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Sample records for controls otolith assembly

  1. Otolith and Vertical Canal Contributions to Dynamic Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. Owen

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine: 1) how do normal subjects adjust postural movements in response to changing or altered otolith input, for example, due to aging? and 2) how do patients adapt postural control after altered unilateral or bilateral vestibular sensory inputs such as ablative inner ear surgery or ototoxicity, respectively? The following hypotheses are under investigation: 1) selective alteration of otolith input or abnormalities of otolith receptor function will result in distinctive spatial, frequency, and temporal patterns of head movements and body postural sway dynamics. 2) subjects with reduced, altered, or absent vertical semicircular canal receptor sensitivity but normal otolith receptor function or vice versa, should show predictable alterations of body and head movement strategies essential for the control of postural sway and movement. The effect of altered postural movement control upon compensation and/or adaptation will be determined. These experiments provide data for the development of computational models of postural control in normals, vestibular deficient subjects and normal humans exposed to unusual force environments, including orbital space flight.

  2. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, radius), the effects of stimulus frequency (0.15 - 0.6 Hz) are examined on eye movements and motion perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolithocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of postflight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control

  3. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolithocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of postflight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved with vibrotactile feedback of orientation.

  4. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved with vibrotactile feedback of orientation.

  5. High‐resolution stock discrimination of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) based on otolith shape, microstructure, and genetic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Henrik; Worsøe Clausen, Lotte; Bekkevold, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    between populations, which suggest genetic control as well. Thus otolith shape serves as a population marker, suitable for individual assignment. Here we use otolith morphological characteristics (otolith shape and larval otolith microstructure) combined with genetic markers to discriminate between...

  6. Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control During Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, less than 20 cm radius), the effects of stimulus frequency (0.15 - 0.6 Hz) are examined on eye movements and motion perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolith-ocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of post-flight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved

  7. Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control During Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, less than 20 cm radius), the effects of stimulus frequency (0.15 - 0.6 Hz) are examined on eye movements and motion perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolith-ocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of post-flight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved

  8. Parabolic flight reveals independent binocular control of otolith-induced eye torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, C. H.; Diamond, S. G.; Stoller, D. F.

    2000-01-01

    To examine otolith-governed ocular torsion in hyper- and hypogravity, eight subjects, including two astronauts, underwent parabolic flight while seated upright with head fixed. A mask fitted with two video cameras provided synchronized images of both eyes at a rate of 25/sec during 15 parabolas, the individual parabolas separated by a few minutes of level 1 G flight. Three main findings emerged: 1) After the first parabola, most subjects showed differential torsional offset of the two eyes in the 1 G portions between parabolas, compared to the conjugate baseline position of the eyes prior to the first parabola. 2) Changes in binocular torsion in the 0 G and 1.8 G portions of parabolic flight revealed in most subjects systematic reversal of direction. The reversal was consistent within, but not across subjects. 3) Disconjugacy defined as the moment-to-moment difference in the movements of the two eyes, and evaluated without the contribution of the differential offset, found two subjects with relatively high disconjugacy scores, and the remaining six with low scores. On the basis of prior studies (9, 20), we would predict the first two would be subject to SMS, the remainder not. The two astronauts, who did not have SMS on their space missions, fell into the low scoring group. We propose that the disconjugacies may be due to intrinsic asymmetries in the otolith receptors on the two sides of the head, which appear to be independently linked to the extraocular muscles of the two eyes, a phenomenon masked in normal 1 G states by adaptation. The apparently independent control of the two sides cannot be detected by the simpler and more common monocular studies.

  9. Parabolic flight reveals independent binocular control of otolith-induced eye torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, C. H.; Diamond, S. G.; Stoller, D. F.

    2000-01-01

    To examine otolith-governed ocular torsion in hyper- and hypogravity, eight subjects, including two astronauts, underwent parabolic flight while seated upright with head fixed. A mask fitted with two video cameras provided synchronized images of both eyes at a rate of 25/sec during 15 parabolas, the individual parabolas separated by a few minutes of level 1 G flight. Three main findings emerged: 1) After the first parabola, most subjects showed differential torsional offset of the two eyes in the 1 G portions between parabolas, compared to the conjugate baseline position of the eyes prior to the first parabola. 2) Changes in binocular torsion in the 0 G and 1.8 G portions of parabolic flight revealed in most subjects systematic reversal of direction. The reversal was consistent within, but not across subjects. 3) Disconjugacy defined as the moment-to-moment difference in the movements of the two eyes, and evaluated without the contribution of the differential offset, found two subjects with relatively high disconjugacy scores, and the remaining six with low scores. On the basis of prior studies (9, 20), we would predict the first two would be subject to SMS, the remainder not. The two astronauts, who did not have SMS on their space missions, fell into the low scoring group. We propose that the disconjugacies may be due to intrinsic asymmetries in the otolith receptors on the two sides of the head, which appear to be independently linked to the extraocular muscles of the two eyes, a phenomenon masked in normal 1 G states by adaptation. The apparently independent control of the two sides cannot be detected by the simpler and more common monocular studies.

  10. Do vestibular otolith organs participate in human orthostatic blood pressure control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Cothron, Adriena V.; Wasmund, Stephen L.; Wasmund, Wendy L.; Carter, Robert 3rd; Muenter, Nicolette K.; Smith, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that vestibular otolith organ stimulation contributes to human orthostatic responses. Twelve subjects underwent three 60 degrees upright tilts: (1) with the neck flexed from 0 degrees to 30 degrees relative to the body during 60 degrees tilt, such that the head moved from horizontal to 90 degrees above horizontal (0 to 1 Gz otolith stimulation); (2) with the head and body aligned, such that they tilted together to 60 degrees (0 to 0.87 Gz otolith stimulation); and (3) with the neck flexed 30 degrees relative to the body during supine conditions, and the neck then extended to -30 degrees during 60 degrees body tilting, such that the head remained at 30 degrees above horizontal throughout body tilting (constant 0.5 Gz otolith stimulation). All three tilt procedures increased thoracic impedance, sympathetic nerve activity (N = 8 of 12), arterial pressure, and heart rate relative to supine conditions (all P < 0.04). Within the first 20 s of tilt, arterial pressure increased most obviously in the 0 to 1 Gz otolith condition. Thoracic impedance tended to increase more in otolith-constant conditions, but no dependent variable differed significantly between tilt conditions, and no significant time x tilt interactions emerged. Otolith inputs may contribute to early transient adjustments to orthostasis. However, lack of significant main effects of tilt condition and time x tilt interactions suggests that potential otolith effects on the variables we studied are relatively subtle and ephemeral, or that other mechanisms compensate for a lack of change in otolith input with orthostasis.

  11. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  12. Bottomfish Otolith Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ryan Nichols (FBSAB LHP) collected this data set and it contains information on fish otoliths collected from previous research cruises and stored in Aiea Research...

  13. OTOLITHS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN FISHERY SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rodriguez Mendoza

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Otoliths are structures located in the inner ear cavity of all teleost fish and serve as a balance organ and also aid in hearing. They have been used traditionally to obtain information about the taxon, age and size of fishes. This is very important because age, growth rate, and mortality rate are three of the most influential life history characteristics controlling the productivity of fish populations. Besides age and growth determination, otoliths have been the object of study in many different fields, such as fish biology (hearing and balance in fishes, larval fish ecology, species identification, fish stock identification and environmental reconstruction of the fish habitat. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the traditional and current applications of the otoliths. Also, a short description of the traditional methods for age determination is included.

  14. Fish otolith biomineralization process: first investigations about organic matrix and growth of Triglidae (Scorpaeniformes otoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Montanini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Otolith formation involves rhythmic variations in the deposition and size of organic matrix framework and carbonate crystals, resulting in the formation of macroscopic translucent and opaque rings and microscopic zonations (growth increments (Morales Nin, 2000. As in most biominerals, the otolith matrix forms only 2-3 % of its weight, but it is admitted that it has a considerable importance in the otolith crystallization processes of nucleation, growth, orientation and growth control. The goal of this study is to characterize the matrix protein composition in the otoliths of Triglidae (Scorpaeniformes as a first step to understand molecular mechanisms of otolith formation according to biology and ecology of the species. In particular 500 sagittal otoliths from six gurnard species were analysed: Chelidonichthys cuculus, C. lucerna, Eutrigla gurnardus, Lepidotrigla cavillone, L. dieuzeidei and Trigloporus lastoviza. Protein contents were estimated by Bradford method and the urea 8 M extracts were loaded into a polyacrylamide gel, separated by SDS page and detected by Silver staining (Sigma followed the protocol of Borelli et al. (2001 with some modifications regarding protein precipitation that was enhanced by using TCA, trichloroacetic acid, 100% w/v. The urea soluble fractions revealed a unique large band around 50-55 kDa. Another common clear band was visible at the top of the separating gel (proteins >300/350 kDa unable to enter into the pores of polyacrylamide gels (12%. The complexity of the protein mixtures was investigated by 2-D electrophoresis (Gel TGX 4-20%; proteins were separated on the basis of both isoelectric point (pI and molecular size. A common protein pattern of 50-75 kDa were found in all gurnards showing a similar composition of organic matter even if the 2-D maps of otolith samples showed specie-specific variation in acid protein fractions in all the pairwise comparison. This result confirmed that the amino acid composition

  15. High‐resolution stock discrimination of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) based on otolith shape, microstructure, and genetic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Henrik; Worsøe Clausen, Lotte; Bekkevold, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    between populations, which suggest genetic control as well. Thus otolith shape serves as a population marker, suitable for individual assignment. Here we use otolith morphological characteristics (otolith shape and larval otolith microstructure) combined with genetic markers to discriminate between...... different populations of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the western Baltic and adjacent waters. We analyse a baseline (spawning individuals from several populations validated by genetic markers) for separation of adult herring (2+) based on otolith shape and juveniles using genetically validated...... otolith shape characteristics as separation parameters. Otolith shape was found to clearly discriminate between individuals at all ages from different spawning populations. The identified distances between populations based on otolith shape matched previously obtained genetic distances and were, when...

  16. A critical period for gravitational effects on otolith formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, M.; Harrison, J.

    Gravity and linear acceleration are sensed in fish by the saccule, utricle (as in mammals) and lagena, each with a solid otolith. Previous experiments in which eggs or larvae of a marine mollusk ( plysia) or fish larvae were raised on aA centrifuge, demonstrated that the size of the otolith or statoconia (in Aplysia) were reduced, in a graded manner, as the gfield was increased, suggesting that some- control mechanism was acting to normalize the weight of the mass. Pre-mated adult female swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) were flown in the CEBAS aquarium system on space shuttle missions STS 89 and STS-90 (Neurolab). Developing- larvae were removed from the adult ovaries after shuttle landing. Otolith sizes were compared between ground- and flight -reared larvae of similar sizes. For later-stage swordtail larvae, with spine lengths from 3 to 6 mm from STS-90 (16 days), the growth of the otolith with increasing spine length was significantly greater in the flight - reared fish for all three otoliths, from the saccule (saggita), utricle (lapillus) and lagena (astericus). However, juvenile fish, 1 cm long at launch, showed no significant difference in otolith size between flight - and ground-reared animals. In very early stage larvae from STS-89 (9 days), with spine length of 1.5 to 3.5 mm, the utricular and saccular otoliths were actually larger in the ground-reared larvae. Thus, it appears that late-stage fish embryos reared in space do produce larger-than - normal otoliths, apparently in an attempt to c mpensate for the reduced weight ofo the test mass in space. However, the results from very early-stage larvae and juvenile fish suggest that there is a fairly short critical period during which altered gravity can affect the size of the test mass. Recent studies on the development of the inner ear of the zebrafish (Danio raria) may explain the critical period for gravitational effects on otolith growth. By 16 hours after zebrafish fertilization (at 28.5 o

  17. High temperature control rod assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollman, Russell E. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  18. High temperature control rod assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollman, R.E.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a control rod assembly for use in nuclear reactor control. It comprises segments, each the segment being made of a graphite composite material, each the segment having a chamber for containing neutron-absorbing material, wherein the chamber compromises a hollow cylindrical sleeve having a first end formed with an opening for receiving the neutron-absorbing material, and having a second end formed with a sleeve bore and an outer sleeve surface; a cylindrical weight-bearing support post positioned substantially centrally of the sleeve, the support post having a first end formed as a ball surface portion and a second end formed as a ball surface portion and a second end formed as a shaft, the shaft being engageable with the sleeve bore for rigidly coupling the support post axially within the hollow sleeve, a hollow cylindrical collar having a socket lip portion correspondingly shaped to receive the ball surface portion of an adjacent support post, and having an inner surface for engaging the outer sleeve surface on the second end of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve.

  19. North American sturgeon otolith morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate expedient species identification of deceased sturgeon (Acipenseridae) when external physical characteristic analysis is inconclusive has become a high priority due to the endangered or threatened status of sturgeon species around the world. Examination of otoliths has provided useful information to aid in population management, age and size-class analysis, understanding predator–prey interactions, and archeological research in other fish species. The relationship between otolith characteristics and sturgeon species has remained unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the shape of otoliths from the eight species of sturgeon found in North America to test the utility of otolith characteristic morphology in species identification. There were distinct differences in the size and shape of the otoliths between species of sturgeon with little shape variation among individuals of the same species. The relationship between otolith length axes was linear, and most of the variability was explained by a Log (axis + 1) transformation of the x and y axes (r2 = 0.8983) using the equation y = 0.73x + 0.0612. Images of otoliths from all eight North American species are presented to assist in the identification process.

  20. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  1. Control model for reconfigurable assembly systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jianfeng; Yin Yuehong; Chen Zhaoneng

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes knowledge based object-oriented timed colored Petri net, a modeling method for reconfigurable assembly systems. Combining knowledge and object-oriented method into timed colored Petri net, a comprehensive and powerful representation model for control of RAS is obtained. With object-oriented method the whole system can be decomposed into concrete objects explicitly, and their relationships are constructed according to the system assembly requirements. Finally, a simple assembly system modeled by the KTCOPN is presented.

  2. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...

  3. Plasticity of the human otolith-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Smith, T. R.; Furman, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The eye movement response to earth vertical axis rotation in the dark, a semicircular canal stimulus, can be altered by prior exposure to combined visual-vestibular stimuli. Such plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has not been described for earth horizontal axis rotation, a dynamic otolith stimulus. Twenty normal human subjects underwent one of two types of adaptation paradigms designed either to attenuate or enhance the gain of the semicircular canal-ocular reflex prior to undergoing otolith-ocular reflex testing with horizontal axis rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stripe pattern that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity. Pre- and post-adaptation horizontal axis rotations were at 60 degrees/s in the dark and produced a modulation in the slow component velocity of nystagmus having a frequency of 0.17 Hz due to putative stimulation of the otolith organs. Results showed that the magnitude of this modulation component response was altered in a manner similar to the alteration in semicircular canal-ocular responses. These results suggest that physiologic alteration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex using deliberately mismatched visual and semicircular canal stimuli induces changes in both canal-ocular and otolith-ocular responses. We postulate, therefore, that central nervous system pathways responsible for controlling the gains of canal-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes are shared.

  4. Remote control of self-assembled microswimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Grosjean, Galien; Darras, Alexis; Hubert, Maxime; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Physics governing the locomotion of microorganisms and other microsystems is dominated by viscous damping. An effective swimming strategy involves the non-reciprocal and periodic deformations of the considered body. Here, we show that a magnetocapillary-driven self-assembly, composed of three soft ferromagnetic beads, is able to swim along a liquid-air interface when powered by an external magnetic field. More importantly, we demonstrate that trajectories can be fully controlled, opening ways to explore low Reynolds number swimming. This magnetocapillary system spontaneously forms by self-assembly, allowing miniaturization and other possible applications such as cargo transport or solvent flows.

  5. Silk: molecular organization and control of assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluzzi, Regina; Winkler, Stefan; Wilson, Donna; Kaplan, David L

    2002-02-28

    The interface between the science and engineering of biology and materials is an area of growing interest. One of the goals of this field is to utilize biological synthesis and processing of polymers as a route to gain insight into topics such as molecular recognition, self-assembly and the formation of materials with well-defined architectures. The biological processes involved in polymer synthesis and assembly can offer important information on fundamental interactions involved in the formation of complex material architectures, as well as practical knowledge into new and important materials related to biomaterial uses and tissue engineering needs. Classic approaches in biology, including genetic engineering, controlled microbial physiology and enzymatic synthesis, are prototypical methods used to control polymer structure and chemistry, including stereoselectivity and regioselectivity, to degrees unattainable using traditional synthetic chemistry. This type of control can lead to detailed and systematic studies of the formation of the structural hierarchy in materials and the subsequent biological responses to these materials.

  6. Restricted fish feeding reduces cod otolith opacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høie, H.; Folkvord, A.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the effect of reduced feeding and constant temperature on cod otolith opacity. Three groups of juvenile cod were given restricted food rations at different times for 4 months, resulting in depressed somatic growth. Otolith opacity was measured on pictures...... in otolith opacity were found between individual fish both within groups and between groups. In two of the three groups significantly more translucent otolith material was deposited in response to reduced feeding. Our results show that variations in feeding and hence fish growth resulted in variation...

  7. Unilateral otolith centrifugation by head tilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, S.M.; Bos, J.E.; Klis, S.F.L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To test for otolith asymmetries, several studies described horizontal translation of the body and head en bloc during fast vertical axis rotation. This stimulus causes one otolithic organ to rotate on-axis, and the other to experience centripetal acceleration. OBJECTIVE: To test a new, m

  8. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  9. Controls of interaction dynamics of orbital assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Renjeng

    1991-01-01

    Building structures and spacecraft in orbit will require technologies for positioning, docking/berthing, and joining orbital structures. A fundamental problem underlying the operation of docking and berthing is that of controlling the contact dynamics of mechanical structures actuated by active mechanisms such as robotic devices. Control systems must be designed to control these active mechanisms so that both the free space motions and contact motions are stable and satisfy specifications on position accuracy and bounds on contact forces. For the large orbital structures of the future, the problem of interactive dynamics and control is fundamentally different in several ways than it was for spacecraft docking in the past. First, future space structures must be treated as flexible structures - the operations of docking, berthing, and assembly will need to respect the vibrations of the structures. Second, the assembly of these structures will require multiple-point contact, rather than the essentially single-point positioning of conventional spacecraft docking. Third, some assembly operations require the subassemblies to be brought and held in contact so that successful joining can be accomplished. A preliminary study of contact stability and compliance control design has resulted in the development of an analytical method and a design method to analyze stability. The analytical method analyzes the problem of stability when an actively-controlled structure contacts a passive structure. This method makes it possible to accurately estimate the stiffness of the passive structures with which the contact motion will become unstable. The analytic results suggest that passivity is neither achievable in practice, nor necessary as a design concept. A contact control system need only be passive up to a certain frequency; beyond that frequency the system can be stabilized with sufficiently small gains. With this concept the Center developed a design methodology for achieving

  10. Missing Links in Antibody Assembly Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Anelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fidelity of the humoral immune response requires that quiescent B lymphocytes display membrane bound immunoglobulin M (IgM on B lymphocytes surface as part of the B cell receptor, whose function is to recognize an antigen. At the same time B lymphocytes should not secrete IgM until recognition of the antigen has occurred. The heavy chains of the secretory IgM have a C-terminal tail with a cysteine instead of a membrane anchor, which serves to covalently link the IgM subunits by disulfide bonds to form “pentamers” or “hexamers.” By virtue of the same cysteine, unassembled secretory IgM subunits are recognized and retained (via mixed disulfide bonds by members of the protein disulfide isomerase family, in particular ERp44. This so-called “thiol-mediated retention” bars assembly intermediates from prematurely leaving the cell and thereby exerts quality control on the humoral immune response. In this essay we discuss recent findings on how ERp44 governs such assembly control in a pH-dependent manner, shuttling between the cisGolgi and endoplasmic reticulum, and finally on how pERp1/MZB1, possibly as a co-chaperone of GRP94, may help to overrule the thiol-mediated retention in the activated B cell to give way to antibody secretion.

  11. [Otolith microchemistry of tuna species: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo-ping

    2011-08-01

    Microchemistry analysis of trace elements and isotopes in fishes' calcified substances is an emerging approach to analyze the population structure, life history, and migration environmental history of fishes. With the increasing improvement of the researches and applications of otolith microchemistry, this approach has been a good tool for studying the ecology of tuna species. Currently, the research contents of tuna species' otolith microchemistry mainly include trace elements and isotopes, and the former is the emphasis and hotspot in applied research, playing a vital role in the researches of population partitioning, natal origin, migration environmental history, and life history of tuna species, especially bluefin tuna. However, most of the researches are focusing on the variation of otolith's Sr/Ca ratio, and there is no final conclusion on the relationships between the fractionation of isotopes C and O in otolith and the temperature. For the sake of exploiting the huge value of otolith microchemistry, it would be necessary to strengthen the researches on the deposition mechanisms of trace elements in otolith, and to analyze the spatio-temporal variations of various trace elements in otolith by comprehensive research methods.

  12. Calcium Gradients in the Fish inner Ear sensory Epithelium and otolithic Membrane: an Energy filtering Transmission electron Microscopy (EFTEM) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M.; Anken, R.; Rahmann, H.

    Inner ear otolith formation in fish is supposed to be performed by the molecular release of proteinacious precursor material from the sensory epithelia, followed by an undirected and diffuse precipitation of calcium carbonate (which is mainly responsible for the functionally important weight of otoliths). Previous experiments have shown, however, that otolith formation in terms of provision both of the protein matrix and of calcium is regulated by a (likely neuronal) feedback mechanism. This regulating mechanism effects a symmetrical crystallisation of the corresponding otoliths in the inner ears of both sides of the head, which is necessary for a correct graviperception and for maintenance of postural control; thus, asymmetrical otoliths can induce kinetoses (e.g., space motion sickness) both in human and fish. On the background of an obviously directed incorporation of calcium into otoliths, the site of origin of the otoliths's inorganic components such as calcium still remains obscure. Therefore, ultrastructural and element analytical investigations were undertaken to screen the calcium distribution within the macular epithelial region using fish as model system. Electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) and electron energy loss spectra (EELS) revealed discrete calcium-precipitations in the extracellular space of the otolithic membrane as well as within the lumina of the epithelial sensory cells. The calcium particles were accumulated at the macular tight junctions and seemed to be distributed in an ascending intracellular and a descending extracellular gradient towards the otolith. Further distinct calcium containing crystals covered the peripheral proteinacious layer of the otolith. The remaining endolymphatic space of the otocyst was lacking calcium precipitates. Overall, the present results indicate that the apical region of the macular epithelium is involved in the controlled release of calcium. This finding is in complete agreement with a study using calcium

  13. Ultrastructural aspects of otoliths and sensory epithelia of fish inner ear exposed to hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M.; Nindl, G.; Anken, R. H.; Körtje, K. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The present electron microscopical investigations were directed to the question, whether alterations in the gravitational force might induce structural changes in the morphology of otoliths or/and inner ear sensory epithelia of developing and adult swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) that had been kept either under long-term moderate hypergravity (8 days; 3g) or under short-time extreme hypergravity (10 minutes up to 9g). The otoliths of adult and neonate swordtail fish were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Macular epithelia of adult fish were examined both by SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The saccular otoliths (sagittae) of normally hatched adult fish revealed an enormous inter- (and even intra-; i.e. left vs. right) individual diversity in shape and size, whereas the otoliths of utricles (lapilli) and lagenae (asterisci) seemed to be more constant regarding morphological parameters. The structural diversity of juvenile otoliths was found to be less prominent as compared to the adults, differing from the latter regarding their peculiar crystalline morphology. Qualitative differences in the fine structure (SEM) of otoliths taken from adult and larval animals kept under 3g in comparison to 1g controls could not be observed. The SEM and TEM investigations of sensory epithelia also did not reveal any effects due to 3g stimulation. Even extreme hypergravity (more than 7g) for 10 minutes did not result in distinct pathological changes.

  14. Radiocarbon Values From Otoliths of Regional Bottomfishes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains bomb radiocarbon dating of opakapaka (Pristipomoides filamentosus) otoliths from recent and archival collections (1978-2008). Specimens were...

  15. Potential control of DNA self-assembly on gold electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The self-assembly monolayer (SAM) was prepared with 2-aminoethanethiol (AET) on the gold electrode.A new approach based on potential was first used to control DNA self-assembly covalently onto the SAM with the activation of 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS). The influence of potential on DNA self-assembly was investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), AC impedance, Auger electron spectrometry (AES) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The result proves that controlled potential can affect the course of DNA self-assembly. More negative potential can restrain the DNA self-assembly, while more positive potential can accelerate the DNA self-assembly, which is of great significance for the control of DNA self-assembly and will find wide application in the field of DNA-based devices.

  16. Alternative method of removing otoliths from sturgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the otoliths (ear bones) from fish that have very thick skulls can be difficult and very time consuming. The common practice of making a transverse vertical incision on the top of the skull with a hand or electrical saw may damage the otolith if not performed correctly. Sturgeons (Acipenseridae) are one family in particular that have a very large and thick skull. A new laboratory method entering the brain cavity from the ventral side of the fish to expose the otoliths was easier than other otolith extraction methods found in the literature. Methods reviewed in the literature are designed for the field and are more efficient at processing large quantities of fish quickly. However, this new technique was designed to be more suited for a laboratory setting when time is not pressing and successful extraction from each specimen is critical. The success of finding and removing otoliths using this technique is very high and does not compromise the structure in any manner. This alternative technique is applicable to other similar fish species for extracting the otoliths.

  17. A linear canal-otolith interaction model to describe the human vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, B T; Demer, J L

    1999-08-01

    A control systems model of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) originally derived for yaw rotation about an eccentric axis (Crane et al. 1997) was applied to data collected during ambulation and dynamic posturography. The model incorporates a linear summation of an otolith response due to head translation scaled by target distance, adding to a semi-circular canal response that depends only on angular head rotation. The results of the model were compared with human experimental data by supplying head angular velocity as determined by magnetic search coil recording as the input for the canal branch of the model and supplying linear acceleration as determined by flux gate magnetometer measurements of otolith position. The model was fit to data by determining otolith weighting that enabled the model to best fit the data. We fit to the model experimental data from normal subjects who were: standing quietly, walking, running, or making active sinusoidal head movements. We also fit data obtained during dynamic posturography tasks of: standing on a platform sliding in a horizontal plane at 0.2 Hz, standing directly on a platform tilting at 0.1 Hz, and standing on the tilting platform buffered by a 5-cm thick foam rubber cushion. Each task was done with the subject attending a target approximately 500, 100, or 50 cm distant, both in light and darkness. The model accurately predicted the observed VOR response during each test. Greater otolith weighting was required for near targets for nearly all activities, consistent with weights for the otolith component found in previous studies employing imposed rotations. The only exceptions were for vertical axis motion during standing, sliding, and tilting when the platform was buffered with foam rubber. In the horizontal axis, the model always fit near target data better with a higher otolith component. Otolith weights were similar with the target visible and in darkness. The model predicts eye movement during both passive whole

  18. Self-assembled nanofiber coatings for controlling cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barros, Raquel C.; Gelens, Edith; Bulten, Erna; Tuin, Annemarie; de Jong, Menno R; Kuijer, Roel; van Kooten, Theo G

    Nanofibers are thought to enhance cell adhesion, growth, and function. We demonstrate that the choice of building blocks in self-assembling nanofiber systems can be used to control cell behavior. The use of 2 D-coated, self-assembled nanofibers in controlling lens epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and

  19. Central integration of canal and otolith signals is abnormal in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan eKing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM, a common cause of vestibular symptoms within the general population, is a disabling and poorly understood form of dizziness. We sought to examine the underlying pathophysiology of VM with three studies which involved central synthesis of canal and otolith cues, and present preliminary results from each of these studies: 1 VM patients appear to have reduced motion perception thresholds when canal and otolith signals are modulated in a coplanar manner during roll tilt; 2 percepts of roll tilt appear to develop more slowly in VM patients than in control groups during a centrifugation paradigm that presents conflicting, orthogonal canal and otolith cues; and 3 eye movement responses appear to be different in VM patients when studied with a post-rotational tilt paradigm, which also presents a canal-otolith conflict, as the shift of the eye’s rotational axis was larger in VM and the relationship between the axis shift and tilt-suppression of the VOR appeared to differ in VM patients relative to control groups. Based on these preliminary perceptual and eye movement results obtained with three different motion paradigms, we present a hypothesis that the integration of canal and otolith signals by the brain differs in VM and that this difference could be cerebellar in origin. We provide several possible mechanisms that could underlie these observations, and speculate that one of more of these mechanisms contributes to the vestibular symptoms and motion intolerance that are characteristic of the VM syndrome.

  20. Human otolith function, experiment M009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II

    1971-01-01

    The experiments that were performed during the Gemini 5 and 7 missions resulted in quantitative information concerning otolithic function and orientation of four subjects exposed to an orbiting spacecraft environment for prolonged periods of time. Preflight counterrolling measurements revealed significant differences between crewmembers with regard to the basic magnitude of otolith response. However, after the flight, each crewmember maintained his respective preflight level of response. This was indicative that no significant change in otolithic sensitivity occurred as a result of the flight, or at least no change persisted long enough to be recorded several hours after recovery. The EVLH data recorded for each subject confirmed the observation that a coordinate space sense exists even in a weightless environment if contact cues are adequate. However, it was noted that the apparent location of the horizontal within the spacecraft may not agree necessarily with its physical correlate in the spacecraft.

  1. Estimating population age structure using otolith morphometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doering-Arjes, P.; Cardinale, M.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    known-age fish individuals. Here we used known-age Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from the Faroe Bank and Faroe Plateau stocks. Cod populations usually show quite large variation in growth rates and otolith shape. We showed that including otolith morphometrics into ageing processes has the potential...... to make ageing objective, accurate, and fast. Calibration analysis indicated that a known-age sample from the same population and environment is needed to obtain robust calibration; using a sample from a different stock more than doubles the error rate, even in the case of genetically highly related...... populations. The intercalibration method was successful but generalization from one stock to another remains problematic. The development of an otolith growth model is needed for generalization if an operational method for different populations is required in the future....

  2. Forward SCT Module Assembly and Quality Control at IFIC Valencia

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, V A; Civera, J V; Costa, M J; Escobar, C; Fuster, J; García, C; García-Navarro, J E; González, F; González-Sevilla, S; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Martí i García, S; Miñano, M; Modesto, P; Nácher, J; Rodríguez-Oliete, R; Sánchez, F J; Sospedra, L; Strachko, V

    2007-01-01

    This note discusses the assembly and the quality control tests of 282 forward detector modules for the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker assembled at the Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC) in Valencia. The construction and testing procedures are outlined and the laboratory equipment is briefly described. Emphasis is given on the module quality achieved in terms of mechanical and electrical stability.

  3. Chirality controlled responsive self-assembled nanotubes in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijken, D. J.; Stacko, P.; Stuart, M. C. A.; Browne, W. R.; Feringa, B. L.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using chirality to dictate dimensions and to store chiral information in self-assembled nanotubes in a fully controlled manner is presented. We report a photoresponsive amphiphile that co-assembles with its chiral counterpart to form nanotubes and demonstrate how chirality can be used

  4. Ontogenetic development of otoliths in Alligator Gar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Snow, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The Alligator Gar Atractosteus spatula is a species of conservation concern throughout its range, and better definition of otoliths during early development would aid understanding its life history and ecology. We conducted X-ray computed tomography scans, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy to examine the three pairs of otoliths and how they developed over time in relation to fish size and age. The sagittae are the largest, possessing distinct dorsal and ventral lobes covered with small otoconia concentrated in the sulcul region. The sagittae exhibited allometric growth, increasing more rapidly in the ventral lobe than in the dorsal. The asterisci were smaller and also exhibited small otoconia on their surface, but much less than the sagittae. The lapilli were oriented laterally, in contrast to the sagittae and asterisci, which were oriented vertically, with a hump on the dorsum and very large otoconia on the lateral surface that appeared to fuse into the main otolith as the fish grew. Based on size measurements and ring counts in all three pairs of otoliths from 101 known-age Alligator Gar sampled weekly through 91 d after hatch, we developed regression models to examine otolith growth and predict age. All relationships were significant and highly explanatory, but the strongest relationships were between otolith and fish size (for measurements from sagittae) and for age predictions from the lapillus. Age prediction models all resulted in a slope near unity, indicating that ring deposition occurred approximately daily. The first ring in sagittae and lapilli corresponded to swim-up, whereas the first ring formed in asterisci approximately 8 d after swim-up. These results fill a gap in knowledge and can aid understanding of evolutionary processes as well as provide useful information for management and conservation.

  5. Controlled Assembly of Rod-Like Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    exploited to dictate the order that emerges in many-body assemblies. (2) Incorporation of TMV into alginate hydrogels As shown in Figure 1, we recently...developed composite materials using porous alginate hydrogel (PAH) and TMV particles for the purpose of cell culturing studies. The porous alginate ... alginate hydrogel synthesis. To verify this simple incorporation method and to confirm that the incorporated virus still maintains its original

  6. Methodological studies on the VVER-440 control assembly calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hordosy, G.; Kereszturi, A.; Maraczy, C. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary)

    1995-12-31

    The control assembly regions of VVER-440 reactors are represented by 2-group albedo matrices in the global calculations of the KARATE code system. Some methodological aspects of calculating albedo matrices with the COLA transport code are presented. Illustrations are given how these matrices depend on the relevant parameters describing the boron steel and steel regions of the control assemblies. The calculation of the response matrix for a node consisting of two parts filled with different materials is discussed.

  7. Fish Inner Ear Otolith Growth Under Real Microgravity (Spaceflight) and Clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf; Brungs, Sonja; Grimm, Dennis; Knie, Miriam; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    Using late larval stages of cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) we have shown earlier that the biomineralization of otoliths is adjusted towards gravity by means of a neurally guided feedback loop. Centrifuge experiments, e.g., revealed that increased gravity slows down otolith growth. Microgravity thus should yield an opposite effect, i.e., larger than normal otoliths. Consequently, late larval cichlids (stage 14, vestibular system operational) were subjected to real microgravity during the 12 days FOTON-M3 spaceflight mission (OMEGAHAB-hardware). Controls were kept at 1 g on ground within an identical hardware. Animals of another batch were subsequently clinorotated within a submersed fast-rotating clinostat with one axis of rotation (2d-clinostat), a device regarded to simulate microgravity. Temperature and light conditions were provided in analogy to the spaceflight experiment. Controls were maintained at 1 g within the same aquarium. After all experiments, animals had reached late stage 21 (fish can swim freely). Maintenance under real microgravity during spaceflight resulted in significantly larger than normal otoliths (both lapilli and sagittae, involved in sensing gravity and the hearing process, respectively). This result is fully in line with an earlier spaceflight study in the course of which otoliths from late-staged swordtails Xiphophorus helleri were analyzed. Clinorotation resulted in larger than 1 g sagittae. However, no effect on lapilli was obtained. Possibly, an effect was present but too light to be measurable. Overall, spaceflight obviously induces an adaptation of otolith growth, whereas clinorotation does not fully mimic conditions of microgravity regarding late larval cichlids.

  8. The OTOLITH Experiment - Assessment of Otolith Function During Postflight Re-adaption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. H.; Wood, S. J.; Schoenfeld, U.

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing "Otolith" experiment is designed to comprehensively assess the otolith function during the re-adaptation phase after spaceflight. The novel protocol includes unilateral testing of each of the two otolith organs the utricle and the saccule. To assess utricle function, the otolith-ocular response (OOR) and the subjective visual vertical (SVV) are measured during unilateral centrifugation, which permits independent stimulation of the right and left ear. Measurement of the unilateral otolith-ocular response (uOOR) yields information on the response behaviour of the right and left peripheral utricles, whereas the SVV reflects the behaviour of the entire pathway from the peripheral otolith receptors to the vestibular cortex. Thus, by comparative evaluation of the results from the two tests, the degree of peripheral versus central adaptation during the post-flight period can be determined. To assess unilateral saccule function, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are recorded. Since the saccules are predominantly aligned to gravity, and interplay with the antigravity muscles, it is hypothesised that these potentials shall be altered after spaceflight. To date the study has been conducted with 5 of a planned 8 short-flight Shuttle astronauts. Preliminary results will be discussed together with those from clinical studies of dizziness patients, where the same test protocol is employed. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This work is supported by the German Aerospace Center (Grant DLR W130729) and is conducted under the auspices of ESA, in cooperation with NASA.

  9. Research on assembly reliability control technology for computer numerical control machine tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, although more and more companies focus on improving the quality of computer numerical control machine tools, its reliability control still remains as an unsolved problem. Since assembly reliability control is very important in product reliability assurance in China, a new key assembly processes extraction method based on the integration of quality function deployment; failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis; and fuzzy theory for computer numerical control machine tools is proposed. Firstly, assembly faults and assembly reliability control flow of computer numerical control machine tools are studied. Secondly, quality function deployment; failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis; and fuzzy theory are integrated to build a scientific extraction model, by which the key assembly processes meeting both customer functional demands and failure data distribution can be extracted, also an example is given to illustrate the correctness and effectiveness of the method. Finally, the assembly reliability monitoring system is established based on key assembly processes to realize and simplify this method.

  10. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-09-13

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation.

  11. Optimal control of electrostatic self-assembly of binary monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopalov, N. V.; Henkelman, G.; Powell, C. T.; Rodin, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    A simple macroscopic model is used to determine an optimal annealing schedule for self-assembly of binary monolayers of spherical particles. The model assumes that a single rate-controlling mechanism is responsible for the formation of spatially ordered structures and that its rate follows an Arrhenius form. The optimal schedule is derived in an analytical form using classical optimization methods. Molecular dynamics simulations of the self-assembly demonstrate that the proposed schedule outperforms other schedules commonly used for simulated annealing.

  12. Perspectives for the comprehensive examination of semicircular canal and otolith function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A H

    2001-12-01

    A review is presented on the three-dimensional aspects of the vestibulo-oculomotor system and the current functional tests for unilateral examination of the individual receptors in the vestibular labyrinth. In the presentation, attention is directed towards the recently developed vestibular tests, which promise a more comprehensive examination of labyrinth function. More explicitly, unilateral tests for the utricle, saccule and the individual semicircular canals are discussed. Caloric irrigation and rotatory testing are widely used as tests for the integrity of the (horizontal) semicircular canals. Little useful diagnosis is made however on the vertical canals, not to mention the otolith organs. A promising approach to the examination of individual semicircular canal function has been described. This involves the perception of self-rotation in each of the planes of the semicircular canals. The patient/subject is rotated by an arbitrary amount on a standard Barany chair and then required to return the chair to its original position, by joystick control of the chair velocity. In order to test the vertical canals, the head of the subject/patient is positioned so that the plane of each canal lies in the plane of rotation. A promising unilateral test of saccular function involves the use of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Here it has been demonstrated that the saccules can be activated using brief, high-intensity acoustic clicks. The myogenic potential is measured using surface electrodes over the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Initial data from patients has indicated that the test is specific for unilateral saccule disorders. The unilateral test of utricle function is based on the eccentric displacement profile. Thus, eccentric displacement of the head to 3.5 cm during constant velocity rotation about the earth-vertical axis generates an adequate unilateral stimulation of the otolith organ, without involving the semicircular canals. This paradigm has also proved

  13. Design requirement on KALIMER control rod assembly duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, W.; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.; Kim, Y. J

    1998-03-01

    This document establishes the design guidelines which are needs for designing the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER as design requirements. it describes control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER and its requirements that includes functional requirements, performance requirements, interfacing systems, design limits and strength requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. The control rod system consists of three parts, which are drive mechanism, drive-line, and absorber bundle. This report deals with the absorber bundle and its outer duct only because the others are beyond the scope of fuel system design. The guidelines for design requirements intend to be used for an improved design of the control rod assembly duct of the KALIMER. (author). 19 refs.

  14. Two applications of airtightness control techniques on big assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Devallan, C; Marcellin, J

    1973-01-01

    Deals with two airtightness control techniques respectively applied on intersecting storage rings (ISR) at CERN in Geneva and on a liquid methane storage tank. These two big assemblies called for two different control techniques which use helium and ammonia respectively as tracer gas. Existing practical leakage detection techniques to meet industrial needs are discussed at the end of the article. (2 refs).

  15. The Assemble and Animate Control Framework for Modular Reconfigurable Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David Johan; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Moghadam, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the “Assemble and Animate” (ASE) control framework. The objective of ASE is to provide a flexible and extendable control framework, which facilitates rapid development and deployment of modular reconfigurable robots. ASE includes a simple event-driven application framework...... for planetary contingency, adaptive locomotion, self-reconfiguration, and tangible behavior-based programming....

  16. Can analysis of Platichthys flesus otoliths provide relevant data on historical metal pollution in estuaries? Experimental and in situ approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selleslagh, Jonathan, E-mail: Jonathan.Selleslagh@u-bordeaux.fr [Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, UMR EPOC 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, place du docteur Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Echard, Aurélie [IRSTEA Centre de Bordeaux, unité EABX, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas (France); Pécheyran, Christophe [Université de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, CNRS, LCABIE-IPREM UMR 5254, 64053 Pau (France); Baudrimont, Magalie [Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, UMR EPOC 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, place du docteur Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Lobry, Jérémy; Daverat, Françoise [IRSTEA Centre de Bordeaux, unité EABX, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas (France)

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent efforts to manage them more efficiently, estuaries are natural sinks for a wide range of metal contaminants, many of which accumulate at potentially toxic concentrations for fish populations, posing a threat to recruitment and stocks. While analysis of metal concentrations in soft tissue and water samples calls for continuous and long-term sampling operations, the use of otoliths to study metal pollution may be one way of providing a historical record of pollutant exposure. In this study, we examine the potential use of otoliths as natural tracers of metal contamination. A “cocktail” of different metals (Cd, Pb and Ni) was used to test bio-accumulation in otoliths and tissue (liver, kidney, muscle and gills) extracted from juvenile flounder (Platichthys flesus). Assessment took place under controlled conditions over a three month period, with water exposure concentrations increasing every 3 weeks. The concentrations used were natural (T1), X5 (T2), X10 (T3), and null (T4). Chemical analyses were carried out using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer ICP-OES and atomic absorption spectrometer AAS for water and tissue, while otolith microchemistry analyses were performed using a femtosecond laser ablation-high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (fsLA-ICP-MS-HR). Significant differences between control and exposed individuals, as well as an increase in metal concentrations according to exposure level, were observed in all tissues except in muscle tissue. Significant increases in Pb were also detected in contaminated fish otoliths compared with control specimens, with the highest concentrations occurring in T3. Cartographies of Pb distribution in otoliths of both control and contaminated fish only showed high concentrations of Pb at the edge of contaminated fish otoliths, indicating an accumulation of metal during the experiment. Although the relationships between exposure level and Pb concentration in

  17. Effect of betel nut chewing on the otolithic reflex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan-Yi; Young, Yi-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of betel nut chewing on the otolithic reflex system. Seventeen healthy volunteers without any experience of chewing betel nut (fresh chewers) and 17 habitual chewers underwent vital sign measurements, ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests prior to the study. Each subject then chewed two pieces of betel nut for 2min (dosing). The same paradigm was repeated immediately, 10min, and 20min after chewing. On a different day, 10 fresh chewers masticated chewing gum as control. Fresh chewers exhibited significantly decreased response rates of oVEMP (53%) and cVEMP (71%) after dosing compared with those from the predosing period. These abnormal VEMPs returned to normal 20min after dosing. In contrast, 100% response rates of oVEMP and cVEMP were observed before and after masticating chewing gum. In habitual chewers, the response rates of oVEMP and cVEMP were 32% and 29%, respectively, 20min after dosing. Chewing betel nuts induced a transient loss of the otolithic reflexes in fresh chewers but may cause permanent loss in habitual chewers. Chewing betel nuts can cause a loss of otholitic reflex function. This creates a risk for disturbed balance and malfunction, for instance, during driving. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Basic Model of a Control Assembly Drop in Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek BULÍN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the modelling and dynamic analysis of a nonlinear system representing a control assembly of the VVER 440/V213 nuclear reactor. A simple rigid body model intended for basic dynamic analyses is introduced. It contains the influences of the pressurized water and mainly the eects of possible control assembly contacts with guiding tubes inside the reactor. Another approach based on a complex multibody model is further described and the suitability of both modelling approaches is discussed.

  19. High Temperature Electromechanical Components for Control Rod Drive Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Thomas E.; Lazarus, Jonathan D.; Yaspo, Robert; Cole, Allan R.; Otwell, Robert L.; Schuster, Gary B.; Jaing, Thomas J.; Meyer, Raymond A.; Shukla, Jaikaran N.; Maldonado, Jerry

    1994-07-01

    The SP-100 power system converts heat generated within a compact fast spectrum nuclear reactor directly to electricity for spacecraft applications. The reactor control system contains the only moving mechanical and electromechanical components in the entire electrical generating system. The high temperature, vacuum environment presents unique challenges for these reactor control system components. This paper describes the environmental testing of these components that has been completed and that is in progress. The specific components and assemblies include electromagnetic (EM) coils, stepper motors, EM clutches, EM brakes, ball bearings, ball screw assemblies, constant torque spring motors, gear sets, position sensors, and very high temperature sliding bearings.

  20. Not All Inner Ears are the Same: Otolith Matrix Proteins in the Inner Ear of Sub-Adult Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis Mossambicus, Reveal Insights Into the Biomineralization Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    The fish ear stones (otoliths) consist mainly of calcium carbonate and have lower amounts of a proteinous matrix. This matrix consists of macromolecules, which directly control the biomineralization process. We analyzed the composition of this proteinous matrix by mass spectrometry in a shotgun approach. For this purpose, an enhanced protein purification technique was developed that excludes any potential contamination of proteins from body fluids. Using this method we identified eight proteins in the inner ear of Oreochromis mossambicus. These include the common otolith matrix proteins (OMP-1, otolin-1, neuroserpin, SPARC and otoconin), and three proteins (alpha tectorin, otogelin and transferrin) not previously localized to the otoliths. Moreover, we were able to exclude the occurrence of two matrix proteins (starmaker and pre-cerebellin-like protein) known from other fish species. In further analyses, we show that the absence of the OMP starmaker corresponds to calcitic otoliths and that pre-cerebellin-like protein is not present at any stage during the development of the otoliths of the inner ear. This study shows O. mossambicus does not have all of the known otolith proteins indicating that the matrix proteins in the inner ear of fish are not the same across species. Further functional studies of the novel proteins we identified during otolith development are required.

  1. Controlled self-assembly of hydrophobic quantum dots through silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Ando, Masanori; Murase, Norio

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the formation of one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanocomposites through the self-assembly of silanized CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) by using a controlled sol-gel process. The self-assembly behavior of the QDs was created when partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxide monomers replaced hydrophobic ligands on the QDs. We examined systematically self-assembly conditions such as solvent components and QD sizes in order to elucidate the formation mechanism of various QD nanocomposites. The QD nanocomposites were assembled in water phase or on the interface of water and oil phase in emulsions. The partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides act as intermolecules to assemble the QDs. The QD nanocomposites with well-defined solid or hollow spherical, fiber-like, sheet-like, and pearl-like morphologies were prepared by adjusting the experimental conditions. The high photoluminescence efficiency of the prepared QD nanocomposites suggests partially hydrolyzed silicon alkoxides reduced the surface deterioration of QDs during self-assembly. These techniques are applicable to other hydrophobic QDs for fabricating complex QD nanocomposites.

  2. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  3. Controlling the amplification of chirality in hydrogen-bonded assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel A.; Crego-Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2005-01-01

    The amplification of chirality (a high enantiomeric or diastereomeric excess induced by a small initial amount of chiral bias) on hydrogen-bonded assemblies has been studied using “sergeants-and-soldiers” experiments under thermodynamically controlled conditions. Here it is shown that different subs

  4. Integrated Quality Control of Precision Assemblies using Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolfi, Alessandro

    coor-dinate measuring machines (CMMs) when working with complex and fragile parts. This Ph.D. project at DTU Mechanical Engineering concerns the applicability of CT for quality control of precision assem-blies. Investigations to quantify the accuracy of CT measurements, reference artefacts to correct...

  5. Controlling plasmon coupling in biomolecule-linked metal nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebba, David S.

    Molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in biomolecule-linked nanoparticle assemblies in two-particle, small cluster, and extended network formats. The relationship between structure and optical properties is explored through comparison of measured spectra with simulated spectra calculated using structural models based upon measured structural parameters. A variety of techniques are used to characterize nanoparticle assemblies, including ensemble extinction and elastic scattering spectroscopy, single-assembly scattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Initially, molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in ˜100 nm assemblies composed of 13 nm gold "satellite" particles tethered by duplex DNA to a 50 nm gold "core" particle. Comparison of core-satellite assemblies formed with duplex DNA tethers of varying length demonstrates that, while core-satellite separation is controlled by the number of base pairs in the DNA tether, structural properties such as core:satellite ratio and yield are independent of DNA tether length. Thus, plasmon coupling within these assemblies is determined by the number of base pairs in the duplex DNA tether; compact assemblies in which tethers are composed of fewer base pairs exhibit plasmon bands that are red-shifted relative to the bands of extended assemblies, indicating increased plasmon coupling in the compact assemblies. Subsequently, core-satellite assemblies are formed with reconfigurable DNA nanostructure tethers that modulate interparticle separation in response to a molecular stimulus. Assembly reconfiguration from a compact to an extended state results in blue-shifting of the assembly plasmon resonance, indicating reduced interparticle coupling and lengthening of the core-satellite tether. Comparison between measured and simulated spectra revealed a close correspondence and provided validation of the structural models that link assembly plasmonic properties

  6. Synthetic Approach to Controlled Assembly of Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0104 Synthetic Approach to Controlled Assembly of Metal Nanoparticles . So-Jung Park Ewha University-Industry Collaboration...Metal Nanoparticles . 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1-4117 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) So-Jung Park 5d...project is to develop synthetic methods to form well-defined colloidal assemblies of metal nanoparticles and to understand their unique optical

  7. Mineralogical and geochemical study of carp otoliths from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-29

    Mar 29, 2012 ... 1State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing100083,. China ... Isotope fractionation of aragonite otoliths and ... assumption that trace metals in otoliths are deposited in ..... Earth. Sci.Frontiers. (in Chinese with English abstract). 15(6): 1-10.

  8. Multi-sensor control for precise assembly of optical components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Li; Rong Weibin; Sun Lining

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform an optical assembly accurately, a multi-sensor control strategy is developed which includes an attitude measurement system, a vision system, a loss measurement system and a force sensor. A 3-DOF attitude measuring method using linear variable differential transformers (LVDT) is designed to adjust the relation of position and attitude between the spher-ical mirror and the resonator. A micro vision feedback system is set up to extract the light beam and the diaphragm, which can achieve the coarse positioning of the spherical mirror in the optical assembly process. A rapid self-correlation method is presented to analyze the spectrum signal for the fine positioning. In order to prevent the damage of the optical components and realize sealing of the resonator, a hybrid force-position control is constructed to control the contact force of the optical components. The experimental results show that the proposed multi-sensor control strategy succeeds in accomplishing the precise assembly of the optical components, which consists of parallel adjustment, macro coarse adjustment, macro approach, micro fine adjustment, micro approach and optical contact. Therefore, the results validate the multi-sensor control strategy.

  9. Multi-sensor control for precise assembly of optical components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform an optical assembly accurately, a multi-sensor control strategy is developed which includes an attitude measurement system, a vision system, a loss measurement system and a force sensor. A 3-DOF attitude measuring method using linear variable differential transformers (LVDT is designed to adjust the relation of position and attitude between the spherical mirror and the resonator. A micro vision feedback system is set up to extract the light beam and the diaphragm, which can achieve the coarse positioning of the spherical mirror in the optical assembly process. A rapid self-correlation method is presented to analyze the spectrum signal for the fine positioning. In order to prevent the damage of the optical components and realize sealing of the resonator, a hybrid force-position control is constructed to control the contact force of the optical components. The experimental results show that the proposed multi-sensor control strategy succeeds in accomplishing the precise assembly of the optical components, which consists of parallel adjustment, macro coarse adjustment, macro approach, micro fine adjustment, micro approach and optical contact. Therefore, the results validate the multi-sensor control strategy.

  10. Assembly of liposomes controlled by triple helix formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2013-09-18

    Attachment of DNA to the surface of different solid nanoparticles (e.g., gold and silica nanoparticles) is well established, and a number of DNA-modified solid nanoparticle systems have been applied to thermal denaturation analysis of oligonucleotides. We report herein the noncovalent immobilization of oligonucleotides on the surface of soft nanoparticles (i.e., liposomes) and the subsequent controlled assembly by DNA triple helix formation. The noncovalent approach avoids tedious surface chemistry and necessary purification procedures and can simplify and extend the available methodology for the otherwise difficult thermal denaturation analysis of complex triple helical DNA assemblies. The approach is based on lipid modified triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) which control the assembly of liposomes in solution in the presence of single- or double-stranded DNA targets. The thermal denaturation analysis is monitored by ultraviolet spectroscopy at submicromolar concentrations and compared to regular thermal denaturation assays in the absence of liposomes. We report on triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) based on DNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA hybrid building blocks and different target sequences (G or C-rich) to explore the applicability of the method for different triple helical assembly modes. We demonstrate advantages and limitations of the approach and show the reversible and reproducible formation of liposome aggregates during thermal denaturation cycles. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) show independently from ultraviolet spectroscopy experiments the formation of liposome aggregates.

  11. Reconfigurable self-assembly through chiral control of interfacial tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibaud, Thomas; Barry, Edward; Zakhary, Mark J; Henglin, Mir; Ward, Andrew; Yang, Yasheng; Berciu, Cristina; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Hagan, Michael F; Nicastro, Daniela; Meyer, Robert B; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-01-04

    From determining the optical properties of simple molecular crystals to establishing the preferred handedness in highly complex vertebrates, molecular chirality profoundly influences the structural, mechanical and optical properties of both synthetic and biological matter on macroscopic length scales. In soft materials such as amphiphilic lipids and liquid crystals, the competition between local chiral interactions and global constraints imposed by the geometry of the self-assembled structures leads to frustration and the assembly of unique materials. An example of particular interest is smectic liquid crystals, where the two-dimensional layered geometry cannot support twist and chirality is consequently expelled to the edges in a manner analogous to the expulsion of a magnetic field from superconductors. Here we demonstrate a consequence of this geometric frustration that leads to a new design principle for the assembly of chiral molecules. Using a model system of colloidal membranes, we show that molecular chirality can control the interfacial tension, an important property of multi-component mixtures. This suggests an analogy between chiral twist, which is expelled to the edges of two-dimensional membranes, and amphiphilic surfactants, which are expelled to oil-water interfaces. As with surfactants, chiral control of interfacial tension drives the formation of many polymorphic assemblages such as twisted ribbons with linear and circular topologies, starfish membranes, and double and triple helices. Tuning molecular chirality in situ allows dynamical control of line tension, which powers polymorphic transitions between various chiral structures. These findings outline a general strategy for the assembly of reconfigurable chiral materials that can easily be moved, stretched, attached to one another and transformed between multiple conformational states, thus allowing precise assembly and nanosculpting of highly dynamical and designable materials with complex

  12. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  13. Controlling guest-host interactions in self-assembled materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Christian Alexander

    Aqueous solutions of self-assembling macromolecules can be found in many industrial formulations, as well as in many living organisms. Regardless of the specific system, the self-assembling macromolecules are rarely found in the absence of other solutes or guest species. Such components may include fragrance molecules incorporated into block-copolymer micelles for use in detergents, dyes included in micellar precursor solutions for the synthesis of mesostructured silica-block copolymer composites, or specifically designed additives for controlling protein folding and activity. A detailed understanding of the structures and dynamic molecular interactions among the various species in solution and their influences on macromolecule aggregation and phase behaviors is of paramount importance for designing systems with improved properties and performance. Unambiguous measurements of the loci of interaction and solubilization of small molecule species (e.g., dyes or surfactants) within self-assembling block-copolymer species or proteins in aqueous solutions have been established. This has been achieved by exploiting powerful correlative multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques, including pulsed-field-gradient diffusion measurements, which provide detailed molecular insights into a variety of heterogeneous self-assembled systems. Furthermore, these insights and measurements enable the solution conditions to be established that permit the control and release of such guest molecules from association with macromolecular carrier species into the surrounding solution. Specifically, the use of temperature to control the distribution of porphyrin guest-species in a block-copolymer host and the light-dependent folding and unfolding of bovine serum albumin through varying interactions with an azo-benzene functionalized surfactant are demonstrated. In the absence of long-range order in these complex systems, advanced NMR spectroscopy methods provide

  14. Thruster direction controlling of assembled spacecraft based on gimbal suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Xu; Hai Huang

    2016-01-01

    The attitude control system design and its control effect are affected considerably by the mass-property pa-rameters of the spacecraft. In the mission of on-orbit servicing, as fuel is expended, or the payloads are added or removed, the center of mass wil be changed in certain axe; conse-quently, some thrusters' directions are deviated from the center of mass (CM) in certain plane. The CM of assembled spacecraft estimation and thruster direction control are studied. Firstly, the attitude dynamics of the assembled spacecraft is established based on the Newton-Euler method. Secondly, the estimation can be identified by the least recursive squares algorithm. Then, a scheme to control the thrusters’ directions is proposed. By using the gimbal instaled at the end of the boom, the angle of the thruster is controled by driving the gimbal; therefore, thrusters can be directed to the CM again. Finaly, numerical simulations are used to verify this scheme. Results of the numerical simulations clearly show that this control scheme is rational and feasible.

  15. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, R.; Pecquerie, L.; de Pontual, H.

    2011-01-01

    for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model...... of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique...... simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  16. Evaluation of Response Patterns in Somatic and Otolith Features of Laboratory- Reared and Wild Clarias gariepinus Exposed to Industrial Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina O. Adeogun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at comparing the responses of somatic and otolith features in Clarias gariepinus under chronic exposure conditions to industrial effluents in the laboratory for 60 days and in the wild for 6 months. Fish were collected upstream and downstream bi-monthly from a river receiving composite mixtures of industrial effluent while laboratory-rearedC. gariepinus were exposed to the same effluent mixtures in 60 days static renewal/bioassay using concentrations of 6.11, 3.05 and 2.23%, respectively and control series. A total of 21 variables representing saggital otolith and somatic data from both wild and laboratory fish were subjected to factor analysis. For laboratory reared fish, PC 1 indexed as ‘otolith factor’, PC 2 indexed as ‘condition factor’ and PC 3 indexed as ‘paired fin factor’ accounted for 26.15, 19.01 and 12.55% of the total variance, respectively. For wild fish, otolith factor (PC 1 and condition factor (PC 2 accounted for 38.24 and 22.69% of the variance respectively. The first 3 components and the first 2 components for laboratory and wild fish accounted for more than 50% of total variance in data. Reliability index (Cronbach’s alpha (&alpha>0.70 showed that the ‘otolith factor’ had strong internal consistency and is reliable as a primary and viable index of stress for both laboratory and wild fish. The complementary role of condition factor in stress detection was also highlighted. The emergence of paired features (otolith, pectoral and pelvic fins as sensitive parameters in toxicity responses may be an indication of the onset of asymmetry in these structures.

