -0.32°, 0.18°, and 0.47°) and localizer (-0.03, -0.01, 0.03mm, and -0.03°, 0.00°, -0.01°) are extracted from means of all XV setups and mean of all XC distributions, respectively. Uncertainties in isocentricity of the MV radiotherapy machine are (0.27, 0.24, 0.34 mm) and kV imager (0.15, -0.4, 0.21 mm). A statisti-cal model is developed to

  15. 早期非小细胞肺癌立体定向消融放疗现状%Current Status of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石安辉; 朱广迎

    2016-01-01

    目前比较立体定向消融放疗(stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, SABR)与手术治疗早期非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)的随机研究证据尚不多,高水平的循证医学证据更是缺乏。尽管STARS和ROSEL两项随机研究结果荟萃分析显示SABR较手术耐受性更好,生存不劣于手术,但是目前仍仅推荐拒绝手术或不可手术的早期NSCLC首选SABR,期待着正在进行的随机研究VALOR(Veterans Affairs Lung Cancer Surgery or Stereotactic Ra-diotherapy in the US)和SABRTooth(SABRTooth study in the United Kingdom)的结果。许多回顾性的研究和病例对照研究显示了SABR治疗的安全性和有效性(局部控制率达90%以上,5年生存率达70%),但是由于肿瘤分期定义、如何决定可否手术及手术患者采用手术方式(开胸或胸腔镜辅助)等不同,很难比较SABR和手术的优劣,尽管大部分结论是两种方法疗效相似,但难以成为循证医学证据,因此争论热点是哪一种方法更安全、创伤更小。本文将就以上争论热点进行述评。%High level evidence from randomized studies comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) to surgery is lacking. Although the results of pooled analysis of two randomized trials for STARS and ROSEL showed that SABR is better tolerated and might lead to better overall survival than surgery for operable clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), SABR, however, is only recommended as a preferred treatment option for early stage NSCLC patients who cannot or will not undergo surgery. We, therefore, are waiting for the results of the ongoing randomized studies [Veterans af-fairs lung cancer surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy in the US (VALOR) and the SABRTooth study in the United Kingdom (SABRTooths)]. Many retrospective and case control studies showed that SABR is safe and effective (local control rate higher than 90%, 5 years survival rate

  16. 放射外科治疗面肌抽搐的初步研究%Treatment of idiopathic hemifacial spasm with with radiosurgery or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy:preliminary results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕学明; 袁绍纪; 孙希炎; 陈援朝; 吕福林; 吕晓彦; 解相礼; 许呈来

    2011-01-01

    Objective In this article we present four patients affected by idiopathic hemifa-cial spasm, refractory to medical therapy and botulinum toxin injections, who were treated by ra-diosurgery and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in four cases. Methods Radiosurgery, with a single dose of 5 Gy, was used in the first patient affected by idiopathic hemifacial spasm and autoimmune polyneuropathy with severe hypoacusia; hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, with 15 Gy in 5 fractions of 3 Gy each, was preferred in the other 3 cases. In all patients, the target consisted of the vestibulocochlear-facial bundle immediately before its entry into the internal acoustic foramen. Results A marked improvement of symptoms was observed in 2 patients, and almost complete disappearance in the other cases, with no complications, particularly, auditory. Conclusion Radiosurgery or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy could represent a therapeutic alternative to microvascular decompression for idiopathic hemifacial spasm for patients not suitable for surgery.%目的 探讨放射治疗对原发性面肌抽搐的效果及并发症分析.方法 其中1例听觉减弱的患者单次给予一次性剂量8 Gy治疗,其余3位听觉正常患者给予5天5次连续不同部位每次3Gy剂量,共计15Gy.所有患者靶点选择在面听神经束出脑干处至进人内听道前部分.结果 2例患者症状消失,1例症状明显减轻.另1例口服药物治疗下症状未见发作.未见明显并发症,特别是听、面神经功能无损伤.4例患者均放疗后2~4周短期随访及18个月到42个月的中期随访,放疗结果满意.结论 放疗治疗原发性面肌抽搐仍为不适于手术患者的一种治疗选择方法,疗效确切.

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery: a "targeted" therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zeng; Liang-Fu Han

    2012-01-01

    The developments of medicine always follow innovations in science and technology.In the past decade,such innovations have made cancer-related targeted therapies possible.In general,the term "targeted therapy" has been used in reference to cellular and molecular level oriented therapies.However,improvements in the delivery and planning of traditional radiation therapy have also provided cancer patients more options for "targeted" treatment,notably stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).In this review,the progress and controversies of SRS and SBRT are discussed to show the role of stereotactic radiation therapy in the ever evolving multidisciplinary care of cancer patients.

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in recurrent or oligometastatic pancreatic cancer. A toxicity review of simultaneous integrated protection (SIP) versus conventional SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkika, E.; Kirste, S.; Schimek-Jasch, T. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Adebahr, S. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); Wiehle, R. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Claus, R. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Hematology, Oncology and Stem-Cell Transplantation, Freiburg (Germany); Wittel, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Nestle, U.; Grosu, A.L.; Brunner, T.B. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Baltas, D. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (partner site Freiburg) (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in pancreatic cancer can be limited by its proximity to organs at risk (OAR). In this analysis, we evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of two different treatment approaches in patients with locally recurrent or oligometastatic pancreatic cancer. According to the prescription method, patients were divided in two cohorts (C1 and C2). The planning target volume (PTV) was created through a 4 mm expansion of the internal target volume. In C2, a subvolume was additionally created, a simultaneous integrated protection (SIP), which is the overlap of the PTV with the planning risk volume of an OAR to which we prescribed a reduced dose. In all, 18 patients were treated (7 with local recurrences, 9 for oligometastases, 2 for both). Twelve of 23 lesions were treated without SIP (C1) and 11 with SIP (C2). The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8-14.6) months. The OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 87 and 58%, respectively. Freedom from local progression for combined cohorts at 6 and 12 months was 93 and 67% (95% CI 15-36), respectively. Local control was not statistically different between the two groups. One patient in C2 experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicities and 1 patient in C1 experienced a grade ≥3 late toxicity. The SIP approach is a useful prescription method for abdominal SBRT with a favorable toxicity profile which does not compromise local control and overall survival despite dose sacrifices in small subvolumes. (orig.) [German] Die stereotaktische Strahlentherapie (SBRT) ist bei Pankreaskarzinomen durch die enge Lagebeziehung der Risikoorgane (OAR) zum Zielvolumen erschwert. In dieser Analyse evaluierten wir die Toxizitaet und die Lokalkontrolle von zwei unterschiedlichen Therapiestrategien bei Patienten mit rezidivierendem oder oligometastatischem Pankreaskarzinom. Die Patienten wurden anhand der Verschreibungsmethode in zwei Kohorten geteilt (C1 und C2). Das

  19. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0236 TITLE: : EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative...2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15Aug2015 - 14Aug2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of 5a...comorbidities that increase surgical risk. Tumor hypoxia is a major known mechanism of radiation resistance and is especially expected to affect very short

  20. Dose quality control in stereotactic radiation therapy using radiosensitive gels; Controle de qualite dosimetrique en radiotherapie stereotaxique a l`aide de gels radiosensibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselle, I.; Rousseau, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 59 - Lille (France). Institut de technologie medicale; Castelain, B.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Sarrazin, T. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France)

    1998-03-01

    Typical dosimeters used in stereotactic radiation therapy such as ionization chambers, films, and thermoluminescent diodes, allow basic physical measurements. They are, however, neither well suited to discern small target volumes with high dose gradient, nor suitable for three-dimensional (3D) dose measurements. Gel dosimetry is becoming more and more interesting, owing to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It permits isocenter position planning verification of accuracy and the precision of the 3D dose mapping in the brain (when irradiated in realistic conditions), especially when several different targets are concerned. Many authors have assessed stereotactic radiation therapy quality control using different gels, and different irradiation procedures. This paper consists of the review of these different methods to assess quality control. Gel dosimetry cannot provide absolute dose measurements. However, gels can be used to check the 3D dose mapping with a high degree of detail. In our experiment, the difference between the stereotactic frame center and the isocenter is about 1 mm. The difference between the theoretical isodoses obtained by the treatment planning system and the experimental isodoses obtained by the MRI gray level calibration is also about 1 mm, the order of magnitude of the MRI pixel size. (authors)

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leksell, L. (Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1983-09-01

    The development and scope of stereotactic radiosurgery is described. The technique, which combines well with the latest diagnostic methods, has already proved a safe and effective way of treating inaccessible cerebral lesions and in particular small arteriovenous malformations, acoustic neuroma and the solid component of craniopharyngioma, as well as playing an increasingly useful role in the therapy of pituitary adenoma.

  2. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  3. A feasibility study evaluating the relationship between dose and focal liver reaction in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for liver cancer based on intensity change of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Han, Young Yih [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, amsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In order to evaluate the relationship between the dose to the liver parenchyma and focal liver reaction (FLR) after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), we suggest a novel method using a three-dimensional dose distribution and change in signal intensity of gadoxetate disodium-gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hepatobiliary phase images. In our method, change of the signal intensity between the pretreatment and follow-up hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was calculated and then threshold dose (TD) for developing FLR was obtained from correlation of dose with the change of the signal intensity. For validation of the method, TDs for six patients, who had been treated for liver cancer with SABR with 45-60 Gy in 3 fractions, were calculated using the method, and we evaluated concordance between volume enclosed by isodose of TD by the method and volume identified as FLR by a physician. The dose to normal liver was correlated with change in signal intensity between pretreatment and follow-up MRI with a median R{sup 2} of 0.935 (range, 0.748 to 0.985). The median TD by the method was 23.5 Gy (range, 18.3 to 39.4 Gy). The median value of concordance was 84.5% (range, 44.7% to 95.9%). Our method is capable of providing a quantitative evaluation of the relationship between dose and intensity changes on follow-up MRI, as well as determining individual TD for developing FLR. We expect our method to provide better information about the individual relationship between dose and FLR in radiotherapy for liver cancer.

