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Sample records for controls growth arrest

  1. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

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    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e95-e103.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

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    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...

  3. Escaping growth arrest in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortlever, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    We now have a general idea of which genes and cellular pathways are central in cancer development: uncontrolled growth governs establishment and spread of the disease. Nevertheless, to fully appreciate the consequences of the interplay of driver mutations in this genetic disease it is imperative we

  4. Opposing roles of C/EBPbeta and AP-1 in the control of fibroblast proliferation and growth arrest-specific gene expression

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    Gagliardi, Mark; Maynard, Scott; Miyake, Tetsuaki

    2003-01-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) express several growth arrest-specific (GAS) gene products in G0. In contact-inhibited cells, the expression of the most abundant of these proteins, the p20K lipocalin, is activated at the transcriptional level by C/EBPbeta. In this report, we describe the role of...

  5. Growth Arrest on Inhibition of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Is Mediated by Noncoding RNA GAS5

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    Mirna Mourtada-Maarabouni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated decay is a key RNA surveillance mechanism responsible for the rapid degradation of mRNAs containing premature termination codons and hence prevents the synthesis of truncated proteins. More recently, it has been shown that nonsense-mediated decay also has broader significance in controlling the expression of a significant proportion of the transcriptome. The importance of this mechanism to the mammalian cell is demonstrated by the observation that its inhibition causes growth arrest. The noncoding RNA growth arrest specific transcript 5 (GAS5 has recently been shown to play a key role in growth arrest induced by several mechanisms, including serum withdrawal and treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Here we show that inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay in several human lymphocyte cell lines causes growth arrest, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of GAS5 in these cells significantly alleviates the inhibitory effects observed. These observations hold true for inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay both through RNA interference and through pharmacological inhibition by aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamycin and G418. These studies have important implications for ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity caused by gentamycin and for the proposed use of NMD inhibition in treating genetic disease. This report further demonstrates the critical role played by GAS5 in the growth arrest of mammalian cells.

  6. β-Arrestin1/miR-326 Transcription Unit Is Epigenetically Regulated in Neural Stem Cells Where It Controls Stemness and Growth Arrest

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    Begalli, Federica; Abballe, Luana; Catanzaro, Giuseppina; Vacca, Alessandra; Napolitano, Maddalena; Tafani, Marco; Giangaspero, Felice; Locatelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Cell development is regulated by a complex network of mRNA-encoded proteins and microRNAs, all funnelling onto the modulation of self-renewal or differentiation genes. How intragenic microRNAs and their host genes are transcriptionally coregulated and their functional relationships for the control of neural stem cells (NSCs) are poorly understood. We propose here the intragenic miR-326 and its host gene β-arrestin1 as novel players whose epigenetic silencing maintains stemness in normal cerebellar stem cells. Such a regulation is mediated by CpG islands methylation of the common promoter. Epigenetic derepression of β-arrestin1/miR-326 by differentiation signals or demethylating agents leads to suppression of stemness features and cell growth and promotes cell differentiation. β-Arrestin1 inhibits cell proliferation by enhancing the nuclear expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. Therefore, we propose a new mechanism for the control of cerebellar NSCs where a coordinated epigenetic mechanism finely regulates β-arrestin1/miR-326 expression and consequently NSCs stemness and cell growth. PMID:28298929

  7. Modulation of medium pH by Caulobacter crescentus facilitates recovery from uranium-induced growth arrest.

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    Park, Dan M; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-09-01

    The oxidized form of uranium [U(VI)] predominates in oxic environments and poses a major threat to ecosystems. Due to its ability to mineralize U(VI), the oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation. However, the physiological basis for U(VI) tolerance is unclear. Here we demonstrated that U(VI) caused a temporary growth arrest in C. crescentus and three other bacterial species, although the duration of growth arrest was significantly shorter for C. crescentus. During the majority of the growth arrest period, cell morphology was unaltered and DNA replication initiation was inhibited. However, during the transition from growth arrest to exponential phase, cells with shorter stalks were observed, suggesting a decoupling between stalk development and the cell cycle. Upon recovery from growth arrest, C. crescentus proliferated with a growth rate comparable to that of a control without U(VI), although a fraction of these cells appeared filamentous with multiple replication start sites. Normal cell morphology was restored by the end of exponential phase. Cells did not accumulate U(VI) resistance mutations during the prolonged growth arrest, but rather, a reduction in U(VI) toxicity occurred concomitantly with an increase in medium pH. Together, these data suggest that C. crescentus recovers from U(VI)-induced growth arrest by reducing U(VI) toxicity through pH modulation. Our finding represents a unique U(VI) detoxification strategy and provides insight into how microbes cope with U(VI) under nongrowing conditions, a metabolic state that is prevalent in natural environments.

  8. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

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    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  9. Coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest in patients who had neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

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    DiFazio, Rachel L; Kocher, Minider S; Berven, Sigurd; Kasser, James

    2003-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of four patients in whom a pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest and metaphyseal irregularities developed. These patients were all treated with neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and presented with a progressive gait disturbance and pain, leg-length discrepancy, and limited abduction. Imaging revealed coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest. Two patients (three hips) underwent proximal femoral valgus osteotomy, one patient underwent fixation of a femoral neck fracture with subsequent greater trochanter transfer, and one patient is being observed. This case series suggests an association between neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and this unusual pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest.

  10. Fibroblasts from long-lived Snell dwarf mice are resistant to oxygen-induced in vitro growth arrest

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    Maynard, Scott P; Miller, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Snell dwarf mice live longer than controls, and show lower age-adjusted rates of lethal neoplastic diseases. Fibroblast cells from adult dwarf mice are resistant to the lethal effects of oxidative and nonoxidative stresses, including the carcinogen methyl methanesulfonate. We now report that dwarf...... in skin fibroblasts by the hormonal milieu of the Snell dwarf lead to resistance to multiple forms of injury, including the oxidative damage that contributes to growth arrest in vitro and neoplasia in intact mice....

  11. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia

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    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with acondroplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Results Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Interpretation Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence—especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted. PMID:22489887

  12. ExbB Cytoplasmic Loop Deletions Cause Immediate, Proton Motive Force-Independent Growth Arrest

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    Bulathsinghala, Charles M.; Jana, Bimal; Baker, Kristin R.

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli TonB system consists of the cytoplasmic membrane proteins TonB, ExbB, and ExbD and multiple outer membrane active transporters for diverse iron siderophores and vitamin B12. The cytoplasmic membrane proteins harvest and transmit the proton motive force (PMF) to outer membrane transporters. This system, which spans the cell envelope, has only one component with a significant cytoplasmic presence, ExbB. Characterization of sequential 10-residue deletions in the ExbB cytoplasmic loop (residues 40 to 129; referred to as Δ10 proteins) revealed that it was required for all TonB-dependent activities, including interaction between the periplasmic domains of TonB and ExbD. Expression of eight out of nine of the Δ10 proteins at chromosomal levels led to immediate, but reversible, growth arrest. Arrest was not due to collapse of the PMF and did not require the presence of ExbD or TonB. All Δ10 proteins that caused growth arrest were dominant for that phenotype. However, several were not dominant for iron transport, indicating that growth arrest was an intrinsic property of the Δ10 variants, whether or not they could associate with wild-type ExbB proteins. The lack of dominance in iron transport also ruled out trivial explanations for growth arrest, such as high-level induction. Taken together, the data suggest that growth arrest reflected a changed interaction between the ExbB cytoplasmic loop and one or more unknown growth-regulatory proteins. Consistent with that, a large proportion of the ExbB cytoplasmic loop between transmembrane domain 1 (TMD1) and TMD2 is predicted to be disordered, suggesting the need for interaction with one or more cytoplasmic proteins to induce a final structure. PMID:23913327

  13. Gene expression signature in organized and growth arrested mammaryacini predicts good outcome in breast cancer

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    Fournier, Marcia V.; Martin, Katherine J.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Xhaja, Kris; Bosch, Irene; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-02-08

    To understand how non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) transit from a disorganized proliferating to an organized growth arrested state, and to relate this process to the changes that occur in breast cancer, we studied gene expression changes in non-malignant HMEC grown in three-dimensional cultures, and in a previously published panel of microarray data for 295 breast cancer samples. We hypothesized that the gene expression pattern of organized and growth arrested mammary acini would share similarities with breast tumors with good prognoses. Using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, we analyzed the expression of 22,283 gene transcripts in two HMEC cell lines, 184 (finite life span) and HMT3522 S1 (immortal non-malignant), on successive days post-seeding in a laminin-rich extracellular matrix assay. Both HMECs underwent growth arrest in G0/G1 and differentiated into polarized acini between days 5 and 7. We identified gene expression changes with the same temporal pattern in both lines. We show that genes that are significantly lower in the organized, growth arrested HMEC than in their proliferating counterparts can be used to classify breast cancer patients into poor and good prognosis groups with high accuracy. This study represents a novel unsupervised approach to identifying breast cancer markers that may be of use clinically.

  14. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

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    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  15. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia

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    Song, Sang-Heon; Agashe, Mandar Vikas; Huh, Young-Jae; Hwang, Soon-Young; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with acondroplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who und...

  16. Overexpression of a novel gene, Cms1, can rescue the growth arrest of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mcm10 suppressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    MCM10 protein is an essential replication factor involved in the initiation of DNA replication. A mcm10 mutant (mcm10-1) of budding yeast shows a growth arrest at 37℃. In the present work, we have isolated a mcm10-1 suppressor strain, which grows at 37℃. Interestingly, this mcm10-1 suppressor undergoes cell cycle arrest at 14℃. A novel gene, YLR003c, is identified by high-copy complementation of this suppressor. We called it as Cmsl (Complementation of Mcm 10 Suppressor). Furthermore, the experiments of transformation show that cells of mcm10-1 suppressor with high-copy plasmid but not low-copy plasmid grow at 14℃, indicating that overexpression of Cmsl can rescue the growth arrest of this mcm10 suppressor at non-permissive temperature. These results suggest that CMS1 protein may functionally interact with MCM10 protein and play a role in the regulation of DNA replication and cell cycle control.

  17. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

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    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Indole-3-carbinol inhibits nasopharyngeal carcinoma growth through cell cycle arrest in vivo and in vitro.

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    Zhe Chen

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a common malignant tumor in the head and neck. Because of frequent recurrence and distant metastasis which are the main causes of death, better treatment is needed. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C, a natural phytochemical found in the vegetables of the cruciferous family, shows anticancer effect through various signal pathways. I3C induces G1 arrest in NPC cell line with downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins, such as CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and pRb. In vivo, nude mice receiving I3C protectively or therapeutically exhibited smaller tumors than control group after they were inoculated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The expression of CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and pRb in preventive treatment group and drug treatment group both decreased compared with the control group. We conclude that I3C can inhibit the growth of NPC in vitro and in vivo by suppressing the expression of CDK and cyclin families. The drug was safe and had no toxic effects on normal tissues and organs.

  19. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

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    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  20. p53 oligomerization status modulates cell fate decisions between growth, arrest and apoptosis.

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    Fischer, Nicholas W; Prodeus, Aaron; Malkin, David; Gariépy, Jean

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the oligomerization domain of p53 are genetically linked to cancer susceptibility in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome. These mutations typically alter the oligomeric state of p53 and impair its transcriptional activity. Activation of p53 through tetramerization is required for its tumor suppressive function by inducing transcriptional programs that lead to cell fate decisions such as cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. How p53 chooses between these cell fate outcomes remains unclear. Here, we use 5 oligomeric variants of p53, including 2 novel p53 constructs, that yield either monomeric, dimeric or tetrameric forms of p53 and demonstrate that they induce distinct cellular activities and gene expression profiles that lead to different cell fate outcomes. We report that dimeric p53 variants are cytostatic and can arrest cell growth, but lack the ability to trigger apoptosis in p53-null cells. In contrast, p53 tetramers induce rapid apoptosis and cell growth arrest, while a monomeric variant is functionally inactive, supporting cell growth. In particular, the expression of pro-arrest CDKN1A and pro-apoptotic P53AIP1 genes are important cell fate determinants that are differentially regulated by the oligomeric state of p53. This study suggests that the most abundant oligomeric species of p53 present in resting cells, namely p53 dimers, neither promote cell growth or cell death and that shifting the oligomeric state equilibrium of p53 in cells toward monomers or tetramers is a key parameter in p53-based cell fate decisions.

  1. Management of Fetal Growth Arrest in One of Dichorionic Twins: Three Cases and a Literature Review

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    Shoji Kaku

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive fetal growth restriction (FGR is often an indication for delivery. In dichorionic diamniotic (DD twin pregnancy with growth restriction only affecting one fetus (selective fetal growth restriction: sFGR, the normal twin is also delivered prematurely. There is still not enough evidence about the optimal timing of delivery for DD twins with sFGR in relation to discordance and gestational age. We report three sets of DD twins with sFGR (almost complete growth arrest affecting one fetus for ≥2 weeks before 30 weeks of gestation. The interval from growth arrest to delivery was 21–24 days and the discordance was 33.7–49.8%. A large-scale study showed no difference of overall mortality or the long-term outcome between immediate and delayed delivery for FGR, while many studies have identified a risk of developmental delay following delivery of the normal growth fetus before 32 weeks. Therefore, delivery of DD twins with sFGR should be delayed if the condition of the sFGR fetus permits in order to increase the gestational age of the normal growth fetus.

  2. Cortical bone tissue resists fatigue fracture by deceleration and arrest of microcrack growth.

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    Akkus, O; Rimnac, C M

    2001-06-01

    Knowledge of kinetics of fatigue crack growth of microcracks is important so as to understand the dynamics of bone adaptation, remodeling, and the etiology of fatigue-based failures of cortical bone tissue. In this respect, theoretical models (Taylor, J. Biomech., 31 (1998) 587-592; Taylor and Prendergast, Proc. Instn. Mech. Engrs. Part H 211 (1997) 369-375) of microcrack growth in cortical bone have predicted a decreasing microcrack growth rate with increasing microcrack length. However, these predictions have not been observed directly. This study investigated microcrack growth and arrest through observations of surface microcracks during cyclic loading (R=0.1, 50-80MPa) of human femoral cortical bone (male, n=4, age range: 37-40yr) utilizing a video microscopy system. The change in crack length and orientation of eight surface microcracks were measured with the number of fatigue cycles from four specimens. At the applied cyclic stresses, the microcracks propagated and arrested in generally less than 10,000 cycles. The fatigue crack growth rate of all microcracks decreased with increasing crack length following initial identification, consistent with theoretical predictions. The growth rate of the microcracks was observed to be in the range of 5x10(-5) to 5x10(-7)mmcycle(-1). In addition, many of the microcracks were observed not to grow beyond 150 microm and a cyclic stress intensity factor of 0.5MNm(-3/2). The results of this study suggest that cortical bone tissue may resist fracture at the microscale by deceleration of fatigue crack growth and arrest of microcracks.

  3. Cdc20 control of cell fate during prolonged mitotic arrest

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    Nilsson, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The fate of cells arrested in mitosis by antimitotic compounds is complex but is influenced by competition between pathways promoting cell death and pathways promoting mitotic exit. As components of both of these pathways are regulated by Cdc20-dependent degradation, I hypothesize that variations...

  4. MR imaging of pituitary hyperplasia in a child with growth arrest and primary hypothyroidism

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    Papakonstantinou, O.; Bakantaki, A.; Papadaki, E.; Gourtsoyiannis, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Bitsori, M.; Mamoulakis, D. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of pituitary hyperplasia has been rarely described in children with primary hypothyroidism. We report a case of pituitary hyperplasia in a child presented with significant growth arrest and laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed symmetrical pituitary enlargement simulating macroadenoma. After thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the child's height increased and pituitary enlargement regressed to normal. Awareness of MRI appearance of pituitary hyperplasia in children with laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism might avoid misdiagnosis for pituitary tumor, which may also manifest as growth disorder, obviating unnecessary surgery. (orig.)

  5. Effect of primycin on growth-arrested cultures and cell integrity of Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Feiszt, Péter; Schneider, György; Emődy, Levente

    2017-06-01

    Bactericidal effect against non-dividing bacteria is a very advantageous, but rare characteristic among antimicrobial agents, mostly possessed by those affecting the cell membrane. These kinds of agents can kill bacterial cells without lysis. We assessed these characteristics on primycin, a topical anti-staphylococcal agent highly effective against prevalent multiresistant strains, as it also acts on the cell membrane. In time-kill studies, primycin preserved its bactericidal activity against growth-arrested Staphylococcus aureus cultures. The bactericidal action was slower against growth-arrested cultures compared to the exponentially growing ones to different extents depending on the manner of arrest. The bactericidal effect was less influenced by stringent response and by protein synthesis inhibition, proving that it does not depend on metabolic activity. In contrast, uncoupling of the membrane potential predominantly slowed, and low temperature almost stopped killing of bacteria. In consideration of published data, these facts suggest that the antibacterial action of primycin involves disrupting of the membrane potential, and is predominantly influenced by the membrane fluidity. Optical density measurements and transmission electron microscopy verified that primycin kills bacterial cells without lysis. These results reveal favorable characteristics of primycin and point to, and broaden the knowledge on its membrane-targeted effect.

  6. Growth Arrest Specific 2 Is Up-Regulated in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells and Required for Their Growth

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    Haixia Zhou; Yue Ge; Lili Sun; Wenjuan Ma; Jie Wu; Xiuyan Zhang; Xiaohui Hu; Eaves, Connie J; Depei Wu; Yun Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Although the generation of BCR-ABL is the molecular hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the comprehensive molecular mechanisms of the disease remain unclear yet. Growth arrest specific 2 (GAS2) regulates multiple cellular functions including cell cycle, apoptosis and calpain activities. In the present study, we found GAS2 was up-regulated in CML cells including CD34+ progenitor cells compared to their normal counterparts. We utilized RNAi and the expression of dominant negative form o...

  7. Growth arrest specific 2 is up-regulated in chronic myeloid leukemia cells and required for their growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhou

    Full Text Available Although the generation of BCR-ABL is the molecular hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, the comprehensive molecular mechanisms of the disease remain unclear yet. Growth arrest specific 2 (GAS2 regulates multiple cellular functions including cell cycle, apoptosis and calpain activities. In the present study, we found GAS2 was up-regulated in CML cells including CD34+ progenitor cells compared to their normal counterparts. We utilized RNAi and the expression of dominant negative form of GAS2 (GAS2DN to target GAS2, which resulted in calpain activity enhancement and growth inhibition of both K562 and MEG-01 cells. Targeting GAS2 also sensitized K562 cells to Imatinib mesylate (IM. GAS2DN suppressed the tumorigenic ability of MEG-01 cells and impaired the tumour growth as well. Moreover, the CD34+ cells from CML patients and healthy donors were transduced with control and GAS2DN lentiviral vectors, and the CD34+ transduced (YFP+ progeny cells (CD34+YFP+ were plated for colony-forming cell (CFC assay. The results showed that GAS2DN inhibited the CFC production of CML cells by 57±3% (n = 3, while affected those of normal hematopoietic cells by 31±1% (n = 2. Next, we found the inhibition of CML cells by GAS2DN was dependent on calpain activity but not the degradation of beta-catenin. Lastly, we generated microarray data to identify the differentially expressed genes upon GAS2DN and validated that the expression of HNRPDL, PTK7 and UCHL5 was suppressed by GAS2DN. These 3 genes were up-regulated in CML cells compared to normal control cells and the growth of K562 cells was inhibited upon HNRPDL silence. Taken together, we have demonstrated that GAS2 is up-regulated in CML cells and the inhibition of GAS2 impairs the growth of CML cells, which indicates GAS2 is a novel regulator of CML cells and a potential therapeutic target of this disease.

  8. The Effects of Ethanol and Strontium on Growth and Development of Two-Cell Arrested Mouse Embryos

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    Mohammad Reza Darabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arresting at a certain stage of development like the two-cell stage could be one of the causes of infertility. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of ethanol and strontium on growth and development of mice embryos arrested at the two-cell stage.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, female mice were coupled with a male following superovulation. Positive vaginal plug mice were sacrificed 48 hours after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG injection. Two-cell embryos were transferred to M16 medium and divided to four groups. The first control group was incubated without any exposure to low temperatures. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were exposed to 4°C for 24 hours. The second control group was incubated immediately, while the third and fourth groups were exposed to 10 mM strontium for five minutes and 0.1% ethanol for a further five minutes. Growth rate and developmental parameters of embryos were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. The significant difference between the groups was determined by Post Hoc.Results: The data shows that developmental rate is decreased significantly by 4°C exposure. The mean percentage of degenerated embryo was significantly different between groups but the mean cleavage rate was not significantly different. The mean percent of morula, blastocyst and hatched blastocyst formation were significantly different between groups during a 120 hours study post hCG injection.Conclusion: The effect of strontium and ethanol on arrested two-cell embryos had no significant effect on the mean percentage of morula, but ethanol treatment significantly increased the percentage of blastocyst and hatched blastocyst formation compared to strontium.

  9. Fast growth in control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Rico (Zulay)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe focus of this paper is on the influence of the fast growth of organizations on the design process of management control systems. What are the management accounting and control problems that a fast growth organization encounters that can be ascribed to this growth. What are the circum

  10. Telomerase expression abrogates rapamycin-induced irreversible growth arrest of uterine fibroid smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Guangli; Sadarangani, Anil; Tang, Wingchung; Cowan, Bryan D; Wang, Jean Y J

    2014-09-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common solid tumors found in women of reproductive age. It has been reported that deregulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays an important role in the etiology of leiomyoma. Here, we investigated the effect of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, on the growth of primary fibroid smooth muscle cells (fSMCs) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-transduced and immortalized fSMCs. With the primary fSMCs, a 24-hour treatment with rapamycin was sufficient to trigger a growth arrest that was not reversible upon drug removal. By contrast, the growth inhibitory effect of rapamycin on the hTERT-transduced fSMCs was readily reversible, as these cells resumed proliferation upon the withdrawal of the drug. These results suggest that rapamycin-induced irreversible growth arrest of fSMCs is dependent on the senescence barrier that is abrogated by the ectopic expression of telomerase.

  11. Higher order nuclear organization in growth arrest of humanmammary epithelial cells: A novel role for telomere-associated proteinTIN2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminker, Patrick; Plachot, Cedric; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Chung, Peter; Crippen, Danielle; Petersen, Ole W.; Bissell, Mina J.; Campisi, Judith; Lelievre, Sophie A.

    2004-12-15

    Nuclear organization, such as the formation of specific nuclear subdomains, is generally thought to be involved in the control of cellular phenotype; however, there are relatively few specific examples of how mammalian nuclei organize during radical changes in phenotype, such as those which occur during differentiation and growth arrest. Using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in which growth arrest is essential for morphological differentiation, we show that the arrest of cell proliferation is accompanied by a reorganization of the telomere-associated protein, TIN2, into one to three large nuclear subdomains. The large TIN2 domains do not contain telomeres and occur concomitant with the continued presence of TIN2 at telomeres. The TIN2 domains were sensitive to DNAse, but not RNAse, occurred frequently, but not exclusively near nucleoli, and overlapped often with dense domains containing heterochromatin protein l{gamma}. Expression of truncated forms of TIN2 simultaneously prevented the formation of TIN2 domains and relaxed the stringent morphogenesis-induced growth arrest in HMECs. Our findings reveal a novel extra-telomeric organization of TIN2 associated with the control of cell proliferation and identify TIN2 as an important regulator of mammary epithelial differentiation.

  12. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley R Lewis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or 'primary' cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400. While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8. GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC protein 4 (DRC4 where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR to generate one of these human missense

  13. Necdin, a p53-target gene, is an inhibitor of p53-mediated growth arrest.

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    Julie Lafontaine

    Full Text Available In vitro, cellular immortalization and transformation define a model for multistep carcinogenesis and current ongoing challenges include the identification of specific molecular events associated with steps along this oncogenic pathway. Here, using NIH3T3 cells, we identified transcriptionally related events associated with the expression of Polyomavirus Large-T antigen (PyLT, a potent viral oncogene. We propose that a subset of these alterations in gene expression may be related to the early events that contribute to carcinogenesis. The proposed tumor suppressor Necdin, known to be regulated by p53, was within a group of genes that was consistently upregulated in the presence of PyLT. While Necdin is induced following p53 activation with different genotoxic stresses, Necdin induction by PyLT did not involve p53 activation or the Rb-binding site of PyLT. Necdin depletion by shRNA conferred a proliferative advantage to NIH3T3 and PyLT-expressing NIH3T3 (NIHLT cells. In contrast, our results demonstrate that although overexpression of Necdin induced a growth arrest in NIH3T3 and NIHLT cells, a growing population rapidly emerged from these arrested cells. This population no longer showed significant proliferation defects despite high Necdin expression. Moreover, we established that Necdin is a negative regulator of p53-mediated growth arrest induced by nutlin-3, suggesting that Necdin upregulation could contribute to the bypass of a p53-response in p53 wild type tumors. To support this, we characterized Necdin expression in low malignant potential ovarian cancer (LMP where p53 mutations rarely occur. Elevated levels of Necdin expression were observed in LMP when compared to aggressive serous ovarian cancers. We propose that in some contexts, the constitutive expression of Necdin could contribute to cancer promotion by delaying appropriate p53 responses and potentially promote genomic instability.

  14. Growth inhibitory effect of 4-phenyl butyric acid on human gastric cancer cells is associated with cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-Zhu Li; Hong-Xia Deng; Wen-Zhu Lou; Xue-Yan Sun; Meng-Wan Song; Jing Tao; Bing-Xiu Xiao; Jun-Ming Guo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth effects of 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) on human gastric carcinoma cells and their mechanisms. METHODS: Moderately-differentiated human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 and lowly-differentiated MGC-803 cells were treated with 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μmol/L PBA for 1-4 d. Cell proliferation was detected using the MTT colorimetric assay. Cell cycle distributions were examined using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells was inhibited by PBA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Flow cytometry showed that SGC-7901 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G0/G1 phase, whereas cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G2/M phase. Although MGC-803 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were also arrested at the G0/G1 phase, cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the S phase. CONCLUSION: The growth inhibitory effect of PBA on gastric cancer cells is associated with alteration of the cell cycle. For moderately-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. For lowly-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and S phases.

  15. Aspartate facilitates mitochondrial function, growth arrest and survival during doxorubicin exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Ken; Madden, Michael; Skildum, Andrew; Wallace, Kendall B

    2015-01-01

    Genomic screens of doxorubicin toxicity in S. cerevisiae have identified numerous mutants in amino acid and carbon metabolism which express increased doxorubicin sensitivity. This work examines the effect of amino acid metabolism on doxorubicin toxicity. S. cerevisiae were treated with doxorubicin in combination with a variety of amino acid supplements. Strains of S. cerevisiae with mutations in pathways utilizing aspartate and other metabolites were examined for sensitivity to doxorubicin. S. cerevisiae cultures exposed to doxorubicin in minimal media showed significantly more toxicity than cultures exposed in rich media. Supplementing minimal media with aspartate, glutamate or alanine reduced doxorubicin toxicity. Cell cycle response was assessed by examining the budding pattern of treated cells. Cultures exposed to doxorubicin in minimal media arrested growth with no apparent cell cycle progression. Aspartate supplementation allowed cultures exposed to doxorubicin in minimal media to arrest after one division with a budding pattern and survival comparable to cultures exposed in rich media. Aspartate provides less protection from doxorubicin in cells mutant in either mitochondrial citrate synthase (CIT1) or NADH oxidase (NDI1), suggesting aspartate reduces doxorubicin toxicity by facilitating mitochondrial function. These data suggest glycolysis becomes less active and mitochondrial respiration more active following doxorubicin exposure. PMID:26317891

  16. p15(INK4b) in HDAC inhibitor-induced growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Yokota, Tomoya; Takaoka, Yuuki; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2003-11-20

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors arrest human tumor cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and activate the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21(WAF1/Cip1). However, several studies have suggested the existence of a p21(WAF1/Cip1)-independent molecular pathway. We report here that HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate, activate the p15(INK4b) gene, a member of the INK4 gene family, through its promoter in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, we show that up-regulation of p15(INK4b) by TSA is associated with cell growth inhibition of HCT116 p21 (-/-) cells. Our findings suggest that p15(INK4b) is one of the important molecular targets of HDAC inhibitors.

  17. Noncoding RNA Gas5 Is a Growth Arrest and Starvation-Associated Repressor of the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Tomoshige; Hurt, Darrell E.; Ichijo, Takamasa; Nader, Nancy; Chrousos, George P.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of nutrients influences cellular growth and survival by affecting gene transcription. Glucocorticoids also influence gene transcription and have diverse activities on cell growth, energy expenditure, and survival. We found that the growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5) noncoding RNA, which is abundant in cells whose growth has been arrested due to lack of nutrients or growth factors, sensitized cells to apoptosis by suppressing glucocorticoid-mediated induction of several responsive genes, including the one encoding cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2. Gas5 bound to the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by acting as a decoy “glucocorticoid response element (GRE)”, thus, competing with DNA GREs for binding to the GR. We conclude that Gas5 is a ribo-repressor of the GR, influencing cell survival and metabolic activities during starvation by modulating the transcriptional activity of the GR. PMID:20124551

  18. Hair follicle growth controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenn, K S; Combates, N J; Eilertsen, K J; Gordon, J S; Pardinas, J R; Parimoo, S; Prouty, S M

    1996-10-01

    Research in hair biology has embarked in the pursuit for molecules that control hair growth. Many molecules already have been associated with the controls of hair patterning, hair maturation, and hair cycling and differentiation. Knowing how these molecules work gives us the tools for understanding and treating patients with hair disorders.

  19. Berberine inhibits growth and induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wang, Bin; Zhuang, Yun; Shao, Dong; Sun, Kewen; Chen, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic natural products may be one of the strategies for the management of the cholangiocarcinoma. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with an increase in G1 arrest. Our western blot analysis showed that berberine-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (Cdki) proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27); a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2 and Cdk4 and cyclins D1, and reduced activity of the Cyclins-Cdk complex. In additional studies, treatment of QBC939 cells with different concentrations (10, 40, 80 μM) of berberine for 48 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis compared to the non-berberine-treated control, which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human cholangiocarcinoma cells QBC939 cells in vitro. Further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of cholangiocarcinoma.

  20. Analysis of HIV-1 Vpr determinants responsible for cell growth arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Yao Xiao-Jian

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 genome encodes a well-conserved accessory gene product, Vpr, that serves multiple functions in the retroviral life cycle, including the enhancement of viral replication in nondividing macrophages, the induction of G2 cell-cycle arrest, and the modulation of HIV-1-induced apoptosis. We previously reported the genetic selection of a panel of di-tryptophan (W-containing peptides capable of interacting with HIV-1 Vpr and inhibiting its cytostatic activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yao, X.-J., J. Lemay, N. Rougeau, M. Clément, S. Kurtz, P. Belhumeur, and E. A. Cohen, J. Biol. Chem. v. 277, p. 48816–48826, 2002. In this study, we performed a mutagenic analysis of Vpr to identify sequence and/or structural determinants implicated in the interaction with di-W-containing peptides and assessed the effect of mutations on Vpr-induced cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae. Results Our data clearly shows that integrity of N-terminal α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83 is crucial for Vpr interaction with di-W-containing peptides as well as for the protein-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast. Interestingly, several Vpr mutants, mainly in the N- and C-terminal domains, which were previously reported to be defective for cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in human cells, still displayed a cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae and remained sensitive to the inhibitory effect of di-W-containing peptides. Conclusions Vpr-induced growth arrest in budding yeast can be effectively inhibited by GST-fused di-W peptide through a specific interaction of di-W peptide with Vpr functional domain, which includes α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83. Furthermore, the mechanism(s underlying Vpr-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast are likely to be distinct from those implicated in cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in human cells.

  1. Glycogen synthesis correlates with androgen-dependent growth arrest in prostate cancer

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    Gorin Frederic A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen withdrawal in normal prostate or androgen-dependent prostate cancer is associated with the downregulation of several glycolytic enzymes and with reduced glucose uptake. Although glycogen metabolism is known to regulate the intracellular glucose level its involvement in androgen response has not been studied. Methods We investigated the effects of androgen on glycogen phosphorylase (GP, glycogen synthase (GS and on glycogen accumulation in the androgen-receptor (AR reconstituted PC3 cell line containing either an empty vector (PC3-AR-V or vector with HPV-E7 (PC3-AR-E7 and the LNCaP cell line. Results Androgen addition in PC3 cells expressing the AR mimics androgen ablation in androgen-dependent prostate cells. Incubation of PC3-AR-V or PC3-AR-E7 cells with the androgen R1881 induced G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 hours and resulted in a gradual cell number reduction over 5 days thereafter, which was accompanied by a 2 to 5 fold increase in glycogen content. 24 hours after androgen-treatment the level of Glucose-6-P (G-6-P had increased threefold and after 48 hours the GS and GP activities increased twofold. Under this condition inhibition of glycogenolysis with the selective GP inhibitor CP-91149 enhanced the increase in glycogen content and further reduced the cell number. The androgen-dependent LNCaP cells that endogenously express AR responded to androgen withdrawal with growth arrest and increased glycogen content. CP-91149 further increased glycogen content and caused a reduction of cell number. Conclusion Increased glycogenesis is part of the androgen receptor-mediated cellular response and blockage of glycogenolysis by the GP inhibitor CP-91149 further increased glycogenesis. The combined use of a GP inhibitor with hormone therapy may increase the efficacy of hormone treatment by decreasing the survival of prostate cancer cells and thereby reducing the chance of cancer recurrence.

  2. Overexpressed active Notch1 induces cell growth arrest of HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Qin, H; Chen, B; Xin, X; Li, J; Han, H

    2007-01-01

    Human cervical carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors, but the mechanisms that orchestrate the multiple oncogenic insults required for initiation and progression are not clear. Notch signaling plays a critical role in maintaining the balance between cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, but perturbed Notch signaling may contribute to tumorigenesis. We now show that Notch1 is detected in all cervical cancer, including advanced diseases. We also constitutively overexpressed active Notch1 in human cervical carcinoma to explore the effects of Notch1 signaling on human cervical carcinoma cell growth and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The signaling may participate in the development of human cervical carcinoma cells, but overexpressed active Notch1 inhibits their growth through induction of cell cycle arrest. Increased Notch1 signaling induced a downmodulation of human papillomavirus transcription through suppression of activator protein (AP)-1 activity by upregulation of c-Jun and the decreased expression of c-Fos. Thus, Notch1 signaling plays a key role and exerts dual effects, functioning in context-specific manner.

  3. Achieving Control of Lesion Growth in CNS with Minimal Damage

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    Raja, Mathankumar

    2012-01-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist which minimizes system damage while achieving control of lesion growth.

  4. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  5. Growth arrest and morphological changes triggered by emodin on Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes cultivated in axenic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lima, Ana R; Noris-Suárez, Karem; Bretaña, Antonio; Contreras, Victor T; Navarro, Maria C; Pérez-Ybarra, Luis; Bubis, José

    2017-08-10

    Emodin is an anthraquinone obtained from Rheum palmatum rootstocks. Here we tested the cytotoxic effects of emodin on Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes, as well as the morphological changes that were induced by this compound in the parasite. Emodin was permeable and blocked in vitro cell division of T. cruzi epimastigotes in axenic medium, causing growth arrest in a dose-dependent but reversible manner. Emodin-exposed epimastigotes underwent duplication of organelles, such as the nucleus, kinetoplast and flagellum, but were incapable of completing cytokinesis. Neither elongation of the parasite body nor appearance of the regular longitudinal cleavage furrow was displayed, suggesting that emodin is most likely affecting components of the parasite cytoskeleton. Moreover, drug-treated parasites acquired alterations such as protuberances, folds and indentations on their membrane surface. Since emodin has been shown to be a potent protein kinase CK2 inhibitor, and we have previously described an association between tubulin and CK2 in T. cruzi epimastigotes (De Lima et al. Parasitology132, 511-523, 2006), we also measured the indirect effect of the drug on tubulin. Incubation of epimastigotes with axenic medium containing emodin hindered the endogenous phosphorylation of tubulin in whole-cell parasite extracts. All our results suggested that the parasite CK2 may be important for the maintenance of the morphology and for the regulation of mitosis-cytokinesis transition in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Interaction of influenza virus NS1 protein with growth arrest-specific protein 8

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    Yu Mengbin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract NS1 protein is the only non-structural protein encoded by the influenza A virus, and it contributes significantly to disease pathogenesis by modulating many virus and host cell processes. A two-hybrid screen for proteins that interact with NS1 from influenza A yielded growth arrest-specific protein 8. Gas8 associated with NS1 in vitro and in vivo. Deletion analysis revealed that the N-terminal 260 amino acids of Gas8 were able to interact with NS1, and neither the RNA-binding domain nor the effector domain of NS1 was sufficient for the NS1 interaction. We also found that actin, myosin, and drebrin interact with Gas8. NS1 and β-actin proteins could be co-immunoprecipitated from extracts of transfected cells. Furthermore, actin and Gas8 co-localized at the plasma membrane. These results are discussed in relation to the possible functions of Gas8 protein and their relevance in influenza virus release.