  17. The Spartan attitude control system - Control electronics assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Spartan attitude control system (ACS) represents an evolutionary development of the previous STRAP-5 ACS through the use of state-of-the-art microprocessors and hardware. Despite a gyro rate signal noise problem that caused the early depletion of argon gas, the Spartan 101 experiment was able to collect several hours of data from two targets. Attention is presently given to the ACS sequencer module, sensor interface box, valve driver box, control electronics software, jam tables, and sequencer programs.

  18. Hyperbaric environmental control assembly for the Space Station Freedom airlock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubly, Robert P.; Schimenti, Dan

    The hyperbaric environmental control assembly (HECA) monitors and controls temperature, humidity and CO2 levels in the Space Station Freedom airlock when the airlock is used for extravehicular activity (EVA) prebreathing campouts and as a hyperbaric treatment facility. Prebreathing is required prior to extravehicular activity due to the differential between the station nominal pressure and the EVA suit pressure. Hyperbaric treatment is required in the event of decompression sickness. The HECA consists of an atmosphere recirculation circuit which provides air circulation and temperature control, and a separate CO2 and humidity control circuit. CO2 and latent water production rates have been calculated from established metabolic profiles for both campout and hyperbaric protocols. An analytical model has been used to predict carbon dioxide and humidity levels as functions of initial crewlock conditions and the specified loads. This model has demonstrated the suitability and robustness of the dual-bed molecular sieve system for the HECA.

  19. Effect of the hydrostatic pressure on otolith growth of early juveniles of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, A T; Coimbra, A M; Damasceno-Oliveira, A

    2012-07-01

    Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus early juveniles were maintained for 2 weeks in a pressurized system under a controlled photoperiod, at constant salinity and temperature. Groups of fish were exposed to one of three absolute hydrostatic pressure (HP) regimes: (1) a constant normal atmospheric pressure (100 kPa), (2) a constant 40 m pressure (500 kPa) or (3) a semi-diurnal cyclic vertical migration (100-500 kPa). No significant differences were detected in otolith size and incremental periodicity among the three HP treatments, suggesting that HP does not affect otolith growth of early juveniles O. niloticus. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Controlled short-linkage assembly of functional nano-objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Shilpi; Kamra, Tripta [Division of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); ENI AB, Malmö (Sweden); Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Uddin, Khan Mohammad Ahsan [Division of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Snezhkova, Olesia [Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Jayawardena, H. Surangi N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave., Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Yan, Mingdi [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave., Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Department of Chemistry, KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 30, S-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Montelius, Lars [ENI AB, Malmö (Sweden); Schnadt, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.schnadt@sljus.lu.se [Division of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Ye, Lei, E-mail: lei.ye@tbiokem.lth.se [Division of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fast photoconjugation of nanoparticles on surface. • Non-destructive feature guarantees intact function of nanoparticles. • Direct contact between nano-objects allows efficient photon and electron transfer. • Possibility of generating patterned nanoparticle assemblies on surface. • Open new opportunities for assembling chemical sensors. - Abstract: In this work, we report a method that allows the deterministic, photo-controlled covalent assembly of nanoparticles directly on surface. As a model system, we study the conjugation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles on a glass surface and confirm that the immobilized nanoparticles maintain their molecular recognition functionality. The glass slide was first modified with perfluorophenylazide and then used to bind MIP nanoparticles under UV irradiation. After each step the surface was analyzed by water contact angle measurement, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and/or synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The MIP nanoparticles immobilized on the glass surface remained stable and maintained specific binding for the template molecule, propranolol. The method developed in this work allows MIP nanoparticles to be directly coupled to a flat surface, offering a straightforward means to construct robust chemical sensors. Using the reported photo conjugation method, it is possible to generate patterned assembly of nanoparticles using a photomask. Since perfluorophenylazide-based photochemistry works with all kinds of organic material, the method developed in this work is expected to enable immobilization of not only MIPs but also other kinds of organic and inorganic–organic core–shell particles for various applications involving photon or electron transfer.

  1. Lead-Radium Activity Ratios From Otoliths of Regional Bottomfishes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains lead-radium dating of opakapaka (Pristipomoides filamentosus) otoliths from recent and archival collections (1987-2009).

  2. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Fablet

    Full Text Available Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  3. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  4. Enrichment of Pb, Hg and Cr in cultured carp otolith

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... record the pollution condition at the sampling time. ... aquatic organisms are aquatic algae, zooplankton .... element cannot show that Hg concentration in otolith ..... from Atlantic croaker along an estuarine pollution gradient.

  5. Shedding Light on Fish Otolith Biomineralization Using a Bioenergetic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves. PMID:22110601

  6. Clinical Testing of Otolith Function: Perceptual Thresholds and Myogenic Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Yuri; BREMOVA, TATIANA; Kremmyda, Olympia; Strupp, Michael; MacNeilage, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP/oVEMP) tests are widely used clinical tests of otolith function. However, VEMP testing may not be the ideal measure of otolith function given the significant inter-individual variability in responses and given that the stimuli used to elicit VEMPs are not physiological. We therefore evaluated linear motion perceptual threshold testing compared with cVEMP and oVEMP testing as measures of saccular and utricular function, respective...

  7. The role of otolith size in hearing – Insights from cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Schulz-Mirbach

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Otolithic end organs in fishes function as accelerometers and are involved in the senses of balance and hearing (e.g. Popper et al. 2005. Otolith mass and shape are likely decisive factors influencing otolith motion, but while it is largely unknown how different shapes affect otolith movement relative to the sensory epithelium (Popper et al. 2005, greater otolith mass is predicted to result in enhanced stimulation of sensory hair cells and improved hearing (Lychakov and Rebane 2005. What few studies exist on this topic, however, yielded contradicting results in that they did or did not find a correlation between increased otolith mass and enhanced hearing (see Kéver et al. 2014. We investigated the relationship between otolith morphology (including 3D-models of otoliths based on high-resolution microCT imaging and otolith weight and hearing abilities in cichlids while comparing three species (Etroplus maculatus, Hemichromis guttatus, Steatocranus tinanti with different swimbladder morphology and hearing abilities (Schulz-Mirbach et al. 2014. We predicted Etroplus maculatus—the species that displays the best hearing sensitivities—to possess larger/heavier otoliths. As swimbladder extensions in this species are connected to the lagena, we further predicted to find heavier lagenar otoliths. Compared to H. guttatus and S. tinanti, E. maculatus showed the heaviest saccular otoliths, while lagenar otoliths were significantly thinner and lighter than in the former two species, apparently contradicting the hypothesis that the lagena and its otolith are primarily involved in improved hearing abilities. Our results support the idea that there is no ‘simple’ relationship between otolith weight, ancilliary auditory structures and hearing abilities. 3D-models of inner ears and otoliths may be ideally suited for future studies modeling complex otolith motion and thus, may provide a better understanding of how otolith morphology contributes to inner

  8. New insights into early history traits of Lypophrys pholis inferred from otolith microstructural studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Queiroga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenetic development of the sagittal otoliths of Lypophris pholis during embryonic, larval, settlement and recruitment stages was examined from eggs, new settlers and recruits collected during low tides in several Portuguese rocky beaches. The eggs were reared under controlled-laboratory conditions until the larval stage. Viewed by scanning electron microscopy, sagittae recorded eight to ten micro-increments before hatching in late embryo phases. In larval otoliths a visible hatching check was observed and micro-increments were deposited on a daily basis. Early settlers presented in the otolith edge two types of settlement marks (Ia and Ib. Furthermore micro-increments in sagittae were also shown to be deposited daily in early juveniles using fluorescent dyes. Pelagic larval duration estimated from micro-increments counts until the settlement marks in recruits collected along the occidental Portuguese coasts ranged from 57 to 73 days. Moreover pelagic larval duration showed a latitudinal reduction trend from North to South probably related the regional seawater temperatures. Settlement sizes did not show however any regional differences suggesting to be a more conservative character within species. Age at coastal recruitment varied between 85 and 109 days, but northern individuals were recruit with an older age. Back calculated spawning, hatching and settlement dates appear to be unrelated to the lunar cycle for L. pholis.

  9. Controlling the photoconductivity: Graphene oxide and polyaniline self assembled intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vempati, Sesha, E-mail: svempati01@qub.ac.uk [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Centre, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Ozcan, Sefika [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Centre, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Polymer Science and Technology, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Uyar, Tamer, E-mail: uyar@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Centre, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-02-02

    We report on controlling the optoelectronic properties of self-assembled intercalating compound of graphene oxide (GO) and HCl doped polyaniline (PANI). Optical emission and X-ray diffraction studies revealed a secondary doping phenomenon of PANI with –OH and –COOH groups of GO, which essentially arbitrate the intercalation. A control on the polarity and the magnitude of the photoresponse (PR) is harnessed by manipulating the weight ratios of PANI to GO (viz., 1:1.5 and 1:2.2 are abbreviated as PG1.5 and PG2.2, respectively), where ±PR = 100(R{sub Dark} – R{sub UV-Vis})/R{sub Dark} and R corresponds to the resistance of the device in dark or UV-Vis illumination. To be precise, the PR from GO, PANI, PG1.5, and PG2.2 are +34%, −111%, −51%, and +58%, respectively.

  10. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Annela M; Richardson, Sam J; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S; Squires, Adam M; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate and manipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from self-assembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlled by varying the humidity of the atmosphere around the droplet. We demonstrate levitation and in situ phase transitions of micellar, hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases. The technique opens up a wide range of new experimental approaches of fundamental importance for environmental, biological, and chemical research.

  11. Controlled short-linkage assembly of functional nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Shilpi; Kamra, Tripta; Uddin, Khan Mohammad Ahsan; Snezhkova, Olesia; Jayawardena, H. Surangi N.; Yan, Mingdi; Montelius, Lars; Schnadt, Joachim; Ye, Lei

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we report a method that allows the deterministic, photo-controlled covalent assembly of nanoparticles directly on surface. As a model system, we study the conjugation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles on a glass surface and confirm that the immobilized nanoparticles maintain their molecular recognition functionality. The glass slide was first modified with perfluorophenylazide and then used to bind MIP nanoparticles under UV irradiation. After each step the surface was analyzed by water contact angle measurement, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and/or synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The MIP nanoparticles immobilized on the glass surface remained stable and maintained specific binding for the template molecule, propranolol. The method developed in this work allows MIP nanoparticles to be directly coupled to a flat surface, offering a straightforward means to construct robust chemical sensors. Using the reported photo conjugation method, it is possible to generate patterned assembly of nanoparticles using a photomask. Since perfluorophenylazide-based photochemistry works with all kinds of organic material, the method developed in this work is expected to enable immobilization of not only MIPs but also other kinds of organic and inorganic-organic core-shell particles for various applications involving photon or electron transfer.

  12. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-05-10

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t{sup 1/2} law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction.

  13. Controlled self-assembly in homopolymer and diblock copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Lei

    This thesis work studies the process, mechanism and control of self-assembly in homopolymers and diblock copolymers. These studies are aimed at finding novel patterning methods that can lead to low cost lithography technologies capable of creating micrometer to nanometer patterns over a large area. We first present a new phenomenon called Lithographically-Induced Self-Assembly (LISA) that can create ordered arrays of pillars in a homopolymer film with a mask placed close to its surface. We demonstrate that the shape, size and morphology of the ordered pillar arrays can be controlled with a patterned mask. A model is developed based on the instability in a fluidic film induced by the Coulomb force from charge accumulation in the polymer film and the mask. Experimental results are shown to support the model. We also investigate the behavior of defects that destroy the ordering of the LISA array and propose ways to prevent them. This self-assembly phenomenon is used as a patterning technique to define the active area of an organic light emitting diode (OLED). The device shows significantly improved lifetime due to the restriction of defect growth. Another patterning technology that is closely related to LISA, Lithographically-Induced Self-Construction (LISC), is also introduced. LISC can form mesas of polymer from the initial thin film and they inherit the shape and size of the mask patterns. A model based on the dynamics of LISA pillar formation and mass conservation is presented and provides a guideline for choosing LISC process parameters. In the final part of the thesis, we study a technique to control the orientation of diblock copolymer phase separation in a thin film by applying a pressure on the film through a flat mask. The result is a well-ordered grating pattern of the phase separation with a period of tens of nanometers. The effect of pressure and film thickness on the final pattern is investigated by experiments. We suggest that the increased ordering is

  14. Controlled assembly of copper phthalocyanine with 1-iodooctadecane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Shengbin; WANG Chen; WAN Lijun; BAI Chunli

    2003-01-01

    The binary assembly behavior of 1-iodoocta- decane with substituted phthalocyanine (Pc) is studied using the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). By altering the substituted alkyl groups attached to the phthalocyanine ring, either uniform assembly or phase separation behavior can be observed. It is suggested that the strength of intermolecular interaction between phthalocyanine molecules is the determining factor for the assembly structure.

  15. Construct hepatic analog by cell-matrix controlled assembly technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Haixia; YAN Yongnian; WANG Xiaohong; CHENG Jie; LIN Feng; XIONG Zhuo; Wu Rendong

    2006-01-01

    A mixture of hepatic cells and chitosan/gelatin solution was deposited to construct a hepatic analog by way of layer-by-layer deposition technique using a home-made devise. The size and cell concentration of the analogs can be controlled freely. Approximately 90% of the hepatic cells remained viable under 0.2 Mpa extrusion pressure. Cultured in vitro 8 weeks before animal test, hepatic cells in structure maintained their phenotype and kept proliferating, and albumin and other secretion of the cells increased. Cords and hepaton-like structures were observed after culture for 20 d. These results indicate that hepatic cells could be assembled directly into a 3D viable structure and expanded to form a hepatic organoid. This accomplishment is considered to be an interesting means for the fabrication of liver replacements.

  16. Force-controlled robotic assembly processes of rigid and flexible objects methodologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghalyan, Ibrahim Fahad Jasim

    2016-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive and integrated approaches for rigid and flexible object assembly. It presents comparison studies with the available force-guided robotic processes and covers contact-state modeling, scheme control strategies, and position searching algorithms. Further, it includes experimental validations for different assembly situations, including those for the assembly of industrial parts taken from the automotive industry. .

  17. Optical manipulation for optogenetics: otoliths manipulation in zebrafish (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre-Bulle, Itia A.; Scott, Ethan; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Otoliths play an important role in Zebrafish in terms of hearing and sense of balance. Many studies have been conducted to understand its structure and function, however the encoding of its movement in the brain remains unknown. Here we developed a noninvasive system capable of manipulating the otolith using optical trapping while we image its behavioral response and brain activity. We'll also present our tools for behavioral response detection and brain activity mapping. Acceleration is sensed through movements of the otoliths in the inner ear. Because experimental manipulations involve movements, electrophysiology and fluorescence microscopy are difficult. As a result, the neural codes underlying acceleration sensation are poorly understood. We have developed a technique for optically trapping otoliths, allowing us to simulate acceleration in stationary larval zebrafish. By applying forces to the otoliths, we can elicit behavioral responses consistent with compensation for perceived acceleration. Since the animal is stationary, we can use calcium imaging in these animals' brains to identify the functional circuits responsible for mediating responses to acceleration in natural settings.

  18. Bisphenol A induces otolith malformations during vertebrate embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeneix Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plastic monomer and plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA, used for manufacturing polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, is produced at over 2.5 million metric tons per year. Concerns have been raised that BPA acts as an endocrine disruptor on both developmental and reproductive processes and a large body of evidence suggests that BPA interferes with estrogen and thyroid hormone signaling. Here, we investigated BPA effects during embryonic development using the zebrafish and Xenopus models. Results We report that BPA exposure leads to severe malformations of the otic vesicle. In zebrafish and in Xenopus embryos, exposure to BPA during the first developmental day resulted in dose-dependent defects in otolith formation. Defects included aggregation, multiplication and occasionally failure to form otoliths. As no effects on otolith development were seen with exposure to micromolar concentrations of thyroid hormone, 17-ß-estradiol or of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 we conclude that the effects of BPA are independent of estrogen receptors or thyroid-hormone receptors. Na+/K+ ATPases are crucial for otolith formation in zebrafish. Pharmacological inhibition of the major Na+/K+ ATPase with ouabain can rescue the BPA-induced otolith phenotype. Conclusions The data suggest that the spectrum of BPA action is wider than previously expected and argue for a systematic survey of the developmental effects of this endocrine disruptor.

  19. Otolithic organ function in patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujuan Zhou; Yongzhen Wu; Jing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Profound sensorineural hearing loss (PSHL) is not uncommonly encountered in otology. In clinics, there is a high incidence of otolithic damage in patients with PSHL, but relevant reports are few. Sharing a continuous membranous structure and similar receptor cell ultrastructures, the cochlea and vestibule may be susceptible to the same harmful factors. Disorders of the inner ear may result in a variety of manifestations, including vertigo, spatial disorientation, blurred vision, impaired articulation, and hearing impairment. Considering the diversity of clinical symptoms associated with PSHL with otolithic dysfunction, it may be frequently misdiagnosed, and objective means of testing the function of otolithic organs should be recommended for hearing-impaired patients. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) via air-conducted sound are of great importance for the diagnosis of otolithic function. Hearing devices such as cochlear implants are commonly accepted treatments for PSHL, and early identification and treatment of vestibular disorders may increase the success rate of cochlear implantation. Therefore, it is necessary to increase awareness of otolithic functional states in patients with PSHL.

  20. Thyroid hormone mediates otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, A M; Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K

    2010-11-01

    Flatfish begin life as bilaterally symmetrical larvae that swim up-right, then abruptly metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles with lateralized swimming postures. Flatfish metamorphosis is mediated entirely by thyroid hormone (TH). Changes in flatfish swim posture are thought to be regulated via vestibular remodeling, although the influence of TH on teleost inner ear development remains unclear. This study addresses the role of TH on the development of the three otolith end-organs (sacculus, utricle, and lagena) during southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) metamorphosis. Compared with pre-metamorphosis, growth rates of the sacculus and utricle otoliths increase dramatically during metamorphosis in a manner that is uncoupled from general somatic growth. Treatment of P. lethostigma larvae with methimazol (a pharmacological inhibitor of endogenous TH production) inhibits growth of the sacculus and utricle, whereas treatment with TH dramatically accelerates their growth. In contrast with the sacculus and utricle otoliths that begin to form and mineralize during embryogenesis, a non-mineralized lagena otolith is first visible 10-12 days after hatching. The lagena grows during pre- and pro-metamorphosis, then abruptly mineralizes during metamorphic climax. Mineralization of the lagena, but not growth, can be induced with TH treatment, whereas treatment with methimazol completely inhibits lagena mineralization without inhibiting its growth. These findings suggest that during southern flounder metamorphosis TH exerts differential effects on growth and development among the three types of otolith.

  1. Adaptive plasticity in the otolith-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizuka, Izumi

    2003-02-01

    This review focuses on the plasticity in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), especially in the otolith-ocular reflex (OOR). The VOR is a mechanism for the production of rapid compensatory eye movements during head movements. The VOR is under adaptive control which corrects VOR performance when visual-vestibular mismatch arises during head movements. It has been demonstrated that chronic exposure to certain visual environments, those generated by magnifying lenses and reversing prisms, alter the gain and phase of VOR in the dark in numerous species. Most experiments concerning such modification of the VOR have used semicircular canal stimulation. The VOR consists of the semicircular-ocular reflex (ScOR) and the OOR. There are few results regarding the relationship between the gain of the ScOR and the OOR. This review summarizes the studies on plasticity in the OOR. In addition, the difficulty in evaluating the OOR using current conventional methods including earth horizontal axis (EHA) rotation, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and linear sled, is discussed. We believe that the ScOR and the OOR share common neural pathways in such a way that a change in the synaptic efficacy of one pathway is accompanied by a change in the other.

  2. Inventory control: cytochrome c oxidase assembly regulates mitochondrial translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, David U; Fox, Thomas D; Rehling, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria maintain genome and translation machinery to synthesize a small subset of subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system. To build up functional enzymes, these organellar gene products must assemble with imported subunits that are encoded in the nucleus. New findings on the early steps of cytochrome c oxidase assembly reveal how the mitochondrial translation of its core component, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1), is directly coupled to the assembly of this respiratory complex.

  3. Inventory control: cytochrome oxidase assembly regulates mitochondrial translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, David U.; Fox, Thomas D.; Rehling, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria maintain a genome and translation-machinery to synthesize a small subset of subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These organellar gene products must assemble with imported subunits that are encoded in the nucleus to build up functional enzymes. New findings on the early steps in cytochrome oxidase assembly reveal how the mitochondrial translation of its core component Cox1 is directly coupled to the assembly of this respiratory complex. PMID:21179059

  4. Accurate length control of supramolecular oligomerization: Vernier assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Christopher A; Tomas, Salvador

    2006-07-12

    Linear oligomeric supramolecular assemblies of defined length have been generated using the Vernier principle. Two molecules, containing a different number (n and m) of mutually complementary binding sites, separated by the same distance, interact with each other to form an assembly of length (n x m). The assembly grows in the same way as simple supramolecular polymers, but at a molecular stop signal, when the binding sites come into register, the assembly terminates giving an oligomer of defined length. This strategy has been realized using tin and zinc porphyrin oligomers as the molecular building blocks. In the presence of isonicotinic acid, a zinc porphyrin trimer and a tin porphyrin dimer form a 3:4 triple stranded Vernier assembly six porphyrins long. The triple strand Vernier architecture introduced here adds an additional level of cooperativity, yielding a stability and selectivity that cannot be achieved via a simple Vernier approach. The assembly properties of the system were characterized using fluorescence titrations and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Assembly of the Vernier complex is efficient at micromolar concentrations in nonpolar solvents, and under more competitive conditions, a variety of fragmentation assemblies can be detected, allowing determination of the stability constants for this system and detailed speciation profiles to be constructed.

  5. The cerebellar nodulus/uvula integrates otolith signals for the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The otolith-driven translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR generates compensatory eye movements to linear head accelerations. Studies in humans indicate that the cerebellum plays a critical role in the neural control of the tVOR, but little is known about mechanisms of this control or the functions of specific cerebellar structures. Here, we chose to investigate the contribution of the nodulus and uvula, which have been shown by prior studies to be involved in the processing of otolith signals in other contexts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded eye movements in two rhesus monkeys during steps of linear motion along the interaural axis before and after surgical lesions of the cerebellar uvula and nodulus. The lesions strikingly reduced eye velocity during constant-velocity motion but had only a small effect on the response to initial head acceleration. We fit eye velocity to a linear combination of head acceleration and velocity and to a dynamic mathematical model of the tVOR that incorporated a specific integrator of head acceleration. Based on parameter optimization, the lesion decreased the gain of the pathway containing this new integrator by 62%. The component of eye velocity that depended directly on head acceleration changed little (gain decrease of 13%. In a final set of simulations, we compared our data to the predictions of previous models of the tVOR, none of which could account for our experimental findings. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide new and important information regarding the neural control of the tVOR. Specifically, they point to a key role for the cerebellar nodulus and uvula in the mathematical integration of afferent linear head acceleration signals. This function is likely to be critical not only for the tVOR but also for the otolith-mediated reflexes that control posture and balance.

  6. Stoichiometric control of DNA-grafted colloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Thi; Venkatasubramanian, Venkat; Kumar, Sanat; Srinivasan, Babji; Pal, Suchetan; Zhang, Yugang; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-21

    There has been considerable interest in understanding the self-assembly of DNA-grafted nanoparticles into different crystal structures, e.g., CsCl, AlB2, and Cr3Si. Although there are important exceptions, a generally accepted view is that the right stoichiometry of the two building block colloids needs to be mixed to form the desired crystal structure. To incisively probe this issue, we combine experiments and theory on a series of DNA-grafted nanoparticles at varying stoichiometries, including noninteger values. We show that stoichiometry can couple with the geometries of the building blocks to tune the resulting equilibrium crystal morphology. As a concrete example, a stoichiometric ratio of 3:1 typically results in the Cr3Si structure. However, AlB2 can form when appropriate building blocks are used so that the AlB2 standard-state free energy is low enough to overcome the entropic preference for Cr3Si. These situations can also lead to an undesirable phase coexistence between crystal polymorphs. Thus, whereas stoichiometry can be a powerful handle for direct control of lattice formation, care must be taken in its design and selection to avoid polymorph coexistence.

  7. Assembly of bio-nanoparticles for double controlled drug release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    Full Text Available A critical limiting factor of chemotherapy is the unacceptably high toxicity. The use of nanoparticle based drug carriers has significantly reduced the side effects and facilitated the delivery of drugs. Source of the remaining side effect includes (1 the broad final in vivo distribution of the administrated nanoparticles, and (2 strong basal drug release from nanoparticles before they could reach the tumor. Despite the advances in pH-triggered release, undesirable basal drug release has been a constant challenge under in vivo conditions. In this study, functionalized single walled carbon nanohorn supported immunoliposomes were assembled for paclitaxel delivery. The immunoliposomes were formulated with polyethylene glycol, thermal stable and pH sensitive phospholipids. Each nanohorn was found to be encapsulated within one immunoliposome. Results showed a highly pH dependent release of paclitaxel in the presence of serum at body temperature with minimal basal release under physiological conditions. Upon acidification, paclitaxel was released at a steady rate over 30 days with a cumulative release of 90% of the loaded drug. The drug release results proved our hypothesized double controlled release mechanism from the nanoparticles. Other results showed the nanoparticles have doubled loading capacity compared to that of traditional liposomes and higher affinity to breast cancer cells overexpressing Her2 receptors. Internalized nanoparticles were found in lysosomes.

  8. Verification of otolith identity used by fisheries scientists for aging channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Stewart, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Previously published studies of the age estimation of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus based on otoliths have reported using the sagittae, whereas it is likely they were actually using the lapilli. This confusion may have resulted because in catfishes (ostariophyseans) the lapilli are the largest of the three otoliths, whereas in nonostariophysean fish the sagittae are the largest. Based on (1) scanning electron microscope microphotographs of channel catfish otoliths, (2) X-ray computed tomography scans of a channel catfish head, (3) descriptions of techniques used to removed otoliths from channel catfish reported in the literature, and (4) a sample of channel catfish otoliths received from fisheries biologists from around the country, it is clear that lapilli are most often used for channel catfish aging studies, not sagittae, as has been previously reported. Fisheries scientists who obtain otoliths from channel catfish can use the information in this paper to correctly identify otolith age.

  9. Regulated assembly of transcription factors and control of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    2001-11-30

    Proteins that function in regulation of transcription initiation are typically homo or hetero-oligomeric. Results of recent biophysical studies of transcription regulators indicate that the assembly of these proteins is often subject to regulation. This regulation of assembly dictates the frequency of transcription initiation via its influence on the affinity of a transcription regulator for DNA and its affect on target site selection. Factors that modulate transcription factor assembly include binding of small molecules, post-translational modification, DNA binding and interactions with other proteins. Here, the results of recent structural and/or thermodynamic studies of a number of transcription regulators that are subject to regulated assembly are reviewed. The accumulated data indicate that this phenomenon is ubiquitous and that mechanisms utilized in eukaryotes and prokaryotes share common features. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Selective assemblies of giant tetrahedra via precisely controlled positional interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingjun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Wang, Jing; Mei, Shan; Dong, Xuehui; Li, Yiwen; Li, Mingxuan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Aida, Takuzo; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Yue, Kan; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembly of rigid building blocks with explicit shape and symmetry is substantially influenced by the geometric factors and remains largely unexplored. We report the selective assembly behaviors of a class of precisely defined, nanosized giant tetrahedra constructed by placing different polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecular nanoparticles at the vertices of a rigid tetrahedral framework. Designed symmetry breaking of these giant tetrahedra introduces precise positional interactions and results in diverse selectively assembled, highly ordered supramolecular lattices including a Frank-Kasper A15 phase, which resembles the essential structural features of certain metal alloys but at a larger length scale. These results demonstrate the power of persistent molecular geometry with balanced enthalpy and entropy in creating thermodynamically stable supramolecular lattices with properties distinct from those of other self-assembling soft materials.

  11. Effect of ocean acidification on growth and otolith condition of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Dean M; Redman, Dylan H; Widman, James C; Meseck, Shannon; King, Andrew; Pereira, Jose J

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from human industrial activities are causing changes in global ocean carbonate chemistry, resulting in a reduction in pH, a process termed "ocean acidification." It is important to determine which species are sensitive to elevated levels of CO2 because of potential impacts to ecosystems, marine resources, biodiversity, food webs, populations, and effects on economies. Previous studies with marine fish have documented that exposure to elevated levels of CO2 caused increased growth and larger otoliths in some species. This study was conducted to determine whether the elevated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) would have an effect on growth, otolith (ear bone) condition, survival, or the skeleton of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops, a species that supports both important commercial and recreational fisheries. Elevated levels of pCO2 (1200-2600 μatm) had no statistically significant effect on growth, survival, or otolith condition after 8 weeks of rearing. Field data show that in Long Island Sound, where scup spawn, in situ levels of pCO2 are already at levels ranging from 689 to 1828 μatm due to primary productivity, microbial activity, and anthropogenic inputs. These results demonstrate that ocean acidification is not likely to cause adverse effects on the growth and survivability of every species of marine fish. X-ray analysis of the fish revealed a slightly higher incidence of hyperossification in the vertebrae of a few scup from the highest treatments compared to fish from the control treatments. Our results show that juvenile scup are tolerant to increases in seawater pCO2, possibly due to conditions this species encounters in their naturally variable environment and their well-developed pH control mechanisms.

  12. Otoliths as an integral part in fossil fish taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Gierl

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Otoliths are small structures in the skull of fishes. They are responsible for hearing and orientation in the 3-dimensional space. They also hold valuable information regarding the taxonomy. Their outline, the shape of the sulcus and other features allow the determination of a fish even to the species level. A lot of fossil species are solely based on otoliths because of their good chance of preservation. Gobies are in this case no different. An additional challenge in gobies is their high similarity between species concerning the preservable parts. Fossil skeletons that are 20 Million years old can show only few differences compared to recent gobies. These features are often hardly recognizable due to their preservation. As a consequence many fossil gobies have been assigned to the genus Gobius sensu lato. Examples are two gobies from the Miocene of Southern Germany. They have a unique combination of characters (six branchiostegals, palatine resembling a “T”, no entopterygoid that allows the rectification of a new fossil genus but the two species are hardly distinguishable based only on the skeleton. The key hints in having two species are the otoliths. They show slight but consistent differences in their outline. This shows that otoliths can be a key feature in species identification. They should also be taken into consideration by recent fish species. Not to mention their possible phylogenetic potential that remains to be explored.

  13. Otolith microchemistry of tropical diadromous fishes: spatial and migratory dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William E.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Otolith microchemistry was applied to quantify migratory variation and the proportion of native Caribbean stream fishes that undergo full or partial marine migration. Strontium and barium water chemistry in four Puerto Rico, U.S.A., rivers was clearly related to a salinity gradient; however, variation in water barium, and thus fish otoliths, was also dependent on river basin. Strontium was the most accurate index of longitudinal migration in tropical diadromous fish otoliths. Among the four species examined, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor, mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, sirajo goby Sicydium spp. and river goby Awaous banana, most individuals were fully amphidromous, but 9-12% were semi-amphidromous as recruits, having never experienced marine or estuarine conditions in early life stages and showing no evidence of marine elemental signatures in their otolith core. Populations of one species, G. dormitor, may have contained a small contingent of semi-amphidromous adults, migratory individuals that periodically occupied marine or estuarine habitats (4%); however, adult migratory elemental signatures may have been confounded with those related to diet and physiology. These findings indicate the plasticity of migratory strategies of tropical diadromous fishes, which may be more variable than simple categorization might suggest.

  14. Otolith geochemistry does not reflect dispersal history of clownfish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, M. L.; Walsh, H. J.; Raventos, N.; Planes, S.; Jones, G. P.; Starczak, V.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    Natural geochemical signatures in calcified structures are commonly employed to retrospectively estimate dispersal pathways of larval fish and invertebrates. However, the accuracy of the approach is generally untested due to the absence of individuals with known dispersal histories. We used genetic parentage analysis (genotyping) to divide 110 new recruits of the orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, from Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea, into two groups: “self-recruiters” spawned by parents on Kimbe Island and “immigrants” that had dispersed from distant reefs (>10 km away). Analysis of daily increments in sagittal otoliths found no significant difference in PLDs or otolith growth rates between self-recruiting and immigrant larvae. We also quantified otolith Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios during the larval phase using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Again, we found no significant differences in larval profiles of either element between self-recruits and immigrants. Our results highlight the need for caution when interpreting otolith dispersal histories based on natural geochemical tags in the absence of water chemistry data or known-origin larvae with which to test the discriminatory ability of natural tags.

  15. Otolith geochemistry does not reflect dispersal history of clownfish larvae

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2010-07-01

    Natural geochemical signatures in calcified structures are commonly employed to retrospectively estimate dispersal pathways of larval fish and invertebrates. However, the accuracy of the approach is generally untested due to the absence of individuals with known dispersal histories. We used genetic parentage analysis (genotyping) to divide 110 new recruits of the orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, from Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea, into two groups: "self-recruiters" spawned by parents on Kimbe Island and "immigrants" that had dispersed from distant reefs (>10 km away). Analysis of daily increments in sagittal otoliths found no significant difference in PLDs or otolith growth rates between self-recruiting and immigrant larvae. We also quantified otolith Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios during the larval phase using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Again, we found no significant differences in larval profiles of either element between self-recruits and immigrants. Our results highlight the need for caution when interpreting otolith dispersal histories based on natural geochemical tags in the absence of water chemistry data or known-origin larvae with which to test the discriminatory ability of natural tags. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Decline in semicircular canal and otolith function with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Yuri; Zuniga, Maria Geraldine; Davalos-Bichara, Marcela; Schubert, Michael C; Walston, Jeremy D; Hughes, Jennifer; Carey, John P

    2012-07-01

    To characterize the physiologic nature of the vestibular dysfunction that occurs with the normative aging process. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary care academic medical center. Fifty individuals age 70 years and above. Head thrust dynamic visual acuity testing and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing. Semicircular canal function measured by head thrust dynamic visual acuity testing in each of the 3 semicircular canal planes, and saccular and utricular function measured by cervical VEMP and ocular VEMP testing, respectively. We observed significant declines in semicircular canal function in each of the canal planes as well as otolith function associated with aging. We found that individuals with impaired horizontal and superior semicircular canal function also were likely to have concomitant deficits in utricular but not saccular function. Overall, we noted that the prevalence of semicircular canal dysfunction was highest followed by saccular then utricular impairment, although we did observe individuals with isolated otolith deficits. These data suggest an overall decline in semicircular canal as well as otolith function associated with aging, although the magnitude of impairment was greater for the semicircular canals than the otoliths in this elderly population. A better understanding of the specific vestibular deficits that occur with aging can inform the development of rational screening, vestibular rehabilitation, and fall risk reduction strategies in older individuals.

  17. Otolith microchemistry of tropical diadromous fishes: spatial and migratory dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W E; Kwak, T J

    2014-04-01

    Otolith microchemistry was applied to quantify migratory variation and the proportion of native Caribbean stream fishes that undergo full or partial marine migration. Strontium and barium water chemistry in four Puerto Rico, U.S.A., rivers was clearly related to a salinity gradient; however, variation in water barium, and thus fish otoliths, was also dependent on river basin. Strontium was the most accurate index of longitudinal migration in tropical diadromous fish otoliths. Among the four species examined, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor, mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, sirajo goby Sicydium spp. and river goby Awaous banana, most individuals were fully amphidromous, but 9-12% were semi-amphidromous as recruits, having never experienced marine or estuarine conditions in early life stages and showing no evidence of marine elemental signatures in their otolith core. Populations of one species, G. dormitor, may have contained a small contingent of semi-amphidromous adults, migratory individuals that periodically occupied marine or estuarine habitats (4%); however, adult migratory elemental signatures may have been confounded with those related to diet and physiology. These findings indicate the plasticity of migratory strategies of tropical diadromous fishes, which may be more variable than simple categorization might suggest.

  18. Controlled assembly of single colloidal crystals using electro-osmotic micro-pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Ran; Oğuz, Erdal C.; Müller, Hannah; Reinmüller, Alexander; Botin, Denis; Löwen, Hartmut; Palberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We assemble charged colloidal spheres at deliberately chosen locations on a charged unstructured glass substrate utilizing ion exchange based electro-osmotic micro-pumps. Using microscopy, a simple scaling theory and Brownian Dynamics simulations, we systematically explore the control parameters of crystal assembly and the mechanisms through which they depend on the experimental boundary conditions. We demonstrate that crystal quality depends crucially on the assembly distance of the colloids...

  19. Development and Application of Otoliths as Paleoclimate Proxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, C. T.; Crowe, D. E.; Sandweiss, D. H.

    2001-12-01

    Otoliths are small (maritime archaeological sites and are also found as fossils as old as the Jurassic. Gross otolith morphology is taxon-specific, often permitting identification to the species level. Depending on the behavior and natural history of each species, conditions within different environments and habitats may be recorded in the isotope chemistry. These environments range from abyssal oceanic depths to mid-continental rivers and lakes, but the most abundant archaeological otoliths are from fish that inhabit shallow coastal waters. Unlike most proxies that are sessile, fish are pelagic and thus record a paleoclimate record indicative of the range of habitats in which the individual grew. In fish with well-understood life histories, such as most economically significant species, this permits evaluation of multiple habitat climates through ontogeny as recorded in the incremental growth. In species with a defined home range (i.e. non-migratory), an integrated temperature history of region can be reconstructed from the δ 18O values, thus avoiding micro-environmental biases sometimes associated with sessile proxies. An example of such use of otoliths is our recent analyses of δ 18O profiles from mid-Holocene archaeological sites in coastal Peru that reflect sea surface temperature (SST) histories. This is an area of coast that lacks more traditional proxies, such as coral, yet is central to the understanding of a global phenomenon such as El Niño/southern oscillation. The high-resolution temperature records preserved in these sea catfish (Galeichthys peruvianus) otoliths reveal warmer than present summer SST in central Peru and near tropical conditions in the north.

  20. Controlled crystallization of hydroxyapatite under hexadecylamine self-assembled monolayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄苏萍; 周科朝; 刘咏; 黄伯云

    2003-01-01

    The role of self-assembled monolayer in inducing the crystal growth was investigated by X-ray diffractions (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that crystallization in the absence of monolayer results in a mixture of poorly crystallized calcium phosphates, including hydroxyapatite (HAP) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP), while the presence of self-assembled monolayer gives rise to oriented and well crystallized HAP crystals. Moreover, the HAP crystal grows very quickly under the self-assembled monolayer, whereas very little calcium phosphate crystals grow without the monolayer. It is rationalized that the hexadecylamine monolayer with high polarity and charged density leads to increase supersaturation and lower the interfacial energy, which attributes to the HAP crystals nucleation. On the other hand, the positive headgroups construct the ordered "recognized site" with distinct size and topology, which results in the oriented HAP crystals deposit.

  1. Microfluidic Induced Controllable Microdroplets Assembly in Confined Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the microfluidic induced monodispersed microdroplet generation and assembly in confined microchannels. Two and three dimensional close-packed droplet lattices were obtained in microfluidic devices by adjusting the channel geometry, the fluidic flow rates and the monodispersed droplet size. The droplet packing was mainly caused by the volumetric effect and capillarity in confined microchannels. Polymerizable fluids were also investigated to demonstrate the effect of fluidic properties on the microdroplet generation and assembly, which could find interesting applications in the future. This approach would be helpful to fundamentally understand the mechanism of self-assembly process of particles in confined microstructures, and practically be applied in sensing and energy storage devices.

  2. Variations in otolith patterns, sizes and body morphometrics of jack mackerel Trachurus japonicus juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaji, Y; Kishida, M; Watanabe, Y; Kawamura, T; Xie, S; Yamashita, Y; Sassa, C; Tsukamoto, Y

    2010-10-01

    Variations in otolith patterns, sizes and body morphometrics of jack mackerel Trachurus japonicus juveniles were investigated. Under transmitted light, translucent (W(t)) and opaque otoliths (W(o)) were detected in juveniles collected from Wakasa Bay between July 2005 and April 2006, whereas only opaque otoliths (G(o)) were detected in Goto-nada Sea individuals between May and June 2006. Three groups of juveniles were distinguished based on differences in hatch season, otolith size and growth history, and body morphometrics. As T. japonicus has different spawning seasons according to spawning grounds, each group was estimated to hatch in different waters. Juveniles with W(t) otoliths were considered to have stayed in coastal habitat longer, as the hatch area was estimated to be near Wakasa Bay. Juveniles with W(o) and G(o) otoliths appear to recruit to coastal waters at larger size, since their hatch areas were estimated to be far from each collection area. Larger otoliths of W(t) were attributed to otolith accretion after the second growth flexion, which was observed only for W(t) . Standard length of W(t) fish at the second otolith growth flexion was estimated to correspond to recruitment size to coastal rocky reefs in Wakasa Bay. Body morphometrics were correlated with otolith size after removing body size effect, suggesting that morphological variations of T. japonicus juveniles were also associated with the timing of recruitment to coastal habitat.

  3. Precisely Controlled 2D Free-Floating Nanosheets of Amphiphilic Molecules through Frame-Guided Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Zhang, Yiyang; Dong, Yuanchen; Wu, Fen; Wang, Dianming; Xin, Ling; Liu, Dongsheng

    2016-11-01

    2D assembly of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution is a challenging and intriguing topic as it is normally thermodynamically unfavorable. However, through frame-guided assembly strategy and using DNA origami as the frame, monodispersed and shape-defined nanosheets are prepared. As leading hydrophobic groups (LHGs) are anchored on the frames, amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution are guided to assemble in the hydrophobic region. By adjusting the distribution of the LHGs, the size and shape of the assemblies can be controlled precisely.

  4. Rigid Biopolymer Nanocrystal Systems for Controlling Multicomponent Nanoparticle Assembly and Orientation in Thin Film Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jennifer [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-10-31

    We have discovered techniques to synthesize well-defined DN conjugated nanostructures that are stable in a wide variety of conditions needed for DNA mediated assembly. Starting from this, we have shown that DNA can be used to control the assembly and integration of semiconductor nanocrystals into thin film devices that show photovoltaic effects.

  5. Control of extracellular matrix assembly by syndecan-2 proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klass, C M; Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    2000-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and organization is maintained by transmembrane signaling and integrins play major roles. We now show that a second transmembrane component, syndecan-2 heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is pivotal in matrix assembly. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were stably...

  6. Complex shape product tolerance and accuracy control method for virtual assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huiping; Jin, Yuanqiang; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Hai

    2015-02-01

    The simulation of virtual assembly process for engineering design lacks of accuracy in the software of three-dimension CAD at present. Product modeling technology with tolerance, assembly precision preanalysis technique and precision control method are developed. To solve the problem of lack of precision information transmission in CAD, tolerance mathematical model of Small Displacement Torsor (SDT) is presented, which can bring about technology transfer and establishment of digital control function for geometric elements from the definition, description, specification to the actual inspection and evaluation process. Current tolerance optimization design methods for complex shape product are proposed for optimization of machining technology, effective cost control and assembly quality of the products.

  7. Otoliths as recorders of palaeoenvironments: comparison of radiocarbon age and isoleucine epimerization in Pleistocene golden perch `Macquaria ambigua` otoliths from Willandra Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, J.M.; Pritchard, C. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Miller, G.H.; Rosewater, A. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Tuniz, C.; Lawson, E. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Fish otoliths form by the accretion of layers of calcium carbonate and organic-rich material that often form distinctive layers over time scales ranging from days to years. These layers are not resorbed during the life of the fish and have potential to provide data relevant to both the biology of the fish and the environment to which the fish has been exposed. Environmental variability based on otoliths can be estimated through measures of stable oxygen isotopes, trace elements, and the widths of both daily and annual increments. Although otoliths can be dated based on measurement of radiocarbon by accelerator mass spectrometry this method is relatively expensive. An alternative method for dating golden perch otoliths is based on measurements of isoleucine D/L ratios. Miller and Rosewater (1995) demonstrated that golden perch otoliths are near a perfect closed system for racemization and that otoliths have potential of dating surrounding sediments older than 100 ka. Despite the suitability of these structures for racemization measurements, many of collections of Pleistocene otoliths from Willandra Lakes are not appropriate for determination of sample age. Most otoliths sampled in the region have been derived from surface collections, while it is recommended that samples should have been buried at least 1 m during most of their history. Therefore, the majority of existing otolith collections are not appropriate for geochronology or palaeothermometry. Nevertheless, when used in conjunction with radiocarbon dates, racemization data may be of value in assessing the relationship among otoliths in an assemblage. Radiocarbon ages and isoleucine D/L ratios were determined for 30 otoliths collected from Willandra Lakes. The rostrum of each otolith was analysed for D/L ratios and a portion of the posterior of the same otolith was analysed for radiocarbon by accelerator mass spectrometry. Sample weights for both analyses ranged from 14.0 to 25.6 mg. The central portion of the

  8. Dynamic Product Assembly and Inventory Control for Maximum Profit

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider a manufacturing plant that purchases raw materials for product assembly and then sells the final products to customers. There are M types of raw materials and K types of products, and each product uses a certain subset of raw materials for assembly. The plant operates in slotted time, and every slot it makes decisions about re-stocking materials and pricing the existing products in reaction to (possibly time-varying) material costs and consumer demands. We develop a dynamic purchasing and pricing policy that yields time average profit within epsilon of optimality, for any given epsilon>0, with a worst case storage buffer requirement that is O(1/epsilon). The policy can be implemented easily for large M, K, yields fast convergence times, and is robust to non-ergodic system dynamics.

  9. Controlled assembly of magnetic nanoparticles on microbubbles for multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lei; Yang, Fang; Song, Lina; Fang, Kun; Tian, Jilai; Liang, Yijun; Li, Mingxi; Xu, Ning; Chen, Zhongda; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-07-21

    Magnetic microbubbles (MMBs) consisting of microbubbles (MBs) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized for use as novel markers for improving multifunctional biomedical imaging. The MMBs were fabricated by assembling MNPs in different concentrations on the surfaces of MBs. The relationships between the structure, magnetic properties, stability of the MMBs, and their use in magnetic resonance/ultrasound (MR/US) dual imaging applications were determined. The MNPs used were NPs of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS)-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide γ-Fe2O3 (SPIO). SPIO was assembled on the surfaces of polymer MBs using a "surface-coating" approach. An analysis of the underlying mechanism showed that the synergistic effects of covalent coupling, electrostatic adsorption, and aggregation of the MNPs allowed them to be unevenly assembled in large amounts on the surfaces of the MBs. With an increase in the MNP loading amount, the magnetic properties of the MMBs improved significantly; in this way, the shell structure and mechanical properties of the MMBs could be modified. For surface densities ranging from 2.45 × 10(-7) μg per MMB to 8.45 × 10(-7) μg per MMB, in vitro MR/US imaging experiments showed that, with an increase in the number of MNPs on the surfaces of the MBs, the MMBs exhibited better T2 MR imaging contrast, as well as an increase in the US contrast for longer durations. In vivo experiments also showed that, by optimizing the structure of the MMBs, enhanced MR/US dual-modality image signals could be obtained for mouse tumors. Therefore, by adjusting the shell composition of MBs through the assembly of MNPs in different concentrations, MMBs with good magnetic and acoustic properties for MR/US dual-modality imaging contrast agents could be obtained.

  10. Controlled Assembly of Viral Surface Proteins into Biological Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri

    In recent years, therapeutic use of engineered particles on the 1-1,000 nm scale has gained popularity; these nanoparticles have been developed for use in drug delivery, gene therapy, vaccine preparation, and diagnostics. Often, viral proteins are utilized in the design of such species, and outlined here are completed studies on the in vitro assembly of nanoparticles derived from two very different viral systems. The incorporation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein precursor gp160 into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs is discussed as a potential platform for vaccine design; efforts were successful, however yield currently limits the practical application of this approach. The utility of bacteriophage lambda procapsids and virus-like particles in therapeutic nanoparticle design is also outlined, as are efforts toward the structural and thermodynamic characterization of a urea-triggered capsid maturation event. It is demonstrated that lambda virus-like particles can be assembled from purified capsid and scaffolding proteins, and that these particles undergo urea-triggered maturation and in vitro decoration protein addition similar to that seen in lambda procapsids. The studies on lambda provided materials for the further development of nanoparticles potentially useful in a clinical setting, as well as shedding light on critical viral assembly and maturation events as they may take place in vivo.

  11. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Purge Control Pump Assembly Modeling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. Gregory; Hunt, Patrick L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary results from a thermal/flow analysis of the Purge Control Pump Assembly (PCPA) indicate that pump performance (mass flow rate) is enhanced via cooling of the housing and lowering of the inlet vapor quality. Under a nominal operational profile (25% duty cycle or less), at the maximum motor dissipation, it appears that the peristaltic tubing temperature will still remain significantly below the expected UPA condenser temperature (78 F max versus approximately 105 F in the condenser) permitting condensation in the pump head.

  12. Does DNA extraction affect the physical and chemical composition of historical cod (Gadus morhua) otoliths?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Hüssy, Karin

    2010-01-01

    conflicting interests regarding how the limited and irreplaceable otolith collections should be used. To resolve this, it is important to find out whether DNA extraction damages otoliths such that they can no longer be used for other research purposes or whether individual otoliths can be used in multiple...... applications. We examined the effects of three different DNA extraction methods on the elemental composition, the morphology, and the clarity of annual growth increments for successful age estimation of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) otoliths that had been archived for 0–31 years. The three extraction methods...... yielded DNA of comparable quality, and none of the methods caused major damage to the otoliths. Of the element concentrations measured, only Mg and Rb showed considerable changes resulting from DNA extraction. The physical properties of the otolith (morphology and clarity of annual growth increments) were...

  13. Self-assembled nanoparticles of glycol chitosan – Ergocalciferol succinate conjugate, for controlled release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinones, Javier Perez; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Glycol chitosan was linked to vitamin D2 hemisuccinate (ergocalciferol hemisuccinate) for controlled release through water-soluble carbodiimide activation. The resulting conjugate formed self-assembled nanoparticles in aqueous solution with particle size of 279 nm and ergocalciferol hemisuccinate...

  14. Detection of Intermediates And Kinetic Control During Assembly of Bacteriophage P22 Procapsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuma, R.; Tsuruta, H.; French, K.H.; Prevelige, P.

    2009-05-26

    Bacteriophage P22 serves as a model for the assembly and maturation of other icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses. P22 coat and scaffolding proteins assemble in vitro into an icosahedral procapsid, which then expands during DNA packaging (maturation). Efficient in vitro assembly makes this system suitable for design and production of monodisperse spherical nanoparticles (diameter {approx} 50 nm). In this work, we explore the possibility of controlling the outcome of assembly by scaffolding protein engineering. The scaffolding protein exists in monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium. We address the role of monomers and dimers in assembly by using three different scaffolding proteins with altered monomer-dimer equilibrium (weak dimer, covalent dimer, monomer). The progress and outcome of assembly was monitored by time-resolved X-ray scattering, which allowed us to distinguish between closed shells and incomplete assembly intermediates. Binding of scaffolding monomer activates the coat protein for assembly. Excess dimeric scaffolding protein resulted in rapid nucleation and kinetic trapping yielding incomplete shells. Addition of monomeric wild-type scaffold with excess coat protein completed these metastable shells. Thus, the monomeric scaffolding protein plays an essential role in the elongation phase by activating the coat and effectively lowering its critical concentration for assembly.

  15. Docking System Design and Self-Assembly Control of Distributed Swarm Flying Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel docking system design and the distributed self‐assembly control strategy for a Distributed Swarm Flying Robot (DSFR. The DSFR is a swarm robot comprising many identical robot modules that are able to move on the ground, dock with each other and fly coordinately once self‐assembled into a robotic structure. A generalized adjacency matrix method is proposed to describe the configurations of robotic structures. Based on the docking system and the adjacency matrix, experiments are performed to demonstrate and verify the self‐assembly control strategy.

  16. Docking System Design and Self-Assembly Control of Distributed Swarm Flying Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel docking system design and the distributed self-assembly control strategy for a Distributed Swarm Flying Robot (DSFR. The DSFR is a swarm robot comprising many identical robot modules that are able to move on the ground, dock with each other and fly coordinately once self-assembled into a robotic structure. A generalized adjacency matrix method is proposed to describe the configurations of robotic structures. Based on the docking system and the adjacency matrix, experiments are performed to demonstrate and verify the self-assembly control strategy.

  17. Research on Precision Assembly Robot's Joint Torque Control Based on Current Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董高云; 许春山; 费燕琼; 赵锡芳

    2003-01-01

    A set of new current sensing device is used to realize joint torque control based on current measurement in a precision assembly robot's third joint. The output torque's model of the joint's brnshless DC motor is founded. Disturbance factors and the compensated effect of the torque's closed loop based on current measurement are analyzed. Related simulations and experiments show that the system has good current tracking and anti-disturbances performance, which improve the force control performance of the robot in assembly.

  18. Temporal stability of otolith elemental fingerprints discriminates among lagoon nursery habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Tournois, J.; Ferraton, Franck; Velez, Laure; D.J. McKenzie; Aliaume, C.; L. Mercier; Darnaude, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of fish otoliths reflects that of the water masses that they inhabit. Otolith elemental compositions can, therefore, be used as natural tags to discriminate among habitats. However, for retrospective habitat identification to be valid and reliable for any adult, irrespective of its age, significant differences in environmental conditions, and therefore otolith signatures, must be temporally stable within each habitat, otherwise connectivity studies have to be carried ...

  19. Sturgeon and paddlefish (Acipenseridae) sagittal otoliths are composed of the calcium carbonate polymorphs vaterite and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracheil, B M; Chakoumakos, B C; Feygenson, M; Whitledge, G W; Koenigs, R P; Bruch, R M

    2017-02-01

    This study sought to resolve whether sturgeon (Acipenseridae) sagittae (otoliths) contain a non-vaterite fraction and to quantify how large a non-vaterite fraction is using neutron diffraction analysis. This study found that all otoliths examined had a calcite fraction that ranged from 18 ± 6 to 36 ± 3% by mass. This calcite fraction is most probably due to biological variation during otolith formation rather than an artefact of polymorph transformation during preparation.

  20. Controlled loading of building blocks into temporary self-assembled scaffolds for directed assembly of organic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, L Todd; Danila, Delia C; Sharpe, Katie; Durkin, Melissa; Clayton, Benjamin; Anderson, Ben; Richter, Andrew; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2008-10-21

    Using temporary self-assembled scaffolds to preorganize building blocks is a potentially powerful method for the synthesis of organic nanostructures with programmed shapes. We examined the underlying phenomena governing the loading of hydrophobic monomers into lipid bilayer interior and demonstrated successful control of the amount and ratio of loaded monomers. When excess styrene derivatives or acrylates were added to the aqueous solution of unilamellar liposomes made from saturated phospholipids, most loading occurs within the first few hours. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy revealed no evidence of aggregation caused by monomers. Bilayers appeared to have a certain capacity for accommodating monomers. The total volume of loaded monomers is independent of monomer structure. X-ray scattering showed the increase in bilayer thickness consistent with loading monomers into bilayer interior. Loading kinetics is inversely proportional to the hydrophobicity and size of monomers. Loading and extraction kinetic data suggest that crossing the polar heads region is the rate limiting step. Consideration of loading kinetics and multiple equilibria are important for achieving reproducible monomer loading. The total amount of monomers loaded into the bilayer can be controlled by the loading time or length of hydrophobic lipid tails. The ratio of loaded monomers can be varied by changing the ratio of monomers used for loading or by the time-controlled replacement of a preloaded monomer. Understanding and controlling the loading of monomers into bilayers contributes to the directed assembly of organic nanostructures.

  1. Biologically inspired strategy for programmed assembly of viral building blocks with controlled dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Jennifer M; Lee, Jae-Hun; Lee, David H; Yi, Hyunmin

    2013-02-01

    Facile fabrication of building blocks with precisely controlled dimensions is imperative in the development of functional devices and materials. We demonstrate the assembly of nanoscale viral building blocks of controlled lengths using a biologically motivated strategy. To achieve this we exploit the simple self-assembly mechanism of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), whose length is solely governed by the length of its genomic mRNA. We synthesize viral mRNA of desired lengths using simple molecular biology techniques, and in vitro assemble the mRNA with viral coat proteins to yield viral building blocks of controlled lengths. The results indicate that the assembly of the viral building blocks is consistent and reproducible, and can be readily extended to assemble building blocks with genetically modified coat proteins (TMV1cys). Additionally, we confirm the potential utility of the TMV1cys viral building blocks with controlled dimensions via covalent and quantitative conjugation of fluorescent markers. We envision that our biologically inspired assembly strategy to design and construct viral building blocks of controlled dimensions could be employed to fabricate well-controlled nanoarchitectures and hybrid nanomaterials for a wide variety of applications including nanoelectronics and nanocatalysis.

  2. Comparison of vertebrae and otoliths measured directly and from radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens

    1997-01-01

    It is general practice among fish ecologists to use indigestible remains such as vertebrae and otoliths in fish stomachs to determine the nature and size of their prey. However, estimation of the relationship between fish length and vertebrae size is a time consuming process when using vertebrae ...... was established at least 10 times faster using radiographs than when direct measurements were used. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  3. Chemistry to conservation: using otoliths to advance recreational and commercial fisheries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A K; Phelps, Q E; Graeb, B D S

    2017-02-01

    Otolith chemistry is an effective technique for evaluating fish environmental history, but its utility in fisheries management has not been comprehensively examined. Thus, a review of otolith chemistry with emphasis on management applicability is presented. More than 1500 otolith chemistry manuscripts published from 1967 to 2015 are reviewed and descriptive case studies are used to illustrate the utility of otolith chemistry as a fisheries management tool. Otolith chemistry publications span a wide variety of topics (e.g. natal origins, habitat use, movement, stock discrimination and statistical theory) and species in freshwater and marine systems. Despite the broad distribution of manuscripts in a variety of fisheries, environmental and ecological journals, the majority of publications (83%, n = 1264) do not describe implications or applications of otolith chemistry for fisheries management. This information gap is addressed through case studies that illustrate management applications of otolith chemistry. Case studies cover numerous topics (e.g. natal origins, population connectivity, stock enhancement, transgenerational marking, pollution exposure history and invasive species management) in freshwater and marine systems using sport fishes, invasive fishes, endangered fishes and species of commercial and aquaculture importance. Otolith chemistry has diverse implications and applications for fisheries management worldwide. Collaboration among fisheries professionals from academia, government agencies and non-governmental organizations will help bridge the research-management divide and establish otolith chemistry as a fisheries management tool.

  4. Hierarchical structure of the otolith of adult wild carp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhuo; Gao Yonghua [State key laboratory of new ceramics and fine processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State key laboratory of new ceramics and fine processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-04-30

    The otolith of adult wild carp contains a pair of asterisci, a pair of lappilli and a pair of sagittae. Current research works are mainly restricted to the field of the daily ring structure. The purpose of this work is to explore the structural characteristics of carp's otolith in terms of hierarchy from nanometer to millimeter scale by transmission election microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on the observation, carp's lapillus is composed of ordered aragonite crystals. Seven hierarchical levels of the microstructure were proposed and described with the scheme representing a complete organization in detail. SEM studies show not only the clear daily growth increment, but also the morphology within the single daily increment. The domain structure of crystal orientation in otolith was observed for the first time. Furthermore, TEM investigation displays that the lapillus is composed of aragonite crystals with nanometer scale. Four hierarchical levels of the microstructure of the sagitta are also proposed. The asteriscus which is composed of nanometer scale vaterite crystals is considered to have a uniform structure.