  4. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pica, Alessia, E-mail: Alessia.Pica@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moeckli, Raphael [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Balmer, Aubin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Beck-Popovic, Maja [Unit of Pediatric Oncology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Do, Huu-Phuoc [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Weber, Damien C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Munier, Francis L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2-111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13-39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  5. Toxic risk of stereotactic body radiotherapy and concurrent helical tomotherapy followed by erlotinib for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chien-An

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT applied by helical tomotherapy (HT is feasible for lung cancer in clinical. Using SBRT concurrently with erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is not reported previously. Case Presentation A 77-year-old man with stage III NSCLC, received erlotinib 150 mg/day, combined with image-guided SBRT via HT. A total tumor dose of 54 Gy/9 fractions was delivered to the tumor bed. The tumor responded dramatically and the combined regimen was well tolerated. After concurrent erlotinib-SBRT, erlotinib was continued as maintenance therapy. The patient developed dyspnea three months after the combined therapy and radiation pneumonitis with interstitial lung disease was suspected. Conclusions Combination SBRT, HT, and erlotinib therapy provided effective anti-tumor results. Nonetheless, the potential risks of enhanced adverse effects between radiation and erlotinib should be monitored closely, especially when SBRT is part of the regimen.

  6. Thoracic radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions: difficulties met when starting up and proposed solutions; Radiotherapie thoracique en conditions stereotaxiques: difficultes rencontrees lors de la mise en route et solutions proposees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halley, A.; Assouline, A.; Belghith, B.; Hemery, C.; Cuenca, X.; Lang, P.; Boisserie, G.; Simon, J.M.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the study of difficulties met when starting up a thoracic irradiation in stereotactic conditions with respiratory feedback by means of a spirometry system. Eight patients have been selected. Images have been acquired in deep-inspiration breath-hold. Various dose levels have delivered in four sessions on the 80-per-cent isodose. It appears that this technique is constrained by the patient's physical capacities and the available technical means. Solutions are the use of a suitable support system, the screening of harmful positioning, and a training phase to respiratory feedback. Short communication

  7. Electronic Support for Retrospective Analysis in the Field of Radiation Oncology: Proof of Principle Using an Example of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of 251 Meningioma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rutzner, Sandra; Fietkau, Rainer; Ganslandt, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Lubgan, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to verify the possible benefit of a clinical data warehouse (DWH) for retrospective analysis in the field of radiation oncology. Material and methods We manually and electronically (using DWH) evaluated demographic, radiotherapy, and outcome data from 251 meningioma patients, who were irradiated from January 2002 to January 2015 at the Department of Radiation Oncology of the Erlangen University Hospital. Furthermore, we linked the Oncology ...

  8. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Greco, Carlo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Motzer, Robert [Solid Tumor Service, Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  9. An open source solution for an in-house built dynamic platform for the validation of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy for VMAT and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Luis; Ziebell, Amy; Morton, Jason; Bhat, Madhava

    2016-12-01

    An in-house solution for the verification of dose delivered to a moving phantom as required for the clinical implementation of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy was developed. The superior-inferior movement required to simulate tumour motion during a normal breathing cycle was achieved via the novel use of an Arduino Uno™, a low-cost open-source microcontroller board connected to a high torque servo motor. Slow CT imaging was used to acquire the image set and a 4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) verified the efficacy of contoured margins before treatment on the moving phantom. Treatment fields were delivered to a section of a CIRS™ anthropomorphic phantom. Dose verification to the dynamic phantom with Gafchromic EBT3 film using 3 %-1 mm gamma analysis acceptance criteria registered an absolute dose pass rate for IMRT and VMAT of 98 and 96.6 %, respectively. It was verified that 100 % of the PTV received the prescribed dose of 12 Gy per fraction using the dynamic phantom, and no major discrepancy between planned and measured results due to interplay between multileaf collimator sequences and target motion was observed. This study confirmed that the use of an in-house solution using open source hardware and software with existing quality assurance equipment was appropriate in validating a new treatment technique.

  10. Factors important for efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy of medically inoperable stage I lung cancer. A retrospective analysis of patients treated in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Pia; Nyman, Jan; Lax, Ingmar

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed results of SBRT treatment of 138 patients with medically inoperable stage I NSCLC treated during 1996-2003 at five different centres in Sweden and Denmark. Mean age was 74 years (range 56-90) with 69 men and 72 women. SBRT was delivered using a 3D conformal multifield technique...... and a stereotactic body frame. Doses delivered were 30-48 Gy (65% isodose at the periphery of planning target volume, PTV) in 2-4 fractions. Equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) was in the range of 50-100 Gy. Mean gross tumour volume (GTV) was 39 cm3 (2-436), and planning target volume was 101 cm3 (11......-719). Overall response rate (CR, PR) was 61% (84/138). SD was noted in 36% (50/138). During a median follow-up period of 33 months (1-107), 16 (12%) local failures occurred, ten of which also included distant metastases. Local failure was associated with tumour size, target definition and central or pleura...

  11. Factors important for efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy of medically inoperable stage I lung cancer. A retrospective analysis of patients treated in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Pia; Nyman, Jan; Lax, Ingmar;

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed results of SBRT treatment of 138 patients with medically inoperable stage I NSCLC treated during 1996-2003 at five different centres in Sweden and Denmark. Mean age was 74 years (range 56-90) with 69 men and 72 women. SBRT was delivered using a 3D conformal multifield technique...... and a stereotactic body frame. Doses delivered were 30-48 Gy (65% isodose at the periphery of planning target volume, PTV) in 2-4 fractions. Equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) was in the range of 50-100 Gy. Mean gross tumour volume (GTV) was 39 cm3 (2-436), and planning target volume was 101 cm3 (11...... proximity. Distant metastases occurred in 25% (35/138) of the patients. Ninety-one (65%) patients died during follow-up of which 55 patients (60%) died of other causes than lung cancer. Three- and 5-year overall survival was 52 and 26% respectively. Lung cancer specific 3- and 5-year overall survival was 66...

  12. Long-term local control achieved after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for adrenal gland metastases: A retrospective analysis of 34 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Alongi, Filippo [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Dept., IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano, Milano (Italy)], Email: filippo.alongi@humanitas.it; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Unit, Dept. of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Univ. of Turin, Turin (Italy)] [and others

    2012-05-15

    Aims and background. To describe feasibility, tolerability and clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of adrenal metastases in 34 consecutive cancer patients. Material and methods. Between March 2004 and July 2010, a total of 34 consecutive patients, accounting for 36 adrenal metastatic lesions, were treated with SBRT. SBRT treatments were delivered by a Linac Varian 600 with microMLC (3DLine, Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and a Linac ELEKTA Precise (Elekta). All 34 patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated during and after completion of SBRT. Following outcomes were taken into account: best clinical response at any time, local control, time to systemic progression, time to local progression, overall survival and toxicity. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and factor potentially affecting outcomes were analyzed with Cox regression analysis. Results. Total RT doses ranged from 20 Gy in 4 fractions to 45 Gy in 18 fractions (median dose: 32 Gy; median number of fractions: 4). All doses were prescribed to the 95% isodose line. No cases of Grade {>=} 3 toxicity were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 41 months (range, 12-75) 22 patients were alive. Three of 28 lesions (11%) showed complete response, 13/28 (46%) partial response, 10/28 (36%) stable disease and 2/28 (7%) progressed in the treated area. Local failure was observed in 13 cases. Actuarial local control rates at one and two years were 66% and 32%, respectively. Median time to local progression was 19 months. Median survival was 22 months. Conclusion. SBRT in adrenal gland metastasis is feasible without significant acute and late toxicities, with a good rate of local control. New SBRT fractionation schemes and the possibility to combine new systemic approaches should be investigated in order to further increase local control and reduce systemic disease progression.

  13. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles, E-mail: angy24538@yahoo.com; Mitsoura, Eleni [Medical Physics Graduate Programme, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan esquina Jesús Carranza Colonia Moderna de la Cruz, C.P. 50180, Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel [Centro de Cáncer ABC, The American British Cowdray Medical Center I.A.P. (CMABC), Calle Sur 136, no. 116, Colonia las Américas, C.P. 01120, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  14. Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery as salvage therapy after failure of whole-brain radiotherapy in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sunit; Chan, Michael D; Lovato, James F; Ellis, Thomas L; Tatter, Stephen B; Bourland, J Daniel; Munley, Michael T; deGuzman, Allan F; Shaw, Edward G; Urbanic, James J; McMullen, Kevin P

    2012-05-01

    Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to improve this. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Sunit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mchan@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Lovato, James F. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to

  16. Which Is the Optimal Biologically Effective Dose of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jian; Yang Fujun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China); Li Baosheng, E-mail: baoshli@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China); Li Hongsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China); Liu Jing [School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Huang Wei; Wang Dongqing; Yi Yan; Wang Juan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between biologically effective dose (BED) and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to explore the optimal BED range for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were identified on Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the proceedings of annual meetings through June 2010. According to the quartile of included studies, BED was divided into four dose groups: low (<83.2 Gy), medium (83.2-106 Gy), medium to high (106-146 Gy), high (>146 Gy). To obtain pooled estimates of overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and local control rate (LCR), data were combined in a random effect model. Pooled estimates were corrected for the percentage of small tumors (<3 cm). Results: Thirty-four observational studies with a total of 2,587 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Corrected pooled estimates of 2- or 3-year OS in the medium BED (76.1%, 63.5%) or the medium to high BED (68.3%, 63.2%) groups were higher than in the low (62.3%, 51.9%) or high groups (55.9%, 49.5%), respectively (p {<=} 0.004). Corrected 3-year CSS in the medium (79.5%), medium to high (80.6%), and high groups (90.0%) were higher than in the low group (70.1%, p = 0.016, 0.018, 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: The OS for the medium or medium to high BED groups were higher than those for the low or high BED group for SBRT in Stage I NSCLC. The medium or medium to high BED (range, 83.2-146 Gy) for SBRT may currently be more beneficial and reasonable in Stage I NSCLC.