  7. Antimicrobial Cream Formulated with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extract of Tuberose Flowers Arrests Growth of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Probir Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Paramita; Das, Satadal

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial potency of herbal extracts is well known. The review of patents and research articles revealed that several herbal extracts have been employed in the formulation of topical products such as creams, exclusive of the cream reported in the present study. 0ur previous study has established antimicrobial potency of supercritical carbon dioxide extracts of tuberose flowers, better known for its sweet fragrance. The present work focuses on formulating a topical antimicrobial herbal cream with methyl eugenol (principal antimicrobial compound) rich - supercritical carbon dioxide extract of tuberose flowers, having good combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies. Supercritical carbon dioxide parameters such as temperature, pressure and time were optimized using full factorial experimental design to obtain methyl eugenol-rich extracts. A cream was formulated using the extract having the best combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies and was assayed further for in vitro antimicrobial potency; physiochemical and sensory properties. Two commercial antimicrobial cream samples were used as reference samples in the study. The extract obtained at 40°C, 10 MPa, 135 min at 1 L min-1 flow rate of gaseous C02 showed the best combination of phytochemical and antimicrobial potencies and was used for formulation of herbal creams. The cream formulated with 5% w/w of extract arrested growth of the common human skin pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and showed stable physiochemical properties and high sensory appeal for a year. The cream could be considered as a 'finished herbal product&' in compliance with the World Health 0rganization guidelines.

  8. Google Glass for Residents Dealing With Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Arrest: A Randomized, Controlled, Simulation-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David; Arnaud, Cécile; Guedj, Romain; Duguet, Alexandre; de Suremain, Nathalie; Petit, Arnaud

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether real-time video communication between the first responder and a remote intensivist via Google Glass improves the management of a simulated in-hospital pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest before the arrival of the ICU team. Randomized controlled study. Children's hospital at a tertiary care academic medical center. Forty-two first-year pediatric residents. Pediatric residents were evaluated during two consecutive simulated pediatric cardiopulmonary arrests with a high-fidelity manikin. During the second evaluation, the residents in the Google Glass group were allowed to seek help from a remote intensivist at any time by activating real-time video communication. The residents in the control group were asked to provide usual care. The main outcome measures were the proportion of time for which the manikin received no ventilation (no-blow fraction) or no compression (no-flow fraction). In the first evaluation, overall no-blow and no-flow fractions were 74% and 95%, respectively. During the second evaluation, no-blow and no-flow fractions were similar between the two groups. Insufflations were more effective (p = 0.04), and the technique (p = 0.02) and rate (p Google Glass group than in the control group. Real-time video communication between the first responder and a remote intensivist through Google Glass did not decrease no-blow and no-flow fractions during the first 5 minutes of a simulated pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest but improved the quality of the insufflations and chest compressions provided.

  9. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  10. Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng. seed extract suppresses breast cancer growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Yanmin; Liu, Yanping; Yang, Xiaoyan Ou; Zhan, Yingzhuan

    2015-10-01

    The herb Momordica cochinchinensis has been used for a variety of purposes, and been shown to have anti‑cancer properties. The present study assessed the potency and the underlying mechanisms of action of the ethyl acetate extract of seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (ESMC2) on breast cancer cells. Therefore, the effects of ESMC2 on the cell viability, cell cycle and apoptosis of MDA‑MB‑231 cells were investigated. The results showed that ESMC2 exerted a marked growth inhibitory effect on the cells. Cell cycle arrest in G2 phase following treatment with ESMC2 was associated with a marked increase in the protein levels of cyclin B1, cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and a decrease in cyclin D1 expression. In addition, ESMC2 dose‑dependently induced cell apoptosis, which was mediated via upregulation of the apoptosis-associated proteins p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2)‑associated X protein, Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer and Bcl-2-associated death promoter expression, as well as downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B, Bcl‑2 and myeloid cell leukemia‑1. Furthermore, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt phosphorylation were decreased by ESMC2 in a dose‑dependent manner, indicating that ESMC2 exerted its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/JNK pathway. Furthermore, nude mouse xenotransplant models were used to evaluate the tumor growth inhibitory effects of ESMC2. The possible chemical components of ESMC2 were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 12 compounds were detected from the major peaks based on the similarity index with entries of a compound database. The results of the present study may aid in the development of novel therapies for breast cancer.

  11. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  12. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vucic

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  13. Solanum tuberosum lectin inhibits Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells growth by inducing apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Rahman, Md Musfikur; Amin, Ruhul; Karim, Md Rezaul; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat; Hossain, M Tofazzal

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a lectin was purified from the potato cultivated in Bangladesh locally known as Sheel. In the present study cytotoxicity of the lectin against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells was studied by MTT assay in vitro in RPMI-1640 medium and 8.0-36.0 % cell growth inhibition was observed at the range of 2.5-160 μg/ml protein concentration when incubated for 24 h. The lectin-induced apoptosis in EAC cells was confirmed by fluorescence and optical microscope. The apoptotic cell death was also confirmed by using caspase inhibitors. Cells growth inhibition caused by the lectin (36 %) was remarkably decreased to 7.6 and 22.3 % respectively in the presence of caspase-3 and -8 inhibitors. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of apoptosis-related genes Bcl-X, p53, and Bax. An intensive expression of Bcl-X gene was observed in untreated control EAC cells with the disappeared of the gene in Sheel-treated EAC cells. At the same time, Bax gene expression appeared only in Sheel-treated EAC cells and the expression level of the p53 gene was increased remarkable after the treatment of EAC cells with the lectin. The lectin showed strong agglutination activity against EAC cells. Flow cytometry was used to study the cell cycle phases of EAC cells and it was observed that the lectin arrested the G2/M phase. In conclusion, Sheel lectin inhibited EAC cells growth by inducing apoptosis.

  14. SUMO modification of Stra13 is required for repression of cyclin D1 expression and cellular growth arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaju Wang

    Full Text Available Stra13, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor is involved in myriad biological functions including cellular growth arrest, differentiation and senescence. However, the mechanisms by which its transcriptional activity and function are regulated remain unclear. In this study, we provide evidence that post-translational modification of Stra13 by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO dramatically potentiates its ability to transcriptionally repress cyclin D1 and mediate G(1 cell cycle arrest in fibroblast cells. Mutation of SUMO acceptor lysines 159 and 279 located in the C-terminal repression domain has no impact on nuclear localization; however, it abrogates association with the co-repressor histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1, attenuates repression of cyclin D1, and prevents Stra13-mediated growth suppression. HDAC1, which promotes cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression, antagonizes Stra13 sumoylation-dependent growth arrest. Our results uncover an unidentified regulatory axis between Stra13 and HDAC1 in progression through the G(1/S phase of the cell cycle, and provide new mechanistic insights into regulation of Stra13-mediated transcriptional repression by sumoylation.

  15. Growth arrest and a persister state enable resistance to osmotic shock and facilitate dissemination of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Lazinski, David W; Kahne, Shoshanna C; Nguyen, Y; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-07-25

    Vibrio cholerae is a water-borne bacterial pathogen and causative agent of cholera. Although V. cholerae is a halophile, it can survive in fresh water, and this has a major role in cholera epidemics through consumption of contaminated water and subsequent fecal-oral spread. After dissemination from humans back into fresh water, V. cholerae encounters limited nutrient availability and an abrupt drop in conductivity but little is known about how V. cholerae adapts to, and survives in this environment. In this work, by abolishing or altering the expression of V. cholerae genes in a high-throughput manner, we observed that many osmotic shock tolerant mutants exhibited slowed or arrested growth, and/or generated a higher proportion of persister cells. In addition, we show that growth-arrested V. cholerae, including a persister subpopulation, are generated during infection of the intestinal tract and together allow for the successful dissemination to fresh water. Our results suggest that growth-arrested and persister subpopulations enable survival of V. cholerae upon shedding to the aquatic environment.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 25 July 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.121.

  16. Notch1 signaling inhibits growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Runzi; An, Huazhang; Yu, Yizhi; Zhang, Minghui; Liu, Shuxun; Xu, Hongmei; Guo, Zhenghong; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Xuetao

    2003-12-01

    Notch signaling plays a critical role in maintaining the balance between cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis; hence, perturbed Notch signaling may contribute to tumorigenesis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Africa and Asia. The mechanisms that orchestrate the multiple oncogenic insults required for initiation and progression of HCC are not clear. We constitutively overexpressed active Notch1 in human HCC to explore the effects of Notch1 signaling on HCC cell growth and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms. We show here that overexpression of Notch1 was able to inhibit the growth of HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical analysis revealed the involvement of cell cycle regulated proteins in Notch1-mediated G(0)/G(1) arrest of HCC cells. Compared with green fluorescent protein (GFP) control, transient transfection of Notch1 ICN decreased expression of cyclin A (3.5-fold), cyclin D1 (2-fold), cyclin E (4.5-fold), CDK2 (2.8-fold), and the phosphorylated form of retinoblastoma protein (3-fold). Up-regulation of p21(waf/cip1) protein expression was observed in SMMC7721-ICN cells stably expressing active Notch1 but not in SMMC7721-GFP cells, which only express GFP. Furthermore, a 12-fold increase in p53 expression and an increase (4.8-fold) in Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase activation were induced in SMMC7721-ICN cells compared with SMMC7721-GFP cells. In contrast, expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein could not be detected in SMMC7721-ICN cells. These findings suggest that Notch1 signaling may participate in the development of HCC cells, affecting multiple pathways that control both cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  17. RRR-α-tocopheryl succinate inhibits human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wu; Yan Zhao; Bai-He Liu; Yao Li; Fang Liu; Jian Guo; Wei-Ping Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of growth inhibition ofhuman gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell with RRR-α-tocopherylsuccinate (VES), a derivative of natural Vitamin E, viainducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest.METHODS: Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells wereregularly incubated in the presence of VES at 5, 10 and20mg@ L 1(VES was dissolved in absolute ethanol anddiluted in RPMI 1640 complete condition mediacorrespondingly to a final concentration of VES and 1mL@L-1 ethanol), succinic acid and ethanol equivalents asvehicle (VEH) control andcondition media only asuntreated (UT) control. Trypan blue dye exclusionanalysis and MTT assay were applied to detect the cellproliferation. 37kBq of tritiated thymidine was added tocells and [3H] TdR uptake was measured to observe DNAsynthesis. Apoptotic morphology was observed byelectron microscopy and DAPI staining. Flow cytometryand terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTPnick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detectVES-triggered apoptosis.RESULTS: VES inhibited SGC-7901 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. The growth curve showed suppressionby 24.7%, 49.2% and 68.7% following 24h of VEStreatment at 5, 10 and 20 mg@L 1, respectively, similar tothe findings from MTT assay. DNA synthesis wasevidently reduced by 35%, 45% and 98% after 24h VEStreatment at 20 mg@ L-1 and 48h at 10 and 20 mg@ L 1,respectively. VES induced SGC-7901 cells to undergoapoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics,including morphological changes of chromatincondensation, chromatin crescent formation/margination,nucleus fragmentation and apoptotic body formation,typical apoptotic sub-G1 peak by flow cytometry andincrease of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay in which 90%of cells underwent apoptosis after 48h of VES treatment at20 mcg@L-1.CONCLUSION: VES can inhibit human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesisarrest. Inhibition of SGC-7901 cell growth by VES is dose-and time

  18. New proposal of silver diamine fluoride use in arresting approximal caries: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos-Silveira, Juliana; Floriano, Isabela; Ferreira, Fernanda R; Viganó, Maria E F; Frizzo, M A; Reyes, Alessandra; Novaes, Tatiane F; Moriyama, Caroline M; Raggio, Daniela P; Imparato, José C P; Mendes, Fausto M; Braga, Mariana M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Approximal surfaces are a challenge to caries lesions control. Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is a simple,low-cost and promisor intervention for arresting caries lesions, but it has never been tested on approximal surfaces. Our aim is to evaluate the efficacy and cost-efficacy of SDF in arresting initial lesions compared to resin infiltration and exclusively flossing (control group). Our second aim is to assess discomf...

  19. Quercetin induces growth arrest through activation of FOXO1 transcription factor in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Chan, Chien-Yi; Chou, I-Tai; Lien, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Hsiao-Chi; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2013-09-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHNs) with aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling are often associated with poor prognosis and low survival. Therefore, efficient inhibition of the EGFR signaling could intervene with the development of malignancy. Quercetin appears to be antitumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear in oral cancer. Fork-head box O (FOXO) transcription factors, Akt downstream effectors, are important regulators of cell growth. Here, we hypothesized that FOXO1 might be crucial in quercetin-induced growth inhibition in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer. Quercetin treatment suppressed cell growth by inducing G2 arrest and apoptosis in EGFR-overexpressing HSC-3 and TW206 oral cancer cells. Quercetin inhibited EGFR/Akt activation with a concomitant induction of FOXO1 activation. FOXO1 knockdown attenuated quercetin-induced p21 and FasL expression and subsequent G2 arrest and apoptosis, respectively. Likewise, quercetin suppressed tumor growth in HSC-3 xenograft mice. Taken together, our data indicate that quercetin is an effective anticancer agent and that FOXO1 is crucial in quercetin-induced growth suppression in EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 on Hep G{sub 2} cells via inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jing; Du, Yi-Fang; Xiao, Zhi-Yi; Pan, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Huan, Lin; Gong, Zhu-Nan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Wei, Shao-Hua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Huang, Shi-Qian; Xun, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Lei-Lei; Xie, Meng-Yu [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Ao, Gui-Zhen [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Soochow University, Jiangsu (China); Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Xu, Guang-Lin, E-mail: xudunlop@126.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2014-01-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the inhibitory activity test on Hep G{sub 2} growth. We found that KYKZL-1 inhibited the growth of Hep G{sub 2} cells via inducing apoptosis. Further studies showed that KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c release from mitochondria and down regulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced the high level of COX-2 and 5-LOX. As shown in its anti-inflammatory effect, KYKZL-1 also exhibited inhibitory effect on the PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} production in Hep G{sub 2} cells. Accordingly, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or LTB{sub 4} reversed the decreases in cell viability. In addition, KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the S–G{sub 2} checkpoint via the activation of p21{sup CIP1} protein and down-regulation of cyclin A expression. These data indicate that the growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 is associated with inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest. Combined with our previous findings, KYKZL-1 exhibiting COX/5-LOX inhibition may be a promising potential agent not only for inflammation control but also for cancer prevention/therapy with an enhanced gastric safety profile. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 resulted in apoptosis of Hep G{sub 2} cells. • KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c and bcl-2/bax ratio. • KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest via modulation of p21{sup CIP1} and cyclin A level.

  1. Methyl Sartortuoate Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Inducing Apoptosis and G2/M-Phase Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiusheng Lan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The potential anti-neoplastic activity of terpenoids is of continued interest. In this study, we investigate whether methyl sartortuoate, a terpenoid isolated from soft coral, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a human colon cancer cell line. Culture studies found that methyl sartortuoate inhibited colon cancer cell (LoVo and RKO growth and caused apoptotic death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, by activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, p53 and Bax, and inactivation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 apoptosis regulating proteins. Methyl sartortuoate treatment led to reduced expression of cdc2 and up-regulated p21 and p53, suggesting that Methyl sartortuoate induced G2-M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/cdc2 pathways. Methyl sartortuoate also up-regulated phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 expression levels. This resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2-M phase and apoptosis in LoVo and RKO cells. Treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented methyl sartortuoate-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. Moreover, methyl sartortuoate also prevented neoplasm growth in NOD-SCID nude mice inoculated with LoVo cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that methyl sartortuoate is capable of leading to activation of caspase-8, -9, -3, increasing p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio apoptosis through MAPK-dependent apoptosis and results in G2-M phase arrest in LoVo and RKO cells. Thus, methyl sartortuoate may be a promising anticancer candidate.

  2. Methyl Sartortuoate Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Inducing Apoptosis and G2/M-Phase Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Qiusheng; Li, Shoufeng; Lai, Wei; Xu, Heyang; Zhang, Yang; Zeng, Yujie; Lan, Wenjian; Chu, Zhonghua

    2015-08-17

    The potential anti-neoplastic activity of terpenoids is of continued interest. In this study, we investigate whether methyl sartortuoate, a terpenoid isolated from soft coral, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a human colon cancer cell line. Culture studies found that methyl sartortuoate inhibited colon cancer cell (LoVo and RKO) growth and caused apoptotic death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, by activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, p53 and Bax, and inactivation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) apoptosis regulating proteins. Methyl sartortuoate treatment led to reduced expression of cdc2 and up-regulated p21 and p53, suggesting that Methyl sartortuoate induced G2-M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/cdc2 pathways. Methyl sartortuoate also up-regulated phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 expression levels. This resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2-M phase and apoptosis in LoVo and RKO cells. Treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented methyl sartortuoate-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. Moreover, methyl sartortuoate also prevented neoplasm growth in NOD-SCID nude mice inoculated with LoVo cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that methyl sartortuoate is capable of leading to activation of caspase-8, -9, -3, increasing p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio apoptosis through MAPK-dependent apoptosis and results in G2-M phase arrest in LoVo and RKO cells. Thus, methyl sartortuoate may be a promising anticancer candidate.

  3. Serum sex hormone and growth arrest-specific protein 6 levels in male patients with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown a high prevalence of low serum testosterone levels in men with cardiovascular disease. Moreover, the tyrosine kinase receptor Axl, the ligand of which is growth arrest-specific protein 6 (GAS6, is expressed in the vasculature, and serum GAS6 levels are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular events. Testosterone regulates GAS6 gene transcription directly, which inhibits calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells and provides a mechanistic insight into the cardioprotective action of androgens. This study was designed to determine the correlation between serum GAS6 and testosterone levels in male patients with coronary heart disease (CHD. We recruited 225 patients with CHD and 102 apparently healthy controls. Serum concentrations of GAS6 and soluble Axl were quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, testosterone, estradiol, and other routine biochemical markers were also measured. Testosterone decreased from 432.69 ± 14.40 to 300.76 ± 6.23 ng dl−1 (P < 0.001 and GAS6 decreased from 16.20 ± 0.31 to 12.51 ± 0.19 ng ml−1 (P < 0.001 in patients with CHD, compared with control subjects. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that serum testosterone and GAS6 levels were positively associated in male patients with CHD. Alterations in GAS6 levels may influence the development of CHD. Downregulation of GAS6/Axl signaling in the presence of low sex hormone levels during disease progression is a potential mechanism by which GAS6 affects CHD. This study provides novel results regarding the influence of sex hormones on serum GAS6 levels in patients with CHD.

  4. Induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CD133+/CD44+ prostate cancer stem cells by flavopiridol

    Science.gov (United States)

    SONER, BURAK CEM; AKTUG, HUSEYIN; ACIKGOZ, EDA; DUZAGAC, FAHRIYE; GUVEN, UMMU; AYLA, SULE; CAL, CAG; OKTEM, GULPERI

    2014-01-01

    Flavopiridol is a flavone that inhibits several cyclin-dependent kinases and exhibits potent growth-inhibitory activity, apoptosis and G1-phase arrest in a number of human tumor cell lines. Flavopiridol is currently undergoing investigation in human clinical trials. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Therefore, cluster of differentiation 133 (CD133)+high/CD44+high prostate CSCs were isolated from the DU145 human prostate cancer cell line. The cells were treated with flavopiridol in a dose- and time-dependent manner to determine the inhibitory effect. Cell viability and proliferation were analyzed and the efficiency of flavopiridol was assessed using the sphere-forming assay. Flavopiridol was applied to monolayer cultures of CD133high/CD44high human prostate CSCs at the following final concentrations: 100, 300, 500 and 1000 nM. The cultures were incubated for 24, 48 and 72 h. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of the drug was determined as 500 nM for monolayer cells. Dead cells were analyzed prior and subsequent to exposure to increasing flavopiridol doses. Annexin-V and immunofluorescence analyses were performed for the evaluation of apoptotic pathways. According to the results, flavopiridol treatment caused significant growth inhibition at 500 and 1000 nM when compared to the control at 24 h. G0/G1 analysis showed a statistically significant difference between 100 and 500 nM (P<0.005), 100 and 1000 nM (P<0.001), 300 and 1000 nM (P<0.001), and 500 and 1000 nM (P<0.001). Flavopiridol also significantly influenced the cells in the G2/M phase, particularly at high-dose treatments. Flavopiridol induced growth inhibition and apoptosis at the IC50 dose (500 nM), resulting in a significant increase in immunofluorescence staining of caspase-3, caspase-8 and p53. In conclusion, the present results indicated that flavopiridol could be a

  5. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  6. Effects of 50 Hz pulsed electromagnetic fields on the growth and cell cycle arrest of mesenchymal stem cells: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinping; Zhang, Mingsheng; Bai, Liming; Bai, Wenfang; Xu, Weicheng; Zhu, Hongxiang

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renew and multipotent differatiation which allows them to be sensitive to microenvironment is altered. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) can affect cellular physiology of some types of cells. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of PEMF on the growth and cell cycle arrest of MSCs expanded in vitro. To achieve this, cultured of normal rat MSCs, the treatment groups were respectively irradiated by 50 Hz PEMF at 10 mT of flux densities for 3 or 6 h. The effects of PEMF on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and cell surface antigen phenotype were investigated. Our results showed that exposed MSCs had a significant proliferative capacity (P cell growth was not different (P>0.05) at an earlier phase after PEMF treatment. Exposure to PEMF had a significant increase the percentage of MSCs in G1 phase compare with the control group, with a higher percentage of cells in G1 phase exposed for 6 h then that for 3 h. At the 16th hour after treatment, PEMF had no significant effect on cell proliferation and cell cycle (P>0.05). These results suggested that PEMF enhanced MSCs proliferation with time-independent and increased the percentage of cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle in a time-dependent manner, and the effect of PEMF on the cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest of MSCs was temporal after PEMF treatment.

  7. The MicroRNA 424/503 Cluster Reduces CDC25A Expression during Cell Cycle Arrest Imposed by Transforming Growth Factor β in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Olivan, Mireia; Castro, Veronica; Saucedo-Cuevas, Laura; Marshall, Netonia; Putcha, Preeti; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bardot, Evan; Ezhkova, Elena; Iavarone, Antonio; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the microRNA 424(322)/503 [miR-424(322)/503] cluster is transcriptionally controlled by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the mammary epithelium. Induction of this microRNA cluster impacts mammary epithelium fate by regulating apoptosis and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling. Here, we expanded our finding to demonstrate that miR-424(322)/503 is an integral component of the cell cycle arrest mediated by TGF-β. Mechanistically, we showed that after TGF-β exposure, increased levels of miR-424(322)/503 reduce the expression of the cell cycle regulator CDC25A. miR-424(322)/503-dependent posttranscriptional downregulation of CDC25A cooperates with previously described transcriptional repression of the CDC25A promoter and proteasome-mediated degradation to reduce the levels of CDC25A expression and to induce cell cycle arrest. We also provide evidence that the TGF-β/miR-424(322)/503 axis is part of the mechanism that regulates the proliferation of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) mammary epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:25266660

  8. The microRNA 424/503 cluster reduces CDC25A expression during cell cycle arrest imposed by transforming growth factor β in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet-Navas, David; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Olivan, Mireia; Castro, Veronica; Saucedo-Cuevas, Laura; Marshall, Netonia; Putcha, Preeti; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bardot, Evan; Ezhkova, Elena; Iavarone, Antonio; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Silva, Jose M

    2014-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the microRNA 424(322)/503 [miR-424(322)/503] cluster is transcriptionally controlled by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the mammary epithelium. Induction of this microRNA cluster impacts mammary epithelium fate by regulating apoptosis and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling. Here, we expanded our finding to demonstrate that miR-424(322)/503 is an integral component of the cell cycle arrest mediated by TGF-β. Mechanistically, we showed that after TGF-β exposure, increased levels of miR-424(322)/503 reduce the expression of the cell cycle regulator CDC25A. miR-424(322)/503-dependent posttranscriptional downregulation of CDC25A cooperates with previously described transcriptional repression of the CDC25A promoter and proteasome-mediated degradation to reduce the levels of CDC25A expression and to induce cell cycle arrest. We also provide evidence that the TGF-β/miR-424(322)/503 axis is part of the mechanism that regulates the proliferation of hormone receptor-positive (HR(+)) mammary epithelial cells in vivo.

  9. Sequential signaling cascade of IL-6 and PGC-1α is involved in high glucose-induced podocyte loss and growth arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Il; Park, Soo Hyun, E-mail: parksh@chonnam.ac.kr

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •The pathophysiological role of IL-6 in high glucose-induced podocyte loss. •The novel role of PGC-1α in the development of diabetic nephropathy. •Signaling of IL-6 and PGC-1α in high glucose-induced dysfunction of podocyte. -- Abstract: Podocyte loss, which is mediated by podocyte apoptosis, is implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 in high glucose-induced apoptosis of rat podocytes. We also examined the pathophysiological role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in this system. High glucose treatment induced not only podocyte apoptosis but also podocyte growth arrest. High glucose treatment also increased IL-6 secretion and activated IL-6 signaling. The high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis was blocked by IL-6 neutralizing antibody. IL-6 treatment or overexpression induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest, and IL-6 siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Furthermore, high glucose or IL-6 treatment increased PGC-1α expression, and PGC-1α overexpression also induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. PGC-1α siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Collectively, these findings showed that high glucose promoted apoptosis and cell growth arrest in podocytes via IL-6 signaling. In addition, PGC-1α is involved in podocyte apoptosis and cell growth arrest. Therefore, blocking IL-6 and its downstream mediators such as IL6Rα, gp130 and PGC-1α may attenuate the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  10. HipA-triggered growth arrest and β-lactam tolerance in Escherichia coli are mediated by RelA-dependent ppGpp synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokinsky, Gregory; Baidoo, Edward E K; Akella, Swetha; Burd, Helcio; Weaver, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; García-Martín, Héctor; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-07-01

    Persistence is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of bacterial cells enters a transient growth-arrested state that confers antibiotic tolerance. While entrance into persistence has been linked to the activities of toxin proteins, the molecular mechanisms by which toxins induce growth arrest and the persistent state remain unclear. Here, we show that overexpression of the protein kinase HipA in Escherichia coli triggers growth arrest by activating synthesis of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) by the enzyme RelA, a signal typically associated with amino acid starvation. We further demonstrate that chemically suppressing ppGpp synthesis with chloramphenicol relieves inhibition of DNA replication initiation and RNA synthesis in HipA-arrested cells and restores vulnerability to β-lactam antibiotics. HipA-arrested cells maintain glucose uptake and oxygen consumption and accumulate amino acids as a consequence of translational inhibition. We harness the active metabolism of HipA-arrested cells to provide a bacteriophage-resistant platform for the production of biotechnologically relevant compounds, which may represent an innovative solution to the costly problem of phage contamination in industrial fermentations.

  11. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  12. Serum Growth Arrest Specific Protein 6 (Gas-6 Levels in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fethullah Gerin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have investigated serum growth ar­rest-specific protein 6 (GAS-6 levels from patients with schizophrenia divided into acute phase remission phases as well as control group. Methods: This study was conducted in Psychiatry De­partment of Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical Fac­ulty. The patients who were diagnosed with schizophrenia after regular psychiatric examination according to DSM-IV criteria (n=22 as well as control subjects were includ­ed in the study. Schizophrenia patients with acute phase and remission phase were evaluated by Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and Clinical global Impression Scale (CGI-S. The serum GAS-6 levels of schizophrenia patients during acute phase and remission phase were compared with the serum GAS-6 levels of healthy controls. Serum GAS-6 levels were measured by commercial ELISA kits. Results: No difference was found in serum GAS-6 levels among the three groups; schizophrenia with acute phase, schizophrenia with remission phase, and controls. There were no correlations between serum GAS-6 levels and PANSS and CGI scores. Conclusion: To reach a definitive data and better in­terpretation about the relationship between GAS-6 and schizophrenia, future studies with larger groups of pa­tients with schizophrenia subdivided by drug naïve and treated with antipsychotics/other treatment modalities and controls are needed.

  13. The Mobile bypass Signal Arrests Shoot Growth by Disrupting Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance, Cytokinin Signaling, and WUS Transcription Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Parrott, David L; Adhikari, Emma; Fraser, Nisa; Sieburth, Leslie E

    2016-07-01

    The bypass1 (bps1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produces a root-sourced compound (the bps signal) that moves to the shoot and is sufficient to arrest growth of a wild-type shoot; however, the mechanism of growth arrest is not understood. Here, we show that the earliest shoot defect arises during germination and is a failure of bps1 mutants to maintain their shoot apical meristem (SAM). This finding suggested that the bps signal might affect expression or function of SAM regulatory genes, and we found WUSCHEL (WUS) expression to be repressed in bps1 mutants. Repression appears to arise from the mobile bps signal, as the bps1 root was sufficient to rapidly down-regulate WUS expression in wild-type shoots. Normally, WUS is regulated by a balance between positive regulation by cytokinin (CK) and negative regulation by CLAVATA (CLV). In bps1, repression of WUS was independent of CLV, and, instead, the bps signal down-regulates CK responses. Cytokinin treatment of bps1 mutants restored both WUS expression and activity, but only in the rib meristem. How the bps signal down-regulates CK remains unknown, though the bps signal was sufficient to repress expression of one CK receptor (AHK4) and one response regulator (AHP6). Together, these data suggest that the bps signal pathway has the potential for long-distance regulation through modification of CK signaling and altering gene expression. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Interaction of E-cadherin and PTEN regulates morphogenesis and growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Fata, Jimmie E.; Martin, Katherine J.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    PTEN is a dual function phosphatase with tumor suppressor function compromised in a wide spectrum of cancers. Because tissue polarity and architecture are crucial modulators of normal and malignant behavior, we postulated that PTEN may play a role in maintenance of tissue integrity. We used two non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMECs) that form polarized, growth-arrested structures (acini) when cultured in 3-dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels (3D lrECM). As acini begin to form, PTEN accumulates in both the cytoplasm, and at cell-cell contacts where it colocalizes with E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex. Reduction of PTEN levels by shRNA in lrECM prevents formation of organized breast acini and disrupts growth arrest. Importantly, disruption of acinar polarity and cell-cell contact by E-cadherin function-blocking antibodies reduces endogenous PTEN protein levels and inhibits its accumulation at cell-cell contacts. Conversely, in SKBR3 breast cancer cells lacking endogenous E-cadherin expression, exogenous introduction of E-cadherin gene causes induction of PTEN expression and its accumulation at sites of cell interactions. These studies provide evidence that E-cadherin regulates both the PTEN protein levels and its recruitment to cell-cell junctions in 3D lrECM indicating a dynamic reciprocity between architectural integrity and the levels and localization of PTEN. This interaction thus appears to be a critical integrator of proliferative and morphogenetic signaling in breast epithelial cells.

  15. Analysis on environmental factors of embryo growth arrest%胚胎停止发育的环境影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨正爱; 田旭光

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨各种环境因素对胚胎发育的影响,为预防胚胎停止发育提供依据.方法:采用自行设计的问卷进行调查,分析比较188例诊断为早期胚胎停止发育患者和281例正常流产妇女的一般情况、饮食习惯、生活习惯、家庭环境、职业环境、心理健康状况和人际关系对胚胎停止发育的影响.结果:单因素分析显示,年龄、怀孕次数、情绪控制能力、精神压力、值夜班、补充叶酸、是否饮茶、是否吸烟、携带手机时间、使用微波炉或电磁炉、接触震动及接触电磁辐射是胚胎停止发育的影响因素(P<0.05);多因素分析显示,补充叶酸(OR=2.514)、是否吸烟(OR=4.254)及接触电磁辐射(OR=4.998)是主要影响因素.结论:胚胎停止发育是多种因素综合影响的结果.孕期叶酸的补充、戒烟及远离电磁辐射是重要的预防措施.%Objective; To explore the effect of various environmental factors on embryonic development, provide a basis for preventing embryo growth arrest. Methods: A self - designed questionnaire was used to survey, analyze, and compare the effects of general condition, dietary habits, living habits, family environment, occupational environment, psychological health status, and interpersonal relationship of 188 patients diagnosed as early embryo growth arrest and 281 normal women undergoing abortion on embryo growth arrest Results: Univa-riate analysis showed that age, times of pregnancy, emotional control, stress, night shift, supplementing folic acid, tea - drinking or not, smoking or not, carrying mobile phones, using a microwave oven or cooker, exposure to vibration, and exposure to electromagnetic radiation were influencing factors of embryo growth arrest ( P < 0. 05 ) ; multivariate analysis showed that supplementing folic acid ( OR= 2. 514 ) , smoking or not ( OR = 4. 254) , and exposure to electromagnetic radiation ( OR = 4. 998 ) were main influencing factors. Conclusion

  16. Chemical Control of Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

    Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

  17. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediates growth arrest or E1A-dependent apoptosis in SKBR3 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, M V

    1998-11-09

    Previously, we have shown that phorbol ester (PMA) induces p21(WAF1/CIP1)-dependent growth arrest in SKBr3 breast cancer and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Here, I demonstrate that inhibition of Raf-1 kinase by dominant-negative Raf-1 or pharmacological depletion of Raf-1 prevented PMA-mediated induction of p21(WAF1/CIP1). Similarly, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK, abolished p21(WAF1/CIP1) induction and PMA-induced growth arrest. Like PMA, the H-ras oncogene, another activator of the Raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway, transactivated p21(WAF1/CIP1) in SKBr3 cells. I further investigated PMA-induced growth arrest following infection of SKBr3 cells with 12S E1A-expressing adenovirus. Although high levels of E1A oncoprotein prevented both PMA-induced p21(WAF1/CIP1) and growth arrest, smaller amounts of E1A abrogated growth arrest without down-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1). Therefore, E1A can stimulate proliferation downstream of p21(WAF1/CIP1). Albeit less effective than full activity, either Rb- or p300-binding activity of E1A was sufficient for the abrogation of PMA-mediated growth arrest. E1A-driven proliferation of PMA-treated SKBr3 cells was accompanied by apoptosis. New therapeutic approaches can be envisioned that would utilize stimulation of the Raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway to inhibit growth of PMA-sensitive cancer cells.

  18. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting at the initiator of hTERT arrests growth of hepatoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Xia; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Cao, Ying-Lin; Ma, Chun-Hong; Han, Li-Hui; Zhang, Li-Ning; Wang, Zhen-Guang; Zhu, Fa-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibitory effect of antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide (asON) complementary to the initiator of human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) on the growth of hepatoma cells. METHODS: The as-hTERT was synthesized by using a DNA synthesizer. HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with as-hTERT at the concentration of 10 μmol/L. After 72 h, these cells were obtained for detecting growth inhibition, telomerase activity using the methods of MTT, TRAP-PCR-ELISA, respectively. BALB/c(nu/nu) mice were injected HepG2.2.15 cells and a human-nude mice model was obtained. There were three groups for anti-tumor activity study. Once tumors were established, these animals in the first group were administered as-hTERT and saline. Apoptosis of tumor cells was detected by FCM. In the 2nd group, the animals were injected HepG2.2.15 cells together with as-hTERT. In the third group, the animals were given as-hTERT 24 hours postinjection of HepG2.2.15 cells. The anti-HBV effects were assayed with ELISA in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: Growth inhibition was observed in cells treated with as-hTERT in vitro. A significant different in the value of A570 - A630 was found between cells treated with as-hTERT and control (P < 0.01) by MTT method. The telomerase activity of tumor cells treated with as-hTERT was reduced, the value of A450 nm was 0.42 compared to control (1.49) with TRAP-PCR-ELISA. The peak of apoptosis in tumor cells given as-hTERT was 21.12%, but not seen in saline-treated control. A prolonged period of carcinogenesis was observed in the second and third group animals. There was inhibitory effect on the expression of HBsAg and HBeAg in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSION: As-hTERT has an anti-tumor activity, which may be useful for gene therapy of tumors. PMID:14760759

  19. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia: 23 children followed to skeletal maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Heon; Agashe, Mandar Vikas; Huh, Young-Jae; Hwang, Soon-Young; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2012-06-01

    Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with achondroplasia. We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence-especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted.