  5. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 10(17) cm(-3). Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  6. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 1017 cm‑3. Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  7. Electrochemically controlled self-assembled monolayers characterized with molecular and sub-molecular resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Welinder, Anna Christina; Chi, Qijin

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled organization of functional molecules on solid surfaces has developed into a powerful and sophisticated tool for surface chemistry and nanotechnology. A number of reviews on the topic have been available since the mid 1990s. This perspective article aims to focus on recent development...... in the investigations of electronic structures and assembling dynamics of electrochemically controlled self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiol containing molecules on gold surfaces. A brief introduction is first given and particularly illustrated by a Table summarizing the molecules studied, the surface lattice...

  8. Controlling self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides at high pH using heterocyclic capping groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam D.; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Heu, Celine; Garvey, Christopher J.; Ratcliffe, Julian; Waddington, Lynne J.; Gardiner, James; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-03-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), it is shown that the existence of pre-assembled structures at high pH for a capped diphenylalanine hydrogel is controlled by the selection of N-terminal heterocyclic capping group, namely indole or carbazole. At high pH, changing from a somewhat hydrophilic indole capping group to a more hydrophobic carbazole capping group results in a shift from a high proportion of monomers to self-assembled fibers or wormlike micelles. The presence of these different self-assembled structures at high pH is confirmed through NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

  9. Controlling self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides at high pH using heterocyclic capping groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam D.; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Heu, Celine; Garvey, Christopher J.; Ratcliffe, Julian; Waddington, Lynne J.; Gardiner, James; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), it is shown that the existence of pre-assembled structures at high pH for a capped diphenylalanine hydrogel is controlled by the selection of N-terminal heterocyclic capping group, namely indole or carbazole. At high pH, changing from a somewhat hydrophilic indole capping group to a more hydrophobic carbazole capping group results in a shift from a high proportion of monomers to self-assembled fibers or wormlike micelles. The presence of these different self-assembled structures at high pH is confirmed through NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. PMID:28272523

  10. Provenancing fish in freshwaters of the Alpine Foreland using Sr/Ca and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in otoliths and otolith shape parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Oehm

    2015-12-01

    Although the studied freshwaters were located only in a 50 km range around lake Chiemsee on a similar geological background, differences in water chemistry, fish otolith chemistry and shape were identified. Species specific differences in reflection of the Sr/Ca ratio of a specific water body were detected. Microchemical and morphological otoliths analyses complemented each other and allowed assigning fish to specific groups of waters of origin. This information provides an important basis for the further application of otolith chemistry and shape analysis in the Alpine foreland for a diverse range of ecological questions.

  11. Control over differentiation of a metastable supramolecular assembly in one and two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Tomoya; Kawai, Shinnosuke; Fujinuma, Satoko; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Sugiyasu, Kazunori

    2017-05-01

    Molecular self-assembly under kinetic control is expected to yield nanostructures that are inaccessible through the spontaneous thermodynamic process. Moreover, time-dependent evolution, which is reminiscent of biomolecular systems, may occur under such out-of-equilibrium conditions, allowing the synthesis of supramolecular assemblies with enhanced complexities. Here we report on the capacity of a metastable porphyrin supramolecular assembly to differentiate into nanofibre and nanosheet structures. Mechanistic studies of the relationship between the molecular design and pathway complexity in the self-assembly unveiled the energy landscape that governs the unique kinetic behaviour. Based on this understanding, we could control the differentiation phenomena and achieve both one- and two-dimensional living supramolecular polymerization using an identical monomer. Furthermore, we found that the obtained nanostructures are electronically distinct, which illustrates the pathway-dependent material properties.

  12. Achieving 3-D Nanoparticle Assembly in Nanocomposite Thin Films via Kinetic Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jingyu; Xiao, Yihan; Xu, Ting [UCB

    2017-02-20

    Nanocomposite thin films containing well-ordered nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are ideal candidates for the fabrication of metamaterials. Achieving 3-D assembly of NPs in nanocomposite thin films is thermodynamically challenging as the particle size gets similar to that of a single polymer chain. The entropic penalties of polymeric matrix upon NP incorporation leads to NP aggregation on the film surface or within the defects in the film. Controlling the kinetic pathways of assembly process provides an alternative path forward by arresting the system in nonequilibrium states. Here, we report the thin film 3-D hierarchical assembly of 20 nm NPs in supramolecules with a 30 nm periodicity. By mediating the NP diffusion kinetics in the supramolecular matrix, surface aggregation of NPs was suppressed and NPs coassemble with supramolecules to form new 3-D morphologies in thin films. The present studies opened a viable route to achieve designer functional composite thin films via kinetic control.

  13. Controllable assembly of silver nanoparticles induced by femtosecond laser direct writing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Sen; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Wang, Jian-Nan; Wang, Lei; Xia,Hong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Ding, Hong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We report controllable assembly of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) for patterning of silver microstructures. The assembly is induced by femtosecond laser direct writing (FsLDW). A tightly focused femtosecond laser beam is capable of trapping and driving Ag NPs to form desired micropatterns with a high resolution of ∼190 nm. Taking advantage of the ‘direct writing’ feature, three microelectrodes have been integrated with a microfluidic chip; two silver-based microdevices including a microheater ...

  14. Towards Robust Predictive Fault–Tolerant Control for a Battery Assembly System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seybold Lothar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the modeling and fault-tolerant control of a real battery assembly system which is under implementation at the RAFI GmbH company (one of the leading electronic manufacturing service providers in Germany. To model and control the battery assembly system, a unified max-plus algebra and model predictive control framework is introduced. Subsequently, the control strategy is enhanced with fault-tolerance features that increase the overall performance of the production system being considered. In particular, it enables tolerating (up to some degree mobile robot, processing and transportation faults. The paper discusses also robustness issues, which are inevitable in real production systems. As a result, a novel robust predictive fault-tolerant strategy is developed that is applied to the battery assembly system. The last part of the paper shows illustrative examples, which clearly exhibit the performance of the proposed approach.

  15. Molecular linker-mediated self-assembly of gold nanoparticles: understanding and controlling the dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Abdennour; Kattumenu, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2013-01-08

    This study sheds light on the mechanism and dynamics of self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using molecular linkers such as aminothiols. An experimental model is established that enables a fine control and prediction of both assembly rate and degree. Furthermore, we have found that under certain conditions, the increase in the molar ratio of linker/AuNPs beyond a certain threshold unexpectedly and dramatically slows down the assembly rate by charge reversal of the surface of nanoparticles. As a result, the assembly rate can be easily tuned to reach a maximum growth within seconds to several days. The decrease of the same molar ratio (linker/AuNPs) below a certain value leads to self-termination of the reaction at different phases of the assembly process, thus providing nanoparticles chains of different length. This work introduces new handles for a rational design of novel self-assembled architectures in a very time-effective manner and contributes to the understanding of the effect of the assembly morphology on the optical properties of gold nanoparticles.

  16. Otoliths of five extant species of the annual killifish Nothobranchius from the East African savannah.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Reichenbacher

    Full Text Available This study presents, for the first time, a comprehensive dataset that documents the range of inter- and intraspecific otolith variation in aplocheiloid killifish, based on a total of 86 individuals representing five extant species of Nothobranchius PETERS, 1868, from East Africa: the sympatric pairs N. rubripinnis SEEGERS, 1986 and N. ruudwildekampi COSTA, 2009 (Eastern Tanzania, and N. orthonotus (PETERS, 1844 and N. furzeri JUBB, 1971 (Southern Mozambique, and two isolated populations of N. korthausae MEINKEN, 1973 (Eastern Tanzania. Otolith characters were analysed based on SEM images, and otolith morphometry was conducted using uni- and multivariate statistics. Two ancient clades of probably Early to Middle Miocene age in eastern Tanzania and southern Mozambique can be recognized based on otolith morphologies, which is consistent with previous work based on molecular data. The distinctive sulcus morphologies in the otoliths of sympatric species may be linked to species-specific hearing capabilities, perhaps constituting a case of character displacement in an area of secondary sympatry. The otoliths of the studied species of Nothobranchius are diagnostic at the species level, even in the case of closely related species diagnosable otherwise only by minor differences in coloration. The two populations of N. korthausae also displayed some differences in their otolith characters. The new data may facilitate future recognition of fossil species of Nothobranchius. As no fossil remains of extant aplocheiloid killifishes have yet been described, the discovery of fossil otoliths of Nothobranchius would significantly advance understanding of the evolutionary history of this interesting group of fishes.

  17. Interactions within the yeast t-SNARE Sso1p that control SNARE complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, M; Chen, X; Cocina, A E; Schultz, S M; Hughson, F M

    2000-10-01

    In the eukaryotic secretory and endocytic pathways, transport vesicles shuttle cargo among intracellular organelles and to and from the plasma membrane. Cargo delivery entails fusion of the transport vesicle with its target, a process thought to be mediated by membrane bridging SNARE protein complexes. Temporal and spatial control of intracellular trafficking depends in part on regulating the assembly of these complexes. In vitro, SNARE assembly is inhibited by the closed conformation adopted by the syntaxin family of SNAREs. To visualize this closed conformation directly, the X-ray crystal structure of a yeast syntaxin, Sso1p, has been determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. Mutants designed to destabilize the closed conformation exhibit accelerated rates of SNARE assembly. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of SNARE assembly and its intramolecular and intermolecular regulation.

  18. Persistent otolith dysfunction even after successful repositioning in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui-Joong; Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Yang, Tae-Ho; Yang, Si-Young

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate utricular and saccular function during the acute and resolved phases of BPPV, ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were studied in 112 patients with BPPV and 50 normal controls in a referral-based University Hospital. Ocular (oVEMPs) and cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) were induced using air-conducted sound (1000Hz tone burst, 100dB normal hearing level) at the time of initial diagnosis and 2 months after successful repositioning in patients with BPPV, and the results were compared with those of the controls. Abnormalities of cVEMPs and oVEMPs in patients with BPPV were prevalent and significantly higher compare to the healthy control group (pVEMP by chi-square test). In the patient group, difference between the proportions of abnormal responses of cVEMP and oVEMP was not significant in both affected (p=0.37, chi-squared test) and non-affected (p=1.00) ears. The abnormalities were more likely reduced or absent responses rather than delayed ones; reduced or absent responses are 17.6% in cVEMPs (p=0.04, chi-square) and 21.6% in oVEMPs (pVEMPs after repositioning maneuvers were not significantly different compared to the initial values from both stimulated affected and non-affected ears. Although most patients had unilateral BPPV, bilateral otolithic dysfunction was often shown by persistently reduced or absent cervical and ocular VEMPs, suggesting that BPPV may be caused by significant bilateral damage to the otolith organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial and ontogenetic variability in the chemical composition of juvenile common sole ( Solea solea) otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, S. E.; Vasconcelos, R. P.; Reis-Santos, P.; Cabral, H. N.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    A description of variations in the chemical composition of fish otoliths at different spatial scales and life history stages is a prerequisite for their use as natural tags in fish population connectivity and migration studies. Otolith geochemistry of juvenile common sole ( Solea solea), a marine migrant species collected in six Portuguese estuaries was examined. Elemental ratios (Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Cu:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca, Pb:Ca) were analysed in two zones of the right otolith (corresponding to late larval and juvenile stages) using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (δ 13C and δ 18O) were determined in left otoliths using isotopic ratio monitoring mass spectrometry (irm-MS). Significant differences in otolith geochemical signatures were found among estuaries, among sites within estuaries and between otolith zones. Several elemental ratios (Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Cu:Ca and Sr:Ca) showed consistent patterns between otolith zones and were likely influenced by environmental factors and ontogenetic effects associated with physiological changes during metamorphosis. Assignment of individuals to their collection estuary based on the otolith geochemical signatures was more accurate at the site level (81%) than among estuaries (69%). Site temperature was not correlated with any of the elemental or isotope ratios, but salinity was significantly correlated with Ba:Ca, δ 13C and δ 18O. Observed spatial variations among estuaries and sites within estuaries indicate that geochemical signatures in otoliths are accurate natural tags of estuarine habitat in common sole. Nevertheless, the significant variations observed between otolith zones should be taken into account in the design of population connectivity studies.

  20. Suitability of otolith microchemistry for stock separation of Baltic cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, F; Marohn, L; Hinrichsen, HH

    2012-01-01

    differences between individuals from the eastern and the western Baltic Sea and between North Sea and Baltic Sea samples. Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Y/Ca, Mg/Ca, Zr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios had the strongest discriminatory power. A further separation of individuals caught in 3 different spawning grounds of the eastern Baltic......, however, was not possible. Elemental compositions from the core regions of otoliths from young of the year cod caught in eastern and western Baltic Sea spawning grounds showed significant differences in Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Mg/Ca concentrations. Analyses of similarities again showed significant differences...

  1. Boom in boarfish abundance: insight from otolith analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coad, Julie Olivia; Hüssy, Karin

    2012-01-01

    for this increase in stock size. Based on annual otolith growth increments, we developed a growth chronology as a proxy for stock fecundity. Growth patterns were similar between geographically separate areas west and south of Ireland, with distinct years of good and bad growth. Good growth was observed in 2004...... of fish are only aged 4–6 years. These age classes correspond to the year with exceptionally high recruitment. This study has demonstrated that both adult growth as a proxy for reproductive potential and environmental conditions favouring early life stage survival may be the cause for the boom in boarfish...

  2. The Assemble and Animate Control Framework for Modular Reconfigurable Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David Johan; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Moghadam, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    , a library of common control and adaptation strategies, and a module abstraction layer which allows ASE to be cross-compiled for a number of different modular robotic platforms and easily ported to new platforms. In this paper we describe the design of ASE and present example applications utilizing ASE...

  3. Decant pump assembly and controls qualification testing - test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehr, T.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-02

    This report summarizes the results of the qualification testing of the supernate decant pump and controls system to be used for in-tank sludge washing in aging waste tank AZ-101. The test was successful and all components are qualified for installation and use in the tank.

  4. Measurements of control rod efficiency in RBMK critical assembly upon dropping of the rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhitarev, V. E., E-mail: vejitarev@nnrd.kiae.su; Kachanov, V. M.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.; Lebedev, G. V., E-mail: lgv2004@mail.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly was measured in the case where one manual-control rod (MCR) is dropped from a steady critical state, and several other MCRs were additionally dropped after 44 s. The measured number of neutrons in the assembly during and after dropping of the rods was used to calculate the efficiency values of the rods by solution of the system of point kinetics equations. A series of methods of the initial data treatment for determination of the desired values of reactivity without the calculated corrections were used.

  5. Measurements of control rod efficiency in RBMK critical assembly upon dropping of the rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitarev, V. E.; Kachanov, V. M.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.; Lebedev, G. V.

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly was measured in the case where one manual-control rod (MCR) is dropped from a steady critical state, and several other MCRs were additionally dropped after 44 s. The measured number of neutrons in the assembly during and after dropping of the rods was used to calculate the efficiency values of the rods by solution of the system of point kinetics equations. A series of methods of the initial data treatment for determination of the desired values of reactivity without the calculated corrections were used.

  6. Otolith Dysfunction in Persons With Both Diabetes and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼSilva, Linda J; Staecker, Hinrich; Lin, James; Maddux, Christy; Ferraro, John; Dai, Hongying; Kluding, Patricia M

    2017-03-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a well-recognized complication of type 2 diabetes (DM) that may contribute to increased fall risk. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is higher in people with DM. The impact of DM on the otolith organs of the vestibular system in people with BPPV is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze otolith function using vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests in people with DM and concurrent BPPV (BPPV + DM), and to examine the relationships between VEMP variables and diabetes-related variables. Prospective, cross-sectional study. Tertiary academic medical center. Participants 40 to 65 years were recruited in four groups: controls (n = 20), people with DM (n = 19), BPPV (n = 18), and BPPV + DM (n = 14). Saccule and utricle function were examined using cervical VEMP (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP), respectively. Diabetes-related variables such as HbA1c, duration of diabetes, and presence of sensory impairment due to diabetes were collected. The frequency of abnormal cVEMP responses was higher in the DM (p = 0.005), BPPV (p = 0.003), and BPPV + DM (p <0.001) groups compared with controls. In the participants with diabetes, higher HbA1c levels were correlated with prolonged P1 (p = 0.03) and N1 latencies (p = 0.03). The frequency of abnormal oVEMP responses was not different between groups (p = 0.2). Although BPPV and DM may independently affect utricle and saccule function, they do not seem to have a distinct cumulative effect.

  7. Controlled assemblies of gold nanorods in PVA nanofiber matrix as flexible free-standing SERS substrates by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan-Ling; Lv, Kong-Peng; Cong, Huai-Ping; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-03-12

    Under control: Controlled assemblies of gold nanorods in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofiber matrix with tunable optical properties can be achieved by using electrospinning. The resultant assemblies can be used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This work provides a facile way to control alignment of anisotropic nanostructures in a polymer nanofiber matrix and generates new assemblies with interesting properties.

  8. Defect- and dopant-controlled carbon nanotubes fabricated by self-assembly of graphene nanoribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cun Zhang and Shaohua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations showed that a basal carbon nanotube can activate and guide the fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on its internal surface by self-assembly of edge-unpassivated graphene nanoribbons with defects. Furthermore, the distribution of defects on self-assembled CNTs is controllable. The system temperature and defect fraction are two main factors that influence the success of self-assembly. Due to possible joint flaws formed at the boundaries under a relatively high constant temperature, a technique based on increasing the temperature is adopted. Self-assembly is always successful for graphene nanoribbons with relatively small defect fractions, while it will fail in cases with relatively large ones. Similar to the self-assembly of graphene nanoribbons with defects, graphene nanoribbons with different types of dopants can also be self-assembled into carbon nanotubes. The finding provides a possible fabrication technique not only for carbon nanotubes with metallic or semi-con- ductive properties but also for carbon nanotubes with electromagnetic induction characteristics.

  9. Towards Nano-Materials with Precise Control over Properties via Cluster-Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Meichun; Reber, Arthur; Khanna, Shiv; Ugrinov, Angel; Chaki, Nirmalya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Saavedra, Héctor; Sen, Ayusman; Weiss, Paul

    2010-03-01

    One pathway towards nanomaterials with controllable band gaps is to assemble solids where atomic clusters serve as building blocks, because clusters' electronic structures vary with size, composition, and the charged state. To study the role of architecture in cluster assemblies, we synthesized multiple architectures of As7^3- clusters through controlling the counter-cations. Optical measurements revealed that the band gaps vary from 1.1-2.1 eV, even though the assemblies are constructed from identical cluster building blocks. First principles theoretical studies reveal that the variation is a result of altering the LUMO levels by changing the counter-cations. Additional variation in the gap is found by covalently linking the clusters with species of varying electronegativity to alter the degree of charge transfer. The findings offer a novel protocol for synthesis of nanoassemblies with tunable electronic properties.

  10. Controlling the Self-Assembly of Semiconducting Nanocrystals within Conjugated Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Bryan L.; Urban, Jeff J.; Segalman, Rachel A.

    2010-03-01

    Blends of conjugated polymers and inorganic nanoparticles have been investigated for numerous optoelectronic applications however optimization relies on precise control over the nanoscale morphologies. Here, we show that conjugated rod-coil block copolymers can be designed to self assemble into controllable morphologies with the coil block templating nanocrystal location. We have constructed a model system where nanocrystals are blended with poly(alkoxy-phenylene vinylene-b-2-vinylpyridine) (PPV-b-P2VP), which self assembles into tunable morphologies. Semiconducting nanocrystals reside within the P2VP domain, due to the favorable interactions between P2VP and the nanoparticle surface as well as the exclusionary effects of the liquid crystalline PPV. The placement of the nanoparticles can be tuned by altering domain size, nanocrystal diameter and nanocrystal surface chemistry. These findings are used to develop a comprehensive understanding of the self assembly processes in conjugated rod-coil block copolymer nanocomposites.

  11. Evaluation of the otolith function using c/oVEMPs in patients with Ménière's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Xu, Hui; Wang, Wu-Qing; Zhang, Qing-Quan; Lv, Qiao-Ying; Song, Xi-Cheng

    2016-06-21

    Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (c/oVEMPs) reflect otolith function. Up-to-date, there are no published reports on the systemic evaluation of otolith function in Ménière's Disease (MD) nor are there any reports on the differences in VEMPs between patients with early and late stage MD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in c/oVEMPs between patients with MD and normal controls, as well as between patients with early and late stage MD. Thirty patients with unilateral MD and thirty healthy subjects (as normal controls) were prospectively enrolled. c/oVEMPs using 500 Hz tone-burst stimuli were performed. VEMP tests were repeated 3 times on each subject to ensure reliability and reproducibility of responses. VEMPs were defined as present or absent. Abnormal VEMP was defined by lack of VEMP response. In the control group, abnormal cVEMPs and oVEMPs responses were detected in 6.67 and 3.34 % respectively. In MD patients (20 with early stage MD [ES-MD], 10 with late stage MD [LS-MD]), abnormal cVEMPs and oVEMPs responses were detected in 40 and 16.7 % respectively. More patients with MD showed abnormal responses in c/oVEMPs as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). cVEMPs was more often abnormal as compared to oVEMPs in MD patients (p < 0.05). There was a significant difference in abnormal cVEMP responses between ES-MD patients (25 %) and LS-MD patients (70 %) (p < 0.05). Difference in abnormal oVEMP responses (ES-MD, 5 %; LS-MD, 40 %) was significant (p < 0.05). An increased occurrence of abnormal c/oVEMP recordings appeared in MD patients, possibly as a result of hydrops of the otolith. cVEMPs were more often abnormal in MD patients as compared to oVEMPs, suggesting that saccular dysfunction may be more common than utricular dysfunction. Furthermore, o/cVEMP abnormalities in the LS-MD group were significantly higher than those in the ES-MD group, suggesting the trend that otolith damage is gradually

  12. Cell-Penetrating Cross-β Peptide Assemblies with Controlled Biodegradable Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sanghun; Lee, Mun-Kyung; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2017-01-09

    Although self-assembled peptide nanostructures (SPNs) have shown potential as promising biomaterials, there is a potential problem associated with the extremely slow hydrolysis rate of amide bonds. Here, we report the development of cell-penetrating cross-β SPNs with a controllable biodegradation rate. The designed self-assembling β-sheet peptide incorporating a hydrolyzable ester bond (self-assembling depsipeptide; SADP) can be assembled into bilayer β-sandwich one-dimensional (1D) fibers similarly to conventional β-sheet peptides. The rate of hydrolysis can be controlled by the pH, temperature, and structural characteristics of the ester unit. The 1D fiber of the SADP transforms into vesicle-like 3D structures when the hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptide segment is attached to the SADP segment. Efficient cell internalization of the 3D nanostructures was observed, and we verified the intracellular degradation and disassembly of the biodegradable nanostructures. This study illustrates the potential of biodegradable cross-β SPNs and provides a valuable toolkit that can be used with self-assembling peptides.

  13. Light-activated control of protein channel assembly mediated by membrane mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Findlay, Heather E.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical processes provide versatile triggers of chemical reactions. Here, we use a photoactivated lipid switch to modulate the folding and assembly of a protein channel within a model biological membrane. In contrast to the information rich field of water-soluble protein folding, there is only a limited understanding of the assembly of proteins that are integral to biological membranes. It is however possible to exploit the foreboding hydrophobic lipid environment and control membrane protein folding via lipid bilayer mechanics. Mechanical properties such as lipid chain lateral pressure influence the insertion and folding of proteins in membranes, with different stages of folding having contrasting sensitivities to the bilayer properties. Studies to date have relied on altering bilayer properties through lipid compositional changes made at equilibrium, and thus can only be made before or after folding. We show that light-activation of photoisomerisable di-(5-[[4-(4-butylphenyl)azo]phenoxy]pentyl)phosphate (4-Azo-5P) lipids influences the folding and assembly of the pentameric bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL. The use of a photochemical reaction enables the bilayer properties to be altered during folding, which is unprecedented. This mechanical manipulation during folding, allows for optimisation of different stages of the component insertion, folding and assembly steps within the same lipid system. The photochemical approach offers the potential to control channel assembly when generating synthetic devices that exploit the mechanosensitive protein as a nanovalve.

  14. Shape-Controlled Metal Nanoparticles and Their Assemblies with Optical Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Kawamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanoparticles (NPs possess excellent optical, optoelectronic, and optochemical properties based on their surface plasmon resonance. However, for practical use, the morphology and assembly of metal NPs need to be controlled. Here, we review facile control methods including seed-mediated growth accompanied with a comproportionation reaction of seeds to control their morphology and assembly. Several synthetic conditions have been modified to precisely control the morphology of metal NPs. Functionalized mesoporous oxides have also been used as hard templates to align metal nanorods and control their dimensions. The high performance of such metal nanorods in surface-enhanced Raman scattering, polarization of light, and photocatalysis has been measured, and the reasons for their high performance are discussed.

  15. Evolving systems: Control and stability inheritance in self-assembling structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the autonomous self-assembly of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. We introduce Evolving Systems and explore the essential topics of the control and stability properties for such systems. The Evolving Systems framework developed in this thesis provides a scalable, modular architecture to model and analyze the subsystem components, their connections to other components, and the Evolved System. Autonomous assembly of large, complex structures in space is one application of Evolving Systems. Future space missions will entail systems where the scale, complexity, and distance preclude astronaut assistance due to the inherent risks and costs. These considerations suggest the need for a framework and methods to advance the state of the art of autonomous assembly of complex systems. A critical requirement for autonomously assembled structures is that they remain stable during and after mating. The important topic of stability in Evolving Systems is the primary focus of this research. We introduce the key component controller design approach to maintain stability in Evolving Systems. One key component from the Evolving System is augmented with additional local control to achieve the goal of ensuring system stability during assembly. The other components of the Evolving System are left unchanged, enabling modular system design and reuse of components. We present simulation results demonstrating the successful use of these methods to maintain stability in illustrative examples. Aerospace systems are difficult and costly to model, due to their complexity and their uncertain operating environments. The adaptive key component controller we present is well suited to poorly modeled systems because its gains adapt to the sensed system outputs. We develop an impedance-admittance formulation of the contact dynamics between components of an Evolving System to obtain

  16. A self-assembling polymer-bound rotaxane under thermodynamic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Ken D; Bampos, Nick; Sanders, Jeremy K M; Gunter, Maxwell J

    2003-06-21

    The thermodynamically controlled self-assembly of a neutral donor-acceptor rotaxane, stoppered via porphyrin coordination and bound to polystyrene beads is described, and the dynamic equilibrium between solid and solution phases has been examined by HR MAS nmr spectroscopy.

  17. Peg-in-Hole assembly using Impedance Control with a 6 DOF Robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, Jan F.; Tiernego, Martin L.J.; Bruzzone, Augostino G.; Kerckhoffs, Eugene J.H.

    1996-01-01

    To gain insight in problems of industrial assembly operations, an anthropomorphic robot equipped with a vision system was used to insert differently shaped pegs into corresponding holes of a plastic ball. Spatial impedance control was used, to properly deal with the interaction between robot and env

  18. Guidance Navigation and Control for Autonomous Multiple Spacecraft Assembly: Analysis and Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Bevilacqua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces theoretical developments and experimental verification for Guidance, Navigation, and Control of autonomous multiple spacecraft assembly. We here address the in-plane orbital assembly case, where two translational and one rotational degrees of freedom are considered. Each spacecraft involved in the assembly is both chaser and target at the same time. The guidance and control strategies are LQR-based, designed to take into account the evolving shape and mass properties of the assembling spacecraft. Each spacecraft runs symmetric algorithms. The relative navigation is based on augmenting the target's state vector by introducing, as extra state components, the target's control inputs. By using the proposed navigation method, a chaser spacecraft can estimate the relative position, the attitude and the control inputs of a target spacecraft, flying in its proximity. The proposed approaches are successfully validated via hardware-in-the-loop experimentation, using four autonomous three-degree-of-freedom robotic spacecraft simulators, floating on a flat floor.

  19. Controlled, bio-inspired self-assembly of cellulose-based chiral reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumanli, Ahu Gumrah; Kamita, Gen; Landman, Jasper; van der Kooij, Hanne; Glover, Beverley J.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly process of photonic structures made of cellulose nanocrystals is studied in detail by locally monitoring and controlling water evaporation. Three different stages during the evaporation process are identified. Spectroscopy quantifies the amount of disorder in the fabricated samples

  20. A pH-regulated quality control cycle for surveillance of secretory protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavassori, Stefano; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Caserta, Imma R; Fagioli, Claudio; Mossuto, Maria F; Fornili, Arianna; van Anken, Eelco; Degano, Massimo; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2013-06-27

    To warrant the quality of the secretory proteome, stringent control systems operate at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi interface, preventing the release of nonnative products. Incompletely assembled oligomeric proteins that are deemed correctly folded must rely on additional quality control mechanisms dedicated to proper assembly. Here we unveil how ERp44 cycles between cisGolgi and ER in a pH-regulated manner, patrolling assembly of disulfide-linked oligomers such as IgM and adiponectin. At neutral, ER-equivalent pH, the ERp44 carboxy-terminal tail occludes the substrate-binding site. At the lower pH of the cisGolgi, conformational rearrangements of this peptide, likely involving protonation of ERp44's active cysteine, simultaneously unmask the substrate binding site and -RDEL motif, allowing capture of orphan secretory protein subunits and ER retrieval via KDEL receptors. The ERp44 assembly control cycle couples secretion fidelity and efficiency downstream of the calnexin/calreticulin and BiP-dependent quality control cycles.

  1. Chemical composition of saccular endolymph and otolith in fish inner ear: lack of spatial uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, P; Edeyer, A; de Pontual, H; Borelli, G; Boeuf, G; Mayer-Gostan, N

    1999-07-01

    Fish otoliths provide a record of age, growth, and environmental influences. In both trout and turbot, spatial chemical investigation of the endolymph surrounding the otolith (sagitta) showed a lack of uniformity. Proteins, PO(3-)(4), and Mg(2+) were significantly more concentrated in the proximal (facing the macula) than distal zone, whereas the opposite was observed for K(+) and total CO(2) (totCO(2)). Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]) was 20% higher in the proximal zone in trout but not in turbot. Total Ca and Cl(-) contents were uniformly distributed in both species. We propose that the endolymphatic gradients of protein and totCO(2) concentration within the endolymph are involved in the otolithic biocalcification process. Microchemical analyses of otolith sections by wavelength dispersive spectrometry showed a lack of spatial uniformity in the K/Ca and Na/Ca ratios, whereas the Sr/Ca ratio was uniform. There is a clear relationship between endolymph and otolith [K(+)], but the interpretation of the results for [Na(+)] needs further investigation. Thus the lack of uniformity in the otolith composition must be taken into account when investigating otolith microchemistry.

  2. Inter-population differences in otolith morphology are genetically encoded in the killifish Aphanius fasciatus (Cyprinodontiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Annabi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inter-population differences in otolith shape, morphology and chemistry have been used effectively as indicators for stock assessment or for recognizing environmental adaptation in fishes. However, the precise parameters that affect otolith morphology remain incompletely understood. Here we provide the first direct support for the hypothesis that inter-population differences in otolith morphology are genetically encoded. The study is based on otolith morphology and two mitochondrial markers (D-loop, 16S rRNA of three natural populations of Aphanius fasciatus (Teleostei: Cyprinodontidae from Southeast Tunisia. Otolith and genetic data yielded congruent tree topologies. Divergence of populations likely results from isolation events in the course of the Pleistocene sea level drops. We propose that otolith morphology is a valuable tool for resolving genetic diversity also within other teleost species, which may be important for ecosystem management and conservation of genetic diversity. As reconstructions of ancient teleost fish faunas are often solely based on fossil otoliths, our discoveries may also lead to a new approach to research in palaeontology.

  3. "Controlling ourselves, by ourselves": risk assemblages on Malaysia's assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, the Malaysian government has identified factories as high risk for HIV and AIDS. Signaling epidemiological concerns over the rising rates of HIV among factory workers, a significant proportion of whom are women, the label also appeared to reconstitute stereotypes of factory women as dangerously sexual and of factories as immoral spaces. Drawing on ethnographic research in the export processing zones of Penang, Malaysia in the mid-1990s, I examine the meanings and experiences of HIV risk among factory women themselves. Data were analyzed using discourse and grounded theory methods, the former to identify women's multiple modes of rationalizing HIV risks, and the latter to theorize the sources and significance of women's HIV risk assemblages. The heuristic of assemblages as localized knowledge spaces helped to show that biomedical and socioreligious risk lexica operated not as fixed epistemological categories but as situational resources in women's risk scripts. Overall, women desired multiple risk knowledges to help them "control themselves by themselves," a project of reflexive self-shaping mediated by the diverse and discordant discourses of gender, ethnicity, and modernity in Malaysia that shaped how HIV risks were engendered and experienced.

  4. DNA as a Powerful Tool for Morphology Control, Spatial Positioning, and Dynamic Assembly of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Several properties of nanomaterials, such as morphologies (e.g., shapes and surface structures) and distance dependent properties (e.g., plasmonic and quantum confinement effects), make nanomaterials uniquely qualified as potential choices for future applications from catalysis to biomedicine. To realize the full potential of these nanomaterials, it is important to demonstrate fine control of the morphology of individual nanoparticles, as well as precise spatial control of the position, orientation, and distances between multiple nanoparticles. In addition, dynamic control of nanomaterial assembly in response to multiple stimuli, with minimal or no error, and the reversibility of the assemblies are also required. In this Account, we summarize recent progress of using DNA as a powerful programmable tool to realize the above goals. First, inspired by the discovery of genetic codes in biology, we have discovered DNA sequence combinations to control different morphologies of nanoparticles during their growth process and have shown that these effects are synergistic or competitive, depending on the sequence combination. The DNA, which guides the growth of the nanomaterial, is stable and retains its biorecognition ability. Second, by taking advantage of different reactivities of phosphorothioate and phosphodiester backbone, we have placed phosphorothioate at selective positions on different DNA nanostructures including DNA tetrahedrons. Bifunctional linkers have been used to conjugate phosphorothioate on one end and bind nanoparticles or proteins on the other end. In doing so, precise control of distances between two or more nanoparticles or proteins with nanometer resolution can be achieved. Furthermore, by developing facile methods to functionalize two hemispheres of Janus nanoparticles with two different DNA sequences regioselectively, we have demonstrated directional control of nanomaterial assembly, where DNA strands with specific hybridization serve as

  5. An evaluation of agreement between pectoral spines and otoliths for estimating ages of catfishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J.A.; Schramm, Harold; Gerard, Patrick D.; Irwin, E.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths have been shown to provide more accurate ages than pectoral spine sections for several catfish populations; but sampling otoliths requires euthanizing the specimen, whereas spines can be sampled non-lethally. To evaluate whether, and under what conditions, spines provide the same or similar age estimates as otoliths, we examined data sets of individual fish aged from pectoral spines and otoliths for six blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus populations (n=420), 14 channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus populations (n=997), and 10 flathead catfish Pylodictus olivaris populations (n=947) from lotic and lentic waters throughout the central and eastern U.S. Logistic regression determined that agreement between ages estimated from otoliths and spines was consistently related to age, but inconsistently related to growth rate. When modeled at mean growth rate, we found at least 80% probability of no difference in spine- and otolith-assigned ages up to ages 4 and 5 for blue and channel catfish, respectively. For flathead catfish, an 80% probability of agreement between spine- and otolith-assigned ages did not occur at any age due to high incidence of differences in assigned ages even for age-1 fish. Logistic regression models predicted at least 80% probability that spine and otolith ages differed by ≤1 year up to ages 13, 16, and 9 for blue, channel, and flathead catfish, respectively. Age-bias assessment found mean spine-assigned age differed by less than 1 year from otolith-assigned age up to ages 19, 9, and 17 for blue catfish, channel catfish, and flathead catfish, respectively. These results can be used to help guide decisions about which structure is most appropriate for estimating catfish ages for particular populations and management objectives.

  6. Performance Testing of a Russian Mir Space Station Trace Contaminant Control Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, R. E.; Perry, J. L.; Abramov, L. H.

    1997-01-01

    A filter assembly which is incorporated into the Russian Trace Contaminant Control Assembly was tested for removal of airborne trace chemical contaminants in a closed loop 9 m(exp 3) system. Given contaminant loading rates and maximum allowable atmospheric concentrations, the Russian system was able to maintain system air concentrations below maximum allowable limits. This was achieved for both a new filter system and for a system where a part of it was pre-loaded to emulate 3 years of system age.

  7. A bioenergetic approach to model and reconstruct individual life traits from fish otoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; Høie, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm‐following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history, and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosy...... observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  8. A bioenergetic approach to model and reconstruct individual life traits from fish otoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; Høie, Hans;

    2012-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm‐following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history, and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosy...... observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  9. Controlling Self-Assembly of Engineered Peptides on Graphite by Rational Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Christopher R.; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yazici, Hilal; Gresswell, Carolyn; Khatayevich, Dmitriy; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins on surfaces is utilized in many fields to integrate intricate biological structures and diverse functions with engineered materials. Controlling proteins at bio-solid interfaces relies on establishing key correlations between their primary sequences and resulting spatial organizations on substrates. Protein self-assembly, however, remains an engineering challenge. As a novel approach, we demonstrate here that short dodecapeptides selected by phage display are capable of self-assembly on graphite and form long-range ordered biomolecular nanostructures. Using atomic force microscopy and contact angle studies, we identify three amino-acid domains along the primary sequence that steer peptide ordering and lead to nanostructures with uniformly displayed residues. The peptides are further engineered via simple mutations to control fundamental interfacial processes, including initial binding, surface aggregation and growth kinetics, and intermolecular interactions. Tailoring short peptides via their primary sequence offers versatile control over molecular self-assembly, resulting in well-defined surface properties essential in building engineered, chemically rich, bio-solid interfaces. PMID:22233341

  10. Sequential Block Copolymer Self-Assemblies Controlled by Metal-Ligand Stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liyuan; Wu, Hongwei; Zhu, Mingjie; Zou, Qi; Yan, Qiang; Zhu, Liangliang

    2016-06-28

    While numerous efforts have been devoted to developing easy-to-use probes based on block copolymers for detecting analytes due to their advantages in the fields of self-assembly and sensing, a progressive response on block copolymers in response to a continuing chemical event is not readily achievable. Herein, we report the self-assembly of a 4-piperazinyl-1,8-naphthalimide based functional block copolymer (PS-b-PN), whose self-assembly and photophysics can be controlled by the stoichiometry-dependent metal-ligand interaction upon the side chain. The work takes advantages of (1) stoichiometry-controlled coordination-structural transformation of the piperazinyl moiety on PS-b-PN toward Fe(3+) ions, thereby resulting in a shrinkage-expansion conversion of the self-assembled nanostructures in solution as well as in thin film, and (2) stoichiometry-controlled competition between photoinduced electron transfer and spin-orbital coupling process upon naphthalimide fluorophore leading to a boost-decline emission change of the system. Except Fe(3+) ions, such a stoichiometry-dependent returnable property cannot be observed in the presence of other transition ions. The strategy for realizing the dual-channel sequential response on the basis of the progressively alterable nanomorphologies and emissions might provide deeper insights for the further development of advanced polymeric sensors.

  11. Terminal groups control self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelakowski, M.; Kita-Tokarczyk, K.

    2016-03-01

    The terminal groups of amphiphilic block copolymers are shown to control macromolecular self-assembly in aqueous solutions, in the micellar/lamellar region of the phase diagram. At the same concentration and using the same self-assembly conditions, dramatic differences are observed in polymer hydration and the resulting nano-/microstructure for two series of polymers with identical block chemistry and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). This suggests a strong contribution from end groups to the hydration as the initial step of the self-assembly process, and could be conveniently used to guide the particle morphology and size. Additionally, for polymers with those head groups which drive vesicular structures, differences in membrane organization affect their physical properties, such as permeability.The terminal groups of amphiphilic block copolymers are shown to control macromolecular self-assembly in aqueous solutions, in the micellar/lamellar region of the phase diagram. At the same concentration and using the same self-assembly conditions, dramatic differences are observed in polymer hydration and the resulting nano-/microstructure for two series of polymers with identical block chemistry and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). This suggests a strong contribution from end groups to the hydration as the initial step of the self-assembly process, and could be conveniently used to guide the particle morphology and size. Additionally, for polymers with those head groups which drive vesicular structures, differences in membrane organization affect their physical properties, such as permeability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: Particle diameters for hydrated NH2-ABA-NH2 polymers with different degrees of functionalization; Fig. S2: TEM characterization of compound micelles from BA-OH polymer after extrusion; Fig. S3: Cryo-TEM and stopped flow characterization of lipid vesicles; Fig. S4 and S5: NMR spectra for ABA and BA polymers

  12. Numerical Analysis on the Free Fall Motion of the Control Rod Assembly for the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se-Hong; Choi, Choengryul; Son, Sung-Man [ELSOLTEC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Yong; Yoon, Kyung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    On receiving the scram signal, the control rod assemblies are released to fall into the reactor core by its weight. Thus drop time and falling velocity of the control rod assembly must be estimated for the safety evaluation. However, because of its complex shape, it is difficult to estimate the drop time by theoretical method. In this study, numerical analysis has been carried out in order to estimate drop time and falling velocity of the control rod assembly to provide the underlying data for the design optimization. Numerical analysis has been carried out to estimate the drop time and falling velocity of the control rod assembly for sodium-cooled fast reactor. Before performing the numerical analysis for the control rod assembly, sphere dropping experiment has been carried out for verification of the CFD methodology. The result of the numerical analysis for the method verification is almost same as the result of the experiment. Falling velocity and drag force increase rapidly in the beginning. And then it goes to the stable state. When the piston head of the control rod assembly is inserted into the damper, the drag force increases instantaneously and the falling velocity decreases quickly. The falling velocity is reduced about 14 % by damper. The total drop time of the control rod assembly is about 1.47s. In the next study, the experiment for the control rod assembly will be carried out, and its result is going to be compared with the CFD analysis result.

  13. Co-assembly, spatiotemporal control and morphogenesis of a hybrid protein-peptide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inostroza-Brito, Karla E.; Collin, Estelle; Siton-Mendelson, Orit; Smith, Katherine H.; Monge-Marcet, Amàlia; Ferreira, Daniela S.; Rodríguez, Raúl Pérez; Alonso, Matilde; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Reis, Rui L.; Sagués, Francesc; Botto, Lorenzo; Bitton, Ronit; Azevedo, Helena S.; Mata, Alvaro

    2015-11-01

    Controlling molecular interactions between bioinspired molecules can enable the development of new materials with higher complexity and innovative properties. Here we report on a dynamic system that emerges from the conformational modification of an elastin-like protein by peptide amphiphiles and with the capacity to access, and be maintained in, non-equilibrium for substantial periods of time. The system enables the formation of a robust membrane that displays controlled assembly and disassembly capabilities, adhesion and sealing to surfaces, self-healing and the capability to undergo morphogenesis into tubular structures with high spatiotemporal control. We use advanced microscopy along with turbidity and spectroscopic measurements to investigate the mechanism of assembly and its relation to the distinctive membrane architecture and the resulting dynamic properties. Using cell-culture experiments with endothelial and adipose-derived stem cells, we demonstrate the potential of this system to generate complex bioactive scaffolds for applications such as tissue engineering.

  14. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic electronic components into sparse arrays with controlled orientation using diamagnetic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachenko, Anton, E-mail: tkacha@rpi.edu; Lu, James J.-Q.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a directed self-assembly (DSA) approach for assembling small electronic components, such as semiconductor dies, into sparse 2D arrays using diamagnetic levitation. The dies attached to a diamagnetic layer can be levitated at a room temperature over a stage made of magnets arranged in a checkerboard pattern. By selecting a proper die design, levitation height, and vibration pattern of the magnetic stage we assemble the dies into a regular 2D array with a specific lateral and vertical orientation of the dies. The assembled dies are transferred to a receiving substrate using capillary force. - Highlights: • Self-assembly of semiconductor dies into arrays using diamagnetic levitation. • Control over the die orientation in vertical and lateral dimensions. • Simulation shows good scalability of assembly time with the number of dies. • Suitable for assembly of LED panels, displays and microcell photovoltaics.

  15. Electrochemically controlled assembly and logic gates operations of gold nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasconi, Marco; Mazzei, Franco

    2012-02-14

    The reversible assembly of β-cyclodextrin-functionalized gold NPs (β-CD Au NPs) is studied on mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM), formed by coadsorption of redox-active ferrocenylalkylthiols and n-alkanethiols on gold surfaces. The surface coverage and spatial distribution of the β-CD Au NPs monolayer on the gold substrate are tuned by the self-assembled monolayer composition. The binding and release of β-CD Au NPs to and from the SAMs modified surface are followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. The redox state of the tethered ferrocene in binary SAMs controls the formation of the supramolecular interaction between ferrocene moieties and β-CD-capped Au NPs. As a result, the potential-induced uptake and release of β-CD Au NPs to and from the surface is accomplished. The competitive binding of β-CD Au NPs with guest molecules in solution shifted the equilibrium of the complexation-decomplexation process involving the supramolecular interaction with the Fc-functionalized surface. The dual controlled assembly of β-CD Au NPs on the surface enabled to use two stimuli as inputs for logic gate activation; the coupling between the localized surface plasmon, associated with the Au NP, and the surface plasmon wave, associated with the thin metal surface, is implemented as readout signal for "AND" logic gate operations.

  16. Quality control of FWC during assembly and commissioning in SST-1 Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh; Santra, Prosenjit; Parekh, Tejas; Biswas, Prabal; Jayswal, Snehal; Chauhan, Pradeep; Paravastu, Yuvakiran; George, Siju; Semwal, Pratibha; Thankey, Prashant; Ramesh, Gattu; Prakash, Arun; Dhanani, Kalpesh; Raval, D. C.; Khan, Ziauddin; Pradhan, Subrata

    2017-04-01

    First Wall Components (FWC) of SST-1 tokamak, which are in the immediate vicinity of plasma, comprises of limiters, divertors, baffles, passive stabilizers designed to operate long duration (∼1000 s) discharges of elongated plasma. All FWC consist of copper alloy heat sink modules with SS cooling tubes brazed onto it, graphite tiles acting as armour material facing the plasma, and are mounted to the vacuum vessels with suitable Inconel support structures at inter-connected ring & port locations. The FWC are very recently assembled and commissioned successfully inside the vacuum vessel of SST-1 undergoing a rigorous quality control and checks at every stage of the assembly process. This paper will present the quality control aspects and checks of FWC from commencement of assembly procedure, namely material test reports, leak testing of high temperature baked components, assembled dimensional tolerances, leak testing of all welded joints, graphite tile tightening torques, electrical continuity and electrical isolation of passive stabilizers from vacuum vessel, baking and cooling hydraulic connections inside vacuum vessel.

  17. Otolith atlas for the western Mediterranean, north and central eastern Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Tuset

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The sagittal otolith of 348 species, belonging to 99 families and 22 orders of marine Teleostean fishes from the north and central eastern Atlantic and western Mediterranean were described using morphological and morphometric characters. The morphological descriptions were based on the otolith shape, outline and sulcus acusticus features. The morphometric parameters determined were otolith length (OL, mm, height (OH, mm, perimeter (P; mm and area (A; mm2 and were expressed in terms of shape indices as circularity (P2/A, rectangularity (A/(OL×OH, aspect ratio (OH/OL; % and OL/fish size. The present Atlas provides information that complements the characterization of some ichthyologic taxa. In addition, it constitutes an important instrument for species identification using sagittal otoliths collected in fossiliferous layers, in archaeological sites or in feeding remains of bony fish predators.

  18. Thyroid hormone-responsive genes mediate otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K; Schreiber, A M

    2011-01-01

    Flatfish begin life as up-right swimming, bilaterally symmetrical larvae that metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles that swim with a highly lateralized posture. We have previously shown that TH induces abrupt growth and mineralization of one component of the vestibular system, the otoliths, during early larval development and metamorphosis. Here we report that four of five vestibular-specific genes that we tested (alpha-tectorin, otogelin, otolith matrix protein, and otopetrins 1 and 2 that are known to be associated with otolith development in other vertebrates are up-regulated 1.5- to 7-fold in larval flatfish during spontaneous metamorphosis and/or following 72 h of TH treatment. These findings suggest that otolith growth and development are mediated by diverse TH-responsive genes during flatfish metamorphosis.

  19. Off-vertical axis rotation: a test of the otolith-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, J. M.; Schor, R. H.; Schumann, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex was studied via off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark. The axis of the turntable could be tilted from vertical by up to 30 degrees. Eye movements were measured with electro-oculography. Results from healthy asymptomatic subjects indicated that 1) a reliable otolith-induced response could be obtained during constant velocity OVAR using a velocity of 60 degrees/s with a tilt of 30 degrees; 2) constant velocity OVAR rotation was nausea-producing and, especially if subjects were rotated in the dark about an earth-vertical axis prior to being tilted, disorienting; and 3) sinusoidal OVAR produced minimal nausea; the eye movement response appeared to be the result of a combination of semicircular canal and otolith components. We conclude that OVAR has the potential of becoming a useful method for clinically assessing both the otolith-ocular reflex and semicircular canal-otolith interaction.

  20. Strontium content in otoliths of common fish species in the northern Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, J-O.; Heselius, S-J. [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Himberg, M.; Hagerstand, H. [Cell Biology, Department of Biosciences, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Harju, L. [Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Engineering, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Lindroos, A. [Geology and Mineralogy, Department of Natural Sciences, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Gunnelius, K.; Smâtt, J-H. [Physical Chemistry, Department of Natural Sciences, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The salinity of water in the northern Baltic Sea forms a gradient as it receives fresh water from several large rivers in the north and salty water by infrequent inflows of North Sea water in the south. The salinity of brackish water in the north-south direction (700 km) changes from about 3 to 7%. In an attempt to use the salinity gradient to study migration patterns, sagittae otoliths were collected from common fish species caught at different locations along the Finnish west coast. Otoliths from fishes caught in fresh-water lakes in Finland and Estonia were also included in the study for comparison. Part of the otoliths was grind and the powder was pressed to pellets which were irradiated in air with an ion beam from the Abo Akademi cyclotron and the emitted X-rays were measured. Other otoliths were embedded in epoxy and polished to reveal the ring structure. These prepared otoliths were irradiated with the ion beam to determine elemental profiles. Furthermore, XRD was applied to study the crystal structure and to identify the minerals in the otoliths. The strontium level of water is usually related to its salinity, and as the strontium ions are able to replace calcium ions in fish otoliths [1], the strontium content in fish otoliths from the same locations is expected to be very similar. However, the PIXE analyses revealed large differences in the strontium content between otoliths from different species of fish caught at the same locations. The strontium concentration in otoliths of perch and pike from the Aland Islands was about 1600 μg/g and of common whitefish 3600 μg/g. The strontium concentration in perch otoliths from the Oravais archipelago, about 400 km north of the Aland Islands, was 1400 μg/g. Corresponding concentration in otoliths of perch and pike caught in fresh-water lakes was 200 μg/g and of common whitefish from Saadjarve 400 μg/g and from Lake Inari 1000 μg/g. Otoliths of perch contained no detectable amounts of zinc (Iower

  1. Growth characteristics and Otolith analysis on Age-0 American Shad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Sally T.; Wetzel, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Otolith microstructure analysis provides useful information on the growth history of fish (Campana and Jones 1992, Bang and Gronkjaer 2005). Microstructure analysis can be used to construct the size-at-age growth trajectory of fish, determine daily growth rates, and estimate hatch date and other ecologically important life history events (Campana and Jones 1992, Tonkin et al. 2008). This kind of information can be incorporated into bioenergetics modeling, providing necessary data for estimating prey consumption, and guiding the development of empirically-based modeling scenarios for hypothesis testing. For example, age-0 American shad co-occur with emigrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon originating from Hanford Reach and the Snake River in the lower Columbia River reservoirs during the summer and early fall. The diet of age-0 American shad appears to overlap with that of juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Chapter 1, this report), but juvenile fall Chinook salmon are also known to feed on age-0 American shad in the reservoirs (USGS unpublished data). Abundant, energy-dense age-0 American shad may provide juvenile fall Chinook salmon opportunities for rapid growth during the time period when large numbers of age-0 American shad are available. Otolith analysis of hatch dates and the growth curve of age-0 American shad could be used to identify when eggs, larvae, and juveniles of specific size classes are temporally available as food for fall Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River reservoirs. This kind of temporally and spatially explicit life history information is important to include in bioenergetics modeling scenarios. Quantitative estimates of prey consumption could be used with spatially-explicit estimates of prey abundance to construct a quantitative assessment of the age-0 American shad impact on a reservoir food web.

  2. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  3. Neuronal feedback between brain and inner ear for growth of otoliths in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Edelmann, E.; Rahmann, H.

    Previous investigations revealed that fish inner ear otolith growth (concerning otolith size and calcium-incorporation) depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In search for the regulating unit, the vestibular nerve was unilaterally transected in neonate swordtail fish ( Xiphophorus helleri) which were subsequently incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone. Calcium incorporation ceased on the transected head sides, indicating that calcium uptake is neurally regulated.

  4. Physiology of Developing Gravity Receptors and Otolith-Ocular Reflexes in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal had the long-term objective of examining the effects of microgravity on the physiology of the adult and developing mammalian gravity receptors. The grant outlined three-years of ground-based studies to examine. 1) the physiologic responses or otolith afferents in the adult rat and during postnatal development, and 2) the otolith organ contributions to the vertical vestibulo-ocular (VOR) and postural reflexes.

  5. The potential dysfunction of otolith organs in patients after mumps infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yu-juan; Yu, Jing; Wu, Yong-Zhen; Tian, Liang; Han, Zhao; Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-lu

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between mumps and the extent of hearing impairment and otolith organ damage. Methods A total of 27 patients with unilateral hearing impairment following mumps were enrolled. The degrees of hearing loss and otolith organ damage were confirmed by audiometric and vestibular evoked myogenic potential [VEMP] tests. All the results were compared and analyzed using Stata 13.0 software for Windows. Results The VEMP thresholds of the affected ears were signifi...

  6. Documenting utility of paddlefish otoliths for quantification of metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Schaffler, James J.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE The otoliths of the inner ear of fishes record the environment of their surrounding water throughout their life. For paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), otoliths have not been routinely used by scientists since their detriments were outlined in the early 1940s. We sought to determine if paddlefish otoliths were useful for resolving elemental information contained within. METHODS Adult paddlefish were collected from two wild, self-sustaining populations in Oklahoma reservoirs in the Arkansas River basin. Juveniles were obtained from a hatchery in the Red River basin of Oklahoma. Otoliths were removed and laser ablation, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to quantify eight elements (Li, Mg, Mn, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and Pb) along the core and edge portions, which were analyzed for differences between otolith regions and among paddlefish sources. RESULTS Differences were found among samples for six of the eight elements examined. Otoliths from Red River basin paddlefish born in a hatchery had significantly lower amounts of Mg and Mn, but higher levels of Rb than otoliths from wild paddlefish in the Arkansas River basin. Concentrations of Y, Sr, and Ba were reduced on the edges of adult paddlefish from both reservoirs compared with the cores. CONCLUSIONS This research shows the utility of using an ICP-MS analysis of paddlefish otoliths. Future research that seeks to determine sources of paddlefish production, such as which reservoir tributaries are most important for reproduction or what proportion of the population is composed of wild versus hatchery-produced individuals, appears promising. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. The dynamics of signal amplification by macromolecular assemblies for the control of chromosome segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semin eLee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The control of chromosome segregation relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, a complex regulatory system that ensures the high fidelity of chromosome segregation in higher organisms by delaying the onset of anaphase until each chromosome is properly bi-oriented on the mitotic spindle. Central to this process is the establishment of multiple yet specific protein-protein interactions in a narrow time-space window. Here we discuss the highly dynamic nature of multi-protein complexes that control chromosome segregation in which an intricate network of weak but cooperative interactions modulate signal amplification to ensure a proper SAC response. We also discuss the current structural understanding of the communication between the SAC and the kinetochore; how transient interactions can regulate the assembly and disassembly of the SAC as well as the challenges and opportunities for the definition and the manipulation of the flow of information in SAC signaling.

  8. Controlling the Self-Assembly of Inorganic Nanoparticles within Conjugated Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Bryan; Segalman, Rachel

    2011-03-01

    Blends of conjugated polymers and inorganic nanoparticles have been investigated for numerous applications however optimization relies on precise control over the nanoscale morphology. We have designed a conjugated rod-coil block copolymer consisting of poly(3-(2'-ethyl)hexylthiophene)-b-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P3EHT-b-P2VP) which self assembles into controllable morphologies. Inorganic nanoparticles reside within the P2VP domain due to the favorable interactions between P2VP and the nanoparticle surface as well as the exclusionary effects of the liquid crystalline P3EHT. The nanoparticle location can be tuned by altering nanocrystal surface chemistry. These findings are used to develop a comprehensive understanding of the self assembly processes in conjugated rod-coil block copolymer nanocomposites.

  9. Control rod reactivity measurement by rod-drop method at a fast critical assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, L.; Yin, Y.; Lian, X.; Zheng, C. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry in CAEP, P. O. Box 919 210, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China)

    2012-07-01

    Rod-drop experiments were carried out to estimate the reactivity of the control rod of a fast critical assembly operated by CAEP. Two power monitor systems were used to obtain the power level and integration method was used to process the data. Three experiments were performed. The experimental results of the reactivity from the two power monitor systems were consistent and showed a reasonable range of reactivity compared to results from positive period method. (authors)

  10. A novel wet extrusion technique to fabricate self-assembled microfiber scaffolds for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Danya M; Harrison, Michael W; Tee, Louis Y; Wei, Karen A; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a novel wet extrusion process to fabricate nonwoven self-assembled microfiber scaffolds with uniform diameters less than 5 μm and without any postmanipulation. In this method, a poly(L-lactic acid) solution flows dropwise into a stirring nonsolvent bath, deforming into liquid polymer streams that self-assemble into a nonwoven microfiber scaffold. The ability to tune fiber diameter was achieved by decreasing polymer spin dope concentration and increasing the silicon oil to petroleum ether ratio of the nonsolvent spin bath. To demonstrate the drug delivery capabilities of scaffolds, heparin was encapsulated using a conventional water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion technique and a cryogenic emulsion technique developed in our laboratory. Spin dope preparation was found to significantly effect the release kinetics of self-assembled scaffolds by altering the interconnectivity of pores within the precipitating filaments. After 35 days, scaffolds prepared from W/O emulsions released up to 45% encapsulated heparin, whereas nearly 80% release of heparin was observed from cryogenic emulsion formulations. The versatility of our system, combined with the prolonged release of small molecules and the ability to control the homogeneity of self-assembling scaffolds, could be beneficial for many tissue regeneration and engineering applications.

  11. Controlling Assembly and Crystallization of S-layers on Diblock Copolymer Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunkel, Ilja; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Stel, Bart; Gu, Xiaodan; Russell, Thomas; Deyoreo, James

    2013-03-01

    Block copolymers (BCPs) self-assemble into arrays of nanoscopic morphologies, including lamellar, cylindrical, and spherical microdomains, that serve as ideal templates for the fabrication of nanostructured materials. The size of the microdomains is a function of the polymer size so tuning the copolymer's molecular weight allows for a precise control over the dimension of the BCP morphologies. Moreover, the heterogeneous chemical nature of BCPs allows them to be used as templates for well-defined protein adsorption. Here, we used nanoscopic BCP patterns as templates to study the assembly of S-layer proteins SbpA from Lysinibacillus sphaericus (ATCC 4525) by in-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The templates were formed by polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) BCPs of various molecular weights after spin coating on solid surfaces and subsequent controlled solvent-vapor annealing. Our results show that by controlling the chemical contrast in templates of different geometry and periodicity, protein assemblies could be directed exclusively to the hydrophobic domains of the template. More importantly, our high-resolution AFM measurements indicate that the proteins crystallized in their native lattice while following the structure of the underlying template by preferential adsorption.