  17. Evaluation for local failure by 18F-FDG PET/CT in comparison with CT findings after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo; Fujii, Hirofumi; Yokosuka, Noriko; Aoki, Yousuke; Oooka, Yoshikazu; Oku, Yohei; Ohashi, Toshio; Sanuki, Naoko; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Ozawa, Yukihiko

    2013-03-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the standard care for medically inoperable early non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, it can be difficult to differentiate local recurrence from non-recurrence radiation-induced lung opacity. We retrospectively assessed (18)F-FDG PET/CT to detect local recurrence after SBRT for NSCLC. Between 2005 and 2011, 273 NSCLCs in 257 patients were treated with SBRT. Prescribed doses were 50Gy and 40Gy per 5 fractions for peripheral and central lesions, respectively. Tri-monthly follow-up CT scans were acquired. (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled for screening at one year after SBRT or when recurrence was highly suspected. The dual-time-point maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmaxs) and their retention indexes (RIs) were obtained. A total of 214 (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were obtained for 164 localized NSCLC tumors in 154 patients. The median follow-up period was 24.9 months (range: 6.3-72.1). Among these, 21 scans of 17 tumors were diagnosed as local recurrence. The median SUVmaxs on early and late images of recurrence and their RI were 5.0 (range: 3.2-10.7), 6.3 (range: 4.2-13.4), and 0.20 (range; 0-0.41), respectively. These were significantly higher than the respective values of non-recurrence images of 1.8 (range: 0.5-4.6), 1.7 (range: 0.5-6.1), and 0.00 (range: -0.37-0.41) (all precurrence were 0, 0, 1, 3, and 17. SUVmaxs of (18)F-FDG PET/CT could detect local recurrence after SBRT for localized NSCLC. In contrast, CT scan results had a limited ability to diagnose local recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54-56 Gy given in 9-7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-22

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003-2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54-56 Gy in 9-7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16-48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10-55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures.

  19. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A [BC Cancer Agency - Vancouver Island Centre (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  20. SU-E-T-534: Dosimetric Effect of Multileaf Collimator Leaf Width On Volumetric Modulated Arc Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Spine Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoush, A; Djemil, T [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Subedi, L [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Huang, L [Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric impact of MLC leaf width in patients treated with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for spine Stereotactic Body radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: Twelve spine SBRT patients were retrospectively selected for this study. The patients were treated with IMRT following the RTOG-0631 of spine metastasis. The prescription dose was 16 Gy in one fraction to 90% of the target volume (V16 > 90%). The maximum spinal cord dose of 14 Gy and 10% of the cord receiving < 10 Gy (V10) were set as dose constraints. For purpose of this study, three dual arc VMAT plans were created for each patient using three different MLC leaf widths: 2.5 mm, 4mm, and 5mm. The compliance to RTOG 0631, conformal index (CI), dose gradient index (DGI), and number of monitor units (MUs) were compared. Results: The average V16 of the target was 91.91±1.36%, 93.73±2.38%, and 92.25±2.49% for 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm leaf widths, respectively (p=0.39). Accordingly, the average CI was 1.36±0.39, 1.36±0.34, and 1.41±0.3 (0.96), respectively. The average DGI was 0.24 ± 0.05, 0.22 ± 0.05, and 0.23 ± 0.04, respectively (p=0.86). The average spinal cord maximum dose was 12.10 ± 0.88 Gy, 12.52 ± 1.15 Gy, and 12.05 ± 1.12 (p=0.75) and V10 was 2.69 ± 1.71 cc, 5.43 ± 2.16 cc, and 3.71 ± 2.34 cc (p=0.15) for 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm leaf widths, respectively. According, the average number of MUs was 4255 ± 431 MU, 5049 ± 1036 MU, and 4231 ± 580 MU respectively (p=0.17). Conclusion: The use of 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm MLCs achieved similar VMAT plan quality as recommended by RTOG-0631. The dosimetric parameters were also comparable for the three MLCs.

  1. Risk-adapted single or fractionated stereotactic high-precision radiotherapy in a pooled series of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. High local control and low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Jan Patrick [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Almuth [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Erfurt (Germany); Pintea, Bogdan [University Hospital of Bonn, Department of Neurosurgery, Bonn (Germany); Gerlach, Ruediger [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Department of Radiosurgery, Erfurt (Germany); Lammering, Guido [MediClin Robert Janker Clinic and MediClin MVZ Bonn, Department of Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Bonn (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University of Duesseldorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a prospectively initiated two-center protocol of risk-adapted single-fraction (SRS) or fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with nonsecretory pituitary adenomas (NSA). A total of 73 NSA patients (39 men/34 women) with a median age of 62 years were prospectively included in a treatment protocol of SRS [planning target volume (PTV) < 4 ccm, > 2 mm to optic pathways = low risk] or SRT (PTV ≥ 4 ccm, ≤ 2 mm to optic pathways = high risk) in two Novalis registered centers. Mean tumor volume was 7.02 ccm (range 0.58-57.29 ccm). Based on the protocol guidelines, 5 patients were treated with SRS and 68 patients with SRT. Median follow-up (FU) reached 5 years with 5-year overall survival (OS) of 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %) and 5-year local control and progression-free survival rates of 100 % (CI 93.3-100 %) and 90.4 % (CI 80.2-95 %), respectively. A post-SRS/SRT new visual disorder occurred in 2 patients (2.7 %), a new oculomotor nerve palsy in one pre-irradiated patient, in 3 patients (4.1 %) a pre-existing visual disorder improved. New complete hypopituitarism occurred in 4 patients (13.8 %) and in 3 patients (25 %) with pre-existing partial hypopituitarism. Pituitary function in 26 % of patients retained normal. Patients with tumor shrinkage (65.75 %) had a significantly longer FU (p = 0.0093). Multivariate analysis confirmed correlation of new hypopituitarism with duration of FU (p = 0.008) and correlation of new hypopituitarism and tumor volume (p = 0.023). No significant influence factors for occurrence of visual disorders were found. Our SRS/SRT protocol proved to be safe and successful in terms of tumor control and protection of the visual system, especially for large tumors located close to optic pathways. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines prospektiv angelegten Behandlungsprotokolls einer risikoadaptierten Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (SRT) von Patienten mit hormoninaktiven Hypophysenadenomen

  2. Electronic Support for Retrospective Analysis in the Field of Radiation Oncology: Proof of Principle Using an Example of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of 251 Meningioma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutzner, Sandra; Fietkau, Rainer; Ganslandt, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Lubgan, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the possible benefit of a clinical data warehouse (DWH) for retrospective analysis in the field of radiation oncology. We manually and electronically (using DWH) evaluated demographic, radiotherapy, and outcome data from 251 meningioma patients, who were irradiated from January 2002 to January 2015 at the Department of Radiation Oncology of the Erlangen University Hospital. Furthermore, we linked the Oncology Information System (OIS) MOSAIQ(®) to the DWH in order to gain access to irradiation data. We compared the manual and electronic data retrieval method in terms of congruence of data, corresponding time, and personal requirements (physician, physicist, scientific associate). The electronically supported data retrieval (DWH) showed an average of 93.9% correct data and significantly (p = 0.009) better result compared to manual data retrieval (91.2%). Utilizing a DWH enables the user to replace large amounts of manual activities (668 h), offers the ability to significantly reduce data collection time and labor demand (35 h), while simultaneously improving data quality. In our case, work time for manually data retrieval was 637 h for the scientific assistant, 26 h for the medical physicist, and 5 h for the physician (total 668 h). Our study shows that a DWH is particularly useful for retrospective analysis in the radiation oncology field. Routine clinical data for a large patient group can be provided ready for analysis to the scientist and data collection time can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, linking multiple data sources in a DWH offers the ability to improve data quality for retrospective analysis, and future research can be simplified.

  3. Can volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams play a role in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver lesions? A volume-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reggiori, Giacomo; Mancosu, Pietro; Castiglioni, Simona; Alongi, Filippo; Pellegrini, Chiara; Lobefalo, Francesca; Catalano, Maddalena; Fogliata, Antonella; Arcangeli, Stefano; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF) beams in patients with hepatic metastases subject to hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods: A planning study on 13 virtual lesions of increasing volume was performed. Two single arc plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using either FFF or FF beams. A second planning study was performed on ten patients treated for liver metastases to validate conclusions. In all cases, a dose of 75 Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and plans were evaluated in terms of coverage, homogeneity, conformity, mean dose to healthy liver and to healthy tissue. For each parameter, results were expressed in relative terms as the percentage ratio between FFF and FF data. Results: In terms of PTV coverage, conformity index favored FFF for targets of intermediate size while FF resulted more suitable for small (<100 cm{sup 3}) and large (>300 cm{sup 3}) targets. Plans optimized with FFF beams resulted in increased sparing of healthy tissue in {approx_equal}85% of cases. Despite the qualitative results, no statistically significant differences were found between FFF and FF results. Plans optimized with un-flattened beams resulted in higher average MU/Gy than plans with FF beams. A remarkable and significant difference was observed in the beam-on time (BOT) needed to deliver plans. The BOT for FF plans was 8.2 {+-} 1.0 min; for FFF plans BOT was 2.2 {+-} 0.2 min. Conclusions: RapidArc plans optimized using FFF were dosimetrically equivalent to those optimized using FF beams, showing the feasibility of SBRT treatments with FFF beams. Some improvement in healthy tissue sparing was observed when using the FFF modality due to the different beam's profile. The main advantage was a considerable reduction of beam-on time, relevant for SBRT techniques.

  4. 小细胞肺癌脑转移全脑放疗失败后挽救性分次立体定向放疗疗效分析%Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for recurrent small cell lung cancer brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李祥攀; 李晔雄; 肖建平; 陈秀军; 姜雪松; 张烨; 徐英杰; 郇福奎; 方浩; 万宝

    2012-01-01

    Objective Evaluation the Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSRT) for the patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) after the whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) failure.Methods We retrospectively analyzed 35 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with linear accelerator FSRT after the WBRT failure. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factor related to survival.Results The following-up rate was 100%.The median following-up time was 11 months.The median over-all survival (OS) time was 10.3( 1 -30) months after FSRT.Controlled extra cranial disease was the only identified significant predictor of increased median OS time (χ2 =4.02,P =0.045 ).The median OS time from the diagnosis of brain metastasis was 22 (6 - 134 )months.14 patients died from brain metastasis,14 from extra-cranial progression,1 from leptomeningeal metastases,and 3 from other causes. Local control at 6 months and 12 months was 91% and 76%,respectively.No significant late complications.New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 17% of patients at a median time of 4(2 -20) months; all patients had received previous WBRT.Conclusions Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was safe and effective treatment for recurrent small-cell lung carcinoma brain metastases.%目的 评价小细胞肺癌( SCLC)全脑放疗(WBRT)后颅内失败分次立体定向放疗(FSRT)挽救的价值.方法 回顾分析WBRT失败后使用FSRT挽救的35例SCLC脑转移患者的生存情况,多因素分析确定和生存相关的预后因素.结果 随访率为100%,中位随访时间11个月.全组总中位生存期为10.3个月,多因素分析显示颅外疾病控制状态和患者的生存相关(χ2=4.02,P=0.045).自诊断脑转移开始中位生存期为22.0个月,未发现严重晚期不良反应.6、12个月局部控制率分别为91%、76%.6例局部未控患者中3例行二程FSRT挽救,挽救治疗后生存时间分别为3、9

  5. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type ... Breast Biopsy? What is Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often ...