  20. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  1. Ethyl acetate extract of Squilla oratoria suppresses growth of HepG2 cells by inducing S phase arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Qi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The oceans and seas are a rich source of organisms from which anti-cancer drugs can be isolated and developed. Marine organisms have been screened in our laboratory, and organic solvent extracts of Squilla oratoria (ESO have been shown to possess cytostatic effects on cancer cell lines of diverse origins. To explore the underlying mechanisms, the growth inhibition by ESO was investigated in the present study. Methods: Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC derived cells (HepG2 were used. The cells were challenged with ESO, cell cycle profile was assayed, and level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression and that of cyclin D1 and cyclin A were evaluated with flow cytomtery. The in vivo antitumor effect of ESO was tested in nude mouse xenografts. PCNA expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in nude mouse xenograft tissues. Results: With the increase in dose of injected ESO, expression of PCNA by human HCC xenografts increased. ESO inhibited the growth of human HCC HepG2 cells both in vitro and in vivo. The effect was correlated with arrest of the cell cycle in S phase. Expression of PCNA, which is a cell-cycle regulator that promotes S phase entry, was elevated in both cell lines and xenografts whereas that of cyclins that promote M phase entry was down-regulated by exposure to ESO. Conclusion: Growth inhibition was explained by arrest of the cell cycle in S phase and down-regulation of molecules that promote cells to enter S phase. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(4.000: 313-322

  2. δ-tocotrienol induces human bladder cancer cell growth arrest, apoptosis and chemosensitization through inhibition of STAT3 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changxiao Ye

    Full Text Available Vitamin E intake has been implicated in reduction of bladder cancer risk. However, the mechanisms remain elusive. Here we reported that δ-tocotrienol (δ-T3, one of vitamin E isomers, possessed the most potent cytotoxic capacity against human bladder cancer cells, compared with other Vitamin E isomers. δ-T3 inhibited cancer cell proliferation and colonogenicity through induction of G1 phase arrest and apoptosis. Western blotting assay revealed that δ-T3 increased the expression levels of cell cycle inhibitors (p21, p27, pro-apoptotic protein (Bax and suppressed expression levels of cell cycle protein (Cyclin D1, anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, resulting in the Caspase-3 activation and cleavage of PARP. Moreover, the δ-T3 treatment inhibited ETK phosphorylation level and induced SHP-1 expression, which was correlated with downregulation of STAT3 activation. In line with this, δ-T3 reduced the STAT3 protein level in nuclear fraction, as well as its transcription activity. Knockdown of SHP-1 partially reversed δ-T3-induced cell growth arrest. Importantly, low dose of δ-T3 sensitized Gemcitabine-induced cytotoxic effects on human bladder cancer cells. Overall, our findings demonstrated, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of δ-T3 on bladder cancer cells and suggest that δ-T3 might be a promising chemosensitization reagent for Gemcitabine in bladder cancer treatment.

  3. Betulinic Acid Inhibits Growth of Cultured Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro by Inducing G1 Arrest and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Kumar Vadivelu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Betulinic acid is a widely available plant-derived triterpene which is reported to possess selective cytotoxic activity against cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin and leukemia. However, the potential of betulinic acid as an antiproliferative and cytotoxic agent on vascular smooth muscle (VSMC is still unclear. This study was carried out to demonstrate the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid on VSMCs using 3-[4,5-dimethylthizol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, flow cytometry cell cycle assay, BrdU proliferation assay, acridine orange/propidium iodide staining, and comet assay. Result from MTT and BrdU assays indicated that betulinic acid was able to inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 of 3.8 μg/mL significantly (P<0.05. Nevertheless, betulinic acid exhibited G1 cell cycle arrest in flow cytometry cell cycle profiling and low level of DNA damage against VSMC in acridine orange/propidium iodide and comet assay after 24 h of treatment. In conclusion, betulinic acid induced G1 cell cycle arrest and dose-dependent DNA damage on VSMC.

  4. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  5. An optimization protocol for Swiss 3T3 feeder cell growth-arrest by Mitomycin C dose-to-volume derivation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Rishi Man; Chaturvedi, Madhusudan; Yerneni, Lakshmana Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Feeder cell functionality following growth-arrest with the cost-effective Mitomycin C vis-à-vis irradiation is controversial due to several methodological variables reported. Earlier, we demonstrated variability in growth arrested Swiss 3T3 feeder cell life-span following titration of feeder cell densities with Mitomycin C concentrations which led to the derivation of doses per cell. Alternatively, to counter the unexpected feeder regrowth at high exposure cell density, we proposed titration of a fixed density with arithmetically derived volumes of Mitomycin C solution that corresponded to permutations of specific concentrations and doses per cell. We now describe an experimental procedure of inducing differential feeder cell growth-arrest by titrating with such volumes and validating the best feeder batch through target cell growth assessment. A safe cell density of Swiss 3T3 tested for the exclusion of Mitomycin C resistant variants was titrated with a range of volumes of a Mitomycin C solution. The differentially growth-arrested feeder batches generated were tested for short-term and long-term viability and human epidermal keratinocyte growth supporting ability. The feeder cell extinction rate was directly proportional to the volume of Mitomycin C solution within a given concentration per se. The keratinocyte colony forming efficiency and the overall growth in mass cultures were maximal with a median extinction rate produced by an intermediate volume, while the faster and slower extinction rates by high and low volumes, respectively, were suboptimal. The described method could counter the inadequacies of growth-arrest with Mitomycin C.

  6. Differential regulation of vitamin D receptor expression in distinct leukemic cell lines upon phorbol ester-induced growth arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folgueira M.A.A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A close correlation between vitamin D receptor (VDR abundance and cell proliferation rate has been shown in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, MCF-7 breast cancer and in HL-60 myeloblastic cells. We have now determined if this association occurs in other leukemic cell lines, U937 and K562, and if VDR content is related to c-myc expression, which is also linked to cell growth state. Upon phorbol myristate acetate (PMA treatment, cells from the three lineages (HL-60, U937 and K562 differentiated and expressed specific surface antigens. All cell lines analyzed were growth inhibited by PMA and the doubling time was increased, mainly due to an increased fraction of cells in the G0/G1 phase, as determined by flow cytometry measurements of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine and cell DNA content. C-myc mRNA expression was down-regulated and closely correlated to cell growth arrest. However, VDR expression in leukemic cell lines, as determined by immunofluorescence and Northern blot assays, was not consistently changed upon inhibition of cell proliferation since VDR levels were down-regulated only in HL-60 cells. Our data suggest that VDR expression cannot be explained simply as a reflection of the leukemic cell growth state.

  7. Peptide nucleic acids arrest the growth of gastric cancer cells SGC7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宽; 张岂凡; 王锡山; 薛英威; 庞达; 傅松滨

    2004-01-01

    Background Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has many characteristics useful in molecular biology. This paper described an effective way to raise the cell ingestion rate of PNA so as to kill gastric cancer cells.Methods Heteroduplexes of PNAs and oligonucleotides, wrapped by Lipofectamine 2000, were used to infect SGC7901 cells. The inhibitive effect of heteroduplexes was evaluated by analyzing cell clone forming and cell growth rate. Telomerase activity of SGC7901 cells was detected by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) and silver staining assay.Results PNAs showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The percentage of proliferation inhibition was 99.4% after 7 days; the rate of cloning inhibition was 98.2% after 8 days;whereas for oligonucleotide groups, at the same concentration, the percentages were 50. 1% and 67. 5% respectively. Antisense PNA-DNA-Lipofectamine 2000 group (AP-D-L group) exhibited significantly different percentages from the control groups (P<0.05). The test result indicated that telomerase activity of the AP-D-L group was inhibited (P<0.05). At the same time, the impact on cell morphology was observed.Conclusions The results showed that PNAs are potent antisense reagents. The telomeraseassociated therapies are very promising for the treatment of malignant tumours.

  8. NBM-T-BBX-OS01, Semisynthesized from Osthole, Induced G1 Growth Arrest through HDAC6 Inhibition in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Tung Pai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Disrupting lung tumor growth via histone deacetylases (HDACs inhibition is a strategy for cancer therapy or prevention. Targeting HDAC6 may disturb the maturation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 mediated cell cycle regulation. In this study, we demonstrated the effects of semisynthesized NBM-T-BBX-OS01 (TBBX from osthole on HDAC6-mediated growth arrest in lung cancer cells. The results exhibited that the anti-proliferative activity of TBBX in numerous lung cancer cells was more potent than suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, a clinically approved pan-HDAC inhibitor, and the growth inhibitory effect has been mediated through G1 growth arrest. Furthermore, the protein levels of cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4 were reduced while cyclin E and CDK inhibitor, p21Waf1/Cip1, were up-regulated in TBBX-treated H1299 cells. The results also displayed that TBBX inhibited HDAC6 activity via down-regulation HDAC6 protein expression. TBBX induced Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and led to the disruption of cyclin D1/Hsp90 and CDK4/Hsp90 association following the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 proteins through proteasome. Ectopic expression of HDAC6 rescued TBBX-induced G1 arrest in H1299 cells. Conclusively, the data suggested that TBBX induced G1 growth arrest may mediate HDAC6-caused Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and consequently increased the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4.

  9. Plant flavone apigenin inhibits HDAC and remodels chromatin to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Mitali; Kaur, Parminder; Shukla, Sanjeev; Abbas, Ata; Fu, Pingfu; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-12-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7,-trihydroxyflavone), an anticancer agent, selectively toxic to cancer cells induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Our studies indicate that apigenin-mediated growth inhibitory responses are due to inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) in prostate cancer cells. Treatment of PC-3 and 22Rv1 cells with apigenin (20-40 µM) resulted in the inhibition of HDAC enzyme activity, specifically HDAC1 and HDAC3 at the protein and message level. Apigenin-mediated HDAC inhibition resulted in global histone H3 and H4 acetylation, as well as localized hyperacetylation of histone H3 on the p21/waf1 promoter. A corresponding increase was observed in p21/waf1 and bax protein and mRNA expression after apigenin exposure, consistent with the use of HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A. The downstream events demonstrated cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in both cancer cells. Studies of PC-3 xenografts in athymic nude mice further demonstrated that oral intake of apigenin at doses of 20 and 50 µg/mouse/d over an 8-wk period resulted in a marked reduction in tumor growth, HDAC activity, and HDAC1 and HDAC3 protein expression at both doses of apigenin. An increase in p21/waf1 expression was observed in apigenin-fed mice, compared to the control group. Furthermore, apigenin intake caused a significant decrease in bcl2 expression with concomitant increase in bax, shifting the bax/bcl2 ratio in favor of apoptosis. Our findings confirm for the first time that apigenin inhibits class I HDACs, particularly HDAC1 and HDAC3 and its exposure results in reversal of aberrant epigenetic events that promote malignancy. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest.

  11. Involvement of MINK, a Ste20 Family Kinase, in Ras Oncogene-Induced Growth Arrest in Human Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicke, B.; Bastien, J.; Khanna, S.J.; Warne, P.H.; Cowling, V.; Cook, S.J.; Peters, G.; Delpuech, O.; Schulze, A.; Berns, K.; Mullenders, J.; Beijersbergen, R.L.; Bernards, R.A.; Ganesan, T.S.; Downward, J.; Hancock, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of activated Ras to induce growth arrest of human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells via induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 has been used to screen for Ras pathway signaling components using a library of RNA interference (RNAi) vectors targeting the kino

  12. B cell receptor-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in WEHI-231 immature B lymphoma cells involve cyclic AMP and Epac proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandoch, Maria; de Jesus, Maider Lopez; Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; Weber, Artur-Aron; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Signaling by the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is essential for B lymphocyte homeostasis and immune function. In immature B cells, ligation of the BCR promotes growth arrest and apoptosis, and BCR-driven balancing between pro-apoptotic extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and antia

  13. Novel protein kinase D inhibitors cause potent arrest in prostate cancer cell growth and motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazo John S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinase D (PKD has been implicated in a wide range of cellular processes and pathological conditions including cancer. However, targeting PKD therapeutically and dissecting PKD-mediated cellular responses remains difficult due to lack of a potent and selective inhibitor. Previously, we identified a novel pan-PKD inhibitor, CID755673, with potency in the upper nanomolar range and high selectivity for PKD. In an effort to further enhance its selectivity and potency for potential in vivo application, small molecule analogs of CID755673 were generated by modifying both the core structure and side-chains. Results After initial activity screening, five analogs with equal or greater potencies as CID755673 were chosen for further analysis: kb-NB142-70, kb-NB165-09, kb-NB165-31, kb-NB165-92, and kb-NB184-02. Our data showed that modifications to the aromatic core structure in particular significantly increased potency while retaining high specificity for PKD. When tested in prostate cancer cells, all compounds inhibited PMA-induced autophosphorylation of PKD1, with kb-NB142-70 being most active. Importantly, these analogs caused a dramatic arrest in cell proliferation accompanying elevated cytotoxicity when applied to prostate cancer cells. Cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by these analogs with varying potencies that correlated to their cellular activity. Conclusions Throughout the battery of experiments, the compounds kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 emerged as the most potent and specific analogs in vitro and in cells. These compounds are undergoing further testing for their effectiveness as pharmacological tools for dissecting PKD function and as potential anti-cancer agents in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  14. Cell Growth Arrest Mediated by STAT Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    pepstatin, and aprotinin (1 (Xg/ml each). Whole cell extracts were immediately subjected to electromobility shift assay. Preparation of membrane and...activation on the cytosol fraction (STAT protein) concentration. Electromobility shift assay (EMSA) The sample after in vitro activation (3 ul) (1 [il...transcription; EGF, epidermal growth factor; NGF, nerve growth factor; EMSA, electromobility shift assay; SIF, sis-inducible factor; SIE, sis

  15. Metformin Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Cycle Arrest by Upregulating MicroRNA34a in Renal Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Halei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Le; Yang, Fan; Tang, Dahai; Zhang, Kebin

    2017-01-01

    Background Metformin is a widely used biguanide drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been revaluated as a potential anti-cancer drug with promising activity in various tumors. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the suppression of cancer cells by metformin remain not well understood. Material/Methods In this study, human renal cell carcinoma cell line ACHN was used to investigate the anti-proliferation effect of metformin. A cell counting kit-8 assay was used to detect the cell viability. The cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of cyclin D1 and p27KIP1 was detected by Western blot. The underlying mechanism involving miRNA34a was further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and transfection with miRNA inhibitor specific for miRNA34a in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. Results Metformin could significantly inhibit the proliferation of ACHN cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the results showed that metformin induced G0/G1 phase arrest and delayed entry into S phase in ACHN cells. It was shown that metformin downregulates the expression of cyclin D1 and increases the p27KIP1 level. Furthermore, metformin increased ACHN cell death. Lastly, miRNA34a was found to be upregulated by metformin in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that inhibition of miRNA34a could partially attenuate the suppressive effect of metformin on renal cancer cell proliferation. Conclusions The study data revealed that metformin induced cell growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest partially by upregulating miRNA34a in renal cancer cells. PMID:28045889

  16. Growth arrest and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells induced by hexamethylene bisacetamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Gao-Liang; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Liu, Min; Chen, Rui-Chuan; Huang, Zhi; Jiang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Fu; Hong, Shui-Gen; Bao, Shi-Deng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cellular effects of hybrid polar compound hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) on the growth and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and to provide the molecular mechanism for potential application of HMBA in the treatment of liver cancer. METHODS: Effects of HMBA on the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells were assayed by MTT chronometry. Apoptosis induced by HMBA was detected by phase-contrast microscopy, flow cytometry, propidium iodide staining and immunocytochemical analysis. RESULTS: The growth of SMMC-7721 cells was significantly inhibited by HMBA, and the growth inhibitory rate was 51.1%, 62.6%, 68.7% and 73.9% respectively after treatment with 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 mmol/L of HMBA. In the cells treated with 10 mmol/L of HMBA for 72 h, the population of cells at sub-G1 phase significantly increased, and the apoptotic bodies and condensed nuclei were detected. Moreover, treatment of SMMC-7721 cells with 10 mmol/L of HMBA down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic protein, while slightly up-regulated the level of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. CONCLUSION: Treatment with 10.0 mmol/L of HMBA can significantly inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells by decreasing the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax. PMID:15052673

  17. Arrest of myelination and reduced axon growth when Schwann cells lack mTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Diane L; Krols, Michiel; Wu, Lai-Man N; Grove, Matthew; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Brophy, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    In developing peripheral nerves, differentiating Schwann cells sort individual axons from bundles and ensheath them to generate multiple layers of myelin. In recent years, there has been an increased understanding of the extracellular and intracellular factors that initiate and stimulate Schwann cell myelination, together with a growing appreciation of some of the signaling pathways involved. However, our knowledge of how Schwann cell growth is regulated during myelination is still incomplete. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a core kinase in two major complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate cell growth and differentiation in a variety of mammalian cells. Here we show that elimination of mTOR from murine Schwann cells prevented neither radial sorting nor the initiation of myelination. However, normal postnatal growth of myelinating Schwann cells, both radially and longitudinally, was highly retarded. The myelin sheath in the mutant was much thinner than normal; nevertheless, sheath thickness relative to axon diameter (g-ratio) remained constant in both wild-type and mutant nerves from P14 to P90. Although axon diameters were normal in the mutant at the initiation of myelination, further growth as myelination proceeded was retarded, and this was associated with reduced phosphorylation of neurofilaments. Consistent with thinner axonal diameters and internodal lengths, conduction velocities in mutant quadriceps nerves were also reduced. These data establish a critical role for mTOR signaling in both the longitudinal and radial growth of the myelinating Schwann cell.

  18. Growth arrest and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells induced by hexamethylene bisacetamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-Liang Ouyang; Qiu-Feng Cai; Min Liu; Rui-Chuan Chen; Zhi Huang; Rui-Sheng Jiang; Fu Chen; Shui-Gen Hong; Shi-Deng Bao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cellular effects of hybrid polar compound hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) on the growth and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and to provide the molecular mechanism for potential application of HMBA in the treatment of liver cancer.METHODS: Effects of HMBA on the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells were assayed by MTT chronometry. Apoptosis induced by HMBA was detected by phase-contrast microscopy, flow cytometry,propidium iodide staining and immunocytochemical analysis.RESULTS: The growth of SMMC-7721 cells was significantly inhibited by HMBA, and the growth inhibitory rate was 51.1%, 62.6%, 68.7% and 73.9% respectively after treatment with 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 mmol/L of HMBA.In the cells treated with 10 mmol/L of HMBA for 72 h, the population of cells at sub-G1 phase significantly increased,and the apoptotic bodies and condensed nuclei were detected. Moreover, treatment of SMMC-7721 cells with 10 mmol/L of HMBA down-regulated the expression of Bcl2 anti-apoptotic protein, while slightly up-regulated the level of pro-apoptotic protein Bax.CONCLUSION: Treatment with 10.0 mmol/L of HMBA can significantly inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells by decreasing the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax.

  19. H4 histamine receptors mediate cell cycle arrest in growth factor-induced murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-France Petit-Bertron

    Full Text Available The most recently characterized H4 histamine receptor (H4R is expressed preferentially in the bone marrow, raising the question of its role during hematopoiesis. Here we show that both murine and human progenitor cell populations express this receptor subtype on transcriptional and protein levels and respond to its agonists by reduced growth factor-induced cell cycle progression that leads to decreased myeloid, erythroid and lymphoid colony formation. H4R activation prevents the induction of cell cycle genes through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway that is not associated with apoptosis. It is mediated specifically through H4R signaling since gene silencing or treatment with selective antagonists restores normal cell cycle progression. The arrest of growth factor-induced G1/S transition protects murine and human progenitor cells from the toxicity of the cell cycle-dependent anticancer drug Ara-C in vitro and reduces aplasia in a murine model of chemotherapy. This first evidence for functional H4R expression in hematopoietic progenitors opens new therapeutic perspectives for alleviating hematotoxic side effects of antineoplastic drugs.

  20. Metformin inhibits salivary adenocarcinoma growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of metformin have been observed in many types of cancer. However, its effect on human salivary gland carcinoma is unknown. The effect of metformin alone or in combination with pp242 (an mTOR inhibitor) on salivary adenocarcinoma cells growth were determined in vitro and in vivo. We found that metformin suppressed HSY cell growth in vitro in a time and dose dependent manner associated with a reduced expression of MYC onco-protein, and the same inhibitory effect of metfor...

  1. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  2. Live-Cell Imaging Visualizes Frequent Mitotic Skipping During Senescence-Like Growth Arrest in Mammary Carcinoma Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi, E-mail: msuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan); Yamauchi, Motohiro; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi [Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Senescence-like growth arrest in human solid carcinomas is now recognized as the major outcome of radiotherapy. This study was designed to analyze cell cycle during the process of senescence-like growth arrest in mammary carcinoma cells exposed to X-rays. Methods and Materials: Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators were introduced into the human mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Cell cycle was sequentially monitored by live-cell imaging for up to 5 days after exposure to 10 Gy of X-rays. Results: Live-cell imaging revealed that cell cycle transition from G2 to G1 phase without mitosis, so-called mitotic skipping, was observed in 17.1% and 69.8% of G1- and G2-irradiated cells, respectively. Entry to G1 phase was confirmed by the nuclear accumulation of mKO{sub 2}-hCdt1 as well as cyclin E, which was inversely correlated to the accumulation of G2-specific markers such as mAG-hGeminin and CENP-F. More than 90% of cells skipping mitosis were persistently arrested in G1 phase and showed positive staining for the senescent biochemical marker, which is senescence-associated ss-galactosidase, indicating induction of senescence-like growth arrest accompanied by mitotic skipping. While G2 irradiation with higher doses of X-rays induced mitotic skipping in approximately 80% of cells, transduction of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for p53 significantly suppressed mitotic skipping, suggesting that ionizing radiation-induced mitotic skipping is associated with p53 function. Conclusions: The present study found the pathway of senescence-like growth arrest in G1 phase without mitotic entry following G2-irradiation.

  3. Arrest of Myelination and Reduced Axon Growth when Schwann Cells Lack mTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Diane L; Krols, Michiel; Wu, Lai-Man N; Grove, Matthew; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Brophy, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    In developing peripheral nerves differentiating Schwann cells sort individual axons from bundles and ensheath them to generate multiple layers of myelin. In recent years there has been an increasing understanding of the extracellular and intracellular factors that initiate and stimulate Schwann cell myelination together with a growing appreciation of some of the signalling pathways involved. However, our knowledge of how Schwann cell growth is regulated during myelination is still incomplete....

  4. Acetate supplementation as a means of inducing glioblastoma stem-like cell growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Patrick M; Tighe, Scott W; Driscoll, Heather E; Fortner, Karen A; Viapiano, Mariano S; Jaworski, Diane M

    2015-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common primary adult malignant brain tumor, is associated with a poor prognosis due, in part, to tumor recurrence mediated by chemotherapy and radiation resistant glioma stem-like cells (GSCs). The metabolic and epigenetic state of GSCs differs from their non-GSC counterparts, with GSCs exhibiting greater glycolytic metabolism and global hypoacetylation. However, little attention has been focused on the potential use of acetate supplementation as a therapeutic approach. N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of brain acetate, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis, are significantly reduced in GBM tumors. We recently demonstrated that NAA supplementation is not an appropriate therapeutic approach since it increases GSC proliferation and pursued an alternative acetate source. The FDA approved food additive Triacetin (glyceryl triacetate, GTA) has been safely used for acetate supplementation therapy in Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation. This study characterized the effects of GTA on the proliferation and differentiation of six primary GBM-derived GSCs relative to established U87 and U251 GBM cell lines, normal human cerebral cortical astrocytes, and murine neural stem cells. GTA reduced proliferation of GSCs greater than established GBM lines. Moreover, GTA reduced growth of the more aggressive mesenchymal GSCs greater than proneural GSCs. Although sodium acetate induced a dose-dependent reduction of GSC growth, it also reduced cell viability. GTA-mediated growth inhibition was not associated with differentiation, but increased protein acetylation. These data suggest that GTA-mediated acetate supplementation is a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit GSC growth.

  5. Interleukin-1beta can mediate growth arrest and differentiation via the leukemia inhibitory factor/JAK/STAT pathway in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2005-02-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a pleiotropic cytokine that can induce several cellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we show that IL-1beta can induce cell cycle arrest and differentiation in the human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, TT. IL-1beta induces cell cycle arrest accompanied by morphological changes and expression of the neuroendocrine marker calcitonin. These changes are blocked by the MEK1/2 specific inhibitor U0126, indicating that MEK1/2 is essential for IL-1beta signaling in TT cells. IL-1beta induces expression of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and activation of STAT3 via the MEK/ERK pathway. This activation of STAT3 could be abrogated by treatment with anti-LIF neutralizing antibody or anti-gp130 blocking antibody, indicating that induction of LIF expression is sufficient and essential for STAT3 activation by IL-1beta. In addition to activation of the LIF/JAK/STAT pathway, IL-1beta also induced an MEK/ERK-mediated intracellular cell-autonomous signaling pathway that is independently sufficient for growth arrest and differentiation. Thus, IL-1beta activates the MEK/ERK pathway to induce growth arrest and differentiation in MTC cells via dual independent signaling mechanisms, the cell-extrinsic LIF/JAK/STAT pathway, and the cell-intrinsic autonomous signaling pathway.

  6. Inhibitor of growth 4 suppresses colorectal cancer growth and invasion by inducing G1 arrest, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hui; Yin, Hong; Yan, Su; Tao, Min; Xie, Yufeng; Chen, Weichang

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found that inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), a tumor suppressor, is reduced in human colorectal cancer (CRC), and is inversely correlated with clinical Dukes' stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis and microvessel density (MVD). However, its underlying mechanism remains undetermined. In the present study, we analyzed ING4 expression in a panel of human CRC cells using low (LS174T and SW480) and high (LoVo and SW620) metastatic cell lines. We demonstrated that both the low and high metastatic CRC cells exhibited a lower level of ING4 compared to the level in normal human colorectal mucous epithelial FHC cells. Furthermore, ING4 expression in high metastatic CRC cells was less than that in low metastatic CRC cells. We then generated a lentivirus construct expressing ING4 and green fluorescent protein (GFP), established a ING4-stably transgenic LoVo CRC cell line, and investigated the effect of lentiviral-mediated ING4 expression on high metastatic LoVo CRC cells. Gain-of-function studies revealed that ING4 significantly inhibited LoVo CRC cell growth and invasion in vitro and induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest. Moreover, ING4 obviously suppressed LoVo CRC subcutaneously xenografted tumor growth and reduced tumor MVD in vivo in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, ING4 markedly upregulated P21 and E-cadherin but downregulated cyclin E, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Snail1, N-cadherin and vimentin in the LoVo CRC cells. Our data provide compelling evidence that i) ING4 suppresses CRC growth possibly via induction of G1 phase arrest through upregulation of P21 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor and downregulation of cyclin E as well as inhibition of tumor angiogenesis through reduction of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF proangiogenic factors; ii) ING4 inhibits CRC invasion and metastasis probably via a switch from mesenchymal marker N-cadherin to epithelial marker E-cadherin through downregulation of

  7. Linear Growth Arrest Without Weight Gain Due to Overuse of Topical Clobetasol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razavi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged potent topical glucocorticoid therapy in infants can cause iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. This case highlights the rarity of poor weight gain in iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. A 17-month-old boy was referred to outpatients pediatric endocrine clinic for evaluation of growth failure. On presentation his weight was 9.7kg (5th percentile and height was 72cm (-3.6 SD below mean for age and sex. Systemic examination revealed grossly moon-like face, hypertrichosis and thin skin in the genital area. His mother reported using local clobetasol for the previous seven months for his diaper dermatitis. Baseline plasma cortisol was low (0.3ng/ml, normal range: 60 to 280ng/ml. During standard dose of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone test, the peak cortisol level was 0.4ng/ml (N>180ng/ml and was consistent with hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis suppression. The patient’s clinical presentation and laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis of secondary adrenal insufficiency and iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. He was treated successfully by discontinuing use of clobetasol. His appearance and growth returned to normal within two months. Morning cortisol was 101.2ng/ml after stopping the oral physiologic dose of hydrocortisone. Our case differed from other reports of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome by presenting in poor weight gain rather than obesity.

  8. Growth arrest of vascular smooth muscle cells in suspension culture using low-acyl gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Tomomi; Fujiyoshi, Masachika; Uchida, Masashi; Abe, Natsuki; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishii, Itsuko

    2017-03-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) causes restenosis in biomaterial vascular grafts. The purposes of this study were to establish a suspension culture system for SMCs by using a novel substrate, low-acyl gellan gum (GG) and to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition. When SMCs were cultured in suspension with GG, their proliferation was inhibited. Their viability was 70% at day 2, which was maintained at more than 50% until day 5. In contrast, the viability of cells cultured in suspension without GG was 5.6% at day 2. By cell cycle analysis, the ratio of SMCs in the S phase when cultured in suspension with GG was lower than when cultured on plastic plates. In SMCs cultured in suspension with GG, the ratio of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein to Rb protein was decreased and p27(Kip1) expression was unchanged in comparison with SMCs cultured on plastic plates. In addition, SMCs could be induced to proliferate again by changing the culture condition from suspension with GG to plastic plates. These results suggest that our established culturing method for SMCs is useful to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition with high viability.

  9. Role of micronised progesterone in maintenance therapy following arrested preterm labor: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitika Shankar Mishra

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that, maintenance tocolytic therapy with micronised progesterone (400 mg up-to 37 weeks of gestation in patients with arrested preterm labor significantly prolongs the latency period and results in better perinatal outcome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1050-1055

  10. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-01

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest. PMID:28108436

  11. Control Inflation while Maintain Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Junsheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dragged by the U.S.subprime crisis and the soaring oil price, the global economy is slowing down,causing problems to China, the country which has continuously achieved miraculous economic growth.Apart from the accumulation of high inflation and risks of overheated economy, China is attacked by serious natural disasters ever since the beginning of 2008,including the snow disaster, the earthquake and the flood.It is obviously that China's priority now is to bring inflation under control so as to maintain the stable growth of economy.

  12. Growth arrest of BCR-ABL positive cells with a sequence-specific polyamide-chlorambucil conjugate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C James Chou

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is characterized by the presence of a constitutively active Abl kinase, which is the product of a chimeric BCR-ABL gene, caused by the genetic translocation known as the Philadelphia chromosome. Imatinib, a selective inhibitor of the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with CML. However, subsets of patients lose their response to treatment through the emergence of imatinib-resistant cells, and imatinib treatment is less durable for patients with late stage CML. Although alternative Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome drug resistance, a cocktail therapy of different kinase inhibitors and additional chemotherapeutics may be needed for complete remission of CML in some cases. Chlorambucil has been used for treatment of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's disease. Here we report that a DNA sequence-specific pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugate, 1R-Chl, causes growth arrest of cells harboring both unmutated BCR-ABL and three imatinib resistant strains. 1R-Chl also displays selective toxicities against activated lymphocytes and a high dose tolerance in a murine model.

  13. Growth Arrest of BCR-ABL Positive Cells with a Sequence-Specific Polyamide-Chlorambucil Conjugate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C. James; O'Hare, Thomas; Lefebvre, Sophie; Alvarez, David; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Eide, Christopher A.; Druker, Brian J.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the presence of a constitutively active Abl kinase, which is the product of a chimeric BCR-ABL gene, caused by the genetic translocation known as the Philadelphia chromosome. Imatinib, a selective inhibitor of the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with CML. However, subsets of patients lose their response to treatment through the emergence of imatinib-resistant cells, and imatinib treatment is less durable for patients with late stage CML. Although alternative Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome drug resistance, a cocktail therapy of different kinase inhibitors and additional chemotherapeutics may be needed for complete remission of CML in some cases. Chlorambucil has been used for treatment of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's disease. Here we report that a DNA sequence-specific pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugate, 1R-Chl, causes growth arrest of cells harboring both unmutated BCR-ABL and three imatinib resistant strains. 1R-Chl also displays selective toxicities against activated lymphocytes and a high dose tolerance in a murine model. PMID:18974832

  14. Silica Nanoparticles Sensitize Human Multiple Myeloma Cells to Snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom-Induced Apoptosis and Growth Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaa Sayed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple myeloma (MM, an almost incurable disease, is the second most common blood cancer. Initial chemotherapeutic treatment could be successful; however, resistance development urges the use of higher toxic doses accompanied by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The establishment of more effective treatments that can overcome or circumvent chemoresistance has become a priority. We recently demonstrated that venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV either alone or in combination with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NPs mediated the growth arrest and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of WEV alone and WEV+NP on proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells. Methods. The impacts of WEV alone and WEV+NP were monitored in MM cells from 70 diagnosed patients. The influences of WEV and WEV+NP were assessed with flow cytometry analysis. Results. WEV alone and WEV+NP decreased the viability of MM cells. Using a CFSE proliferation assay, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited MM cell proliferation. Furthermore, analysis of the cell cycle using the propidium iodide (PI staining method indicated that WEV+NP strongly altered the cell cycle of MM cells and enhanced the induction of apoptosis. Conclusions. Our data reveal the biological effects of WEV and WEV+NP on MM cells that enable these compounds to function as effective treatments for MM.

  15. Gallotannin imposes S phase arrest in breast cancer cells and suppresses the growth of triple-negative tumors in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiejun Zhao

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancers are associated with poor clinical outcomes and new therapeutic strategies are clearly needed. Gallotannin (Gltn has been previously demonstrated to have potent anti-tumor properties against cholangiocarcinoma in mice, but little is known regarding its capacity to suppress tumor outgrowth in breast cancer models. We tested Gltn for potential growth inhibitory properties against a variety of breast cancer cell lines in vitro. In particular, triple-negative breast cancer cells display higher levels of sensitivity to Gltn. The loss of proliferative capacity in Gltn exposed cells is associated with slowed cell cycle progression and S phase arrest, dependent on Chk2 phosphorylation and further characterized by changes to proliferation related genes, such as cyclin D1 (CcnD1 as determined by Nanostring technology. Importantly, Gltn administered orally or via intraperitoneal (IP injections greatly reduced tumor outgrowth of triple-negative breast cells from mammary fat pads without signs of toxicity. In conclusion, these data strongly suggest that Gltn represents a novel approach to treat triple-negative breast carcinomas.

  16. Overexpression of the promyelocytic leukemia gene suppresses growth of human bladder cancer cells by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Dalin 贺大林; NAN Xunyi 南勋义; Chang Kun-Song; WANG Yafeng 王亚峰; Chung Leland W.K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To examine the anti-oncogenic effects of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) on bladder cancer and to explore its molecular mechanisms of growth suppression.Methods Wild-type PML was transfected into bladder cancer cells (5637 cell) and expressed in a replication-deficient adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system and introduced into human bladder cancer cells (5637 cell) in vitro and in vivo. The effect and mechanisms of the PML gene in cell growth, clonogenicity, and tumorigenicity of bladder cancer cells were studied using in vitro and in vivo growth assays, soft agar colony-forming assay, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis assay and in vivo tumorigenicity assay.Results Overexpression of PML in 5637 cells significantly reduced their growth rate and clonogenicity on soft agar. PML suppressed bladder cancer cell growth by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated PML (Ad-PML) significantly suppressed the tumorigenicity and growth of bladder cancer cells. Intratumoral injection of Ad-PML into tumors induced by 5637 cells dramatically suppressed their growth. Conclusions The results indicated that overexpression of PML protein may promote efficient growth inhibition of human bladder cancer cells by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and adenovirus-mediated PML (Ad-PML) expression efficiently suppresses human bladder cancer growth.