  12. Side-chain-controlled self-assembly of polystyrene-polypeptide miktoarm star copolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Junnila, Susanna

    2012-03-27

    We show how the self-assembly of miktoarm star copolymers can be controlled by modifying the side chains of their polypeptide arms, using A 2B and A 2B 2 type polymer/polypeptide hybrids (macromolecular chimeras). Initially synthesized PS 2PBLL and PS 2PBLL 2 (PS, polystyrene; PBLL, poly(ε-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-l-lysine) ) miktoarms were first deprotected to PS 2PLLHCl and PS 2PLLHCl 2 miktoarms (PLLHCl, poly(l-lysine hydrochloride)) and then complexed ionically with sodium dodecyl sulfonate (DS) to give the supramolecular complexes PS 2PLL(DS) and PS 2(PLL(DS)) 2. The solid-state self-assemblies of these six miktoarm systems were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS). The side chains of the polypeptide arms were observed to have a large effect on the solubility, polypeptide conformation, and self-assembly of the miktoarms. Three main categories were observed: (i) lamellar self-assemblies at the block copolymer length scale with packed layers of α-helices in PS 2PBLL and PS 2PBLL 2; (ii) charge-clustered polypeptide micelles with less-defined conformations in a nonordered lattice within a PS matrix in PS 2PLLHCl and PS 2PLLHCl 2; (iii) lamellar polypeptide-surfactant self-assemblies with β-sheet conformation in PS 2PLL(DS) and PS 2(PLL(DS)) 2 which dominate over the formation of block copolymer scale structures. Differences between the 3- and 4-arm systems illustrate how packing frustration between the coil-like PS arms and rigid polypeptide conformations can be relieved by the right number of arms, leading to differences in the extent of order. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Intercalation Assembly Method and Intercalation Process Control of Layered Intercalated Functional Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kaitao; WANG Guirong; LI Dianqing; LIN Yanjun; DUAN Xue

    2013-01-01

    Layered intercalated functional materials of layered double hydroxide type are an important class of functional materials developed in recent years.Based on long term studies on these materials in the State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering in Beijing University of Chemical Technology,the principle for the design of controlled intercalation processes in the light of future production processing requirements has been developed.Intercalation assembly methods and technologies have been invented to control the intercalation process for preparing layered intercalated materials with various structures and functions.

  14. Dynamic control of chirality and self-assembly of double-stranded helicates with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Depeng; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Cheng, Jinling; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-03-01

    Helicity switching in biological and artificial systems is a fundamental process that allows for the dynamic control of structures and their functions. In contrast to chemical approaches to responsive behaviour in helicates, the use of light as an external stimulus offers unique opportunities to invert the chirality of helical structures in a non-invasive manner with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we report that unidirectional rotary motors with connecting oligobipyridyl ligands, which can dynamically change their chirality upon irradiation, assemble into metal helicates that are responsive to light. The motor function controls the self-assembly process as well as the helical chirality, allowing switching between oligomers and double-stranded helicates with distinct handedness. The unidirectionality of the light-induced motion governs the sequence of programmable steps, enabling the highly regulated self-assembly of fully responsive helical structures. This discovery paves the way for the future development of new chirality-dependent photoresponsive systems including smart materials, enantioselective catalysts and light-driven molecular machines.

  15. Dynamic control of chirality and self-assembly of double-stranded helicates with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Depeng; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Cheng, Jinling; Feringa, Ben L.

    2016-11-01

    Helicity switching in biological and artificial systems is a fundamental process that allows for the dynamic control of structures and their functions. In contrast to chemical approaches to responsive behaviour in helicates, the use of light as an external stimulus offers unique opportunities to invert the chirality of helical structures in a non-invasive manner with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we report that unidirectional rotary motors with connecting oligobipyridyl ligands, which can dynamically change their chirality upon irradiation, assemble into metal helicates that are responsive to light. The motor function controls the self-assembly process as well as the helical chirality, allowing switching between oligomers and double-stranded helicates with distinct handedness. The unidirectionality of the light-induced motion governs the sequence of programmable steps, enabling the highly regulated self-assembly of fully responsive helical structures. This discovery paves the way for the future development of new chirality-dependent photoresponsive systems including smart materials, enantioselective catalysts and light-driven molecular machines.

  16. Localized Aurora B activity spatially controls non-kinetochore microtubules during spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Medema, René H

    2011-12-01

    Efficient spindle assembly involves the generation of spatial cues around chromosomes that locally stabilize microtubule (MT) plus-ends. In addition to the small GTPase Ran, there is evidence that Aurora B kinase might also generate a spatial cue around chromosomes but direct proof for this is still lacking. Here, we find that the Aurora B substrate MCAK localizes to MT plus-ends throughout the mitotic spindle, but its accumulation is strongly reduced on MT plus-ends near chromatin, suggesting that a signal emanating from chromosomes negatively regulates MCAK plus-end binding. Indeed, we show that Aurora B is the kinase responsible for producing this chromosome-derived signal. These results are the first to visualize spatially restricted Aurora B kinase activity around chromosomes on an endogenous substrate and explain how Aurora B could spatially control the dynamics of non-kinetochore MTs during spindle assembly.

  17. Controlled capillary assembly of magnetic Janus particles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qingguang; Davies, Gary B; Harting, Jens

    2016-08-21

    Capillary interactions can be used to direct assembly of particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces. Precisely controlling the magnitude and direction of capillary interactions to assemble particles into favoured structures for materials science purposes is desirable but challenging. In this paper, we investigate capillary interactions between magnetic Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces. We develop a pair-interaction model that predicts that these particles should arrange into a side-side configuration, and carry out simulations that confirm the predictions of our model. Finally, we investigate the monolayer structures that form when many magnetic Janus particles adsorb at the interface. We find that the particles arrange into long, straight chains exhibiting little curvature, in contrast with capillary interactions between ellipsoidal particles. We further find a regime in which highly ordered, lattice-like monolayer structures form, which can be tuned dynamically using an external magnetic field.

  18. Hybrid gels assembled from Fmoc-amino acid and graphene oxide with controllable properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Pengyao; Chu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shangyang; Ma, Mingfang; Hao, Aiyou

    2014-08-04

    A supramolecular gel is obtained from the self-assembly of an ultralow-molecular-weight gelator (N-fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl glutamic acid) in good and poor solvents. The gelators can self-assemble into a lamellar structure, which can further form twisted fibers and nanotubes in the gel phase. Rheological studies show that the gels are robust and rigid, and are able to rapidly self-recover to a gel after being destroyed by shear force. Fluorescence experiments reveal the aggregation-induced emission effects of the gel system; the fluorescence intensity is significantly enhanced by gel formation. Graphene oxide (GO) is introduced into the system efficiently to give a hybrid material, and the interaction between gelators-GO sheets is studied. Rheological and fluorescent studies imply that the mechanical properties and the fluorescent emission of the hybrid materials can be fine-tuned by controlling the addition of GO.

  19. Light- and Solvent-Controlled Self-Assembly Behavior of Spiropyran-Polyoxometalate-Alkyl Hybrid Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yang; Saad, Ali; Yin, Panchao; Wu, Jiayingzi; Oms, Olivier; Dolbecq, Anne; Mialane, Pierre; Liu, Tianbo

    2016-08-08

    A molecular photochromic spiropyran-polyoxometalate-alkyl organic-inorganic hybrid has been synthesized and fully characterized. The reversible switching of the hydrophobic spiropyran fragment to the hydrophilic merocyanine one can be easily achieved under light irradiation at different wavelengths. This switch changes the amphiphilic feature of the hybrid, leading to a light-controlled self-assembly behavior in solution. It has been shown that the hybrid can reversibly self-assemble into vesicles in polar solvents and irreversibly into reverse vesicles in non-polar solvents. The sizes of the vesicles and the reverse vesicles are both tunable by the polarity of the solvent, with the hydrophobic interactions being the main driving force.

  20. Hierarchical charge distribution controls self-assembly process of silk in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Cencen; Liu, Lijie; Kaplan, David L.; Zhu, Hesun; Lu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Silk materials with different nanostructures have been developed without the understanding of the inherent transformation mechanism. Here we attempt to reveal the conversion road of the various nanostructures and determine the critical regulating factors. The regulating conversion processes influenced by a hierarchical charge distribution were investigated, showing different transformations between molecules, nanoparticles and nanofibers. Various repulsion and compressive forces existed among silk fibroin molecules and aggregates due to the exterior and interior distribution of charge, which further controlled their aggregating and deaggregating behaviors and finally formed nanofibers with different sizes. Synergistic action derived from molecular mobility and concentrations could also tune the assembly process and final nanostructures. It is suggested that the complicated silk fibroin assembly processes comply a same rule based on charge distribution, offering a promising way to develop silk-based materials with designed nanostructures.

  1. Dia2 controls transcription by mediating assembly of the RSC complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Andress

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dia2 is an F-box protein found in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae. Together with Skp1 and Cul1, Dia2 forms the substrate-determining part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, otherwise known as the SCF. Dia2 has previously been implicated in the control of replication and genome stability via its interaction with the replisome progression complex. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified components of the RSC chromatin remodelling complex as genetic interactors with Dia2, suggesting an additional role for Dia2 in the regulation of transcription. We show that Dia2 is involved in controlling assembly of the RSC complex. RSC belongs to a group of ATP-dependent nucleosome-remodelling complexes that controls the repositioning of nucleosomes. The RSC complex is expressed abundantly and its 17 subunits are recruited to chromatin in response to both transcription activation and repression. In the absence of Dia2, RSC-mediated transcription regulation was impaired, with concomitant abnormalities in nucleosome positioning. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings imply that Dia2 is required for the correct assembly and function of the RSC complex. Dia2, by controlling the RSC chromatin remodeller, fine-tunes transcription by controlling nucleosome positioning during transcriptional activation and repression.

  2. Controlled formation of calcium-phosphate-based hybrid mesocrystals by organic-inorganic co-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Halei; Chu, Xiaobin; Li, Li; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2010-11-01

    An understanding of controlled formation of biomimetic mesocrystals is of great importance in materials chemistry and engineering. Here we report that organic-inorganic hybrid plates and even mesocrystals can be conveniently synthesized using a one-pot reaction in a mixed system of protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)), surfactant (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)) and supersaturated calcium phosphate solution. The morphologies of calcium-phosphate-based products are analogous to the general inorganic crystals but they have abnormal and interesting substructures. The hybrids are constructed by the alternate stacking of organic layer (thickness of 1.31 nm) and well-crystallized inorganic mineral layer (thickness of 2.13 nm) at the nanoscale. Their morphologies (spindle, rhomboid and round) and sizes (200 nm-2 μm) can be tuned gradually by changing BSA, AOT and calcium phosphate concentrations. This modulation effect can be explained by a competition between the anisotropic and isotropic assembly of the ultrathin plate-like units. The anisotropic assembly confers mesocrystal characteristics on the hybrids while the round ones are the results of isotropic assembly. However, the basic lamellar organic-inorganic substructure remains unchanged during the hybrid formation, which is a key factor to ensure the self-assembly from molecule to micrometre scale. A morphological ternary diagram of BSA-AOT-calcium phosphate is used to describe this controlled formation process, providing a feasible strategy to prepare the required materials. This study highlights the cooperative effect of macromolecule (frame structure), small biomolecule (binding sites) and mineral phase (main component) on the generation and regulation of biomimetic hybrid mesocrystals.

  3. Controlled self-assembly of conjugated rod-coil block copolymers for applications in organic optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuefei

    Organic electronics are of great interest in manufacturing light weight, mechanical flexible, and inexpensive large area devices. While significant improvements have been made over the last several years and it is now clear that morphology on the lengthscale of exciton diffusion (10nm) is of crucial importance, a clear relationship between structure and device properties has not emerged. This lack of understanding largely emerges from an inability to control morphology on this lengthscale. This thesis will center around an approach, based on block copolymer self-assembly, to generate equilibrium nanostructures on the 10 nm lengthscale of exciton diffusion and study their effects on device performance. Self-assembly of semiconducting block copolymers is complicated by the non-classical chain shape of conjugated polymers. Unlike classical polymers, the chains do not assume a Gaussian coil shape which is stretched near block copolymer interfaces, instead the chains are elongated and liquid crystalline. Previous work has demonstrated how these new molecular interactions and shapes control the phase diagram of so-called rod-coil block copolymers. Here, we will focus on controlling domain size, orientation, and chemical structure. While domain size can be controlled directly through molecular weight, this requires significant additional synthesis of domain size is to be varied. Here, the domain size is controlled by blending homopolymers into a self-assembling rod-coil block copolymer. When coil-like blocks are incorporated, the domains swell, as expected. When rod-like blocks are incorporated, they interdigitate with the rods of the block copolymers. This results in an increase in interfacial area which forces the coils to rearrange and an overall decrease in domain size with increasing rod content. Control over lamellar orientation is crucial in order to design and control charge transport pathways and exciton recombination or separation interfaces. While numerous

  4. Quality characteristic association analysis of computer numerical control machine tool based on meta-action assembly unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As everyone knows, assembly quality plays a very important role in final product quality. Since computer numerical control machine tool is a large system with complicated structure and function, and there are complex association relationships among quality characteristics in assembly process, then it is difficult and inaccurate to analyze the whole computer numerical control machine tool quality characteristic association at one time. In this article, meta-action assembly unit is proposed as the basic analysis unit, of which quality characteristic association is studied to guarantee the whole computer numerical control machine tool assembly quality. First, based on “Function-Motion-Action” decomposition structure, the definitions of meta-action and meta-action assembly unit are introduced. Second, manufacturing process association and meta-action assembly unit quality characteristic association are discussed. Third, after understanding the definitions of information entropy and relative entropy, the concrete meta-action assembly unit quality characteristic association analysis steps based on relative entropy are described in detail. And finally, the lifting piston translation assembly unit of automatic pallet changer is taken as an example, the association degree between internal leakage and the influence factors of part quality characteristics and mate-relationships among them are calculated to figure out the most influential factors, showing the correctness and feasibility of this method.

  5. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Kelton

    2011-08-26

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Near-reef elemental signals in the otoliths of settling Pomacentrus amboinensis (Pomacentridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sih, Tiffany L.; Kingsford, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Settlement is a key life history transition for coral reef fishes, and how long a fish spends close to a reef prior to settlement is poorly understood. We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and otolith microstructure analysis (daily increments and settlement marks) to determine the length of time larval fish spend near a reef prior to settlement. The otoliths of Pomacentrus amboinensis collected from four neighbouring reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef showed clear and consistent differences in their elemental signatures prior to and following settlement. Elevated Ba:Ca near settlement and post-settlement was found in fish from all four reefs. However, there was individual variation in elemental profiles, with an increased otolith Ba-to-Ca ratio (near-reef signature) at settlement in 33 % of fish, and up to 8 d prior to settlement in others. Increment widths, often used as a proxy for growth, decreased approaching the settlement mark for all fish, providing further evidence for a "search phase" in larvae. We demonstrated experimentally that otoliths of fish kept in reefal or inter-reefal waters had different elemental chemistry. There were differences in the elemental composition of water samples within the study area, but no consistent trends with distance from reefs. There was poor discrimination of multi-element signatures among fish from different reefs during their pre-settlement phases. However, discrimination improved in the settlement and post-settlement phases of otoliths, indicating that reef waters and perhaps stage of ontogeny affected otolith chemistry. This study demonstrated clear near-reef elemental signatures in fish around settlement. We suggest these differences are due to a combination of water chemistry and physiological influences (e.g., growth). Combining LA-ICP-MS with otolith microstructure analysis can provide high-resolution information on the early life history of reef fishes. Further, a

  7. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, K. W.; Berumen, M. L.; Mateo, I.; Elsdon, T. S.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas.

  8. Predistortion control device and method, assembly including a predistortion control device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokkeler, André

    2005-01-01

    A predistortion control device (1). The device has a first predistortion control input connectable to a power amplifier output (21); a second predistortion control input (11) connectable to a signal contact of a predistortion device; and a predistortion control output (12) connectable to a control c

  9. Controlled assembly and plasmonic properties of asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jun Hee; Lim, Jonghui; Yoon, Sangwoon

    2012-08-28

    The assembly of noble metal nanoparticles offers an appealing means to control and enhance the plasmonic properties of nanostructures. However, making nanoassemblies with easily modifiable gap distances with high efficiency has been challenging. Here, we report a novel strategy to assemble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into Janus-type asymmetric core-satellite nanostructures. Markedly different desorption efficiency between large and small AuNPs in ethanol allows us to prepare the asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies in a dispersed colloidal state with near 100% purity. The resulting nanoassemblies have well-defined structures in which a core AuNP (51 nm) is covered by an average of 13 ± 3 satellite AuNPs (13 nm) with part of the core surfaces left unoccupied. Strong surface plasmon coupling is observed from these nanoassemblies as a result of the close proximity between the core and the satellites, which appears significantly red-shifted from the surface plasmon resonance frequencies of the constituting nanoparticles. The dependence of the surface plasmon coupling on a gap distance of less than 3 nm is systematically investigated by varying the length of the alkanedithiol linkers. The asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies also serve as an excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate with an enhancement factor of ~10(6). Finally, we demonstrate that the presented assembly method is extendible to the preparation of compositionally heterogeneous core-satellite nanoassemblies.

  10. Flower-like superstructures of AIE-active tetraphenylethylene through solvophobic controlled self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimimarand, Mina; La, Duong Duc; Kobaisi, Mohammad Al; Bhosale, Sheshanath V.

    2017-02-01

    The development of well-organized structures with high luminescent properties in the solid and aggregated states is of both scientific and technological interest due to their applications in nanotechnology. In this paper we described the synthesis of amphiphilic and dumbbell shaped AIE-active tetraphenylethylene (TPE) derivatives and studied their self-assembly with solvophobic control. Interestingly, both TPE derivatives form a 3D flower-shape supramolecular structure from THF/water solutions at varying water fractions. SEM microscopy was used to visualise step-wise growth of flower-shape assembly. TPE derivatives also show good mechanochromic properties which can be observed in the process of grinding, fuming and heating. These TPE derivative self-assemblies are formed due to two main important properties: (i) the TPE-core along with alkyl chains, optimizing the dispersive interactions within a construct, and (ii) amide-linkage through molecular recognition. We believe such arrangements prevent crystallization and favour the directional growth of flower-shape nanostructures in a 3D fashion.

  11. Intelligent controller of a flexible hybrid robot machine for ITER assembly and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-saedi, Mazin I., E-mail: mazin.al-saedi@lut.fi; Wu, Huapeng; Handroos, Heikki

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Studying flexible multibody dynamic of hybrid parallel robot. • Investigating fuzzy-PD controller to control a hybrid flexible hydraulically driven robot. • Investigating ANFIS-PD controller to control a hybrid flexible robot. Compare to traditional PID this method gives better performance. • Using the equilibrium of reaction forces between the parallel and serial parts of hybrid robot to control the serial part hydraulically driven. - Abstract: The assembly and maintenance of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) vacuum vessel (VV) is highly challenging since the tasks performed by the robot involve welding, material handling, and machine cutting from inside the VV. To fulfill the tasks in ITER application, this paper presents a hybrid redundant manipulator with four DOFs provided by serial kinematic axes and six DOFs by parallel mechanism. Thus, in machining, to achieve greater end-effector trajectory tracking accuracy for surface quality, a robust control of the actuators for the flexible link has to be deduced. In this paper, the intelligent control of a hydraulically driven parallel robot part based on the dynamic model and two control schemes have been investigated: (1) fuzzy-PID self tuning controller composed of the conventional PID control and with fuzzy logic; (2) adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system-PID (ANFIS-PID) self tuning of the gains of the PID controller, which are implemented independently to control each hydraulic cylinder of the parallel robot based on rod position predictions. The obtained results of the fuzzy-PID and ANFIS-PID self tuning controller can reduce more tracking errors than the conventional PID controller. Subsequently, the serial component of the hybrid robot can be analyzed using the equilibrium of reaction forces at the universal joint connections of the hexa-element. To achieve precise positional control of the end effector for maximum precision machining, the hydraulic cylinder should

  12. Weak competing interactions control assembly of strongly bonded TCNQ ionic acceptor molecules on silver surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changwon; Rojas, Geoffrey A.; Jeon, Seokmin; Kelly, Simon J.; Smith, Sean C.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Yoon, Mina; Maksymovych, Petro

    2014-09-01

    The energy scales of interactions that control molecular adsorption and assembly on surfaces can vary by several orders of magnitude, yet the importance of each contributing interaction is not apparent a priori. Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is an archetypal electron acceptor molecule and it is a key component of organic metals. On metal surfaces, this molecule also acts as an electron acceptor, producing negatively charged adsorbates. It is therefore rather intriguing to observe attractive molecular interactions in this system that were reported previously for copper and silver surfaces. Our experiments compared TCNQ adsorption on noble metal surfaces of Ag(100) and Ag(111). In both cases we found net attractive interactions down to the lowest coverage. However, the morphology of the assemblies was strikingly different, with two-dimensional islands on Ag(100) and one-dimensional chains on Ag(111) surfaces. This observation suggests that the registry effect governed by the molecular interaction with the underlying lattice potential is critical in determining the dimensionality of the molecular assembly. Using first-principles density functional calculations with a van der Waals correction scheme, we revealed that the strengths of major interactions (i.e., lattice potential corrugation, intermolecular attraction, and charge-transfer-induced repulsion) are all similar in energy. The van der Waals interactions, in particular, almost double the strength of attractive interactions, making the intermolecular potential comparable in strength to the diffusion potential and promoting self-assembly. However, it is the anisotropy of local intermolecular interactions that is primarily responsible for the difference in the topology of the molecular islands on Ag(100) and Ag(111) surfaces. We anticipate that the intermolecular potential will become more attractive and dominant over the diffusion potential with increasing molecular size, providing new design strategies for the

  13. Growth characteristics and otolith analysis on age-0 American shad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Sally T.; Wetzel, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Otolith microstructure analysis provides useful information on the growth history of fish (Campana and Jones 1992, Bang and Gronkjaer 2005). Microstructure analysis can be used to construct the size-at-age growth trajectory of fish, determine daily growth rates, and estimate hatch date and other ecologically important life history events (Campana and Jones 1992, Tonkin et al. 2008). This kind of information can be incorporated into bioenergetics modeling, providing necessary data for estimating prey consumption, and guiding the development of empirically-based modeling scenarios for hypothesis testing. For example, age-0 American shad co-occur with emigrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon originating from Hanford Reach and the Snake River in the lower Columbia River reservoirs during the summer and early fall. The diet of age-0 American shad appears to overlap with that of juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Chapter 1, this reoprt), but juvenile fall Chinook salmon are also known to feed on age-0 American shad in the reservoirs (USGS unpublished data). Abundant, energy-dense age-0 American shad may provide juvenile fall Chinook salmon opportunities for rapid growth during the time period when large number of age-0 American shad are available. Otolith analysis of hatch dates and the growth curve of age-0 American shad could be used to identify when eggs, larvae, and juveniles of specific size classes are temporally available as food for fall Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River reservoirs. This kind of temporally and spatially explicit life history information is important to include in bioenergetics modeling scenarios. Quantitive estimates of prey consumption could be used with spatially-explicit estimates of prey abundance to construct a quantitative assessment of the age-0 American shad impact on a reservoir food web. Analysis of the age-0 American shad growth trajectory or individual growth records may show evidence of differential growth rates over time that may

  14. Optical control of electron spin qubit in InAs self-assembled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emary, Clive [TU Berlin, Sekr. PN 7-1, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Sham, Lu Jeu [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The spin of an electron trapped in a self-assembled quantum dot is viewed as a promising quantum bit. We present here a theory of the control of such qubits using short laser pulses to excite virtual trion states within the dots. We describe mechanisms for qubit initialisation and for performing universal one and two qubit operations. We show that, for InAs dots, initialisation can be achieved on the nanosecond time-scale, and that coherent operations can performed with laser pulses with durations of tens of picoseconds. These results are of direct relevance to current experiments.

  15. JOURNAL CONTROL SYSTEM; library journal management. [IBM360/75,91; COBOL and Assembly language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, A.S.; Passiakos, M.

    The JOURNAL CONTROL SYSTEM is a series of programs designed to handle all journal ordering for the three Union Carbide installations in Oak Ridge - ORNL, Y-12, and ORG-DP. This series of programs provides: (1) management information in the form of cost, subscriber, and title statistics, (2) seven-copy purchase requisitions, and (3) claim letters to vendors relating to missing issues. In addition, computer check-in, notification of binding, and recording of journal arrival is supplied for the ORNL library operation.IBM360/75,91; COBOL and Assembly language; OS/360; A decimal feature machine with 200K memory.

  16. Macroscopic assembly by optical control of zmol-level DNA hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takuya; Nishimura, Yushi; Tamura, Mamoru; Nishida, Keisuke; Ito, Syoji; Tokonami, Shiho

    2017-04-01

    Remote acceleration of a molecular recognition will open an avenue for the control of various biological functions. Here, we have developed a new principle for the rapid macroscopic assembly based on the light-induced molecular recognition via nanoparticles. Remarkably, as an application of this principle, we have demonstrated the submillimetre network formation triggered by light-induced hybridization of zmol-level DNA within a few minutes. This finding will be used for the rapid and highly sensitive genetic screening without fluorescent labeling.

  17. Micro-vision servo control of a multi-axis alignment system for optical fiber assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihai; Yu, Fei; Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Wenjie; Zhang, Jianbin

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes a novel optical fiber assembly system featuring a multi-axis alignment function based on micro-vision feedback control. It consists of an active parallel alignment mechanism, a passive compensation mechanism, a micro-gripper and a micro-vision servo control system. The active parallel alignment part is a parallelogram-based design with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) function to achieve precise rotation without fatal lateral motion. The passive mechanism, with five degrees of freedom (5-DOF), is used to implement passive compensation for multi-axis errors. A specially designed 1-DOF micro-gripper mounted onto the active parallel alignment platform is adopted to grasp and rotate the optical fiber. A micro-vision system equipped with two charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras is introduced to observe the small field of view and obtain multi-axis errors for servo feedback control. The two CCD cameras are installed in an orthogonal arrangement—thus the errors can be easily measured via the captured images. Meanwhile, a series of tracking and measurement algorithms based on specific features of the target objects are developed. Details of the force and displacement sensor information acquisition in the assembly experiment are also provided. An experiment demonstrates the validity of the proposed visual algorithm by achieving the task of eliminating errors and inserting an optical fiber to the U-groove accurately.

  18. Determination of interannual variability in early life history of Pleuronectes platessa (L. using otolith microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Filipa Moreira De Sousa

    2015-11-01

    Plaice 0-group juveniles were sampled from an inshore nursery ground (Valosen, Bodø, Norway between 2005 and 2006, and otolith microstructure was examined. For that, sagitta otoliths were mounted in microscope slides using a thermoplastic cement (crystalbond™, with the concave side down. Otoliths were then hand-ground to the otolith core using sandpaper (3, 1 µm and examined under transmitted light in a microscope linked to an image analysis system. This technique exposed the daily increments in the otoliths that once counted allowed to determine hatch dates, larval duration, settlement dates and total age of the fish. A one-month difference in hatching and settlement times was found between 2005 and 2006, occurring later in 2006, but larval stage duration was similar in both years. Compared to other areas located further south, hatching and settlement occurred earlier showing a latitudinal cline. Interannual differences in growth were also detected, with higher rates in 2006 which could be related to warmer temperatures during plaice first summer of life. Yet, growth rates were similar to other locations across the species distributional range which suggest the existence of a countergradient growth compensation mechanism in this northern population. This means that despite the lower environmental temperature at high latitudes, other factors such as productivity and photoperiod may play a key role during the growing season. Nevertheless, further work needs to be done in order to fully understand temporal variation in plaice early life dynamics.

  19. Comparison of rainbow smelt age estimates from fin rays and otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M.G.; Maloy, A.P.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, although nonnative, are an important component of the offshore food web in the Laurentian Great Lakes. In Lake Ontario, we estimate ages of rainbow smelt annually to study population dynamics such as year-class strength and age-specific growth and mortality. Since the early 1980s, we have used pectoral fin rays to estimate rainbow smelt ages, but the sectioning and mounting of fin rays are time and labor intensive. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of using otoliths rather than fin rays to estimate rainbow smelt ages. Three readers interpreted the ages of 172 rainbow smelt (60-198 mm total length) based on thin sections of pectoral fin rays, whole otoliths with no preparation, and whole otoliths that had been cleared for 1 month in a 70:30 ethanol : glycerin solution. Bias was lower and precision was greater for fin rays than for otoliths; these results were consistent for comparisons within readers (first and second readings by one individual; three readers were used) and between readers (one reading for each reader within a pair). Both otolith methods appeared to misclassify age-1 rainbow smelt. Fin ray ages had the highest precision and provided the best approximation of age estimates inferred from the Lake Ontario population's length frequency distribution and from our understanding of this population. ?? American Fisheries Society 2008.

  20. Controlling the assembly of hydrophobized gold nanoparticles at the air-water interface by varying the interfacial tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Nahar [Material Characterization Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Sastry, Murali [Tata Chemical Innovation Center, Anmol Pride, Baner Road, Pune-45 (India); Kakkar, Rita [Department of Chemistry, Delhi University, Delhi-110007 (India); Pasricha, Renu, E-mail: pasrichar@mail.nplindia.ernet.i [Material Characterization Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2010-11-30

    Controlled assembly is the key to harness the nanoscale properties of nanoparticles in most technological applications and it has been an important challenge as it leads to the manipulation of interparticle properties. The present work depicts the control of the assembly of nanoparticles in the monolayers by evaporation kinetics and particle interactions at the air-liquid interface. In the presence of attractive particle-particle and particle-monolayers interactions, nanoparticles self assemble into a superlattice structure upon drying from a colloidal suspension on to the preformed lipid monolayers. This self-assembly mechanism produces monolayers with long-range ordering. However, rapid dewetting and high rate of evaporation can significantly undermine the extent of ordering. Using gold nanoparticles as vehicles for experimentation and by changing the monolayers and solvent, we here demonstrate that the extent of ordering of nanoparticles can be controlled.

  1. Origins of invasive piscivores determined from the strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr) of otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Brian A.; Johnson, Brett M.; Breton, Andre R.; Martinez, Patrick J.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Gillanders, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    We examined strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) in fish otoliths to determine the origins of invasive piscivores in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB, western USA). We examined 87Sr/86Sr from fishes in different reservoirs, as well as the temporal stability and interspecies variability of 87Sr/86Sr of fishes within reservoirs, determined if 87Sr/86Sr would be useful for "fingerprinting" reservoirs where invasive piscivores may have been escaping into riverine habitat of endangered fishes in the UCRB, and looked for evidence that such movement was occurring. Our results showed that in most cases 87Sr/86Sr was unique among reservoirs, overlapped among species in a given reservoir, and was temporally stable across years. We identified the likely reservoir of origin of river-caught fish in some cases, and we were also able to determine the year of possible escapement. The approach allowed us to precisely describe the 87Sr/86Sr fingerprint of reservoir fishes, trace likely origins of immigrant river fish, and exclude potential sources, enabling managers to focus control efforts more efficiently. Our results demonstrate the potential utility of 87Sr/86Sr as a site-specific and temporally stable marker for reservoir fish and its promise for tracking fish movements of invasive fishes in river-reservoir systems.

  2. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocollic and vestibulo-ocular pathways are severely affected in Machado-Joseph disease patients evaluated by VEMPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A new method to reconstruct fish diet and movement patterns from δ 13 C values in otolith amino acids

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Kelton W.

    2011-08-01

    Fish ecologists have used geochemical values in otoliths to examine habitat use, migration, and population connectivity for decades. However, it remains difficult to determine an unambiguous dietary δ 13C signature from bulk analysis of otolith. Studies to date have focused on the aragonite component of otoliths with less attention paid to the organic fraction. We describe the application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (SIA) to analyze amino acid (AA) δ 13C values from small amounts (<1 mg) of otolith powder. We examined δ 13C values of otolith and muscle AAs from a reef-associated snapper (Lutjanus ehrenbergii (Peters, 1869)) collected along a carbon isotope gradient (isoscape) from seagrass beds to coral reefs. Carbon isotope values in otolith and muscle samples were highly correlated within and among coastal habitats. Moreover, δ 13C values of otolith AAs provided a purely dietary record that avoided dilution from dissolved inorganic carbon. Otolith AAs served as a robust tracer of δ 13C values at the base of the food web, making compound-specific SIA a powerful tool for dietary reconstructions and tracking the movement of fishes across isoscapes.

  4. Chemical Control of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dot Shape, Self-Assembly, and Charge Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Martin R.

    Lead(II) sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) are a promising excitonic material for numerous application that require that control of fluxes of charge and energy at nanoscale interfaces, such as solar energy conversion, photo- and electrocatalysis, light emitting diodes, chemical sensing, single-electron logic elements, field effect transistors, and photovoltaics. PbS QDs are particularly suitable for photonics applications because they exhibit size-tunable band-edge absorption and fluorescence across the entire near-infrared spectrum, undergo efficient multi-exciton generation, exhibit a long radiative lifetime, and possess an eight-fold degenerate ground-state. The effective integration of PbS QDs into these applications requires a thorough understanding of how to control their synthesis, self-assembly, and charge transport phenomena. In this document, I describe a series of experiments to elucidate three levels of chemical control on the emergent properties of PbS QDs: (1) the role of surface chemistry in controlling PbS QD shape during solvothermal synthesis, (2) the role of QD shape and ligand functionalization in self-assembly at a liquid-air interface, and (3) the role of QD packing structure on steady-state conductivity and transient current dynamics. At the synthetic level (1), I show that the final shape and surface chemistry of PbS QDs is highly sensitive to the formation of organosulfur byproducts by commonly used sulfur reagents. The insight into PbS QD growth gained from this work is then developed to controllably tune PbS QD shape from cubic to octahedral to hexapodal while maintaining QD size. At the following level of QD self-assembly (2), I show how QD size and shape dictate packing geometry in extended 2D arrays and how this packing can be controllably interrupted in mixed monolayers. I also study the role of ligand structure on the reorganization of QD arrays at a liquid-air interface and find that the specific packing defects in QD arrays vary

  5. Mechanisms of TSC-mediated control of synapse assembly and axon guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Knox

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex is a dominant genetic disorder produced by mutations in either of two tumor suppressor genes, TSC1 and TSC2; it is characterized by hamartomatous tumors, and is associated with severe neurological and behavioral disturbances. Mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 deregulate a conserved growth control pathway that includes Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb and Target of Rapamycin (TOR. To understand the function of this pathway in neural development, we have examined the contributions of multiple components of this pathway in both neuromuscular junction assembly and photoreceptor axon guidance in Drosophila. Expression of Rheb in the motoneuron, but not the muscle of the larval neuromuscular junction produced synaptic overgrowth and enhanced synaptic function, while reductions in Rheb function compromised synapse development. Synapse growth produced by Rheb is insensitive to rapamycin, an inhibitor of Tor complex 1, and requires wishful thinking, a bone morphogenetic protein receptor critical for functional synapse expansion. In the visual system, loss of Tsc1 in the developing retina disrupted axon guidance independently of cellular growth. Inhibiting Tor complex 1 with rapamycin or eliminating the Tor complex 1 effector, S6 kinase (S6k, did not rescue axon guidance abnormalities of Tsc1 mosaics, while reductions in Tor function suppressed those phenotypes. These findings show that Tsc-mediated control of axon guidance and synapse assembly occurs via growth-independent signaling mechanisms, and suggest that Tor complex 2, a regulator of actin organization, is critical in these aspects of neuronal development.

  6. Regulation and Quality Control of Adiponectin Assembly by Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone ERp44*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampe, Lutz; Radjainia, Mazdak; Xu, Cheng; Harris, Paul W. R.; Bashiri, Ghader; Goldstone, David C.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Wang, Yu; Mitra, Alok K.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, a collagenous hormone secreted abundantly from adipocytes, possesses potent antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory properties. Mediated by the conserved Cys39 located in the variable region of the N terminus, the trimeric (low molecular weight (LMW)) adiponectin subunit assembles into different higher order complexes, e.g. hexamers (middle molecular weight (MMW)) and 12–18-mers (high molecular weight (HMW)), the latter being mostly responsible for the insulin-sensitizing activity of adiponectin. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone ERp44 retains adiponectin in the early secretory compartment and tightly controls the oxidative state of Cys39 and the oligomerization of adiponectin. Using cellular and in vitro assays, we show that ERp44 specifically recognizes the LMW and MMW forms but not the HMW form. Our binding assays with short peptide mimetics of adiponectin suggest that ERp44 intercepts and converts the pool of fully oxidized LMW and MMW adiponectin, but not the HMW form, into reduced trimeric precursors. These ERp44-bound precursors in the cis-Golgi may be transported back to the ER and released to enhance the population of adiponectin intermediates with appropriate oxidative state for HMW assembly, thereby underpinning the process of ERp44 quality control. PMID:26060250

  7. Macro-hydrogels versus nanoparticles by the controlled assembly of polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalat, M; Alcouffe, P; David, L; Delair, T

    2015-12-10

    The controlled assembly of oppositely charged chitosan (CS, Mw ∼ 33 × 10(3) to 600 × 10(3)g mol(-1)) and dextran sulfate (DS, Mw = 1.3 × 10(6)g mol(-1)) or heparin (HP, Mw = 1.8 × 10(4)g mol(-1)) led either to nanoparticles or macro-hydrogels, at room temperature. The control over the electrostatic attractive interactions was achieved using 2 mol L(-1) NaCl in the polyion solutions and subsequent dialysis to let the assembly occur. Macrohydrogels formed with an excess of polyanion. In the presence of an excess of polycation, colloidal gels were exclusively obtained. At salt concentrations lower than 1 mol L(-1), the spontaneous gelation provided macro-hydrogels, whatever the polyion in excess. Rheology measurements showed a similar elastic behaviour for CS-DS and CS-HP hydrogels, though CS-HP hydrogels appeared less cohesive. SAXS experiments revealed an aggregate morphology with internal and surface structure depending on the degree of acetylation (DA) of chitosan.

  8. Self-assembly of size-controlled liposomes on DNA nanotemplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Shigematsu, Hideki; Xu, Weiming; Shih, William M.; Rothman, James E.; Lin, Chenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Artificial lipid-bilayer membranes are valuable tools for the study of membrane structure and dynamics. For applications such as the study of vesicular transport and drug delivery, there is a pressing need for artificial vesicles with controlled size. However, controlling vesicle size and shape with nanometre precision is challenging, and approaches to achieve this can be heavily affected by lipid composition. Here, we present a bio-inspired templating method to generate highly monodispersed sub-100-nm unilamellar vesicles, where liposome self-assembly was nucleated and confined inside rigid DNA nanotemplates. Using this method, we produce homogeneous liposomes with four distinct predefined sizes. We also show that the method can be used with a variety of lipid compositions and probe the mechanism of templated liposome formation by capturing key intermediates during membrane self-assembly. The DNA nanotemplating strategy represents a conceptually novel way to guide lipid bilayer formation and could be generalized to engineer complex membrane/protein structures with nanoscale precision.

  9. Evaluation of otoliths Salt Creek pupfish (Cyprinodon salinus salinus) for use in analyses of age and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzul, Maria C.; Gaines, D. Bailey; Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael C.; Dinsmore, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We collected Salt Creek pupfish (Cyprinodon salinus salinus) from Salt Creek, Death Valley, California, in November 2009 and May 2010. The purpose of our study was to determine whether otoliths displayed interpretable marks that might be used for estimating age and growth. Otoliths exhibited alternating bands of opaque and translucent material. Kendall rank correlation between number of bands on otoliths and length of fish were high for two readers (τ = 0.65 and 0.79) and exact agreement between readers was 51%. Otoliths exhibited 0–5 bands, which provided evidence that longevity of Salt Creek pupfish likely is >1 year. Total length of fish collected in spring and autumn differed for fish with one and three bands on otoliths.

  10. Using otolith microstructure to analyse growth of juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Mosegaard, Henrik; Hinrichsen, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Pelagic and demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua L. were collected on the slope and the top of Rønne bank in the Baltic Sea during 2 cruises in November and December 1998. The growth, age at settling and vertical migration pattern were studied by otolith microstructure analysis....... The relationship between fish and otolith size were found to change at settling, with an increase of fish size in relation to otolith size after settling. This change was more pronounced on the slope compared to the top of the bank. The timing of first settling at the 2 localities did not differ with respect...... to fish age. At both localities, fish that hatched early in the season spent a shorter time in the pelagic stage than late-hatched fish. However, significant differences in growth rate during the pelagic stage were observed, where fish captured on the slope grew faster. On the bank, individuals with fast...

  11. Establishing nursery estuary otolith geochemical tags for Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Is temporal stability estuary dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Diarmuid; Wögerbauer, Ciara; Roche, William

    2016-12-01

    The ability to determine connectivity between juveniles in nursery estuaries and adult populations is an important tool for fisheries management. Otoliths of juvenile fish contain geochemical tags, which reflect the variation in estuarine elemental chemistry, and allow discrimination of their natal and/or nursery estuaries. These tags can be used to investigate connectivity patterns between juveniles and adults. However, inter-annual variability of geochemical tags may limit the accuracy of nursery origin determinations. Otolith elemental composition was used to assign a single cohort of 0-group sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax to their nursery estuary thus establishing an initial baseline for stocks in waters around Ireland. Using a standard LDFA model, high classification accuracies to nursery sites (80-88%) were obtained. Temporal stability of otolith geochemical tags was also investigated to assess if annual sampling is required for connectivity studies. Geochemical tag stability was found to be strongly estuary dependent.

  12. Otolith microchemistry: Insights into bioavailable pollutants in a man-made, urban inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronis, Christina; Evans, Noreen J; McDonald, Bradley J; Nice, Helen E; Gagnon, Marthe Monique

    2017-02-23

    Black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) were collected from an artificial inlet, Claisebrook Cove, Western Australia. Claisebrook Cove is adjacent to an historic contaminated site that was remediated during the 1990s. It was later identified as a priority area due to elevated levels of sediment contaminants including Zn, Cu, and Pb. Black bream were collected from this cove in 2005 and 2012 and their otoliths were analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of the most recent growth zone. Levels of Zn and Mn, which are metabolically regulated, did not correlate with sediment contamination. However, reduction in sediment Cu levels over time coincided with reduced Cu otolith levels from 2005 to 2012. Results indicate that the elemental composition of the marginal edge of Black bream otoliths can identify bioavailable contaminants in an urban estuary and, with monitoring, can be utilized to establish long-term trends.

  13. Micro-PIXE study of whole otolith of Anguilla japonica at elver stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Guo, H.; Wei, K.; Tang, W. [Institute of Life Science, Shanghai Fisheries University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Satoh, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Takano, K.; Kamiya, T. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shen, H., E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.c [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang, M.; Mi, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Strontium and calcium contents, within the otolith of Anguilla japonica, were measured by external micro-PIXE. According to the measured metamorphic checks, each otolith was divided into three stages. Comparing with the Sr:Ca ratios in stage 2, the ratios in stage 1 had two different trends. Among these fish, it may reflect their maternal condition was not the same. The ratios in stage 3 which was corresponding to the estuarine habitat were smaller than that in any other stage which was corresponding to the ocean habitat in each otolith. Suggested by our results, the eels from the spawning site may separate into two groups when they are near to the south of Taiwan, and then move to the different estuaries in China. It could be proposed that, in general, the migration direction is from south to north along the east coast in China.

  14. PIXE analyses of polished otoliths for identification of anadromous whitefish in the Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, Jan-Olof, E-mail: jlill@abo.fi [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Heimbrand, Yvette [Institute of Coastal Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Slotte, Joakim [Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Himberg, Mikael [Laboratory of Aquatic Pathobiology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Florin, Ann-Britt [Institute of Coastal Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Hägerstrand, Henry [Laboratory of Aquatic Pathobiology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    In this work we describe an application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to the elemental analysis of polished otoliths of whitefish. Two spots on polished otoliths were irradiated; one spot in the core region of the otolith and another one close to the edge. The irradiations were performed in air with a collimated 0.5 mm proton beam. The ratio of the strontium concentrations in the two spots was used to distinguish between different ecotypes (river, sea, lake) of whitefish. Criteria on the ratios were suggested for identification of the whitefish forms. The results were compared to results of μ-beam PIXE scans as well as multi-point scans with the 0.5 mm proton beam. The measuring set-up and the results are discussed.

  15. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-10

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of 'pressure control' to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres  with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  16. Assembly and Quality Control of the LHC Cryostats at CERN Motivations, Means, Results and Lessons Learnt

    CERN Document Server

    Poncet, A; Parma, V; Strubin, P; Tock, JP; Tommasini, D

    2007-01-01

    In 2001, the project management decided to perform at CERN the final assembly of the LHC superconducting magnets with cryostat parts and cold masses produced by European Industry in large series. This industrial-like production has required a very significant investment in tooling, production facilities, engineering and quality control efforts, in contractual partnership with a consortium of firms. This unusual endeavour of a limited lifetime represented more than 850,000 working hours spanning over five years, the work being done on a result-oriented basis by the contractor. This paper presents the reasons for having conducted this project at CERN, summarizes the work breakdown structure, the production means and methods, the infrastructure specially developed, the tooling, logistics and quality control aspects of the work performed and the results achieved, in analytical form. Finally, the lessons learnt are outlined.

  17. Spatial variation in elemental composition of otoliths of three species of fish (family Sparidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillanders, B. M.; Kingsford, M. J.

    2003-08-01

    Determining the nursery habitat of fishes that have moved from estuarine nursery habitats is difficult. The elemental fingerprints of otoliths of three species of sparids were determined to investigate their utility as a natural tag of the nursery habitat. Juvenile Pagrus auratus (snapper), Rhabdosargus sarba (tarwhine) and Acanthopagrus australis (bream) were collected from two sites in each of 15, six and three estuaries, respectively, and their otoliths analysed by solution-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Significant differences in otolith chemistry were found for all three species of juveniles collected from different estuaries. The same patterns among estuaries were not seen for all species, although it was not possible to sample the same sites within an estuary for all species. For bream, significant differences in otolith chemistry were found among all three estuaries, whereas for tarwhine the six estuaries were separated into three groups. For snapper, a number of estuaries could be separated, but there was some overlap for other estuaries. All three species were collected from the same site within one estuary and their otoliths analysed. Significant differences were found among species, but the implication of this finding remains unclear as the three species show differences in microhabitat use and may also differ in age. Because the elemental fingerprints of juveniles vary among estuaries or groups of estuaries, the nursery or recruitment estuary of adult fish could now be determined by analysing the juvenile region of adult otoliths. Thus, connectivity between estuaries and open coastal populations could be determined. Such information will have major implications for fisheries management because it will provide information on the distance that fish have moved from their recruitment estuary and the number of estuaries that contribute to each adult population.

  18. Nanomanipulation and controlled self-assembly of metal nanoparticles and nanocrystals for plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Hung-Ying; Lin, Meng-Hsien; Sun, Liuyang; Li, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) associated with metallic nanostructures offer unique possibilities for light concentration beyond the diffraction limit, which can lead to strong field confinement and enhancement in deep subwavelength regions. In recent years, many transformative plasmonic applications have emerged, taking advantage of the spectral and spatial tunability of LSPRs enabled by near-field coupling between constituent metallic nanostructures in a variety of plasmonic metastructures (dimers, metamolecules, metasurfaces, metamaterials, etc.). For example, the "hot spot" formed at the interstitial site (gap) between two coupled metallic nanostructures in a plasmonic dimer can be spectrally tuned via the gap size. Capitalizing on these capabilities, there have been significant advances in plasmon enhanced or enabled applications in light-based science and technology, including ultrahigh-sensitivity spectroscopies, light energy harvesting, photocatalysis, biomedical imaging and theranostics, optical sensing, nonlinear optics, ultrahigh-density data storage, as well as plasmonic metamaterials and metasurfaces exhibiting unusual linear and nonlinear optical properties. In this review, we present two complementary approaches for fabricating plasmonic metastructures. We discuss how meta-atoms can be assembled into unique plasmonic metastructures using a variety of nanomanipulation methods based on single- or multiple-probes in an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical tweezers, and focused electron-beam nanomanipulation. We also provide a few examples of nanoparticle metamolecules with designed properties realized in such well-controlled plasmonic metastructures. For the spatial controllability on the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales, we show that controlled self-assembly is the method of choice to realize scalable two-dimensional, and three-dimensional plasmonic metastructures. In the section of applications

  19. Dimensionality controls cytoskeleton assembly and metabolism of fibroblast cells in response to rigidity and shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Ochsner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various physical parameters, including substrate rigidity, size of adhesive islands and micro-and nano-topographies, have been shown to differentially regulate cell fate in two-dimensional (2-D cell cultures. Cells anchored in a three-dimensional (3-D microenvironment show significantly altered phenotypes, from altered cell adhesions, to cell migration and differentiation. Yet, no systematic analysis has been performed that studied how the integrated cellular responses to the physical characteristics of the environment are regulated by dimensionality (2-D versus 3-D. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arrays of 5 or 10 microm deep microwells were fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS. The actin cytoskeleton was compared for single primary fibroblasts adhering either to microfabricated adhesive islands (2-D or trapped in microwells (3-D of controlled size, shape, and wall rigidity. On rigid substrates (Young's Modulus = 1 MPa, cytoskeleton assembly within single fibroblast cells occurred in 3-D microwells of circular, rectangular, square, and triangular shapes with 2-D projected surface areas (microwell bottom surface area and total surface areas of adhesion (microwell bottom plus wall surface area that inhibited stress fiber assembly in 2-D. In contrast, cells did not assemble a detectable actin cytoskeleton in soft 3-D microwells (20 kPa, regardless of their shapes, but did so on flat, 2-D substrates. The dependency on environmental dimensionality was also reflected by cell viability and metabolism as probed by mitochondrial activities. Both were upregulated in 3-D cultured cells versus cells on 2-D patterns when surface area of adhesion and rigidity were held constant. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that cell shape and rigidity are not orthogonal parameters directing cell fate. The sensory toolbox of cells integrates mechanical (rigidity and topographical (shape and dimensionality information differently when cell

  20. Otoliths in situ from Sarmatian (Middle Miocene) fishes of the Paratethys. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzhans, Werner; Carnevale, Giorgio; Bannikov, Alexandre F.

    2017-01-01

    Several well-preserved otoliths were extracted from four slabs containing fish specimens of Atherina suchovi. Atherina suchovi is one of the five Atherina species recorded from the Middle Miocene of the Central and Eastern Paratethys established on articulated skeletal remains. This corresponds...... it appears to be closely related to A. gidjakensis. A list is presented and briefly discussed showing Sarmatian skeleton-based fish records from the Central and Eastern Paratethys with an overview of known and currently studied fishes with otoliths in situ....

  1. Fluid-Mediated Stochastic Self-Assembly at Centimetric and Sub-Millimetric Scales: Design, Modeling, and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Haghighat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic self-assembly provides promising means for building micro-/nano-structures with a variety of properties and functionalities. Numerous studies have been conducted on the control and modeling of the process in engineered self-assembling systems constituted of modules with varied capabilities ranging from completely reactive nano-/micro-particles to intelligent miniaturized robots. Depending on the capabilities of the constituting modules, different approaches have been utilized for controlling and modeling these systems. In the quest of a unifying control and modeling framework and within the broader perspective of investigating how stochastic control strategies can be adapted from the centimeter-scale down to the (sub-millimeter-scale, as well as from mechatronic to MEMS-based technology, this work presents the outcomes of our research on self-assembly during the past few years. As the first step, we leverage an experimental platform to study self-assembly of water-floating passive modules at the centimeter scale. A dedicated computational framework is developed for real-time tracking, modeling and control of the formation of specific structures. Using a similar approach, we then demonstrate controlled self-assembly of microparticles into clusters of a preset dimension in a microfluidic chamber, where the control loop is closed again through real-time tracking customized for a much faster system dynamics. Finally, with the aim of distributing the intelligence and realizing programmable self-assembly, we present a novel experimental system for fluid-mediated programmable stochastic self-assembly of active modules at the centimeter scale. The system is built around the water-floating 3-cm-sized Lily robots specifically designed to be operative in large swarms and allows for exploring the whole range of fully-centralized to fully-distributed control strategies. The outcomes of our research efforts extend the state-of-the-art methodologies

  2. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-01

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of ‘pressure control’ to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  3. Directed assembly of bio-inspired hierarchical materials with controlled nanofibrillar architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Napier, Bradley; Zhao, Siwei; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Applegate, Matthew B.; Marelli, Benedetto; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2017-05-01

    In natural systems, directed self-assembly of structural proteins produces complex, hierarchical materials that exhibit a unique combination of mechanical, chemical and transport properties. This controlled process covers dimensions ranging from the nano- to the macroscale. Such materials are desirable to synthesize integrated and adaptive materials and systems. We describe a bio-inspired process to generate hierarchically defined structures with multiscale morphology by using regenerated silk fibroin. The combination of protein self-assembly and microscale mechanical constraints is used to form oriented, porous nanofibrillar networks within predesigned macroscopic structures. This approach allows us to predefine the mechanical and physical properties of these materials, achieved by the definition of gradients in nano- to macroscale order. We fabricate centimetre-scale material geometries including anchors, cables, lattices and webs, as well as functional materials with structure-dependent strength and anisotropic thermal transport. Finally, multiple three-dimensional geometries and doped nanofibrillar constructs are presented to illustrate the facile integration of synthetic and natural additives to form functional, interactive, hierarchical networks.

  4. Kinetic control of block copolymer self-assembly into multicompartment and novel geometry nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingchao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Ke; Wooley, Karen; Mays, Jimmy; Percec, Virgil; Pochan, Darrin

    2012-02-01

    Micelles with the segregation of hydrophobic blocks trapped in the same nanoparticle core have been produced through co-self-assembly of two block copolymers in THF/water dilute solution. The dissolution of two block copolymer sharing the same polyacrylic acid PAA blocks in THF undergoes consequent aggregation and phase separation through either slow water titration or quick water addition that triggers the micellar formation. The combination and comparison of the two water addition kinetic pathways are the keys of forming multicompartment structures at high water content. Importantly, the addition of organic diamine provides for acid-base complexation with the PAA side chains which, in turn, plays the key role of trapping unlike hydrophobic blocks from different block copolymers into one nanoparticle core. The kinetic control of solution assembly can be applied to other molecular systems such as dendrimers as well as other block copolymer molecules. Transmission electron microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, light scattering have been applied to characterize the micelle structures.

  5. Controlling the self-assembly of protein polymers via heterodimer-forming modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domeradzka, Natalia Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies formed by protein polymers are attractive candidates for future biomaterials. Ideally, one would like to be able to define the nanostructure, in which the protein polymers should self-assemble, and then design protein polymer sequences that assemble exactly into such nanost

  6. Laser driven self-assembly of shape-controlled potassium nanoparticles in porous glass

    CERN Document Server

    Marmugi, L; Burchianti, A; Veronesi, S; Moi, L; Marinelli, C

    2014-01-01

    We observe growth of shape-controlled potassium nanoparticles inside a random network of glass nanopores, exposed to low-power laser radiation. Visible laser light plays a dual role: it increases the desorption probability of potassium atoms from the inner glass walls and induces the self-assembly of metastable metallic nanoparticles along the nanopores. By probing the sample transparency and the atomic light-induced desorption flux into the vapour phase, the dynamics of both cluster formation/evaporation and atomic photo-desorption processes are characterized. Results indicate that laser light not only increases the number of nanoparticles embedded in the glass matrix but also influences their structural properties. By properly choosing the laser frequency and the illumination time, we demonstrate that it is possible to tailor the nanoparticles'shape distribution. Furthermore, a deep connection between the macroscopic behaviour of atomic desorption and light-assisted cluster formation is observed. Our result...

  7. Hierarchical structural control of visual properties in self-assembled photonic-plasmonic pigments

    CERN Document Server

    Koay, Natalie; Kay, Theresa M; Nerger, Bryan A; Miles-Rossouw, Malaika; Shirman, Tanya; Vu, Thy L; England, Grant; Phillips, Katherine R; Utech, Stefanie; Vogel, Nicolas; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple one-pot co-assembly method for the synthesis of hierarchically structured pigment particles consisting of silica inverse-opal bricks that are doped with plasmonic absorbers. We study the interplay between the plasmonic and photonic resonances and their effect on the visual appearance of macroscopic collections of photonic bricks that are distributed in randomized orientations. Manipulating the pore geometry tunes the wavelength- and angle-dependence of the scattering profile, which can be engineered to produce angle-dependent Bragg resonances that can either enhance or contrast with the color produced by the plasmonic absorber. By controlling the overall dimensions of the photonic bricks and their aspect ratios, their preferential alignment can either be encouraged or suppressed. This causes the Bragg resonance to appear either as uniform color travel in the former case or as sparse iridescent sparkle in the later case. By manipulating the surface chemistry of these photonic bricks, which ...

  8. Living in the matrix: assembly and control of Vibrio cholerae biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschler, Jennifer K.; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Utada, Andrew S.; Warner, Christopher J. A.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Linington, Roger G.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Nearly all bacteria form biofilms as a strategy for survival and persistence. Biofilms are associated with biotic and abiotic surfaces and are composed of aggregates of cells that are encased by a self-produced or acquired extracellular matrix. Vibrio cholerae has been studied as a model organism for understanding biofilm formation in environmental pathogens, as it spends much of its life cycle outside of the human host in the aquatic environment. Given the important role of biofilm formation in the V. cholerae life cycle, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process and the signals that trigger biofilm assembly or dispersal have been areas of intense investigation over the past 20 years. In this Review, we discuss V. cholerae surface attachment, various matrix components and the regulatory networks controlling biofilm formation. PMID:25895940

  9. Controlling DNA Bundle Size and Spatial Arrangement in Self-assembled Arrays on Superhydrophobic Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriele Ciasca; Luca Businaro; Marco De Spirito; Massimiliano Papi; Valentina Palmieri; Michela Chiarpotto; Simone Di Claudio; Adele De Ninno; Ennio Giovine; Gaetano Campi; Annamaria Gerardino

    2015-01-01

    The use of superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) is now emerging as an attractive platform for the realization of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with potential applications in many nanotechnological and biotechnological fields. To this purpose, a strict control of the nanostructures size and their spatial arrangement is highly required. However, these parameters may be strongly dependent on the complex evaporation dynamics of the sessile droplet on the SHS. In this work, we investigated the effect of the evaporation dynamics on the size and the spatial arrangement of self-assembled 1D DNA bundles. Our results reveal that different arrangements and bundle size distributions may occur depending on droplet evaporation stage. These results contribute to elucidate the formation mechanism of 1D nanostructures on SHSs.