  6. Computed tomography-based anatomic assessment overestimates local tumor recurrence in patients with mass-like consolidation after stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Neal E; Yang, Wensha; McIntosh, Alyson; Sheng, Ke; Benedict, Stanley H; Read, Paul W; Larner, James M

    2012-12-01

    To investigate pulmonary radiologic changes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), to distinguish between mass-like fibrosis and tumor recurrence. Eighty consecutive patients treated with 3- to 5-fraction SBRT for early-stage peripheral non-small cell lung cancer with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were reviewed. The mean biologic equivalent dose received was 150 Gy (range, 78-180 Gy). Patients were followed with serial CT imaging every 3 months. The CT appearance of consolidation was defined as diffuse or mass-like. Progressive disease on CT was defined according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Positron emission tomography (PET) CT was used as an adjunct test. Tumor recurrence was defined as a standardized uptake value equal to or greater than the pretreatment value. Biopsy was used to further assess consolidation in select patients. Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 12.0-36.0 months). Abnormal mass-like consolidation was identified in 44 patients (55%), whereas diffuse consolidation was identified in 12 patients (15%), at a median time from end of treatment of 10.3 months and 11.5 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence was found in 35 of 44 patients with mass-like consolidation using CT alone. Combined with PET, 10 of the 44 patients had tumor recurrence. Tumor size (hazard ratio 1.12, P=.05) and time to consolidation (hazard ratio 0.622, P=.03) were predictors for tumor recurrence. Three consecutive increases in volume and increasing volume at 12 months after treatment in mass-like consolidation were highly specific for tumor recurrence (100% and 80%, respectively). Patients with diffuse consolidation were more likely to develop grade ≥ 2 pneumonitis (odds ratio 26.5, P=.02) than those with mass-like consolidation (odds ratio 0.42, P=.07). Incorporating the kinetics of mass-like consolidation and PET to the current criteria for evaluating posttreatment response will increase the likelihood of correctly identifying

  7. Computed Tomography-Based Anatomic Assessment Overestimates Local Tumor Recurrence in Patients With Mass-like Consolidation After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlap, Neal E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Yang Wensha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McIntosh, Alyson [Department of Radiation Oncology, John and Dorothy Morgan Cancer Center, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, PA (United States); Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Larner, James M., E-mail: jml2p@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary radiologic changes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), to distinguish between mass-like fibrosis and tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: Eighty consecutive patients treated with 3- to 5-fraction SBRT for early-stage peripheral non-small cell lung cancer with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were reviewed. The mean biologic equivalent dose received was 150 Gy (range, 78-180 Gy). Patients were followed with serial CT imaging every 3 months. The CT appearance of consolidation was defined as diffuse or mass-like. Progressive disease on CT was defined according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Positron emission tomography (PET) CT was used as an adjunct test. Tumor recurrence was defined as a standardized uptake value equal to or greater than the pretreatment value. Biopsy was used to further assess consolidation in select patients. Results: Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 12.0-36.0 months). Abnormal mass-like consolidation was identified in 44 patients (55%), whereas diffuse consolidation was identified in 12 patients (15%), at a median time from end of treatment of 10.3 months and 11.5 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence was found in 35 of 44 patients with mass-like consolidation using CT alone. Combined with PET, 10 of the 44 patients had tumor recurrence. Tumor size (hazard ratio 1.12, P=.05) and time to consolidation (hazard ratio 0.622, P=.03) were predictors for tumor recurrence. Three consecutive increases in volume and increasing volume at 12 months after treatment in mass-like consolidation were highly specific for tumor recurrence (100% and 80%, respectively). Patients with diffuse consolidation were more likely to develop grade {>=}2 pneumonitis (odds ratio 26.5, P=.02) than those with mass-like consolidation (odds ratio 0.42, P=.07). Conclusion: Incorporating the kinetics of mass-like consolidation and PET to the current criteria for evaluating posttreatment response will

  8. A treatment planning comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator–based stereotactic body radiotherapy for central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merna, Catherine; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kishan, Amar U.; Michailian, Argin; Lamb, James; Sheng, Ke; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael L.; Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of planning stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for large central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer with a tri-cobalt-60 (tri-{sup 60}Co) system equipped with real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance, as compared to linear accelerator (LINAC)–based SBRT. In all, 20 patients with large central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer who were treated between 2010 and 2015 with LINAC-based SBRT were replanned using a tri-{sup 60}Co system for a prescription dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Doses to organs at risk were evaluated based on established MD Anderson constraints for central lung SBRT. R{sub 100} values were calculated as the total tissue volume receiving 100% of the dose (V{sub 100}) divided by the planning target volume and compared to assess dose conformity. Dosimetric comparisons between LINAC-based and tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans were performed using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon Ranks test. Blinded reviews by radiation oncologists were performed to assess the suitability of both plans for clinical delivery. The mean planning target volume was 48.3 cc (range: 12.1 to 139.4 cc). Of the tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans, a mean 97.4% of dosimetric parameters per patient met MD Anderson dose constraints, whereas a mean 98.8% of dosimetric parameters per patient were met with LINAC-based SBRT planning (p = 0.056). R{sub 100} values were similar between both plans (1.20 vs 1.21, p = 0.79). Upon blinded review by 4 radiation oncologists, an average of 90% of the tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans were considered acceptable for clinical delivery compared with 100% of the corresponding LINAC-based SBRT plans (p = 0.17). SBRT planning using the tri-{sup 60}Co system with built-in MRI is feasible and achieves clinically acceptable plans for most central lung patients, with similar target dose conformity and organ at risk dosimetry. The added benefit of real-time MRI-guided therapy may further optimize tumor targeting while

  9. Impact of pretreatment whole-tumor perfusion computed tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography measurements on local control of non–small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Seino, Hiroko; Kakehata, Shinya; Tsushima, Fumiyasu; Fujita, Hiromasa; Fujita, Tamaki; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between the average iodine density (AID) detected by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) yielded by [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Seventy-four patients with medically inoperable NSCLC who underwent both DE-CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT before SBRT (50‒60 Gy in 5‒6 fractions) were followed up after a median interval of 24.5 months. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to determine associations between local control (LC) and variables, including AID, SUVmax, tumor size, histology, and prescribed dose. The median AID and SUVmax were 18.64 (range, 1.18–45.31) (100 µg/cm3) and 3.2 (range, 0.7–17.6), respectively. No correlation was observed between AID and SUVmax. Two-year LC rates were 96.2% vs 75.0% (P = 0.039) and 72.0% vs 96.2% (P = 0.002) for patients classified according to high vs low AID or SUVmax, respectively. Two-year LC rates for patients with adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma vs unknown cancer were 96.4% vs 67.1% vs 92.9% (P = 0.008), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified SUVmax as a significant predictor of LC. The 2-year LC rate was only 48.5% in the subgroup of lower AID and higher SUVmax vs >90% (range, 94.4–100%) in other subgroups (P = 0.000). Despite the short follow-up period, a reduction in AID and subsequent increase in SUVmax correlated significantly with local failure in SBRT-treated NSCLC patients. Further studies involving larger populations and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. PMID:27296251

  10. Contribution to the planning and dosimetry of photon beams applied to radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy; Contribuicao ao planejamento e a dosimetria de feixes de fotons aplicados a radiocirurgia e a radioterapia estereotaxica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Walter Menezes

    2003-08-15

    Radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy are irradiation techniques that use small diameter photon beams for treating intracranial lesions such as pituitary adenomas, acoustic tumors and arterio-venous malformations which are inaccessible for surgery. These treatment techniques are characterized by the use of very small radiation beams which deliver a precisely measured dose to the target volume, while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Treatment can be performed by using multiple {sup 60}Co gamma-ray sources (in the so-called 'Gamma Knife'), charged particles or X-ray beams produced by linear accelerators. The prescribed dose can be given in a single session or in multiple fractions, as in conventional radiotherapy. The success of the treatment depends, among other factors, of the accurate determination of the parameters that characterize the radiation beam produced by the equipment, as well as, of a well designed quality assurance program. In this study, the dosimetric parameters of a set of collimating cones of a Radionics{sup TM} treatment system applied to two 6 MV- photon beams (Clinac 600C - Varian{sup TM}, and Mevatron MD2 - Siemens{sup TM}) were evaluated by using a water filled PMMA simulator. Measurements were carried out for photon beam diameters ranging from 12.5 to 40.0 mm for the Clinac-600C and from 5.0 to 50.0 mm for the Mevatron MD2. The parameters were evaluated by using a parallel plate ionization chamber (Markus), Kodak X-Omat V dosimetric films, thermoluminescent dosemeters (Harschaw, TLD-100) and photodiodes. The maximum tissue-ratio, the off-axis profile and the output factors were determined and the results were compared to those reported elsewhere. A study of the dosimetric characteristics of some commercially available phototransistors was also carried out. The results showed that these electronic components can be successfully used for measuring the dosimetric parameters of small diameter photon beans used in

  11. [Irradiation in stereotactic conditions: prerequisites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingon, P; Lisbona, A

    2014-10-01

    Indications of treatment by stereotactic body radiotherapy are dramatically increasing due to new potential indications. The conditions associated with the treatment delivery are multiple. The first step of the process is crucial. It is related to the validation of the indication proposed during the multidisciplinary meeting as regard the evidence-based proof of the concept. These emerging techniques mainly extracranial stereotactic body irradiation do not benefit from long-term evaluation in terms of efficiency as well as normal tissue late toxicities. Priority should be given to prospective independent clinical trials, validated by an independent scientific committee, performed under a relevant and well dedicated multicentric quality assurance program aiming to improve knowledge and selection of indications. The SFRO is still working with others professionals on the definition of the conditions for the implementation of such treatments and actively collaborates with the authorities to define the appropriate conditions to preserve the quality of the treatment delivery under these specific conditions. Copyright © 2014 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Stereotactic radiation therapy combined with temozolomide in the treatmsct recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after whole brain radiotherapy%非小细胞肺癌全脑放疗复发后替莫唑胺联合立体定向放疗补救治疗临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡勇; 王季颖