  17. Aureobasidin A arrests growth of yeast cells through both ceramide intoxication and deprivation of essential inositolphosphorylceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerantola, Vanessa; Guillas, Isabelle; Roubaty, Carole

    2009-01-01

    , 2Delta.YDC1 cells stop growing when exposed to Aureobasidin A (AbA), an inhibitor of the inositolphosphorylceramide synthase AUR1, yet their ceramide levels remain very low. This finding argues against a current hypothesis saying that yeast cells do not require inositolphosphorylceramides and die...... in the presence of AbA only because ceramides build up to toxic concentrations. Moreover, W303lag1Delta lac1Delta ypc1Delta ydc1Delta cells, reported to be AbA resistant, stop growing on AbA after a certain number of cell divisions, most likely because AbA blocks the biosynthesis of anomalous...... inositolphosphorylsphingosides. Thus, data argue that inositolphosphorylceramides of yeast, the equivalent of mammalian sphingomyelins, are essential for growth. Data also clearly confirm that wild-type strains, when exposed to AbA, immediately stop growing because of ceramide intoxication, long before...

  18. Growth Arrest Line Mimicking Lymphoma Involvement: The Findings of (99m)Tc-MDP Bone SPECT/CT and Serial Bone Scan in a Child with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chanwoo; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Yun Young; Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Young-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Growth arrest lines appear as dense sclerotic lines parallel to the growth plate of long bones on radiography. We describe the case of a 9-year-old female with growth arrest lines initially masquerading as lymphoma involvement on (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy who had been treated with chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma about 3 years previously. Subsequent regional bone SPECT/CT clearly diagnosed the growth arrest lines, and retrograde review of previous bone scintigraphy demonstrated line migration in this patient. Growth arrest lines should be considered a possible diagnosis on bone scintigraphy, especially in the surveillance of children who have experienced severe childhood infections, malnutrition, immobilization, or treatment with immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic drugs that may inhibit bone growth.

  19. Growth arrest line mimicking lymphoma involvement: The findings of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone SPECT/CT and serial bone scan in a child with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Yun Young; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Young Ho [Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Growth arrest lines appear as dense sclerotic lines parallel to the growth plate of long bones on radiography. We describe the case of a 9-year-old female with growth arrest lines initially masquerading as lymphoma involvement on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy who had been treated with chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma about 3 years previously. Subsequent regional bone SPECT/CT clearly diagnosed the growth arrest lines, and retrograde review of previous bone scintigraphy demonstrated line migration in this patient. Growth arrest lines should be considered a possible diagnosis on bone scintigraphy, especially in the surveillance of children who have experienced severe childhood infections, malnutrition, immobilization, or treatment with immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic drugs that may inhibit bone growth.

  20. Growth arrest of lung carcinoma cells (A549) by polyacrylate-anchored peroxovanadate by activating Rac1-NADPH oxidase signalling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirupama; Anwar, Tarique; Islam, Nashreen S; Ramasarma, T; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is often required in sublethal, millimolar concentrations to show its oxidant effects on cells in culture as it is easily destroyed by cellular catalase. Previously, we had shown that diperoxovanadate, a physiologically stable peroxovanadium compound, can substitute H2O2 effectively in peroxidation reactions. We report here that peroxovanadate when anchored to polyacrylic acid (PAPV) becomes a highly potent inhibitor of growth of lung carcinoma cells (A549). The early events associated with PAPV treatment included cytoskeletal modifications, increase in GTPase activity of Rac1, accumulation of the reactive oxygen species, and also increase in phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA damage. These effects persisted even at 24 h after removal of the compound and culminated in increased levels of p53 and p21 together with growth arrest. The PAPV-mediated growth arrest was significantly abrogated in cells pre-treated with the N-acetylcysteine, Rac1 knocked down by siRNA and DPI an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. In conclusion, our results show that polyacrylate derivative of peroxovanadate efficiently arrests growth of A549 cancerous cells by activating the axis of Rac1-NADPH oxidase leading to oxidative stress and DNA damage.

  1. Arecoline-induced growth arrest and p21WAF1 expression are dependent on p53 in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Wen; Guh, Jinn-Yuh; Tsai, Jung-Fa; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Chen, Hung-Chun; Huang, Jau-Shyang; Yang, Yu-Lin; Hung, Wen-Chun; Chuang, Lea-Yea

    2008-01-14

    Betel-quid use is associated with the risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and arecoline, the major alkaloid of betel-quid, is hepatotoxic in mice. Therefore, we studied the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of arecoline in normal rat hepatocytes (Clone-9 cells). Arecoline dose-dependently (0.1-1mM) decreased cell cycle-dependent proliferation while inducing DNA damage at 24h. Moreover, arecoline (1mM)-induced apoptosis and necrosis at 24h. Arecoline dose-dependently (0.1-0.5mM) increased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) mRNA, gene transcription and bioactivity and neutralizing TGF-beta antibody attenuated arecoline (0.5mM)-inhibited cell proliferation at 24h. Arecoline (0.5mM) also increased p21(WAF1) protein expression and p21(WAF1) gene transcription. Moreover, arecoline (0.5mM) time-dependently (8-24h) increased p53 serine 15 phosphorylation. Pifithrin-alpha (p53 inhibitor) and the loss of the two p53-binding elements in the p21(WAF1) gene promoter attenuated arecoline-induced p21(WAF1) gene transcription at 24h. Pifithrin-alpha also attenuated arecoline (0.5mM)-inhibited cell proliferation at 24h. We concluded that arecoline induces cytotoxicity, DNA damage, G(0)/G(1) cell cycle arrest, TGF-beta1, p21(WAF1) and activates p53 in Clone-9 cells. Moreover, arecoline-induced p21(WAF1) is dependent on p53 while arecoline-inhibited growth is dependent on both TGF-beta and p53.

  2. Growth arrest and rapid capture of select pathogens following magnetic nanoparticle treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Swiecicka, Izabela; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Markiewicz, Karolina H; Surel, Urszula; Kułakowska, Alina; Namiot, Zbigniew; Szynaka, Beata; Bucki, Robert; Car, Halina

    2015-07-01

    Thorough understanding of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) properties is essential for developing new theranostics. In this study, we provide evidence that non-modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their functionalized derivatives may be used to restrict growth and capture different pathogens. Coprecipitation of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions in an alkaline solution was used to synthesize MNPs that subsequently were functionalized by gold and aminosilane coating. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to assess their physicochemical properties. A significant decrease of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans outgrown from medium after addition of MNPs or their derivatives was observed during 24h culture. Measurement of optical density revealed that using MNPs, these pathogens can be quickly captured and removed (with efficiency reaching almost 100%) from purposely infected saline buffer and body fluids such as human blood plasma, serum, abdominal fluids and cerebrospinal fluids. These effects depend on nanoparticle concentration, surface chemistry, the type of pathogen, as well as the surrounding environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Resveratrol induces growth arrest and apoptosis through activation of FOXO transcription factors in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resveratrol, a naturally occurring phytopolyphenol compound, has attracted extensive interest in recent years because of its diverse pharmacological characteristics. Although resveratrol possesses chemopreventive properties against several cancers, the molecular mechanisms by which it inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis have not been clearly understood. The present study was carried out to examine whether PI3K/AKT/FOXO pathway mediates the biological effects of resveratrol. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Resveratrol inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Resveratrol, PI3K inhibitors (LY294002 and Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor alone slightly induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. These inhibitors further enhanced the apoptosis-inducing potential of resveratrol. Overexpression of wild-type PTEN slightly induced apoptosis. Wild type PTEN and PTEN-G129E enhanced resveratrol-induced apoptosis, whereas PTEN-G129R had no effect on proapoptotic effects of resveratrol. Furthermore, apoptosis-inducing potential of resveratrol was enhanced by dominant negative AKT, and inhibited by wild-type AKT and constitutively active AKT. Resveratrol has no effect on the expression of FKHR, FKHRL1 and AFX genes. The inhibition of FOXO phosphorylation by resveratrol resulted in its nuclear translocation, DNA binding and transcriptional activity. The inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway induced FOXO transcriptional activity resulting in induction of Bim, TRAIL, p27/KIP1, DR4 and DR5, and inhibition of cyclin D1. Similarly, resveratrol-induced FOXO transcriptional activity was further enhanced when activation of PI3K/AKT pathway was blocked. Over-expression of phosphorylation deficient mutants of FOXO proteins (FOXO1-TM, FOXO3A-TM and FOXO4-TM induced FOXO transcriptional activity, which was further enhanced by resveratrol. Inhibition of FOXO transcription factors by shRNA blocked resveratrol-induced upregulation of Bim, TRAIL, DR4, DR5, p27/KIP1 and

  4. Daily Arrests

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset provides the public with arrest information from the Montgomery County Central Processing Unit (CPU) systems. The data presented is derived from every...

  5. The mechanism of CIRP in inhibition of keratinocytes growth arrest and apoptosis following low dose UVB radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi; Feng, Jianguo; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Liling; Wu, Shiyong

    2017-06-01

    UV induces CIRP expression and subsequent Stat3 activation, but the biological function and mechanism of CIRP and Stat3 in mediating UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that CIRP is elevated in all tested melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer cell lines; and the expression of CIRP is upregulated in keratinocytes after being irradiated with relatively low dose (dose (50 mJ/cm(2) ), UVB acutely and chronically. The increased expression of CIRP, either induced by UVB or through overexpression, leads to resistance of keratinocytes to UVB-induced growth arrest and death; and reduced expression of CIRP by RNA knockdown sensitizes keratinocyte cells to the low dose UVB radiation. We also demonstrated that CIRP expression is required for the low dose UVB-induced Tyr705-phosphorylation, but not total amount, of Stat3. The p-Stat3 level is correlated with the expression levels of cyclin D1 and VEGF, two known downstream cell growth regulators of Stat3, as well as Bag-1/S, an apoptosis regulator. Inhibition of Stat3 DNA-binding activity by S3I-201 leads to a reduction of the p-Stat3 and Bag-1/S along with growth and survival of keratinocytes post-UVB; and the effect of S3I-201 on the UVB-irradiated cells can be partially inhibited by overexpression of CIRP or Bag-1/S. Furthermore, the overexpression of Bag-1/S can totally inhibit UVB-induced PARP cleavage and caspase 3 activation. The results presented above led us to propose that CIRP-p(705)Stat3 cascade promotes cell proliferation and survival post-UVB via upregulating the expression of cyclin D1 and Bag-1/S, respectively. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cell cycle arrest by activating atypical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 through up-regulation of Smad3-dependent p35 expression in human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Ji; Yang, Sun Woo; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2016-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) play important roles in control of cell division. Cdk5 is an atypical member of Cdk family with non-cyclin-like regulatory subunit, p35, but its role in cell cycle progression is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of Cdk5/p35 on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced cell cycle arrest. In human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, TGF-β1 induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and increased p27KIP1 expression. Interestingly, pretreatment with roscovitine, an inhibitor of Cdk5, or transfection with small interfering (si) RNAs specific to Cdk5 and p35 significantly attenuated the TGF-β1-induced p27KIP1 expression and cell cycle arrest. TGF-β1 increased Cdk5 activity via up-regulation of p35 gene at transcriptional level, and these effects were abolished by transfection with Smad3 siRNA or infection of adenovirus carrying Smad3 mutant at the C-tail (3SA). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further revealed that wild type Smad3, but not mutant Smad3 (3SA), binds to the region of the p35 promoter region (-1000--755) in a TGF-β1-dependent manner. These results for the first time demonstrate a role of Cdk5/p35 in the regulation of cell cycle progression modulated by TGF-β1.

  7. LKB1 Haploinsufficiency Cooperates With Kras to Promote Pancreatic Cancer Through Suppression of p21-Dependent Growth Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Jennifer P.; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Karim, Saadia A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Nixon, Colin; McKay, Colin J.; Carter, Ross; Brunton, Valerie G.; Frame, Margaret C.; Ashworth, Alan; Oien, Karin A.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Sansom, Owen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients carrying germline mutations of LKB1 have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer; however, it is unclear whether down-regulation of LKB1 is an important event in sporadic pancreatic cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of LKB1 down-regulation for pancreatic cancer in mouse and human and to elucidate the mechanism by which Lkb1 deregulation contributes to this disease. Methods We first investigated the consequences of Lkb1 deficiency in a genetically modified mouse model of pancreatic cancer, both in terms of disease progression and at the molecular level. To test the relevance of our findings to human pancreatic cancer, we investigated levels of LKB1 and its potential targets in human pancreatic cancer. Results We definitively show that Lkb1 haploinsufficiency can cooperate with oncogenic KrasG12D to cause pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in the mouse. Mechanistically, this was associated with decreased p53/p21-dependent growth arrest. Haploinsufficiency for p21 (Cdkn1a) also synergizes with KrasG12D to drive PDAC in the mouse. We also found that levels of LKB1 expression were decreased in around 20% of human PDAC and significantly correlated with low levels of p21 and a poor prognosis. Remarkably, all tumors that had low levels of LKB1 had low levels of p21, and these tumors did not express mutant p53. Conclusions We have identified a novel LKB1-p21 axis that suppresses PDAC following Kras mutation in vivo. Down-regulation of LKB1 may therefore serve as an alternative to p53 mutation to drive pancreatic cancer in vivo. PMID:20452353

  8. Androgen receptor-dependent transactivation of growth arrest-specific gene 6 mediates inhibitory effects of testosterone on vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Bo-Kyung; Akishita, Masahiro; Iijima, Katsuya; Ogawa, Sumito; Maemura, Koji; Yu, Jing; Takeyama, Kenichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Eto, Masato; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi

    2010-03-05

    Recent epidemiological studies have found that androgen deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease in men. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the cardioprotective effects of androgens. Here we show the inhibitory effects of testosterone on vascular calcification and a critical role of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transactivation of growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a key regulator of inorganic phosphate (P(i))-induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Testosterone and nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone inhibited P(i)-induced calcification of human aortic VSMC in a concentration-dependent manner. Androgen inhibited P(i)-induced VSMC apoptosis, an essential process for VSMC calcification. The effects on VSMC calcification were mediated by restoration of P(i)-induced down-regulation of Gas6 expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt phosphorylation. These effects of androgen were blocked by an AR antagonist, flutamide, but not by an estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780. We then explored the mechanistic role of the AR in Gas6 expression and found an abundant expression of AR predominantly in the nucleus of VSMC and two consensus ARE sequences in the Gas6 promoter region. Dihydrotestosterone stimulated Gas6 promoter activity, and this effect was abrogated by flutamide and by AR siRNA. Site-specific mutation revealed that the proximal ARE was essential for androgen-dependent transactivation of Gas6. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated ligand-dependent binding of the AR to the proximal ARE of Gas6. These results indicate that AR signaling directly regulates Gas6 transcription, which leads to inhibition of vascular calcification, and provides a mechanistic insight into the cardioprotective action of androgens.

  9. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Protein in Patients with Sjogren Syndrome: Determination of the Plasma Level and Expression in the Labial Salivary Gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6 is a vitamin K-dependent protein expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes that are involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation in response to inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the implications of Gas6 in Sjögren syndrome (SS and its expression in the labial salivary gland.A total of 254 adults, including 159 with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS, 34 with secondary Sjögren syndrome (sSS, and 61 normal controls, were recruited. Plasma Gas6 concentrations were determined, and Gas6 expressions in labial salivary gland (LSG tissues from controls and pSS and sSS patients were also evaluated. Plasma Gas6 concentrations were significantly lower among patients with pSS than normal controls (13.5 ± 8.6 vs. 19.9 ± 13.4 ng/ml, p < 0.001. There were, however, no significant differences in plasma Gas6 levels between pSS and sSS patients (13.5 ± 8.6 vs. 16.9 ± 11.2 ng/ml, p = 0.068. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for white blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count, lymphocyte count, and C3 and C4 levels, lower plasma Gas6 concentrations were significantly associated with an increased risk of SS. Moreover, by using a semi-quantitative scale to evaluate Gas6 expression in LSG tissues, Gas6 expression was found to be markedly lower in LSG tissues from pSS patients than in tissues from normal controls.Decreased plasma Gas6 concentration and LSG expression were associated with pSS. As such, Gas6 may represent a novel independent risk factor for pSS, with a potential role in salivary gland inflammation and dysfunction.

  10. High-density growth arrest in Ras-transformed cells: low Cdk kinase activities in spite of absence of p27(Kip) Cdk-complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Anja; Willumsen, Berthe M

    2005-09-01

    The ras oncogene transforms immortalized, contact-inhibited non-malignant murine fibroblasts into cells that are focus forming, exhibit increased saturation density, and are malignant in suitable hosts. Here, we examined changes in cell cycle control complexes as normal and Ras-transformed cells ceased to grow exponentially, to reveal the molecular basis for Ras-dependent focus formation. As normal cells entered density-dependent arrest, cyclin D1 decreased while cyclin D2 was induced and replaced D1 in Cdk4 complexes. Concomitantly, p27(Kip1) levels rose and the inhibitor accumulated in both Cdk4 and Cdk2 complexes, as these kinases were inactivated. Ras-transformed cells failed to arrest at normal saturation density and showed no significant alterations in cell control complexes at this point. Yet, at an elevated density the Ras-transformed cells ceased to proliferate and entered a quiescent-like state with low Cdk4 and Cdk2 activity. Surprisingly, this delayed arrest was molecularly distinct from contact inhibition of normal cells, as it occurred in the absence of p27(Kip1) induction and cyclin D1 levels remained high. This demonstrates that although oncogenic Ras efficiently disabled the normal response to contact inhibition, a separate back-up mechanism enforced cell cycle arrest at higher cell density.

  11. Picropodophyllin causes mitotic arrest and catastrophe by depolymerizing microtubules via insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waraky, Ahmed; Akopyan, Karen; Parrow, Vendela; Strömberg, Thomas; Axelson, Magnus; Abrahmsén, Lars; Lindqvist, Arne; Larsson, Olle; Aleem, Eiman

    2014-09-30

    Picropodophyllin (PPP) is an anticancer drug undergoing clinical development in NSCLC. PPP has been shown to suppress IGF-1R signaling and to induce a G2/M cell cycle phase arrest but the exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study identified an IGF-1-independent mechanism of PPP leading to pro-metaphase arrest. The mitotic block was induced in human cancer cell lines and in an A549 xenograft mouse but did not occur in normal hepatocytes/mouse tissues. Cell cycle arrest by PPP occurred in vitro and in vivo accompanied by prominent CDK1 activation, and was IGF-1R-independent since it occurred also in IGF-1R-depleted and null cells. The tumor cells were not arrested in G2/M but in mitosis. Centrosome separation was prevented during mitotic entry, resulting in a monopolar mitotic spindle with subsequent prometaphase-arrest, independent of Plk1/Aurora A or Eg5, and leading to cell features of mitotic catastrophe. PPP also increased soluble tubulin and decreased spindle-associated tubulin within minutes, indicating that it interfered with microtubule dynamics. These results provide a novel IGF-1R-independent mechanism of antitumor effects of PPP.

  12. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of an Immature Necrotic Molar with Arrested Root Development by Using Recombinant Human Platelet-derived Growth Factor: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhujiang, Annie; Kim, Sahng G

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic treatment has provided a treatment option that aims to allow root maturation. The present report describes the regenerative endodontic treatment of a necrotic, immature molar by using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB) and shows the continued root maturation in the tooth with arrested root development. A regenerative endodontic procedure that used a growth factor was performed for a necrotic molar with arrested root formation in a 20-year-old patient. Thorough disinfection by using mechanical instrumentation and copious irrigation of antimicrobial agents as well as intracanal medication with calcium hydroxide was performed throughout the first 2 appointments. At the third appointment, the root canals were irrigated with an antimicrobial solution and 17% EDTA, and bleeding was evoked by passing sterile paper points beyond the apex in each canal. Small pieces of a collagen membrane saturated with rhPDGF-BB solution from GEM 21S were packed into each canal. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed, and Cavit and composite resin were used to restore the tooth. Complete root maturation and resolution of a periapical radiolucency were observed at the 15-month follow-up. The present report presents a regenerative endodontic procedure that uses rhPDGF-BB for a necrotic molar with arrested root development. The finding of continued root development in the present case suggests that regenerative endodontic treatment may be able to resume the root maturation process in teeth with arrested root formation. Further clinical studies are required to investigate the efficacy of rhPDGF-BB in regenerative endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temperature control of growth and productivity in mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells synthesizing a recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, N; Hovey, A

    1993-11-05

    The use of a temperature switch to control the growth and productivity of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants was investigated to extend the productive life span of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in batch culture. Bromodeoxyuridine was used at 39 degrees C to select mutagenized CHO-K1 cells, which resulted in the isolation of 31 temperature-sensitive mutants that were growth inhibited at 39 degrees C. Two of these mutants were successfully transfected with the gene for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) using glutamine synthetase amplification, and a permanent recombinant cell line established (5G1-B1) that maintains the ts phenotype.Continuous exposure to the nonpermissive temperature (npt) of 39 degrees C led to a rapid decline in cell viability. However, a temperature regime using alternating incubations at 34 degrees C and 39 degrees C arrested the 5G1-B1 cells while retaining a high cell viability for up to 170 h in culture. The specific production rate of the growth-arrested cells was 3-4 times that of control cultures maintained at a constant 34 degrees C over the crucial 72-130-h period of culture, which resulted in a 35% increase in the maximum product yield. Glucose uptake and lactate production both decreased in arrested cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that 5G1-B1 cells arrested in the G(1) or G(0) phase of the cell cycle, and no major structural damage was caused to these cells by the alternating temperature regime.These results demonstrate that growth-arrested ts CHO cells have increased productivity compared to growing cultures and maintain viability for longer periods. The system offers the prospect of enhancing the productivity of recombinant mammalian cells grown in simple batch fermentors.

  14. Growth arrest-specific transcript 5 associated snoRNA levels are related to p53 expression and DNA damage in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Krell

    Full Text Available The growth arrest-specific transcript 5 gene (GAS5 encodes a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA and hosts a number of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs that have recently been implicated in multiple cellular processes and cancer. Here, we investigate the relationship between DNA damage, p53, and the GAS5 snoRNAs to gain further insight into the potential role of this locus in cell survival and oncogenesis both in vivo and in vitro.We used quantitative techniques to analyse the effect of DNA damage on GAS5 snoRNA expression and to assess the relationship between p53 and the GAS5 snoRNAs in cancer cell lines and in normal, pre-malignant, and malignant human colorectal tissue and used biological techniques to suggest potential roles for these snoRNAs in the DNA damage response.GAS5-derived snoRNA expression was induced by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner in colorectal cancer cell lines and their levels were not affected by DICER. Furthermore, p53 levels strongly correlated with GAS5-derived snoRNA expression in colorectal tissue.In aggregate, these data suggest that the GAS5-derived snoRNAs are under control of p53 and that they have an important role in mediating the p53 response to DNA damage, which may not relate to their function in the ribosome. We suggest that these snoRNAs are not processed by DICER to form smaller snoRNA-derived RNAs with microRNA (miRNA-like functions, but their precise role requires further evaluation. Furthermore, since GAS5 host snoRNAs are often used as endogenous controls in qPCR quantifications we show that their use as housekeeping genes in DNA damage experiments can lead to inaccurate results.

  15. Inositol Hexaphosphate Inhibits Growth and Induces G1 Arrest and Apoptotic Death of Androgen-Dependent Human Prostate Carcinoma LNCaP Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Chapla; Dhanalakshmi, Sivanandhan; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US male population. One approach to control this malignancy is its preventive intervention by dietary agents. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), a dietary constituent, has shown promising efficacy against various cancers; however, limited studies have been performed with IP6 against PCA. Here, we investigated the growth-inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of IP6 in androgen-dependent human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. IP6 treatment of cells resulted in a strong growth inhibition and an increase in G1 cell population. In mechanistic studies, IP6 resulted in an increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 levels, together with a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and cyclin D1 protein levels. An increase in CDKI levels by IP6 also led to a concomitant increase in their interactions with CDK2 and CDK4, together with a strong decrease in the kinase activity of both CDKs. Downstream in CDKI-CDK-cyclin cascade, consistent with its inhibitory effect on CDK kinase activity, IP6 treatment of cells increased hypophosphorylated levels of retinoblastoma (Rb) with a decrease in Rb phosphorylation at serine 780, 807, and 811 sites, and caused a moderate to strong decrease in the levels of transcription factors E2F1, E2F4, and E2F5. In other studies, IP6 caused a dose- and a time-dependent apoptotic death of LNCaP cells, and a decrease in Bcl2 levels, causing a strong increase in Bax versus Bcl2 ratio, as well as an inhibition of constitutively active AKT phosphorylation. Taken together, these molecular alterations provide an insight into IP6-caused growth inhibition, G1 arrest, and apoptotic death of human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Because early clinical PCA growth is an androgen-dependent response, the results of the present study employing androgen-dependent LNCaP cells suggest that IP6 has

  16. Inositol Hexaphosphate Inhibits Growth and Induces G1 Arrest and Apoptotic Death of Androgen-Dependent Human Prostate Carcinoma LNCaP Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapla Agarwal

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCA is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancerrelated deaths in the US male population. One approach to control this malignancy is its preventive intervention by dietary agents. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6, a dietary constituent, has shown promising efficacy against various cancers; however, limited studies have been performed with IP6 against PCA. Here, we investigated the growth-inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of IP6 in androgen-dependent human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. IP6 treatment of cells resulted in a strong growth inhibition and an increase in G1 cell population. In mechanistic studies, IP6 resulted in an increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs Cipi/p21 and Kip1/p27 levels, together with a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK 4 and cyclin D1 protein levels. An increase in CDKI levels by IP6 also led to a concomitant increase in their interactions with CDK2 and CDK4, together with a strong decrease in the kinase activity of both CDKs. Downstream in CDKI-CDK-cyclin cascade, consistent with its inhibitory effect on CDK kinase activity, IP6 treatment of cells increased hypophosphorylated levels of retinoblastoma (Rb with a decrease in Rb phosphorylation at serine 780, 807, and 811 sites, and caused a moderate to strong decrease in the levels of transcription factors E2F1, E2F4, and E2F5. In other studies, IP6 caused a dose- and a time-dependent apoptotic death of LNCaP cells, and a decrease in Bcl2 levels, causing a strong increase in Bax versus Bcl2 ratio, as well as an inhibition of constitutively active AKT phosphorylation. Taken together, these molecular alterations provide an insight into IP6-caused growth inhibition, G1 arrest, and apoptotic death of human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Because early clinical PCA growth is an androgen-dependent response, the results of the present study employing androgendependent LNCaP cells suggest that IP6 has

  17. Epigenetic transcriptional regulation of the growth arrest-specific gene 1 (Gas1 in hepatic cell proliferation at mononucleosomal resolution.

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    Natalia Sacilotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gas1 (growth arrest-specific 1 gene is known to inhibit cell proliferation in a variety of models, but its possible implication in regulating quiescence in adult tissues has not been examined to date. The knowledge of how Gas1 is regulated in quiescence may contribute to understand the deregulation occurring in neoplastic diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gas1 expression has been studied in quiescent murine liver and during the naturally synchronized cell proliferation after partial hepatectomy. Chromatin immunoprecipitation at nucleosomal resolution (Nuc-ChIP has been used to carry out the study preserving the in vivo conditions. Transcription has been assessed at real time by quantifying the presence of RNA polymerase II in coding regions (RNApol-ChIP. It has been found that Gas1 is expressed not only in quiescent liver but also at the cell cycle G(1/S transition. The latter expression peak had not been previously reported. Two nucleosomes, flanking a nucleosome-free region, are positioned close to the transcription start site. Both nucleosomes slide in going from the active to the inactive state and vice versa. Nuc-ChIP analysis of the acquisition of histone epigenetic marks show distinctive features in both active states: H3K9ac and H3K4me2 are characteristic of transcription in G(0 and H4R3me2 in G(1/S transition. Sequential-ChIP analysis revealed that the "repressing" mark H3K9me2 colocalize with several "activating" marks at nucleosome N-1 when Gas1 is actively transcribed suggesting a greater plasticity of epigenetic marks than proposed until now. The recruitment of chromatin-remodeling or modifying complexes also displayed distinct characteristics in quiescence and the G(1/S transition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The finding that Gas1 is transcribed at the G(1/S transition suggests that the gene may exert a novel function during cell proliferation. Transcription of this gene is modulated by specific "activating" and

  18. Sarsaparilla (Smilax Glabra Rhizome) Extract Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth by S Phase Arrest, Apoptosis, and Autophagy via Redox-Dependent ERK1/2 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Tiantian; Qu, Like; Wang, Lixin; Yang, Xingxin; Xu, Shuo; Feng, Junnan; Gao, Yujing; Zhao, Chuanke; Han, Yong; Cai, Shaoqing; Shou, Chengchao

    2015-05-01

    Cancer is still the major cause of death across the world. Regular approaches cannot effectively solve the emerging problems, including drug/radiation resistance, side effects, and therapeutic ineffectiveness. Natural dietary supplements have shown effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Sarsaparilla (Smilax Glabra Rhizome) has growth-inhibitory effects on several cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, with little toxicity on normal cells. However, the mechanism underlying its function remains elusive. In the present study, we examined the anticancer activity of the supernatant of the water-soluble extract (SW) from sarsaparilla. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-ion trap-time-of-flight (LC/MS-IT-TOF) analysis identified flavonoids, alkaloids, and phenylpropanoids as the major bioactive components of SW. SW was shown to markedly inhibit the growth of a broad spectrum of cancer cell lines in the in vitro and in vivo assays. S phase arrest, autophagy, or/and apoptosis were partly responsible for SW-induced growth inhibition. Results of microarray analysis and validation by quantitative RT-PCR indicated the involvement of oxidative stress and the MAPK1 pathway in SW-treated cells. We further found that SW destroyed intracellular-reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) balance, and supplement with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or glutathione (GSH) significantly antagonized SW-induced S phase arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy. In addition, SW-induced GSH/GSSG imbalance activated the ERK1/2 pathway, which contributed to SW-induced S phase arrest, apoptosis, autophagy, and resultant growth-inhibitory effect. Together, our results provide a molecular basis for sarsaparilla as an anticancer agent.

  19. Control of nucleation and growth in protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The potential advantages of nucleation and growth control through temperature, rather than the addition of precipitants or removal of solvent, are discussed. A simple light scattering arrangement for the characterization of nucleation and growth conditions in solutions is described. The temperature dependence of the solubility of low ionic strength lysozyme solutions is applied in preliminary nucleation and growth experiments.

  20. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. 154.822 Section 154.822 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a)...

  1. Metformin Induced AMPK Activation, G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest and the Inhibition of Growth of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas In Vitro and In Vivo.

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    Cai, Xianbin; Hu, Xi; Tan, Xiaojun; Cheng, Weijie; Wang, Qinjia; Chen, Xiaofeng; Guan, Yinghong; Chen, Chong; Jing, Xubin

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) have become a severe threat to health and the current treatments for ESCC are frequently not effective. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the anti-hyperglycemic agent metformin may reduce the risk of developing cancer, including ESCC, among diabetic patients. However, the antitumor effects of metformin on ESCC and the mechanisms underlying its cell cycle regulation remain elusive. The findings reported herein show that the anti-proliferative action of metformin on ESCC cell lines is partially mediated by AMPK. Moreover, we observed that metformin induced G0/G1 phase arrest accompanied by the up-regulation of p21CIP1 and p27KIP1. In vivo experiments further showed that metformin inhibited tumor growth in a ESCC xenograft model. Most importantly, the up-regulation of AMPK, p53, p21CIP1, p27KIP1 and the down-regulation of cyclinD1 are involved in the anti-tumor action of metformin in vivo. In conclusion, metformin inhibits the growth of ESCC cells both in cell cultures and in an animal model. AMPK, p53, p21CIP1, p27KIP1 and cyclinD1 are involved in the inhibition of tumor growth that is induced by metformin and cell cycle arrest in ESCC. These findings indicate that metformin has the potential for use in the treatment of ESCC.

  2. Generation of growth arrested Leishmania amastigotes: a tool to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Solanki, Sumit; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-06-30

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is fatal if not treated and is prevalent widely in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of world. VL is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani or Leishmania infantum. Although several second generation vaccines have been licensed to protect dogs against VL, there are no effective vaccines against human VL [1]. Since people cured of leishmaniasis develop lifelong protection, development of live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccines, which can have controlled infection, may be a close surrogate to leishmanization. This can be achieved by deletion of genes involved in the regulation of growth and/or virulence of the parasite. Such mutant parasites generally do not revert to virulence in animal models even under conditions of induced immune suppression due to complete deletion of the essential gene(s). In the Leishmania life cycle, the intracellular amastigote form is the virulent form and causes disease in the mammalian hosts. We developed centrin gene deleted L. donovani parasites that displayed attenuated growth only in the amastigote stage and were found safe and efficacious against virulent challenge in the experimental animal models. Thus, targeting genes differentially expressed in the amastigote stage would potentially attenuate only the amastigote stage and hence controlled infectivity may be effective in developing immunity. This review lays out the strategies for attenuation of the growth of the amastigote form of Leishmania for use as live vaccine against leishmaniasis, with a focus on visceral leishmaniasis.

  3. Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest (ALASCA and the effectiveness of an early intervention service: design of a randomised controlled trial

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    Bakx Wilbert GM

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac arrest survivors may experience hypoxic brain injury that results in cognitive impairments which frequently remain unrecognised. This may lead to limitations in daily activities and participation in society, a decreased quality of life for the patient, and a high strain for the caregiver. Publications about interventions directed at improving quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest are scarce. Therefore, evidence about effective rehabilitation programmes for cardiac arrest survivors is urgently needed. This paper presents the design of the ALASCA (Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest trial, a randomised, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a new early intervention service for survivors of a cardiac arrest and their caregivers. Methods/design The study population comprises all people who survive two weeks after a cardiac arrest and are admitted to one of the participating hospitals in the Southern part of the Netherlands. In a two-group randomised, controlled clinical trial, half of the participants will receive an early intervention service. The early intervention service consists of several consultations with a specialised nurse for the patient and their caregiver during the first three months after the cardiac arrest. The intervention is directed at screening for cognitive problems, provision of informational, emotional and practical support, and stimulating self-management. If necessary, referral to specialised care can take place. Persons in the control group will receive the care as usual. The primary outcome measures are the extent of participation in society and quality of life of the patient one year after a cardiac arrest. Secondary outcome measures are the level of cognitive, emotional and cardiovascular impairment and daily functioning of the patient, as well as the strain for and quality of life of the caregiver. Participants and their caregivers will be followed

  4. Fibroblast growth factor 2 causes G2/M cell cycle arrest in ras-driven tumor cells through a Src-dependent pathway.

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    Jacqueline Salotti

    Full Text Available We recently reported that paracrine Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2 triggers senescence in Ras-driven Y1 and 3T3(Ras mouse malignant cell lines. Here, we show that although FGF2 activates mitogenic pathways in these Ras-dependent malignant cells, it can block cell proliferation and cause a G2/M arrest. These cytostatic effects of FGF2 are inhibited by PD173074, an FGF receptor (FGFR inhibitor. To determine which downstream pathways are induced by FGF2, we tested specific inhibitors targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K and protein kinase C (PKC. We show that these classical mitogenic pathways do not mediate the cytostatic activity of FGF2. On the other hand, the inhibition of Src family kinases rescued Ras-dependent malignant cells from the G2/M irreversible arrest induced by FGF2. Taken together, these data indicate a growth factor-sensitive point in G2/M that likely involves FGFR/Ras/Src pathway activation in a MEK, PI3K and PKC independent manner.

  5. Suppression of AKT anti-apoptotic signaling by a novel drug candidate results in growth arrest and apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

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    Andrea Cuconati

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the third most common cause of cancer fatalities worldwide, with limited treatment options and five year survival rates of between 50% growth inhibition by HBF-0079. In Huh7 cells, HBF-0079 induced cell cycle arrest in G1 and concomitant apoptosis, and its effects were irreversible after removal of the compound. These observations corroborate a loss of AKT phosphorylation at the mTORC2-targeted residue S473, with concurrent loss of phosphorylation of the mTORC1 targets SK6 and 4EBP1 in Huh7 but not PH5CH cells. Finally, growth of Hep3B-derived tumors in a murine xenograft model was significantly repressed by the compound through either systemic or intratumoral administration of formulated HBF-0079. The potential for development of this drug candidate is discussed.