  10. Structural and chemical control in assembly of multicomponent metal-organic coordination networks on a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ziliang; Lin, Nian

    2010-08-11

    Surface-supported supramolecular self-assembly has been used to generate multicomponent two-dimensional metal-organic coordination networks on a Au(111) surface. The networks consist of linker ligands of 4',4''''-(1,4-phenylene)bis(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and nodal ligands of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin that are connected by pyridine-Fe-terpyridine motifs. Scanning tunneling microscopy revealed the coexistence of two polymorphic types of network structures (rhombus and Kagome). Through control of the dosage of the constituent ligands, homogeneous structural phases were obtained selectively. In particular, the rhombus structure could be converted into the more complex and more open Kagome structure by inclusion of guest molecules. Finally, coordination networks providing structural and chemical homogeneity were realized by judiciously choosing the dosages of the constituent ligands and the chemical substitution of the porphyrin ligands.

  11. Controlling Electronic Transitions in Fullerene van der Waals Aggregates via Supramolecular Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saunak; Herrmann-Westendorf, Felix; Schacher, Felix H; Täuscher, Eric; Ritter, Uwe; Dietzek, Benjamin; Presselt, Martin

    2016-08-24

    Morphologies crucially determine the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors. Therefore, hierarchical and supramolecular approaches have been developed for targeted design of supramolecular ensembles of organic semiconducting molecules and performance improvement of, e.g., organic solar cells (OSCs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). We demonstrate how the photonic properties of fullerenes change with the formation of van der Waals aggregates. We identified supramolecular structures with broadly tunable absorption in the visible spectral range and demonstrated how to form aggregates with targeted visible (vis) absorption. To control supramolecular structure formation, we functionalized the C60-backbone with polar (bis-polyethylene glycol malonate-MPEG) tails, thus yielding an amphiphilic fullerene derivative that self-assembles at interfaces. Aggregates of systematically tuned size were obtained from concentrating MPEGC60 in stearic acid matrices, while different supramolecular geometries were provoked via different thin film preparation methods, namely spin-casting and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) deposition from an air-water interface. We demonstrated that differences in molecular orientation in LB films (C2v type point group aggregates) and spin-casting (stochastic aggregates) lead to huge changes in electronic absorption spectra due to symmetry and orientation reasons. These differences in the supramolecular structures, causing the different photonic properties of spin-cast and LB films, could be identified by means of quantum chemical calculations. Employing supramolecular assembly, we propounded that molecular symmetry in fullerene aggregates is extremely important in controlling vis absorption to harvest photons efficiently, when mixed with a donor molecule, thus improving active layer design and performance of OSCs.

  12. Otolith morphology and hearing abilities in cave- and surface-dwelling ecotypes of the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana (Teleostei: Poeciliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Cave fish have rarely been investigated with regard to their inner ear morphology, hearing abilities, and acoustic communication. Based on a previous study that revealed morphological differences in the saccular otolith between a cave and two surface populations of Poecilia mexicana, we checked for additional differences in utricular and lagenar otoliths and tested whether different populations have similar hearing sensitivities. We found pronounced differences in the shape of all three otoliths. Otoliths of the saccule and lagena from cave fish differed from those of surface fish in the features of the face oriented towards the sensory epithelium. In addition, otoliths of the utricle and lagena were significantly heavier in cave fish. Auditory sensitivities were measured between 100 and 1500Hz, utilizing the auditory evoked potential recording technique. We found similar hearing abilities in cave and surface fish, with greatest sensitivity between 200 and 300Hz. An acoustic survey revealed that neither ecotype produced species-specific sounds. Our data indicate that cave dwelling altered the otolith morphology in Atlantic mollies, probably due to metabolic differences. Different otolith morphology, however, did not affect general auditory sensitivity or acoustic behavior.

  13. Oxygen isotope record of the 1997-1998 El Niño in Peruvian sea catfish (Galeichthys peruvianus) otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, C. Fred T.; Crowe, Douglas E.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2002-12-01

    Sagittal otoliths of the Peruvian sea catfish Galeichthys peruvianus were collected from the north coast of Peru during and after the 1997-1998 El Niño. The otoliths were analyzed via laser microprobe and micromilling techniques for oxygen isotope composition through ontogeny to document their use as an El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) proxy. Results were compared to theoretical calculations for the δ18O of otolith aragonite using measured sea surface temperatures (SST) and δ18O values for local seawater assuming equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation was achieved. All otoliths recorded the 1997-1998 El Niño event as well as seasonal temperature variations. These ENSO events were recorded in otolith aragonite as significant negative excursions in δ18O that reflected the increased temperature of local marine waters. The combined otolith data were used to create a 10-year SST record, including ENSO events and local seasonal temperature variation, validating the use of otolith δ18O as a temperature proxy.

  14. Migratory Patterns of American Shad (Alosa Sapidissima) Revealed by Natural Geochemical Tags in Otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    200-201. Nolan, K., Grossfield, J., & Wirgin, I. 1991. Discrimination among Atlantic coast populations of American shad (A losa sapidissima) using...element signatures in otoliths record natal river of juvenile American shad (A losa sapidissima). Limnology and Oceanography 43: 1826-1835. Thorrold

  15. Otoliths in continental shelf and slope surficial sediments off Saurashtra, Arabian Sea, India and their significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; John, S.; Rana, R.S.

    is in progress and will be reported in due course. This preliminary report which is the first report from the northern Arabian Sea on fossil fish otolith may help as an additional tool in the reconstruction of paleoenvironment and in assessing the latitudinal...

  16. The utricular otoliths, lapilli, of teleosts: their morphology and relevance for species identification and systematics studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Assis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the general morphology of the utricular otoliths, lapilli, of teleost fishes, proposes a terminology for their parts, identifies their two major morphological types, provides some examples of their use in species identification, and discusses their usefulness in studies of fish phylogeny and systematics.

  17. Hearing capacities and otolith size in two ophidiiform species (Ophidion rochei and Carapus acus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéver, Loïc; Colleye, Orphal; Herrel, Anthony; Romans, Pascal; Parmentier, Eric

    2014-07-15

    Numerous studies have highlighted the diversity of fish inner ear morphology. However, the function of the shape, size and orientation of the different structures remains poorly understood. The saccule (otolithic endorgan) is considered to be the principal hearing organ in fishes and it has been hypothesized that sagitta (saccular otolith) shape and size affect hearing capacities: large sagittae are thought to increase sensitivity. The sagittae of many ophidiids and carapids occupy a large volume inside the neurocranium. Hence they are a good structure with which to test the size hypothesis. The main aim of this study was to investigate hearing capacities and inner ear morphology in two ophidiiform species: Ophidion rochei and Carapus acus. We used a multidisciplinary approach that combines dissections, μCT-scan examinations and auditory evoked potential techniques. Carapus acus and O. rochei sagittae have similar maximal diameters; both species have larger otoliths than many non-ophidiiform species, especially compared with the intra-neurocranium volume. Both species are sensitive to sounds up to 2100 Hz. Relative to the skull, O. rochei has smaller sagittae than the carapid, but better hearing capacities from 300 to 900 Hz and similar sensitivities at 150 Hz and from 1200 to 2100 Hz. Results show that hearing capacities of a fish species cannot be predicted only based on sagitta size. Larger otoliths (in size relative to the skull) may have evolved mainly for performing vestibular functions in fishes, especially those species that need to execute precise and complex movements.

  18. The potential dysfunction of otolith organs in patients after mumps infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Juan; Yu, Jing; Wu, Yong-Zhen; Tian, Liang; Han, Zhao; Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between mumps and the extent of hearing impairment and otolith organ damage. A total of 27 patients with unilateral hearing impairment following mumps were enrolled. The degrees of hearing loss and otolith organ damage were confirmed by audiometric and vestibular evoked myogenic potential [VEMP] tests. All the results were compared and analyzed using Stata 13.0 software for Windows. The VEMP thresholds of the affected ears were significantly higher than those of the unaffected ears in both tests (cervical VEMP [cVEMP] test and ocular VEMP [oVEMP] test; p = 0.000 and 0.001, respectively). The mean cVEMP and oVEMP threshold values of the affected ears with hearing impairment for ≤10 years were significantly lower than those of affected ears with hearing impairment for >10 years [p = 0.009 and 0.004, respectively]. Deafness resulting from mumps is usually profound and permanent, which indicates severe damage to the cochlea due to the disease. The functions of otolith organs in the vestibular system are also impaired. Over time, the function of the otolith organs or their neural pathway may suffer secondary damage.

  19. Otolith development in larval and juvenile Schizothorax davidi: ontogeny and growth increment characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Taiming; Hu, Jiaxiang; Cai, Yueping; Xiong, Sen; Yang, Shiyong; Wang, Xiongyan; He, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory-reared Schizothorax davidi larvae and juveniles were examined to assess the formation and characteristics of David's schizothoracin otoliths. Otolith development was observed and their formation period was verified by monitoring larvae and juveniles of known age. The results revealed that lapilli and sagittae developed before hatching, and the first otolith increment was identified at 2 days post hatching in both. The shape of lapilli was relatively stable during development compared with that of sagittae; however, growth of four sagittae and lapilli areas was consistent, but the posterior area grew faster than the anterior area and the ventral surface grew faster than the dorsal surface. Similarly, the sum length of the radius of the anterior and posterior areas on sagittae and lapilli were linearly and binomially related to total fish length, respectively. Moreover, daily deposition rates were validated by monitoring known-age larvae and juveniles. The increase in lapilli width was 1.88±0.080 0 μm at the ninth increment, which reached a maximum and the decreased gradually toward the otolith edge, whereas that of sagittae increased more slowly. These results illustrate the developmental biology of S. davidi, which will aid in population conservation and fish stock management.

  20. Marking pike fry otoliths with alizarin complexone and strontium : an evaluation of methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian; Grønkjær, P.; Nielsen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrated that both alizarin complexone and strontium are useful in mass marking of pike Esox lucius fry otoliths. Visual detection of alizarin complexone marks was considered more reliable than the quantitative analysis of strontium for differentiating marked and unmarked...

  1. Otoliths in situ from Sarmatian (Middle Miocene) fishes of the Paratethys. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzhans, Werner; Carnevale, Giorgio; Bratishko, Andriy

    2017-01-01

    previously described by Fedotov (1976). The new data allow further synonymization of otolith-based species, such as P. insectus (Weiler 1943) and possibly also P. irregularis (Gaemers 1973). Moreover, Properca sabbai Pauca 1929 is removed from the faunal list of Sarmatian fishes in the Paratethys. Kner...

  2. Identifying blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stock structure in the Northeast Atlantic by otolith shape analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahe, Kélig; Oudard, Clémence; Mille, Tiphaine;

    2016-01-01

    Information on stock identification and spatial stock structure provide a basis for understanding fish population dynamics and improving fisheries management. In this study, otolith shape analysis was used to study the stock structure of blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) in the northeast At...

  3. DISAIN OTOMATISASI PROSES BVC (BASE VALVE COMPLETE ASSEMBLY PRESS BERBASIS KENDALI PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Ardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu komponen penting dalam shock absorber adalah BVC (Base Valve Complete assembly yang merupakan komponen pengatur aliran fluida dalam shock absorber. Komponen BVC assembly ini terdiri dari 5 part berbeda yang dirakit kemudian dipress untuk menjadi satu BVC assembly. Proses press komponen BVC assembly ini dilakukan secara manual dengan menggunakan silinder pneumatik, dan tangan operator memegang BVC assembly saat proses press. Hal ini dianggap tidak safety terhadap operator, terutama mereka yang baru mengetahuinya. Untuk mengatasi hal ini, dibuatlah suatu mesin dengan menggunakan kendali PLC untuk melakukan proses press BVC assembly. Operator dibantu dengan penggunaan jig holder dalam mempersiapkan komponen BVC assembly untuk proses press. Semua pergerakan mesin dikendalikan oleh PLC Omron CPM2A secara otomatis sehingga operator hanya tinggal mempersiapkan komponen BVC assembly pada jig holder. Dengan demikian faktor safety operator dalam proses press BVC assembly dapat aman dan terkendali. Dan waktu operasional mesin press lebih stabil pada kisaran waktu 2 menit 36 detik untuk 50 kali proses press yang setiap proses press menghasilkan 2 BVC assembly.

  4. Dynamic control of the location of nanoparticles in hybrid co-assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhilong; Li, Xiaokang; Jiang, Xuesong; Lin, Shaoliang; Yin, Jie

    2015-03-01

    We herein demonstrated an approach to control the spatial distribution of components in hybrid microspheres. Hybrid core-shell structured microspheres (CSMs) prepared through co-assembly were used as starting materials, which are comprised of anthracene-ended hyperbranched poly(ether amine) (AN-hPEA) in the shell and crystallized anthracene containing polyhedral oligomer silsesquioxane (AN-POSS). Upon thermal annealing at a temperature higher than the melting point of AN-POSS, the diffusion of AN-POSS from the core to the shell of CSM leads to a transition of morphology from the core-shell structure to core-transition-shell to the more stable homogeneous morphology, which has been revealed by experimental results of TEM and DSC. The mechanism for the morphology transition of CSM induced by the diffusion of AN-POSS was disclosed by a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation. A mathematical model for the diffusion of POSS in the hybrid microsphere is established according to Fick's law of diffusion and can be used to quantify its distribution in CSM. Thus, the spatial distribution of POSS in the microsphere can be controlled dynamically by tuning the temperature and time of thermal annealing.We herein demonstrated an approach to control the spatial distribution of components in hybrid microspheres. Hybrid core-shell structured microspheres (CSMs) prepared through co-assembly were used as starting materials, which are comprised of anthracene-ended hyperbranched poly(ether amine) (AN-hPEA) in the shell and crystallized anthracene containing polyhedral oligomer silsesquioxane (AN-POSS). Upon thermal annealing at a temperature higher than the melting point of AN-POSS, the diffusion of AN-POSS from the core to the shell of CSM leads to a transition of morphology from the core-shell structure to core-transition-shell to the more stable homogeneous morphology, which has been revealed by experimental results of TEM and DSC. The mechanism for the morphology transition

  5. Coupling otolith microstructure analysis and hydrographic backtracking suggests a mechanism for the 2000s North Sea herring recruitment failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Stine Dalmann; Payne, Mark; Worsøe Clausen, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    . Individual larval growth rates, averaged over the 30 days prior to capture, were estimated for 200 larval otoliths from four different years using a model‐based analysis of the ring widths. The otolith measurements were complemented with additional information derived from hydrographic backtracking models (e...... stock productivity) as taking place during the larval overwintering phase: however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study we analysed archived larval samples captured both before and after the onset of the reduced survival to test the hypothesis of a reduction in the larval growth rate...... demonstrates how coupling two different techniques (otolith microstructure analysis and hydrographic modelling) can yield unique insights into fish ecology...

  6. Ocean acidification alters the otoliths of a pantropical fish species with implications for sensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignami, Sean; Enochs, Ian C; Manzello, Derek P; Sponaugle, Su; Cowen, Robert K

    2013-04-30

    Ocean acidification affects a wide diversity of marine organisms and is of particular concern for vulnerable larval stages critical to population replenishment and connectivity. Whereas it is well known that ocean acidification will negatively affect a range of calcareous taxa, the study of fishes is more limited in both depth of understanding and diversity of study species. We used new 3D microcomputed tomography to conduct in situ analysis of the impact of ocean acidification on otolith (ear stone) size and density of larval cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a large, economically important, pantropical fish species that shares many life history traits with a diversity of high-value, tropical pelagic fishes. We show that 2,100 μatm partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) significantly increased not only otolith size (up to 49% greater volume and 58% greater relative mass) but also otolith density (6% higher). Estimated relative mass in 800 μatm pCO2 treatments was 14% greater, and there was a similar but nonsignificant trend for otolith size. Using a modeling approach, we demonstrate that these changes could affect auditory sensitivity including a ∼50% increase in hearing range at 2,100 μatm pCO2, which may alter the perception of auditory information by larval cobia in a high-CO2 ocean. Our results indicate that ocean acidification has a graded effect on cobia otoliths, with the potential to substantially influence the dispersal, survival, and recruitment of a pelagic fish species. These results have important implications for population maintenance/replenishment, connectivity, and conservation efforts for other valuable fish stocks that are already being deleteriously impacted by overfishing.

  7. Assessment of functional development of the otolithic system in growing children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Yi-Ho

    2015-04-01

    Although the caloric test, rotational test, and posturography have been used to investigate balance function conventionally, and they are older than tests of otolithic organs, yet it seems that most clinicians are less familiar with the development of otolithic (saccular and utricular) function in children. This study reviewed the electrophysiological testing used to assess the functional development of the otolithic system in growing children. Based on the literature, studies of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) tests in children ranging from newborns, small children to adolescents were reviewed. Papers concerning foam posturography in children were also included. The cVEMPs can be elicited in newborns at day 5, whereas the oVEMPs are absent in neonatal period. When children grow to 2 years old, the oVEMPs can be induced with eyes closed condition, while the oVEMPs with eyes up condition can be elicited in children aged >3 years old, with the characteristic parameters similar to adult levels. In contrast with cVEMPs, it is until the neck length >15.3cm (aldolesence), one need not account for neck length in evaluating cVEMP latency. Additionally, foam posturography indicated by the Romberg quotient of the sway velocity/area on foam pad is considered to reflect the otolithic function, which reached adult levels when the children at 12 years old. For the functional development of the otolithic system in growing children to approach adult levels, the earliest occurrence is the oVEMP test, followed by the foam posturography, and cVEMP test. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-assembly of designed precursors: A route to crystallographically aligned new materials with controlled nanoarchitecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Richard, E-mail: rwestove@uoregon.edu; Atkins, Ryan A.; Falmbigl, Matthias; Ditto, Jeffrey J.; Johnson, David C.

    2016-04-15

    Modulated elemental reactants is a method by which new and complex intergrowth compounds can be synthesized by the self-assembly of designed precursors prepared by physical vapor deposition. Careful calibration of the composition and thickness of the precursors ensures the formation of the desired product by precise control of local composition and diffusion lengths. Superstructures of increasing complexity can be realized using binary and ternary systems as starting points. The synthesis of systems based on three different binary compounds, either alloyed together or separated into distinct layers, expands the number of possible superstructures that can be formed using this technique, but provides analytical challenges. The synthesis of [(SnSe){sub 1.15}]{sub 1}([Ta{sub x}V{sub 1−x}]Se{sub 2}){sub 1}[(SnSe){sub 1.15}]{sub 1}([V{sub y}Ta{sub 1−y}]Se{sub 2}){sub 1} compound is used to illustrate the preparation of precursors and the challenges in both measuring and limiting the interdiffusion of layers during self-assembly. Systematic changes in the electrical properties of (SnSe){sub 1+δ}(Ta{sub x}V{sub 1−x})Se{sub 2} alloys are observed as x is varied. The electrical resistivity of [(SnSe){sub 1.15}]{sub 1}([Ta{sub x}V{sub 1−x}]Se{sub 2}){sub 1}[(SnSe){sub 1.15}]{sub 1}([V{sub y}Ta{sub 1−y}]Se{sub 2}){sub 1} can be modeled as the two constituent layers in parallel.

  9. Mechatronic Development and Vision Feedback Control of a Nanorobotics Manipulation System inside SEM for Nanodevice Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan; Wang, Yaqiong; Yang, Bin; Li, Guanghui; Chen, Tao; Nakajima, Masahiro; Sun, Lining; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been developed in recent decades for nanodevices such as nanoradios, nanogenerators, carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) and so on, indicating that the application of CNTs for nanoscale electronics may play a key role in the development of nanotechnology. Nanorobotics manipulation systems are a promising method for nanodevice construction and assembly. For the purpose of constructing three-dimensional CNTFETs, a nanorobotics manipulation system with 16 DOFs was developed for nanomanipulation of nanometer-scale objects inside the specimen chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Nanorobotics manipulators are assembled into four units with four DOFs (X-Y-Z-θ) individually. The rotational one is actuated by a picomotor. That means a manipulator has four DOFs including three linear motions in the X, Y, Z directions and a 360-degree rotational one (X-Y-Z-θ stage, θ is along the direction rotating with X or Y axis). Manipulators are actuated by picomotors with better than 30 nm linear resolution and <1 micro-rad rotary resolution. Four vertically installed AFM cantilevers (the axis of the cantilever tip is vertical to the axis of electronic beam of SEM) served as the end-effectors to facilitate the real-time observation of the operations. A series of kinematic derivations of these four manipulators based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) notation were established. The common working space of the end-effectors is 2.78 mm by 4.39 mm by 6 mm. The manipulation strategy and vision feedback control for multi-manipulators operating inside the SEM chamber were been discussed. Finally, application of the designed nanorobotics manipulation system by successfully testing of the pickup-and-place manipulation of an individual CNT onto four probes was described. The experimental results have shown that carbon nanotubes can be successfully picked up with this nanorobotics manipulation system. PMID:27649180

  10. Damage Control Plan for International Space Station Recharge Tank Assembly Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA has retired the Space Shuttle Program, a new method of transporting compressed gaseous nitrogen and oxygen needed to be created for delivery of these crucial life support resources to the International Space Station (ISS). One of the methods selected by NASA includes the use of highly pressurized, unprotected Recharge Tank Assemblies (RTAs) utilizing Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). A COPV consists of a thin liner wrapped with a fiber composite and resin or epoxy. It is typically lighter weight than an all metal pressure vessel of similar volume and therefore provides a higher-efficiency means for gas storage. However COPVs are known to be susceptible to damage resulting from handling, tool drop impacts, or impacts from other objects. As a result, a comprehensive Damage Control Plan has been established to mitigate damage to the RTA COPV throughout its life cycle. The DCP is intended to evaluate and mitigate defined threats during manufacturing, shipping and handling, test, assembly level integration, shipment while pressurized, launch vehicle integration and mission operations by defining credible threats and methods for preventing potential damage while still maintaining the primary goal of resupplying ISS gas resources. A comprehensive threat assessment is performed to identify all threats posed to the COPV during the different phases of its lifecycle. The threat assessment is then used as the basis for creating a series of general inspection, surveillance and reporting requirements which apply across all phases of the COPV's life, targeted requirements only applicable to specific work phases and a series of training courses for both ground personnel and crew aboard the ISS. A particularly important area of emphasis deals with creating DCP requirements for a highly pressurized, large and unprotected RTA COPV for use during Inter Vehicular Activities (IVA) operations in the micro gravity environment while supplying pressurized gas to the

  11. Climate and edaphic controllers influence rhizosphere community assembly for a wild annual grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Erin E; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Estera, Katerina Y; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; De Valpine, Perry; Brodie, Eoin L; Firestone, Mary K

    2016-05-01

    The interface between roots and soil, known as the rhizosphere, is a dynamic habitat in the soil ecosystem. Unraveling the factors that control rhizosphere community assembly is a key starting point for understanding the diversity of plant-microbial interactions that occur in soil. The goals of this study were to determine how environmental factors shape rhizosphere microbial communities, such as local soil characteristics and the regional climate, and to determine the relative influence of the rhizosphere on microbial community assembly compared to the pressures imposed by the local and regional environment. We identified the bacteria present in the soil immediately adjacent to the roots of wild oat (A vena spp.) in three California grasslands using deep Illumina 16S sequencing. Rhizosphere communities were more similar to each other than to the surrounding soil communities from which they were derived, despite the fact that the grasslands studied were separated by hundreds of kilometers. The rhizosphere was the dominant factor structuring bacterial community composition (38% variance explained), and was comparable in magnitude to the combined local and regional effects (22% and 21%, respectively). Rhizosphere communities were most influenced by factors related to the regional climate (soil moisture and temperature), while background soil communities were more influenced by soil characteristics (pH, CEC, exchangeable cations, clay content). The Avena core microbiome was strongly phylogenetically clustered according to the metrics NRI and NTI, which indicates that selective processes likely shaped these communities. Furthermore, 17% of these taxa were not detectable in the background soil, even with a robust sequencing depth of approximately 70,000 sequences per sample. These results support the hypothesis that roots select less abundant or possibly rare populations in the soil microbial community, which appear to be lineages of bacteria that have made a

  12. Mechatronic Development and Vision Feedback Control of a Nanorobotics Manipulation System inside SEM for Nanodevice Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan; Wang, Yaqiong; Yang, Bin; Li, Guanghui; Chen, Tao; Nakajima, Masahiro; Sun, Lining; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-09-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been developed in recent decades for nanodevices such as nanoradios, nanogenerators, carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) and so on, indicating that the application of CNTs for nanoscale electronics may play a key role in the development of nanotechnology. Nanorobotics manipulation systems are a promising method for nanodevice construction and assembly. For the purpose of constructing three-dimensional CNTFETs, a nanorobotics manipulation system with 16 DOFs was developed for nanomanipulation of nanometer-scale objects inside the specimen chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Nanorobotics manipulators are assembled into four units with four DOFs (X-Y-Z-θ) individually. The rotational one is actuated by a picomotor. That means a manipulator has four DOFs including three linear motions in the X, Y, Z directions and a 360-degree rotational one (X-Y-Z-θ stage, θ is along the direction rotating with X or Y axis). Manipulators are actuated by picomotors with better than 30 nm linear resolution and <1 micro-rad rotary resolution. Four vertically installed AFM cantilevers (the axis of the cantilever tip is vertical to the axis of electronic beam of SEM) served as the end-effectors to facilitate the real-time observation of the operations. A series of kinematic derivations of these four manipulators based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) notation were established. The common working space of the end-effectors is 2.78 mm by 4.39 mm by 6 mm. The manipulation strategy and vision feedback control for multi-manipulators operating inside the SEM chamber were been discussed. Finally, application of the designed nanorobotics manipulation system by successfully testing of the pickup-and-place manipulation of an individual CNT onto four probes was described. The experimental results have shown that carbon nanotubes can be successfully picked up with this nanorobotics manipulation system.

  13. Mechatronic Development and Vision Feedback Control of a Nanorobotics Manipulation System inside SEM for Nanodevice Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT have been developed in recent decades for nanodevices such as nanoradios, nanogenerators, carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs and so on, indicating that the application of CNTs for nanoscale electronics may play a key role in the development of nanotechnology. Nanorobotics manipulation systems are a promising method for nanodevice construction and assembly. For the purpose of constructing three-dimensional CNTFETs, a nanorobotics manipulation system with 16 DOFs was developed for nanomanipulation of nanometer-scale objects inside the specimen chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Nanorobotics manipulators are assembled into four units with four DOFs (X-Y-Z-θ individually. The rotational one is actuated by a picomotor. That means a manipulator has four DOFs including three linear motions in the X, Y, Z directions and a 360-degree rotational one (X-Y-Z-θ stage, θ is along the direction rotating with X or Y axis. Manipulators are actuated by picomotors with better than 30 nm linear resolution and <1 micro-rad rotary resolution. Four vertically installed AFM cantilevers (the axis of the cantilever tip is vertical to the axis of electronic beam of SEM served as the end-effectors to facilitate the real-time observation of the operations. A series of kinematic derivations of these four manipulators based on the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H notation were established. The common working space of the end-effectors is 2.78 mm by 4.39 mm by 6 mm. The manipulation strategy and vision feedback control for multi-manipulators operating inside the SEM chamber were been discussed. Finally, application of the designed nanorobotics manipulation system by successfully testing of the pickup-and-place manipulation of an individual CNT onto four probes was described. The experimental results have shown that carbon nanotubes can be successfully picked up with this nanorobotics manipulation system.

  14. Controlling the electronic structure of nanocrystal assemblies by variation of the particle - particle interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Willey, T M; Terminello, L J

    2004-09-27

    The change in the electronic structure of germanium nanocrystals is investigated as their concentration is increased from non-interacting, individual particles to assembled arrays of particles. The electronic structure of the individual nanoclusters shows clear effects due to quantum confinement which are lost in the concentrated assemblies of bare particles. When the surface of the individual particles is passivated, they retain their quantum confinement properties also upon assembly. These effects are interpreted in terms of a particle - particle interaction model.

  15. Residual dizziness after the first BPPV episode: role of otolithic function and of a delayed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faralli, Mario; Lapenna, Ruggero; Giommetti, Giorgia; Pellegrino, Cristina; Ricci, Giampietro

    2016-10-01

    Residual dizziness (RD) following the resolution of a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BBPV) episode is frequently reported by patients. Possible causes are still under debate in the literature. This study discusses the possible role of otolithic function and of elapsed time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis in the genesis of RD. In total, 116 patients younger than 65 years with their first episode of BPPV and without any other comorbidities were enrolled in the study. Before a bedside examination, subjective visual vertical (SVV) was determined in the case of a history suggestive of BPPV. SVV was tested 1 week later in those patients with BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal, and in whom positioning maneuvers showed resolution of BPPV. At 1 week control, reported RD and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) were recorded. Diagnosis and treatment of BPPV occurred within 4 days in 43 patients (group A), between 5 and 8 days in 38 patients (group B) and in more than 9 days in 35 patients (group C). Higher values of reported RD and DHI were recorded in group C, while higher values of SVV deviation were recorded in group A with an inverse relationship between SVV and DHI. Initial peripheral vestibular function asymmetry due to BPPV can induce a new central adaptation. This adaptation becomes better established the longer otoconia remain floating in the endolymph. Because of these changes, the brain is unable to quickly readapt to the old pattern after resolution resulting in more persistent RD.

  16. From Solution to Biointerface: Graphene Self-Assemblies of Varying Lateral Sizes and Surface Properties for Biofilm Control and Osteodifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhaojun; Shi, Yuying; Xiong, Pan; Zhou, Wenhao; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-07-13

    Bringing multifunctional graphene out of solution through facile self-assembly to form 2D surface nanostructures, with control over the lateral size and surface properties, would be an intriguing accomplishment, especially in biomedical fields where biointerfaces with functional diversity are in high demand. Guided by this goal, in this work, we built such graphene-based self-assemblies on orthopedic titanium, attempting to selectively regulate bacterial activities and osteoblastic functions, which are both crucial in bone regeneration. Briefly, large-area graphene oxide (GO) sheets and functionalized reduced GO (rGO) micro-/nanosheets were self-assembled spontaneously and controllably onto solid Ti, through an evaporation-assisted electrostatic assembly process and a mussel-inspired one-pot assembly process, respectively. The resultant layers were characterized in terms of topological structure, chemical composition, hydrophilicity, and protein adsorption properties. The antibacterial efficacies of the assemblies were examined by challenging them with pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria that produce biofilms, whereby around 50% antiadhesion effects and considerable antibiofilm activities were observed for both layer types but through dissimilar modes of action. Their cytocompatibility and osteogenic potential were also investigated. Interfaced with MC3T3-E1 cells, the functionalized rGO sheets evoked better cell adhesion and growth than GO sheets, whereas the latter elicited higher osteodifferentiation activity throughout a 28-day in vitro culture. In this work, we showed that it is technically possible to construct graphene interface layers of varying lateral dimensions and surface properties and confirmed the concept of using the obtained assemblies to address the two major challenges facing orthopedic clinics. In addition, we determined fundamental implications for understanding the surface-biology relationship of graphene biomaterials, in

  17. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (∼1012 inch−2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on–off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics. PMID:27491392

  18. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seungho; Yun, Chao; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Kursumovic, Ahmed; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lu, Ping; Jia, Quanxi; Fan, Meng; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Hofmann, Stephan; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (~1012 inch-2). We systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on-off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics.

  19. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide with controlled polarization for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu; Zhu, Ren; Jenkins, Kory; Yang, Rusen

    2016-11-01

    Peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their biocompatibility, functional molecular recognition and unique biological and electronic properties. The strong piezoelectricity in diphenylalanine peptide expands its technological potential as a smart material. However, its random and unswitchable polarization has been the roadblock to fulfilling its potential and hence the demonstration of a piezoelectric device remains lacking. Here we show the control of polarization with an electric field applied during the peptide self-assembly process. Uniform polarization is obtained in two opposite directions with an effective piezoelectric constant d33 reaching 17.9 pm V-1. We demonstrate the power generation with a peptide-based power generator that produces an open-circuit voltage of 1.4 V and a power density of 3.3 nW cm-2. Devices enabled by peptides with controlled piezoelectricity provide a renewable and biocompatible energy source for biomedical applications and open up a portal to the next generation of multi-functional electronics compatible with human tissue.

  20. Controlled growth of hexagonal gold nanostructures during thermally induced self-assembling on Ge(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jany, B. R.; Gauquelin, N.; Willhammar, T.; Nikiel, M.; van den Bos, K. H. W.; Janas, A.; Szajna, K.; Verbeeck, J.; Van Aert, S.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Krok, F.

    2017-01-01

    Nano-sized gold has become an important material in various fields of science and technology, where control over the size and crystallography is desired to tailor the functionality. Gold crystallizes in the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase, and its hexagonal closed packed (hcp) structure is a very unusual and rare phase. Stable Au hcp phase has been reported to form in nanoparticles at the tips of some Ge nanowires. It has also recently been synthesized in the form of thin graphene-supported sheets which are unstable under electron beam irradiation. Here, we show that stable hcp Au 3D nanostructures with well-defined crystallographic orientation and size can be systematically created in a process of thermally induced self-assembly of thin Au layer on Ge(001) monocrystal. The Au hcp crystallite is present in each Au nanostructure and has been characterized by different electron microscopy techniques. We report that a careful heat treatment above the eutectic melting temperature and a controlled cooling is required to form the hcp phase of Au on a Ge single crystal. This new method gives scientific prospects to obtain stable Au hcp phase for future applications in a rather simple manner as well as redefine the phase diagram of Gold with Germanium. PMID:28195226

  1. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide with controlled polarization for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu; Zhu, Ren; Jenkins, Kory; Yang, Rusen

    2016-01-01

    Peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their biocompatibility, functional molecular recognition and unique biological and electronic properties. The strong piezoelectricity in diphenylalanine peptide expands its technological potential as a smart material. However, its random and unswitchable polarization has been the roadblock to fulfilling its potential and hence the demonstration of a piezoelectric device remains lacking. Here we show the control of polarization with an electric field applied during the peptide self-assembly process. Uniform polarization is obtained in two opposite directions with an effective piezoelectric constant d33 reaching 17.9 pm V−1. We demonstrate the power generation with a peptide-based power generator that produces an open-circuit voltage of 1.4 V and a power density of 3.3 nW cm−2. Devices enabled by peptides with controlled piezoelectricity provide a renewable and biocompatible energy source for biomedical applications and open up a portal to the next generation of multi-functional electronics compatible with human tissue. PMID:27857133

  2. Shape-controlled synthesis of gold nanoplates and their self-assembly by repulsive electrostatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Liyan; Rao, Yanying; Sun, Qian; Li, Danyang; Cheng, Yuan; Dong, Jian; Qian, Weiping

    2012-06-01

    This study focuses on understanding the growth and control of the gold nanoplates by seed-mediated growth approach. These monodispersive size-controlled gold nanoplates have the average thickness of 8-10 nm and average size tunable from 70 to 150 nm, exhibiting strong surface plasmon absorption in the near infrared (NIR) region. For the gold nanoplates formation, the seeds serve as nucleation sites, ascorbic acid (AA) serves as a new reductant to reduce hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4), surface activity system cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and potassium iodide (KI) are critical factors. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) analyses reveal that gold nanoplates with the (111) lattice plane as the basal plane are single crystals. CTAB are absorbed on the surface of the (111) lattice plane of the single crystals, accounting for self-assembled monolayer and head-to-head arrays. The two arrays have been shown to serve as effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates using Niel blue A (NBA) sulfate as Raman report molecule.

  3. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  4. Controlled growth of hexagonal gold nanostructures during thermally induced self-assembling on Ge(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jany, B. R.; Gauquelin, N.; Willhammar, T.; Nikiel, M.; van den Bos, K. H. W.; Janas, A.; Szajna, K.; Verbeeck, J.; van Aert, S.; van Tendeloo, G.; Krok, F.

    2017-02-01

    Nano-sized gold has become an important material in various fields of science and technology, where control over the size and crystallography is desired to tailor the functionality. Gold crystallizes in the face-centered cubic (fcc) phase, and its hexagonal closed packed (hcp) structure is a very unusual and rare phase. Stable Au hcp phase has been reported to form in nanoparticles at the tips of some Ge nanowires. It has also recently been synthesized in the form of thin graphene-supported sheets which are unstable under electron beam irradiation. Here, we show that stable hcp Au 3D nanostructures with well-defined crystallographic orientation and size can be systematically created in a process of thermally induced self-assembly of thin Au layer on Ge(001) monocrystal. The Au hcp crystallite is present in each Au nanostructure and has been characterized by different electron microscopy techniques. We report that a careful heat treatment above the eutectic melting temperature and a controlled cooling is required to form the hcp phase of Au on a Ge single crystal. This new method gives scientific prospects to obtain stable Au hcp phase for future applications in a rather simple manner as well as redefine the phase diagram of Gold with Germanium.

  5. The controllable assembly of nanorods, nanowires and microwires of a perylenediimide molecule with photoswitching property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ying, E-mail: yingma@imr.ac.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110168 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science (China); An, Boxing; Wang, Meng; Shi, Fangxiao; Wang, Qing; Gu, Yaxin; Niu, Wanyang; Fan, Zhaorong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110168 (China); Shang, Yanli [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Wang, Dan; Zhao, Cong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110168 (China)

    2015-07-15

    By using an electron donor–acceptor molecule that consists of a perylenediimide (PDI) core bonded with two ferrocene (Fc) units, well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed through simply adjusting the initial concentration of PDI-Fc in dichloromethane or CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Moreover, the two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were demonstrated in the microwire through controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. The assembly strategy via complementary donors and acceptors is of significance for constructing photoconductive systems and developing novel functional devices. - Graphical abstract: The two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were observed by controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. - Highlights: • An electron donor–acceptor molecule (PDI-Fc) was synthesized. • Well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed. • The two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. • Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were observed.

  6. Self-assembled sorbitol-derived supramolecular hydrogels for the controlled encapsulation and release of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Edward J; Okesola, Babatunde O; Smith, David K

    2015-05-01

    A simple supramolecular hydrogel based on 1,3:2,4-di(4-acylhydrazide)benzylidene sorbitol (DBS-CONHNH2), is able to extract acid-functionalised anti-inflammatory drugs via directed interactions with the self-assembled gel nanofibres. Two-component hydrogel-drug hybrid materials can be easily formed by mixing and exhibit pH-controlled drug release.

  7. Organization, Integration and Assembly of Genetic and Epigenetic Regulatory Machinery in Nuclear Microenvironments: Implications for Biological Control in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Gary S.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Stein, Janet L.; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, Andre; Montecino, Martin; Young, Daniel W.; Javed, Amjad; Pratap, Jitesh; Choi, Je-Yong; Ali, Syed A; Pande, Sandhya; Hassan, Mohammad Q.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing awareness that the fidelity of gene expression necessitates coordination of transcription factor metabolism and organization of genes and regulatory proteins within the three dimensional context of nuclear architecture. The regulatory machinery that governs genetic and epigenetic control of gene expression is compartmentalized in nuclear microenvironments. Temporal and spatial parameters of regulatory complex organization and assembly are functionally linked to biological con...

  8. Two-dimensional assembly based on flow supramolecular chemistry: kinetic control of molecular interactions under solvent diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Munenori; Kozawa, Tomohiro

    2014-05-19

    Self-assembly of porphyrin molecules can be controlled kinetically to form structures with lengths extending from the nano- to the micrometer scale, through a programmed solvent-diffusion process in designed microflow spaces. Temporal solvent structures generated in the microflow were successfully transcribed into molecular architectures.

  9. Solvothermal synthesis and controlled self-assembly of monodisperse titanium-based perovskite colloidal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruntu, Daniela; Rostamzadeh, Taha; Costanzo, Tommaso; Salemizadeh Parizi, Saman; Caruntu, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    The rational design of monodisperse ferroelectric nanocrystals with controlled size and shape and their organization into hierarchical structures has been a critical step for understanding the polar ordering in nanoscale ferroelectrics, as well as the design of nanocrystal-based functional materials which harness the properties of individual nanoparticles and the collective interactions between them. We report here on the synthesis and self-assembly of aggregate-free, single-crystalline titanium-based perovskite nanoparticles with controlled morphology and surface composition by using a simple, easily scalable and highly versatile colloidal route. Single-crystalline, non-aggregated BaTiO3 colloidal nanocrystals, used as a model system, have been prepared under solvothermal conditions at temperatures as low as 180 °C. The shape of the nanocrystals was tuned from spheroidal to cubic upon changing the polarity of the solvent, whereas their size was varied from 16 to 30 nm for spheres and 5 to 78 nm for cubes by changing the concentration of the precursors and the reaction time, respectively. The hydrophobic, oleic acid-passivated nanoparticles exhibit very good solubility in non-polar solvents and can be rendered dispersible in polar solvents by a simple process involving the oxidative cleavage of the double bond upon treating the nanopowders with the Lemieux-von Rudloff reagent. Lattice dynamic analysis indicated that regardless of their size, BaTiO3 nanocrystals present local disorder within the perovskite unit cell, associated with the existence of polar ordering. We also demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to being used for fabricating large area, crack-free, highly uniform films, BaTiO3 nanocubes can serve as building blocks for the design of 2D and 3D mesoscale structures, such as superlattices and superparticles. Interestingly, the type of superlattice structure (simple cubic or face centered cubic) appears to be determined by the type of solvent

  10. Torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex measurements for identifying otolith asymmetries possibly related to space motion sickness susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    Recent studies by Diamond and Markham 1,2 have identified significant correlations between space motion sickness susceptibility and measures of disconjugate torsional eye movements recorded during parabolic flights. These results support an earlier proposal by von Baumgarten and Thümler 3 which hypothesized that an asymmetry of otolith function between the two ears is the cause of space motion sickness. It may be possible to devise experiments that can be performed in the 1 g environment on earth that could identify and quantify the presence of asymmetric otolith function. This paper summarizes the known physiological and anatomical properties of the otolith organs and the properties of the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex which are relevant to the design of a stimulus to identify otolith asymmetries. A specific stimulus which takes advantage of these properties is proposed.

  11. Variation of Ca, Sr, Ba and Mg in the otolith of mudskipper in west coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarimin, A S; Ghaffar, M A; Mohamed, C A R

    2009-02-01

    A study on elemental composition in the otolith of giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, was done from June to October 2003. Specimens were obtained from the mangrove areas of Kuala Selangor, Sepang and Melaka in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 70 sagitta otoliths were analyzed to detect variation of Sr, Ba and Mg, replacing the natural chemical composition of the otolith, which is the calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The average ratio of Sr:Ca was 0.11 x 10(-4), Ba:Ca was 5.7 x 10(-3) and Mg:Ca was 0.2 x 10(-3). Strong correlation (R > 0.8) between fish body size and otolith weight ofmudskipper (p < 0.01) also found during this study.

  12. Charge-controlled assembling of bacteriorhodopsin and semiconductor quantum dots for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanophotonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Troyon, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin within its natural purple membrane (PM) is explored to monitor their assembling. It is shown that the efficiency of FRET may be controlled by variation of the surface charge and thickness of QD organic coating. Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed correlation between the surface charge of QDs and degree of their ordering on the surface of PM. The most FRET-efficient QD-PM complexes have the highest level of QDs ordering, and their assembling design may be further optimized to engineer hybrid materials with advanced biophotonic and photovoltaic properties.

  13. Self-repairing complex helical columns generated via kinetically controlled self-assembly of dendronized perylene bisimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percec, Virgil; Hudson, Steven D; Peterca, Mihai; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Aqad, Emad; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Heiney, Paul A

    2011-11-16

    The dendronized perylene 3,4:9,10-tetracarboxylic acid bisimide (PBI), (3,4,5)12G1-3-PBI, was recently reported to self-assemble in complex helical columns containing tetramers of PBI as basic repeat unit. These tetramers contain a pair of two molecules arranged side-by-side and another pair in the next stratum of the column turned upside-down and rotated around the column axis. Intra- and intertetramer rotation angles and stacking distances are different. At high temperature, (3,4,5)12G1-3-PBI self-assembles via a thermodynamically controlled process in a 2D hexagonal columnar phase while at low temperature in a 3D orthorhombic columnar array via a kinetically controlled process. Here, we report the synthesis and structural analysis, by a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray and electron diffraction, and solid-state NMR performed at different temperatures, on the supramolecular structures generated by a library of (3,4,5)nG1-3-PBI with n = 14-4. For n = 11-8, the kinetically controlled self-assembly from low temperature changes in a thermodynamically controlled process, while the orthorhombic columnar array for n = 9 and 8 transforms from the thermodynamic product into the kinetic product. The new thermodynamic product at low temperature for n = 9, 8 is a self-repaired helical column with an intra- and intertetramer distance of 3.5 Å forming a 3D monoclinic periodic array via a kinetically controlled self-assembly process. The complex dynamic process leading to this reorganization was elucidated by solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction. This discovery is important for the field of self-assembly and for the molecular design of supramolecular electronics and solar cell.

  14. Control over Structure and Function of Peptide Amphiphile Supramolecular Assemblies through Molecular Design and Energy Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantakitti, Faifan

    a controlled local release of the soluble growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) was realized from the particle's core composed of cross-linked alginate. The alginate-core and PA-shell microparticles were found to allow independent tuning of the bioactivity of a PA and a release of the growth factor for specific signaling to cells. Using microcarriers which encapsulated BMP-4 and coated with RGDS PA nanofibers, it was shown that a control over spatial distribution, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of premyoblastic cells on the surface of microcarriers can be effectively achieved. Finally, in drastic contrast to the traditional approach to material development based on altering molecular structure, chapter 4 presents the energy landscapes in which supramolecular assemblies of unique architecture exist in different thermodynamic wells. Experimental results and calculations revealed that the energy landscapes are rooted in competing interactions between PA monomers, namely beta-sheet hydrogen bonds and repulsion among charged groups. Switching off or on the repulsive electrostatic interactions by changing the ionic strength promoted or suppressed the dominant ?-sheet hydrogen bonding interactions respectively. However, the dominant forces can prevail if the assemblies are above a certain size and thereby can exist in a kinetically trapped state. Preparative pathways involving dilution, annealing, and addition of salt were investigated in which the structures belonging to different energy states could be accessed and demonstrated that these energy landscapes involving competitive interactions was applicable not only to PA systems but also to a non-peptide supramolecular system based on pi-orbital overlaps as the dominant attraction among molecules and electrostatic repulsion. In chapter 5, structure and biological function relationships of long or short PA nanofibers are reported, and such fibers were prepared from identical monomers based on

  15. Controlled growth and assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrane, Badr

    Carbon nanotubes are promising candidates for enhancing electronic devices in the future at the nanoscale level. Their integration into today's electronics has however been challenging due to the difficulties in controlling their orientation, location, chirality and diameter during formation. This thesis investigates and develops new techniques for the controlled growth and assembly of carbon nanotubes as a way to address some of these challenges. Colloidal lithography using nanospheres of 450 nm in diameter, acting as a shadow mask during metal evaporation, has been used to pattern thin films of single-walled carbon nanotube multilayer catalysts on Si and Si/SiO2 substrates. Large areas of periodic hexagonal catalyst islands were formed and chemical vapor deposition resulted in aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si substrates within the hexagonal array of catalyst islands. On silicon dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotubes connecting the hexagonal catalyst islands were observed. To help explain these observations, a growth model based on experimental data has been used. Electrostatic interaction, van der Waals interaction and gas flow appear to be the main forces contributing to single-walled carbon nanotube alignment on Si/SiO2. Although the alignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si substrates is still not fully understood, it may be due to a combination of the above factors, in addition to silicide-nanotube interaction. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of the post-growth samples show single-walled carbon nanotubes of 1-2 nm in diameter. Based on the atomic force microscopy data and Raman spectra, a mixture of individual and bundles of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes were inferred to be present. A novel technique based on direct nanowriting of carbon nanotube catalysts in liquid form has also been developed. The reliability of this method to produce nanoscale catalyst geometries in a highly controlled manner, as required for

  16. Temporal stability of otolith elemental fingerprints discriminates among lagoon nursery habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournois, Jennifer; Ferraton, Franck; Velez, Laure; McKenzie, David J.; Aliaume, Catherine; Mercier, Lény; Darnaude, Audrey M.

    2013-10-01

    The chemical composition of fish otoliths reflects that of the water masses that they inhabit. Otolith elemental compositions can, therefore, be used as natural tags to discriminate among habitats. However, for retrospective habitat identification to be valid and reliable for any adult, irrespective of its age, significant differences in environmental conditions, and therefore otolith signatures, must be temporally stable within each habitat, otherwise connectivity studies have to be carried out by matching year-classes to the corresponding annual fingerprints. This study investigated how various different combinations of chemical elements in otoliths could distinguish, over three separate years, between four coastal lagoon habitats used annually as nurseries by gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean). A series of nine elements were measured in otoliths of 301 S. aurata juveniles collected in the four lagoons in 2008, 2010 and 2011. Percentages of correct re-assignment of juveniles to their lagoon of origin were calculated with the Random Forest classification method, considering every possible combination of elements. This revealed both spatial and temporal variations in accuracy of habitat identification, with correct re-assignment to each lagoon ranging from 44 to 99% depending on the year and the lagoon. There were also annual differences in the combination of elements that provided the best discrimination among the lagoons. Despite this, when the data from the three years were pooled, a combination of eight elements (B, Ba, Cu, Li, Mg, Rb, Sr and Y) provided greater than 70% correct re-assignment to each single lagoon, with a multi-annual global accuracy of 79%. When considering the years separately, discrimination accuracy with these elemental fingerprints was above 90% for 2008 and 2010. It decreased to 61% in 2011, when unusually heavy rainfall occurred, which presumably reduced chemical differences among several of the

  17. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae, E-mail: nicolae.leopold@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2014-12-15

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  18. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae

    2014-12-01

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl4 by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of 20 and 120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4-8 and 10-30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  19. Temperature-responsive self-assembled monolayers of oligo(ethylene glycol): control of biomolecular recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareie, Hadi M; Boyer, Cyrille; Bulmus, Volga; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Davis, Thomas P

    2008-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG)-tethered molecules on gold are important for various biorelevant applications ranging from biomaterials to bioanalytical devices, where surface resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption is needed. Incorporation of a stimuli-responsive character to the OEG SAMs enables the creation of nonfouling surfaces with switchable functionality. Here we present an OEG-derived structure that is highly responsive to temperature changes in the vicinity of the physiological temperature, 37 degrees C. The temperature-responsive solution behavior of this new compound was demonstrated by UV-vis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Its chemisorption onto gold(111), and the retention of responsive behavior after chemisorption have been demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy. The OEG-derived SAMs have been shown to reversibly switch the wettability of the surface, as determined by contact angle measurements. More importantly, SPR and AFM studies showed that the OEG SAMs can be utilized to control the affinity binding of streptavidin to the biotin-tethered surface in a temperature-dependent manner while still offering the nonspecific protein-resistance to the surface.

  20. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis.

  1. Controlled self-assembly of organic composite microdisks for efficient output coupling of whispering-gallery-mode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cong; Liu, Si-Yun; Zou, Chang-Ling; Liu, Yingying; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2015-01-14

    Flexible microdisk whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators with high quality factors were achieved through the controlled assembly of organic materials with an emulsion-solvent-evaporation method. The high material compatibility of the assembled microdisks enabled us to realize low-threshold WGM lasers by doping with organic dyes as gain media. Furthermore, the emulsion-assisted self-assembly provided a strategy for the one-step fabrication of microwire-waveguide-connected microdisk heterostructures, which can be utilized for the efficient output of the isotropic WGM lasers from the coupled waveguides. We hope that these results will pave an avenue for the construction of new types of flexible WGM-based components for photonic integration.

  2. Size-controllable DNA nanoribbons assembled from three types of reusable brick single-strand DNA tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Chen, Congzhou; Li, Xin; Song, Tao; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Yanfeng

    2015-11-21

    Precise control of nanostructure is a significant goal shared by supramolecular chemistry, nanotechnology and materials science. In DNA nanotechnology, methods of constructing desired DNA nanostructures using programmable DNA strands have been studied extensively and have become a promising branch of research, but developing universal and low-cost (in the sense of using fewer types of DNA strands) methods remains a challenge. In this work, we propose a novel approach to assemble size-controllable DNA nanoribbons with three types of reusable brick SSTs (single-stranded DNA tiles), where the control of ribbon size is achieved by regulating the concentration ratio between manipulative strands and packed single-stranded DNA tiles. In our method, three types of brick SSTs are sufficient in assembling DNA nanoribbons of different sizes, which is much less than the number of types of unique tile-programmable assembling strategy, thus achieving a universal and low-cost method. The assembled DNA nanoribbons are observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experimental observations strongly suggest the feasibility and reliability of our method.

  3. Phase behaviour of self-assembled monolayers controlled by tuning physisorbed and chemisorbed states: A lattice-model view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Sara; Cheung, David L; Johnston, Karen

    2016-04-07

    The self-assembly of molecules on surfaces into 2D structures is important for the bottom-up fabrication of functional nanomaterials, and the self-assembled structure depends on the interplay between molecule-molecule interactions and molecule-surface interactions. Halogenated benzene derivatives on platinum have been shown to have two distinct adsorption states: a physisorbed state and a chemisorbed state, and the interplay between the two can be expected to have a profound effect on the self-assembly and phase behaviour of these systems. We developed a lattice model that explicitly includes both adsorption states, with representative interactions parameterised using density functional theory calculations. This model was used in Monte Carlo simulations to investigate pattern formation of hexahalogenated benzene molecules on the platinum surface. Molecules that prefer the physisorbed state were found to self-assemble with ease, depending on the interactions between physisorbed molecules. In contrast, molecules that preferentially chemisorb tend to get arrested in disordered phases. However, changing the interactions between chemisorbed and physisorbed molecules affects the phase behaviour. We propose functionalising molecules in order to tune their adsorption states, as an innovative way to control monolayer structure, leading to a promising avenue for directed assembly of novel 2D structures.

  4. Effects of extreme habitat conditions on otolith morphology: a case study on extremophile live bearing fishes (Poecilia mexicana, P. sulphuraria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Riesch, Rüdiger; García de León, Francisco J; Plath, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Our study was designed to evaluate if, and to what extent, restrictive environmental conditions affect otolith morphology. As a model, we chose two extremophile livebearing fishes: (i) Poecilia mexicana, a widespread species in various Mexican freshwater habitats, with locally adapted populations thriving in habitats characterized by the presence of one (or both) of the natural stressors hydrogen sulphide and darkness, and (ii) the closely related Poecilia sulphuraria living in a highly sulphidic habitat (Baños del Azufre). All three otolith types (lapilli, sagittae, and asterisci) of P. mexicana showed a decrease in size ranging from the non-sulphidic cave habitat (Cueva Luna Azufre), to non-sulphidic surface habitats, to the sulphidic cave (Cueva del Azufre), to sulphidic surface habitats (El Azufre), to P. sulphuraria. Although we found a distinct differentiation between ecotypes with respect to their otolith morphology, no clear-cut pattern of trait evolution along the two ecological gradients was discernible. Otoliths from extremophiles captured in the wild revealed only slight similarities to aberrant otoliths found in captive-bred fish. We therefore hypothesize that extremophile fishes have developed coping mechanisms enabling them to avoid aberrant otolith growth - an otherwise common phenomenon in fishes reared under stressful conditions.

  5. Texture and nano-scale internal microstructure of otoliths in the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana: a high-resolution EBSD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, T; Götz, A; Griesshaber, E; Plath, M; Schmahl, W W

    2013-08-01

    Otoliths of modern bony fishes are massive polycrystalline structures consisting mainly of calcium carbonate (primarily aragonite), and 1-10% organic residuals. Unlike other biomineralisates like shells, teeth and bones, they are not optimized for mechanical loads but serve the senses of hearing and balance in the inner ear. We examined internal structural variation of otoliths through microstructural and texture analyses. Our study applied the electron backscattered diffraction technique (EBSD) to whole sections of saccular otoliths on cave- and surface-dwelling fish. Application of high spatial resolution EBSD on otoliths of the livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana allowed for an investigation of crystal orientation despite the small size (<150 nm) of aragonite crystallites. Crystallites at the rims of otoliths had a higher structural organization than those situated near the center, where no dominant orientation pattern was discernible. Moreover, the medial (sulcal) face of otoliths, which makes contact with the sensory epithelium, was more structured than the lateral (antisulcal) face.

  6. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission: 3. Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, D. G.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, "falls" were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot be ruled out.

  7. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission. III - Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, D. G. D.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, 'falls' were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot by ruled out.

  8. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  9. Polymeric microtubules that breathe: CO2 -driven polymer controlled-self-assembly and shape transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Zhao, Yue

    2013-09-16

    Tubular breathing motion: Polymer tubules self-assembled from a gas-sensitive triblock copolymer can undergo shape evolution. A sequence from microtubes through submicroscopic vesicles to nanosized spherical micelles is modulated by CO2 stimulation levels.

  10. Strongly Dichroic Organic Films via Controlled Assembly of Modular Aromatic Charge-Transfer Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bé, Ariana Gray; Tran, Cheryl; Sechrist, Riley; Reczek, Joseph J

    2015-10-02

    The formation of highly anisotropic organic thin films based on the designed self-assembly of mixed-stack liquid crystals is reported. A series of alkoxyanthracene donors is combined in a modular fashion with a naphthalenediimide acceptor to generate new charge-transfer columnar liquid crystals. Materials characterization and molecular modeling provides insight into structure-function relationships in these organic materials that lead to the striking bulk dichroic properties of certain molecular assemblies.

  11. Modelling the mixing of herring stocks between the Baltic and the North Sea from otolith data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Clara; Post, Søren Lorentzen; Worsøe Clausen, Lotte;

    2012-01-01

    Herring catches in the western Baltic, Kattegat and Skagerrak consist of a mixture of stocks, mainly North Sea autumn spawners (NSAS) and western Baltic spring spawners (WBSS), which is managed through a single TAC. Catches of these two stocks are split using otolith microstructures from Danish...... as provide solutions to the complex management of this mix. The stock‐specific seasonal trends in distribution of the two main stocks from otolith data were analysed using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) of stock composition. The results show a clear seasonal and age‐related pattern...... and are consistent with existing ideas about the migration patterns of WBSS and NSAS within Division IIIa and adjacent waters. This work therefore provides the foundation for the development of a more rational management of the herring stocks in this area...

  12. Factors determining variations in otolith microincrement width of demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Mosegaard, Henrik; Hinrichsen, H.H.;

    2003-01-01

    Pelagic and demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua L. were collected on the slope and the top of Rønne bank in the Baltic Sea during 2 cruises in November and December 1998. The objective of this study was to evaluate distinct changes in otolith increment width observed in demersal juveniles b......, performed vertical migrations during the second interval, and stayed in association with the seafloor in the subsequent interval, corresponding to the time after the breakdown of the thermocline....