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)全脑放疗后颅内失败采用替莫唑胺联合立体定向治疗挽救的价值.方法 54例患者进入本次研究,所有全脑放疗后颅内复发转移的患者接受替莫唑胺化疗联合立体定向放疗,分析局控率,生存率情况,多因素分析确定和生存相关的预后因素.结果 随访率100%,中位随访时间为13个月.全组中位生存时间为11.7个月.独立递归分级指数(RPA)l,2,3级中位生存期分别为19,14,9个月.自脑转移开始患者的中位生存时间为15个月(6~22个月),立体定向治疗加替莫唑胺挽救治疗后6和12个月局部控制率分别为93%和65%.结论 联合治疗有较好的有效性和安全性,值得在NSCLC中颅内治疗失败后作为挽救治疗推广.%Purpose To observe the therapeutic effect and toxicity of stereotactic radiation therapy combined with temozolomide in treating recurrent non small cell lung cancer after whole brain radiotherapy. Methods 54 patients with recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after whole brain radiotherapy were treated by stereotactic radiation therapy combined with temozolomide. Results The follow-up rate was 100%. The median follow-up time was 12 months. The median over-up survival (OS) time was 11.7 months. The median OS time from the diagnosis of brain metastasis was 15 months. Local control at 6 and 12 months was 93% and 65%. Conclusion The therapy of stereotactic radiation therapy combined with temozolomide was safe and effective in the treatment of recurrent non small cell lung cancer after whole brain radiotherapy.

  13. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  14. Effects and prognostic factors of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer%大分割立体定向放射治疗NSCLC脑转移的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    斯琴高娃; 李墨

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects and prognostic factors for patients with brain metastases in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT). METHODS: A total of 60 patients with brain metastasis were recruited, which included 124 metastatic lesions. All patients received the treatment of HSRT. Ninety metastasis lesions received the HSRT plus whole brain radiotherapy, and thirty-four lesions received the HSRT alone. Median follow up time was 12 months. The effective rate and prognostic factors were observed and analyzed accordingly. RESULTS: In group of receiving HSRT with whole brain radiotherapy, forty-six of metastasis lesions were reached to complete remission (CR) , 28 to partial remision (PR), 9 to stable disease(SD), and 7 to progressive disease(PD). Local-control (LC) rate at 6- and 12-month was 92. 3% and 66. 9%, and the overall survival (OS) rate was 73. 2% and 47.6%, respectively. In group of receiving HSRT alone, twenty of metastasis lesions were reached for CR, 7 for PR, 4 for SD, and 3 for PD. LC rate at 6- and 12- month was 92. 7% and 65. 9% and the OS rate was 70. 2% and 45. 8% , respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the amount of the metastasis lesions (OR= 1. 675, P=0. 001), extracranial metastasis (OR=1. 934, P. 036) and the control of the primary tumor (OR=7. 936, P=0. 033) were the independent factors for the OS. CONCLUSIONS; HSRT is one of the efficacious methods for the treatment in NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Numbers of brain metastasis lesions, extracranial metastasis and controlled primary lesion are independent prognostic factors.%目的:分析大分割立体定向放射治疗(HSRT)非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)脑转移的有效性及预后因素.方法:选取60例有1 24个脑转移病灶的NSCLC患者进行HSRT,其中90个病变进行全脑放射治疗加HSRT,34个病变初始进行HSRT,中位随访12个月.观察近期疗效及预后因素.结果:全脑放疗加HSRT组46

  15. Stereotactic Irradiation of GH-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Minniti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT is often employed in patients with acromegaly refractory to medical and/or surgical interventions in order to prevent tumour regrowth and normalize elevated GH and IGF-I levels. It achieves tumour control and hormone normalization up to 90% and 70% of patients at 10–15 years. Despite the excellent tumour control, conventional RT is associated with a potential risk of developing late toxicity, especially hypopituitarism, and its role in the management of patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenomas remains a matter of debate. Stereotactic techniques have been developed with the aim to deliver more localized irradiation and minimize the long-term consequences of treatment, while improving its efficacy. Stereotactic irradiation can be given in a single dose as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS or in multiple doses as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT. We have reviewed the recent published literature on stereotactic techniques for GH-secreting pituitary tumors with the aim to define the efficacy and potential adverse effects of each of these techniques.

  16. Clinical value of stereotactic body radiotherapy for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer%立体定向放疗治疗胰腺转移癌的临床效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 祁会特; 郝睿; 常冬姝; 李宏奇; 李平; 吴伟章; 王颖杰; 夏廷毅

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical value of stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer.Methods Data of 17 patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer were retrospectively studied.All patients were admitted to Air Force General Hospital from January 2006 to December 2014.Lung carcinoma was the most common primary tumor (n =7),followed by cystic carcinoma (n =3),esophageal cancer (n =1),gastric carcinoma (n =1),renal carcinoma (n =1),colon carcinoma (n =1),acute myeloid leukemia (n =1),left chest fibrous histiocytoma (n =1),and upper extremity synovial sarcoma (n =1).There were 8 patients choosing the therapy of body gamma knife,5 choosing the therapy of IMRT,3 choosing the therapy of 3DCRT and 1 choosing the therapy of TOMO.Metastases median maximum diameter was 3.6 cm (range,1.6-1.7 cm),median target volume was 37.1 mm3 (range,11.1-72.1 mm3) and median GTV dose was 50 Gy (range,40-70 Gy).Patients treatment time was 14 to 22 days,5 fractions/week and median single dose was 3 Gy.Results Of all the patients of this group,4 patients qualified as complete remission (CR),8 patients reached the standard of partial remission (PR),and 2 patients maintained the situation of stable disease (SD).The total percentage of therapeutic efficiency was 70.1% (12/17).As for the analgesic therapy,3 patients qualified as CR,5 patients reached the standard of PR,and 1 patient maintained the situation of MR (minimal response).The total percentage of analgesic therapeutic efficiency was 100 %.The local control rates for six-month and 1 year were both 100 %,and the overall survival rates for 1 year and 2 years were 35.3 % and 5.9 %.No Grade 3 or more acute and late radiation reaction was observed.Conclusion The majority of patients with pancreatic metastatic carcinoma have lost the opportunity to have surgery,but the stereotactic radiation therapy can improve the quality of life and local control rate with small toxicity and acceptable complications

  17. Stereotactic Hypofractionated Irradiation for Metastatic, Inoperable, and Recurrent Malignancies: A Modern Necessity, rather than a Luxury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar P. Susheela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic-irradiation combines highly conformal delivery of radiation to selected volumes at large doses per fraction, with the treatment completed typically within one to five fractions. The radiobiological equivalence of doses delivered by stereotactic-irradiation (often beyond 80–100 Gy is much higher in comparison to the doses achievable by conventional fractionation. At the high fraction sizes used in stereotactic-irradiation, evidence suggests the role of various radiobiological mechanisms of actions, which are not traditionally relatable with conventional radiotherapy. In spite of the accumulating evidence in favour of the efficacy of stereotactic irradiation in terms of improving local control and at times attaining increments in survival, the clinical adoption of the technique remains dismal. This review provides a brief description of the available evidence describing the benefits of stereotactic-irradiation for the management of patients with oligometastases, unresectable malignancies and for disease recurrence after prior radiotherapy. Given the growing body of evidence illustrating the efficacy of stereotactic irradiation among patients with conditions which were previously often regarded as untreatable, it is likely that the widespread adoption of stereotactic irradiation may achieve cure in a few patients, while in the remainder providing prospects of long term local control. This could be a step in the direction of converting incurable malignancies into chronic controllable diseases.

  18. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  19. 大剂量多次分割立体定向放疗对听神经瘤的疗效分析%Clinical Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Five Fractions for Acoustic Neuromas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志萍; 溝脇尚志; 小倉健; 宇藤惠; 平岡眞寛

    2015-01-01

    目的:评价大剂量分割立体定向放疗(hypo-FSRT)治疗听神经瘤患者在肿瘤局部控制及有效听力保存等方面的临床价值。方法回顾性分析47例单侧听神经瘤患者,中位年龄61岁,放疗前19例患者持有有效听力,肿瘤最大径中位值20 mm,处方剂量:等中心总剂量25 Gy,5次分割,每日1次,80%剂量曲线包绕计划靶区( PTV)边缘。采用实体瘤消退评价标准( RECIST)改良版1.1评估肿瘤消退情况。采用Gardner-Robertson Class 评估听力保存情况。 SPSS 18.0软件进行统计分析。结果中位随访及听力随访时间分别为61及52个月,30例(63.8%)、13例(27.67%)及4例(8.5%)患者分别出现肿瘤部分缩退(PR)、稳定(SD)、进展(PD),根据Kaplan-Meier生存分析,5年肿瘤局部控制率为90.4%,放疗前肿瘤是否合并囊变成分在肿瘤控制方面存在显著性差异(P=0.015),合并囊变的肿瘤预示放疗后出现肿瘤进展的可能性大。放疗后14例(29.8%)患者出现肿瘤暂时性增大。1、3、5年患者有效听力保存率分别为68.4%,62.1%及35.5%。有效听力保存与未保存患者在肿瘤消退情况方面存在明显差异(P=0.017)。1例(2.1%)患者行挽救性手术,2例(4.3%)患者行VP-脑室分流术,2例(4.3%)患者新出现三叉神经轻度麻痹。结论 Hypo-FSRT (25 Gy/5次)治疗单侧听神经瘤可有效控制肿瘤,放疗后并发症发生率低。影像定期随访中观察到肿瘤暂时性增大及逐渐缩退过程。放疗前肿瘤合并囊变预示患者放疗后出现肿瘤进展的机率更高。%Objective To study the clinical outcomes of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy ( hypo-FSRT) for a-coustic neuromas (ANs).Methods 47 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma were treated consecutively with hypo -FSRT. The median age was 61 years old