  6. DAF-16/FOXO regulates transcription of cki-1/Cip/Kip and repression of lin-4 during C. elegans L1 arrest.

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    Baugh, L Ryan; Sternberg, Paul W

    2006-04-18

    Development is typically studied as a continuous process under laboratory conditions, but wild animals often develop in variable and stressful environments. C. elegans larvae hatch in a developmentally arrested state (L1 arrest) and initiate post-embryonic development only in the presence of food (E. coli in lab). In contrast to the well-studied dauer arrest, L1 arrest occurs without morphological modification, although larvae in L1 arrest are more resistant to environmental stress than developing larvae . Consistent with its role in dauer formation and aging, we show that insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling regulates L1 arrest. daf-2 insulin/IGF receptor mutants have a constitutive-L1-arrest phenotype when fed and extended survival of L1 arrest when starved. Conversely, daf-16/FOXO mutants have a defective-arrest phenotype, failing to arrest development and dying rapidly when starved. We show that DAF-16 is required for transcription of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor cki-1 in stem cells in response to starvation, accounting for the failure of daf-16/FOXO mutants to arrest cell division during L1 arrest. Other developmental events such as cell migration, cell fusion, and expression of the microRNA lin-4, a temporal regulator of post-embryonic development, are also observed in starved daf-16/FOXO mutants. These results suggest that DAF-16/FOXO promotes developmental arrest via transcriptional regulation of numerous target genes that control various aspects of development.

  7. Enforcement following 0.08% BAC law change: sex-specific consequences of changing arrest practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Davaran, Ardavan

    2013-10-01

    This research evaluated effects of stricter 0.08% BAC drunken driving law on changes in sex-specific DUI arrest rates, controlling for increased law enforcement resources and shifts in DUI-related behaviors. Another main purpose, the study assessed female/male differences in arrest increases due to broader enforcement standards and efforts. Panel data was assembled for 24 states over 1990-2007 on DUI arrests, alcohol policy, law enforcement resources, drinking and drunken driving prevalence. Two-way fixed-effects seemingly unrelated regression models predicted female versus male changes in DUI arrests following implementation of lower legal limits of intoxication, net controls. Findings suggest, first, that a broader legal definition of drunken driving intending to officially sanction less serious offenders (0.08% vs. 0.10% BAC) was associated with increased DUI arrests for both sexes. Second, growth in specialized DUI-enforcement units also was related to increased arrests. Whereas male and female arrest trends were equally affected by the direct net-widening effects of 0.08% BAC alcohol-policy, specialized DUI-enforcement efforts to dig deeper into the offender-pool had stronger arrest-producing effects on females, particularly prior to law change. Specifying how changes in law and enforcement resources affect arrest outcomes is an important pre-cursor to alcohol-policy analyses of effectiveness. A potential unintended consequence, effects of law and enforcement may differ across population segments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Piperine, an alkaloid from black pepper, inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells via G1 arrest and apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Paul B; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Doucette, Carolyn D; Walsh, Mark; Hoskin, David W

    2015-10-01

    Piperine, a piperidine alkaloid present in black pepper, inhibits the growth of cancer cells, although the mechanism of action is not well understood. In this study, we show that piperine (75-150 µM) inhibited the growth of several colon cancer cell lines but had little effect on the growth of normal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Piperine inhibited HT-29 colon carcinoma cell proliferation by causing G1 phase cell cycle arrest that was associated with decreased expression of cyclins D1 and D3 and their activating partner cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, as well as reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein and up-regulation of p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1 expression. In addition, piperine caused hydroxyl radical production and apoptosis that was partially dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species. Piperine-treated HT-29 cells showed loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, as well as caspase activation and reduced apoptosis in the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK. Increased expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins inositol-requiring 1α protein, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein, and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as decreased phosphorylation of Akt and reduced survivin expression were also observed in piperine-treated HT-29 cells. Furthermore, piperine inhibited colony formation by HT-29 cells, as well as the growth of HT-29 spheroids. Cell cycle arrest and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated apoptosis following piperine treatment of HT-29 cells provides the first evidence that piperine may be useful in the treatment of colon cancer.

  9. Tanshinone IIA Inhibits Growth of Keratinocytes through Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis: Underlying Treatment Mechanism of Psoriasis

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    Fu-Lun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to elucidate the cellular mechanisms whereby Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro in keratinocytes, the target cells in psoriasis. Tan IIA inhibited proliferation of mouse keratinocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis, resulting in S phase arrest accompanied by down-regulation of pCdk2 and cyclin A protein expression. Furthermore, Tan IIA-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential changes were also further demonstrated by DNA fragmentation, single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (SCGE, and flow cytometry methods. Apoptosis was partially blocked by the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. Mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis further downstream was investigated, showing changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm, and enhanced activation of cleaved caspase-3 and Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. There was also no translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus in apoptotic keratinocytes, indicating Tan IIA-induced apoptosis occurs mainly through the caspase pathway. Our findings provide the molecular mechanisms by which Tan IIA can be used to treat psoriasis and support the traditional use of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bungee (Labiatae for psoriasis and related skin diseases.

  10. Circulating Fibronectin Controls Tumor Growth

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    Anja von Au

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibronectin is ubiquitously expressed in the extracellular matrix, and experimental evidence has shown that it modulates blood vessel formation. The relative contribution of local and circulating fibronectin to blood vessel formation in vivo remains unknown despite evidence for unexpected roles of circulating fibronectin in various diseases. Using transgenic mouse models, we established that circulating fibronectin facilitates the growth of bone metastases by enhancing blood vessel formation and maturation. This effect is more relevant than that of fibronectin produced by endothelial cells and pericytes, which only exert a small additive effect on vessel maturation. Circulating fibronectin enhances its local production in tumors through a positive feedback loop and increases the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF retained in the matrix. Both fibronectin and VEGF then cooperate to stimulate blood vessel formation. Fibronectin content in the tumor correlates with the number of blood vessels and tumor growth in the mouse models. Consistent with these results, examination of three separate arrays from patients with breast and prostate cancers revealed that a high staining intensity for fibronectin in tumors is associated with increased mortality. These results establish that circulating fibronectin modulates blood vessel formation and tumor growth by modifying the amount of and the response to VEGF. Furthermore, determination of the fibronectin content can serve as a prognostic biomarker for breast and prostate cancers and possibly other cancers.

  11. Ling Zhi-8 mediates p53-dependent growth arrest of lung cancer cells proliferation via the ribosomal protein S7-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Ting; Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Sheu, Fuu; Ho, Chau-Mei; Chen, Edmund I-T

    2011-12-01

    Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8), an immunomodulatory protein, is derived from and has been cloned from the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi or Ling Zhi); this protein exhibits immunomodulating and antitumor properties. We investigated the effects of recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) on the proliferation of A549 human lung cancer cells. Here, we showed that rLZ-8 inhibits cell growth and that this is correlated with increased G(1) arrest. The treatment of A549 cells with rLZ-8 activated p53 and p21 expression, and both the G(1) arrest and the antigrowth effect were found to be p53 dependent. It was further demonstrated that rLZ-8 inhibited tumor growth in mice transplanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Interestingly, rLZ-8 treatment was found to lead to nucleolar stress (or ribosomal stress) as evidenced by inhibition of precursor ribosomal RNA synthesis and reduced polysome formation in A549 cells. These changes resulted in an increasing binding of ribosomal protein S7 to MDM2 and a decreased interaction between MDM2 and p53. Taking these results together, we have identified a novel rLZ-8 antitumor function that positively modulates p53 via ribosomal stress and inhibits lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our current results suggest that rLZ-8 may have potential as a therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cancers that contain wild-type p53 and high expression of MDM2.

  12. Salter-Harris Type III and IV medial malleolar fractures: growth arrest: is it a fate? A retrospective study of 48 cases with open reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottalorda, Jérôme; Béranger, Vincent; Louahem, Djamel; Camilleri, Jean Philippe; Launay, Franck; Diméglio, Alain; Bourelle, Sophie; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Bollini, Gérard

    2008-09-01

    Salter-Harris type III and IV medial malleolar fractures (MacFarland fracture) is a joint fracture of the ankle in children. The fracture line passes through the medial part of the lower epiphyseal disk of the tibia. Prognosis is dominated by later risk of misalignment and osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of these fractures. We retrospectively analyzed the cases of 48 children with MacFarland fractures (31 boys and 17 girls), mean age at the time of trauma 11 years 6 months (range, 8-15 years). The fractures were classed into two groups according to the Salter and Harris classification for epiphyseal detachment: Salter III (30 cases) and Salter IV (18 cases). Surgical treatment was given in all cases (46 screw fixations, 2 pin fixations). Three outcome categories were used: good (no pain, no stiffness, no limp, no misalignment, no surgical complication, no healing problem), fair (pain and/or stiffness and/or limp and/or healing problem without misalignment, no surgical complication), and poor (misalignment or surgical complication). Mean follow-up was 3 years and 3 months (24-94 months). Twenty-eight children were skeletally mature at the longest follow-up. The three-month postoperative assessment showed 35 patients with good results and 13 children with fair results. Ankle stiffness was noted in 6 cases, ankle pain in 4 cases, wound healing complications in 4 cases, limp in 1 case, and snapping in 1 case. The long-term outcome was considered good for 45 patients, fair for 2 patients (1 wound adherence and 1 hypertrophic scar tissue), and poor for 1 patient (6-degree varus deformity). We did not note leg-length discrepancy or malunion at the longest follow-up. Our results show that growth arrest after MacFarland fracture is no fate. We used surgery more than is generally reported by other teams, opting for surgery as soon as the displacement was >or=1 mm. Surgical treatment was arthrotomy in all cases to

  13. 6-Gingerol Inhibits Growth of Colon Cancer Cell LoVo via Induction of G2/M Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Bin; Lin, Chun-Che; Tsay, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    6-Gingerol, a natural component of ginger, has been widely reported to possess antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic activities. Despite its potential efficacy against cancer, the anti-tumor mechanisms of 6-gingerol are complicated and remain sketchy. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anti-tumor effects of 6-gingerol on colon cancer cells. Our results revealed that 6-gingerol treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of human colon cancer cell, LoVo, in a dose-dependent manner. Further flow cytometric analysis showed that 6-gingerol induced significant G2/M phase arrest and had slight influence on sub-G1 phase in LoVo cells. Therefore, levels of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and their regulatory proteins involved in S-G2/M transition were investigated. Our findings revealed that levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, and CDK1 were diminished; in contrast, levels of the negative cell cycle regulators p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1) were increased in response to 6-gingerol treatment. In addition, 6-gingerol treatment elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation level of p53. These findings indicate that exposure of 6-gingerol may induce intracellular ROS and upregulate p53, p27(Kip1), and p21(Cip1) levels leading to consequent decrease of CDK1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1 as result of cell cycle arrest in LoVo cells. It would be suggested that 6-gingerol should be beneficial to treatment of colon cancer.

  14. 6-Gingerol Inhibits Growth of Colon Cancer Cell LoVo via Induction of G2/M Arrest

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    Ching-Bin Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 6-Gingerol, a natural component of ginger, has been widely reported to possess antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic activities. Despite its potential efficacy against cancer, the anti-tumor mechanisms of 6-gingerol are complicated and remain sketchy. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anti-tumor effects of 6-gingerol on colon cancer cells. Our results revealed that 6-gingerol treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of human colon cancer cell, LoVo, in a dose-dependent manner. Further flow cytometric analysis showed that 6-gingerol induced significant G2/M phase arrest and had slight influence on sub-G1 phase in LoVo cells. Therefore, levels of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, and their regulatory proteins involved in S-G2/M transition were investigated. Our findings revealed that levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, and CDK1 were diminished; in contrast, levels of the negative cell cycle regulators p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 were increased in response to 6-gingerol treatment. In addition, 6-gingerol treatment elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and phosphorylation level of p53. These findings indicate that exposure of 6-gingerol may induce intracellular ROS and upregulate p53, p27Kip1, and p21Cip1 levels leading to consequent decrease of CDK1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1 as result of cell cycle arrest in LoVo cells. It would be suggested that 6-gingerol should be beneficial to treatment of colon cancer.

  15. Wogonoside induces growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest via promoting the expression and binding activity of GATA-1 in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Hui, Hui; Xu, Jingyan; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Yuxin; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2016-06-01

    GATA-1, a zinc finger transcription factor, has been demonstrated to play a key role in the progression of leukemia. In this study, we investigate the effects of wogonoside, a naturally bioactive flavonoid derived from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, on cell growth and cell cycle in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, and uncover its underlying mechanisms. The experimental design comprised CML cell lines K562, imatinib-resistant K562 (K562r) cells, and primary CML cells, treated in vitro or in vivo, respectively, with wogonoside; growth and cell cycle were then evaluated. We found that wogonoside could induce growth inhibition and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in both normal and K562r cells. Wogonoside promotes the expression of GATA-1 and facilitates the binding to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and p21 promoter, thus inhibiting MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including CDK2, CDK4, cyclin A, and cyclin D1, and increasing p21 expression. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that administration of wogonoside decreased CML cells and prolonged survival in NOD/SCID mice with CML cell xenografts. In conclusion, these results clearly revealed the inhibitory effect of wogonoside on the growth in CML cells and suggested that wogonoside may act as a promising drug for the treatment of imatinib-resistant CML.

  16. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  17. UV-B inhibition of hypocotyl growth in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is a consequence of cell cycle arrest initiated by photodimer accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biever, Jessica J; Brinkman, Doug; Gardner, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important constituent of sunlight that determines plant morphology and growth. It induces photomorphogenic responses but also causes damage to DNA. Arabidopsis mutants of the endonucleases that function in nucleotide excision repair, xpf-3 and uvr1-1, showed hypersensitivity to UV-B (280-320nm) in terms of inhibition of hypocotyl growth. SOG1 is a transcription factor that functions in the DNA damage signalling response after γ-irradiation. xpf mutants that carry the sog1-1 mutation showed hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B irradiation similar to the wild type. A DNA replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea (HU), also inhibited hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings, but xpf-3 was not hypersensitive to HU. UV-B irradiation induced accumulation of the G2/M-specific cell cycle reporter construct CYCB1;1-GUS in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings that was consistent with the expected accumulation of photodimers and coincided with the time course of hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B treatment. Etiolated mutants of UVR8, a recently described UV-B photoreceptor gene, irradiated with UV-B showed inhibition of hypocotyl growth that was not different from that of the wild type, but they lacked UV-B-specific expression of chalcone synthase (CHS), as expected from previous reports. CHS expression after UV-B irradiation was not different in xpf-3 compared with the wild type, nor was it altered after HU treatment. These results suggest that hypocotyl growth inhibition by UV-B light in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, a photomorphogenic response, is dictated by signals originating from UV-B absorption by DNA that lead to cell cycle arrest. This process occurs distinct from UVR8 and its signalling pathway responsible for CHS induction.

  18. Planning instruments to control urban growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2010-01-01

    It is challenging to plan and control urban development in peri-urban areas. But if no planning is done, the result will often be unsustainable, including widespread, dispersed and uncoordinated urban growth. Spatial planning based on zoning remains the most important planning instrument and its...... success depend on regional coordination. Incentive based instruments may contrbute to growth management, but only few examples are available and their effects on urban growth patterns yet to be seen....

  19. Programmed cell death 2 protein induces gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wei, Wei; Jin, Hui-Cheng; Ying, Rong-Chao; Zhu, A-Kao; Zhang, Fang-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death 2 (PDCD2) is a highly conserved nuclear protein, and aberrant PDCD2 expression alters cell apoptosis. The present study aimed to investigate PDCD2 expression in gastric cancer. Tissue specimens from 34 gastric cancer patients were collected for analysis of PDCD2 expression using immunohistochemistry, western blotting and qRT-PCR. Gastric cancer cell lines (a p53-mutated MKN28 line and a wild-type p53 MKN45 line) were used to assess the effects of PDCD2 overexpression. p53-/- nude mice were used to investigate the effect of PDCD2 on ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis. The data showed that PDCD2 expression was reduced in gastric cancer tissue specimens, and loss of PDCD2 expression was associated with the poor survival of patients. PDCD2 expression induced gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis. The antitumor effects of PDCD2 expression were dependent on p53 expression in gastric cancer cells. Moreover, PDCD2 expression inhibited activity of the ATM/Chk1/2/p53 signaling pathway. In addition, PDCD2 expression suppressed UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in p53+/+ nude mice, but not in p53-/- mice. The data from the present study demonstrated that loss of PDCD2 expression could contribute to gastric cancer development and progression and that PDCD2-induced gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis are p53-dependent.

  20. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  1. Early repolarization with horizontal ST segment may be associated with aborted sudden cardiac arrest: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk stratification of the early repolarization pattern (ERP is needed to identify malignant early repolarization. J-point elevation with a horizontal ST segment was recently suggested as a malignant feature of the ERP. In this study, the prevalence of the ERP with a horizontal ST segment was examined among survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA without structural heart disease to evaluate the value of ST-segment morphology in risk stratification of the ERP. Methods We reviewed the data of 83 survivors of SCA who were admitted from August 2005 to August 2010. Among them, 25 subjects without structural heart disease were included. The control group comprised 60 healthy subjects who visited our health promotion center; all control subjects were matched for age, sex, and underlying disease (diabetes mellitus, hypertension. Early repolarization was defined as an elevation of the J point of at least 0.1 mV above the baseline in at least two continuous inferior or lateral leads that manifested as QRS slurring or notching. An ST-segment pattern of Results The SCA group included 17 men (64% with a mean age of 49.7 ± 14.5 years. The corrected QTc was not significantly different between the SCA and control groups (432.7 ± 37.96 vs. 420.4 ± 26.3, respectively; p = 0.089. The prevalence of ERP was not statistically different between the SCA and control groups (5/25, 20% vs. 4/60, 6.7%, respectively; p = 0.116. The prevalence of early repolarization with a horizontal ST segment was more frequent in the SCA than in the control group (20% vs. 3.3%, respectively; p = 0.021. Four SCA subjects (16% and one control subject (1.7% had a J-point elevation of >2 mm (p = 0.025. Four SCA subjects (16% and one (1.7% control subject had an ERP in the inferior lead (p = 0.025. Conclusion The prevalence of ERP with a horizontal ST segment was higher in patients with aborted SCA than in matched controls. This result suggests that ST morphology has

  2. Translational neuroendocrinology: control of human growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, P E; Gill, M S; Tillmann, V; Westwood, M

    2014-06-01

    Human growth is driven by both basic cell processes as well as hormones, in particular the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis. Understanding how these mechanisms are coordinated is not only critical to achieving a normal growth rate, but also to recognising potential new causes of disordered growth and how they might be treated. We have demonstrated in healthy children that height is gained by periods of rapid growth interspersed by periods of very slow growth or even stasis. We have also shown that a lower order organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, grows in a similar manner. By contrast, secretion of GH from somatotrophs occurs on a daily basis in discrete pulses over a 24-h period. We have used the measurement of GH in urine as a surrogate marker of GH secretion to show that there are rhythms of GH output with frequencies of several days. We then assessed which attributes of these GH profiles were related to growth and found that disorderliness in the GH profile (as measured by approximate entropy) was related to better growth rate. This feature was then tested in the dwarf rat using different GH regimens to introduce variation into the administration of daily GH injections. Better long bone growth was associated with week-to-week or even random dose variation compared to the same amount of GH delivered as a standard daily dose. Understanding the control of growth has implications in clinical practice for modelling GH treatment regimens based on physiological principles.

  3. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA): safety and efficacy of low-dose prostacyclin administration and blood pressure target in addition to standard therapy, as compared to standard therapy alone, in post-cardiac arrest syndrome patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Johansson, Pär I; Hassager, Christian

    2016-08-02

    Morbidity and mortality following initial survival of cardiac arrest remain high despite great efforts to improve resuscitation techniques and post-resuscitation care, in part due to the ischemia-reperfusion injury secondary to the restoration of the blood circulation. Patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest display evidence of endothelial injury and coagulopathy (hypocoagulability, hyperfibrinolysis), which in associated with poor outcome. Recent randomized controlled trials have revealed that treatment with infusion of prostacyclin reduces endothelial damage after major surgery and AMI. Thus, a study is pertinent to investigate if prostacyclin infusion as a therapeutic intervention reduces endothelial damage without compromising, or even improving, the hemostatic competence in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. Post-cardiac arrest patients frequently have a need for vasopressor therapy (catecholamines) to achieve the guideline-supported blood pressure goals. To evaluate a possible catecholamine interaction with the primary endpoints of this study, included patients will be randomized into two different blood pressure goals within guideline-recommended targets. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind investigator-initiated pilot trial in 40 out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest (OHCA) patients will be conducted. Patients will be randomly assigned to either the active treatment group (48 hours of active study drug (iloprost, 1 ng/kg/min) or to the control group [placebo (saline) infusion]. Target mean blood pressure levels will be allocated 1:1 to 65 mmHg or approximately 75 mmHg, which gives four different permutations, namely: (i) iloprost/65 mHg, (ii) iloprost/75 mmHg, (iii) placebo/65 mmHg, and (iv) placebo/75 mmHg. All randomized patients will be treated in accordance with state-of-the art therapy including targeted temperature management. The primary endpoint of this study is change in biomarkers indicative of endothelial activation and damage

  4. The adenovirus E4orf4 protein induces growth arrest and mitotic catastrophe in H1299 human lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Szymborski, A; Miron, M-J; Marcellus, R; Binda, O; Lavoie, J N; Branton, P E

    2009-01-22

    The human adenovirus E4orf4 protein, when expressed alone, induces p53-independent death in a wide range of cancer cells. Earlier studies by our groups suggested that although in some cases cell death can be associated with some hallmarks of apoptosis, it is not always affected by caspase inhibitors. Thus it is unlikely that E4orf4-induced cell death occurs uniquely through apoptosis. In the present studies using H1299 human lung carcinoma cells as a model system we found that death is induced in the absence of activation of any of the caspases tested, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, or release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. E4orf4 caused a substantial change in cell morphology, including vigorous membrane blebbing, multiple nuclei in many cells and increased cell volume. Most of these characteristics are not typical of apoptosis, but they are of necrosis. FACS analysis and western blotting for cell cycle markers showed that E4orf4-expressing cells became arrested in G(2)/M and also accumulated high levels of cyclin E. The presence of significant numbers of tetraploid and polyploid cells and some cells with micronuclei suggested that E4orf4 appears to induce death in these cells through a process resulting from mitotic catastrophe.

  5. Neferine, an alkaloid from lotus seed embryo, inhibits human lung cancer cell growth by MAPK activation and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornima, Paramasivan; Weng, Ching Feng; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    Neferine is the major bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the seed embryo of a traditional medicinal plant Nelumbo nucifera (Lotus). Epidemiological studies have revealed the therapeutic potential of lotus seed embryo. Although several mechanisms have been proposed, a clear anticancer action mechanism of neferine on lung cancer cells is still not known. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the world, and the patients with advanced stage of nonsmall lung cancer require adjunct chemotherapy after surgical resection for the eradication of cancer cells. In this study, the effects of neferine were evaluated and characterized in A549 cells. Neferine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner with the hypergeneration of reactive oxygen species, activation of MAPKs, lipid peroxidation, depletion of cellular antioxidant pool, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular calcium accumulation. Furthermore, neferine treatment leads to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB and Bcl2, upregulation of Bax and Bad, release of cytochrome C, activation of caspase cascade, and DNA fragmentation. In addition, neferine could induce p53 and its effector protein p21 and downregulation of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 thereby inducing G1 cell cycle arrest. These results suggest a novel function of neferine as an apoptosis inducer in lung cancer cells.

  6. Growth arrest in the ribosomopathy, Bowen-Conradi syndrome, is due to dramatically reduced cell proliferation and a defect in mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armistead, Joy; Patel, Nehal; Wu, Xiaoli; Hemming, Richard; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Basra, Gagandeep Singh; Del Bigio, Marc R; Ding, Hao; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Bowen-Conradi syndrome (BCS) is a ribosomopathy characterized by severe developmental delay and growth failure that typically leads to death by one year of age. It is caused by a c.257A>G, p.D86G substitution in the ribosomal biogenesis protein, Essential for Mitotic Growth 1 (EMG1). We generated a knock-in of the D86G substitution in mice to characterize the effects of EMG1 deficiency, particularly in the brain, where EMG1 expression is high. Embryos homozygous for the mutation in Emg1 were small for gestational age with neural tube defects, and died between embryonic days 8.5 and 12.5. These embryos exhibited dramatically reduced cell proliferation, which we also detected in autopsy brain tissue and bone marrow of BCS patients, consistent with a requirement for high levels of EMG1 in tissues with rapid cell proliferation. In fibroblasts derived from the BCS mouse embryos, we detected a high proportion of binucleated cells, indicating that a mitotic defect underlies the growth arrest in BCS. These studies add to growing evidence of a link between ribosome biogenesis, mitotic progression, and brain development that is currently unexplored.

  7. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  8. Natural Variation in Small Molecule–Induced TIR-NB-LRR Signaling Induces Root Growth Arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-Complexed R Protein VICTR in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E.; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2012-01-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor–nucleotide binding–Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid–induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest. PMID:23275581

  9. Novel ent-Kaurane Diterpenoid from Rubus corchorifolius L. f. Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexiang; Wu, Xian; Ouyang, Wen; Gu, Min; Gao, Zili; Song, Mingyue; Chen, Yunjiao; Lin, Yanyin; Cao, Yong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    The tender leaves of Rubus corchorifolius L. f. have been consumed as tea for drinking in China since ancient times. In this study, a novel ent-kaurane diterpenoid was isolated and identified from R. corchorifolius L. f. leaves as ent-kaur-2-one-16β,17-dihydroxy-acetone-ketal (DEK). DEK suppressed the growth of HCT116 human colon cancer cells with an IC50 value of 40 ± 0.21 μM, while it did not cause significant growth inhibition on CCD-18Co human colonic myofibroblasts at up to100 μM. Moreover, DEK induced extensive apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in the colon cancer cells. Accordingly, DEK caused profound effects on multiple signaling proteins associated with cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. DEK significantly upregulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved PARP, p53, Bax, and tumor suppressor p21(Cip1/Waf1), downregulated the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins such as cyclinD1, CDK2, and CDK4 and carcinogenic proteins such as EGFR and COX-2, and suppressed the activation of Akt. Overall, our results provide a basis for using DEK as a potential chemopreventive agent against colon carcinogenesis.

  10. New pyrazolo-[3,4-d]-pyrimidine derivative Src kinase inhibitors lead to cell cycle arrest and tumor growth reduction of human medulloblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Alessandra; Schenone, Silvia; Angelucci, Adriano; Cozzi, Martina; Caracciolo, Valentina; Pentimalli, Francesca; Puca, Andrew; Pucci, Biagio; La Montagna, Raffaele; Bologna, Mauro; Botta, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children, and despite improvements in the overall survival rate, it still lacks an effective treatment. Src plays an important role in cancer, and recently high Src activity was documented in medulloblastoma. In this report, we examined the effects of novel pyrazolo-[3,4-d]-pyrimidine derivative Src inhibitors in medulloblastoma. By MTS assay, we showed that the pyrimidine derivatives indicated as S7, S29, and SI163 greatly reduce the growth rate of medulloblastoma cells by inhibiting Src phosphorylation, compared with HT22 non-neoplastic nerve cells. These compounds also halt cells in the G2/M phase, and this effect likely occurs through the regulation of cdc2 and CDC25C phosphorylation, as shown by Western blot. Moreover, the exposure to pyrimidine derivatives induces apoptosis, assayed by the supravital propidium iodide assay, through modulation of the apoptotic proteins Bax and Bcl2, and inhibits tumor growth in vivo in a mouse model. Notably, S7, S29, and SI163 show major inhibitory effects on medulloblastoma cell growth compared with the chemotherapeutic agents cisplatin and etoposide. In conclusion, our results suggest that S7, S29, and SI163 could be novel attractive candidates for the treatment of medulloblastoma or tumors characterized by high Src activity.—Rossi, A., Schenone, S., Angelucci, A., Cozzi, M., Caracciolo, V., Pentimalli, F., Puca, A., Pucci, B., La Montagna, R., Bologna, M., Botta, M., Giordano, A. New pyrazolo-[3,4-d]-pyrimidine derivative Src kinase inhibitors lead to cell cycle arrest and tumor growth reduction of human medulloblastoma cells. PMID:20354138

  11. Photoperiodic growth control in perennial trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, Abdul; Sane, Aniruddha P

    2015-01-01

    Plants have to cope with changing seasons and adverse environmental conditions. Being sessile, plants have developed elaborate mechanisms for their survival that allow them to sense and adapt to the environment and reproduce successfully. A major adaptive trait for the survival of trees of temperate and boreal forests is the induction of growth cessation in anticipation of winters. In the last few years enormous progress has been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying SDs induced growth cessation in model perennial tree hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides). In this review we discuss the molecular mechanism underlying photoperiodic control of growth cessation and adaptive responses.

  12. Mdm4 (Mdmx) regulates p53-induced growth arrest and neuronal cell death during early embryonic mouse development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliorini, Domenico; Lazzerini Denchi, Eros; Danovi, Davide

    2002-01-01

    characterized by overall growth deficiency, anemia, improper neural tube closure, and dilation of lateral ventricles. In situ analysis demonstrated increased levels of p21(CIP1/Waf1) and lower levels of Cyclin E and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression. Consistent with lack of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine...

  13. Antrodia salmonea induces G2 cell-cycle arrest in human triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells and suppresses tumor growth in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Huang, Hui-Chi; Hsu, Li-Sung; Huang, Pei-Jane; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2017-01-20

    Antrodia salmonea (AS), is a well-known folk medicinal mushroom in Taiwan, has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we examined the effects of AS on cell-cycle arrest in vitro in MDA-MB-231 cells and on tumor regression in vivo using an athymic nude mice model. AS (0-200μg/mL) treatment significantly induced G2 cell-cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells by reducing the levels of cyclin B1, cyclin A, cyclin E, and CDC2 proteins. In addition, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment prevented AS induced G2 cell-cycle arrest, indicating that ROS accumulation and subsequent cell cycle arrest might be a major mechanism of AS-induced cytotoxicity. Further, AS treatment decreased COX-2 expression and induced PARP cleavage was significantly reversed by NAC pretreatment in MDA-MB-231 cells. The in vivo study results revealed that AS treatment was effective in terms of delaying the tumor incidence and reducing the tumor growth in MDA-MB-231-xenografted nude mice. TUNEL assay, immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting confirmed that AS significantly modulated the xenografted tumor progression as demonstrated by induction of apoptosis, autophagy, and cell-cycle arrest. Our data strongly suggest that Antrodia salmonea could be an anti-cancer agent for human breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by apigenin through induction of G2/M arrest and histone H3 acetylation-mediated p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Tsui-Hwa; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wen, Yu-Ching; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Kuo, Tsang-Chih; Lee, Wei-Jiunn

    2017-02-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, has anticancer properties in various malignant cancer cells. However, the molecular basis of the anticancer effect remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying the induction of cell cycle arrest by apigenin. Our results showed that apigenin at the nonapoptotic induction concentration inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Immunoblot analysis indicated that apigenin suppressed the expression of cyclin A, cyclin B, and cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (CDK1), which control the G2-to-M phase transition in the cell cycle. In addition, apigenin upregulated p21(WAF1/CIP1) and increased the interaction of p21(WAF1/CIP1) with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which inhibits cell cycle progression. Furthermore, apigenin significantly inhibited histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and induced histone H3 acetylation. The subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay indicated that apigenin increased acetylation of histone H3 in the p21(WAF1/CIP1) promoter region, resulting in the increase of p21(WAF1/CIP1) transcription. In a tumor xenograft model, apigenin effectively delayed tumor growth. In these apigenin-treated tumors, we also observed reductions in the levels of cyclin A and cyclin B and increases in the levels of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and acetylated histone H3. These findings demonstrate for the first time that apigenin can be used in breast cancer prevention and treatment through epigenetic regulation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 434-444, 2017.

  15. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  16. Modeling and control of greenhouse crop growth

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Francisco; Guzmán, José Luis; Ramírez-Arias, Armando

    2015-01-01

    A discussion of challenges related to the modeling and control of greenhouse crop growth, this book presents state-of-the-art answers to those challenges. The authors model the subsystems involved in successful greenhouse control using different techniques and show how the models obtained can be exploited for simulation or control design; they suggest ideas for the development of physical and/or black-box models for this purpose. Strategies for the control of climate- and irrigation-related variables are brought forward. The uses of PID control and feedforward compensators, both widely used in commercial tools, are summarized. The benefits of advanced control techniques—event-based, robust, and predictive control, for example—are used to improve on the performance of those basic methods. A hierarchical control architecture is developed governed by a high-level multiobjective optimization approach rather than traditional constrained optimization and artificial intelligence techniques.  Reference trajector...

  17. Influence of edaravone on growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 expression following focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang; Xiao-Mei Wu; Bo Jiang; Chun-Yu Wang; Hai-Nan Zhang; Xiang-Min Shen

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of edaravone on the expression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34). Methods: A total of 108 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham operation group, model group and edaravone group (36 cases for each group). Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h followed by reperfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Then, GADD34 expression was measured with immunohistochemistry at different time-points after reperfusion in the peri-infarct regions of all rats. Results: The GADD34 expression was detected in the peri-infarct regions of rats 1 h after reperfusion, which reached its peak 24 h after reperfusion. And edaravone could significantly down-regulate the GADD34 expression. Conclusions:Edaravon could down-regulate GADD34 expression, which suggests that edaravone may exert an important function in inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by scavenging free radicals in the upper stream.

  18. Influence of edaravone on growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 expression following focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Wang; Xiao-Mei; Wu; Bo; Jiang; Chun-Yu; Wang; Hai-Nan; Zhang; Xiang-Min; Shen

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of edaravone on the expression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34(GADD34).Methods:A total of 108 healthy male Sprague-Dawlcy rats were randomly divided into sham operation group,model group and edaravone.group(36 cases for each group).Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h followed by reperfusion in Sprague-Dawlev rats.Then.GAOD34 expression was measured with immunohistochemistry at different time-points after reperfusion in the peri-infarct regions of all rats.Results:The GADD34 expression was detected in the peri-infaret regions of rats 1 h after reperfusion,which reached its peak 24 h after reperfusion.And edaravone could significantly down-regulate the GAOD34 expression.Conclusions:Edaravon could down-regulate GADD34 expression,which suggests that edaravone may exert an important function in inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by scavenging free radicals in the upper stream.

  19. Tempranillo-derived grape seed extract induces apoptotic cell death and cell growth arrest in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, Javier; González-Gómez, David; Moreno, Daniel; Fernández-León, María F; Rodríguez, Ana B; Pariente, José A; Delgado-Adámez, Jonathan

    2013-12-01

    Although grape seed extract (GSE) has proven to be effective against various cancers, few studies have investigated the effects of GSE on human leukemia. In this study, we analysed the mechanisms involved in the apoptotic effects induced by GSE on human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells. Thus, GSE treatment succeeded in activating caspase-3 (P < 0.05), the activation being dose-dependent and time-dependent. Activation of caspase-3 induced by GSE was accompanied by mitochondrial membrane depolarization (P < 0.05). Moreover, disruption of mitochondrial integrity caused by GSE treatment subsequently led to activation of caspase-9 (P < 0.05), and also produced a slight increase in ROS levels (P < 0.05). Cytotoxic effects elicited by GSE treatment ultimately resulted in extensive S-phase arrest (P < 0.05) and a substantial increase in the intrinsic rate of apoptosis (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the GSE induces apoptotic cell death and cell growth inhibition in human leukemic HL-60 cells, which seems to be dependent on mitochondrial damage. Therefore, the GSE obtained from Tempranillo cultivars could be an effective approach to restrain uncontrolled cell proliferation and survival in leukemia cells.