  13. Validation of daily ring deposition in the otoliths of age-0 channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaris, P.C.; Irwin, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    We developed and validated methods for estimating the daily age of age-0 channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Two clutches of channel catfish eggs were hatched in the laboratory; subsequently, one was stocked in a 186-m2 earthen nursery pond and the other in a 757-L outdoor circular tank. Before stocking, subsamples of fish were collected at swim-up and 3 d after swim-up to evaluate early ring formation. Fish were sampled from the pond and tank on eight occasions ranging from 30 to 119 d posthatch. Distinct differences in early ring formation were found between yolk sac and free-swimming larval stages. Mean ring count and known age were closely related for tank- and pond-raised fish, indicating that daily ring deposition occurred in the otoliths of age-0 channel catfish up to 119 d posthatch. The accuracy of daily age estimation was similar between tank and pond samples, and daily ring counts were considerably accurate up to 60 d posthatch. Pond-raised fish were more difficult to age than tank-raised fish, which we attributed to ring compression resulting from slower growth among pond-raised fish after 30 d. The total length of tank- and pond-raised fish was positively related to otolith size; however, the slopes of the relationships between fish length and otolith radius were different between treatments. Therefore, we could not confirm that the relationship between fish length and otolith size was directly proportional for age-0 channel catfish. We encourage researchers to use this aging technique to determine how abiotic and biotic factors influence early life history characteristics and ultimately the population dynamics of catfishes (Ictaluridae). ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Water-Assembled Graphene Oxide Langmuir Monolayers: Guiding Controlled Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Katharine L; Biedermann, Laura B; Zavadil, Kevin R

    2015-09-15

    Liquid-phase transfer of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers is investigated from the perspective of the mechanical properties of these films. Monolayers are assembled in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough, and oscillatory barrier measurements are used to characterize the resulting compressive and shear moduli as a function of surface pressure. GO monolayers are shown to develop a significant shear modulus (10-25 mN/m) at relevant surface pressures while RGO monolayers do not. The existence of a shear modulus indicates that GO is acting as a two-dimensional solid driven by strong interaction between the individual GO sheets. The absence of such behavior in RGO is attributed to the decrease in oxygen moieties on the sheet basal plane, permitting RGO sheets to slide across one another with minimum energy dissipation. Knowledge of this two-dimensional solid behavior is exploited to successfully transfer large-area, continuous GO films to hydrophobic Au substrates. The key to successful transfer is the use of shallow-angle dipping designed to minimize tensile stress present during the insertion or extraction of the substrate. A shallow dip angle on hydrophobic Au does not impart a beneficial effect for RGO monolayers, as these monolayers do not behave as two-dimensional solids and do not remain coherent during the transfer process. We hypothesize that this observed correlation between monolayer mechanical properties and continuous film transfer success is more universally applicable across substrate hydrophobicities and could be exploited to control the transfer of films composed of two-dimensional materials.

  15. Lake trout otolith chronologies as multidecadal indicators of high-latitude freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, B.A.; Von Biela, V.R.; Zimmerman, C.E.; Brown, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude ecosystems are among the most vulnerable to long-term climate change, yet continuous, multidecadal indicators by which to gauge effects on biology are scarce, especially in freshwater environments. To address this issue, dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) techniques were applied to growth-increment widths in otoliths from lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Chandler Lake system, Alaska (68.23°N, 152.70°W). All otoliths were collected in 1987 and exhibited highly synchronous patterns in growth-increment width. Increments were dated, the widths were measured, and age-related growth declines were removed using standard dendrochronology techniques. The detrended time series were averaged to generate an annually resolved chronology, which continuously spanned 1964–1984. The chronology positively and linearly correlated with August air temperature over the 22-year interval (p productivity. Given the broad distribution of lake trout within North America, this study suggests that otolith chronologies could be used to examine responses between freshwater ecosystems and environmental variability across a range of temporal and spatial scales.

  16. Temporal variability in estuarine fish otolith elemental fingerprints: Implications for connectivity assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis-Santos, Patrick; Gillanders, Bronwyn M.; Tanner, Susanne E.; Vasconcelos, Rita P.; Elsdon, Travis S.; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2012-10-01

    The chemical composition of fish otoliths can provide valuable information for determining the nursery value of estuaries to adult populations of coastal fishes. However, understanding temporal variation in elemental fingerprints at different scales is important as it can potentially confound spatial discrimination among estuaries. Otolith elemental ratios (Li:Ca, Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Cu:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca and Pb:Ca) of Platichthys flesus and Dicentrarchus labrax, from several estuaries along the Portuguese coast in two years and three seasons (spring, summer and autumn) within a year, were determined via Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Elemental fingerprints varied significantly among years and seasons within a year but we achieved accurate classifications of juvenile fish to estuarine nursery of origin (77-96% overall cross-validated accuracy). Although elemental fingerprints were year-specific, variation among seasons did not hinder spatial discrimination. Estuarine fingerprints of pooled seasonal data were representative of the entire juvenile year class and attained high discrimination (77% and 80% overall cross-validated accuracy for flounder and sea bass, respectively). Incorporating seasonal variation resulted in up to an 11% increase in correct classification of individual estuaries, in comparison to seasons where accuracies were lowest. Overall, understanding the implications of temporal variations in otolith chemistry for spatial discrimination is key to establish baseline data for connectivity studies.

  17. Analysis of matrix proteins of otolith in upside-down catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, K.; Okamoto, N.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, T.

    We have previously suggested that the calcium density of the otolith in upside-down swimming Synodontis nigriventris is lower than that in upside-up swimming Synodontis multipunctatus Biol Space Sci 2002 In this study we examined EDTA-soluble matrix proteins of otolith in the utricle of the catfish S nigriventris S multipunctatus and upside-up swimming Synodontis brichadi and goldfish Carassius auratus We detected two main bands about 55 kD and 80 kD with SDS-PAGE in the 3 species of the catfish In cntrast goldfish had the about 55 kD band alone The band of about 80 kD was consisted of two sub-bands a lighter and a heavier band A lighter band was observed in S brichadi and a heavier band was observed in S nigriventris S multipunctatus had the both bands Furthermore mass spectrometric analysis showed there were some proteins of molecular weight under 14 kD The molecular weights of the proteins were different among the fishes These results suggest that many different kinds of matrix protein may cause different degree of calcification in otolith formation

  18. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotas, Charlotte W [ORNL; Rogers, Peter [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yoda, Minami [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  19. Mineral Surface Chemistry and Nanoparticle-aggregation Control Membrane Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Nita; Kaddour, Hussein; Dalai, Punam; Wang, Ziqiu; Bass, Garrett; Gao, Min

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes to enclose functional biomolecules, thus defining a “protocell,” was a seminal moment in the emergence of life on Earth and likely occurred at the micro-environment of the mineral-water interface. Mineral-lipid interactions are also relevant in biomedical, industrial and technological processes. Yet, no structure-activity relationships (SARs) have been identified to predict lipid self-assembly at mineral surfaces. Here we examined the influence of minerals on the self-assembly and survival of vesicles composed of single chain amphiphiles as model protocell membranes. The apparent critical vesicle concentration (CVC) increased in the presence of positively-charged nanoparticulate minerals at high loadings (mg/mL) suggesting unfavorable membrane self-assembly in such situations. Above the CVC, initial vesicle formation rates were faster in the presence of minerals. Rates were correlated with the mineral’s isoelectric point (IEP) and reactive surface area. The IEP depends on the crystal structure, chemical composition and surface hydration. Thus, membrane self-assembly showed rational dependence on fundamental mineral properties. Once formed, membrane permeability (integrity) was unaffected by minerals. Suggesting that, protocells could have survived on rock surfaces. These SARs may help predict the formation and survival of protocell membranes on early Earth and other rocky planets, and amphiphile-mineral interactions in diverse other phenomena. PMID:28266537

  20. Controllable self-assembly of NaREF4 upconversion nanoparticles and their distinctive fluorescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Ni, Yaru; Zhu, Cheng; Fang, Liang; Kou, Jiahui; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the growth of hexagonal NaYF4:Yb3+, Tm3+ nanocrystals with tunable sizes induced by different contents of doped Yb3+ ions (10%-99.5%) using the thermal decomposition method. These nanoparticles, which have different sizes, are then self-assembled at the interface of cyclohexane and ethylene and transferred onto a normal glass slide. It is found that the size of nanoparticles directs their self-assembly. Due to the appropriate size of 40.5 nm, 15% Yb3+ ions doped nanoparticles are able to be self-assembled into an ordered inorganic monolayer membrane with a large area of about 10 × 10 μm2. More importantly, the obvious short-wave (300-500 nm) fluorescence improvement of the ordered 2D self-assembly structure is observed to be relative to disordered nanoparticles, which is because intrinsic absorption and scattering of upconversion nanoparticles leads to the self-loss of fluorescence, especially the short-wave fluorescence inside the disordered structure, and the relative emission of short-wave fluorescence is reduced. The construction of a 2D self-assembly structure can effectively avoid this and improve the radiated short-wave fluorescence, especially UV photons, and is able to direct the design of new types of solid-state optical materials in many fields.

  1. Controlled Self-Assembly of Cyclophane Amphiphiles: From 1D Nanofibers to Ultrathin 2D Topological Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhao, Donglin; Wu, Qinghe; Zhang, Na; Su, Yu-An; Chen, Wei; Yu, Luping

    2016-07-05

    A novel series of amphiphilic TC-PEG molecules were designed and synthesized based on the orthogonal cyclophane unit. These molecules were able to self-assemble from 1D nanofibers and nanobelts to 2D ultrathin nanosheets (3 nm thick) in a controlled way by tuning the length of PEG side chains. The special structure of the cyclophane moiety allowed control in construction of nanostructures through programmed noncovalent interactions (hydrophobic hydrophilic interaction and pi-pi interaction). The self-assembled nanostructures were characterized by combining real space imaging (TEM, SEM, and AFM) and reciprocal space scattering (GIWAXS) techniques. This unique supramolecular system may provide a new strategy for the design of materials with tunable nanomorphology and functionality.

  2. Controlled preparation of porous TiO2-Ag nanostructures through supramolecular assembly for plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jinbo; Li, Junbai

    2015-01-14

    By templating Ag(+)-induced supramolecular assembly at different temperatures, porous TiO2-Ag nanotubes and nanospheres are fabricated in a controlled manner due to the effect of Rayleigh instability. Compared with traditional TiO2 nanoparticles, TiO2-Ag nanostructures above show much more extensive visible light absorption and exhibit the noticeably plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis because of the existence of Ag nanoparticles.

  3. Long-range orientational self-assembly, spatially-controlled deprotonation and off-centered metallation of an expanded porphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera, Borja; Trukhina, Olga; Björk, Jonas; Bottari, Giovanni; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Martín-Jiménez, Alberto; Islyaikin, Mikhail K; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M; Miranda, Rodolfo; Torres, Tomas; Ecija, David

    2017-09-10

    Expanded porphyrins are large-cavity macrocycles with enormous potential in coordination chemistry, anion sensing, photodynamic therapy and optoelectronics. In the last two decades, surface science community has assessed the physico-chemical properties of tetrapyrrolic-like macrocycles. However, to date, the sublimation, self-assembly and atomistic insights of expanded porphyrins on surfaces have remained elusive. Here, we show the self-assembly on Au(111) of an expanded aza-porphyrin, namely an "expanded hemiporphyrazine", through a unique growth mechanism based on long-range orientational self-assembly. Furthermore, a spatially-controlled "writing" protocol on such self-assembled architecture is presented based on the STM tip-induced deprotonation of the inner protons of individual macrocycles. Finally, the capability of these surface-confined macrocycles to host lanthanide elements is assessed, introducing a novel off-centered coordination motif. The presented findings represent a milestone in the fields of porphyrinoid chemistry and surface science, revealing a great potential for novel surface patterning, opening new avenues for molecular level information storage, and boosting the emerging field of surface-confined coordination chemistry involving f-block elements.

  4. UREA/ammonium ion removal system for the orbiting frog otolith experiment. [ion exchange resins for water treatment during space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, J. R.; Anselmi, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using free urease enzyme and ANGC-101 ion exchange resin to remove urea and ammonium ion for space system waste water applications was studied. Specifically examined is the prevention of urea and ammonia toxicity in a 30-day Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) flight experiment. It is shown that free urease enzyme used in conjunction with ANGC-101 ion-exchange resin and pH control can control urea and amonium ion concentration in unbuffered recirculating water. In addition, the resin does not adversely effect the bullfrogs by lowering the concentration of cations below critical minimum levels. Further investigations on bioburden control, frog waste excretion on an OFO diet, a trade-off analysis of methods of automating the urea/ammonium ion removal system and fabrication and test of a semiautomated breadboard were recommended as continuing efforts. Photographs of test equipment and test animals are shown.

  5. Modular jet impingement assemblies with passive and active flow control for electronics cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Joshi, Shailesh

    2016-09-13

    Power electronics modules having modular jet impingement assembly utilized to cool heat generating devices are disclosed. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a modular manifold having a distribution recess, one or more angled inlet connection tubes positioned at an inlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly couple the inlet tube to the distribution recess and one or more outlet connection tubes positioned at an outlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly coupling the outlet tube to the distribution recess. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a manifold insert removably positioned within the distribution recess and include one or more inlet branch channels each including an impinging slot and one or more outlet branch channels each including a collecting slot. Further a heat transfer plate coupled to the modular manifold, the heat transfer plate comprising an impingement surface including an array of fins that extend toward the manifold insert.

  6. Investigation of parameters controlling the dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes on microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria; Bøggild, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes were assembled onto microelectrodes by dielectrophoresis. The dependence of the obtained networks on several assembly parameters such as bias voltage, field application time, frequency, electrode geometry and the nanotube solvent were investigated both...... structurally and electrically. Reproducible differences in morphological and electrical properties were observed for the parameters investigated. Application of a bias voltage above 10 V for more than 30 seconds with nanotubes in an SDS solution, resulted in dense networks with a relatively low resistance...... in the 10 k Omega regime. On the other hand, individual nanotubes and bundles were assembled with lower voltages applied for less than 10 seconds and with other nanotubes solutions. The experimental results were combined with theoretical calculations in order to find a geometry and voltage independent...

  7. RNA-controlled assembly of tobacco mosaic virus-derived complex structures: from nanoboomerangs to tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Fabian J.; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Wege, Christina

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro assembly of artificial nanotubular nucleoprotein shapes based on tobacco mosaic virus-(TMV-)-derived building blocks yielded different spatial organizations of viral coat protein subunits on genetically engineered RNA molecules, containing two or multiple TMV origins of assembly (OAs). The growth of kinked nanoboomerangs as well as of branched multipods was determined by the encapsidated RNAs. A largely simultaneous initiation at two origins and subsequent bidirectional tube elongation could be visualized by transmission electron microscopy of intermediates and final products. Collision of the nascent tubes' ends produced angular particles with well-defined arm lengths. RNAs with three to five OAs generated branched multipods with a maximum of four arms. The potential of such an RNA-directed self-assembly of uncommon nanotubular architectures for the fabrication of complex multivalent nanotemplates used in functional hybrid materials is discussed.

  8. Controlling the morphology of metal-triggered collagen peptide assemblies through ligand alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Raghavendhar R; Chmielewski, Jean

    2015-07-01

    A number of methods have been explored to promote the higher order assembly of collagen peptide triple helices. In one case, NCoH, a complex hierarchical metal-promoted assembly was observed to form micron-scaled florettes with a ruffled surface topology at the nanoscale. In an effort to elucidate the role of the ligands in this collagen peptide assemblage, we reduced the number of carboxylates within the N-terminal ligand to produce a new peptide, ICoH. A striking difference in the morphology of the metal-triggered material was observed with ICoH, with stacked arrays of nanofibrils predominating. As the peptide to metal ion ratio was increased, the length of the stacks of fibrils was also observed to increase. These data demonstrate that a significantly less complex assembly process occurs with the removal of a single carboxylate moiety from the metal binding ligand at the termini of the collagen peptide. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Process characterization and control of hand-soldered printed wiring assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheray, D.L.; Mandl, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    A designed experiment was conducted to characterize the hand soldering process parameters for manufacturing printed wiring assemblies (PWAs). Component tinning was identified as the most important parameter in hand soldering. After tinning, the soldering iron tip temperature of 700{degrees}F and the choice of operators influence solder joint quality more than any other parameters. Cleaning and flux/flux core have little impact on the quality of the solder joint. The need for component cleaning prior to assembly must be evaluated for each component.

  10. Characterization of estuary use by Nisqually Hatchery Chinook based on Otolith analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind-Null, Angie M.; Larsen, Kim A.; Reisenbichler, Reg

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Nisqually Fall Chinook population is one of 27 stocks in the Puget Sound evolutionarily significant unit listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). Preservation and extensive restoration of the Nisqually delta ecosystem are planned to assist in recovery of the stock. A pre-restoration baseline including life history types, estuary residence time, growth rates, and habitat use are needed to evaluate the potential response of hatchery and wild Chinook salmon to restoration. Otolith analysis has been selected as a means to examine Chinook salmon life history, growth, and residence in the Nisqually estuary. Over time, the information from the otolith analyses will be used to: 1) determine if estuary restoration actions cause changes to the population structure (i.e. frequency of the different life history trajectories) for Nisqually River Chinook, 2) compare pre- and post- restoration residence times and growth rates, 3) suggest whether estuary restoration yields substantial benefits for Chinook salmon through (1) and (2), and 4) compare differences in habitat use between hatchery and wild Chinook to further protect ESA listed stock. Otoliths are calcium carbonate structures in the inner ear that grow in proportion to the overall growth of the fish. Daily growth increments can be measured so date and fish size at various habitat transitions can be back-calculated. Careful analysis of otolith microstructure can be used to determine the number of days that a fish resided in the estuary as a juvenile (increment counts), size at entrance to the estuary, size at egress, and the amount that the fish grew while in the estuary. Juvenile hatchery Chinook salmon are generally released as smolts that move quickly through the delta with much shorter residence times than for many wild fish and are not dependent on the delta as nursery habitat (Myers and Horton 1982; Mace 1983; Levings et al. 1986). The purpose of this study is to use and

  11. Pre-Restoration Habitat Use by Chinook Salmon in the Nisqually Estuary Using Otolith Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind-Null, Angela; Larsen, Kimberly; Reisenbichler, Reginald

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Nisqually Fall Chinook population is one of 27 stocks in the Puget Sound evolutionarily significant unit listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. The preservation of the Nisqually delta ecosystem coupled with extensive restoration of approximately 1,000 acres of diked estuarine habitat is identified as the highest priority action for the recovery of naturally spawning Nisqually River Fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nisqually Chinook Recovery Plan. In order to evaluate the response of Chinook salmon to restoration, a pre-restoration baseline of life history diversity and estuary utilization must be established. Otolith analysis has been proposed as a means to measure Chinook salmon life history diversity, growth, and residence in the Nisqually estuary. Over time, the information from the otolith analyses will be used to: (1) determine if estuary restoration actions cause changes to the population structure (i.e. frequency of the different life history trajectories) for Nisqually River Chinook, (2) compare pre and post restoration residence times and growth rates, and (3) suggest whether estuary restoration yields substantial benefits for Chinook salmon. Otoliths are calcium carbonate structures in the inner ear that grow in proportion to the overall growth of the fish. Daily growth increments can be measured so date and fish size at various habitat transitions can be back-calculated. Careful analysis of otolith microstructure can be used to determine the number of days that a fish resided in the estuary as a juvenile (increment counts), size at entrance to the estuary, size at egress, and the amount that the fish grew while in the estuary. Juvenile Chinook salmon can exhibit a variety of life history trajectories ? some enter the sea (or Puget Sound) as fry, some rear in the estuary before entering the sea, and some rear in the river and then move rapidly through the estuary into the sea as smolts. The

  12. A solvent-controlled switch of manganese complex assemblies with a beta-diketonate-based ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromí, Guillem; Gamez, Patrick; Roubeau, Olivier; Berzal, Paula Carrero; Kooijman, Huub; Spek, Anthony L; Driessen, Willem L; Reedijk, Jan

    2002-07-15

    The coordination properties of the new polynucleating ligand H(3)L1 (1,3-bis(3-oxo-3-phenylpropionyl)-2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzene) with Mn(II/III) are described. Depending on the solvent used, the reaction of H(3)L1 with Mn(OAc)(2) yields either of the two new multinuclear assemblies [Mn(2)(HL1)(2)(py)(4)] (1) and [Mn(3)(HL1)(3)] (2), as revealed by X-ray crystallography. The structure of 2 is remarkable in that it shows a unique asymmetric triple-stranded helicate. Complexes 1 and 2 can be interconverted by controlling the solvent of the reaction system, and therefore, this ensemble constitutes an interesting externally addressable switch. In the presence of Mn(III)/pyridine, partial degradation of H(3)L1 occurs via oxidative cleavage, and the new complex [Mn(2)(L2)(2)(py)(4)] (3) is formed. The crystal structure of this complex has shown the fully deprotonated form of the new donor H(3)L2 (3-(3-oxo-3-phenylpropionyl)-5-methylsalicylic acid). From the same reaction, the Mn(II) complex 1 is also obtained. A rational synthesis of H(3)L2 is reported, and this has been used to prepare 3 in high yields, directly from its components. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility (chi(m)) measurements were performed on complexes 1-3 under a magnetic field of 1 kG. The data for each complex were fit to the appropriate chi(m) vs T theoretical equation, respectively. In 1, the Mn(II) ions are uncoupled, with g = 2.01. The data from 2 were fit by assuming the presence of an exchange coupled Mn(II)...Mn(II) pair next to a magnetically isolated Mn(II) center. The fit gave J = -2.75 cm(-1), g(12) = 1.97, and g(3) = 1.92, respectively. In 3, two models fit the experimental data. In the most satisfactory, the Mn(III) ions are coupled antiferromagnetically with J = -1.48 cm(-1) and g = 1.98 and a term for weak ferromagnetic intermolecular exchange is included with zJ' = 0.39 cm(-1). The other model contemplates the presence of two uncoupled zero field split Mn(III) ions.

  13. Controlling Molecular Motion, Assembly and Coupling as a Step towards Molecular Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Colin James

    changes in the supramolecular self-assembly of thioethers. Chapter 9 details how the ordering and length of surface-bound hydrogen-bonded chains of methanol are dictated by the underlying surface and examines an unreported chiral meta-stable methanol hexamer. Single-molecule measurements can answer many of the current questions in the field of molecular machines and lead to control of molecular motion. Development of mechanisms to direct molecular motion and to couple this motion to external systems is crucial for the rational design of new molecular machinery with functionalities such as mass transport, propulsion, separations, sensing, signaling and chemical reactions.

  14. Controlling the stereochemistry and regularity of butanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Jiawei; Ouyang, Runhai; Jensen, Palle Skovhus;

    2014-01-01

    The rich stereochemistry of the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of four butanethiols on Au(111) is described, the SAMs containing up to 12 individual C, S, or Au chiral centers per surface unit cell. This is facilitated by synthesis of enantiomerically pure 2-butanethiol (the smallest unsubstitu...

  15. Morphological diversity and polymorphism of self-assembling collagen peptides controlled by length of hydrophobic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Kenneth; Khan, I John; Nanda, Vikas

    2014-12-23

    Synthetic collagen mimetic peptides are used to probe the role of hydrophobic forces in mediating protein self-assembly. Higher order association is an integral property of natural collagens, which assemble into fibers and meshes that comprise the extracellular matrix of connective tissues. The unique triple-helix fold fully exposes two-thirds of positions in the protein to solvent, providing ample opportunities for engineering interaction sites. Inclusion of just a few hydrophobic groups in a minimal peptide promotes a rich variety of self-assembly behaviors, resulting in hundred-nanometer to micron size nanodiscs and nanofibers. Morphology depends primarily on the length of hydrophobic domains. Peptide discs contain lipophilic domains capable of sequestering small hydrophobic dyes. Combining multiple peptide types result in composite structures of discs and fibers ranging from stars to plates-on-a-string. These systems provide valuable tools to shed insight into the fundamental principles underlying hydrophobicity-driven higher order protein association that will facilitate the design of self-assembling systems in biomaterials and nanomedical applications.

  16. Electrokinetic stringency control in self-assembled monolayer-based biosensors for multiplex urinary tract infection diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Sin, Mandy L Y; Pyne, Jeff D; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-01-01

    Rapid detection of bacterial pathogens is critical toward judicious management of infectious diseases. Herein, we demonstrate an in situ electrokinetic stringency control approach for a self-assembled monolayer-based electrochemical biosensor toward urinary tract infection diagnosis. The in situ electrokinetic stringency control technique generates Joule heating induced temperature rise and electrothermal fluid motion directly on the sensor to improve its performance for detecting bacterial 16S rRNA, a phylogenetic biomarker. The dependence of the hybridization efficiency reveals that in situ electrokinetic stringency control is capable of discriminating single-base mismatches. With electrokinetic stringency control, the background noise due to the matrix effects of clinical urine samples can be reduced by 60%. The applicability of the system is demonstrated by multiplex detection of three uropathogenic clinical isolates with similar 16S rRNA sequences. The results demonstrate that electrokinetic stringency control can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the biosensor for multiplex urinary tract infection diagnosis. Urinary tract infections remain a significant cause of mortality and morbidity as secondary conditions often related to chronic diseases or to immunosuppression. Rapid and sensitive identification of the causative organisms is critical in the appropriate management of this condition. These investigators demonstrate an in situ electrokinetic stringency control approach for a self-assembled monolayer-based electrochemical biosensor toward urinary tract infection diagnosis, establishing that such an approach significantly improves the biosensor's signal-to-noise ratio. © 2013.

  17. Controlled graphene oxide assembly on silver nanocube monolayers for SERS detection: dependence on nanocube packing procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Banchelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid graphene oxide/silver nanocubes (GO/AgNCs arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS applications were prepared by means of two procedures differing for the method used in the assembly of the silver nanocubes onto the surface: Langmuir–Blodgett (LB transfer and direct sequential physisorption of silver nanocubes (AgNCs. Adsorption of graphene oxide (GO flakes on the AgNC assemblies obtained with both procedures was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM technique as a function of GO bulk concentration. The experiment provided values of the adsorbed GO mass on the AgNC array and the GO saturation limit as well as the thickness and the viscoelastic properties of the GO film. Atomic force microscopy (AFM measurements of the resulting samples revealed that a similar surface coverage was achieved with both procedures but with a different distribution of silver nanoparticles. In the GO covered LB film, the AgNC distribution is characterized by densely packed regions alternating with empty surface areas. On the other hand, AgNCs are more homogeneously dispersed over the entire sensor surface when the nanocubes spontaneously adsorb from solution. In this case, the assembly results in less-packed silver nanostructures with higher inter-cube distance. For the two assembled substrates, AFM of silver nanocubes layers fully covered with GO revealed the presence of a homogeneous, flexible and smooth GO sheet folding over the silver nanocubes and extending onto the bare surface. Preliminary SERS experiments on adenine showed a higher SERS enhancement factor for GO on Langmuir–Blodgett films of AgNCs with respect to bare AgNC systems. Conversely, poor SERS enhancement for adenine resulted for GO-covered AgNCs obtained by spontaneous adsorption. This indicated that the assembly and packing of AgNCs obtained in this way, although more homogeneous over the substrate surface, is not as effective for SERS analysis.

  18. Organization, integration, and assembly of genetic and epigenetic regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments: implications for biological control in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gary S; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, Andre J; Montecino, Martin; Young, Daniel W; Javed, Amjad; Pratap, Jitesh; Choi, Je-Yong; Ali, Syed A; Pande, Sandhya; Hassan, Mohammad Q

    2009-02-01

    There is growing awareness that the fidelity of gene expression necessitates coordination of transcription factor metabolism and organization of genes and regulatory proteins within the three-dimensional context of nuclear architecture. The regulatory machinery that governs genetic and epigenetic control of gene expression is compartmentalized in nuclear microenvironments. Temporal and spatial parameters of regulatory complex organization and assembly are functionally linked to biological control and are compromised with the onset and progression of tumorigenesis. High throughput imaging of cells, tissues, and tumors, including live cell analysis, is expanding research's capabilities toward translating components of nuclear organization into novel strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Using otolith weight to predict the age of Pennahia macrocephalus in the mouth of the Beibu Gulf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yunrong; WU Yanfang; LU Huosheng; LI Zhonglu; JIN Xianshi

    2009-01-01

    The relation between otolith weight (OW) and the age of marine fish is studied. A total of 222 individuals of bighead white croaker, Pennahia macrocephalus were sampled seasonally in the mouth of the Beibu Gulf, the South China Sea, in 2007. Since there are no significant differences in sagittal OW between otolith in pairs (P≧>0.05), the undamaged left sagittal otolith is used for age determination. The highest correlations among standard length, OW and fish ages are confirmned by linear, exponential and multinomial regression. Results show that sagittal OW overlaps only occasionally among age groups, and to individuals with similar standard length, the older and slower-growing fish has a heavier otolith because of the continued otolith material deposition. There are differences in sagittal OW among different age groups and significant positive linear relationship with age (P<0.05). The age readings can be verified by plotting the sagittal OW versus the standard length for age groups, and the individuals with similar standard length but in different ages can be separated by sagittal OW frequency analysis. Mostly, the predicted ages using the regression between sagittai OW and ages are closed to the observed ages by counting annulus on scale. It indicates that the sagittal OW analysis is a useful technique for validating the accuracy of age determination by annuli counts, especially for individuals of similar size. Furthermore,the technique is applied for Pennahia macrocephalus with discussion in this paper.

  20. Controlled assembly: a prerequisite for the use of recombinant spider silk in regenerative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Recent biotechnological progress has enabled the production of spider silk proteins, spidroins, in heterologous hosts. Matrices based on recombinant spidroins support stem cell growth and are well tolerated when implanted in living tissue, thus the material is highly attractive for use in regenerative medicine. However, the matrices made are far from natural silk in terms of mechanical properties and are either spontaneously assembled, which results in heterogeneous products, or spun from harsh solvents with the concomitant risk of harmful remnants in the final products. If we could mimic the spider's aqueous silk spinning process we would likely obtain a material that had reproducible and better characteristics and that more easily could be transferred to clinical practice. Herein, the knowledge of the spiders' silk production system and the prerequisites for artificial spinning and assembly of recombinant proteins are reviewed and discussed in a biomedical context. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  2. Time lapse microscopy of temperature control during self-assembly of 3D DNA crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Fiona W.; Jong, Michael Alexander; Tan, Andre; Tseng, Robert; Park, Eunice; Ohayon, Yoel P.; Sha, Ruojie; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA nanostructures are created by exploiting the high fidelity base-pairing interactions of double-stranded branched DNA molecules. These structures present a convenient medium for the self-assembly of macroscopic 3D crystals. In some self-assemblies in this system, crystals can be formed by lowering the temperature, and they can be dissolved by raising it. The ability to monitor the formation and melting of these crystals yields information that can be used to monitor crystal formation and growth. Here, we describe the development of an inexpensive tool that enables direct observation of the crystal growth process as a function of both time and temperature. Using the hanging-drop crystallization of the well-characterized 2-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif for our model system, its response to temperature has been characterized visually.

  3. Mobile CubeSat Command and Control: Assembly and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    INSTRUCTIONS ............................................49  APPENDIX B.  LIST OF REQUIRED TOOLS .........................................................51...installed then uninstalled just to be reinstalled later as components that shipped quickly always seemed to block the installation of the later...arriving parts. Appendix B is a list of additional tools used to assemble the MC3. All of tools are common in shop environment but if building an MC3

  4. CplexA: a Mathematica package to study macromolecular-assembly control of gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Saiz, L

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Macromolecular assembly vertebrates essential cellular processes, such as gene regulation and signal transduction. A major challenge for conventional computational methods to study these processes is tackling the exponential increase of the number of configurational states with the number of components. CplexA is a Mathematica package that uses functional programming to efficiently compute probabilities and average properties over such exponentially large number of states from the en...

  5. Shape-controlled assembly of luminescent dumbbell-like CdTe cystine nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Haifeng; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Li, Chang Ming; Zang, Jianfeng

    2007-11-01

    A shape perfect luminescent dumbbell with size up to several microns was prepared by incorporating CdTe quantum dots (QDs) into locally created L-cystine matrices, and the photoluminescence of the shaped dumbbells can be easily tailored by reaction time. The growth mechanism was thoroughly investigated. This work not only gives a potential application in optical devices, but also gives a deep insight on the assembly mechanism of nanomaterials into micron-size objects.

  6. Shape-controlled assembly of luminescent dumbbell-like CdTe-cystine nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Haifeng; Cui Xiaoqiang; Li Changming; Zang Jianfeng [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 70 Nanyang Drive 637457 (Singapore); Center for Advanced Bionanosystems, Nanyang Technological University, 70 Nanyang Drive 637457 (Singapore)

    2007-11-14

    A shape perfect luminescent dumbbell with size up to several microns was prepared by incorporating CdTe quantum dots (QDs) into locally created L-cystine matrices, and the photoluminescence of the shaped dumbbells can be easily tailored by reaction time. The growth mechanism was thoroughly investigated. This work not only gives a potential application in optical devices, but also gives a deep insight on the assembly mechanism of nanomaterials into micron-size objects.

  7. Rab33B Controls Hepatitis B Virus Assembly by Regulating Core Membrane Association and Nucleocapsid Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusch, Christina; Döring, Tatjana; Prange, Reinhild

    2017-06-21

    Many viruses take advantage of cellular trafficking machineries to assemble and release new infectious particles. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we demonstrate that the Golgi/autophagosome-associated Rab33B is required for hepatitis B virus (HBV) propagation in hepatoma cell lines. While Rab33B is dispensable for the secretion of HBV subviral envelope particles, its knockdown reduced the virus yield to 20% and inhibited nucleocapsid (NC) formation and/or NC trafficking. The overexpression of a GDP-restricted Rab33B mutant phenocopied the effect of deficit Rab33B, indicating that Rab33B-specific effector proteins may be involved. Moreover, we found that HBV replication enhanced Rab33B expression. By analyzing HBV infection cycle steps, we identified a hitherto unknown membrane targeting module in the highly basic C-terminal domain of the NC-forming core protein. Rab33B inactivation reduced core membrane association, suggesting that membrane platforms participate in HBV assembly reactions. Biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses provided further hints that the viral core, rather than the envelope, is the main target for Rab33B intervention. Rab33B-deficiency reduced core protein levels without affecting viral transcription and hampered core/NC sorting to envelope-positive, intracellular compartments. Together, these results indicate that Rab33B is an important player in intracellular HBV trafficking events, guiding core transport to NC assembly sites and/or NC transport to budding sites.

  8. Controlled release of TGF-beta 1 from RADA self-assembling peptide hydrogel scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ao; Chen, Shuo; He, Bin; Zhao, Weikang; Chen, Xiaojun; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive mediators, cytokines, and chemokines have an important role in regulating and optimizing the synergistic action of materials, cells, and cellular microenvironments for tissue engineering. RADA self-assembling peptide hydrogels have been proved to have an excellent ability to promote cell proliferation, wound healing, tissue repair, and drug delivery. Here, we report that D-RADA16 and L-RADA16-RGD self-assembling peptides can form stable second structure and hydrogel scaffolds, affording the slow release of growth factor (transforming growth factor cytokine-beta 1 [TGF-beta 1]). In vitro tests demonstrated that the plateau release amount can be obtained till 72 hours. Moreover, L-RADA16, D-RADA16, and L-RADA16-RGD self-assembling peptide hydrogels containing TGF-beta 1 were used for 3D cell culture of bone mesenchymal stem cells of rats for 2 weeks. The results revealed that these three RADA16 peptide hydrogels had a significantly favorable influence on proliferation of bone mesenchymal stem cells and hold some promise in slow and sustained release of growth factor. PMID:27703332

  9. Assembly and Commissioning of a Liquid Argon Detector and Development of a Slow Control System for the COHERENT Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaemingk, Michael; Cooper, Robert; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    COHERENT is a collaboration whose goal is to measure coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS). COHERENT plans to deploy a suite of detectors to measure the expected number-of-neutrons squared dependence of CEvNS at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One of these detectors is a liquid argon detector which can measure these low energy nuclear recoil interactions. Ensuring optimal functionality requires the development of a slow control system to monitor and control various aspects, such as the temperature and pressure, of these detectors. Electronics manufactured by Beckhoff, Digilent, and Arduino among others are being used to create these slow control systems. This poster will generally discuss the assembly and commissioning of this CENNS-10 liquid argon detector at Indiana University and will feature work on the slow control systems.

  10. Experience gained from carrying out ultrasonic cleaning of fuel assemblies and control and protection system assemblies in the Novovoronezh NPP unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorburov, V. I.; Shvarov, V. A.; Vitkovskii, S. L.

    2014-02-01

    A growth of deposits on fuel assembly elements was revealed during operation of the Novovoronezh NPP Unit 3 starting from 1997. This growth caused progressive reduction of coolant flow rate through the reactor core and increase of pressure difference across the assemblies, which eventually led to the need to reduce the power unit output and then to shut down the power unit. In view of these circumstances, it was decided to develop an installation for ultrasonic cleaning of fuel assemblies. The following conclusions were drawn with regard of this installation after completion of all stages of its development, commissioning, and improvement: no detrimental effect of ultrasound on the integrity of fuel assemblies was revealed, whereas the cleaning effect on the fuel assemblies subjected to ultrasonic treatment and improvement of their thermal-hydraulic characteristics are obvious. With these measures implemented, it became possible to clean all fuel assemblies in the core in 2011, to achieve better thermal-hydraulic characteristics, and to avoid reduction of power output and off-scheduled outages of Unit 3.

  11. Using otolith shape for intraspecific discrimination: the case of gurnards (Scorpaeniformes, Triglidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Montanini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sagittal otoliths are sound transducers and play an important role in fish hearing. Triglidae (Teleostei, Scorpaeniformes are known for sound producing ability in agonistic contexts related to territorial defence, reproduction and competitive feeding (Amorim et al., 2004. Chelidonichthys cuculus and C. lucerna show a significant body size-depth relationship and specie-specific feeding strategies with growth. Both juveniles and adults of C. cuculus prey necto-benthic invertebrates while C. lucerna specimens change diet from crustaceans to teleost during growth (Stagioni et al., 2012; Vallisneri et al., 2014; Montanini et al., 2015. The goal of this study was to analyze intraspecific shape variations in sagitta of model species of gurnards. 217 specimens were collected during bottom trawl surveys in Adriatic sea (northeastern Mediterranean. Each left sagitta was removed, cleaned in ultrasounds bath and kept dry. The otolith digital images were processed to calculate five shape indices (aspect ratio, roundness, rectangularity, ellipticity and circularity. Indices were normalised to avoid allometric effects according to Lleonart et al. (2000, than processed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA. The SHAPE program was used to extract the outline and to assess the variability of shapes (EFA method and estimated it through the study of principal component analysis (PCA. Considering the first two discriminant functions, LDA plot showed a clearly separation between juvenile and adults for both species. About EFA, the first 4 principal component discriminated over 80% of variance and significant differences were found at critical size between juveniles and adults for all the components analysed. The allometric trends corresponded to a relative elongation of the sulcus acusticus and an increase of excisura ostii. The combined use of the two external outlines methods should be highly informative for intraspecific discrimination and might be related to

  12. The great melting pot. Common sole population connectivity assessed by otolith and water fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morat, Fabien; Letourneur, Yves; Dierking, Jan; Pécheyran, Christophe; Bareille, Gilles; Blamart, Dominique; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the scale and importance of individual dispersion between populations and life stages is a key challenge in marine ecology. The common sole (Solea solea), an important commercial flatfish in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, has a marine pelagic larval stage, a benthic juvenile stage in coastal nurseries (lagoons, estuaries or shallow marine areas) and a benthic adult stage in deeper marine waters on the continental shelf. To date, the ecological connectivity among these life stages has been little assessed in the Mediterranean. Here, such an assessment is provided for the first time for the Gulf of Lions, NW Mediterranean, based on a dataset on otolith microchemistry and stable isotopic composition as indicators of the water masses inhabited by individual fish. Specifically, otolith Ba/Ca and Sr/Ca profiles, and δ(13)C and δ(18)O values of adults collected in four areas of the Gulf of Lions were compared with those of young-of-the-year collected in different coastal nurseries. Results showed that a high proportion of adults (>46%) were influenced by river inputs during their larval stage. Furthermore Sr/Ca ratios and the otolith length at one year of age revealed that most adults (∼70%) spent their juvenile stage in nurseries with high salinity, whereas the remainder used brackish environments. In total, data were consistent with the use of six nursery types, three with high salinity (marine areas and two types of highly saline lagoons) and three brackish (coastal areas near river mouths, and two types of brackish environments), all of which contributed to the replenishment of adult populations. These finding implicated panmixia in sole population in the Gulf of Lions and claimed for a habitat integrated management of fisheries.

  13. Assessment of endolymphatic hydrops and otolith function in patients with Ménière's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Tomoko; Imai, Takao; Takimoto, Yasumitsu; Takeda, Noriaki; Kitahara, Tadashi; Uno, Atsuhiko; Kamakura, Takefumi; Osaki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inohara, Hidenori

    2017-03-01

    Ménière's disease is associated with hydrops of the inner ear endolymphatic space, and histopathologically, the cochlea and vestibule are usually involved. We used gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and the gain in the utricular induced linear vestibulo-ocular reflex to test the hypothesis that vestibular hydrops in Ménière's disease patients is associated with otolith organ dysfunction. We evaluated 21 patients diagnosed with unilateral definitive Ménière's disease using gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging to detect endolymphatic hydrops in the cochlea and vestibule. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and the gain in utricular induced linear vestibulo-ocular reflex during eccentric rotation were measured to assess otolith organ function. For eccentric rotation, patients were rotated while displaced from the axis of rotation, while linear acceleration stimulated the utricle and induced the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed vestibular hydrops in 14 of 20 patients (70%). Among the 14 patients, ten (71%) had abnormal cervical and three (21%) had abnormal ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Four patients (4/21, 19%) had abnormal linear vestibulo-ocular reflexes, three of whom also had abnormal ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Overall, 16 of 17 patients had normal linear vestibulo-ocular reflexes and normal ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Vestibular endolymphatic hydrops in Ménière's disease patients caused otolith organ dysfunction, mainly in the saccule. The number of Ménière's disease patients with abnormal ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials was low (19%), and they also had abnormal utricular induced linear vestibulo-ocular reflexes.

  14. Fish otolith geochemistry, environmental conditions and human occupation at Lake Mungo, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kelsie; Stern, Nicola; Williams, Ian S.; Kinsley, Les; Wood, Rachel; Sporcic, Katarina; Smith, Tegan; Fallon, Stewart; Kokkonen, Harri; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    Fish otoliths from the Willandra Lakes Region World Heritage Area (south-western New South Wales, Australia) have been analysed for oxygen isotopes and trace elements using in situ techniques, and dated by radiocarbon. The study focused on the lunettes of Lake Mungo, an overflow lake that only filled during flooding events and emptied by evaporation, and Lake Mulurulu, which was part of the running Willandra Creek system. Samples were collected from two different contexts: from hearths directly associated with human activity, and isolated surface finds. AMS radiocarbon dating constrains the human activity documented by five different hearths to a time span of less than 240 years around 19,350 cal. BP. These hearths were constructed in aeolian sediments with alternating clay and sand layers, indicative of fluctuating lake levels and occasional drying out. The geochemistry of the otoliths confirms this scenario, with shifts in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca marking the entry of the fish into Lake Mungo several years before their death, and a subsequent increase in the δ18O by ˜4‰ indicating increasing evaporation of the lake. During sustained lake-full conditions there are considerably fewer traces of human presence. It seems that the evaporating Lake Mungo attracted people to harvest fish that might have become sluggish through oxygen starvation in an increasingly saline water body (easy prey hypothesis). In contrast, surface finds have a much wider range in radiocarbon age as a result of reworking, and do not necessarily indicate evaporative conditions, as shown by comparison with otoliths from upstream Lake Mulurulu.

  15. Natural growth, otolith shape and diet analyses of Odontesthes nigricans Richardson (Atherinopsidae) from southern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuca, M. E.; Lozano, I. E.; Brown, D. R.; Renzi, M.; Luizon, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Age and growth, otolith shape and diet of Odontesthes nigricans were analysed in order to provide an insight into the life history of the species and furthermore, to assess their possible use as a tool for discriminating silverside populations from the South Atlantic Ocean (Punta María) and Beagle Channel waters (Varela Bay). The age and growth analysis was performed by counting daily increments and annual marks in sagittae otoliths. Length-at-age data of individuals Gompertz model (SLt = 6.22 exp 2.45 [1-exp (-0.02t)]), which provided an excellent description of the pattern of daily growth for O. nigricans juveniles from Varela Bay. The spawning period was also assessed through back-calculation of hatching dates and it extended from November to February. The count of annual marks in larger individuals identified 7 year classes (0+ to 6+) in Varela Bay and 6 year classes (0+ to 5+) in Punta María. The von Bertalanffy growth model explained more than 95% of the growth patterns observed in O. nigricans from Varela Bay (SLt = 245.49 [1 - exp -0.24(t+0.46)]) and Punta María (SLt = 345.09 [1 - exp -0.15(t+0.31)]). Particularly, k and SL∞ varied significantly between sampling sites; reaching Punta María a larger SL∞ value with a lower k. Otolith shape variation was also explored using elliptical Fourier analysis and it showed significant differences between Varela Bay and Punta María populations. Furthermore, gut content analysis characterized O. nigricans as an invertebrate predator, being benthic organisms the most important components of its diet, which also showed significant site dependence. The use of all these analyses contributed to a holistic approach which maximized the likelihood of correctly identifying both O. nigricans populations in the southernmost limit of the species distribution.

  16. Otolith shape analysis as a tool for stock identification of the southern blue whiting, Micromesistius australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Leguá

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The southern blue whiting, Micromesistius australis (Norman, 1937, is an important demersal resource associated with the slope and continental shelf of southern Chile, Argentina and the Malvinas/Falkland Islands. Recent studies have reported schools of adult fish from Atlantic waters migrating along the southern Chilean coast in mid-winter, moving northwards to spawn in August (47°-51°S, and then returning to Atlantic waters, presumably to feed. The migratory pattern suggests the presence of one or more stock units associated with the South American coast. In the present study, "otolith morphometry" is used to determine the stock structure of M. australis based on applications of basic size descriptors (SDs (area, perimeter and otolith size, shape indices (SIs (circularity, squareness, shape factor, roundness, ellipticity, and normalised elliptical Fourier descriptors (NEFDs. Samples were collected during the winter and spring of 2010, during the reproductive period, in the economic zone of southern Chile (36°-57°S, in the Pacific Ocean and around the Falkland Islands economic zone (50°-52°S in the Atlantic Ocean. Analyses were conducted to include the effects of size, sex and age. A stepwise canonical discriminant analysis showed that fish were successfully discriminated with SDs, SIs and NEFDs. In this analysis, 86.4% and 70.1% of the fish were correctly classified as belonging to the Atlantic and Pacific stocks, respectively. A multivariate analysis of variance showed that the mean values of the NEFDs, SDs, and SIs did not vary significantly between sexes within areas (P > 0.05, but varied significantly between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans (P < 0.05. These results highlighted that otolith shape analysis can be a useful tool to evaluate the potential level of mixing in feeding areas where both stocks, the Pacific and Atlantic units, are expected to co-occur.

  17. The morphology of saccular otoliths as a tool to identify different mugilid species from the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicó Fortunato, Roberta; Benedito Durà, Vicent; Volpedo, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    In the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea there are 8 species of the Mugilidae family: Mugil cephalus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, Oedalechilus labeo, Chelon labrosus, Liza saliens, Liza carinata and Liza haematocheila. The identification of mugilids is very important for local fisheries management and regulations, but it is difficult using gross morphological characters. This work aims to contribute to the identification of mullets present in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea using saccular otolith features of each species. Specimens of C. labrosus, L. aurata, L. ramada, L. saliens and M. cephalus were obtained from Delta del Ebro (40°38'N-0°44'E) in artisanal catches. For L. carinata and O. labeo photographs extracted from AFORO online database were used. L. haematocheila was not studied for lack of otolith samples. A general pattern of the saccular otoliths for this family was identified: the shape of the otoliths are rectangular to oblong with irregular margins; they present a heterosulcoid, ostial sulcus acusticus, with an open funnel-like ostium to the anterior margin and a closed, tubular cauda, ending towards the posterior ventral corner, always larger than the ostium. In the present study, the mugilid species could be recognized using their saccular otolith morphology. Here we give the first key to identify Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean mullets. The distinctive features between the species were the position and centrality of the sulcus, the curvature of the cauda, the presence of areal depositions and plateaus, and the type of anterior and posterior regions. These features could be used not only to reinforce the identification keys through morphological and meristic characters of the species, but also to identify the species consumed by piscivores, being the otoliths the only identifiable remains of the individuals.

  18. Onset of maturity and cohort composition at spawning of Baltic sprat Sprattus sprattus on the basis of otolith macrostructure analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reglero, P.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Data on catch per unit effort (CPUE) from the Danish commercial fishery showed dense aggregations of sprat Sprattus sprattus born in 1997 in the main spawning area of the Baltic Sea during May 1999. After the analysis of their otolith macrostructure, these fish were found to have a shorter distance...... predictor of sprat total length (L-T) and mass (M) in age group 0 years. Changes in the otolith size distribution over time were related to variations in cohort composition depending on the L-T and M attained during the juvenile stage. Examination of the gonads suggested two life history patterns: 1...

  19. Uptake of Trace Elements in Aragonitic Otoliths of an Estuarine Dependent Fish, Spotted Seatrout, from surface waters of Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorval, E.; Jones, C.; Hannigan, R.; Sako, A.

    2002-05-01

    Seagrass beds in Chesapeake Bay are critical habitats for early life stages of Spotted seatrout, {\\Cynoscion nebulosus}. Spotted seatrout spawn in surface waters in the Bay during late spring and thereafter their larvae settle in seagrass beds where the juveniles spend three to four months. These habitats provide refuge and food for larvae and juveniles, influencing growth, mortality, and survival rates. Identification of essential seagrass habitats for estuarine-dependent fish is of primary importance given the current decline in habitat quality. We hypothesized that the geochemistry of surface waters in Chesapeake Bay is different along both the latitudinal and longitudinal gradients, and that we could use trace elements in otoliths as a natural tag to differentiate survivors among seagrass beds. We investigated the relationship between water and otolith trace element chemistry and we present here some preliminary results. From July to September 2001 we collected surface waters during spring tide from seagrass beds and around the mouth of the Potomac, Rappahannock, and York river. Waters were filtered through a 0.45 uM filter and acidified to pH < 2 with ultrapure nitric acid. In September, we collected juvenile fish in seagrass beds along the Western and Eastern shores, Tangier and Smith Islands. From each individual fish one sagittal otolith was extracted, cleaned with milli-Q water, soaked for 5 minutes in ultrapure hydrogen peroxide, rinsed, and sonicated. All dried and cleaned otoliths were dissolved in ultrapure nitric acid. We used trace metal clean procedures to process both water and otoliths and trace elements were measured by sector field ICP-MS. Both waters and otoliths showed distinct chemical signatures among seagrass beds, and samples could be classified with high accuracy to their respective sites of collection. For most seagrass beds Ba/Ca, Rb/Ca, V/Ca showed inverse relationship between water and otolith whereas Sr/Ca was positively correlated

  20. A pyridyl-monoannulated naphthalene diimide motif self-assembles into tuneable nanostructures by means of solvophobic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Sheshanath V; Adsul, Mukund; Shitre, Ganesh V; Bobe, Sharad R; Bhosale, Sidhanath V; Privér, Steven H

    2013-06-03

    The supramolecular self-assembly of the core-substituted naphthalene diimide bearing pyridyl motifs leads to the formation of a variety of nanostructures with pH and solvent control. The detection of HCl can be monitored by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as the naked eye, with a change in colour (blue to red, see figure). The cycle is fully reversed by the addition of triethylamine (TEA). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Controlled modulation of electronic properties of graphene by self-assembled monolayers on SiO2 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng; Sun, Zhengzong; Lu, Wei; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Yu; Tour, James M

    2011-02-22

    In this study, with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of aminopropyl-, ammoniumpropyl-, butyl-, and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilanes deposited in-between graphene and the SiO(2) substrate, a controlled doping of graphene was realized with a threshold voltage ranging from -18 to 30 V. In addition, the SAMs are covalently bonded to the SiO(2) surface rather than the graphene surface, thereby producing minimal effects on the mobility of the graphene. Finally, it is more stable than conventional noncovalent dopants.

  2. Photolabile plasmonic vesicles assembled from amphiphilic gold nanoparticles for remote-controlled traceable drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jibin; Fang, Zheng; Wang, Chenxu; Zhou, Jiajing; Duan, Bo; Pu, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a new type of photo-responsive plasmonic vesicles that allow for active delivery of anticancer payloads to specific cancer cells and personalized drug release regulated by external photo-irradiation. Our results show that amphiphilic gold nanoparticles carrying hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and photo-responsive hydrophobic poly(2-nitrobenzyl acrylate) (PNBA) can assemble into plasmonic vesicles with gold nanoparticles embedded in the hydrophobic shell of PNBA, which can be converted into hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) upon photo exposure. Benefiting from the interparticle plasmonic coupling of gold nanoparticles in close proximity, the plasmonic vesicles assembled from amphiphilic gold nanoparticles exhibit distinctively different optical properties from single nanoparticle units, which offer the opportunity to track the photo-triggered disassembly of the vesicles and the associated cargo release by plasmonic imaging. We have shown the dense layer of PEG grafts on the vesicles not only endow plasmonic vesicles with excellent colloidal stability, but also serve as flexible spacers for bioconjugation of targeting ligands to facilitate the specific recognition of cancer cells. The targeted delivery of model anticancer drug doxorubicin, investigated by dual-modality plasmonic and fluorescence imaging and toxicity studies, clearly demonstrated the potential of photolabile plasmonic vesicles as multi-functional drug carriers.We have developed a new type of photo-responsive plasmonic vesicles that allow for active delivery of anticancer payloads to specific cancer cells and personalized drug release regulated by external photo-irradiation. Our results show that amphiphilic gold nanoparticles carrying hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and photo-responsive hydrophobic poly(2-nitrobenzyl acrylate) (PNBA) can assemble into plasmonic vesicles with gold nanoparticles embedded in the hydrophobic shell of PNBA, which can be converted into

  3. Assembly of an Experimental Quad-Rotor Type UAV for Testing a Novel Autonomous Flight Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida Khatoon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research a prototype experimental Quad-rotor type UAV have been assembled using low cost components easily available in the Indian market. The quad-copter is used for testing a novel autonomous flight control strategy developed using embedded system. In order to enable a mini-UAV to perform target acquisition, localization and continuous surveillance in real world environment one must develop a technology which may be a combination of aircraft engineering, control systems, and wireless communication. The major limiting factors in developing the capabilities of small low cost UAVs are connectivity, computational processing power and lack of resource integration. To overcome these limitations in this research we have tried to assemble an experimental quad-rotor prototype UAV capable of being remotely controlled in the range of 20 meter, which is specifically designed as an economical, moderately functional, small airborne platform intended to meet the requirement for fast-response to time-critical events in many small private sectors or government agencies. The experimental prototype quad-copter has been successfully implemented and tested for 15 minutes smooth flight time.

  4. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells.

  5. Synthesis of size-controlled faceted pentagonal silver nanorods with tunable plasmonic properties and self-assembly of these nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Brendan; McEachran, Matthew; Kitaev, Vladimir

    2009-01-27

    Monodisperse size-controlled faceted pentagonal silver nanorods were synthesized by thermal regrowth of decahedral silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) in aqueous solution at 95 degrees C, using citrate as a reducing agent. The width of the silver nanorods was determined by the size of the starting decahedral particle, while the length was varied from 50 nm to 2 mum by the amount of new silver added to the growth solution. Controlled regrowth allowed us to produce monodisperse AgNPs with a shape of elongated pentagonal dipyramid (regular Johnson solid, J(16)). Faceted pentagonal particles exhibited remarkable optical properties with sharp plasmon resonances precisely tunable across visible and NIR. Due to the narrow size distribution, faceted pentagonal silver nanorods readily self-assembled into the 3-D arrays similar to smectic mesophases. Hexagonal arrangement in the array completely overrode five-fold symmetry of the nanorods. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of pentagonal symmetry in metal nanoparticles and offer a facile method of the preparation of monodisperse AgNPs with controlled dimensions and plasmonic properties that are promising for optical applications and functional self-assembly.

  6. Beyond the heteroepitaxial quantum dot : self-assembling complex nanostructures controlled by strain and growth kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Peter (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Lam, Chi-Hang (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong); Gray, Jennifer Lynn (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA); Means, Joel L. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Floro, Jerrold Anthony; Hull, Robert (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA)

    2005-06-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth of GeSi alloys on Si (001) under deposition conditions that partially limit surface mobility leads to an unusual form of strain-induced surface morphological evolution. We discuss a kinetic growth regime wherein pits form in a thick metastable wetting layer and, with additional deposition, evolve to a quantum dot molecule - a symmetric assembly of four quantum dots bound by the central pit. We discuss the size selection and scaling of quantum dot molecules. We then examine the key mechanism - preferred pit formation - in detail, using ex situ atomic force microscopy, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. A picture emerges wherein localized pits appear to arise from a damped instability. When pits are annealed, they extend into an array of highly anisotropic surface grooves via a one-dimensional growth instability. Subsequent deposition on this grooved film results in a fascinating structure where compact quantum dots and molecules, as well as highly ramified quantum wires, are all simultaneously self-assembled.

  7. G domain dimerization controls dynamin's assembly-stimulated GTPase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappie, Joshua S.; Acharya, Sharmistha; Leonard, Marilyn; Schmid, Sandra L.; Dyda, Fred (NIH); (Scripps)

    2010-06-14

    Dynamin is an atypical GTPase that catalyses membrane fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The mechanisms of dynamin's basal and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis are unknown, though both are indirectly influenced by the GTPase effector domain (GED). Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a human dynamin 1-derived minimal GTPase-GED fusion protein, which was dimeric in the presence of the transition state mimic GDP.AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structure reveals dynamin's catalytic machinery and explains how assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis is achieved through G domain dimerization. A sodium ion present in the active site suggests that dynamin uses a cation to compensate for the developing negative charge in the transition state in the absence of an arginine finger. Structural comparison to the rat dynamin G domain reveals key conformational changes that promote G domain dimerization and stimulated hydrolysis. The structure of the GTPase-GED fusion protein dimer provides insight into the mechanisms underlying dynamin-catalysed membrane fission.

  8. N(+) implantation induce cytocompatibility of shape-controlled three-dimensional self-assembly graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ye; Li, Dejun; Zhao, Mengli; Gong, Huanhuan; Wan, Rongxin; Gu, Hanqing

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present research was to synthesize N(+) implanted 3D self-assembly graphene (N(+)/3D-SGHs) to overcome the weaknesses of graphene (small sizes and poor hydrophilicity) in tissue engineering scaffolds. N(+)/3D-SGHs was achieved by ion implantation on one-step hydrothermal synthesized 3D self-assembly graphene (3D-SGHs), and N(+)/3D-SGHs with different doses of nitrogen ions (1 × 10(16) ions/cm(2), 1 × 10(18) ions/cm(2) and 1 × 10(20) ions/cm(2)), which adjusted by nitrogen ion beam intensity. N(+)/3D-SGHs, as scaffolds, provide stereo space and hydrophilic groups for mouse-fibroblast cells (L929) growth and proliferation. Notably, N(+)/3D-SGHs with the N(+) injected quantity of 1 × 10(20) ions/cm(2) displayed the highest protein-adhesion strength, cell viability and proliferation, which supported its good cytocompatibility. This study demonstrated N(+)/3D-SGHs as a promising and effective tissue scaffold that might have applications in biomedicine.