  20. 非小细胞肺癌伽玛刀治疗后并发放射性肺不张分析%An analysis of radiotherapy-induced alelectasis complicated stereotactic body radiation therapy(body gamma-knife)for patients with medically inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利民; 周光华; 李强; 苏加利; 朱道奇; 易正生

    2011-01-01

    Objective: By retrospective analysis of radiotherapy - induced alelectasis complicated stereotactic body radiation therapy( body gamma - knife )for patients with medically inoperable non - small - cell lung cancer, to improve the methed of high - dose conformal radiotherapy. Methods: A total of 488 medically inoperable patients with biopsy - confirmed non - small - cell lung cancer( NSCLC ) included peripheral tumor( 226 patients )and centre tumor ( 262 patients ), underwent treatment prospectively using the stereotactic gamma - ray whole - body therapeutic system ( body gamma - knife radiosurgery ). A total dose of 35 to 60 Gy was delivered at 3 to 8 Gy/fraction to the 50% to 70% isodose line covering the planning target volume, one fraction one day and five fraction one week. Results: Three to six months after treatment, there were twenty cases of radiation therapy - induced atelectasis occurred in centre tumor and no one occurred in peripheral tumor,there was significant difference between patients with peripheral VS central tumors. Conclusion: Radiation therapy - induced alelectasis is a significant clinical complication of dose escalation for lung cancer. Based on our study results, the high - dose conformal radiotherapy should be used more carefully for patients with central tumors than for peripheral tumor due to excessive toxicity. Its necessaary to make grade 1 and 2 bronnchus as a dose - limited oragn for patients with medically inoperable non - small - cell lung cancer theating by stereotactic body radiation therapy.%目的:回顾分析伽玛刀大分割适形放射治疗非小细胞肺癌(non small cell lung cancer,NSCLC)后并发非肿瘤性肺不张的原因,进一步完善大分割适形放射治疗.方法:488例非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)分为中央型(262例)和周围型(226例),分别进行了伽玛刀分次治疗,剂量3Gy-8Gy/次,处方剂量50%-70% 剂量线,1次/日,5次/周,连续照射,总次数5-16次,总剂量35Gy-60Gy.结果:非小细胞

  1. 立体定向放射治疗和全脑放射治疗脑转移瘤对患者神经认知功能和健康相关生活质量的影响分析%Evaluation of neurocognitive and quality of life in patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春满; 郑云峰; 米娟

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of brain metastases and stereotactic radiotherapy( SRT)and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT)on neurocognitive functioning and health - related quality of life(HRQoL). Methods Neurocognitive functioning and HRQoL of 192 patients with brain metastases were measured after three kinds of radiotherapy. Six cognitive domains were assessed. HRQoL was assessed with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer(EORTC)QLQ - C30 and BN20 questionnaires. Results In terms of neurocogni-tive function,there was no significant difference in visual memory,working memory,attention,visual conformation capacity( P ﹥ 0. 05). There was significant difference in information processing speed and executive functioning( P ﹤ 0. 05)between WBRT,SRT and SRT + WBRT. The pa-tients with KPS ﹤ 90 compared with those with KPS≥90 in the information processing speed and executive function showed significant difference( P ﹤ 0. 05). In terms of HRQoL,there was no significant difference in emotional functioning,role functioning,motor dysfunction,communication deficits( P ﹥ 0. 05)and significant difference in physical functioning and cognitive functioning( P ﹤ 0. 05)between WBRT,SRT and SRT +WBRT;the patients with KPS ﹤ 90 compared with those with KPS≥90 inphysical functioning and cognitive functioning showed significant differ-ence( P ﹤ 0. 05). Conclusion Over time,SRT + WBRT improved neurocognitive functioning and HRQoL of patients,suggesting that SRT +WBRT may be preferred for brain metastases.%目的探讨立体定向放射治疗(SRT)和全脑放射治疗(WBRT)对脑转移瘤患者神经认知功能和健康相关生活质量的影响。方法对收集的192例脑转移瘤患者,分别进行单纯 WBRT、单纯 SRT 以及 SRT + WBRT 治疗,每组随机分为64例患者,分别进行神经认知功能和健康相关生活质量( HRQoL)的评价,神经认知功能共评价6个功能部分,HRQoL 用 QLQ - C30

  2. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  3. Observation of 46 Patients with Radioactivity Liver Injury Induced by Liver Cancer after Stereotactic Radiother-apy with Gamma Knife%伽马刀立体定向放疗46例肝癌致放射性肝损伤观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆笼辉; 王莉; 丁涤非; 胡凯; 张华; 丁庆社

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe radiation injury and analyze related factors of patients with radioactivity liver injury induced by liver cancer after stereotactic radiotherapy with gamma knife. Methods A total of 46 patients with liv-er cancer confirmed by pathological examination during August 2011 and August 2013 were divided into the marker of hepatitis B virus (HBVM) ( +) group (n=23) and HBVM ( -) group (n=23), and the two groups were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with gamma knife. Child-Pugh classification was evaluated in the two groups before treatment, after treatment and 4, 15 and 25 weeks after treatment. Levels of albumin (ALB), direct bilirubin (DBIL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (AKP) were detected. Before the treatment, gross tumor volume ( GTV) had been painted by CT physicians and clinicians respectively, and the differ-ences (ΔGTV1) of the two groups were compared. The differences in ALT variation (ΔALT ) and GTV variation (ΔGTV2) before treatment were compared with those 15 weeks after treatment. Results The differences in Child-Pugh classification and indexes of liver function in the two groups 15 weeks after treatment were statistically significant com-pared with those before treatment in the same group (P0. 05 ); there were statistically significant inΔALT and ΔGTV1 between the two groups ( P0. 05 ) . Conclusion The stereotactic technique of gamma knife in treatment of liver cancer should take the infection status of HBV into account, so clinicians should accurately paint rationalely delineate range of external GTV and make individualized treatment plan to reduce the incidence rate of liver injury.%目的:观察伽马刀立体定向放疗肝癌致肝组织辐射损伤的发生情况,分析相关因素。方法选择解放军123医院肿瘤科2011年8月-2013年8月收治的、经病理学证实的46例肝癌,分为乙肝病毒标志物( HBVM)(+)和HBVM(-)两组,每组23例,

  4. 立体定向放疗联合高强度聚焦超声治疗原发性肝癌的临床研究%The Clinical Study of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Combined with High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for Primary Hepatic Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚晖; 龚金兰; 李莉; 王芸

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨立体定向放射( SRT )联合高强度聚焦超声治疗原发性肝癌的临床价值。方法采用立体定向大分割剂量低分次放疗联合高强度聚焦超声治疗128例原发性肝癌患者,放射生物剂量为DT 60 Gy,同期配合高强度聚焦超声治疗10次。结果近期局部有效率为90.6%;1、2、3年生存率分别为79.7%(102/128)、53.1%(68/128)和46.1%(59/128);治疗3个月后与治疗前比较,患者血清AFP及CA199水平变化显著( P<0.05);治疗3个月后NK细胞及T淋巴细胞亚群CD3、CD4、CD8、CD4/CD8水平显著提高,治疗前后差异有显著性( P<0.01)。结论立体定向低分次放射治疗联合高强度聚焦超声治疗原发性肝癌,能提高肿瘤局部控制率,提高患者机体免疫功能,并减少放射性肝病的发生,是治疗失去手术指征原发性肝癌的有效方法。%Objective To investigate the clinical value of primary hepatic carcinoma treated by hypofractionated ster -eotactic radiotherapy and high-intensity focused ultrasound .Methods 128 patients were treated by stereotactic radiotherapy with total irradiation of DT60Gy and 10 fractions of high-intensity focused ultrasound.Results The local control rate was 90.6% ;1-,2-,and 3-year survival rate was 79.7%(102/128),53.1%( 68/128),46.1%( 59/128) respectively;the changes in ser-um AFP and CA199 before and after treatment were significant (P<0.05);CD3,CD4,CD8,CD4/CD8 and NK cells increased significantly(P<0.01).Conclusion Stereotactic radiotherapy and high-intensity focused ultrasound is an effective treatment for primary hepatic carcinoma .It can ease the symptoms ,control the disease and increase the survival time .

  5. Immune Modulation and Stereotactic Radiation: Improving Local and Abscopal Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New and innovative treatment strategies for cancer patients in the fields of immunotherapy and radiotherapy are rapidly developing in parallel. Among the most promising preclinical treatment approaches is combining immunotherapy with radiotherapy where early data suggest synergistic effects in several tumor model systems. These studies demonstrate that radiation combined with immunotherapy can result in superior efficacy for local tumor control. More alluring is the emergence of data suggesting an equally profound systemic response also known as “abscopal” effects with the combination of radiation and certain immunotherapies. Studies addressing optimal radiation dose, fractionation, and modality to be used in combination with immunotherapy still require further exploration. However, recent anecdotal clinical reports combining stereotactic or hypofractionated radiation regimens with immunotherapy have resulted in dramatic sustained clinical responses, both local and abscopal. Technologic advances in clinical radiation therapy has made it possible to deliver hypofractionated regimens anywhere in the body using stereotactic radiation techniques, facilitating further clinical investigations. Thus, stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy agents represents an exciting and potentially fruitful new space for improving cancer therapeutic responses.

  6. Evaluation of novel radiotherapy technologies: what evidence is needed to assess their clinical and cost effectiveness, and how should we get it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, J. van; Grutters, J.P.C.; Macbeth, F.