  20. Myeloblastic leukemia cells conditionally blocked by myc-estrogen receptor chimeric transgenes for terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, M; Liebermann, D; Hoffman-Liebermann, B

    1993-05-01

    Conditional mutants of the myeloblastic leukemic M1 cell line, expressing the chimeric mycer transgene, have been established. It is shown that M1 mycer cells, like M1, undergo terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and programmed cell death (apoptosis) after treatment with the physiologic differentiation inducer interleukin-6. However, when beta-estradiol is included in the culture medium, M1 mycer cells respond to differentiation inducers like M1 myc cell lines, where the differentiation program is blocked at an intermediate stage. By manipulating the function of the mycer transgene product, it is shown that there is a 10-hour window during myeloid differentiation, from 30 to 40 hours after the addition of the differentiation inducer, when the terminal differentiation program switches from being dependent on c-myc suppression to becoming c-myc suppression independent, where activation of c-myc has no apparent effect on mature macrophages. M1 mycer cell lines provide a powerful tool to increase our understanding of the role of c-myc in normal myelopoiesis and in leukemogenesis, also providing a strategy to clone c-myc target genes.

  1. Newt orthologue of Growth arrest-specific 6 (NvGas6) is implicated in stress response during newt forelimb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beug, Shawn; Vascotto, Sandy G; Tsilfidis, Catherine

    2006-03-01

    Red-spotted newts are capable of regenerating various structures and organs through the process of epimorphic regeneration. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and their ligands are important for normal cellular development and physiology but most have not yet been characterised during regeneration. We have isolated a newt orthologue of Growth arrest-specific 6 (NvGas6), and examined its expression during forelimb regeneration and within a blastema cell line (B1H1). During limb regeneration, NvGas6 expression increases upon amputation, peaks during maximal blastema cell proliferation, and is subsequently downregulated during redifferentiation. Transcripts are localised to the wound epithelium and distal mesenchymal cells during dedifferentiation and proliferative phases, and scattered within redifferentiating tissues during later stages. In B1H1 cultures, NvGas6 is upregulated under reduced serum conditions and myogenesis. Treatment with mimosine and colchicine or exposure to heat shock or anoxia results in upregulation of NvGas6 expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that during regeneration, NvGas6 expression may be upregulated in response to cellular stress.

  2. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Enhances the Suppressive Function of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Mainly through Axl Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-ju Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Growth arrest-specific (Gas 6 is one of the endogenous ligands of TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk, and its role as an immune modulator has been recently emphasized. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are essential for the active suppression of autoimmunity. The present study was designed to investigate whether Tregs express TAM receptors and the potential role of Gas6-TAM signal in regulating the suppressive function of Tregs. Methods. The protein and mRNA levels of TAM receptors were determined by using Western blot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR. Then, TAM receptors were silenced using targeted siRNA or blocked with specific antibody. The suppressive function of Tregs was assessed by using a CFSE-based T cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of Foxp3 and CTLA4 whereas cytokines secretion levels were measured by ELISA assay. Results. Tregs express both Axl and Mertk receptors. Gas6 increases the suppressive function of Tregs in vitro and in mice. Both Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression on Tregs are enhanced after Gas6 stimulation. Gas6 enhances the suppressive activity of Tregs mainly through Axl receptor. Conclusion. Gas6 has a direct effect on the functions of CD4+CD25+Tregs mainly through its interaction with Axl receptor.

  3. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Enhances the Suppressive Function of CD4(+)CD25(+) Regulatory T Cells Mainly through Axl Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang-Ju; Zheng, Jia-Yi; Bian, Jia-Lan; Chen, Long-Wang; Dong, Ning; Yu, Yan; Hong, Guang-Liang; Chandoo, Arvine; Yao, Yong-Ming; Lu, Zhong-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Background. Growth arrest-specific (Gas) 6 is one of the endogenous ligands of TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk), and its role as an immune modulator has been recently emphasized. Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for the active suppression of autoimmunity. The present study was designed to investigate whether Tregs express TAM receptors and the potential role of Gas6-TAM signal in regulating the suppressive function of Tregs. Methods. The protein and mRNA levels of TAM receptors were determined by using Western blot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR. Then, TAM receptors were silenced using targeted siRNA or blocked with specific antibody. The suppressive function of Tregs was assessed by using a CFSE-based T cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of Foxp3 and CTLA4 whereas cytokines secretion levels were measured by ELISA assay. Results. Tregs express both Axl and Mertk receptors. Gas6 increases the suppressive function of Tregs in vitro and in mice. Both Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression on Tregs are enhanced after Gas6 stimulation. Gas6 enhances the suppressive activity of Tregs mainly through Axl receptor. Conclusion. Gas6 has a direct effect on the functions of CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs mainly through its interaction with Axl receptor.

  4. Mechanical versus manual chest compression for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC): a pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Gavin D; Lall, Ranjit; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Cooke, Matthew W; Horton, Jessica; Lamb, Sarah E; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Woollard, Malcolm; Carson, Andy; Smyth, Mike; Whitfield, Richard; Williams, Amanda; Pocock, Helen; Black, John J. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical chest compression devices have the potential to help maintain high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but despite their increasing use, little evidence exists for their effectiveness. We aimed to study whether the introduction of LUCAS-2 mechanical CPR into front-line emergency response vehicles would improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: The pre-hospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac...

  5. Zerumbone, a Sesquiterpene, Controls Proliferation and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Laryngeal Carcinoma Cell Line Hep-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegannathan, Srimathi Devi; Arul, Santhosh; Dayalan, Haripriya

    2016-07-01

    Zerumbone (ZER), a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet Smith, has been shown to possess antiproliferative, anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity against various types of human carcinoma. The molecular mechanism by which ZER mediates its activity against many cancer types is revealed by many studies. Upregulation of proapoptotic molecules and suppression of antiapoptotic gene expression are few of the mechanisms by which ZER mediates its effect. The present study is focused on investigating the effect of ZER on proliferation of laryngeal carcinoma cells (Hep-2). MTT assay results showed that ZER (0.01-100 μM) induced death of Hep-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner; significant suppression of proliferation of Hep-2 cells was seen with a IC50 value of 15 µM. ZER at a concentration of 15 and 30 μM for 48 h showed early signs of apoptosis as evidenced by confocal microscopy imaging. Flow cytometry studies showed that ZER induced cell cycle arrest. ZER arrested Hep-2 proliferation at S and G2/M phases of cell cycle. In conclusion, these results indicate that ZER has antiproliferative effect and arrests cell cycle in Hep-2 cells in vitro. This could be a potential anticancer drug against laryngeal carcinoma.

  6. Inhibition of p38-MAPK potentiates cisplatin-induced apoptosis via GSH depletion and increases intracellular drug accumulation in growth-arrested kidney tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Maria Elena; Quiroga, Adoración G; Castro, José; Ortiz, Alberto; Aller, Patricio; Mata, Felicísima

    2009-10-01

    We were interested in analyzing the regulation by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) of cisplatin-provoked toxicity in epithelial renal tubule cell lines, when assayed under culture conditions (cell confluence plus serum deprivation), which mimic the characteristics of a nonproliferating epithelium. Under these restrictive growth conditions, cisplatin induced apoptosis with lower efficacy than in exponentially growing cells, and decreased p38-MAPK phosphorylation in NRK-52E and other (LLC-PK1, MDCK, HK2) cell lines. Moreover, cisplatin-provoked apoptosis was potentiated by cotreatment with p38-MAPK-specific inhibitors (SB203580, SB220025) or transfection with a kinase-negative mutant of MKK6, whereas c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase/MAPK and ERK Kinase inhibitors were ineffective. By contrast, when applied to exponentially growing cells, cisplatin stimulated p38-MAPK phosphorylation and apoptosis, was attenuated by kinase inhibitors. Treatment of confluent/serum-deprived cells with cisplatin caused mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption and activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as indicated by the decrease in Bcl-X(L) expression, increase in Bax expression and cytochrome c release, and these effects were potentiated by cotreatment with SB203580. Treatment of confluent/serum-deprived cells with cisplatin plus SB203580 decreased the intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) content, and increased intracellular cisplatin accumulation as well as cisplatin binding to DNA. Cotreatment with the GSH-depleting agent D,L-buthionine-R,S-sulfoximine also potentiated cisplatin-provoked apoptosis. In summary, p38-MAPK inhibition potentiates cisplatin-provoked apoptosis in growth-arrested epithelial renal tubule cells, a result that may be explained at least in part by GSH depletion and drug transport alteration.

  7. The molecular mechanism of curcumol on inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis in Jurkat cells, a model of CD4⁺ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Xiaoji; Wang, Zhizhong; Zhong, Bing; Fang, Yongfei

    2014-08-01

    CD4(+) T cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) express growth signaling pathway in association with deregulated growth and resistance to apoptosis. The janus kinase (Jak) 3 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway play a critical role in interleukin-2 (IL-2)-induced CD4(+) T cell proliferation. The present study aimed to explore the anti-cell proliferation mechanism of curcumol, a pure monomer extracted from Chinese medical plant Rhizoma curcumae. Cell proliferation was determined using WST-1 assay after curcumol treatment. The cell cycle distribution and Bcl-2 protein expression were assessed by flow cytometry. The cellular morphology of apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33258 staining. The expressions of phosphorylated-Jak3 (p-Jak3), p-STAT3, and p-STAT5a following IL-2 stimulation were determined by western blot analysis. The Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay was used to detect the DNA binding activities of transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5. The study results showed that curcumol could inhibit the IL-2-induced Jurkat cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vitro. Curcumol could cause cell cycle arrest at the S phase, induce cell apoptosis, and inhibit the expression of Bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumol at 50μg/mL and Jak3 inhibitor ZM39923 could inhibit the phosphorylation of Jak3 and STAT5a. In conclusion, the underlying mechanism of curcumol on suppressing CD4(+) T cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis might partly be mediated by inhibition of Jak3-STAT5-related molecular activities and Bcl-2 expression, respectively; further studies are required in vivo to test the use of curcumol as a promising therapeutic option for RA.

  8. The effectiveness of the biannual application of silver nitrate solution followed by sodium fluoride varnish in arresting early childhood caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Li, Samantha KY; Wong, May CM; Lo, Edward CM

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be effective in arresting early childhood caries (ECC). Since SDF is not available in certain countries, some dentists use adjunctive application of 25 % silver nitrate (AgNO3) and 5 % sodium fluoride (NaF) to arrest ECC. This randomised controlled trial will systematically compare the efficacy of a 25 % AgNO3 solution followed by 5 % NaF varnish with that of a 38 % SDF solution in arresting ECC when applied at...

  9. The effectiveness of the biannual application of silver nitrate solution followed by sodium fluoride varnish in arresting early childhood caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Li, Samantha KY; Wong, May CM; Lo, Edward CM.

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be effective in arresting early childhood caries (ECC). Since SDF is not available in certain countries, some dentists use adjunctive application of 25 % silver nitrate (AgNO3) and 5 % sodium fluoride (NaF) to arrest ECC. This randomised controlled trial will systematically compare the efficacy of a 25 % AgNO3 solution followed by 5 % NaF varnish with that of a 38 % SDF solution in arresting ECC when applied at...

  10. [Association study between 834+7G/A and +1332C/T polymorphisms in the growth arrest specific 6 gene and risk of severe preeclampsia in Chinese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Liyan; Guan, Linbo; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jinxin; Zhu, Yue; Wei, Xin; Liu, Yu; Bai, Huai

    2017-02-10

    To investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of the growth arrest specific 6 (GAS6) gene and severe preeclampsia in a South West Han Chinese population. Blood samples from 167 patients with severe preeclampsia and 312 normal pregnant women as controls from Han Chinese in Chengdu area were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. C and T allele frequencies for +1332C/T site were 85.63% and 14.37% in the patient group, respectively, and 78.04% and 21.96% in control group, respectively. The TT genotype and variant T allelic frequencies of the +1332C/T polymorphism were significantly lower in patients with severe preeclampsia than in the control group (both Ppreeclampsia was 0.602 (95%CI: 0.401-0.904) in carriers for the variant T allele (χ(2)=6.045, P=0.014). G and A allele frequencies for 834+7G/A site were 72.75% and 27.25% in case group, respectively, and 74.36% and 25.64% in control group, respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies of the 834+7G/A polymorphism in patients with severe preeclampsia and controls showed no significant differences (both P>0.05). In addition, there was no significant association between the polymorphisms and blood pressure levels in the patient or control groups. The variant GAS6+1332 T allele is associated with a decreased risk for severe preeclampsia in a South West Han Chinese population. On the other hand, the 834+7G/A polymorphism has no effect on the severe preeclampsia.

  11. Glutathione reductase-null malaria parasites have normal blood stage growth but arrest during development in the mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Fuentes-Caraballo, Mariela; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel; Coppens, Isabelle; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Janse, Chris J; Serrano, Adelfa E

    2010-08-27

    Malaria parasites contain a complete glutathione (GSH) redox system, and several enzymes of this system are considered potential targets for antimalarial drugs. Through generation of a gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS)-null mutant of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei, we previously showed that de novo GSH synthesis is not critical for blood stage multiplication but is essential for oocyst development. In this study, phenotype analyses of mutant parasites lacking expression of glutathione reductase (GR) confirmed that GSH metabolism is critical for the mosquito oocyst stage. Similar to what was found for gamma-GCS, GR is not essential for blood stage growth. GR-null parasites showed the same sensitivity to methylene blue and eosin B as wild type parasites, demonstrating that these compounds target molecules other than GR in Plasmodium. Attempts to generate parasites lacking both GR and gamma-GCS by simultaneous disruption of gr and gamma-gcs were unsuccessful. This demonstrates that the maintenance of total GSH levels required for blood stage survival is dependent on either de novo GSH synthesis or glutathione disulfide (GSSG) reduction by Plasmodium GR. Our studies provide new insights into the role of the GSH system in malaria parasites with implications for the development of drugs targeting GSH metabolism.

  12. Platelet-derived growth factor-DD targeting arrests pathological angiogenesis by modulating glycogen synthase kinase-3beta phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Hou, Xu; Lee, Chunsik; Li, Yang; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Tang, Zhongshu; Zhang, Fan; Langer, Harald F; Arjunan, Pachiappan; Dong, Lijin; Wu, Zhijian; Zhu, Linda Y; Wang, Lianchun; Min, Wang; Colosi, Peter; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Li, Xuri

    2010-05-14

    Platelet-derived growth factor-DD (PDGF-DD) is a recently discovered member of the PDGF family. The role of PDGF-DD in pathological angiogenesis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain largely unexplored. In this study, using different animal models, we showed that PDGF-DD expression was up-regulated during pathological angiogenesis, and inhibition of PDGF-DD suppressed both choroidal and retinal neovascularization. We also demonstrated a novel mechanism mediating the function of PDGF-DD. PDGF-DD induced glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) Ser(9) phosphorylation and Tyr(216) dephosphorylation in vitro and in vivo, leading to increased cell survival. Consistently, GSK3beta activity was required for the antiangiogenic effect of PDGF-DD targeting. Moreover, PDGF-DD regulated the expression of GSK3beta and many other genes important for angiogenesis and apoptosis. Thus, we identified PDGF-DD as an important target gene for antiangiogenic therapy due to its pleiotropic effects on vascular and non-vascular cells. PDGF-DD inhibition may offer new therapeutic options to treat neovascular diseases.

  13. The role of control in entrepreneurial growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Fleck, Emma; Krueger, Norris

    In this article we seek to extend previous work on control by developing a theoretical framework for understanding the role of control in entrepreneurship. We explore power-control theory as a tool for understanding the risk-related behaviours among entrepreneurs. Self-efficacy has long been used...... as a proxy for entrepreneurial intentions. However, little research has attempted to establish the underlying mechanisms that produce or inhibit the development of self-efficacy. Social cognitive theory links self-efficacy to the exercise of personal control. Extending these findings to entrepreneurship...... of socialization in the family, and in particular to patriarchal dominance. Taking our departure from the critical realist approach, we propose a research framework for understanding the role of control and self-efficacy in determining entrepreneurial growth....

  14. Carbon nanotubes: controlled growth and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Notable progress has been made on the synthesis, properties and uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the past two decades. However, the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs with predefined and uniform structures remains a big challenge, and making full use of CNTs in applications still requires great effort. In this article, our strategies and recent progress on the controlled synthesis of SWCNTs by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed, and the applications of CNTs in lithium-ion batteries, transparent conductive films, and as connectors of metal atomic chains are discussed. Finally, future prospects for CNTs are considered.

  15. Physeal arrest of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzug, Joshua M; Little, Kevin; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common pediatric fractures. Although most of these fractures heal without complication, some result in partial or complete physeal arrest. The risk of physeal arrest can be reduced by avoiding known risk factors during fracture management, including multiple attempts at fracture reduction. Athletes may place substantial compressive and shear forces across the distal radial physes, making them prone to growth arrest. Timely recognition of physeal arrest can allow for more predictable procedures to be performed, such as distal ulnar epiphysiodesis. In cases of partial arrest, physeal bar excision with interposition grafting can be performed. Once ulnar abutment is present, more invasive procedures may be required, including ulnar shortening osteotomy or radial lengthening.

  16. CARI III Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Model through Induction of G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88% was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients.

  17. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  18. Suppression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45alpha expression confers resistance to sulindac and indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Shiun-Kwei; Hodges, Amy; Hoa, Neil

    2010-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as sulindac and indomethacin are a major cause of gastric erosions and ulcers. Induction of apoptosis by NSAIDs is an important mechanism involved. Understanding how NSAIDs affect genes that regulate apoptosis is useful for designing therapeutic or preventive strategies and for evaluating the efficacy of safer drugs being developed. We investigated whether growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45alpha (GADD45alpha), a stress signal response gene involved in regulation of DNA repair and induction of apoptosis, plays a part in NSAID-induced gastric mucosal injury and apoptosis in vivo in mice and in vitro in cultured human AGS and rat RGM-1 gastric epithelial cells. Intraperitoneal administration of sulindac and indomethacin both resulted in up-regulation of GADD45alpha expression and induction of significant injury and apoptosis in gastric mucosa of wild-type mice. GADD45alpha(-/-) mice were markedly more resistant to both sulindac- and indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal injury and apoptosis than wild-type mice. Sulindac sulfide and indomethacin treatments also concentration-dependently increased GADD45alpha expression and apoptosis in AGS and RGM-1 cells. Antisense suppression of GADD45alpha expression significantly reduced sulindac and indomethacin-induced activation of caspase-9 and apoptosis in AGS cells. Pretreatments with exogenous prostaglandins and small interfering RNA suppression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 did not affect up-regulation of GADD45alpha by sulindac sulfide and indomethacin in AGS cells. These findings indicate that GADD45alpha up-regulation is a COX-independent mechanism that is required for induction of severe gastric mucosal apoptosis and injury by NSAIDs, probably via a capase-9-dependent pathway of programmed cell death.

  19. Inhibition of activated receptor tyrosine kinases by Sunitinib induces growth arrest and sensitizes melanoma cells to Bortezomib by blocking Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Anabel; Velasco, Ana; Santacana, Maria; Dolcet, Xavier; Valls, Joan; Abal, Leandre; Moreno, Sara; Egido, Ramón; Casanova, Josep M; Puig, Susana; Vilella, Ramón; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Martí, Rosa M

    2012-02-15

    Despite the use of multiple therapeutic strategies, metastatic melanoma remains a challenge for oncologists. Thus, new approaches using combinational treatment may be used to try to improve the prognosis of this disease. In this report, we have analyzed the expression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in melanoma specimens and in four metastatic melanoma cell lines. Both melanoma specimens and cell lines expressed RTKs, suggesting that they may represent eventual targets for multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Suntinib. Sunitinib reduced the proliferation of two melanoma cell lines (M16 and M17) and increased apoptosis in one of them (M16). Moreover, the two metastatic melanoma cell lines harbored an activated receptor (PDGFRα and VEGFR, respectively), and Sunitinib suppressed the phosphorylation of the RTKs and their downstream targets Akt and ribosomal protein S6, in these two cell lines. Similar results were obtained when either PDGFRα or VEGFR2 expression was silenced by lentiviral-mediated short-hairpin RNA delivery in M16 and M17, respectively. To evaluate the interaction between Sunitinib and Bortezomib, median dose effect analysis using MTT assay was performed, and combination index was calculated. Bortezomib synergistically enhanced the Sunitinib-induced growth arrest in Sunitinib-sensitive cells (combination index < 1). Moreover, LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, sensitized melanoma cells to Bortezomib treatment, suggesting that downregulation of phospho-Akt by Sunitinib mediates the synergy obtained by Bortezomib + Sunitinib cotreatment. Altogether, our results suggest that melanoma cells harboring an activated RTK may be clinically responsive to pharmacologic RTK inhibition by Sunitinib, and a strategy combining Sunitinib and Bortezomib, may provide therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  20. Hwanggeumchal sorghum induces cell cycle arrest, and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis through Jak2/STAT pathways in breast cancer xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer.

  1. N-Methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced senescence-like growth arrest in colon cancer cells is associated with loss of adenomatous polyposis coli protein, microtubule organization, and telomeric DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Satya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a state in which mammalian cells enter into an irreversible growth arrest and altered biological functions. The senescence response in mammalian cells can be elicited by DNA-damaging agents. In the present study we report that the DNA-damaging agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG is able to induce senescence in the HCT-116 colon cancer cell line. Results Cells treated with lower concentrations of MNNG (0–25 microM for 50 h showed a dose-dependent increase in G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis; however, cells treated with higher concentrations of MNNG (50–100 microM showed a senescence-like G0/G1 phase arrest which was confirmed by increased expression of β-galactosidase, a senescence induced marker. The G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis were found to be associated with increased levels of p53 protein, but the senescence-like G0/G1 phase arrest was dissociated with p53 protein levels, since the p53 protein levels decreased in senescence-like arrested cells. We further, determined whether the decreased level of p53 was a transcriptional or a translational phenomenon. The results revealed that the decreased level of p53 protein in senescence-like arrested cells was a transcriptional phenomenon since p53 mRNA levels simultaneously decreased after treatment with higher concentrations of MNNG. We also examined the effect of MNNG treatment on other cell cycle-related proteins such as p21, p27, cyclin B1, Cdc2, c-Myc and max. The expression levels of these proteins were increased in cells treated with lower concentrations of MNNG, which supported the G2/M phase arrest. However, cells treated with higher concentrations of MNNG showed decreased levels of these proteins, and hence, may not play a role in cell cycle arrest. We then examined a possible association of the expression of APC protein and telomeric DNA signals with cellular senescence in MNNG-treated cells. We found that protein and m

  2. A case-control study of non-monitored ECG metrics preceding in-hospital bradyasystolic cardiac arrest: implication for predictive monitor alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Do, Duc; Bai, Yong; Boyle, Noel G

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether additional electrocardiographic (ECG) metrics not available on current patient monitors could predict bradyasystolic cardiac arrest in hospitalized adult patients. A retrospective case-control design was used to study eight ECG metrics from 22 adult bradyasystolic patients and their 45 control patients. The eight ECG metrics included heart rate, QRS width, interval from P-wave peak to QRS onset (PRp), heart rate-corrected interval from QRS onset to T-wave peak (QTpc), amplitude of QRS peak (rAmp), amplitude of P-wave (pAmp), amplitude of T-wave (tAmp), and absolute difference in the ECG amplitudes at QRS onset and offset divided by rAmp, that is, relative J-point amplitude (relJAmp). We derived the maximal true-positive rate (TPR) of detecting cardiac arrest at a globally minimal false-positive rate (FPR) for each metric and for the absolute slope values resulted from a linear fitting of the time series of these metrics. We also recorded the first time crossing the detection threshold to the time of arrest as lead time. Conditions of relJAmp >20% and PRp >196.6 ms, respectively, achieved a TPR of 22.7% and 27.3% with zero FPRs. The lead prediction time of these two conditions was 5.7 ± 6.8 hours and 8.0 ± 7.2 hours, respectively. Performance of triggers based on the absolute slope values depended on the window length used for linear fitting. rAmp slope of a 2-hour window, PRp slope of a 30-minute window, and relJAmp slope of a 2-hour window achieved the best TPR of 27.3% (FPR = 2.3%, lead time = 6.5 ± 5.7 hours), 14.3% (FPR=0.0%, lead time = 10.9 ± 10.9), and 18.2% (FPR = 2.3%, lead time = 8.8 ± 9.8), respectively. McNemar test showed that only relJAmp >20.0% is significantly different from the baseline trigger of HR >149.3 bpm (p=0.046). In addition, metrics-based and slope-based triggers were complementary as an "OR" combination of two single-metric triggers raised the TPR up to 45.4% with zero FPR. It is feasible to compute

  3. Virtual water controlled demographic growth of nations

    CERN Document Server

    Suweis, Samir; Maritan, Amos; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Population growth is in general constrained by food production, which in turn depends on the access to water resources. At a country level, some populations use more water than they control because of their ability to import food and the virtual water required for its production. Here, we investigate the dependence of demographic growth on available water resources for exporting and importing nations. By quantifying the carrying capacity of nations based on calculations of the virtual water available through the food trade network, we point to the existence of a global water unbalance. We suggest that current export rates will not be maintained and consequently we question the long-run sustainability of the food trade system as a whole. Water rich regions are likely to soon reduce the amount of virtual water they export, thus leaving import-dependent regions without enough water to sustain their populations. We also investigate the potential impact of possible scenarios that might mitigate these effects throu...

  4. 液压阻拦机定长冲跑控制规律优化%Optimization and Kinetic Simulation of Constant Runout Control System of Arresting Gear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑茂; 王超; 黄胜

    2013-01-01

    To gain the optimum control regularity of the constant runout control system,the kinetic simulation for MK7-3 arresting gear was completed and the control valve flow area of the constant runout was optimized using Hicks-Henne shape function and the steepest descent method.Finally,kinetic simulation of different weights,engaged speeds and thrusts indicates that different aircrafts can be arrested at a constant distance and that the loads on wires and the acceleration of aircrafts are proper,showing the validity and the safety of the optimized control regularity.%为确定舰载机最优阻拦定长冲跑控制规律,对美国MK7-3型液压阻拦机进行了动力学仿真,并采用Hicks-Henne形状函数和最速下降法对定长冲跑控制阀通流面积曲线进行了优化.对不同质量、进场速度和发动机推力的舰载机进行了阻拦仿真实验,结果表明:优化后的定长冲跑控制规律能使不同质量、进场速度和发动机推力的舰载机均在相同的阻拦距离上停下来,且钢索张力和舰载机加速度变化规律合理,证明了本文所述优化方法的合理性和安全性.

  5. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest following trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K-G

    2016-11-01

    For decades, survival rates of cardiac arrest following trauma were reported between 0 and 2 %. Since 2005, survival rates have increased with a wide range up to 39 % and good neurological recovery in every second person injured for unknown reasons. Especially in children, high survival rates with good neurologic outcomes are published. Resuscitation following traumatic cardiac arrest differs significantly from nontraumatic causes. Paramount is treatment of reversible causes, which include massive bleeding, hypoxia, tension pneumothorax, and pericardial tamponade. Treatment of reversible causes should be simultaneous. Chest compression is inferior following traumatic cardiac arrest and should never delay treatment of reversible causes of the traumatic cardiac arrest. In massive bleeding, bleeding control has priority. Damage control resuscitation with permissive hypotension, aggressive coagulation therapy, and damage control surgery represent the pillars of initial treatment. Cardiac arrest due to hypoxia should be resolved by airway management and ventilation. Tension pneumothorax should be decompressed by finger thoracostomy, pericardial tamponade by resuscitative thoracotomy. In addition, resuscitative thoracotomy allows direct and indirect bleeding control. Untreated impact brain apnea may rapidly lead to cardiac arrest and requires quick opening of the airway and effective oxygenation. Established algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrest following trauma enable a safe, structured, and effective management.

  6. Effect of Common Genetic Variants of Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Gene on Insulin Resistance, Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in an Asian Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hsun Hsieh

    Full Text Available Growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6, a vitamin K-dependent protein, has been implicated in systemic inflammation, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR. Data from recent studies suggest that polymorphisms in the Gas6 gene are associated with cardiovascular disorders and type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, the association of Gas6 gene variants with obesity, IR, and T2D development has not been explored.Four common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the Gas6 gene were genotyped in 984 participants from the Stanford Asia-Pacific Program for Hypertension and Insulin Resistance (SAPPHIRe family cohort. An insulin suppression test was performed to determine IR based on steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG. Associations between IR indices and obesity, and SNP genotypes, based on previously-reported data for this cohort (Phase I, were analyzed. In the present follow-up study (Phase II, the effects of gene variants of Gas6 on the progression to T2D were explored in individuals who were free of T2D in Phase I. The mean follow-up period for Phase II was 5.7 years.The mean age of the study population in Phase I was 49.5 years and 16.7% of individuals developed T2D during follow-up. After adjusting for covariates, three SNPs (rs8191973, rs8197974, and rs7323932 were found to be associated with SSPG levels (p = 0.007, p = 0.03, and p = 0.011, respectively. This association remained significant after multiple testing and showed a significant interaction with physical activity for SNP rs8191973. However, no other significant correlations were observed between Gas6 polymorphisms and other indices of IR or obesity. A specific haplotype, AACG (from rs8191974, rs7323932, rs7331124, and rs8191973, was positively associated with SSPG levels (p = 0.0098. None of the polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of T2D development.Our results suggest that Gas6 gene variants are associated with IR, although their effects on subsequent progression to T2D were minimal in

  7. Simultaneous changes in the function and expression of beta 1 integrins during the growth arrest of poorly differentiated colorectal cells (LISP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Roela

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Cells usually lose adhesion and increase proliferation and migration during malignant transformation. Here, we studied how proliferation can affect the other two characteristics, which ultimately lead to invasion and metastasis. We determined the expression of ß1 integrins, as well as adhesion and migration towards laminin-1, fibronectin, collagens type I and type IV presented by LISP-1 colorectal cancer cells exposed to 2.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, an agent capable of decreasing proliferation in this poorly differentiated colorectal cell line. Untreated cells (control, as shown by flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies, expressed alpha2 (63.8 ± 11.3% positive cells, alpha3 (93.3 ± 7.0%, alpha5 (50.4 ± 12.0% and alpha6 (34.1 ± 4.9% integrins but not alpha1, alpha4, alphav or ß4. Cells adhered well to laminin-1 (73.4 ± 6.0% and fibronectin (40.0 ± 2.0% substrates but very little to collagens. By using blocking monoclonal antibodies, we showed that alpha2, alpha3 and alpha6 mediated laminin-1 adhesion, but neither alpha3 nor alpha5 contributed to fibronectin adherence. DMSO arrested cells at G0/G1 (control: 55.0 ± 2.4% vs DMSO: 70.7 ± 2.5% while simultaneously reducing alpha5 (24.2 ± 19% and alpha6 (14.3 ± 10.8% expression as well as c-myc mRNA (7-fold, the latter shown by Northern blotting. Although the adhesion rate did not change after exposure to DMSO, alpha3 and alpha5 played a major role in laminin-1 and fibronectin adhesion, respectively. Migration towards laminin-1, which was clearly increased upon exposure to DMSO (control: 6 ± 2 cells vs DMSO: 64 ± 6 cells, was blocked by an antibody against alpha6. We conclude that the effects of DMSO on LISP-1 proliferation were accompanied by concurrent changes in the expression and function of integrins, consequently modulating adhesion/migration, and revealing a complex interplay between function/expression and the proliferative state of cells.

  8. Simultaneous changes in the function and expression of beta 1 integrins during the growth arrest of poorly differentiated colorectal cells (LISP-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roela, R A; Brentani, M M; Katayama, M L H; Reis, M; Federico, M H H

    2003-08-01

    Cells usually lose adhesion and increase proliferation and migration during malignant transformation. Here, we studied how proliferation can affect the other two characteristics, which ultimately lead to invasion and metastasis. We determined the expression of beta 1 integrins, as well as adhesion and migration towards laminin-1, fibronectin, collagens type I and type IV presented by LISP-1 colorectal cancer cells exposed to 2.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an agent capable of decreasing proliferation in this poorly differentiated colorectal cell line. Untreated cells (control), as shown by flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies, expressed alpha 2 (63.8 11.3% positive cells), alpha 3 (93.3 7.0%), alpha 5 (50.4 12.0%) and alpha 6 (34.1 4.9%) integrins but not alpha1, alpha 4, alpha v or 4. Cells adhered well to laminin-1 (73.4 6.0%) and fibronectin (40.0 2.0%) substrates but very little to collagens. By using blocking monoclonal antibodies, we showed that alpha 2, alpha 3 and alpha 6 mediated laminin-1 adhesion, but neither alpha 3 nor alpha 5 contributed to fibronectin adherence. DMSO arrested cells at G0/G1 (control: 55.0 2.4% vs DMSO: 70.7 2.5%) while simultaneously reducing alpha 5 (24.2 19%) and alpha 6 (14.3 10.8%) expression as well as c-myc mRNA (7-fold), the latter shown by Northern blotting. Although the adhesion rate did not change after exposure to DMSO, alpha 3 and alpha 5 played a major role in laminin-1 and fibronectin adhesion, respectively. Migration towards laminin-1, which was clearly increased upon exposure to DMSO (control: 6 2 cells vs DMSO: 64 6 cells), was blocked by an antibody against alpha 6. We conclude that the effects of DMSO on LISP-1 proliferation were accompanied by concurrent changes in the expression and function of integrins, consequently modulating adhesion/migration, and revealing a complex interplay between function/expression and the proliferative state of cells.

  9. Alcohol, drug and other prior crimes and risk of arrest in handgun purchasers: protocol for a controlled observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintemute, Garen J; Kass, Philip H; Stewart, Susan L; Cerdá, Magdalena; Gruenewald, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Alcohol abuse is common in the USA and is a well-established risk factor for violence. Other drug use and criminal activity are risk factors as well and frequently occur together with alcohol abuse. Firearm ownership is also common; there are >50 million firearm owners in the USA. This study assesses the relationships between alcohol and drug abuse and future violence among firearm owners, which no prior research has done. Design and study population This records-based retrospective cohort study will involve all persons who legally purchased handguns in California in 2001—approximately 116 000 individuals—with follow-up through the end of 2013. Methods The principal exposures include prior convictions for alcohol-related and drug-related offenses. The primary outcome measure is an arrest following handgun purchase for a violent Crime Index offense: homicide, rape, robbery or aggravated assault. Subjects will be considered at risk for outcome events for only as long as their residence in California can be established independently of outcome events. Covariates include individual characteristics (eg, age, sex, criminal history, firearm purchase history) and community characteristics (eg, demographics, socioeconomic measures, firearm ownership and alcohol outlet density). We will employ survival analytic methods, expressing effects as HRs. Discussion The results of this large-scale study are likely to be generalisable and to have important implications for violence prevention policies and programmes. PMID:26498316

  10. Growth-arrest-specific 7C protein inhibits tumor metastasis via the N-WASP/FAK/F-actin and hnRNP U/β-TrCP/β-catenin pathways in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Ruo-Chia; Chang, Jer-Wei; Mao, Jiou-Shan; Tsai, Charng-Dar; Wu, Pei-Chen; Lin, Cuei-Jyuan; Lu, Yi-Lin; Liao, Sheng-You; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Hsu, Han-Shui; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Growth-arrest-specific 7 (GAS7) belongs to a group of adaptor proteins that coordinate the actin cytoskeleton. Among human GAS7 isoforms, only GAS7C possesses a Src homology 3 domain. We report here that GAS7C acts as a migration suppressor and can serve as a prognostic biomarker in lung cancer. GAS7C overexpression reduces lung cancer migration, whereas GAS7C knockdown enhances cancer cell migration. Importantly, ectopically overexpressed GAS7C binds tightly with N-WASP thus inactivates the ...