  9. Self-assembled molecular platforms for bacteria/material biointerface studies: importance to control functional group accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmler, Judith; Ponche, Arnaud; Anselme, Karine; Ploux, Lydie

    2013-11-13

    Highly controlled mixed molecular layers are crucial to study the role of material surface chemistry in biointerfaces, such as bacteria and subsequent biofilms interacting with biomaterials. Silanes with non-nucleophilic functional groups are promising to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) due to their low sensitivity to side-reactions. Nevertheless, the real control of surface chemistry, layer structure, and organization has not been determined. Here, we report a comprehensive synthesis and analysis of undecyltrichlorosilane- and 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane-based mixed SAMs on silicon substrates. The impact of the experimental conditions on the control of surface chemistry, layer structure, and organization was investigated by combining survey and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, wettability measurements, and ellipsometry. The most appropriate conditions were first determined for elaborating highly reproducible, but easily made, pure 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane SAMs. We have demonstrated that the control is maintained on more complex surfaces, i.e., surfaces revealing various chemical densities, which were obtained with different ratios of undecyltrichlorosilane and 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane. The control is also maintained after bromine to amine group conversion via SN2 bromine-to-azide reactions. The appropriateness of such highly controlled amino- and methyl-group revealing platforms (NH2-X%/CH3) for biointerface studies was shown by the higher reproducibility of bacterial adhesion on NH2-100%/CH3 SAMs compared to bacterial adhesion on molecular layers of overall similar surface chemistry but less control at the molecular scale.

  10. Control of dynamical self-assembly of strongly Brownian nanoparticles through convective forces induced by ultrafast laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilday, Serim; Akguc, Gursoy B.; Tokel, Onur; Makey, Ghaith; Yavuz, Ozgun; Yavuz, Koray; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, F. Omer; Gulseren, Oguz

    We report a new dynamical self-assembly mechanism, where judicious use of convective and strong Brownian forces enables effective patterning of colloidal nanoparticles that are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than the laser beam. Optical trapping or tweezing effects are not involved, but the laser is used to create steep thermal gradients through multi-photon absorption, and thereby guide the colloids through convective forces. Convective forces can be thought as a positive feedback mechanism that helps to form and reinforce pattern, while Brownian motion act as a competing negative feedback mechanism to limit the growth of the pattern, as well as to increase the possibilities of bifurcation into different patterns, analogous to the competition observed in reaction-diffusion systems. By steering stochastic processes through these forces, we are able to gain control over the emergent pattern such as to form-deform-reform of a pattern, to change its shape and transport it spatially within seconds. This enables us to dynamically initiate and control large patterns comprised of hundreds of colloids. Further, by not relying on any specific chemical, optical or magnetic interaction, this new method is, in principle, completely independent of the material type being assembled.

  11. Connectivity between migrating and landlocked populations of a diadromous fish species investigated using otolith microchemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Tulp

    Full Text Available Smelt Osmerus eperlanus has two different life history strategies in The Netherlands. The migrating population inhabits the Wadden Sea and spawns in freshwater areas. After the closure of the Afsluitdijk in 1932, part of the smelt population became landlocked. The fresh water smelt population has been in severe decline since 1990, and has strongly negatively impacted the numbers of piscivorous water birds relying on smelt as their main prey. The lakes that were formed after the dike closure, IJsselmeer and Markermeer have been assigned as Natura 2000 sites, based on their importance for (among others piscivorous water birds. Because of the declining fresh water smelt population, the question arose whether this population is still supported by the diadromous population. Opportunities for exchange between fresh water and the sea are however limited to discharge sluices. The relationship between the diadromous and landlocked smelt population was analysed by means of otolith microchemistry. Our interpretation of otolith strontium ((88Sr patterns from smelt specimens collected in the fresh water area of Lake IJsselmeer and Markermeer, compared to those collected in the nearby marine environment, is that there is currently no evidence for a substantial contribution from the diadromous population to the spawning stock of the landlocked population.

  12. Controlling Hierarchically Self-Assembly in Supramolecular Tailed-Dendron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet-Lacroix, Nathalie; Rao, Jingui; Zhang, Afang; Schlüter, Dieter; Ruokolainen, Janne; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2010-03-01

    We study the self-assembly of a dendritic macromolecular system formed by a second-generation dendron and a polymer chain emanating from its focal point. We use supramolecular ionic interactions to attach to the periphery of the dendrons sulphated alkyl tails. The resulting ``triblock copolymers'' have a molecular architecture similar to a four-arm pitchfork with varying arms and holder lengths. The bulk morphologies observed by SAXS and TEM show thermodynamically stable, hierarchical ``inverted'' hexagonal or lamellar structures. The structural models for the molecular packing emerging from experimental findings are benchmarked to available self-consistent field theories (SCFT) and experiments and theoretical predictions are found in perfect agreement. The present results show that supramolecular systems based on tailed dendrons and surfactants can be used to scale up of the structural organization from the liquid crystalline length scale to the block copolymer length scale, while preserving the inverted unconventional morphologies offering new possibilities in the design of nanostructured materials.

  13. Controlled metalation of self-assembled porphyrin nanoarrays in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwärter, Willi; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Brink, Susan; Riemann, Andreas; Schiffrin, Agustin; Ruben, Mario; Barth, Johannes V

    2007-02-02

    We report a bottom-up approach for the fabrication of metallo-porphyrin compounds and nanoarchitectures in two dimensions. Scanning tunneling microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy observations elucidate the interaction of highly regular porphyrin layers self-assembled on a Ag(111) surface with iron monomers supplied by an atomic beam. The Fe is shown to be incorporated selectively in the porphyrin macrocycle whereby the template structure is strictly preserved. The immobilization of the molecular reactants allows the identification of single metalation events in a novel reaction scheme. Because the template layers provide extended arrays of reaction sites, superlattices of coordinatively unsaturated and magnetically active metal centers are obtained. This approach offers novel pathways to realize metallo-porphyrin compounds, low-dimensional metal-organic architectures and patterned surfaces which cannot be achieved by conventional means.

  14. Controlling the assembly of graphene oxide by an electrolyte-assisted approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuting; Yang, Haijun; Wang, Yufei; Chen, Shimou; Li, Dan; Zhang, Suojiang; Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-07-21

    In this work, we studied the effects of salts on the self-assembly of two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO) driven by the dissolution of a sub-microliter droplet. Two kinds of structures were obtained. One was a GO snowball with small salt crystals inserted between sheets, which formed with a low initial concentration of insoluble salt in the GO dispersion. The other was a hybrid nanostructure containing NaCl or KCl crystals on a GO snowball, which formed with a high initial salt concentration in the suspension. In addition, we report the novel nanodent-decorated GO snowballs formed by templating the spontaneously formed microdroplets through ouzo effects. Such highly crumpled snowball structures may find applications in super-capacitors or catalyst supports.

  15. Silver nanoplates: controlled preparation, self-assembly, and applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zao; Xu, Xibin; Wu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Chaohua; Li, Xibo; Luo, Bingchi; Luo, Jiangshan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Yi, Yougen; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoplates were prepared in a dual reduction system with NaBH4 and sodium citrate both as reducing agents. And then the as-prepared nanoplates could be growing up through multistage growth methodology. The average edge length of Ag nanoplates can be tailored from 40 nm to 260 nm without changing their shape, crystallinity, and the average thickness. Furthermore, the effectiveness of these silver nanoplates as substrates prepared by the silanization self-assembly method toward surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection was evaluated by using 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) as probe molecules. It was found that the enhancement ability of the silver nanoplates film is remarkable lower than that of the spherical silver nanoparticle film. The reason is attributed to the electromagnetic mechanism and chemical mechanism. This work will be of great significance in understanding the SERS enhancement mechanism and in the fabrication of nanoparticle films for biosensing.

  16. Directional cell movements downstream of Gbx2 and Otx2 control the assembly of sensory placodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Steventon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranial placodes contribute to sensory structures including the inner ear, the lens and olfactory epithelium and the neurons of the cranial sensory ganglia. At neurula stages, placode precursors are interspersed in the ectoderm surrounding the anterior neural plate before segregating into distinct placodes by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we perform live imaging to follow placode progenitors as they aggregate to form the lens and otic placodes. We find that while placode progenitors move with the same speed as their non-placodal neighbours, they exhibit increased persistence and directionality and these properties are required to assemble morphological placodes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these factors are components of the transcriptional networks that coordinate placode cell behaviour including their directional movements. Together with previous work, our results support a dual role for Otx and Gbx transcription factors in both the early patterning of the neural plate border and the later segregation of its derivatives into distinct placodes.

  17. Physical encapsulation and controlled assembly of lipid bilayers within flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Leo, Donald J.

    2010-04-01

    Biomolecular networks formed from droplet interface bilayers (DIB) use principles of phase separation and molecular self-assembly to create a new type of functional material. The original DIB embodiment consists of lipid-encased aqueous droplets surrounding by a large volume of oil contained in a shallow well. However, recent results have shown that, by reducing the amount of oil that separates the droplets from the supporting substrate, physically-encapsulated DIBs display increased durability and portability. In this paper we extend the concept of encapsulated biomolecular networks to one in which phase separation and molecular self-assembly occur entirely within internally-structured reservoirs of a solid material. Flexible substrates with 200μm wideby- 200μm deep internal microchannels for holding the aqueous and oil phases are fabricated from Sylgard 184 polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using soft-lithography microfabrication techniques. Narrowed apertures along the microchannels enable the use of the regulated attachment method (RAM) to subdivide and reattach lipid-encased aqueous volumes contained within the material with an applied external force. The use of perfluorodecalin, a fluorocarbon oil, instead of hexadecane eliminates absorption of the oil phase into the PDMS bulk while a silanization surface treatment of the internal channel walls maximizes wetting by the oil phase to retain a thin layer of oil within the channels to provide a fluid oil/water interface around the aqueous volumes. High-quality 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPHPC) lipid bilayers formed within the prototype substrates have electrical resistance between 1-100GΩ, enabling the measurement of single and few-channel recordings of alpha-hemolysin (αHL) and alamethicin proteins incorporated into the bilayers.

  18. Otolith shape analysis and mitochondrial DNA markers distinguish three sand smelt species in the Atherina boyeri species complex in western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinar, A. S.; Chaoui, L.; Quignard, J. P.; Aurelle, D.; Kara, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    Atherina boyeri is a common euryhaline teleost fish in the Mediterranean and adjacent areas, which inhabits coastal and estuarine waters, including coastal lagoons and more rarely inland waters. Several recent studies have pointed the possible existence of three distinct groups or species, one lagoon/freshwater group and two 'punctuated and unpunctuated on the flanks' marine groups, within an A. boyeri species complex. This study is a combined approach using otolith shape and molecular markers to better define the structure of the species in the western Mediterranean. Genetic differentiation and species delimitation among nine Atherina boyeri populations from several marine and lagoon/brakish habitat sites in Algeria, Tunisia and France were investigated using three mitochondrial (control region, Cyt b and 16S) and one nuclear markers (2nd intron of S7). For further phylogenetic and phylogeographic study, we added sequences from Genbank covering more areas (Ionian Sea, Adriatic Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Black Sea, Atlantic). Five groups were found. Two of them perfectly corresponded to two species already recognized Atherina presbyter and Atherina hepsetus, both living in marine waters; and three additional, including Atherina boyeri (brackish and freshwater environments) and two independent groups of marine punctated and unpunctated individuals. Those findings are corroborated by the study of the otolith contour shape of 362 individuals of seven populations from different habitats using Fourier analysis. Individuals could be discriminated into five groups based on the first two functions (Wilk's lambda = 0.07, p < 0.001). Samples from Ziama inlet, marine punctuated individuals and unpunctuated marine specimens from Annaba's Gulf formed three well separated groups. Specimens from Mellah and Mauguio lagoons formed another group. The last one includes individuals from Bizerte and Thau lagoons. The divergences between them strongly support the potential species within the

  19. Measuring the efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly using a model of RKI-1 reactimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitarev, V. E.; Lebedev, G. V.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    The efficiency of control rods of the RBMK critical assembly is measured in a series of experiments. The aim of measurements is to determine the characteristics of the model of an RKI-1 reactimeter. The RKI-1 reactimeter is intended for measuring the efficiency of control rods when, according to conditions of operation, the metrological certification of results of an experiment is required. Complications with the metrological certification of reactimeters arise owing to the fact that usually calculated corrections to the results of measurements are required. When the RKI-1 reactimeter is used, there is no need to introduce calculated corrections; the result of measurements is given with the indication of substantiated errors. In connection with this, the metrological certification of the results of measurements using the RKI-1 reactimeter is simplified.

  20. The Detector Control System of the ATLAS SemiCondutor Tracker during Macro-Assembly and Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Basiladze, S; Bates, R L; Bell, P; Bingefors, N; Böhm, J; Brenner, R; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Clark, A; Codispoti, G; Colijn, A P; D'Auria, S; Dorholt, O; Doherty, F; Ferrari, P; Ferrère, D; Górnicki, E; Koperny, S; Lefèvre, R; Lindquist, L-E; Malecki, P; Mikulec, B; Mohn, B; Pater, J; Pernegger, H; Phillips, P; Robichaud-Véronneau, A; Robinson, D; Roe, S; Sandaker, H; Sfyrla, A; Stanecka, E; Stastny, J; Viehhauser, G; Vossebeld, J; Wells, P

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is one of the largest existing semiconductor detectors. It is situated between the Pixel detector and the Transition Radiation Tracker at one of the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During 2006-2007 the detector was lowered into the ATLAS cavern and installed in its final position. For the assembly, integration and commissioning phase, a complete Detector Control System (DCS) was developed to ensure the safe operation of the tracker. This included control of the individual powering of the silicon modules, a bi-phase cooling system and various types of sensors monitoring the SCT environment and the surrounding test enclosure. The DCS software architecture, performance and operational experience will be presented in the view of a validation of the DCS for the final SCT installation and operation phase.

  1. Precursor-involved and Conversion Rate-controlled Self-assembly of a 'Super Gelator' in Thixotropic Hydrogels for Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    区彩文; 王怀民; 杨志谋; 陈敏生

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrogelation is a totally different process to the heating-cooling gelation process, in which the pre- cursors of the gelators can be involved during the formation of self-assembled structures. Using thixotropic hy- drogels formed by a super gelator as our studied system, we demonstrated that the enzyme concentration/conversion rate of enzymatic reaction had a strong influence on the morphology of resulting self-assembled nanostructures and the property of resulting hydrogels. The principle demonstrated in this study not only helps to understand and elucidate the phenomenon of self-assembly triggered by enzymes in biological systems, but also offers a unique methodology to control the morphology of self-assembled structures for specific applications such as controlled drug re- lease.

  2. Slave to the rhythm: seasonal signals in otolith microchemistry reveal age of eastern Baltic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Gröger, J.; Heidemann, F.

    2016-01-01

    Annual growth zones in cod otoliths from the eastern Baltic stock are less discrete than in other cod stocks leading to biased age reading, which recently led to a failure of age-based assessment in the eastern Baltic cod stock. In this study, we explored the applicability of minor and trace elem...

  3. Controlled perturbation of the thermodynamic equilibrium by microfluidic separation of porphyrin-based aggregates in a multi-component self-assembling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Floris; Meijer, E W

    2013-03-04

    In a microfluidic H-cell, a multi-component self-assembled system is brought out-of-equilibrium by changing the bimodal composition of porphyrin stacks and pyridine-capped dimers. Driven by their different diffusivities, diffusion-controlled separation in methylcyclohexane reveals different compositions when detected in-line and off-line, which demonstrates the kinetic behaviour of this metastable system. The microfluidic technique also proves to be highly equipped to determine diffusion constants of the different assemblies.

  4. Listening in on the past: what can otolith δ18O values really tell us about the environmental history of fishes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnaude, Audrey M; Sturrock, Anna; Trueman, Clive N; Mouillot, David; Campana, Steven E; Hunter, Ewan

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios from fish otoliths are used to discriminate marine stocks and reconstruct past climate, assuming that variations in otolith δ18O values closely reflect differences in temperature history of fish when accounting for salinity induced variability in water δ18O. To investigate this, we exploited the environmental and migratory data gathered from a decade using archival tags to study the behaviour of adult plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) in the North Sea. Based on the tag-derived monthly distributions of the fish and corresponding temperature and salinity estimates modelled across three consecutive years, we first predicted annual otolith δ18O values for three geographically discrete offshore sub-stocks, using three alternative plausible scenarios for otolith growth. Comparison of predicted vs. measured annual δ18O values demonstrated >96% correct prediction of sub-stock membership, irrespective of the otolith growth scenario. Pronounced inter-stock differences in δ18O values, notably in summer, provide a robust marker for reconstructing broad-scale plaice distribution in the North Sea. However, although largely congruent, measured and predicted annual δ18O values did not fully match [ corrected]. Small, but consistent, offsets were also observed between individual high-resolution otolith δ18O values measured during tag recording time and corresponding δ18O predictions using concomitant tag-recorded temperatures and location-specific salinity estimates. The nature of the shifts differed among sub-stocks, suggesting specific vital effects linked to variation in physiological response to temperature. Therefore, although otolith δ18O in free-ranging fish largely reflects environmental temperature and salinity, we counsel prudence when interpreting otolith δ18O data for stock discrimination or temperature reconstruction until the mechanisms underpinning otolith δ18O signature acquisition, and associated variation, are clarified.

  5. Listening in on the past: what can otolith δ18O values really tell us about the environmental history of fishes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey M Darnaude

    Full Text Available Oxygen isotope ratios from fish otoliths are used to discriminate marine stocks and reconstruct past climate, assuming that variations in otolith δ18O values closely reflect differences in temperature history of fish when accounting for salinity induced variability in water δ18O. To investigate this, we exploited the environmental and migratory data gathered from a decade using archival tags to study the behaviour of adult plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L. in the North Sea. Based on the tag-derived monthly distributions of the fish and corresponding temperature and salinity estimates modelled across three consecutive years, we first predicted annual otolith δ18O values for three geographically discrete offshore sub-stocks, using three alternative plausible scenarios for otolith growth. Comparison of predicted vs. measured annual δ18O values demonstrated >96% correct prediction of sub-stock membership, irrespective of the otolith growth scenario. Pronounced inter-stock differences in δ18O values, notably in summer, provide a robust marker for reconstructing broad-scale plaice distribution in the North Sea. However, although largely congruent, measured and predicted annual δ18O values did not fully match [ corrected]. Small, but consistent, offsets were also observed between individual high-resolution otolith δ18O values measured during tag recording time and corresponding δ18O predictions using concomitant tag-recorded temperatures and location-specific salinity estimates. The nature of the shifts differed among sub-stocks, suggesting specific vital effects linked to variation in physiological response to temperature. Therefore, although otolith δ18O in free-ranging fish largely reflects environmental temperature and salinity, we counsel prudence when interpreting otolith δ18O data for stock discrimination or temperature reconstruction until the mechanisms underpinning otolith δ18O signature acquisition, and associated variation, are

  6. Controlled Assembly of Heterobinuclear Sites on Mesoporous Silica: Visible Light Charge-Transfer Units with Selectable Redox Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Heinz; Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Mild synthetic methods are demonstrated for the selective assembly of oxo-bridged heterobinuclear units of the type TiOCrIII, TiOCoII, and TiOCeIII on mesoporous silica support MCM-41. One method takes advantage of the higher acidity and, hence, higher reactivity of titanol compared to silanol OH groups towards CeIII or CoII precursor. The procedure avoids the customary use of strong base. The controlled assembly of the TiOCr system exploits the selective redox reactivity of one metal towards another (TiIII precursor reacting with anchored CrVI centers). The observed selectivity for linking a metal precursor to an already anchored partner versus formation of isolated centers ranges from a factor of six (TiOCe) to complete (TiOCr, TiOCo). Evidence for oxo bridges and determination of the coordination environment of each metal centers is based on K-edge EXAFS (TiOCr), L-edge absorption spectroscopy (Ce), and XANES measurements (Co, Cr). EPR, optical, FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy furnish additional details on oxidation state and coordination environment of donor and acceptor metal centers. In the case of TiOCr, the integrity of the anchored group upon calcination (350 oC) and cycling of the Cr oxidation state is demonstrated. The binuclear units possess metal-to-metal charge-transfer transitions that absorb deep in the visible region. The flexible synthetic method for assembling the units opens up the use of visible light charge transfer pumps featuring donor or acceptor metals with selectable redox potential.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability in the otolith chemistry of the Brazilian snapper Lutjanus alexandrei from estuarine and coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, A; Ferreira, B P; Rooker, J R

    2016-07-01

    Otolith chemistry of juvenile and adult individuals of the Brazilian snapper Lutjanus alexandrei was measured to assess the utility of natural markers for investigating individual movements. Individuals were collected over a 3-year period (2010-2012) along the north-eastern coast of Brazil from both estuarine (juvenile to sub-adult stages) and coastal (sub-adult to adult stages) areas. Six elements ((7) Li, (24) Mg, (55) Mn, (59) Co, (88) Sr and (137) Ba) were measured in sectioned otoliths of L. alexandrei using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Edge composition analysis indicated that element:Ca ratios in the otoliths of juvenile and sub-adult L. alexandrei from estuaries were not significantly different among the three consecutive years (2010, 2011 and 2012), suggesting that physicochemical conditions within the nursery area investigated were temporally stable. Similarly, apart from two elements (Ba and Co), element:Ca ratios for larger L. alexandrei inhabiting coastal waters were also similar. In contrast, otolith chemistry of similar sized L. alexandrei from estuarine and coastal areas was significantly different (based on recently accreted material). Otolith Mn:Ca and Ba:Ca were both significantly higher for L. alexandrei collected in estuaries compared to fish from adjacent coastal reefs, while the opposite trend was observed for Sr:Ca. Given the pronounced differences in otolith chemistry between estuarine and coastal areas, element:Ca transects were constructed from the core to margin of the otoliths for adults (age 7+ years) collected on reefs to determine the timing of movement (ontogenetic migration) from estuarine to coastal areas. Based on observed patterns of decline for both Mn:Ca and Ba:Ca, it appears that L. alexandrei begin the move to more coastal habitats (i.e. lower element:Ca ratios) after age 2 years. The patterns observed for this species highlight the importance of conserving connectivity between

  8. Morphological control via chemical and shear forces in block copolymer self-assembly in the lab-on-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Wei; Sinton, David; Moffitt, Matthew G

    2013-02-26

    We investigate the effects of variation in chemical conditions (solvent composition, water content, polymer concentration, and added salt) on the morphologies formed by PS-b-PAA in DMF/dioxane/water mixtures in a two-phase gas-liquid segmented microfluidic reactor. The differences in morphologies between off-chip and on-chip self-assembly and on-chip morphological trends for different chemical conditions are explained by the interplay of top-down shear effects (coalescence and breakup) and bottom-up chemical forces. Using off-chip morphology results, we construct a water content-solvent composition phase diagram showing disordered, sphere, cylinder, and vesicle regions. On-chip morphologies are found to deviate from off-chip morphologies by three identified shear-induced paths: 1) sphere-to-cylinder, and 2) sphere-to-vesicle transitions, both via shear-induced coalescence when initial micelle sizes are small, and 3) cylinder-to-sphere transitions via shear-induced breakup when initial micelle sizes are large (high capillary number conditions). These pathways contribute to the generation of large extended bilayer aggregates uniquely on-chip, at either increased polymer or salt concentrations. Collectively these results demonstrate the broad utility of top-down directed molecular self-assembly in conjunction with chemical forces to control morphology and size of polymer colloids at the nanoscale.

  9. Modeling and characterization of molecular structures in self assembled and Langmuir-Blodgett films for controlled fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials and Process Sciences Center

    1997-10-01

    Self Assembled (SA) thin films and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) thin films are emerging technologies for the development of chemical and bio-chemical sensors, electrooptic films, second harmonic generators (frequency doublers), templates for biomimetic growth etc. One of the goals of this project was to extend Sandia`s characterization techniques and molecular modeling capabilities for these complex two-dimensional geometries with the objective of improving the control of the fabrication of these structures for specific applications. Achieving this requires understanding both the structure throughout the thickness of the films and the in-plane lattice of the amphiphilic molecules. To meet these objectives they used atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectivity, and molecular modeling. While developing these capabilities, three different materials systems were fabricated and characterized: (1) Self Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and LB films of arachidic acid on silicon wafers; (2) SAMs on PZT substrates; and (3) electrochemical deposition of CdS on LB film templates.

  10. Laser Ultrasonic System for Surface Crack Visualization in Dissimilar Welds of Control Rod Drive Mechanism Assembly of Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shil Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a J-groove dissimilar weld crack visualization system based on ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI technology. A full-scale control rod drive mechanism (CRDM assembly specimen was fabricated to verify the proposed system. An ultrasonic sensor was contacted at one point of the inner surface of the reactor vessel head part of the CRDM assembly. Q-switched laser beams were scanned to generate ultrasonic waves around the weld bead. The localization and sizing of the crack were possible by ultrasonic wave propagation imaging. Furthermore, ultrasonic spectral imaging unveiled frequency components of damage-induced waves, while wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging enhanced damage visibility by generating a wave propagation video focused on the frequency component of the damage-induced waves. Dual-directional anomalous wave propagation imaging with adjacent wave subtraction was also developed to enhance the crack visibility regardless of crack orientation and wave propagation direction. In conclusion, the full-scale specimen test demonstrated that the multiple damage visualization tools are very effective in the visualization of J-groove dissimilar weld cracks.

  11. Fluorescent polymeric assemblies as stimuli-responsive vehicles for drug controlled release and cell/tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Li, Yang; Yu, Shirong; Mao, Jie; Liu, Cheng; Li, Qi; Yuan, Conghui; He, Ning; Luo, Weiang; Dai, Lizong

    2015-01-01

    Polymer assemblies with good biocompatibility, stimuli-responsive properties and clinical imaging capability are desirable carriers for future biomedical applications. Herein, we report on the synthesis of a novel anthracenecarboxaldehyde-decorated poly(N-(4-aminophenyl) methacryl amide-oligoethyleneglycolmonomethylether methacrylate) (P(MAAPAC-MAAP-MAPEG)) copolymer, comprising fluorescent chromophore and acid-labile moiety. This copolymer can assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and shows a spherical shape with well-defined particle size and narrow particle size distribution. The pH-responsive property of the micelles has been evaluated by the change of particle size and the controlled release of guest molecules. The intrinsic fluorescence property endows the micelles with excellent cell/tissue imaging capability. Cell viability evaluation with human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402 cells demonstrates that the micelles are nontoxic. The cellular uptake of the micelles indicates a time-dependent behavior. The H22-tumor bearing mice treated with the micelles clearly exhibits the tumor accumulation. These multi-functional nanocarriers may be of great interest in the application of drug delivery.

  12. Supramolecular self-assembly and controllable drug release of thermosensitive hyperbranched multiarm copolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A novel temperature-responsive hyperbranched multiarm copolymer with a hydrophobic hyperbranched poly(3-ethyl-3-(hydroxymethyl)oxetane)(HBPO) core and thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) arms was synthesized via the atom transfer radical polymerization(ATRP) of NIPAM monomers from a hyperbranched HBPO macroinitiator.It was found that HBPO-star-PNIPAM self-assembled into multimolecular micelles(around 60 nm) in water at room temperature according to pyrene probe fluorescence spectrometry,1H NMR,TEM,and DLS measurements.The micelle solution showed a reversible thermosensitive phase transition at a lower critical solution temperature(LCST)(around 32°C) observed by variable temperature optical absorbance measurements.Variable temperature NMR and DLS analyses demonstrated that the LCST transition originated from the secondary aggregation of the micelles driven by increasing hydrophobic interaction due to the dehydration of PNIPAM shells upon heating.The drug loading and release properties of HBPO-star-PNIPAM micelles were also investigated using prednisone acetate as a model drug.The micelles showed a much improved drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-dependent sustainable release behavior due to the special micellar structure.The micelles exhibited no apparent cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells.

  13. Non-lamellar lipid assembly at interfaces: controlling layer structure by responsive nanogel particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Valldeperas, Maria; Hirst, Christopher; Montis, Costanza; Pálsson, Gunnar K; Wang, Meina; Nöjd, Sofi; Gentile, Luigi; Barauskas, Justas; Steinke, Nina-Juliane; Schroeder-Turk, Gerd E; George, Sebastian; Skoda, Maximilian W A; Nylander, Tommy

    2017-08-06

    Biological membranes do not only occur as planar bilayer structures, but depending on the lipid composition, can also curve into intriguing three-dimensional structures. In order to fully understand the biological implications as well as to reveal the full potential for applications, e.g. for drug delivery and other biomedical devices, of such structures, well-defined model systems are required. Here, we discuss the formation of lipid non-lamellar liquid crystalline (LC) surface layers spin-coated from the constituting lipids followed by hydration of the lipid layer. We demonstrate that hybrid lipid polymer films can be formed with different properties compared with the neat lipid LC layers. The nanostructure and morphologies of the lipid films formed reflect those in the bulk. Most notably, mixed lipid layers, which are composed of glycerol monooleate and diglycerol monooleate with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanogels, can form films of reverse cubic phases that are capable of responding to temperature stimulus. Owing to the presence of the nanogel particles, changing the temperature not only regulates the hydration of the cubic phase lipid films, but also the lateral organization of the lipid domains within the lipid self-assembled film. This opens up the possibility for new nanostructured materials based on lipid-polymer responsive layers.

  14. Controlling the stereochemistry and regularity of butanethiol self-assembled monolayers on au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiawei; Ouyang, Runhai; Jensen, Palle S; Ascic, Erhad; Tanner, David; Mao, Bingwei; Zhang, Jingdong; Tang, Chunguang; Hush, Noel S; Ulstrup, Jens; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-10

    The rich stereochemistry of the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of four butanethiols on Au(111) is described, the SAMs containing up to 12 individual C, S, or Au chiral centers per surface unit cell. This is facilitated by synthesis of enantiomerically pure 2-butanethiol (the smallest unsubstituted chiral alkanethiol), followed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging combined with density functional theory molecular dynamics STM image simulations. Even though butanethiol SAMs manifest strong headgroup interactions, steric interactions are shown to dominate SAM structure and chirality. Indeed, steric interactions are shown to dictate the nature of the headgroup itself, whether it takes on the adatom-bound motif RS(•)Au(0)S(•)R or involves direct binding of RS(•) to face-centered-cubic or hexagonal-close-packed sites. Binding as RS(•) produces large, organizationally chiral domains even when R is achiral, while adatom binding leads to rectangular plane groups that suppress long-range expression of chirality. Binding as RS(•) also inhibits the pitting intrinsically associated with adatom binding, desirably producing more regularly structured SAMs.

  15. Impaired modulation of the otolithic function in acute unilateral cerebellar infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo Young; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2014-06-01

    To define the cerebellar contribution in modulating the otolithic signals, we investigated the otolithic function in 27 patients with acute unilateral cerebellar infarctions in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA, n = 17, 63%), combined PICA and superior cerebellar artery (SCA) (n = 7, 30%), SCA (n = 2, 7%), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1, 4%) from 2010 to 2012. The patients had evaluation of the ocular tilt reaction [head tilt, ocular torsion (OT), and skew deviation], tilt of the subjective visual vertical (SVV), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in response to air conducted tone bursts, and ocular VEMPs induced by tapping the head at AFz. The evaluation was completed within 2 weeks after symptom onset. Patients often showed OT or SVV tilt (15/27, 55.6%) that was either ipsi- (n = 6) or contraversive (n = 9). Overall, there were no differences in the amplitudes and latencies of cervical and ocular VEMPs between the ipsi- and contralesional sides. However, individual analyses revealed frequent abnormalities of cervical (11/27, 41%) and/or ocular (9/27, 33%) VEMPs. While 11 (73%) of the 15 patients with the OTR/SVV tilt showed abnormalities of cervical (n = 9) and/or ocular (n = 7) VEMP responses, only three (25%) of the 12 patients without the OTR/SVV tilt had abnormal cervical (n = 2) and/or ocular (n = 2) VEMPs (73% vs. 25%, Fisher's exact test, p = 0.021). The concordance rate in the results of cervical and ocular VEMPs was marginally significant (19/27, 70%, p = 0.052, binominal). Unilateral cerebellar lesions may generate otolithic imbalances, as evidenced by the OTR/SVV tilt and asymmetric ocular or cervical VEMP responses, but without directionality according to the lesion side. Patients with the OTR/SVV tilt had abnormal VEMPs more often than those without.

  16. Thresholds for perception of direction of linear acceleration as a possible evaluation of the otolith function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingma H

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous attempts to measure otolith function using ocular counter-rolling have shown poor sensitivity and specificity, thereby hindering a useful clinical application. We have conducted a study to investigate whether thresholds for the perception of the direction of linear acceleration might be an alternative for the clinical evaluation of otolith or statolith function. Methods Perception of the direction of motion was evaluated in 28 healthy subjects while all external auditory and visual cues were eliminated. Whole body motion stimulus was generated by a motor driven linear sled at a stimulus frequency of 1 Hz at a linear acceleration ranging from 0 to maximum 40 cm/ s2. Subjects were required to correctly indicate the direction of motion (anterior-posterior or lateral or whether they were stationary. Both velocity and acceleration thresholds were measured. Results The median acceleration thresholds for the perception of direction of linear movement for anterior-posterior movement was 8.5 cm/s2 and for lateral movement 6.5 cm/s2. According to the literature, acceleration thresholds depend on the stimulus profile whereas velocity thresholds do not. The median velocity thresholds for the perception of direction of linear movement for anterior-posterior movement was 13.5 cm/s and for lateral movement was 10.4 cm/s. The median velocity thresholds for the perception of direction of linear movement for anterior-posterior movement increased linearly with age, whereas the median velocity threshold for lateral movement was not correlated with age. Conclusion The thresholds found in this study are lower than reported in the literature before which may be due to the repetative predictive sinusoidal stimulus which makes it relatively easy to lower the threshold by learning already within one test prophile. The variablity is large in line with the previous literature, but our experiments indicate that variability decreases after a

  17. Femtosecond laser-controlled self-assembly of amorphous-crystalline nanogratings in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, Daniel; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembly (SA) of molecular units to form regular, periodic extended structures is a powerful bottom-up technique for nanopatterning, inspired by nature. SA can be triggered in all classes of solid materials, for instance, by femtosecond laser pulses leading to the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with a period slightly shorter than the laser wavelength. This approach, though, typically involves considerable material ablation, which leads to an unwanted increase of the surface roughness. We present a new strategy to fabricate high-precision nanograting structures in silicon, consisting of alternating amorphous and crystalline lines, with almost no material removal. The strategy can be applied to static irradiation experiments and can be extended into one and two dimensions by scanning the laser beam over the sample surface. We demonstrate that lines and areas with parallel nanofringe patterns can be written by an adequate choice of spot size, repetition rate and scan velocity, keeping a constant effective pulse number (N eff) per area for a given laser wavelength. A deviation from this pulse number leads either to inhomogeneous or ablative structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach can be used with different laser systems having widely different wavelengths (1030 nm, 800 nm, 400 nm), pulse durations (370 fs, 100 fs) and repetition rates (500 kHz, 100 Hz, single pulse) and that the grating period can also be tuned by changing the angle of laser beam incidence. The grating structures can be erased by irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse, triggering recrystallization of the amorphous stripes. Given the large differences in electrical conductivity between the two phases, our structures could find new applications in nanoelectronics.

  18. Model-Based Control of a Continuous Coating Line for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Electrode Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Devaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most expensive component of a fuel cell is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA, which consists of an ionomer membrane coated with catalyst material. Best-performing MEAs are currently fabricated by depositing and drying liquid catalyst ink on the membrane; however, this process is limited to individual preparation by hand due to the membrane’s rapid water absorption that leads to shape deformation and coating defects. A continuous coating line can reduce the cost and time needed to fabricate the MEA, incentivizing the commercialization and widespread adoption of fuel cells. A pilot-scale membrane coating line was designed for such a task and is described in this paper. Accurate process control is necessary to prevent manufacturing defects from occurring in the coating line. A linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG controller was developed based on a physics-based model of the coating process to optimally control the temperature and humidity of the drying zones. The process controller was implemented in the pilot-scale coating line proving effective in preventing defects.

  19. "Bis-Click" Ligation of DNA: Template-Controlled Assembly, Circularisation and Functionalisation with Bifunctional and Trifunctional Azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank

    2017-03-08

    Ligation and circularisation of oligonucleotides containing terminal triple bonds was performed with bifunctional or trifunctional azides. Both reactions are high yielding. Template-assisted bis-click ligation of two individual non-complementary oligonucleotide strands was accomplished to yield heterodimers exclusively. In this context, the template fulfils two functions: it accelerates the ligation reaction and controls product assembly (heterodimer vs. homodimer formation). Intermolecular bis-click circularisation of one oligonucleotide strand took place without template assistance. For construction of oligonucleotides with terminal triple bonds in the nucleobase side chain, 7- or 5-functionalised 7-deaza-dA and dU residues were used. These oligonucleotides are directly accessible by solid-phase synthesis. When trifunctional azides were employed instead of bifunctional linkers, functionalisation of the remaining azido group was performed with small molecules such as 1-ethynyl pyrene, biotin propargyl amide or with ethynylated oligonucleotides. By this means, branched DNA was constructed.

  20. Controlled Release of the Indomethacin Microencapsulation Based on Layer-by-layer Assembly by Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN You-fang; LIN Xian-fu

    2007-01-01

    Indomethacin has been encapsulated with polyelectrolyte multilayers for controlled release. Gelatin and alginate were alternatively deposited on indomethacin microcrystals. The released amount of indomethacin from coated microcrystals in pH6. 8phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was measured with a UV spectrophometer. The polyelectrolyte multilayer capsule thickness was proved to control the release rate. The effects of osmotic pressure existed during the release process of indomethacin from microcapsules coated by (gelatin/alginate) 4.

  1. A UNIT, AN ASSEMBLY AND A METHOD FOR CONTROLLING IN A DYNAMIC EGOCENTRIC INTERACTIVE SPACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    A portable unit for providing instructions for navigation in menus or controlling equipment, the unit having a user interface and a camera pointing in the general direction of the user. The unit tracking relative movements between the unit and the user and converting the relative movement into th...... into the instructions. The unit may be used as a remote control for audio or video equipment or computers or the like.......A portable unit for providing instructions for navigation in menus or controlling equipment, the unit having a user interface and a camera pointing in the general direction of the user. The unit tracking relative movements between the unit and the user and converting the relative movement...

  2. Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.

  3. The cortical spatiotemporal correlate of otolith stimulation: vestibular evoked potentials by body translations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, M; Moser, M; Boegle, R; Conrad, J; Zu Eulenburg, P; Dieterich, M

    2017-02-22

    The vestibular organ senses linear and rotational acceleration of the head during active and passive motion. These signals are necessary for bipedal locomotion, navigation, the coordination of eye and head movements in 3D space. The temporal dynamics of vestibular processing in cortical structures have hardly been studied in humans, let alone with natural stimulation. The aim was to investigate the cortical vestibular network related to natural otolith stimulation using a hexapod motion platform. We conducted two experiments, 1. to estimate the sources of the vestibular evoked potentials (VestEPs) by means of distributed source localization (n=49), and 2. to reveal modulations of the VestEPs through the underlying acceleration intensity (n=24). For both experiments subjects were accelerated along the main axis (left/right, up/down, fore/aft) while the EEG was recorded. We were able to identify five VestEPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, P3) with latencies between 38 and 461 ms as well as an evoked beta-band response peaking with a latency of 68 ms in all subjects and for all acceleration directions. Source localization gave the cingulate sulcus visual (CSv) area and the opercular-insular region as the main origin of the evoked potentials. No lateralization effects due to handedness could be observed. In the second experiment, area CSv was shown to be integral in the processing of acceleration intensities as sensed by the otolith organs, hinting at its potential role in ego-motion detection. These robust VestEPs could be used to investigate the mechanisms of inter-regional interaction in the natural context of vestibular processing and multisensory integration.

  4. Sustained and controlled release of lipophilic drugs from a self-assembling amphiphilic peptide hydrogel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briuglia, Maria-Lucia; Urquhart, Andrew; Lamprou, Dimitrios A.

    2014-01-01

    . In this work, we have investigated the diffusion properties of Pindolol, Quinine and Timolol maleate from RADA16 in PBS and in BSS-PLUS at 37°C. A sustained, controlled, reproducible and efficient drug release has been detected for all the systems, which allows to understand the dependence of release kinetics...

  5. Controlling the assembly of CdS nanorods via solvent and acidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, L. J. A.; Khodabakhsh, S.; Greenham, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report control over the phase behavior of CdS nanorods via the solvent and acidity. CdS nanorods were synthesized using alkane phosphonic acid ligands, which were replaced after synthesis by a series of aromatic ligands. Change of ligand enabled us to cast films from different solvents. By replac

  6. Ultra-Portable Smartphone Controlled Integrated Digital Microfluidic System in a 3D-Printed Modular Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Yafia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Portable sensors and biomedical devices are influenced by the recent advances in microfluidics technologies, compact fabrication techniques, improved detection limits and enhanced analysis capabilities. This paper reports the development of an integrated ultraportable, low-cost, and modular digital microfluidic (DMF system and its successful integration with a smartphone used as a high-level controller and post processing station. Low power and cost effective electronic circuits are designed to generate the high voltages required for DMF operations in both open and closed configurations (from 100 to 800 V. The smartphone in turn commands a microcontroller that manipulate the voltage signals required for droplet actuation in the DMF chip and communicates wirelessly with the microcontroller via Bluetooth module. Moreover, the smartphone acts as a detection and image analysis station with an attached microscopic lens. The holder assembly is fabricated using three-dimensional (3D printing technology to facilitate rapid prototyping. The holder features a modular design that enables convenient attachment/detachment of a variety of DMF chips to/from an electrical busbar. The electrical circuits, controller and communication system are designed to minimize the power consumption in order to run the device on small lithium ion batteries. Successful controlled DMF operations and a basic colorimetric assay using the smartphone are demonstrated.

  7. Fingerprints of lagoonal life: Migration of the marine flatfish Solea solea assessed by stable isotopes and otolith microchemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Jan; Morat, Fabien; Letourneur, Yves; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille

    2012-06-01

    The commercially important marine flatfish common sole (Solea solea) facultatively uses NW Mediterranean lagoons as nurseries. To assess the imprint left by the lagoonal passage, muscle carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope values of S. solea juveniles caught in Mauguio lagoon in spring (shortly after arrival from the sea) and in autumn (before the return to the sea) were compared with values of juveniles from adjacent coastal marine nurseries. In addition, in the lagoon, sole otolith stable isotope (C and oxygen (O)) and elemental (11 elements) composition in spring and autumn, and the stable isotope composition (C and N) of organic matter sources in autumn, were determined. Overall, our data indicate that a distinct lagoonal signature existed. Specifically, lagoon soles showed a strong enrichment in muscle tissue 15N (>6‰) compared to their coastal relatives, likely linked to sewage inputs (see below), and a depletion in 13C (1-2‰), indicative of higher importance of 13C depleted terrestrial POM in the lagoon compared to coastal nurseries. In addition, over the time spent in the lagoon, sole otolith δ13C and δ18O values and otolith elemental composition changed significantly. Analysis of the lagoon sole foodweb based on C and N isotopes placed sediment particulate organic matter (POM) at the base. Seagrasses, formerly common but in decline in Mauguio lagoon, played a minor role in the detritus cycle. The very strong 15N enrichment of the entire foodweb (+7 to +11‰) compared to little impacted lagoons and coastal areas testified of important human sewage inputs. Regarding the S. solea migration, the analysis of higher turnover and fast growth muscle tissue and metabolically inert and slower growth otoliths indicated that soles arrived at least several weeks prior to capture in spring, and that no migrations took place in summer. In the autumn, the high muscle δ15N value acquired in Mauguio lagoon would be a good marker of recent return to the sea, whereas

  8. Layered Double Hydroxide Assemblies with Controllable Drug Loading Capacity and Release Behavior as well as Stabilized Layer-by-Layer Polymer Multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Fengzhu; Xu, Linan; Zhang, Yihe; Meng, Zilin

    2015-09-02

    A stable drug release system with magnetic targeting is essential in a drug delivery system. In the present work, layered double hydroxide assemblies stabilized by layer-by-layer polymer multilayers were prepared by alternative deposition of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid) species on composite particles of Fe3O4 and ZnAl-LDH and then covalent cross-linkage of the polymer multilayers by photosensitive cross-linker. The successful fabrication was recorded by Zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectrum measurements. The formed assemblies were stable in high pH solutions (pH > 7). The drug loading capacity and release behavior of the assemblies could be controlled by treatment with appropriate acidic solution, and were confirmed by loading and release of a simulated drug, methylene blue. The formed assemblies possessed enough saturated magnetic strength and were sensitive to external magnetic field which was essential for targeting drug delivery. The formed assemblies were multifunctional assemblies with great potential as drug delivery system.

  9. Roughness-controlled self-assembly of mannitol/LB agar microparticles by polymorphic transformation for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengying; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Quynh; Tay, Bao Hui; Mendyk, Aleksander; Shao, Yu-Hsuan; Lau, Raymond

    2015-01-05

    Novel roughness-controlled mannitol/LB Agar microparticles were synthesized by polymorphic transformation and self-assembly method using hexane as the polymorphic transformation reagent and spray-dried mannitol/LB Agar microparticles as the starting material. As-prepared microparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray diffraction spectra (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI). The XRD and DSC results indicate that after immersing spray-dried mannitol/LB Agar microparticles in hexane, β-mannitol was completely transformed to α-mannitol in 1 h, and all the δ-mannitol was transformed to α form after 14 days. SEM shows that during the transformation the nanobelts on the spray-dried mannitol/LB Agar microparticles become more dispersed and the contour of the individual nanobelts becomes more noticeable. Afterward, the nanobelts self-assemble to nanorods and result in rod-covered mannitol/LB Agar microparticles. FTIR indicates new hydrogen bonds were formed among mannitol, LB Agar, and hexane. SEM images coupled with image analysis software reveal that different surface morphology of the microparticles have different drug adhesion mechanisms. Comparison of ACI results and image analysis of SEM images shows that an increase in the particle surface roughness can increase the fine particle fractions (FPFs) using the rod-covered mannitol microparticles as drug carriers. Transformed microparticles show higher FPFs than commercially available lactose carriers. An FPF of 28.6 ± 2.4% was achieved by microparticles transformed from spray-dried microparticles using 2% mannitol(w/v)/LB Agar as feed solution. It is comparable to the highest FPF reported in the literature using lactose and spray-dried mannitol as carriers.

  10. Age, growth and utility of otolith morphometrics as a predictor of age in the wrasse Coris julis (Labridae from the eastern Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frane Škeljo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Age and growth of Coris julis were determined by examining sagittal otoliths belonging to fish sampled between November 2008 and October 2009 in the eastern Adriatic Sea (north-central Mediterranean Sea. A total of 1102 specimens (528 males, 487 females and 87 individuals of indeterminate sex, ranging from 48 to 222 mm total length were analysed. Ninety-two per cent of the otoliths were readable and 68% of the specimens had two readings in agreement. Counting of daily rings revealed that the second opaque ring represents the first annulus (315.1±27.8 daily rings. The maximum observed age was 7 years for males and 5 years for females, with males dominating in higher age classes ( > 3 years and females in age classes 1+ and 2+. Growth was described by the von Bertalanffy growth curves and significant differences were found between males (L∞=29.10 cm, k=0.12 and t0=–1.48 and females (L∞=21.27 cm, k=0.21 and t0=–1.08. Otolith mass, length, width and thickness were determined for the otoliths belonging to 465 fish and the utility of these morphometrics as a predictor of age was evaluated. The most precise age estimations were obtained from the otolith length data, followed by the otolith mass.

  11. Software protocol design: Communication and control in a multi-task robot machine for ITER vacuum vessel assembly and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming, E-mail: ming.li@lut.fi [Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland); Wu, Huapeng; Handroos, Heikki [Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland); Yang, Guangyou [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Yongbo [Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Lappeenranta University of Technology (Finland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A high-level protocol is proposed for the data inter-transmission. • The protocol design is task-oriented for the robot control in the software system. • The protocol functions as a role of middleware in the software. • The protocol running stand-alone as an independent process in the software provides greater security. • Providing a reference design protocol for the multi-task robot machine in the industry. - Abstract: A specific communication and control protocol for software design of a multi-task robot machine is proposed. In order to fulfill the requirements on the complicated multi machining functions and the high performance motion control, the software design of robot is divided into two main parts accordingly, which consists of the user-oriented HMI part and robot control-oriented real-time control system. The two parts of software are deployed in the different hardware for the consideration of run-time performance, which forms a client–server-control architecture. Therefore a high-level task-oriented protocol is designed for the data inter-communication between the HMI part and the control system part, in which all the transmitting data related to a machining task is divided into three categories: trajectory-oriented data, task control-oriented data and status monitoring-oriented data. The protocol consists of three sub-protocols accordingly – a trajectory protocol, task control protocol and status protocol – which are deployed over the Ethernet and run as independent processes in both the client and server computers. The protocols are able to manage the vast amounts of data streaming due to the multi machining functions in a more efficient way. Since the protocol is functioning in the software as a role of middleware, and providing the data interface standards for the developing groups of two parts of software, it also permits greater focus of both software parts developers on their own requirements-oriented design. By

  12. Supervisory Control of the Right Arm of the Beam Assembly Teleoperator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    arm; 2) know the final configuration of the arm; 3) compute a trajectory; 4) transmit the appropriate command to the joint/actuator control system. The...value for maximum torque (T) was computed using the maximum torque for the shoulder yaw motor and the gear train dimensions between the shoulder and the...command will not saturate the actuator. To find T , the equation for the torque and drag force is used and solved for T T = JT 6 + Drag Moment where T

  13. van der Waals interactions between nanotubes and nanoparticles for controlled assembly of composite nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Graham A; Marsh, Dan H; Bourne, Stephen J; Reade, Thomas J; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2010-08-24

    We have demonstrated that ubiquitous van der Waals forces are significant in controlling the interactions between nanoparticles and nanotubes. The adsorption of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on nanotubes (MWNTs) obeys a simple quadratic dependence on the nanotube surface area, regardless of the source of AuNPs and MWNTs. Changes in the geometric parameters of the components have pronounced effects on the affinity of nanoparticles for nanotubes, with larger, more polarizable nanostructures exhibiting stronger attractive interactions, the impact of which changes in the following order MWNT diameter > AuNP diameter > MWNT length.

  14. Optical control and determination of charge in self-assembled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkusinski, M.; Hawrylak, P.; Babinski, A.; Potemski, M.; Raymond, S.; Lapointe, J.; Wasilewski, Z.

    2007-03-01

    We present a theory and experiment allowing for optical control of charge in a single InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) in magnetic fields up to 23 T [1]. The charge is controlled by excitation energy and power and is determined by comparing the experimental PL spectra of the QD to the ones calculated for N electrons and one hole using the parabolic confinement and the CI technique for many-carrier states. The number N is determined from the characteristic features in PL [2]. For N=4 electrons in low fields the degenerate p shell is half-filled and the system is in a triplet state. At larger fields the degeneracy is removed and a triplet-singlet transition occurs. This transition is seen as a discontinuity in the magnetic-field dependence of PL lines. In even higher fields, electrons increase their polarization through spin-flip transitions, which also leads to discontinuities of the PL spectra. Also, as the magnetic moment of electrons increases, the electron-hole exchange leads to the appearance of multiple PL lines. [1] A. Babinski et al, Physica E 26, 190 (2005) [2] A. Wojs and P. Hawrylak, Phys. Rev. B 55, 13066 (1997)

  15. SOFIA's secondary mirror assembly: in-flight performance and control approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinacher, Andreas; Lammen, Yannick; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2016-08-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5m infrared telescope built into a Boeing 747 SP. In 2014 SOFIA reached its Full Operational Capability milestone and nowadays takes off about three times a week to observe the infrared sky from altitudes above most of the atmosphere's water vapor content. An actively controlled 352mm SiC secondary mirror is used for infrared chopping with peak-to-peak amplitudes of up to 10 arcmin and chop frequencies of up to 20Hz and also as actuator for fast pointing corrections. The Swiss-made Secondary Mirror Mechanism (SMM) is a complex, highly integrated and compact flexure based mechanism that has been performing with remarkable reliability during recent years. Above mentioned capabilities are provided by the Tilt Chopper Mechanism (TCM) which is one of the two stages of the SMM. In addition the SMM is also used to establish a collimated telescope and to adjust the telescope focus depending on the structure's temperature which ranges from about 40°C at takeoff in Palmdale, CA to about -40°C in the stratosphere. This is achieved with the Focus Center Mechanism (FCM) which is the base stage of the SMM on which the TCM is situated. Initially the TCM was affected by strong vibrations at about 300 Hz which led to unacceptable image smearing. After some adjustments to the PID-type controller it was finally decided to develop a completely new control algorithm in state space. This pole placement controller matches the closed loop system poles to those of a Bessel filter with a corner frequency of 120 Hz for optimal square wave behavior. To reduce noise present on the position and current sensors and to estimate the velocity a static gain Kalman Filter was designed and implemented. A system inherent delay is incorporated in the Kalman filter design and measures were applied to counteract the actuators' hysteresis. For better performance over the full operational temperature range and to represent an amplitude

  16. Microfluidics-assisted diffusion self-assembly: toward the control of the shape and size of pectin hydrogel microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Mélanie; Davy, Joelle; Fang, Aiping; Renard, Denis

    2014-05-12

    We demonstrated the generation of pectin hydrogel microparticles having complex shapes either by combining the phenomenon of gelation and water diffusion-induced self-assembly in microfluidic channels (on-chip) or by the deformation of the pregelled droplets outside the channels (off-chip) at a fluid-fluid interface. We proved that by tuning the mode of pectin cross-linking (CaCl2 vs CaCO3) and the degree of shrinking (water content in the dimethyl carbonate (DMC) organic continuous phase) we can control the shape of the final particle. Sphere, doughnut, oblate ellipsoid, or mushroom-type morphologies were thus produced, demonstrating the ability to control the formation of anisotropic biopolymer-based hydrogel microparticles using microfluidics. Shape changes were explained by the redistribution of calcium ions in combination with the local Peclet number experienced by the microdroplets during the on-chip process. Moreover, during the off-chip process, the interplay between elastic and viscous forces for microdroplets entering the CaCl2-DMC interface caused deformation of the pregelled droplets to occur and therefore resulted in the formation of microparticles with a mushroom-like morphology.

  17. Control over self-assembly of diblock copolymers on hexagonal and square templates for high area density circuit boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Heinz, Hendrik

    2011-12-27

    Self-assembled diblock copolymer melts on patterned substrates can induce a smaller characteristic domain spacing compared to predefined lithographic patterns and enable the manufacture of circuit boards with a high area density of computing and storage units. Monte Carlo simulation using coarse-grain models of polystyrene-b-polydimethylsiloxane shows that the generation of high-density hexagonal and square patterns is controlled by the ratio N(D) of the surface area per post and the surface area per spherical domain of neat block copolymer. N(D) represents the preferred number of block copolymer domains per post. Selected integer numbers support the formation of ordered structures on hexagonal (1, 3, 4, 7, 9) and square (1, 2, 5, 7) templates. On square templates, only smaller numbers of block copolymer domains per post support the formation of ordered arrays with significant stabilization energies relative to hexagonal morphology. Deviation from suitable integer numbers N(D) increases the likelihood of transitional morphologies between square and hexagonal. Upon increasing the spacing of posts on the substrate, square arrays, nested square arrays, and disordered hexagonal morphologies with multiple coordination numbers were identified, accompanied by a decrease in stabilization energy. Control over the main design parameter N(D) may allow an up to 7-fold increase in density of spherical block copolymer domains per surface area in comparison to the density of square posts and provide access to a wide range of high-density nanostructures to pattern electronic devices.

  18. Designing Functionalized Nanoparticles for Controlled Assembly in Polymer Matrix: Self consistent PRISM Theory and Monte Carlo simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Arthi; Nair, Nitish

    2011-03-01

    Significant interest has grown around the ability to create hybrid materials with controlled spatial arrangement of nanoparticles mediated by a polymer matrix. By functionalizing or grafting polymers on to nanoparticle surfaces and systematically tuning the composition, chemistry, molecular weight and grafting density of the grafted polymers one can tailor the inter-particle interactions and control the assembly/dispersion of the particles in the polymer matrix. In our recent work using self-consistent Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (PRISM) theory- Monte Carlo simulations we have shown that tailoring the monomer sequences in the grafted copolymers provides a novel route to tuning the effective inter-particle interactions between the functionalized nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. In this talk I will present how monomer sequence and molecular weights (with and without polydispersity) of the grafted polymers, compatibility of the graft and matrix polymers, and nanoparticle size affect the chain conformations of the grafted polymers and the potential of mean force between the grafted nanoparticles in the matrix.

  19. Size-controlled electrochemical growth of PbS nanostructures into electrochemically patterned self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nişancı, Fatma Bayrakçeken; Demir, Ümit

    2012-06-05

    1-Hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers (HDT SAMs) on Au(111) were used as a molecular resist to fabricate nanosized patterns by electrochemical reductive partial desorption for subsequent electrodeposition of PbS from the same solution simultaneously. The influences of potential steps of variable pulse width and amplitude on the size and the number of patterns were investigated. The kinetics of pattern formation by reductive desorption appears to be instantaneous according to chronoamperometric and morphological investigations. PbS structures were deposited electrochemically into the patterns on HDT SAMs by a combined electrochemical technique, based on the codeposition from the same saturated PbS solution at the underpotential deposition of Pb and S. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements showed that all of the PbS deposits were disk shaped and uniformly distributed on Au(111) surfaces. Preliminary results indicated that the diameter and the density of PbS deposits can be controlled by controlling the pulse width and amplitude of potential applied at the reductive removal stage of HDT SAMs and the deposition time during the electrochemical deposition step.

  20. Topology and Shape Control for Assemblies of Block Copolymer Blends in Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2015-10-27

    We study binary blends of asymmetric diblock copolymers (AB/AC) in selective solvents with a mesoscale model. We investigate the morphological transitions induced by the concentration of the AC block copolymer and the difference in molecular weight between the AB and AC copolymers, when segments B and C exhibit hydrogen-bonding interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work modeling mixtures of block copolymers with large differences in molecular weight. The coassembly mechanism localizes the AC molecules at the interface of A and B domains and induces the swelling of the B-rich domains. The coil size of the large molecular weight block copolymer depends only on the concentration of the short block copolymer (AC or AB), regardless of the B–C interactions. However, the B–C interactions control the morphological transitions that occur in these blends.

  1. Migration behaviour of twaite shad Alosa fallax assessed by otolith Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magath, V; Marohn, L; Fietzke, J; Frische, M; Thiel, R; Dierking, J

    2013-06-01

    Individual migration behaviour during the juvenile and adult life phase of the anadromous twaite shad Alosa fallax in the Elbe estuary was examined using otolith Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca profiles. Between hatching and the end of the first year of life, juveniles showed two migration patterns. Pattern one exhibited a single downstream migration from fresh water to the sea with no return into fresh water. In contrast, pattern two showed a first migration into the sea, then a return into fresh water and, finally, a second downstream migration into marine water. This first report of migration plasticity for A. fallax points to different exposure times to estuarine threats depending on the migration strategy. In adults, high Sr:Ca and low Ba:Ca in the majority of individuals confirmed prior reports of a primarily marine habitat use. Patterns reflecting spawning migrations were rarely observed on otoliths, possibly due to the short duration of visits to fresh water.