    2012-01-01

    Technical innovations in radiation oncology--eg, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and particle therapy--can be developed rapidly and introduced into the clinic even when costs associated with their use are much higher than those for conventional radiotherapy. Although cli

  7. Radioterapia estereotáctica Stereotactic radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Aristu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La radioterapia con técnica estereotáctica es una modalidad de radioterapia externa que utiliza un sistema de coordenadas tridimensionales independientes del paciente para la localización precisa de la lesión. También se caracteriza porque los haces de irradiación son altamente conformados, precisos y convergentes sobre la lesión que hacen posible la administración de dosis muy altas de radioterapia sin incrementar la irradiación de los órganos o estructuras sanas adyacentes. Cuando el procedimiento se realiza en una sesión de tratamiento se denomina radiocirugía y si se administra en varias sesiones se denomina radioterapia estereotáctica. Se precisa de sistemas de fijación e inmovilización del paciente especiales (guías o marcos estereotácticos y dispositivos de radioterapia capaces de generar haces muy conformados (acelerador lineal, gammaknife, cyberknife, tomoterapia, ciclotrones. La radioterapia estereotáctica moderna utiliza marcas radioopacas intratumorales o sistemas de imágenes de TAC incluidos en el dispositivo de irradiación, que permiten una precisa localización de las lesiones móviles en cada sesión de tratamiento. Además, los avances tecnológicos hacen posible coordinar los movimientos de la lesión en la respiración con la unidad de radioterapia (gaiting y tracking de forma que pueden estrecharse al máximo los márgenes y por lo tanto excluir un mayor volumen de tejido sano La radiocirugía está indicada principalmente en lesiones cerebrales benignas o malignas menores de 3-4 centímetros (malformaciones arteriovenosas, neurinomas, meningiomas, metástasis cerebrales y la radioterapia estereotáctica se administra fundamentalmente en tumores de localización extracraneal que requieran una alta conformación y precisión como cáncer precoz de pulmón inoperable y metástasis hepáticas.Stereotactic radiotherapy is an external radiation modality that uses a system of three dimensional references

  8. SU-F-R-47: Quantitative Shape Relationship Analysis of PTV Modification for Critical Anatomy Sparing and Its Impact On Pathologic Response for Neoadjuvant Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Rosati, L; Chen, L; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Peng, L; Mian, O; Narang, A; Hacker-Prietz, A; Herman, J; McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) may be used to increase surgery candidacy in borderline resectable (BRPC) and locally advanced (LAPC) pancreatic cancer. However, the planning target volume (PTV) may need to be limited to avoid toxicity when the gross tumor volume (GTV) is anatomically involved with surrounding critical structures. Our study aims to characterize the coverage of GTV and investigate the association between modified PTV and pathologic (pCR) or near pathologic (npCR) complete response rates determined from the surgical specimen. Methods: Patients treated with neoadjuvant pancreas SBRT followed by surgery from 2010–2015 were selected from Oncospace. Overlap volume histogram (OVH) analysis was performed to determine the extent of compromise of the PTV from both the GTV and a standard target (GTV+3mm). Subsequently, normalized overlap volume (%) was calculated for: (1) GTV-PTV, and (2) GTV+3mm expansion-PTV. A logistic regression model was used to identify the association between the overlap ratios and ≥ npCR(pCR/npCR) stratified by active breathing control (ABC) versus free-breathing status. Results: Eighty-one (BRPC: n=42, LAPC: n=39) patients were available for analysis. Nearly 40% (31/81) had ≥npCR and 75% (61/81) were able to complete ABC. Mean coverage of the GTV-PTV was 92.6% (range, 59.9%–100%, SD = 8.68) and coverage of the GTV+3mm expansion-PTV was 85. 2% (range, 59.9% −100.0%, SD= 8.67). Among the patients with ABC, every 10% increase in GTV coverage doubled the odds to have ≥npCR (OR = 1.82, p=0.06). Coverage of GTV+3mm expansion was not associated with ≥npCR regardless of ABC status. Conclusion: Preferential sparing of critical anatomy over GTV-PTV coverage with ABC management suggests worse ≥npCR rates for neoadjuvant SBRT in BRPC and LAPC. Limiting the GTV and GTV+3mm expansion in free-breathing patients was not associated with pathologic response perhaps due to larger GTV definitions as a result of motion

  9. Convergence Insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from convergence insufficiency? Symptoms of convergence insufficiency include diplopia (double vision) and headaches when reading. Many patients ... another time or simply watched for symptoms of diplopia or headaches with near work. A patient who ...

  10. 伽玛刀分次治疗大于3cm直径脑膜瘤疗效分析%Analysis of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for meningiomas larger than 3 centimeters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧明亮; 庞军

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨伽玛刀分次治疗(FSRT)大于3 cm直径脑膜瘤的疗效,评价其临床应用价值.方法 搜集2007年3月至2010年3月采用FSRT的直径>3 cm脑膜瘤患者45例,其中男25例,女20例,年龄18~84岁(中位值51岁).首次应用伽玛刀治疗23例,术后残留和/或复发22例.肿瘤直径3.1~7.3 cm(中位值4.1 cm),计划靶体6积2.7~103.5cm3(中位值17.1 cm3),FSRT总剂量21~36 Gy(中位值28 Gy),分4~10次(中位值7次).结果 所有病人随访3~12个月(中位值6个月),随访率100%.局部控制率CR4.44%,PR62.22%,SD28.89%,PD4.44%,总有效率为95.56%.结论 FSRT能有效控制大于3 cm直径脑膜瘤,并改善患者生活质量,安全,副反应小.尤其是颅底深部、手术难以全切除或术后残留、复发以及年老体弱不宜手术者,首选伽玛刀可以获得理想的疗效.%Objective To assess the feasibility and the short - term effect of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) with Super-Gamma-knife for meningiomas more than 3cm in diameter. Methods From March 2007 to March 2010, 45 patients (25 male and 20 female) with meningiomas larger than 3cm were treated using FSRT with Super-Gamma-knife. The median age was 51 (range, 18~84) years old. There were 23 newly diagnosed patients and 22 recurrent patients. The largest diameter of tumors was 3. 1~7. 3 cm(median, 4. Lcm). Planning target volume were 2. 7~103. 5cm3 (median, 17. Lcm3) . The median dose of FSRT was 28 (range, 21~36) Gy in 7 (range, 4~10) fractions. Results All patients followed up clinically for 3~12 months ,In 45 patients with meningiomas , the tumor disappeared in 2( 4. 44 %),reduced in 28(62. 22%), unchanged in 13(28. 89%), and increased in 2(4. 44 %)with a response rate of 95. 56%. Conclusion FSRT is definitive and safe with mild side effect for selected patients with meningiomas larger than 3cm. It is especially fitted for skull base meningiomas, unresectable meningiomas,postoperative tumor residual and recurrent

  11. Systematic Evaluation of Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer%立体定向放疗在乳腺癌脑转移瘤中的系统评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    简红梅; 吴英

    2016-01-01

    目的:应用系统评价方法评价立体定向放疗在乳腺癌脑转移瘤中的疗效和安全性。方法检索PubMed、MEDILINE,EMBASE and Cochrane图书馆以及中国生物医学文献数据库等数据库,纳入接受单独立体定向放疗治疗(SRS)对比SRS联合全脑放疗(WBRT)的乳腺癌脑转移的随机对照试验或队列对照研究,检索日期截止至2014年6月。以Cochrane系统评价方法评价纳入研究,提取有效数据后使用RevMan 5.2软件对总生存期、局部控制生存期进行meta分析。结果共纳入2个回顾性队列研究,包括103例患者,meta分析结果显示SRS对比SRS联合WBRT在总生存期(HR=0.85,95%CI[0.56,1.29],=0.44),局部控制生存期(HR=1.25,95%CI[0.82,1.90],=0.30)方面均无明显差别。结论目前证据表明单独SRS对比SRS联合WBRT在乳腺癌脑转移患者中并无明显的生存差别,但在不良反应和局部缓解率方面尚不清楚,需要更多高质量随机对照试验进一步证实。%Objective The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS)has became an effective treatment for patients of metastases from breast cancer. Methods Electronic (PubMed,MEDILINE,EMBASE and Cochrane library databases)was conducted throughout June 2014 to identify trails for patients underwent SRS alone or in combination with WBRT for newly diagnosed of brain metastases from breast cancer . The Cochrane Collaboration Review Manage 5.2 statistical software was used for this meta-analysis.Results A total of two retrospective cohort including 103 patients. No significant difference both in overall survival(OS) (HR=0.85,95%CI[0.56,1.29],p=0.44)and local control(LC) time (HR=1.25,95%CI[0.82,1.90],p=0.30)between these two therapies was observed . Conclusion Our finding suggest both SRS and SRS plus WBRT can be selected for newly diagnosed brain metastases patients for breast cancer .But in term of adverse reactions and long-term effects is not clear,the need for

  12. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Tozer-Loft, S M

    2000-01-01

    compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising, but significant association with outcome. A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy i...

  13. [Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer.

  14. Clinical evaluation of X-ray voxel Monte Carlo versus pencil beam-based dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer under normal and deep inspiration breath hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, V; Borzì, G R; Strolin, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Soriani, A; D'Alessio, D; Ambesi, F; Di Grazia, A M; Strigari, L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between dose distributions calculated with the pencil beam (PB) and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for patients with lung cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or HybridArc techniques. The 2 algorithms were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, under normal and deep inspiration breath hold, and in terms of the tumor control probability (TCP). The dependence of the differences in tumor volume and location was investigated. Dosimetric validation was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 (International Specialty Products, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Forty-five Computed Tomography (CT) data sets were used for this study; 40 Gy at 8 Gy/fraction was prescribed with 5 noncoplanar 6-MV IMRT beams or 3 to 4 dynamic conformal arcs with 3 to 5 IMRT beams distributed per arc. The plans were first calculated with PB and then recalculated with MC. The difference between the mean tumor doses was approximately 10% ± 4%; these differences were even larger under deep inspiration breath hold. Differences between the mean tumor dose correlated with tumor volume and path length of the beams. The TCP values changed from 99.87% ± 0.24% to 96.78% ± 4.81% for both PB- and MC-calculated plans (P = .009). When a fraction of hypoxic cells was considered, the mean TCP values changed from 76.01% ± 5.83% to 34.78% ± 18.06% for the differently calculated plans (P < .0001). When the plans were renormalized to the same mean dose at the tumor, the mean TCP for oxic cells was 99.05% ± 1.59% and for hypoxic cells was 60.20% ± 9.53%. This study confirms that the MC algorithm adequately accounts for inhomogeneities. The inclusion of the MC in the process of IMRT optimization could represent a further step in the complex problem of determining the optimal treatment plan.

  15. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Large Bilateral Thalamic and Basal Ganglia Arteriovenous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in the basal ganglia and thalamus have a more aggressive natural history with a higher morbidity and mortality than AVMs in other locations. Optimal treatment—complete obliteration without new neurological deficits—is often challenging. We present a patient with a large bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic AVM successfully treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (HFSRS with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Methods. The patient was treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery to 30 Gy at margin in 5 fractions of 9 static fields with a minimultileaf collimator and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Results. At 10 months following treatment, digital subtraction angiography showed complete obliteration of the AVM. Conclusions. Large bilateral thalamic and basal ganglia AVMs can be successfully treated with complete obliteration by HFSRS with IMRT with relatively limited toxicity. Appropriate caution is recommended.