  11. Combination of Low Concentration of (−-Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG and Curcumin Strongly Suppresses the Growth of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Vitro and in Vivo through Causing Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Huang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available (−-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and curcumin are two naturally derived agents that have been widely investigated worldwide. They exhibit their anti-tumor effects in many types of cancers. In the current study, the effect of the combination of the two agents on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells was investigated. The results revealed that at low concentrations, the combination of the EGCG and curcumin strongly enhanced cell cycle arrest. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the cells were arrested at G1 and S/G2 phases. Two main cell cycle related proteins cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 were significantly inhibited at the present of EGCG and curcumin. EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine fluorescence staining showed that the DNA replication was significantly blocked. A clonal growth assay also confirmed a marked repression of cell growth. In a lung cancer xenograft node mice model, combination of EGCG and curcumin exhibited protective effect against weight loss due to tumor burden. Tumor growth was strongly repressed by the combination of the two agents, without causing any serious side-effect. Overall, these results strongly suggest that EGCG in combination with curcumin could be a candidate for chemoprevention agent of NSCLC.

  12. Economic growth and carbon emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    The question about whether environmental improvement is compatible with continued economic growth remains unclear and requires further study in a specific context. This study intends to provide insight on the potential for carbon emissions control in the absence of international agreement, and connect the empirical analysis with theoretical framework. The Chinese electricity generation sector is used as a case study to demonstrate the problem. Both social planner and private problems are examined to derive the conditions that define the optimal level of production and pollution. The private problem will be demonstrated under the emission regulation using an emission tax, an input tax and an abatement subsidy respectively. The social optimal emission flow is imposed into the private problem. To provide tractable analytical results, a Cobb-Douglas type production function is used to describe the joint production process of the desired output and undesired output (i.e., electricity and emissions). A modified Hamiltonian approach is employed to solve the system and the steady state solutions are examined for policy implications. The theoretical analysis suggests that the ratio of emissions to desired output (refer to 'emission factor'), is a function of productive capital and other parameters. The finding of non-constant emission factor shows that reducing emissions without further cutting back the production of desired outputs is feasible under some circumstances. Rather than an ad hoc specification, the optimal conditions derived from our theoretical framework are used to examine the relationship between desired output and emission level. Data comes from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Electric Power Yearbook and provincial information of electricity generation for the year of 1993-2003 are used to estimate the Cobb-Douglas type joint production by the full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method. The empirical analysis shed light on the optimal

  13. EGFR-targeted plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles suppress lung tumor growth by abrogating G2/M cell-cycle arrest and inducing DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shinji Kuroda,1 Justina Tam,2 Jack A Roth,1 Konstantin Sokolov,2 Rajagopal Ramesh3–5 1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Pathology, 4Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, 5Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Background: We have previously demonstrated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (225-NP produce a therapeutic effect in human lung cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 225-NP-mediated antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo using the EGFR-mutant HCC827 cell line. Methods: The growth inhibitory effect of 225-NP on lung tumor cells was determined by cell viability and cell-cycle analysis. Protein expression related to autophagy, apoptosis, and DNA-damage were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted using a human lung tumor xenograft mouse model. Results: The 225-NP treatment markedly reduced tumor cell viability at 72 hours compared with the cell viability in control treatment groups. Cell-cycle analysis showed the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was reduced when treated with 225-NP, with a concomitant increase in the number of cells in Sub-G1 phase, indicative of cell death. Western blotting showed LC3B and PARP cleavage, indicating 225-NP-treatment activated both autophagy- and apoptosis-mediated cell death. The 225-NP strongly induced γH2AX and phosphorylated histone H3, markers indicative of DNA damage and mitosis, respectively. Additionally, significant γH2AX foci formation was observed in 225-NP-treated cells compared with control treatment groups, suggesting 225-NP induced cell death by triggering DNA damage. The 225-NP-mediated DNA damage involved abrogation of the

  14. Cardiac arrest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  15. Pittsburgh Police Arrest Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Arrest data contains information on people taken into custody by City of Pittsburgh police officers. More serious crimes such as felony offenses are more likely to...

  16. 可控金属氧化物避雷器操作冲击动作特性试验方法%Test Method for Switching Impulse Response Properties of Controllable Metal Oxide Surge Arrester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺子鸣; 陈维江; 陈秀娟; 颜湘莲

    2012-01-01

    The controllable metal oxide surge arrester is a new electrical set-up which can deeply reduce switching overvoltage in UHV transmission system.The conventional arrester test method could not be used to validate the switching impulse response properties of the controllable metal oxide surge arrester.Consequently,we discussed the switching impulse response properties of the controllable metal oxide surge arrester,and put forward a new test method which switching impulse current test and switching impulse voltage test were carried out respectively fitting test requirements.Moreover,we verified the response delay of controllable switch and the residual voltage of controllable metal oxide surge arrester in the test.The parallel modulated wave capacitor was used in the existing residual voltage test circuit to implement the switching impulse current test method,the impulse voltage generator,regulator and measurement circuit were used to implement the switching impulse voltage test method,and a designed 110 kV controllable metal oxide surge arrester was used in the verification test.In the test,the controllable arrester could respond reliably under switching impulse voltage.By comparing with the conventional arrester,the decreased range of the residual voltage of controllable arrester was close to the designed controllable rate of 25% in the same current.Furthermore,the designed controllable arrester with expected limit effect was verified,and the availability of the approach was verified.%可控金属氧化物避雷器(简称可控避雷器)是一种可以深度降低特高压交流输电系统操作过电压的新型设备,现有的避雷器试验方法无法检验其在操作冲击下的动作特性。为此,分析了可控避雷器在操作冲击下的动作特性,设计了检验可控开关动作时延和可控开关动作前后避雷器残压这两个动作特性的试验方法,采用操作冲击电流和操作冲击电压分别进行了试验

  17. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  18. A synthetic circuit for selectively arresting daughter cells to create aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Bruno; Silver, Pamela A; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M

    2010-05-01

    The ability to engineer genetic programs governing cell fate will permit new safeguards for engineered organisms and will further the biological understanding of differentiation and aging. Here, we have designed, built and implemented a genetic device in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls cell-cycle progression selectively in daughter cells. The synthetic device was built in a modular fashion by combining timing elements that are coupled to the cell cycle, i.e. cell-cycle specific promoters and protein degradation domains, and an enzymatic domain which conditionally confers cell arrest. Thus, in the presence of a drug, the device is designed to arrest growth of only newly-divided daughter cells in the population. Indeed, while the engineered cells grow normally in the absence of drug, with the drug the engineered cells display reduced, linear growth on the population level. Fluorescence microscopy of single cells shows that the device induces cell arrest exclusively in daughter cells and radically shifts the age distribution of the resulting population towards older cells. This device, termed the 'daughter arrester', provides a blueprint for more advanced devices that mimic developmental processes by having control over cell growth and death.

  19. EGFR-targeted plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles suppress lung tumor growth by abrogating G2/M cell-cycle arrest and inducing DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Shinji; Tam, Justina; Roth, Jack A; Sokolov, Konstantin; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (225-NP) produce a therapeutic effect in human lung cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 225-NP-mediated antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo using the EGFR-mutant HCC827 cell line. Methods The growth inhibitory effect of 225-NP on lung tumor cells was determined by cell viability and cell-cycle analysis. Protein expression related to autophagy, apoptosis, and DNA-damage were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted using a human lung tumor xenograft mouse model. Results The 225-NP treatment markedly reduced tumor cell viability at 72 hours compared with the cell viability in control treatment groups. Cell-cycle analysis showed the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was reduced when treated with 225-NP, with a concomitant increase in the number of cells in Sub-G1 phase, indicative of cell death. Western blotting showed LC3B and PARP cleavage, indicating 225-NP-treatment activated both autophagy- and apoptosis-mediated cell death. The 225-NP strongly induced γH2AX and phosphorylated histone H3, markers indicative of DNA damage and mitosis, respectively. Additionally, significant γH2AX foci formation was observed in 225-NP-treated cells compared with control treatment groups, suggesting 225-NP induced cell death by triggering DNA damage. The 225-NP-mediated DNA damage involved abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint by inhibiting BRCA1, Chk1, and phospho-Cdc2/CDK1 protein expression. In vivo therapy studies showed 225-NP treatment reduced EGFR phosphorylation, increased γH2AX foci, and induced tumor cell apoptosis, resulting in suppression of tumor growth. Conclusion The 225-NP treatment induces DNA damage and abrogates G2/M phase of the cell cycle, leading to cellular apoptosis and suppression of lung tumor growth

  20. Antrodia camphorata induces G(1) cell-cycle arrest in human premyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells and suppresses tumor growth in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsin-Ling; Kumar, K J Senthil; Kuo, Ya-Ting; Chang, Hebron C; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hsu, Li-Sung; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a well-known medicinal mushroom in Taiwan. The broth from a fermented culture of Antrodia camphorata (AC) has been shown to induce apoptosis in cultured human premyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of AC on cell cycle arrest in vitro in HL-60 cells and on tumor regression in vivo using an athymic nude mouse model. We found that AC (20-80 μg mL(-1)) treatment significantly induced G1 cell-cycle arrest in HL-60 cells by reducing the levels of cyclin D1, CDK4, cyclin E, CDK2, cyclin A, and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (p-Rb). Moreover, AC treatment led to significantly increased protein expression levels of CDK inhibitors, including p21(WAF1) and p15(NIK4B). Additionally, AC treatment markedly induced intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, the in vivo study results revealed that AC treatment was effective in terms of delaying the tumor incidence in nude mice that had been inoculated with HL-60 cells as well as in reducing the tumor burden. Histological analysis confirmed that AC treatment significantly modulated the xenografted tumor progression as demonstrated by a reduction in mitotic cells. Our data strongly suggest that Antrodia camphorata could be an anti-cancer agent for human leukemia.

  1. Quality control system response to stochastic growth of amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Lizana, Ludvig; Otzen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic model describing aggregation of misfolded proteins and degradation by the protein quality control system in a single cell. Aggregate growth is contrasted by the cell quality control system, that attacks them at different stages of the growth process, with an efficiency t...

  2. IL-4 protects the B-cell lymphoma cell line CH31 from anti-IgM-induced growth arrest and apoptosis:contribution of the PI-3' kinase/AKT pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregory B Carey; Elena Semenova; Xiulan Qi; Achsah D Keegan

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin-4(IL-4)promotes lymphocyte survival and protects primary lymphomas from apoptosis.Previous studies reported differential requirements for the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6(STAT6)and IRS2/phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase(PI-3K)signaling pathways in mediating the IL-4-induced protection from Fas-mediated apoptosis.In this study,we characterized IL-4-activated signals that suppress anti-IgM-mediated apoptosis and growth arrest of CH31,a model B-cell lymphoma line.In CH31,anti-IgM treatment leads to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential,phospho-Akt,phospho-CDK2,and c-myc protein.These losses are followed by massive induction ofp27Kip1 protein expression,cell cycle arrest,and apoptosis.Strikingly,IL-4 treatment prevented or reversed these changes.Furthermore,IL-4 suppressed the activation of caspases 9 and 3,and,in contrast to previous reports,induced the phosphorylation(deactivation)of BAD.IL-4 treatment also induced expression of BclxL,a STAT6-dependent gene.Pharmacologic inhibitors and dominant inhibitory forms of PI-3K andAkt abrogated the anti-apoptotic function of IL-4.These results suggest that the IL-4 receptor activates several signaling pathways,with the Akt pathway playing a major role in suppression of the apoptotic program activated by anti-IgM.

  3. Paradigm shift in plant growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Christian

    2015-06-01

    For plants to grow they need resources and appropriate conditions that these resources are converted into biomass. While acknowledging the importance of co-drivers, the classical view is still that carbon, that is, photosynthetic CO2 uptake, ranks above any other drivers of plant growth. Hence, theory and modelling of growth traditionally is carbon centric. Here, I suggest that this view is not reflecting reality, but emerged from the availability of methods and process understanding at leaf level. In most cases, poorly understood processes of tissue formation and cell growth are governing carbon demand, and thus, CO2 uptake. Carbon can only be converted into biomass to the extent chemical elements other than carbon, temperature or cell turgor permit.

  4. Mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A Villablanca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH for survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. However, there is little literature demonstrating a survival benefit. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing the efficacy of MTH in patients successfully resuscitated from OHCA. Materials and Methods: Electronic databases were searched for RCT involving MTH in survivors of OHCA, and the results were put through a meta-analysis. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality, and the secondary endpoint was favorable neurological function. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were computed using the Mantel-Haenszel method. A fixed-effect model was used and, if heterogeneity (I2 was >40, effects were analyzed using a random model. Results: Six RCT (n = 1400 patients were included. Overall survival was 50.7%, and favorable neurological recovery was 45.5%. Pooled data demonstrated no significant all-cause mortality (OR, 0.81; 95% CI 0.55-1.21 or neurological recovery (OR, 0.77; 95% CI 0.47-1.24. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated that MTH did not confer benefit on overall survival rate and neurological recovery in patients resuscitated from OHCA.

  5. Growth of III-V films by control of MBE growth front stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    For the growth of strain-layer materials and high quality single and multiple quantum wells, the instantaneous control of growth front stoichiometry is critical. The process of the invention adjusts the offset or phase of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) control shutters to program the instantaneous arrival or flux rate of In and As4 reactants to grow InAs. The interrupted growth of first In, then As4, is also a key feature.

  6. 4β-Hydroxywithanolide E from Physalis peruviana (golden berry inhibits growth of human lung cancer cells through DNA damage, apoptosis and G2/M arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zong-Lun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The crude extract of the fruit bearing plant, Physalis peruviana (golden berry, demonstrated anti-hepatoma and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this process is still unknown. Methods Herein, we isolated the main pure compound, 4β-Hydroxywithanolide (4βHWE derived from golden berries, and investigated its antiproliferative effect on a human lung cancer cell line (H1299 using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis analyses. An alkaline comet-nuclear extract (NE assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage due to the drug. Results It was shown that DNA damage was significantly induced by 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL 4βHWE for 2 h in a dose-dependent manner (p p 50 of 4βHWE in H1299 cells for 24 and 48 h were 0.6 and 0.71 μg/mL, respectively, suggesting it could be a potential therapeutic agent against lung cancer. In a flow cytometric analysis, 4βHWE produced cell cycle perturbation in the form of sub-G1 accumulation and slight arrest at the G2/M phase with 1 μg/mL for 12 and 24 h, respectively. Using flow cytometric and annexin V/propidium iodide immunofluorescence double-staining techniques, these phenomena were proven to be apoptosis and complete G2/M arrest for H1299 cells treated with 5 μg/mL for 24 h. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that golden berry-derived 4βHWE is a potential DNA-damaging and chemotherapeutic agent against lung cancer.

  7. Novel protein controls growth regulators in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A recent study by CAS researchers could add new dimensions to the understanding of downstream signaling mechanism of Brassinosteroids(BRs), a group of plant growth regulators, in rice. Their work was published by the August 21 issue of the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

  8. Effectiveness of feedback with a smartwatch for high-quality chest compressions during adult cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chiwon; Lee, Juncheol; Oh, Jaehoon; Song, Yeongtak; Chee, Youngjoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Shin, Hyungoo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for using smartwatches with a built-in accelerometer as feedback devices for high-quality chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, to the best of our knowledge, no previous study has reported the effects of this feedback on chest compressions in action. A randomized, parallel controlled study of 40 senior medical students was conducted to examine the effect of chest compression feedback via a smartwatch during cardiopulmonary resuscitation of manikins. A feedback application was developed for the smartwatch, in which visual feedback was provided for chest compression depth and rate. Vibrations from smartwatch were used to indicate the chest compression rate. The participants were randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups, and they performed chest compressions on manikins for 2 min continuously with or without feedback, respectively. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth (≥5 cm and ≤6 cm) was assessed as the primary outcome, and the chest compression depth, chest compression rate, and the proportion of complete chest decompression (≤1 cm of residual leaning) were recorded as secondary outcomes. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth in the intervention group was significantly higher than that in the control group (64.6±7.8% versus 43.1±28.3%; p = 0.02). The mean compression depth and rate and the proportion of complete chest decompressions did not differ significantly between the two groups (all p>0.05). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-related feedback via a smartwatch could provide assistance with respect to the ideal range of chest compression depth, and this can easily be applied to patients with out-of-hospital arrest by rescuers who wear smartwatches.

  9. The European Arrest Warrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora-Ioana Balan-Rusu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper it is generally examined the institution of the European arrest warrant according to the latest changes and additions through the adoption of a new European legislative act. The paper is a continuation of research in the area of judicial cooperation in criminal matters in the European Union. It may be useful to the judicial bodies with the responsibilities of issuing and executing a specific European arrest warrant and to academics and students in law schools. The research results, the essential contribution, the originality consist of the general examination of the institution, the critical remarks and proposals for amending and completing certain provisions insufficiently clear.

  10. A polyphenolic fraction from grape seeds causes irreversible growth inhibition of breast carcinoma MDA-MB468 cells by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinases activation and inducing G1 arrest and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, C; Sharma, Y; Zhao, J; Agarwal, R

    2000-07-01

    In recent years, significant emphasis is being placed on identifying naturally occurring cancer preventive and interventive agents. In this regard, a polyphenolic fraction isolated from grape seeds (hereafter referred as GSP) has recently been shown by us and others to prevent tumorigenesis in mouse skin models. Chemical analysis of GSP has shown that it is largely constituted with procyanidins that are strong antioxidants. Breast cancer is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in United States women. Accordingly, here we investigated the effect of GSP on mitogenic signaling and regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis as molecular targets for the growth arrest, apoptotic death, and/or differentiation of estrogen-independent MDA-MB468 human breast carcinoma cells. Treatment of cells with GSP (at 25-, 50-, and 75-microg/ml doses for 1-3 days) resulted in a highly significant inhibition (90% to complete, P cancer in humans.

  11. Form planning Control to growth management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2016-01-01

    The 1950s marked the birth of comprehensive planning in Denmark, when a number of socio-spatial challenges emerged as a result of the country’s rapid economic growth. These challenges were eventually addressed by the administrative reform of 1970 and the following planning reform implemented from...... caused that spatial planning be regarded more as a cost than an asset. Accordingly, it is evident that the Danish planning domain has progressively lost political clout and the focus is changed towards facilitation and management of economic growth.......The 1950s marked the birth of comprehensive planning in Denmark, when a number of socio-spatial challenges emerged as a result of the country’s rapid economic growth. These challenges were eventually addressed by the administrative reform of 1970 and the following planning reform implemented from...... 1970 until 1977. The reforms established an integrated planning system aiming to achieve spatial coordination through a hierarchy of plans occurring at multiple scales and a certain degree of horizontal and vertical integration of policies across sectors and jurisdictions. Since then, Denmark has been...

  12. The role of control in entrepreneurial growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Fleck, Emma; Krueger, Norris

    In this article we seek to extend previous work on control by developing a theoretical framework for understanding the role of control in entrepreneurship. We explore power-control theory as a tool for understanding the risk-related behaviours among entrepreneurs. Self-efficacy has long been used...... as a proxy for entrepreneurial intentions. However, little research has attempted to establish the underlying mechanisms that produce or inhibit the development of self-efficacy. Social cognitive theory links self-efficacy to the exercise of personal control. Extending these findings to entrepreneurship...

  13. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid inhibits growth of Erwinia amylovora and acts as a seed germination-arrest factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xiaoyun; Azevedo, Mark D; Armstrong, Donald J; Banowetz, Gary M; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2013-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) shares biological activities with 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a related molecule produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6. We found that culture filtrates of a P. aeruginosa strain overproducing AMB weakly interfered with seed germination of the grassy weed Poa annua and strongly inhibited growth of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the devastating orchard crop disease known as fire blight. AMB was active against a 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine-resistant isolate of E. amylovora, suggesting that the molecular targets of the two oxyvinylglycines in Erwinia do not, or not entirely, overlap. The AMB biosynthesis and transport genes were shown to be organized in two separate transcriptional units, ambA and ambBCDE, which were successfully expressed from IPTG-inducible tac promoters in the heterologous host P. fluorescens CHA0. Engineered AMB production enabled this model biocontrol strain to become inhibitory against E. amylovora and to weakly interfere with the germination of several graminaceous seeds. We conclude that AMB production requires no additional genes besides ambABCDE and we speculate that their expression in marketed fire blight biocontrol strains could potentially contribute to disease control.

  14. Inhibition of in vitro growth and arrest in the G0/G1 phase of HCT8 line human colon cancer cells by kaempferide triglycoside from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineti, Valentina; Tognarini, Isabella; Azzari, Chiara; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Clematis, Francesca; Dolci, Marcello; Lanzotti, Virginia; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Curir, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    The effects of phytoestrogens have been studied in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in various non-gonadal targets. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates a protective effect of phytoestrogens also in colorectal cancer. The mechanism through which estrogenic molecules control colorectal cancer tumorigenesis could possibly involve estrogen receptor beta, the predominantly expressed estrogen receptor subtype in colon mucosa.To validate this hypothesis, we therefore used an engineered human colon cancer cell line induced to overexpress estrogen receptor beta, beside its native cell line, expressing very low levels of ERbeta and not expressing ERalpha; as a phytoestrogenic molecule, we used kaempferide triglycoside, a glycosylated flavonol from a Dianthus caryophyllus cultivar. The inhibitory properties of this molecule toward vegetal cell growth have been previously demonstrated: however, no data on its activity on animal cell or information about the mechanism of this activity are available. Kaempferide triglycoside proved to inhibit the proliferation of native and estrogen receptor beta overexpressing colon cancer cells through a mechanism not mediated by ligand binding dependent estrogen receptor activation. It affected HCT8 cell cycle progression by increasing the G(0)/G(1) cell fraction and in estrogen receptor beta overexpressing cells increased two antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, the biological effects of this kaempferide triglycoside were strengthened by the presence of high levels of estrogen receptor beta.Pleiotropic molecular effects of phytoestrogens may explain their protective activity against colorectal cancer and may represent an interesting area for future investigation with potential clinical applications.

  15. The European arrest warrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđić Vojislav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper portrays the new European Union extradition system, established by the Framework Decision on the European arrest warrant and the surrender procedures between Member States of 2002. In the introductory remarks, the author explains the formation and development of the traditional extradition procedure, depicts relevant legal sources, and points to its flaws, which boil down to tardiness and inefficiency. The main author's standpoint is that the European arrest warrant is based on mutual trust in the member-states' legal systems, and that it depoliticizes the extradition procedure by transforming interstate cooperation into cooperation between member - states' law enforcement authorities. On these grounds, the author determines the nature of this new legal institute, that introduces radical changes into the paradigm of the classical extradition, and explains its main features as well as the scope of application. Further on, the paper explores the conditions for issuance of the European arrest warrant, which are proscribed by negative formulations - as absolute and relative obstacles for extradition. Finally, the author explains the standardized formal elements of the European arrest warrant content, which should make its application easier and more expeditious.

  16. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kulcenty, Katarzyna [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Wierzchowski, Marcin [Department of Chemical Technology of Drugs, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Murias, Marek [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Department of Cancer Diagnostics and Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan (Poland); Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga, E-mail: liebert@ump.edu.pl [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  17. Runway Arrested Landing Site (RALS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Runway Arrested Landing Site includes an underground complex located on a Mod 2, Mod 3, and Mod 3+ arresting gear and are located under the runway and accurately...

  18. Aqueous extracts of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata are protective against H₂O₂-induced DNA damage, growth inhibition, and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Lee, Jin-Ching; Yi, Szu-Cheng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2012-06-13

    Potential antioxidant properties of an aqueous extract of the edible red seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) against oxidative DNA damage were evaluated. The AEGT revealed several antioxidant molecules, including phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid. In a cell-free assay, the extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity that significantly reduced H₂O₂-induced plasmid DNA breaks in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001). The AEGT also suppressed H₂O₂-induced oxidative DNA damage in H1299 cells by reducing the percentage of damaged DNA in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001) as measured by a modified alkaline comet-nuclear extract (comet-NE) assay. The MTT assay results showed that AEGT confers significant protection against H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity and that AEGT itself is not cytotoxic (P < 0.001). Moreover, H₂O₂-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest was significantly released when cells were co-treated with different concentrations of AEGT (P < 0.001). Taken together, these findings suggest that edible red algae Gracilaria water extract can prevent H₂O₂-induced oxidative DNA damage and its related cellular responses.

  19. Alpinia pricei Rhizome Extracts Induce Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Squamous Carcinoma KB Cells and Suppress Tumor Growth in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Cheng Hseu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpinia pricei has been shown to induce apoptosis in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells. In this study, we report the effectiveness of the ethanol (70% extracts of A. pricei rhizome (AP extracts in terms of tumor regression as determined using both in vitro cell culture and in vivo athymic nude mice models of KB cells. We found that the AP extract (25–200 μg/mL treatment decreased the proliferation of KB cells by arresting progression through the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. This cell cycle blockade was associated with reductions in cyclin A and B1, Cdc2, and Cdc25C, and increased p21/WAF1, Wee1, p53 and phospho-p53 (p-p53 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that AP extract treatment decreased metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA expression, while expression of their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 (TIMP-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, were increased in KB cells. Furthermore, AP extract treatment effectively delayed tumor incidence in nude mice inoculated with KB cells and reduced the tumor burden. AP extract treatment also induced apoptotic DNA fragmentation, as detected by in situ TUNEL staining. Thus, A. pricei may possess antitumor activity in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells.

  20. Dactylone inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced transformation and phenotype expression of human cancer cells and induces G1-S arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Sergey N; Shubina, Larisa K; Bode, Ann M; Stonik, Valentin A; Dong, Zigang

    2007-06-15

    The marine natural chamigrane-type sesquiterpenoid, dactylone, is closely related to secondary metabolites of some edible species of red algae. In the present study, the effect of dactylone was tested on the mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ Cl41 cell line and its stable transfectants as well as on several human tumor cell lines, including lung (H460), colon (HCT-116), and skin melanomas (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). This natural product was effective at nontoxic doses as a cancer-preventive agent, which exerted its actions, at least in part, through the inhibition of cyclin D3 and Cdk4 expression and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) phosphorylation. The inhibition of these cell cycle components was followed by cell cycle arrest at the G1-S transition with subsequent p53-independent apoptosis. Therefore, these data showed that application of dactylone and related compounds may lead to decreased malignant cell transformation and/or decreased tumor cell proliferation.

  1. NF-kappa B signaling pathway is involved in growth inhibition, G2/M arrest and apoptosis induced by Trichostatin A in human tongue carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Jun; Duan, Li; Fan, Mingwen; Wu, Xinxing

    2006-01-01

    The HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) exhibits antiturnour activity in various tumour cells. However, little is known about the effect of TSA on growth of human tongue carcinoma cells. In this study, we observed that TSA concentration-dependently inhibited growth of human tongue carcinoma Tca8113

  2. Physiological control of growth, reproduction and lactation in deer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Ryg

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available The physiological mechanisms controlling the growth, lactation and reproductive cycles of cervids, and the control of allocation of energy to different organs are discussed. The growth cycle may be secondary to an appetite cycle, regulated by changes in the secretion of prolactin, gonadal steroids, and possibly unknown factors. The reproductive cycle is controlled by changes in the release at the hypothalamic hormone GnRH, and by changes in the feedback effect of gonadal steroids. These cycles are probably the result of the timing effects of nutrition and changing photoperiod on an endogenous, circannual rhythm. The effect of photopenod is mediated by the pineal hormone melatonin. The physiological mechanisms controlling the partitioning of substrates between milk production, fetal growth and the tissues of the mother are poorly understood, but may involve changes in the secretion of growth hormone, insulin and triiodothyronine.

  3. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control and cow dung manure treatments on growth of Quality Protein Maize. The trial consisted of factorial ... Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important staple food crops in West and ... food production (Kamara and Sanginga, 2001). Of.

  4. TOR and paradigm change: cell growth is controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael N

    2016-09-15

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of target of rapamycin (TOR), a highly conserved kinase and central controller of cell growth. In this Retrospective, I briefly describe the discovery of TOR and the subsequent elucidation of its cellular role. I place particular emphasis on an article by Barbet et al. from 1996, the first suggesting that TOR controls cell growth in response to nutrients.

  5. Growth Control and Optics of Organic Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2005-01-01

    Light-emitting organic nanofibers made of phenyl molecules like para-hexaphenyl (p-6P) and grown on muscovite mica form a model system well-suited for the study of optics in the sub-wavelength regime. We demonstrate that p-6P nanofibers can be grown with high control of the morphology of individual...

  6. Optical control of gallium nanoparticle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, K. F.; Fedotov, V. A.; Pochon, S.; Ross, K. J.; Stevens, G. C.; Zheludev, N. I.; Brocklesby, W. S.; Emel'yanov, V. I.

    2002-03-01

    We report that low-intensity light can dramatically influence and regulate the nanoparticle self-assembly process: Illumination of a substrate exposed to a beam of gallium atoms results in the formation of gallium nanoparticles with a relatively narrow size distribution. Very low light intensities, below the threshold for thermally induced evaporation, exert considerable control over nanoparticle formation.

  7. Curcumin inhibits growth potential by G1 cell cycle arrest and induces apoptosis in p53-mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasiram, Jade Dhananjay; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Kannan, Janani; Kotteeswaran, Venkatesan; Sivalingam, Nageswaran

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound and it is isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, have been reported to possess anticancer effect against stage I and II colon cancer. However, the effect of curcumin on colon cancer at Dukes' type C metastatic stage III remains still unclear. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of curcumin on p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage. The cellular viability and proliferation were assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT assay, respectively. The cytotoxicity effect was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle distribution was performed by flow cytometry analysis. Here we have observed that curcumin treatment significantly inhibited the cellular viability and proliferation potential of p53 mutated COLO 320DM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin treatment showed no cytotoxic effects to the COLO 320DM cells. DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis revealed that curcumin treatment induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM cells. Furthermore, curcumin caused cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, decreased the cell population in the S phase and induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM colon adenocarcinoma cells. Together, these data suggest that curcumin exerts anticancer effects and induces apoptosis in p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage.

  8. Resveratrol inhibits the growth of gastric cancer by inducing G1 phase arrest and senescence in a Sirt1-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Yang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, has been reported to exert anticancer activity by affecting diverse molecular targets. In this study, we examined the effects and the underlying mechanisms of resveratrol on gastric cancer. We found that resveratrol inhibited the proliferation of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. At the concentration of 25 and 50 µM, resveratrol inhibited the cell viability and diminished the clonogenic potential of gastric cancer cells. Resveratrol treatment arrested gastric cancer cells in the G1 phase and led to senescence instead of apoptosis. Regulators of the cell cycle and senescence pathways, including cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4 and 6, p21 and p16, were dysregulated by resveratrol treatment. The inhibitory effects of resveratrol on gastric cancer were also verified in vivo using a nude mice xenograft model. Resveratrol (40 mg/kg/d exerted inhibitory activities on gastric cancer development and significantly decreased the fractions of Ki67-positive cells in the tumor specimens from the nude mice. After resveratrol treatment, the induction of senescence and the changes in the expression of the regulators involved in the cell cycle and senescence pathways were similar to what we observed in vitro. However, the depletion of Sirtuin (Sirt1 reversed the above-described effects of resveratrol both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that resveratrol inhibits gastric cancer in a Sirt1-dependent manner and provide detailed evidence for the possibility of applying resveratrol in gastric cancer prevention and therapy.

  9. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G₂ /M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Harish C; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), one of the most common neoplasms, cause serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and antiproliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fisetin (5-80 μm) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G₂ /M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2; Bcl-xL and Mcl-1); (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad); (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential; (iv) release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria; (v) activation of caspases; and (vi) cleavage of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: Role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Harish C.; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) one of the most common neoplasms causes serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3′,4′,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and anti-proliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fistein (5-80 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1), (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad), (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential, (iv) release of cytchrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria, (v) activation of caspases, and (vi) cleavage of PARP protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. PMID:23800058

  11. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  12. Sublingual Microcirculation is Impaired in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Omar, Yasser; Massey, Michael; Wiuff Andersen, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: We hypothesized that microcirculatory dysfunction, similar to that seen in sepsis, occurs in post-cardiac arrest patients and that better microcirculatory flow will be associated with improved outcome. We also assessed the association between microcirculatory dysfunction and inflammatory...... markers in the post-cardiac arrest state. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated the sublingual microcirculation in post-cardiac arrest patients, severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and healthy control patients using Sidestream Darkfield microscopy. Microcirculatory flow was assessed using...... the microcirculation flow index (MFI) at 6 and 24h in the cardiac arrest patients, and within 6h of emergency department admission in the sepsis and control patients. RESULTS: We evaluated 30 post-cardiac arrest patients, 16 severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and 9 healthy control patients. Sublingual...

  13. Arrested larval development in cattle nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J; Duncan, M

    1987-06-01

    Most economically important cattle nematodes are able to arrest their larval development within the host - entering a period of dormancy or hypobiosis. Arrested larvae have a low death rate, and large numbers can accumulate in infected cattle during the grazing season. Because of this, outbreaks of disease caused by such nematodes can occur at times when recent infection with the parasites could not have occurred, for example during winter in temperature northern climates when cattle are normally housed. The capacity to arrest is a heritable trait. It is seen as an adaptation by the parasite to avoid further development to its free-living stages during times when the climate is unsuitable for free-living survival. But levels of arrestment can vary markedly in different regions, in different cattle, and under different management regimes. Climatic factors, previous conditioning, host immune status, and farm management all seem to affect arrestment levels. In this article, James Armour and Mary Duncan review the biological basis of the phenomenon, and discuss the apparently conflicting views on how it is controlled.

  14. Transforming growth factor alpha controls the transition from hypertrophic cartilage to bone during endochondral bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Shirine E; Pest, Michael A; Kim, Gunwoo; Ohora, Sara N; Qin, Ling; Beier, Frank

    2012-07-01

    We have recently identified transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) as a novel growth factor involved in the joint disease osteoarthritis. The role of TGFα in normal cartilage and bone physiology however, has not been well defined. The objective of this study was to determine the role of TGFα in bone development through investigation of the Tgfa knockout mouse. The gross skeletons as well as the cartilage growth plates of Tgfa knockout mice and their control littermates were examined during several developmental stages ranging from newborn to ten weeks old. Knockout mice experienced skeletal growth retardation and expansion of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate. These phenotypes were transient and spontaneously resolved by ten weeks of age. Tgfa knockout growth plates also had fewer osteoclasts along the cartilage/bone interface. Furthermore, knockout mice expressed less RUNX2, RANKL, and MMP13 mRNA in their cartilage growth plates than controls did. Tgfa knockout mice experience a delay in bone development, specifically the conversion of hypertrophic cartilage to true bone. The persistence of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate appears to be mediated by a decrease in MMP13 and RANKL expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes and a resulting reduction in osteoclast recruitment. Overall, TGFα appears to be an important growth factor regulating the conversion of cartilage to bone during the process of endochondral ossification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effectiveness of the biannual application of silver nitrate solution followed by sodium fluoride varnish in arresting early childhood caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Li, Samantha Ky; Wong, May Cm; Lo, Edward Cm

    2015-09-25

    The application of 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be effective in arresting early childhood caries (ECC). Since SDF is not available in certain countries, some dentists use adjunctive application of 25 % silver nitrate (AgNO3) and 5 % sodium fluoride (NaF) to arrest ECC. This randomised controlled trial will systematically compare the efficacy of a 25 % AgNO3 solution followed by 5 % NaF varnish with that of a 38 % SDF solution in arresting ECC when applied at half-yearly intervals over a 30-month period. This study is a randomised, double-blinded, non-inferiority clinical trial. The hypothesis tested is that adjunctive application of 25 % AgNO3 followed by 5 % NaF is at least not appreciably worse than a 38 % SDF in arresting ECC. Approximately 3100 kindergarten children aged 3-4 years will be screened and at least 1070 children with caries will be recruited. This sample size is sufficient for an appropriate statistical analysis (power at 90 % (β = 0.10) with a 2-sided type-I error of α = 0.05), allowing for an overall 20 % drop-out rate. The children will be randomly allocated into 2 groups to treat their caries over a 30-month period: Group A - biannual adjunctive application of a 25 % AgNO3 solution and a 5 % NaF varnish, and Group B - biannual adjunctive application of a 38 % SDF solution followed by a placebo varnish. Clinical examinations will be conducted at 6-month intervals. Primary outcome measured is the number of active caries surfaces which are arrested. Information on confounding factors such as oral hygiene habits will be collected through a parental questionnaire. We expect that adjunctive application of 25 % AgNO3 solution and 5 % NaF varnish and of 38 % SDF solution can both effectively arrest ECC. Lower concentrations of silver and fluoride are contained in 25 % AgNO3 and 5 % NaF, respectively, than in 38 % SDF; therefore, AgNO3/NaF are more favourable for use in young children. Because its use for caries management is

  16. Genetic and physiological controls of growth under water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, François; Parent, Boris; Caldeira, Cecilio F; Welcker, Claude

    2014-04-01

    The sensitivity of expansive growth to water deficit has a large genetic variability, which is higher than that of photosynthesis. It is observed in several species, with some genotypes stopping growth in a relatively wet soil, whereas others continue growing until the lower limit of soil-available water. The responses of growth to soil water deficit and evaporative demand share an appreciable part of their genetic control through the colocation of quantitative trait loci as do the responses of the growth of different organs to water deficit. This result may be caused by common mechanisms of action discussed in this paper (particularly, plant hydraulic properties). We propose that expansive growth, putatively linked to hydraulic processes, determines the sink strength under water deficit, whereas photosynthesis determines source strength. These findings have large consequences for plant modeling under water deficit and for the design of breeding programs.