  2. Template-particle stabilized bicontinuous emulsion yielding controlled assembly of hierarchical high-flux filtration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Samuel C; Kohll, A Xavier; Raso, Renzo A; Schumacher, Christoph M; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2015-01-14

    A novel solvent-evaporation-based process that exploits template-particle stabilized bicontinuous emulsions for the formation of previously unreached membrane morphologies is reported in this article. Porous membranes have a wide range of applications spanning from water filtration, pharmaceutical purification, and battery separators to scaffolds for tissue engineering. Different situations require different membrane morphologies including various pore sizes and pore gradients. However, most of the previously reported membrane preparation procedures are restricted to specific morphologies and morphology alterations require an extensive optimization process. The tertiary system presented in this article, which consists of a poly(ether sulfone)/dimethylacetamide (PES/DMAc) solution, glycerol, and ZnO-nanoparticles, allows simple and exact tuning of pore diameters ranging from sub-20 nm, up to 100 nm. At the same time, the pore size gradient is controlled from 0 up to 840%/μm yielding extreme asymmetry. In addition to structural analysis, water flux rates of over 5600 L m(-2) h(-1) are measured for membranes retaining 45 nm silica beads.

  3. SG-II-Up prototype final optics assembly:optical damage and clean-gas control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongfeng Zhao; Li Wan; Zunqi Lin; Pin Shao; Jianqiang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The Shenguang-II Upgrade(SG-II Up) facility is an under-construction high-power laser driver with eight beams, 24 kJ energy, 3 ns pulse duration and ultraviolet laser output, in the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, China.The prototype design and experimental research of the prototype final optics assembly(FOA), which is one of the most important parts of the SG-II Up facility, have been completed on the ninth beam of the SG-II facility. Thirty-three shots were fired using 1-ω energy from 1000 to 4500 J and 3-ω energy from 500 to 2403 J with a 3 ns square pulse. During the experiments, emphasis was given to the process of optical damage and to the effects of clean-gas control. A numerical model of the FOA generated by the Integrated Computer Engineering and Manufacturing code for Computational Fluid Dynamics(ICEMCFD) demonstrated that a flux within 1–5 l s-1 and a 180 s period is effectual to avoid contaminant sputtering to the optics. The presence of surface ‘mooning’ damage and surface spots located outside the clear aperture are induced by contaminants such as wire, silica gel and millimeter order fiber and metal.

  4. Surface-Directed Assembly of Sequence-Defined Synthetic Polymers into Networks of Hexagonally Patterned Nanoribbons with Controlled Functionalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Long; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; DeYoreo, James J.

    2016-05-24

    The exquisite self-assembly of proteins and peptides in nature into highly ordered functional materials has inspired innovative approaches to biomimetic materials design and synthesis. Here we report the assembly of peptoids—a class of highly stable sequence-defined synthetic polymers—into biomimetic materials on mica surfaces. The assembling 12-mer peptoid contains alternating acidic and aromatic residues, and the presence of Ca2+ cations creates peptoid-peptoid and peptoid-mica interactions that drive assembly. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that peptoids first assemble into discrete nanoparticles, these particles then transform into hexagonally-patterned nanoribbons on mica surfaces. AFM-based dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) studies show that peptoid-mica interactions are much stronger than peptoidpeptoid interactions in the presence of Ca2+, illuminating the physical parameters that drive peptoid assembly. We further demonstrate the display of functional groups at the N-terminus of assembling peptoid sequence to produce biomimetic materials with similar hierarchical structures. This research demonstrates that surface-directed peptoid assembly can be used as a robust platform to develop biomimetic coating materials for applications.

  5. Application of otolith shape analysis in identifying different ecotypes of Coilia ectenes in the Yangtze Basin, China

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Radhakrishnan, K.V.; Li, Y.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Liu, M.; Murphy, B.R.; Xie, S.

    As the three ecotypes of C. ectenes are prone to intermixing along Yangtze, 84 identifying an efficient methodology for their distinction is imperative. In several cases of 85 recent morphological and genetic studies, controversy arose... 3.2. Shape visualization 190 191 The average shape of the otoliths showed distinct differences among the three 192 ecotypes (Fig. 4). There was a well-developed antirostrum for both the anadromous and 193 the land...

  6. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2017-02-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  7. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2016-10-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  8. Age Determination of Microlepidotus brevipinnis (Steindachner, 1869 (Pisces: Haemulidae in the Coast of Jalisco, Mexico, by Reading Otoliths and Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Cabral-Solis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with age determination of the brassy grunt Microlepidotus brevipinnis by reading otoliths (sagittae and scales which allowed the identification of 13 age groups. Growth of otoliths and scales is proportional to the growth of the fish. The time of formation of fast and slow growth bands in sagittae, as well as the time of ring formation in the scales is one year. The highest growth in length of this species takes place during the first year of life, in which the organism reaches 125.0 mm, this reduces natural mortality of the individuals by decreasing depredation. Growth in weight of this species is isometric. Sexual differentiation of the organisms is apparent after the age of two years and there were differences in the average length for each age in scales and otoliths for males and females. The age of other members of the Haemulidae family were compared with those obtained in the present study and M. brevipinnis reaches its oldest age in 13 years. It occupies a middle point (442.4 mm in relation to the total lengths of other haemulids in the Mexican Pacific coast.

  9. Electronmicroscopic Investigations on the Role of Vesicle-like Bodies in Inner Ear Maculae for Fish Otolith Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M.; Vöhringer, P.; Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The presence, morphology and possible origin of vesicle-like bodies (VBs) within the inner ear otolithic membrane of developmental stages of cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and adult swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri was analysed by means of transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively) employing various fixation procedures. The VBs are believed to be involved in the formation of the otolith (or statolith in birds and mammals) regarding the supply of the otolith's organic material. Increasing the osmolarity of the fixation medium decreased the number of VBs seen. Decalcification ended up in a complete disappearance of the VBs. Whilst a fixation with glutaraldehyde followed by OS04 fixation yielded numerous VBs, only few of them were observed when the tissue was fixed with glutaraldehyde and OSO4 simultaneously. Therefore, the results strongly suggest that the VBs are fixative (i.e., glutaraldehyde) induced artifacts, so-called blisters. With this, the supply of an oto- or statolith's organic material remains obscure. Possibly, it is provided by secretion from the supporting cells as has been hypothesized earlier

  10. Otolith chemistry of fishes from Kosi Bay, South Africa: A preliminary multiple analytical methods approach to reconstruct fish migrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbach, Andreas; Cowley, Paul D.; Kramar, Utz; Neumann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Over exploitation of fish stocks in coastal areas is a subject of global concern. Increasing numbers of traditional fish traps, recreational fishing effort and unknown extents of illegal gillnetting are blamed for the declining abundance of estuarine-dependent fish species in the Kosi Bay estuarine lake system in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Otoliths from four important fishery species (Lutjanus argentimaculatus, Pomadasys commersonnii, Acanthopagrus vagus, and Rhabdosargus sarba) and water samples collected from throughout the Kosi Bay system were analyzed for trace element constituents and δ18O values, in an attempt to reconstruct fish movements. The applied microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis proved valuable in detecting μm-scale spatially resolved Sr/Ca ratio distributions across otolith thin sections. Sr/Ca ratios and δ18O in otoliths correlated well with ambient water conditions and, thus, enabled us to reconstruct migratory histories of individual fish in the estuarine lake system. The findings are representative of the known biology of these species, although exact spatial and temporal ranges of migrations remain unclear. Interestingly, samples of two species (L. argentimaculatus and R. sarba) did not show any clue of migrations back to sea, which would be necessary for successful spawning. Further laboratory and field investigations with larger sample sizes are necessary to detect fishery impacts on migratory behavior at a population level.

  11. Age validation of canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) using two independent otolith techniques: lead-radium and bomb radiocarbon dating.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Lundstrom, C C; Stanley, R D

    2007-11-04

    Canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) have long been an important part of recreational and commercial rockfish fishing from southeast Alaska to southern California, but localized stock abundances have declined considerably. Based on age estimates from otoliths and other structures, lifespan estimates vary from about 20 years to over 80 years. For the purpose of monitoring stocks, age composition is routinely estimated by counting growth zones in otoliths; however, age estimation procedures and lifespan estimates remain largely unvalidated. Typical age validation techniques have limited application for canary rockfish because they are deep dwelling and may be long lived. In this study, the unaged otolith of the pair from fish aged at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada was used in one of two age validation techniques: (1) lead-radium dating and (2) bomb radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) dating. Age estimate accuracy and the validity of age estimation procedures were validated based on the results from each technique. Lead-radium dating proved successful in determining a minimum estimate of lifespan was 53 years and provided support for age estimation procedures up to about 50-60 years. These findings were further supported by {Delta}{sup 14}C data, which indicated a minimum estimate of lifespan was 44 {+-} 3 years. Both techniques validate, to differing degrees, age estimation procedures and provide support for inferring that canary rockfish can live more than 80 years.

  12. Estimating contemporary early life-history dispersal in an estuarine fish: integrating molecular and otolith elemental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, I R; Campana, S E; Bentzen, P

    2008-03-01

    Dispersal during the early life history of the anadromous rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, was examined using assignment testing and mixture analysis of multilocus genotypes and otolith elemental composition. Six spawning areas and associated estuarine nurseries were sampled throughout southeastern Newfoundland. Samples of adults and juveniles isolated by > 25 km displayed moderate genetic differentiation (F(ST) ~ 0.05), whereas nearby (nursery samples displayed low differentiation (F(ST) 80% self-assignment) with nearby runs self-assigning at rates between 50 % and 70%. Assignment and mixture analysis of juveniles using adult baselines indicated high local recruitment at several locations (70-90%). Nearby (estuaries at the head of St Mary's Bay showed mixtures of individuals (i.e. 20-40% assignment to adjacent spawning location). Laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry transects across otoliths of spawning adults of unknown dispersal history were used to estimate dispersal among estuaries across the first year of life. Single-element trends and multivariate discriminant function analysis (Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca) classified the majority of samples as estuarine suggesting limited movement between estuaries (juveniles evident in the genetic data at nearby sites and a lack of evidence of straying in the otolith data support a hypothesis of selective mortality of immigrants. If indeed selective mortality of immigrants reduces the survivorship of dispersers, estimates of dispersal in marine environments that neglect survival may significantly overestimate gene flow.

  13. Stable isotopic composition of otoliths in identification of stock structure of small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yukun; HUANG Jiansheng; TANG Xuexi; JIN Xianshi; SUN Yao

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios (δ18O andδ13C) in otoliths were used to identify the stock structure of small yellow croaker,Larimichthys polyactis. Otoliths were collected from fish at five locations across the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea representing most of their distributional range and fisheries areas. The significant differences in the isotopic signatures showed that the five locations could be chemically distinguished and clearly separated, indicating stock subdivision. Correlation ofδ18O andδ13C values suggested that population ofL. polyactis could be divided into the Bohai Sea group, the southern Yellow Sea group and the central Yellow Sea group. Discriminant analysis ofδ18O andδ13C values demonstrated a high significant difference with 85.7% classification accuracy. The spatial separation ofL. polyactis indicated a complex stock structure across the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. These results indicate that optimal fisheries management may require a comprehensive consideration on the current spatial arrangements. This study has provided further evidence that measurement of the stable isotopes ratios in otolith can be a valuable tool in the delineation of fishery management units.

  14. Growth conditions of 0-group plaice Pleuronectes platessa in the western Wadden Sea as revealed by otolith microstructure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; Freitas, Vânia; de Paoli, Hélène; Witte, Johannes IJ.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2016-05-01

    Growth studies based on population-based growth estimates are limited by the fact that they do not take into account differences in age/size structure within the population. To overcome these problems, otolith microstructure analysis is often used to estimate individual growth. Here, we analyse growth of 0-group plaice in the western Wadden Sea in two years: a year preceded by a mild winter (1995) and a year preceded by a severe winter (1996). Growth was analysed by combining information on individual growth based on otolith analysis with predictions of maximum growth (= under optimal food conditions) based on a Dynamic Energy Budget model. Otolith analysis revealed that settlement occurred earlier in 1995 than in 1996. In both years, one main cohort was found, followed by a group of late settlers. No differences in mean length-at-age were found between these groups. DEB modelling suggested that growth was not maximal during the whole growing season: realized growth (the fraction of maximum growth realized by 0-group plaice) declined in the summer, although this decline was relatively small. In addition, late settling individuals exhibited lower realized growth than individuals from the main cohort. This study confirms that growth conditions for 0-group plaice are not optimal and that a growth reduction occurs in summer, as suggested in previous studies.

  15. Otolith morphology varies between populations, sexes and male alternative reproductive tactics in a vocal toadfish Porichthys notatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A P H; Adragna, J B; Balshine, S

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the morphology of sagittal otoliths of the plainfin midshipman fish Porichthys notatus was compared between populations, sexes and male alternative reproductive phenotypes (known as 'type I males or guarders' and 'type II males or sneakers'). Sagitta size increased with P. notatus size and changes in shape were also detected with increasing body size. Porichthys notatus sagittae begin as simple rounded structures, but then elongate as they grow and take on a more triangular and complex shape with several prominent notches and indentations along the dorsal and caudal edges. Moreover, the sagittae of the two geographically and genetically distinct populations of P. notatus (northern and southern) differed in shape. Porichthys notatus from the north possessed taller sagittae with deeper caudal indentations compared to P. notatus from the south. Sagitta shape also differed between females and males of the conventional guarder tactic. Furthermore, guarder males had smaller sagittae for their body size than did sneaker males or females. These differences in sagittal otolith morphology are discussed in relation to ecological and life history differences between the sexes and male tactics of this species. This is the first study to investigate teleost otolith morphology from the perspective of alternative reproductive tactics.

  16. Otolith shape analysis for stock discrimination of two Collichthys genus croaker (Pieces: Sciaenidae,) from the northern Chinese coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Liu, Jinhu; Song, Junjie; Cao, Liang; Dou, Shuozeng

    2017-08-01

    The otolith morphology of two croaker species (Collichthys lucidus and Collichthys niveatus) from three areas (Liaodong Bay, LD; Huanghe (Yellow) River estuary, HRE; Jiaozhou Bay, JZ) along the northern Chinese coast were investigated for species identification and stock discrimination. The otolith contour shape described by elliptic Fourier coefficients (EFC) were analysed using principal components analysis (PCA) and stepwise canonical discriminant analysis (CDA) to identify species and stocks. The two species were well differentiated, with an overall classification success rate of 97.8%. And variations in the otolith shapes were significant enough to discriminate among the three geographical samples of C. lucidus (67.7%) or C. niveatus (65.2%). Relatively high mis-assignment occurred between the geographically adjacent LD and HRE samples, which implied that individual mixing may exist between the two samples. This study yielded information complementary to that derived from genetic studies and provided information for assessing the stock structure of C. lucidus and C. niveatus in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.

  17. Life history inhomogeneity in Baltic Sea whitefish populations revealed by otolith strontium signatures – identification of stocked fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Hägerstrand

    2015-11-01

    The strontium concentrations in the otolith cores of whitefish from River Tornionjoki were higher than that of the four otoliths with low core strontium from fishes caught at sea (Table 1. Supposing that this latter group represent stocked fish raised in freshwater ponds, the vast majority of River Tornionjoki whitefish is naturally reproduced fish. This is plausible because in River Tornionjoki, the major whitefish spawning river in Finland, no larger stocking have been made since 1990s (Jokikokko and Huhmarniemi 2014. In conclusion, the concentration of otolith core strontium differs in whitefish hatched in fresh-water and in whitefish hatched in river water or in brackish Baltic Sea water. This difference can be used to reveal stocked whitefish. Barium concentration may be an even better indicator in this respect than strontium, as previous results indicate (Hägerstrand et al., 2015. Stocked river spawning whitefish appear in large amount at the southern feeding grounds around the Åland Islands, as already indicated by e.g. Leskelä et al. (2009.

  18. Morphology control of polymer: Fullerene solar cells by nanoparticle self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenluan

    During the past two decades, research in the field of polymer based solar cells has attracted great effort due to their simple processing, mechanical flexibility and potential low cost. A standard polymer solar cell is based on the concept of a bulk-heterojunction composed of a conducting polymer as the electron donor and a fullerene derivative as the electron acceptor. Since the exciton lifetime is limited, this places extra emphasis on control of the morphology to obtain improved device performance. In this thesis, detailed characterization and novel morphological design of polymer solar cells was studied, in addition, preliminary efforts to transfer laboratory scale methods to industrialized device fabrication was made. Magnetic contrast neutron reflectivity was used to study the vertical concentration distribution of fullerene nanoparticles within poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2- b]thiophene (pBTTT) thin film. Due to the wide space between the side chains of polymer, these fullerene nanoparticles intercalate between them creating a stable co-crystal structure. Therefore, a high volume fraction of fullerene was needed to obtain optimal device performance as phase separated conductive pathways are required and resulted in a homogeneous fullerene concentration profile through the film. Small angle neutron scattering was used to find there is amorphous fullerene even at lower concentration since it was previously believed that all fullerene formed a co-crystal. These fullerene molecules evolve into approximately 15 nm sized agglomerates at higher concentrations to improve electron transport. Unfortunately, thermal annealing gives these agglomerates mobility to form micrometer sized crystals and reduce the device performance. In standard poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCMBM) solar cells, a higher concentration of PCBM at the cathode interface is desired due to the band alignment structure. This was

  19. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis of hexagonal bipyramidal crystals and hollow self-assembled Al-MOF spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Sarawade, Pradip

    2013-11-25

    We report an efficient protocol for the synthesis of monodisperse crystals of an aluminum (Al)-based metal organic framework (MOF) while obtaining excellent control over the size and shape solely by tuning of the reaction parameters without the use of a template or structure-directing agent. The size of the hexagonal crystals of the Al-MOF can be selectively varied from 100 nm to 2000 nm by simply changing the reaction time and temperature via its nucleation-growth mechanism. We also report a self-assembly phenomenon, observed for the first time in case of Al-MOF, whereby hollow spheres of Al-MOF were formed by the spontaneous organization of triangular sheet building blocks. These MOFs showed broad hysteresis loops during the CO2 capture, indicating that the adsorbed CO2 is not immediately desorbed upon decreasing the external pressure and is instead confined within the framework, which allows for the capture and subsequent selective trapping of CO2 from gaseous mixtures. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Controlled assembly of high-order nanoarray metal structures on bulk copper surface by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wanwan; Yang, Jianjun

    2017-07-01

    We report a new one-step maskless method to fabricate high-order nanoarray metal structures comprising periodic grooves and particle chains on a single-crystal Cu surface using femtosecond laser pulses at the central wavelength of 400 nm. Remarkably, when a circularly polarized infrared femtosecond laser pulse (spectrally centered at 800 nm) pre-irradiates the sample surface, the geometric dimensions of the composite structure can be well controlled. With increasing the energy fluence of the infrared laser pulse, both the groove width and particle diameter are observed to reduce, while the measured spacing-to-diameter ratio of the nanoparticles tends to present an increasing tendency. A physical scenario is proposed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms: as the infrared femtosecond laser pulse pre-irradiates the target, the copper surface is triggered to display anomalous transient physical properties, on which the subsequently incident Gaussian blue laser pulse is spatially modulated into fringe-like energy depositions via the excitation of ultrafast surface plasmon. During the following relaxation processes, the periodically heated thin-layer regions can be transferred into the metastable liquid rivulets and then they break up into nanodroplet arrays owing to the modified Rayleigh-like instability. This investigation indicates a simple integrated approach for active designing and large-scale assembly of complexed functional nanostructures on bulk materials.

  1. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junbo; Wu, Wenlan; Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan

    2017-03-01

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol- b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG- b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG- b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  2. Photoswitching of azobenzene-containing self-assembled monolayers as a tool for control over silicon surface electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyar, Ivan V.; Titov, Evgenii; Lomadze, Nino; Saalfrank, Peter; Santer, Svetlana

    2017-03-01

    We report on photoinduced remote control of work function and surface potential of a silicon surface modified with a photosensitive self-assembled monolayer consisting of chemisorbed azobenzene molecules (4-nitroazobenzene). It was found that the attachment of the organic monolayer increases the work function by hundreds of meV due to the increase in the electron affinity of silicon substrates. The change in the work function on UV light illumination is more pronounced for the azobenzene jacketed silicon substrate (ca. 250 meV) in comparison to 50 meV for the unmodified surface. Moreover, the photoisomerization of azobenzene results in complex kinetics of the work function change: immediate decrease due to light-driven processes in the silicon surface followed by slower recovery to the initial state due to azobenzene isomerization. This behavior could be of interest for electronic devices where the reaction on irradiation should be more pronounced at small time scales but the overall surface potential should stay constant over time independent of the irradiation conditions.

  3. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis of hexagonal bipyramidal crystals and hollow self-assembled Al-MOF spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawade, Pradip; Tan, Hua; Anjum, Dalaver; Cha, Dongkyu; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2014-02-01

    We report an efficient protocol for the synthesis of monodisperse crystals of an aluminum (Al)-based metal organic framework (MOF) while obtaining excellent control over the size and shape solely by tuning of the reaction parameters without the use of a template or structure-directing agent. The size of the hexagonal crystals of the Al-MOF can be selectively varied from 100 nm to 2000 nm by simply changing the reaction time and temperature via its nucleation-growth mechanism. We also report a self-assembly phenomenon, observed for the first time in case of Al-MOF, whereby hollow spheres of Al-MOF were formed by the spontaneous organization of triangular sheet building blocks. These MOFs showed broad hysteresis loops during the CO2 capture, indicating that the adsorbed CO2 is not immediately desorbed upon decreasing the external pressure and is instead confined within the framework, which allows for the capture and subsequent selective trapping of CO2 from gaseous mixtures.

  4. Fuel cell integral bundle assembly including ceramic open end seal and vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafred, Paolo R [Murrysville, PA; Gillett, James E [Greensburg, PA

    2012-04-24

    A plurality of integral bundle assemblies contain a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion containing a base support, the base supports a dense, ceramic air exhaust manifold having four supporting legs, the manifold is below and connects to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the open end of the fuel cells rest upon and within a separate combination ceramic seal and bundle support contained in a ceramic support casting, where at least one flexible cushion ceramic band seal located between the recuperator and fuel cells protects and controls horizontal thermal expansion, and where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all of the weight of the generator.

  5. High-speed assembly language (80386/80387) programming for laser spectra scan control and data acquisition providing improved resolution water vapor spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An assembly language program using the Intel 80386 CPU and 80387 math co-processor chips was written to increase the speed of data gathering and processing, and provide control of a scanning CW ring dye laser system. This laser system is used in high resolution (better than 0.001 cm-1) water vapor spectroscopy experiments. Laser beam power is sensed at the input and output of white cells and the output of a Fabry-Perot. The assembly language subroutine is called from Basic, acquires the data and performs various calculations at rates greater than 150 faster than could be performed by the higher level language. The width of output control pulses generated in assembly language are 3 to 4 microsecs as compared to 2 to 3.7 millisecs for those generated in Basic (about 500 to 1000 times faster). Included are a block diagram and brief description of the spectroscopy experiment, a flow diagram of the Basic and assembly language programs, listing of the programs, scope photographs of the computer generated 5-volt pulses used for control and timing analysis, and representative water spectrum curves obtained using these programs.

  6. Oldest isotopically characterized fish otoliths provide insight to Jurassic continental climate of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, William P.

    1999-03-01

    Large, shallow, epeiric seas and adjacent lagoons such as those described herein likely played a significant role in moderating Jurassic coastal and continental climate. Jurassic (Bathonian) ocean surface temperatures in Scotland have been calculated from δ18O(CaCO3) values of a suite of the oldest well-preserved fish otoliths analyzed to date. Otolith δ18O values range from -4.7‰ to -1.9‰ (Vienna Peedee belemnite, VPDB), while δ13C(CaCO3) values vary from -5.4‰ to +1.5‰ (VPDB), representing the oldest stable isotopic record of paleodiet, paleoecology, and fish migration to date. Using a global ocean δ18O(H2O) value of -1.0‰ (Vienna standard mean ocean water, VSMOW) for an ice-free Jurassic, fish species that migrated from estuarine to open marine water record time-averaged temperatures of 23 °C. Estuarine fish, assuming a similar temperature, record variation in δ18O(H2O) values from -3.7‰ to -2.0‰ (VSMOW). That significant mixing of fresh water and seawater occurred in the Jurassic in Scotland is in general agreement with data presented by others (molluscan fauna, lithostratigraphy, paleogeography, and paleocirculation models). The δ18O values and temperatures derived in this study correspond to the meteorologic and hydrologic parameters of a mid-latitude maritime climate with low seasonality, a mean temperature of 23 °C, and abundant precipitation and humidity. The δ18O(H2O) values calculated from estuarine fish indicate that rainfall must have a δ18O(H2O) value lower than -3.7‰ (VSMOW). Values of δ18O and δ13C suggest an environment hydrologically similar to that observed in the Everglades of south Florida or the estuaries of south Texas, both notable fish nurseries today. However, sea-surface temperatures were lower than those of modern Florida or Texas as evidenced by reduced evaporative enrichment of δ18O(H2O) values.

  7. Otolith oxygen isotopes measured by high-precision secondary ion mass spectrometry reflect life history of a yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Mary Elizabeth; Orland, Ian J; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Helser, Thomas E; Black, Bryan A; Valley, John W

    2013-03-30

    The oxygen isotope ratio (δ(18)O value) of aragonite fish otoliths is dependent on the temperature and the δ(18)O value of the ambient water and can thus reflect the environmental history of a fish. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) offers a spatial-resolution advantage over conventional acid-digestion techniques for stable isotope analysis of otoliths, especially given their compact nature. High-precision otolith δ(18)O analysis was conducted with an IMS-1280 ion microprobe to investigate the life history of a yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera), a Bering Sea species known to migrate ontogenetically. The otolith was cut transversely through its core and one half was roasted to eliminate organic contaminants. Values of δ(18)O were measured in 10-µm spots along three transects (two in the roasted half, one in the unroasted half) from the core toward the edge. Otolith annual growth zones were dated using the dendrochronology technique of crossdating. Measured values of δ(18)O ranged from 29.0 to 34.1‰ (relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). Ontogenetic migration from shallow to deeper waters was reflected in generally increasing δ(18)O values from age-0 to approximately age-7 and subsequent stabilization after the expected onset of maturity at age-7. Cyclical variations of δ(18)O values within juvenile otolith growth zones, up to 3.9‰ in magnitude, were caused by a combination of seasonal changes in the temperature and the δ(18)O value of the ambient water. The ion microprobe produced a high-precision and high-resolution record of the relative environmental conditions experienced by a yellowfin sole that was consistent with population-level studies of ontogeny. Furthermore, this study represents the first time that crossdating has been used to ensure the dating accuracy of δ(18)O measurements in otoliths. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Controlled-release and preserved bioactivity of proteins from (self-assembled core-shell double-walled microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In order to address preserved protein bioactivities and protein sustained-release problems, a method for preparing double-walled microspheres with a core (protein-loaded nanoparticles with a polymer-suspended granule system-formed core and a second shell (a polymer-formed shell for controlled drug release and preserved protein bioactivities has been developed using (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W phases. The method, based on our previous microsphere preparation method (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W, employs different concentric poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide, poly(D,L-lactide, and protein-loaded nanoparticles to produce a suspended liquid which then self-assembles to form shell-core microspheres in the hydrophilic oil phase, which are then solidified in the water phase. Variations in the preparation parameters allowed complete encapsulation by the shell phase, including the efficient formation of a poly(D,L-lactide shell encapsulating a protein-loaded nanoparticle-based poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide core. This method produces core-shell double-walled microspheres that show controlled protein release and preserved protein bioactivities for 60 days. Based upon these results, we concluded that the core-shell double-walled microspheres might be applied for tissue engineering and therapy for chronic diseases, etc.Keywords: protein delivery, protein stability, core-shell microspheres, dextran nanoparticles

  9. Synthesis, morphological control, dispersion stabilization and in situ self-assembly of noble metal nanostructures using multidentate resorcinarene surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangbum

    In this dissertation, a detailed investigation on the influence of various macrocyclic resorcinarene surfactants in determining the morphology, stabilization and self-assembly of mono- and bi- metallic nanoparticles was undertaken. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  10. Modulating the forces between self-assembling molecules to control the shape of vesicles and the mechanics and alignment of nanofiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Megan Ann

    One of the great challenges in supramolecular chemistry is the design of molecules that can self-assemble into functional aggregates with well-defined three-dimensional structures and bulk material properties. Since the self-assembly of nanostructures is greatly influenced by both the nature of the self-assembling components and the environmental conditions in which the components assemble, this work explores how changes in the molecular design and the environment affect the properties of self-assembled structures. We first explore how to control the mechanical properties of self-assembled fibrillar networks by changing environmental conditions. We report here on how changing pH, screening ions, and solution temperature affect the gelation, stiffness, and response to deformation of peptide amphiphile gels. Although the morphology of PA gels formed by charge neutralization and salt-mediated charge screening are similar by electron microscopy, rheological measurements indicate that the calcium-mediated ionic bridges in CaCl2-PA gels form stronger intra- and inter-fiber crosslinks than the hydrogen bonds formed by the protonated carboxylic acid residues in HCl-PA gels. In contrast, the structure of PA gels changes drastically when the PA solution is annealed prior to gel formation. Annealed PA solutions are birefringent and can form viscoelastic strings of aligned nanofibers when manually dragged across a thin film of CaCl2. These aligned arrays of PA nanofibers hold great promise in controlling the orientation of cells in three-dimensions. Separately, we applied the principles of molecular design to create buckled membrane nanostructures that mimic the shape of viruses. When oppositely charged amphiphilic molecules are mixed they can form vesicles with a periodic two-dimensional ionic lattice that opposes the membrane's natural curvature and can result in vesicle buckling. Our results demonstrate that a large +3 to -1 charge imbalance between the cationic and anionic

  11. Automatic Control Technology for High Precision Multi-Ring Assembly System%高精度多环片自动装配控制技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓东; 单镇东; 罗怡; 李聪明

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize automatic assembly for the ring parts , a high precision multi-ring automatic assembly system was designed and set up .The main frame of the system , including 4 guided shafts and 4 linear bearings , ensures the guided accuracy and rigidity .The linear guide assembly can switch assembly operation to assemble and remove rings automatically .In the assembly direction , spiral elevator and grat-ing achieve position accuracy of the rings .In the LabVIEW environment , layered software architecture and modular control strategy avoid unnecessary repeated data detection and lost , thus meeting the assem-bly precision of ring components .Control system consisting of system initialization module , parameter set-ting module , assembly module and pulling-out module was programmed .The automatic assembly task was fulfilled by communication and collaboration between these modules .Experimental results show that the maximum position error was 26μm and the perpendicularity error was 17μm.The average assembly time for one individual ring was 75 s.The assembly system can satisfy the requirements of ring component assembly .%为了实现对微小环片零件的自动化装配,搭建了自动装配系统。通过4根直线导向轴与4个直线轴承来提高系统的导向精度和刚度。采用直线导轨进行各装配作业模块之间的切换,保证了微小环片零件的自动装配与取出。在环片的装配方向上,螺旋升降机和光栅尺实现环片的位置精度控制。在LabVIEW编程环境中,采用分层软件架构和模块化控制思想,避免了不必要的数据循环检测与丢失,能够达到环片组件的装配精度要求。控制系统分为系统初始化模块、参数设置模块、装配模块和取出模块,自动装配系统通过各个模块间的相互交流配合完成装配任务。采用本文中自动装配系统装配环片的实验结果表明,环片零件装配的最大位置误差为26

  12. Effects of functional groups and soluble matrices in fish otolith on calcium carbonate mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Dongni; Li Zhuo; Gao Yonghua; Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Calcium carbonate mineralization is significantly influenced by organic matrices in vivo. The effect mainly relies on functional groups in proteins. In order to study the influence of functional groups on calcium carbonate mineralization, -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were grafted onto single crystal silicon chips, and such modified chips were used as substrates in in vitro mineralization experiments. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) test was conducted to examine the grafting efficiency, and the three groups were successfully grafted. Calcium carbonate mineralization on a modified silicon substrate was examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the results showed that the effects of -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were quite different. Furthermore, a water-soluble protein matrix (WSM) and an acid-soluble protein matrix (ASM) extracted from fish otolith were adsorbed onto the -COOH-modified silicon substrate, and the effects of the protein matrices on calcium carbonate mineralization were studied. The results showed that both WSM and ASM of lapillus could mediate aragonite crystallization, but the size and morphology of the formed crystals were different. The WSM and ASM of asteriscus adsorbed on the silicon substrate had little effect on calcium carbonate mineralization; almost all the crystals were calcite, while both asteriscus WSM and ASM in solution could mediate vaterite crystals, and the morphologies of vaterite crystal aggregates were different.

  13. Spawning period of Senegal sole, Solea senegalensis, based on juvenile otolith microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Catarina; Maia, Anabela; Amara, Rachid; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2013-02-01

    The Senegal sole, Solea senegalensis, is a flatfish species distributed from the Bay of Biscay to the coast of South Africa. Although it is a species of high commercial value its spawning period remains poorly known. In the Tagus estuary, Portugal, two juvenile cohorts of this species colonize two independent nursery areas within the estuarine system. Left lapilli otoliths of these 0-group juveniles were used to estimate age and back-calculate hatch dates, thus allowing the estimation of S. senegalensis spawning period in the Portuguese coast. The two cohorts of S. senegalensis completed the colonization of the two nurseries in July. The ages of juveniles were estimated to range between 46 and 111 days in nursery A, and between 33 and 61 days in nursery B. Hatch dates ranged from April to early June for juveniles colonizing nursery A, and from May to early June for juveniles colonizing nursery B. The mean hatch date in nursery A was the 7th of May, while in nursery B it was the 25th of May. It was concluded that the spawning period for this species off the Portuguese coast was from April to June.

  14. On Strongly Coupled Linear Elliptic Systems with Application to Otolith Membrane Distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Youssef

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: In this research, the author discussed the problems associated with the approximation of the mixed derivative terms appearing in strongly coupled linear elliptic systems by the finite difference method over irregular domains. To avoid the appearance of mixed derivative terms the author introduced a reformulation for the system through introducing a new dependent variable which adds one supplementary (simple differential equation to the system but does not change its elliptic character. Approach: The basic idea in the reformulation is the direct generation of the Laplacian operator which has an efficient finite difference treatment. Results: Two finite difference formulae with symmetric appearance approximating the first order derivatives on curved boundaries up to O(h2 are established, that can be considered as a generalization to the well known central formula. Applications to the otolith membrane model have proved the reliability and efficiency of the present treatment in comparison with other methods. Conclusions/Recommendations: Although, this treatment has increased the number of algebraic equations approximating the system linearly 3n instead of 2n, the overall accuracy is increased quadratically. The band width of matrix of coefficients of the algebraic system is decreased and there is no need to interpolate along the diagonals due to the absence of mixed derivatives. The treatment is promising and other extensions are mentioned.

  15. Preliminary results of Sr:Ca ratios of Coilia nasus in otoliths by micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Guo, H. [Institute of Life Science, Shanghai Fisheries University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Shen, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)]. E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn; Li, X. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Tang, W. [Institute of Life Science, Shanghai Fisheries University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Liu, J. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Jin, J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Mi, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2007-07-15

    Coilia nasus, distributed in Changjiang River as well as northwest Pacific, has a high economic value owing to its delicacy and nutritional value. Recently, the fishing yields in Changjiang River have decreased dramatically due to excessive fishing and changes in the aquatic ecology. In order to prevent excessive fishing effectively, the life history pattern of C. nasus should be known in detail. Ootoliths contain much information about a fish's life history, because elemental concentrations remain unaltered after deposition, and can be analysed. C. nasus collected from Jing Jiang (lower reaches of the Changjiang River) and Jiu Duan Sha (the estuary of the Changjiang River) were studied by measuring Sr:Ca ratios in their otoliths using micro-PIXE. On average, the Sr:Ca ratios of estuarine C. nasus were found to be higher. The Sr:Ca ratios were higher in the core regions and lower in the outermost marginal regions, and shows fluctuations in certain regions. Possible corresponding life history patterns are discussed.

  16. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Species and life-history affects the utility of otolith chemical composition to determine natal stream-of-origin in Pacific salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Christian E.; Swanson, Heidi K.; Volk, Eric C.; Kent, Adam J.R.

    2013-01-01

    To test the utility of otolith chemical composition as a tool for determining the natal stream of origin for salmon, we examined water chemistry and otoliths of juvenile and adult Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta and Coho Salmon O. kisutch from three watersheds (five rivers) in the Norton Sound region of Alaska. The two species are characterized by different life histories: Coho Salmon rear in freshwater for up to 3 years, whereas Chum Salmon emigrate from freshwater shortly after emergence. We used laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS) to quantify element: Ca ratios for Mg, Mn, Zn, Sr, and Ba, and we used multicollector LA-ICP-MS to determine 87Sr:86Sr ratios in otolith regions corresponding to the period of freshwater residence. Significant differences existed in both water and otolith elemental composition, suggesting that otolith composition could be used to discriminate the natal origin of Coho Salmon and Chum Salmon but only when 87Sr:86Sr ratios were included in the discriminant function analyses. The best discriminant model included 87Sr:86Sr ratios, and without 87Sr:86Sr ratios it was difficult to discriminate among watersheds and rivers. Classification accuracy was 80% for Coho Salmon and 68% for Chum Salmon, indicating that this method does not provide sufficient sensitivity to estimate straying rates of Pacific salmon at the scale we studied.

  18. Otolith morphology and body size relationships for juvenile Sciaenidae in the Río de la Plata estuary (35-36°S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Waessle

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of the family Sciaenidae have been reported inhabiting bottom waters of the Río de la Plata estuary. Of these juvenile stripped weakfish (Cynoscion guatucupa, king weakfish (Macrodon ancylodon, whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri and banded ground drum (Paralonchurus brasiliensis are by far the most abundant. These species are also important prey of several top-predator species among large fishes, seabirds and mammals. In this study we provide new information regarding otolith morphology and body size relationships of juvenile sciaenid fish. The sagittae morphology of juvenile sciaenids showed strong changes in the course of their development (e.g. in overall shape and development of concrescences on the outer surface. Analysing the morphometric relationships, we concluded that otolith length and otolith mass are good indicators of fish standard length and fish weight in all species. If otolith length or mass is used to estimate fish length, the regression explained more than 97% of the variation in all species. All equations relating fish standard length and fish weight for juvenile stages of the species studied explained a very large proportion of the variance in the data. These data will help researchers studying food habits of top predators to determine size and weight of usually juvenile fish-prey from length, broad and/or weight of recovered otoliths.

  19. Atlas of marine bony fish otoliths (Sagittae of Southeastern - Southern Brazil Part I: Gadiformes (Macrouridae, Moridae, Bregmacerotidae, Phycidae and Merlucciidae; Part II: Perciformes (Carangidae, Sciaenidae, Scombridae and Serranidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lucia Del Bianco Rossi-Wongtschowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The drawings, detailed pictures, precise descriptions and measurements that characterize otoliths must be made available for studies in various areas, including taxonomy, phylogeny, ecology, fisheries, paleontology, diversity, predator-prey relationships and modeling. The Collection of Teleostei Fish Otoliths of Southeastern-Southern Brazil (COSS-Brasil of IOUSP contains 45,000 pairs of otoliths from 210 species. This publication is the first in a series that will constitute an atlas of Teleostei otoliths for southeastern-southern Brazil and presents the results of the morphologic and morphometric analyses of 11 Gadiformes and 36 Perciformes species by means of the most commonly used features, measurements and indices. Three otoliths of each species were illustrated and photographed whenever possible. The frequency of occurrence was calculated for each characteristic by total length classes (TL, and the ontogenetic differences were analyzed (multiple χ2 test; significance 0.05. Morphometric analyses were conducted for each characteristic per total length (TL class and for the whole sample, and the ontogenetic differences were analyzed.

  20. A Method for Designing Assembly Tolerance Networks of Mechanical Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing mechanical assemblies, assembly tolerance design is an important issue which must be seriously considered by designers. Assembly tolerances reflect functional requirements of assembling, which can be used to control assembling qualities and production costs. This paper proposes a new method for designing assembly tolerance networks of mechanical assemblies. The method establishes the assembly structure tree model of an assembly based on its product structure tree model. On this basis, assembly information model and assembly relation model are set up based on polychromatic sets (PS theory. According to the two models, the systems of location relation equations and interference relation equations are established. Then, using methods of topologically related surfaces (TTRS theory and variational geometric constraints (VGC theory, three VGC reasoning matrices are constructed. According to corresponding relations between VGCs and assembly tolerance types, the reasoning matrices of tolerance types are also established by using contour matrices of PS. Finally, an exemplary product is used to construct its assembly tolerance networks and meanwhile to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. [The influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in the patients presenting with an unilateral lesion in a peripheral vestibular neuron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhac, S A; Pleshko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in 20 patients with vestibular neuronitis (at the stages of decompensation and subcompensation) and in 30 healthy subjects by the electronystagmographic technique. The sinusoidal (program 1) and eccentric (program 2) rotation was applied with the angular velocity of 10 degrees/s (stimulus 1, rotation rate 0.04 Hz), 30 degrees/s (stimulus II, rotation rate 0.12 Hz), 60 degrees/s (stimulus III) and oscillation periods of 18, 6, and 3 s respectively. No significant changes in the parameters of the vesicular reflex were observed in the patients with vestibular neuronitis and control subjects studied in the phase of decompensation under programs 1 and 2 . The study of the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis in the subcompensation phase (program 2) revealed a significant increase of nystagmus intensity on the affected side compared with the respective parameters estimated in the framework of program 1 (pvestibular labyrinth dysfunction in the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis at the stage of decompensation.

  2. Controllable assembly of well-defined monodisperse Au nanoparticles on hierarchical ZnO microspheres for enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic and antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Fang, Hua-Bin; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Ye, Rongqin; Tao, Xia; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2015-11-01

    A high-efficiency visible-light-driven photocatalyst composed of homogeneously distributed Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) well-defined on hierarchical ZnO microspheres (ZMS) via a controllable layer-by-layer self-assembly technique is demonstrated. The gradual growth of the characteristic absorption bands of Au loaded on ZnO in the visible light region with an increasing number of assemblies indicates the enhancement of the light harvesting ability of the ZMS/Au composites as well as the reproducibility and controllability of the entire assembly process. Results on the photoelectrochemical performance characterized by EIS and transient photocurrent response spectra indicate that the ZMS/Au composites possess increased photoinduced charge separation and transfer efficiency compared to the pure ZMS film. As a result, the hybrid composites exhibited enhanced decomposition activity for methylene blue and salicylic acid as well as antibacterial activity in killing S. aureus and E. coli under visible light irradiation. It can be noted that well-distributed Au components even at a rather low Au/ZnO weight ratio of ~1.2% also exhibited extraordinary photocatalysis. Such a facile and controllable self-assembly approach may be viable for preparing high-performance visible-light-driven ZMS/Au photocatalysts in a simple and controllable way, and consequently, the technology may extend to other plasmon-enhanced heterostructures made of nanostructured semiconductors and noble metals for great potential application in environmental protection.A high-efficiency visible-light-driven photocatalyst composed of homogeneously distributed Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) well-defined on hierarchical ZnO microspheres (ZMS) via a controllable layer-by-layer self-assembly technique is demonstrated. The gradual growth of the characteristic absorption bands of Au loaded on ZnO in the visible light region with an increasing number of assemblies indicates the enhancement of the light harvesting ability of

  3. Thermodynamic versus kinetic control in self-assembly of zero-, one-, quasi-two-, and two-dimensional metal-organic coordination structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Wu, Qi; Liu, Jun; Shi, Ziliang; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2015-03-14

    Four types of metal-organic structures exhibiting specific dimensionality were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and Monte Carlo simulations. The four structures were self-assembled out of specifically designed molecular building blocks via the same coordination motif on an Au(111) surface. We found that the four structures behaved differently in response to thermal annealing treatments: The two-dimensional structure was under thermodynamic control while the structures of lower dimension were under kinetic control. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the self-assembly pathways of the four structures are associated with the characteristic features of their specific heat. These findings provide insights into how the dimensionality of supramolecular coordination structures affects their thermodynamic properties.

  4. Temperature-enhanced solvent vapor annealing of a C3 symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene: controlling the self-assembly from nano- to macroscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treossi, Emanuele; Liscio, Andrea; Feng, Xinliang; Palermo, Vincenzo; Müllen, Klaus; Samorì, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Temperature-enhanced solvent vapor annealing (TESVA) is used to self-assemble functionalized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules into ordered macroscopic layers and crystals on solid surfaces. A novel C3 symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene functionalized with alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic side chains is used as a model system since its multivalent character can be expected to offer unique self-assembly properties and behavior in different solvents. TESVA promotes the molecule's long-range mobility, as proven by their diffusion on a Si/SiO(x) surface on a scale of hundreds of micrometers. This leads to self-assembly into large, ordered crystals featuring an edge-on columnar type of arrangement, which differs from the morphologies obtained using conventional solution-processing methods such as spin-coating or drop-casting. The temperature modulation in the TESVA makes it possible to achieve an additional control over the role of hydrodynamic forces in the self-assembly at surfaces, leading to a macroscopic self-healing within the adsorbed film notably improved as compared to conventional solvent vapor annealing. This surface re-organization can be monitored in real time by optical and atomic force microscopy.

  5. Septipyridines as conformationally controlled substitutes for inaccessible bis(terpyridine-derived oligopyridines in two-dimensional self-assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Caterbow

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The position of the peripheral nitrogen atoms in bis(terpyridine-derived oligopyridines (BTPs has a strong impact on their self-assembly behavior at the liquid/HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite interface. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions in these peripheral pyridine units show specific 2D structures for each BTP isomer. From nine possible constitutional isomers only four have been described in the literature. The synthesis and self-assembling behavior of an additional isomer is presented here, but the remaining four members of the series are synthetically inaccessible. The self-assembling properties of three of the missing four BTP isomers can be mimicked by making use of the energetically preferred N–C–C–N transoid conformation between 2,2'-bipyridine subunits in a new class of so-called septipyridines. The structures are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and a combination of force-field and first-principles electronic structure calculations.

  6. Control on self-assembly structures of rod-coil-rod (PANI)98-(PEG)136-(PANI)98 triblock copolymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifang YANG; Jingao WU; Yingkui YANG; Xingping ZHOU; Xiaolin XIE

    2008-01-01

    The self-assembly behaviors of the rod-coil-rod (PANI)98-(PEG)136-(PANI)98 triblock copolymer are investigated in different solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), dimethyl formamide (DMF), ethanol and water. The effects of solvents, concentration and ultrasonic irradiation on self-assembly are discussed. The results indicate that the triblock copolymer forms particles, rods, fiber, networks and fiber bands in the above solvents, respectively. Especially, the triblock copolymer can form a multi-layer, tri-dimensional fibrous network and a petaline structure from the mono-layer fibrous network with the increase of its concentration in ethanol. Also, the ultrasonic irradiation has a great effect on the self-assembly of the triblock copolymer.

  7. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...

  8. Co-assembly of cyclic peptide nanotubes and block copolymers in thin films: controlling the kinetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Xu, Ting

    2015-09-01

    Directed co-assembly of polymer-conjugated cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNs) and block copolymers in thin films is a viable approach to fabricate sub-nanometer porous membranes without synthesizing nanotubes with identical length and vertical alignment. Here we show that the process is pathway dependent and successful co-assembly requires eliminating CPNs larger than 100 nm in solution. Optimizing polymer-solvent interactions can improve conjugate dispersion to a certain extent, but this limits thin film fabrication. Introduction of a trace amount of hydrogen-bond blockers, such as trifluoroacetic acid by vapor absorption, is more effective to reduce CPN aggregation in solution and circumvents issues of solvent immiscibility. This study provides critical insights into guided assemblies within nanoscopic frameworks toward sub-nanometer porous membranes.Directed co-assembly of polymer-conjugated cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNs) and block copolymers in thin films is a viable approach to fabricate sub-nanometer porous membranes without synthesizing nanotubes with identical length and vertical alignment. Here we show that the process is pathway dependent and successful co-assembly requires eliminating CPNs larger than 100 nm in solution. Optimizing polymer-solvent interactions can improve conjugate dispersion to a certain extent, but this limits thin film fabrication. Introduction of a trace amount of hydrogen-bond blockers, such as trifluoroacetic acid by vapor absorption, is more effective to reduce CPN aggregation in solution and circumvents issues of solvent immiscibility. This study provides critical insights into guided assemblies within nanoscopic frameworks toward sub-nanometer porous membranes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03915k

  9. Internal-Modified Dithiol DNA-Directed Au Nanoassemblies: Geometrically Controlled Self-Assembly and Quantitative Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuan; Shan, Hangyong; Li, Min; Chen, Shu; Liu, Jianyu; Cheng, Yanfang; Ye, Cui; Yang, Zhilin; Lai, Xuandi; Hu, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a hierarchical DNA-directed self-assembly strategy to construct structure-controlled Au nanoassemblies (NAs) has been demonstrated by conjugating Au nanoparticles (NPs) with internal-modified dithiol single-strand DNA (ssDNA) (Au-B-A or A-B-Au-B-A). It is found that the dithiol-ssDNA-modified Au NPs and molecule quantity of thiol-modified ssDNA grafted to Au NPs play critical roles in the assembly of geometrically controlled Au NAs. Through matching Au-DNA self-assembly units, geometrical structures of the Au NAs can be tailored from one-dimensional (1D) to quasi-2D and 2D. Au-B-A conjugates readily give 1D and quasi-2D Au NAs while 2D Au NAs can be formed by A-B-Au-B-A building blocks. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements and 3D finite-difference time domain (3D-FDTD) calculation results indicate that the geometrically controllable Au NAs have regular and linearly “hot spots”-number-depended SERS properties. For a certain number of NPs, the number of “hot spots” and accordingly enhancement factor of Au NAs can be quantitatively evaluated, which open a new avenue for quantitative analysis based on SERS technique.

  10. Chemical controls on uranyl citrate speciation and the self-assembly of nanoscale macrocycles and sandwich complexes in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, M; Unruh, D K; Gojdas, K; Flores, E; Streicher, L; Forbes, T Z

    2015-03-28

    Uranyl citrate forms trimeric species at pH > 5.5, but exact structural characteristics of these important oligomers have not previously been reported. Crystallization and structural characterization of the trimers suggests the self-assembly of the 3 : 3 and 3 : 2 U : Cit complexes into larger sandwich and macrocyclic molecules. Raman spectroscopy and ESI-MS have been utilized to investigate the relative abundance of these species in solution under varying pH and citrate concentrations. Additional dynamic light scattering experiments indicate that self-assembly of the larger molecules does occur in aqueous solution.

  11. Water temperature and fish growth: otoliths predict growth patterns of a marine fish in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountrey, Adam N; Coulson, Peter G; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Meekan, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Ecological modeling shows that even small, gradual changes in body size in a fish population can have large effects on natural mortality, biomass, and catch. However, efforts to model the impact of climate change on fish growth have been hampered by a lack of long-term (multidecadal) data needed to understand the effects of temperature on growth rates in natural environments. We used a combination of dendrochronology techniques and additive mixed-effects modeling to examine the sensitivity of growth in a long-lived (up to 70 years), endemic marine fish, the western blue groper (Achoerodus gouldii), to changes in water temperature. A multi-decadal biochronology (1952-2003) of growth was constructed from the otoliths of 56 fish collected off the southwestern coast of Western Australia, and we tested for correlations between the mean index chronology and a range of potential environmental drivers. The chronology was significantly correlated with sea surface temperature in the region, but common variance among individuals was low. This suggests that this species has been relatively insensitive to past variations in climate. Growth increment and age data were also used in an additive mixed model to predict otolith growth and body size later this century. Although growth was relatively insensitive to changes in temperature, the model results suggested that a fish aged 20 in 2099 would have an otolith about 10% larger and a body size about 5% larger than a fish aged 20 in 1977. Our study shows that species or populations regarded as relatively insensitive to climate change could still undergo significant changes in growth rate and body size that are likely to have important effects on the productivity and yield of fisheries.

  12. Radiocarbon in otoliths of yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus): a reference time series for the coastal waters of southeast Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr-Ferrey, L A; Andrews, A H; Frantz, B R; Coale, K H; Brown, T A; Cailliet, G M

    2003-10-14

    Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices during the 1950s and 1960s created a global radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) signal in the environment that has provided a useful tracer and chronological marker in oceanic systems and organisms. The bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal retained in fish otoliths can be used as a permanent, time-specific recorder of the 14C present in ambient seawater, making it a useful tool in age validation of fishes. The goal of this study was to determine {sup 14}C levels in otoliths of the age-validated yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) to establish a reference time series for the coastal waters of southeast Alaska. Radiocarbon values from the first year's growth of 43 yelloweye rockfish otoliths were plotted against estimated birth year to produce a 14C time series for these waters spanning 1940 to 1990. The time series shows the initial rise of bomb 14C occurred in 1958 in coastal southeast Alaskan waters and {sup 14}C levels rose relatively rapidly to peak {Delta}{sup 14}C values (60-70%) between 1966 and 1971, with a subsequent declining trend through the end of the record in 1990 (-3.2%). In addition, the radiocarbon data, independent of the radiometric study, confirms the longevity of the yelloweye rockfish up to a minimum of 44 years and strongly supports higher age estimates. The yelloweye rockfish record provides a {sup 14}C chronology that will be useful for the interpretation of {sup 14}C accreted in biological samples from these waters and in future rockfish age validation studies.

  13. The mangrove nursery paradigm revisited: otolith stable isotopes support nursery-to-reef movements by Indo-Pacific fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael A Kimirei

    Full Text Available Mangroves and seagrass beds have long been perceived as important nurseries for many fish species. While there is growing evidence from the Western Atlantic that mangrove habitats are intricately connected to coral reefs through ontogenetic fish migrations, there is an ongoing debate of the value of these coastal ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific. The present study used natural tags, viz. otolith stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, to investigate for the first time the degree to which multiple tropical juvenile habitats subsidize coral reef fish populations in the Indo Pacific (Tanzania. Otoliths of three reef fish species (Lethrinus harak, L. lentjan and Lutjanus fulviflamma were collected in mangrove, seagrass and coral reef habitats and analyzed for stable isotope ratios in the juvenile and adult otolith zones. δ(13C signatures were significantly depleted in the juvenile compared to the adult zones, indicative of different habitat use through ontogeny. Maximum likelihood analysis identified that 82% of adult reef L. harak had resided in either mangrove (29% or seagrass (53% or reef (18% habitats as juveniles. Of adult L. fulviflamma caught from offshore reefs, 99% had passed through mangroves habitats as juveniles. In contrast, L. lentjan adults originated predominantly from coral reefs (65-72% as opposed to inshore vegetated habitats (28-35%. This study presents conclusive evidence for a nursery role of Indo-Pacific mangrove habitats for reef fish populations. It shows that intertidal habitats that are only temporarily available can form an important juvenile habitat for some species, and that reef fish populations are often replenished by multiple coastal habitats. Maintaining connectivity between inshore vegetated habitats and coral reefs, and conserving habitat mosaics rather than single nursery habitats, is a major priority for the sustainability of various Indo Pacific fish populations.

  14. Use of otoliths to estimate size at sexual maturity in fish

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    Carlos Sérgio Agostinho

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The viability of an alternative method for estimating the size at sexual maturity of females of Plagioscion squamosissimus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae was analyzed. This methodology was used to evaluate the size at sexual maturity in crabs, but has not yet been used for this purpose in fishes. Separation of young and adult fishes by this method is accomplished by iterative adjustment of straight-line segments to the data for length of the otolith and length of the fish. The agreement with the estimate previously obtained by another technique and the possibility of calculating the variance indicates that in some cases, the method analyzed can be used successfully to estimate size at sexual maturity in fish. However, additional studies are necessary to detect possible biases in the method.A viabilidade de uma metologia alternativa para a estimativa do tamanho de maturação sexual de fêmeas de Plagioscion squamosissimus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae foi analisada. Esta metodologia tem sido utilizada para avaliar o tamanho da maturação sexual em caranguejos mas ainda não havia sido utilizada em peixes com este objetivo. A separação dos peixes jovens e adultos por este método é feita pelo ajuste iterativo de segmentos de reta aos dados de comprimento do otólito e comprimento do peixe. A concordância com a estimativa obtida previamente utilizando outra técnica e a possibilidade do cálculo da variância indica que em alguns casos o método analisado pode ser utilizado com sucesso para estimar o tamanho de maturação sexual em peixes, mas outros estudos são necessários para se detectar possíveis bias do método.

  15. Supramolecular synthons on surfaces : Controlling dimensionality and periodicity of tetraarylporphyrin assemblies by the interplay of cyano and alkoxy substituents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintjes, Nikolai; Hornung, Jens; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Voigt, Tobias; Samuely, Tomáš; Thilgen, Carlo; Stöhr, Meike; Diederich, François; Jung, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The self-assembly of three porphyrin derivatives was studied in detail on a Cu(111) substrate by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). All derivatives have two 4-cyanophenyl substituents in diagonally opposed meso-positions of the porphyrin core. but differ in the nature of the other two mes

  16. Life history traits of the fish community in Lake Annecy: evidence from the stable isotope composition of otoliths

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    Gerdeaux D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis (SIA of fish otoliths shows great potential for exploring the ecology of fish, but this method has not been applied to the study of lacustrine fish communities. Both sequential and whole-otolith SIAs were performed on six fish species of Lake Annecy and their results compared to muscle SIA. The first purpose of these investigations was to test the use of δ18Ooto values for reconstructing fish thermal history and delimiting spatial distribution in a stratified lake. Comparison of species-specific fractionation equations and the general equation developed for freshwater fishes showed that the general one was the best suited for thermal estimation of Lake Annecy fishes and suggested that inter-specific differences or specific “vital effects” are not the only reason for apparent difference in fractionation. Thermal estimations based on SIA were consistent with descriptions of thermal habitats in the literature, except in the case of roach (Rutilus rutilus. Based on the current results, roach appears to live in a colder habitat than do perch (Perca fluviatilis. The high water transparency and thermal stratification of Lake Annecy could explain this distribution. Moreover, perch juveniles were found to live in two different thermal niches. This finding highlights the great plasticity of the species. Second, the potential use of δ13Coto values to reconstruct variation in diet and metabolism was assessed. The proportion of metabolic carbon (M contributing to otolith carbon varies markedly among species. Comparison with δ13Cmuscle values shows no direct relationship between δ13Coto and diet at either the intra-individual or the inter-specific level. A strong linear relationship between either M or the isotopic offset between otolith and muscle (Δδ13Coto - muscle and δ18Ooto values was found; this relationship reveals the dependence of M on the ambient temperature at which the species occurs. This relationship might be

  17. Otolith shape analysis as a tool for population discrimination of the white grunt (Haemulon plumieri) stock in the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Treinen-Crespo, Cristina; Villegas-Hernández, Harold; Guillén-Hernández, Sergio; Ruiz-Zárate, Ángel; González-Salas, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the population structure of the white grunt (Haemulon plumieri) from the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula was determined through an otolith shape analysis based on the samples collected in three locations: Celestún (N 20°49’,W 90°25’), Dzilam (N 21°23’, W 88°54’) and Cancún (N 21°21’,W 86°52’). The otolith outline was based on the elliptic Fourier descriptors, which indicated that the H. plumieri population in the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula is composed of th...

  18. The Otolith Group’s “Monuments to Dead Television.” Independent Cinema and the Migrant Experience in Europe between Television and the Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ferrara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available “Monument to dead television” is the expression the British collective The Otolith Group uses to define its activity of recuperating long-lost quality films, and re-screening them in contemporary art museums and gallery spaces. What these films share is a cinematic vocation and a complex approach to the question of memory and migration in Europe, and to the role of images as testimonies or documents. This essay explores The Otolith Group’s interest in such forgotten archives of modern television in order t