  16. Clinical and pathological changes in cerebral arteriovenous malformations after stereotactic radiosurgery failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei-ming; YE Xun; ZHAO Yuan-li; WANG Shuo; ZHAO Ji-zong

    2008-01-01

    Background Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative to resection of intracraniaI cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs),while it will failin some cases.This study aimed to evaluate the changes after stereotactic radiosurgery for AVMs.Methods Nineteen cases with cerebral AVMs had failure after stereotactic radiosurgery therapy.The symptoms and angiography were assessed.All patients underwent microsurgery.Pathologic examination was performed for all cases and electron microscopic examination was carried out in 6 patients.Reaults Seven cases had hemorrhage from 12 to 98 months after stereotactic radiosurgery,5 had headache.4 had refractory encephalon edema,2 had epilepsy as a new symptom and 1 had a pressure cyst 5 years after radiosurgery.Angiography in 18 cases,8-98 months after radiation therapy,demonstrated no significant changes in 5 cases.slight reduction in 9,near complete obliteration in 1 and complete obliteration in 3.An abnormal vessel was found on pathologic examination in 17 cases,even one case had obliterated in angiography.Electron microscopy examination showed vessel wall weakness,but the vessels remained open and blood circulated.One case died because of a moribund state before surgery.The other 18 cases had no new neurological deficiencies,seizure control and no hemorrhage occurred after microsurgery at an average follow-up of 3 years.Conclusion Stereotactic radiotherapy for AVMs should have a long period follow-up.If serious complications occur,microsurgery can be performed as salvage treatment.

  17. Current concepts in stereotactic radiosurgery - a neurosurgical and radiooncological point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesper J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stereotactic radiosurgery is related to the history of "radiotherapy" and "stereotactic neurosurgery". The concepts for neurosurgeons and radiooncologists have been changed during the last decade and have also transformed neurosurgery. The gamma knife and the stereotactically modified linear accelerator (LINAC are radiosurgical equipments to treat predetermined intracranial targets through the intact skull without damaging the surrounding normal brain tissue. These technical developments allow a more precise intracranial lesion control and offer even more conformal dose plans for irregularly shaped lesions. Histological determination by stereotactic biopsy remains the basis for any otherwise undefined intracranial lesion. As a minimal approach, it allows functional preservation, low risk and high sensitivity. Long-term results have been published for various indications. The impact of radiosurgery is presented for the management of gliomas, metastases, brain stem lesions, benign tumours and vascular malformations and selected functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia. In AVM's it can be performed as part of a multimodality strategy including resection or endovascular embolisation. Finally, the technological advances in radiation oncology as well as stereotactic neurosurgery have led to significant improvements in radiosurgical treatment opportunities. Novel indications are currently under investigation. The combination of both, the neurosurgical and the radiooncological expertise, will help to minimize the risk for the patient while achieving a greater treatment success.

  18. Outcomes of treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery or proton beam therapy for choroidal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikuade, M J; Salvi, S; Rundle, P A; Errington, D G; Kacperek, A; Rennie, I G

    2015-09-01

    To present our experience of the use of stereotactic radiosurgery and proton beam therapy to treat posterior uveal melanoma over a 10 year period. Case notes of patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or Proton beam therapy (PBT) for posterior uveal melanoma were reviewed. Data collected included visual acuity at presentation and final review, local control rates, globe retention and complications. We analysed post-operative visual outcomes and if visual outcomes varied with proximity to the optic nerve or fovea. 191 patients were included in the study; 85 and 106 patients received Stereotactic radiosurgery and Proton beam therapy, respectively. Mean follow up period was 39 months in the SRS group and 34 months in the PBT group. Both treatments achieved excellent local control rates with eye retention in 98% of the SRS group and 95% in the PBT group. The stereotactic radiosurgery group showed a poorer visual prognosis with 65% losing more than 3 lines of Snellen acuity compared to 45% in the PBT group. 33% of the SRS group and 54% of proton beam patients had a visual acuity of 6/60 or better. Stereotactic radiosurgery and proton beam therapy are effective treatments for larger choroidal melanomas or tumours unsuitable for plaque radiotherapy. Our results suggest that patients treated with proton beam therapy retain better vision post-operatively; however, possible confounding factors include age, tumour location and systemic co-morbidities. These factors as well as the patient's preference should be considered when deciding between these two therapies.

  19. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for the primary treatment of localized prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oliai, Caspian; Lanciano, Rachelle; Sprandio, Brian; Yang, Jun; Lamond, John; Arrigo, Steven; Good, Michael; Mooreville, Michael; Garber, Bruce; Brady, Luther W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The low alpha/beta ratio of prostate cancer suggests that hypofractionated schemes of dose-escalated radiotherapy should be advantageous. We report our experience using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the primary treatment of prostate cancer to assess efficacy and toxicity. Methods From 2007 to 2010, 70 patients (51 % low risk, 31 % intermediate risk, and 17 % high risk) with localized prostate cancer were treated with SBRT using the CyberKnife system. One-third of pa...

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Simon S. [Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Teh, Bin S. [The Methodist Hospital Cancer Center and Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States). Weill Cornell Medical College; Lu, Jiade J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schefter, Tracey E. (eds.) [Colorado Univ., Aurora, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  1. Intracranial Metastatic Neuroblastoma Treated with Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Report of Two Novel Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Rowland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial metastasis of neuroblastoma (IMN is associated with poor survival. No curative therapy for the treatment of IMN currently exists. Unfractionated radiotherapy may be beneficial in the treatment of IMN given the known radiosensitivity of neuroblastoma as well as its proclivity to metastasize as discrete lesions. We present two patients with IMN treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS. Single-fraction radiotherapy yielded temporary reduction of tumor burden and stability of disease in both patients. SRS may be a useful palliative tool in the treatment of IMN and expands the overall treatment options for this disease.

  2. Updates in outcomes of stereotactic radiation therapy in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, Monica Livia

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Treatment of acromegaly has undergone important progress in the last 20 years mainly due to the development of new medical options and advances in surgical techniques. Pituitary surgery is usually first-line therapy, and medical treatment is indicated for persistent disease, while radiation (RT) is often used as third-line therapy. The benefits of RT (tumor volume control and decreased hormonal secretion) are hampered by the long latency of the effect and the high risk of adverse effects. Stereotactic RT methods have been developed with the aim to provide more precise targeting of the tumor with better control of the radiation dose received by the adjacent brain structures. The purpose of this review is to present the updates in the efficacy and safety of pituitary RT in acromegalic patients, with an emphasis on the new stereotactic radiation techniques. Methods A systematic review was performed using PubMed and articles/abstracts and reviews detailing RT in acromegaly from 2000 to 2016 were included. Results Stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT) for patients with persistent active acromegaly after surgery and/or during medical therapy provide comparable high rates of tumor control, i.e. stable or decrease in size of the tumor in 93-100% of patients at 5-10 years and endocrinological remission in 40-60% of patients at 5 years. Hypofractionated RT is an optimal option for tumors located near the optic structures, due to its lower toxicity for the optic nerves compared to single-dose radiosurgery. The rate of new hypopituitarism varies from 10 to 50% at 5 years and increases with the duration of follow-up. The risk for other radiation-induced complications is usually low (0-5% for new visual deficits, cranial nerves damage or brain radionecrosis and 0-1% for secondary brain tumors) and risk of stroke may be higher in FSRT. Conclusion Although the use of radiotherapy in patients with acromegaly has decreased with advances in

  3. Weak Convergence and Weak Convergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narita Keiko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we deal with weak convergence on sequences in real normed spaces, and weak* convergence on sequences in dual spaces of real normed spaces. In the first section, we proved some topological properties of dual spaces of real normed spaces. We used these theorems for proofs of Section 3. In Section 2, we defined weak convergence and weak* convergence, and proved some properties. By RNS_Real Mizar functor, real normed spaces as real number spaces already defined in the article [18], we regarded sequences of real numbers as sequences of RNS_Real. So we proved the last theorem in this section using the theorem (8 from [25]. In Section 3, we defined weak sequential compactness of real normed spaces. We showed some lemmas for the proof and proved the theorem of weak sequential compactness of reflexive real Banach spaces. We referred to [36], [23], [24] and [3] in the formalization.

  4. Phase II study on stereotactic body radiotherapy of colorectal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Traberg Hansen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    -up was 4.3 years. After 2 years, actuarial local control was 86% and 63% in tumor and patient based analysis, respectively. Nineteen percent were without local or distant progression after 2 years and overall survival was 67, 38, 22, 13, and 13% after 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years, respectively. One patient died...

  5. Use of a liquid ionization chamber for stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Crop, F; Lacornerie, T; Vandevelde, F; Reynaert, N

    2013-04-21

    Liquid ionization chambers (LICs) offer an interesting tool in the field of small beam dosimetry, allowing better spatial resolution and reduced perturbation effects. However, some aspects remain to be addressed, such as the higher recombination and the effects from the materials of the detector. Our aim was to investigate these issues and their impact. The first step was the evaluation of the recombination effects. Measurements were performed at different SSDs to vary the dose per pulse, and the collection efficiency was obtained. The BEAMnrc code was then used to model the Cyberknife head. Finally, the liquid ionization chamber itself was modelled using the EGSnrc-based code Cavity allowing the evaluation of the influence of the volume and the chamber materials. The liquid ionization charge collection efficiency is approximately 0.98 at 1.5 mGy pulse(-1), the highest dose per pulse that we have measured. Its impact on the accuracy of output factors is less than half a per cent. The detector modelling showed a significant contribution from the graphite electrode, up to 6% for the 5 mm collimator. The dependence of the average electronic mass collision stopping power of iso-octane with beam collimation is negligible and thus has no influence on output factor measurements. Finally, the volume effect reaches 5% for the small 5 mm collimator and becomes much smaller (<0.5%) for diameters above 10 mm. LICs can effectively be used for small beam relative dosimetry as long as adequate correction factors are applied, especially for the electrode and volume effects.

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for acoustic neuroma by linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Tooru; Shirato, Hiroki; Fukuda, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1997-10-01

    We analyzed forty on