  17. [Control of growth and expression of protooncogenes in regenerating liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y; Gong, D Z; Cui, X Y; Mei, M H

    1996-01-01

    There are many humoral factors involved in the control of growth in regenerating liver. The complete hepatocyte mitogens such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), hepatic stimulator substance (HSS) can strongly stimulate hepatocyte DNA synthesis and mitosis. The hepatocyte growth inhibitors such as transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1), however, do not stimulate DNA synthesis, but inhibit EGF mitogenesis. In addition, the comitogens such as norepinephrine and insulin are necessary to regulate the growth of regenerating liver. It has become clear that the hepatocyte proliferation and protooncogenes are linked closely. Some protooncogenes can express specifically as markers in the different phases of the cell cycle and in hepatocytes that enter the cell cycle (G0 to G1 transit) and continue to progress.

  18. Private Benefits of Control,Growth Opportunities and Investor Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Xiao; Jiaxing You

    2009-01-01

    We develop a model to illustrate that controlling shareholders choose the level of investor protection that maximizes their own interests. Controlling shareholders in companies with complicated control structures can easily extract private benefits and are thus reluctant to enhance investor protection which would necessitate increased transparency. In contrast, controlling shareholders in companies with valuable growth opportunities are willing to improve investor protection so that they can benefit from the increased value resulting from the lower cost of capital. We test this prediction using firm-level data in China. The results show that the level of investor protection increases with decreases in control structure opacity and increases in growth opportunities. The correlation is more significant for enforcement than for the mechanisms of investor protection.

  19. The primary cilium is a sensory organelle that regulates growth control and tissue homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Schneider, Linda; Clement, Christian Alexandro;

    2006-01-01

    The growth-arrest specific receptor tyrosine kinase, PDGFRa, is up-regulated and targeted to the primary cilium during growth arrest in NIH3T3 cells and primary cultures of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and PDGF-AA-stimulated fibroblast cycle entrance is regulated through activation...... of ciliary PDGFRaa followed by activation of the mitogenic Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathway, which also operates in the cilium. Quiescent MEFs derived from Tg737orpk mutants fail to form normal cilia and to activate Mek1/2-Erk1/2 and re-enter the cell cycle after stimulation with PDGF-AA [Schneider et al. (2005......) Current Biology]. Prolonged growth arrest in wt cells is associated with activation of p53 and cells remain viable for at least 7 days of serum starvation. In contrast, mutant MEFs fail to activate p53 upon starvation and cells begin to die 2 days after starvation. These results indicate that the primary...

  20. Controlled Directional Growth of TiO2 Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In, Su-il; Hou, Yidong; Abrams, Billie

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate how the anodization direction and growth rate of vertically aligned, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube (NT) arrays can be controlled and manipulated by the local concentration of O-2 in the electrolyte. This leads to the growth of highly active TiO2 NT arrays directly on nonconducting...... substrates in a single step. By controlling the oxygen concentration, the electrical contact to the titanium film can be preserved until the entire film is anodized. This approach to growing transparent TiO2 NT films yields possibilities for using glass without any transparent conducting oxide coating...

  1. Theracurmin® efficiently inhibits the growth of human prostate and bladder cancer cells via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minyong; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Kook, Ha Rim; Lee, Sangchul; Oh, Jong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok-Soo

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer properties of Theracurmin®, a novel form of the yellow curry pigment curcumin, as well as explore the molecular mechanisms of the potential anticancer effects of Theracurmin® on human prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells in vitro. The proliferation of cancer cells was examined by using the Cell Counting Kit-8. The clonogenic growth potential was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was evaluated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis was applied to explore the expression patterns of molecules associated with apoptotic cell death and cell cycle checkpoint. We noted that Theracurmin® and curcumin exhibited similar anticancer effects in both androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These agents reduced cell viability and clonogenic growth potential by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle disturbance in human prostate cancer cells. Theracurmin® and curcumin also exerted marked anticancer effects on human bladder cancer cells, even in cisplatin-resistant T24R2 cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, Theracurmin® and curcumin treatment decreased cell viability and clonogenicity via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle dysregulation in human bladder cancer cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that Theracurmin® has potential as an anticancer agent in complementary and alternative medicine for these urological cancers.

  2. RhoA/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling after growth arrest-specific protein 6/mer receptor tyrosine kinase engagement promotes epithelial cell growth and wound repair via upregulation of hepatocyte growth factor in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Park, Hyun-Jung; Woo, So-Youn; Park, Eun-Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2014-09-01

    Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6)/Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) signaling modulates cytokine secretion and helps to regulate the immune response and apoptotic cell clearance. Signaling pathways that activate an epithelial growth program in macrophages are still poorly defined. We report that Gas6/Mer/RhoA signaling can induce the production of epithelial growth factor hepatic growth factor (HGF) in macrophages, which ultimately promotes epithelial cell proliferation and wound repair. The RhoA/protein kinase B (Akt)/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, including p38 MAP kinase, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, and Jun NH2-terminal kinase axis in RAW 264.7 cells, was identified as Gas6/Mer downstream signaling pathway for the upregulation of HGF mRNA and protein. Conditioned medium from RAW 264.7 cells that had been exposed to Gas6 or apoptotic cells enhanced epithelial cell proliferation of the epithelial cell line LA-4 and wound closure. Cotreatment with an HGF receptor-blocking antibody or c-Met antagonist downregulated this enhancement. Inhibition of Mer with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by RhoA siRNA or Rho kinase pharmacologic inhibitor suppressed Gas6-induced HGF mRNA and protein expression in macrophages and blocked epithelial cell proliferation and wound closure induced by the conditioned medium. Our data provide evidence that macrophages can be reprogrammed by Gas6 to promote epithelial proliferation and wound repair via HGF, which is induced by the Mer/RhoA/Akt/MAP kinase pathway. Thus, defects in Gas6/Mer/RhoA signaling in macrophages may delay tissue repair after injury to the alveolar epithelium.

  3. Controlling protein crystal growth rate by means of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SantamarIa-Holek, I; Gadomski, A [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, University of Technology and Life Sciences, PL-85796 Bydgoszcz (Poland); RubI, J M, E-mail: isholek.fc@gmail.com, E-mail: agad@utp.edu.pl, E-mail: mrubi@ub.edu [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, University of Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    We have proposed a model to analyze the growth kinetics of lysozyme crystals/aggregates under non-isothermal conditions. The model was formulated through an analysis of the entropy production of the growth process which was obtained by taking into account the explicit dependence of the free energy on the temperature. We found that the growth process is coupled with temperature variations, resulting in a novel Soret-type effect. We identified the surface entropy of the crystal/aggregate as a decisive ingredient controlling the behavior of the average growth rate as a function of temperature. The behavior of the Gibbs free energy as a function of temperature is also analyzed. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good in the range of temperatures considered.

  4. Controlling protein crystal growth rate by means of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanamaría-Holek, I; Gadomski, A; Rubí, J M

    2011-06-15

    We have proposed a model to analyze the growth kinetics of lysozyme crystals/aggregates under non-isothermal conditions. The model was formulated through an analysis of the entropy production of the growth process which was obtained by taking into account the explicit dependence of the free energy on the temperature. We found that the growth process is coupled with temperature variations, resulting in a novel Soret-type effect. We identified the surface entropy of the crystal/aggregate as a decisive ingredient controlling the behavior of the average growth rate as a function of temperature. The behavior of the Gibbs free energy as a function of temperature is also analyzed. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good in the range of temperatures considered.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hui-Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Suntaek [Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Jin [CHA Cancer Institute, CHA University of Medicine and Science, Seoul 135-081 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul, E-mail: bckim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces Smad3 linker phosphorylation through Akt-ERK1/2 pathway. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated suppression of TGF-β signal requires Smad3 linker phosphorylation. •This is a first report about interplay between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and growth inhibition pathway. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.05–0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15{sup INK4B} expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15{sup INK4B}-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing

  6. Expert System Control of Plant Growth in an Enclosed Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George; Lanoue, Mark; Bathel, Matthew; Ryan, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The Expert System is an enclosed, controlled environment for growing plants, which incorporates a computerized, knowledge-based software program that is designed to capture the knowledge, experience, and problem-solving skills of one or more human experts in a particular discipline. The Expert System is trained to analyze crop/plant status, to monitor the condition of the plants and the environment, and to adjust operational parameters to optimize the plant-growth process. This system is intended to provide a way to remotely control plant growth with little or no human intervention. More specifically, the term control implies an autonomous method for detecting plant states such as health (biomass) or stress and then for recommending and implementing cultivation and/or remediation to optimize plant growth and to minimize consumption of energy and nutrients. Because of difficulties associated with delivering energy and nutrients remotely, a key feature of this Expert System is its ability to minimize this effort and to achieve optimum growth while taking into account the diverse range of environmental considerations that exist in an enclosed environment. The plant-growth environment for the Expert System could be made from a variety of structures, including a greenhouse, an underground cavern, or another enclosed chamber. Imaging equipment positioned within or around the chamber provides spatially distributed crop/plant-growth information. Sensors mounted in the chamber provide data and information pertaining to environmental conditions that could affect plant development. Lamps in the growth environment structure supply illumination, and other additional equipment in the chamber supplies essential nutrients and chemicals.

  7. High-Dose Estrogen and Clinical Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Induce Growth Arrest, p21, and p53 in Primate Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2005-06-09

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer affecting women. Hormone-based therapies are variably successful in treating ovarian cancer, but the reasoning behind these therapies is paradoxical. Clinical reagents such as tamoxifen are considered to inhibit or reverse tumor growth by competitive inhibition of the estrogen receptor (ER); however high dose estrogen is as clinically effective as tamoxifen, and it is unlikely that estrogen is acting by blocking ER activity; however, it may be activating a unique function of the ER that is nonmitogenic. For poorly defined reasons, 90% of varian cancers derive from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). In vivo the ER-positive OSE is exposed to high estrogen levels, reaching micromolar concentrations in dominant ovarian follicles. Using cultured OSE cells in vitro, we show that these levels of estradiol (1 ug/ml; {approx}3um) block the actions of serum growth factors, activate the G1 phase retinoblastoma AQ:A checkpoint, and induce p21, an inhibitor of kinases that normally inactivate the retinoblastoma checkpoint. We also show that estradiol increases p53 levels, which may contribute to p21 induction. Supporting the hypothesis that clinical selective ER modulators activate this novel ER function, we find that micromolar doses of tamoxifen and the ''pure antiestrogen'' ICI 182,780 elicit the same effects as estradiol. We propose that, in the context of proliferation, these data clarify some paradoxical aspects of hormone-based therapy and suggest that fuller understanding of normal ER function is necessary to improve therapeutic strategies that target the ER. (J Clin Endocrinol Metab 90: 0000-0000, 2005)

  8. [Five recommendations for controlling population growth in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Z; Wu, C P; Lin, F D

    1980-10-01

    The rapid population growth rate (2% annually from 1949 to 1978) caused great difficulties for China's national economy because it increased the burden of families, communities, and government. It caused employment problems and slowed increases in living standards and educational levels. The best way to control population growth is based on a combination of political education and effective economic measures. The recommendations are: 1) coordinate employment, food rationing, salaries, bonuses, health treatment, age and condition of retirement, preschool care and education with family planning programs, maintain the elderly's living standard, and give preference to childless and single child families; 2) educate people about family planning and incorporate population growth and family planning into political and economics courses in high school and college; 3) incorporate population control into national economic plans; 4) prohibit families with 3 children and advocate 1 child per couple; and 5) establish a permanent population committee to plan, develop, and implement population policies and related research.

  9. Expert system for controlling plant growth in a contained environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George A. (Inventor); Lanoue, Mark Allen (Inventor); Bethel, Matthew (Inventor); Ryan, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In a system for optimizing crop growth, vegetation is cultivated in a contained environment, such as a greenhouse, an underground cavern or other enclosed space. Imaging equipment is positioned within or about the contained environment, to acquire spatially distributed crop growth information, and environmental sensors are provided to acquire data regarding multiple environmental conditions that can affect crop development. Illumination within the contained environment, and the addition of essential nutrients and chemicals are in turn controlled in response to data acquired by the imaging apparatus and environmental sensors, by an "expert system" which is trained to analyze and evaluate crop conditions. The expert system controls the spatial and temporal lighting pattern within the contained area, and the timing and allocation of nutrients and chemicals to achieve optimized crop development. A user can access the "expert system" remotely, to assess activity within the growth chamber, and can override the "expert system".

  10. Synergism between Inositol Polyphosphates and TOR Kinase Signaling in Nutrient Sensing, Growth Control, and Lipid Metabolism in Chlamydomonas[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bradley S.; Li, Jia; Liu, Yu; Diamond, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    The networks that govern carbon metabolism and control intracellular carbon partitioning in photosynthetic cells are poorly understood. Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved growth regulator that integrates nutrient signals and modulates cell growth in eukaryotes, though the TOR signaling pathway in plants and algae has yet to be completely elucidated. We screened the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using insertional mutagenesis to find mutants that conferred hypersensitivity to the TOR inhibitor rapamycin. We characterized one mutant, vip1-1, that is predicted to encode a conserved inositol hexakisphosphate kinase from the VIP family that pyrophosphorylates phytic acid (InsP6) to produce the low abundance signaling molecules InsP7 and InsP8. Unexpectedly, the rapamycin hypersensitive growth arrest of vip1-1 cells was dependent on the presence of external acetate, which normally has a growth-stimulatory effect on Chlamydomonas. vip1-1 mutants also constitutively overaccumulated triacylglycerols (TAGs) in a manner that was synergistic with other TAG inducing stimuli such as starvation. vip1-1 cells had reduced InsP7 and InsP8, both of which are dynamically modulated in wild-type cells by TOR kinase activity and the presence of acetate. Our data uncover an interaction between the TOR kinase and inositol polyphosphate signaling systems that we propose governs carbon metabolism and intracellular pathways that lead to storage lipid accumulation. PMID:27600537

  11. Stoichiometry controlled oxide thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, Rik; Smit, Jasper; Orsel, Kasper; Vailionis, Arturas; Bastiaens, Bert; Huijben, Mark; Boller, Klaus; Rijnders, Guus; Koster, Gertjan

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of species in the plasma plume during pulsed laser deposition controls both the stoichiometry as well as the growth kinetics of the deposited SrTiO3 thin films, instead of the commonly assumed mass distribution in the plasma plume and the kinetic energy of the arriving species. It was

  12. High-density growth arrest in Ras-transformed cells: low Cdk kinase activities in spite of absence of p27Kip Cdk-complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    The ras oncogene transforms immortalized, contact-inhibited non-malignant murine fibroblasts into cells that are focus forming, exhibit increased saturation density, and are malignant in suitable hosts. Here, we examined changes in cell cycle control complexes as normal and Ras-transformed cells...

  13. Anchorage-independent growth of pocket protein-deficient murine fibroblasts requires bypass of G2 arrest and can be accomplished by expression of TBX2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vormer, Tinke L; Foijer, Floris; Wielders, Camiel L C; te Riele, Hein

    2008-01-01

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for pocket proteins (i.e., pRB/p107-, pRB/p130-, or pRB/p107/p130-deficient MEFs) have lost proper G(1) control and are refractory to Ras(V12)-induced senescence. However, pocket protein-deficient MEFs expressing Ras(V12) were unable to exhibit anchorage-

  14. Proteasomal degradation of sphingosine kinase 1 and inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase by the sphingosine kinase inhibitors, SKi or ABC294640, induces growth arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Melissa; Pitman, Melissa; Pitson, Stuart M; Pyne, Nigel J; Pyne, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Sphingosine kinases (two isoforms termed SK1 and SK2) catalyse the formation of the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate. We demonstrate here that the SK2 inhibitor, ABC294640 (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-adamantane-1-carboxylic acid (pyridin-4-ylmethyl)amide) or the SK1/SK2 inhibitor, SKi (2-(p-hydroxyanilino)-4-(p-chlorophenyl)thiazole)) induce the proteasomal degradation of SK1a (Mr = 42 kDa) and inhibit DNA synthesis in androgen-independent LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. These effects are recapitulated by the dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1) inhibitor, fenretinide. Moreover, SKi or ABC294640 reduce Des1 activity in Jurkat cells and ABC294640 induces the proteasomal degradation of Des1 (Mr = 38 kDa) in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, SKi or ABC294640 or fenretinide increase the expression of the senescence markers, p53 and p21 in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. The siRNA knockdown of SK1 or SK2 failed to increase p53 and p21 expression, but the former did reduce DNA synthesis in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. Moreover, N-acetylcysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) blocked the SK inhibitor-induced increase in p21 and p53 expression but had no effect on the proteasomal degradation of SK1a. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Des1 increased p53 expression while a combination of Des1/SK1 siRNA increased the expression of p21. Therefore, Des1 and SK1 participate in regulating LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cell growth and this involves p53/p21-dependent and -independent pathways. Therefore, we propose targeting androgen-independent prostate cancer cells with compounds that affect Des1/SK1 to modulate both de novo and sphingolipid rheostat pathways in order to induce growth arrest.

  15. ECPR for Refractory Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-17

    Cardiac Arrest; Heart Arrest; Sudden Cardiac Arrest; Cardiopulmonary Arrest; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; CPR; Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

  16. Different Expression and Clinical Significance of DNA Methyltransferases in the Chorionic Villi of Early Embryo Growth Arrest%DNA甲基转移酶在胚胎停育绒毛组织中的表达差异及临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭为伟; 高静; 周磊; 黄维清; 孔庆暖

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and DNMT3L mRNA and protein in the chorionic villi of early embryo growth arrest and explore its clinical significance. Methods:We randomly selected 40 women as observational group in which were diagnosed with early embryo growth arrest by B ultrasound and accepted complete curettage of uterine cavity after visiting the Obstetrical Department of the Qingdao Municipal Hospital between January 2013 and June 2014, during the same period, select another 40 women who performed induced abortion with normal early pregnancy as control group.①Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used on the normal groups (40 cases) and the early embryo growth arrest group (40 cases) to quantitatively determine DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and DNMT3L mRNA expression in the chorionic villi tissues. ②Streptavidin- Perosidase (SP) immunochemistry and Western blot were performed on the two groups to detect the expression and distribution of DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and DNMT3L. Results: ①qRT-PCR showed there were no statistically significant difference of DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and DNMT3L expression in two groups (P>0.05).②Immuno-chemistry showed DNMTs were predominately distributed on the villous trophoblasts which the cytoplasm and nuclear had varying degrees of positive staining. And semi-quantitative analysis indicated that the expression of DNMT3A of early embryo growth arrest was significantly lower, compared with that of the normal group (P0.05). Conclusions:The lower expression of the DNMT3A protein might be involved in the pathogenesis of early embryo growth arrest.%目的:探讨胚胎停育绒毛组织中DNA甲基转移酶(DNMTs)4种亚型DNMT1、DNMT3A、DNMT3B与DNMT3L的mRNA及蛋白表达差异,并探讨其临床意义。方法:随机选取2013年1月-2014年6月在青岛市立医院妇产科门诊就诊的经B型超声(B超)证实为胚胎停育而行清宫术的40例患者为观察组,并选取同期

  17. Quercetin-3-methyl ether inhibits lapatinib-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cell growth by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jixia; Zhu, Feng; Lubet, Ronald A.; De Luca, Antonella; Grubbs, Clinton; Ericson, Marna E.; D’Alessio, Amelia; Normano, Nicola; Dong, Zigang; Bode, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Lapatinib, an oral, small-molecule, reversible inhibitor of both EGFR and HER2, is highly active in HER2 positive breast cancer as a single agent and in combination with other therapeutics. However, resistance against lapatinib is an unresolved problem in clinical oncology. Recently, interest in the use of natural compounds to prevent or treat cancers has gained increasing interest because of presumed low toxicity. Quercetin-3-methyl ether, a naturally occurring compound present in various plants, has potent anticancer activity. Here, we found that quercetin-3-methyl ether caused in a significant growth inhibition of lapatinib-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cells. Western blot data showed that quercetin-3-methyl ether had no effect on Akt or ERKs signaling in resistant cells. However, quercetin-3-methyl ether caused a pronounced G2/M block mainly through the Chk1-Cdc25c-cyclin B1/Cdk1 pathway in lapatinib-sensitive and -resistant cells. In contrast, lapatinib produced an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase mediated through cyclin D1, but only in lapatinib-sensitive cells. Moreover, quercetin-3-methyl ether induced significant apoptosis, accompanied with increased levels of cleaved caspase 3, caspase 7 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in both cell lines. Overall, these results suggested that quercetin-3-methyl ether might be a novel and promising therapeutic agent in lapatinib-sensitive or -resistant breast cancer patients. PMID:22086611

  18. 125I seed irradiation induces up-regulation of the genes associated with apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and inhibits growth of gastric cancer xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Iodine 125 (125I) seed irradiation can be used as an important supplementary treatment for unresectable advanced gastric cancer. Here, we aim to comprehensively elucidate the biological effects induced by 125I seed irradiation in human gastric cancer xenograft model by using global expression and DNA methylation analyses. Methods The 48 mice bearing NCI-N87 gastric cancer xenografts were randomly separated into 2 groups: sham seeds (O mCi) were implanted into the control g...

  19. Quantifying the entropic cost of cellular growth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Daniele; Capuani, Fabrizio; De Martino, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Viewing the ways a living cell can organize its metabolism as the phase space of a physical system, regulation can be seen as the ability to reduce the entropy of that space by selecting specific cellular configurations that are, in some sense, optimal. Here we quantify the amount of regulation required to control a cell's growth rate by a maximum-entropy approach to the space of underlying metabolic phenotypes, where a configuration corresponds to a metabolic flux pattern as described by genome-scale models. We link the mean growth rate achieved by a population of cells to the minimal amount of metabolic regulation needed to achieve it through a phase diagram that highlights how growth suppression can be as costly (in regulatory terms) as growth enhancement. Moreover, we provide an interpretation of the inverse temperature β controlling maximum-entropy distributions based on the underlying growth dynamics. Specifically, we show that the asymptotic value of β for a cell population can be expected to depend on (i) the carrying capacity of the environment, (ii) the initial size of the colony, and (iii) the probability distribution from which the inoculum was sampled. Results obtained for E. coli and human cells are found to be remarkably consistent with empirical evidence.

  20. Sporophytic control of pollen tube growth and guidance in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausser, Andreas; Kliwer, Irina; Srilunchang, Kanok-orn; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Pollen tube germination, growth, and guidance (progamic phase) culminating in sperm discharge is a multi-stage process including complex interactions between the male gametophyte as well as sporophytic tissues and the female gametophyte (embryo sac), respectively. Inter- and intra-specific crossing barriers in maize and Tripsacum have been studied and a precise description of progamic pollen tube development in maize is reported here. It was found that pollen germination and initial tube growth are rather unspecific, but an early, first crossing barrier was detected before arrival at the transmitting tract. Pollination of maize silks with Tripsacum pollen and incompatible pollination of Ga1s/Ga1s-maize silks with ga1-maize pollen revealed another two incompatibility barriers, namely transmitting tract mistargeting and insufficient growth support. Attraction and growth support by the transmitting tract seem to play key roles for progamic pollen tube growth. After leaving transmitting tracts, pollen tubes have to navigate across the ovule in the ovular cavity. Pollination of an embryo sac-less maize RNAi-line allowed the role of the female gametophyte for pollen tube guidance to be determined in maize. It was found that female gametophyte controlled guidance is restricted to a small region around the micropyle, approximately 50-100 microm in diameter. This area is comparable to the area of influence of previously described ZmEA1-based short-range female gametophyte signalling. In conclusion, the progamic phase is almost completely under sporophytic control in maize.

  1. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  2. Perception and regulatory principles of microbial growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonsari, Armin S; Kollmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Fast growth represents an effective strategy for microbial organisms to survive in competitive environments. To accomplish this task, cells must adapt their metabolism to changing nutrient conditions in a way that maximizes their growth rate. However, the regulation of the growth related metabolic pathways can be fundamentally different among microbes. We therefore asked whether growth control by perception of the cell's intracellular metabolic state can give rise to higher growth than by direct perception of extracellular nutrient availability. To answer this question, we created a simplified dynamical computer model of a cellular metabolic network whose regulation was inferred by an optimization approach. We used this model for a competing species experiment, where a species with extracellular nutrient perception competes against one with intracellular nutrient perception by evaluating their respective average growth rate. We found that the intracellular perception is advantageous under situations where the up and down regulation of pathways cannot follow the fast changing nutrient availability in the environment. In this case, optimal regulation ignores any other nutrients except the most preferential ones, in agreement with the phenomenon of catabolite repression in prokaryotes. The corresponding metabolic pathways remain activated, despite environmental fluctuations. Therefore, the cell can take up preferential nutrients as soon as they are available without any prior regulation. As a result species that rely on intracellular perception gain a relevant fitness advantage in fluctuating nutrient environments, which enables survival by outgrowing competitors.

  3. Adrenergic receptor control mechanism for growth hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackard, W G; Heidingsfelder, S A

    1968-06-01

    The influence of catecholamines on growth hormone secretion has been difficult to establish previously, possibly because of the suppressive effect of the induced hyperglycemia on growth hormone concentrations. In this study, an adrenergic receptor control mechanism for human growth hormone (HGH) secretion was uncovered by studying the effects of alpha and beta receptor blockade on insulin-induced growth hormone elevations in volunteer subjects. Alpha adrenergic blockade with phentolamine during insulin hypoglycemia, 0.1 U/kg, inhibited growth hormon elevations to 30-50% of values in the same subjects during insulin hypoglycemia without adrenergic blockade. More complete inhibition by phentolamine could not be demonstrated at a lower dose of insulin (0.05 U/kg). Beta adrenergic blockade with propranolol during insulin hypoglycemia significantly enhanced HGH concentrations in paired experiments. The inhibiting effect of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade on HGH concentrations could not be attributed to differences in blood glucose or free fatty acid values; however, more prolonged hypoglycemia and lower plasma free fatty acid values may have been a factor in the greater HGH concentrations observed during beta blockade. In the absence of insulin induced hypoglycemia, neither alpha nor beta adrenergic receptor blockade had a detectable effect on HGH concentrations. Theophylline, an inhibitor of cyclic 3'5'-AMP phosphodiesterase activity, also failed to alter plasma HGH concentrations. These studies demonstrate a stimulatory effect of alpha receptors and a possible inhibitory effect of beta receptors on growth hormone secretion.

  4. A new approach to the CZ crystal growth weighing control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimkin, P. V.; Moskovskih, V. A.; Vasiliev, Y. V.; Shlegel, V. N.; Yuferev, V. S.; Vasiliev, M. G.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of a new approach was to improve the robustness of the weighing control of CZ growth especially for semiconductors, for which the “anomalous“ behavior of the apparent weight provokes instability of the servo-loop. In the described method, the periodic reciprocating measuring motion of small amplitude is superposed on the uniform pull-rod movement. The cross-sectional area is determined from the weight sensor responses that are modulated mainly by the forces of hydrostatic pressure. By the example of germanium crystal growth, it is shown that in the control system, based on such a way of the diameter measuring, a simple PI control law provides a good close loop system's stability and dynamics for the materials with the “anomalous” behavior of a weighing signal. The effect of a meniscus on the modulation measuring of a crystal diameter is also discussed.

  5. Ingestion of an isothiocyanate metabolite from cruciferous vegetables inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cell xenografts by apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Jen Wei; Wu, Hongyan; Ramaswamy, Gita; Conaway, C Clifford; Chung, Fung-Lung; Wang, Longgui; Liu, Delong

    2004-08-01

    Epidemiological surveys indicate that intake of cruciferous vegetables is inversely related to prostate cancer incidence, although the responsible dietary factors have not been identified. Our studies demonstrated that exposure of human prostate cancer cells in culture to the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC-NAC), the major metabolite of PEITC that is abundant in watercress, inhibited proliferation and tumorigenesis. The PEITC-NAC is known to mediate cytoprotection at initiation of carcinogenesis. The relevance of PEITC-NAC in diets on the growth of prostate tumor cells has been evaluated in immunodeficient mice with xenografted tumors of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. The daily PEITC-NAC (8 micromol/g) supplemented diet group showed a significant reduction in tumor size in 100% of the mice during the 9-week treatment period. Tumor weight at autopsy was reduced by 50% compared with mice on the diet without PEITC-NAC (P = 0.05). Mitosis and in vivo 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeled proliferating cells were reduced in these tumors. The PEITC-NAC diet up-regulated the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases p21WAF-1/Cip-1 and p27Kip1, and reduced the expression of cyclins D and E, indicating they were potential molecular targets. As a result, phosphorylated Rb was significantly decreased and the G1- to S-phase transition retarded. The treated tumors also showed a significant increase in apoptosis as determined by in situ end-labeling, and by poly ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage. This study demonstrates the first in vivo evidence of dietary PEITC-NAC inhibiting tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells. PEITC-NAC may prevent initiation of carcinogenesis and modulate the post-initiation phase by targeting cell cycle regulators and apoptosis induction.

  6. Parkin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Jung, Byung Chul; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kang, Yeo Wool; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2015-08-14

    Parkin is a known tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism by which parkin acts as a tumor suppressor remains to be fully elucidated. Previously, we reported that parkin expression induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. However, at that time, we did not consider the involvement of parkin in cell cycle control. In the current study, we investigated whether parkin is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppression of cancer cell growth. In our cell cycle analyses, parkin expression induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which parkin induces this G2/M arrest, we analyzed cell cycle regulatory molecules involved in the G2/M transition. Parkin expression induced CDC2 phosphorylation which is known to inhibit CDC2 activity and cause G2/M arrest. Cyclin B1, which is degraded during the mitotic transition, accumulated in response to parkin expression, thereby indicating parkin-induced G2/M arrest. Next, we established that Myt1, which is known to phosphorylate and inhibit CDC2, increased following parkin expression. In addition, we found that parkin also induces increased Myt1 expression, G2/M arrest, and reduced cell viability in TNF-α-treated HCT15 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of parkin expression by parkin-specific siRNA decreased Myt1 expression and phosphorylation of CDC2 and resulted in recovered cell viability. These results suggest that parkin acts as a crucial molecule causing cell cycle arrest in G2/M, thereby suppressing tumor cell growth.

  7. Performance of metal oxide gapless surge arresters for HVDC systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diseko, N.L.

    1990-09-01

    An examination of the electrical stresses which may be imposed upon metal oxide surge arresters in a dc converter station is undertaken by means of simulation of the dc system and associated ac systems in the time domain using a digital computer program. Detailed models of a dc link are developed for temporary overvoltage stresses and steep front stresses. The most critical stresses for each type of dc station arrester due to converter faults and converter malfunctions are identified. The energy stresses were generally determined to be dependent on the converter control and protection strategies adopted during the faults. The arrester energy stresses for faults on both the line side and valve side busses of the converter transformer were determined to be sensitive to the instant of fault application and the duration of the fault. The arrester stresses for ac bus faults were analyzed in detail to determine their statistical distribution relative to the point on wave at which the fault occurred in each affected phase, and to the instant of fault clearance in each phase. Generally, the highest stresses occur for sequential fault occurrence in the phases compared with simultaneous faults. The studies indicate that the stresses in the arresters in a dc pile experiencing the worst duty depend on the number of arresters represented. Modelling only one arrester of a series-connected group does not provide correct results when the fault condition imposes duty on more than one of the arresters in the group. The study also indicates that the highest stresses do not necessarily occur in the single arrester connected across the valve with the highest prospective overvoltage. Hence the capability to represent all valve arresters within one pole is necessary when determining the most onerous stresses. 11 refs., 79 figs., 28 tabs.

  8. Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Syed A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1 plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer

  9. Ginsenoside Rb1, Rg1 and three extracts of traditional Chinese medicine attenuate ultraviolet B-induced G1 growth arrest in HaCaT cells and dermal fibroblasts involve down-regulating the expression of p16, p21 and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Yun-Gui; Wang, Yan-Fei

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to confirm whether traditional Chinese medicine ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), polygonum multiflorum (PM), ginkgo extract (GE) and lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) can attenuate G1 growth arrest of HaCaT cells and dermal fibroblasts induced by 10 subcytotoxic ultraviolet B (UVB) exposures, and to explore the possible mechanism in terms of the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins p16, p21 and p53. Ten subcytotoxic exposures to UVB induced G1 growth arrest of HaCaT cells and dermal fibroblasts. Cell-cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry, and mRNA levels of p16, p21 and p53 were detected by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and protein levels were detected using Western blot analysis. Five types of traditional Chinese medicine attenuated UVB-induced G1 growth arrest. The mRNA and protein levels of p16, p21 and p53 in HaCaT cells and dermal fibroblasts increased after UVB irradiation, but pretreatment with five types of traditional Chinese medicine decreased the expression of p16, p21 and p53. These results indicated that five types of traditional Chinese medicine can attenuate G1 growth arrest of HaCaT cells and dermal fibroblasts induced by UVB exposures, which was caused by down-regulating the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins p16, p21 and p53. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Model for the feedback control system of bacterial growth. II. Growth in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleecken, S

    1989-12-07

    A mathematical model is developed that describes substrate limited bacterial growth in a continuous culture and that is based upon the conceptual framework elaborated in a previous paper for describing the feedback control system of cell growth [S. Bleecken, (1988). J. theor. Biol. 133, 37.] Central to the theory are the ideas that the limiting substrate is converted into low molecular weight building blocks of macromolecular synthesis which again are converted into biomass (RNA and protein) and that the rates of RNA and protein synthesis are controlled by the intracellular concentration of building blocks. It is shown that a continuous culture can be simulated by two interconnected feedback control systems the actuating signals of which are limiting substrate concentration and the intracellular concentration of building blocks, respectively. Three types of steady-states are found to appear in a continuous culture, besides the well-known stable steady-state of the whole culture there exist two batchlike steady-states of the biotic part of the culture which are metastable. The model is used to analyse the steady-states and their stability properties as well as the dynamic responses of biomass, RNA, protein, building block and substrate concentrations to changes in environmental conditions. Especially the inoculation of a continuous culture and the effects of step changes in dilution rate, inlet substrate concentration and growth temperature are studied in detail. Relations between the growth behaviour of a single cell and that of a continuous culture are derived. The RNA to protein ratio is introduced as a rough measure of the physiological state of cells and it is shown that a cell reacts to environmental changes with a simple pattern of basic responses in growth rate and physiological state. There are reasons to assume that the model presented is the minimal version of a structured model of bacterial growth and represents an optimum compromise between biological

  11. Modified atmospheric conditions controlling fungal growth on cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1997-01-01

    2 level, relative humidity and temperature) and the composition of the cheese. All fungal species commonly found on cheese, starter cultures as well as contaminants, were examined.The most important factors influencing fungal growth are temperature, water activity of the medium and the carbon......Effective control of fungal growth on cheese under storage conditions is of great concern for the dairy industry. Therefore we designed a research project together with the Danish dairy industry on modelling fungal growth on cheese as affected by the combined effect of storage conditions (O2 and CO...... a competitive advantage over other fungi in moist conditions with high carbon dioxide levels, such as inside a roquefort cheese or in gas tight grain storage. The key to success in food packaging is to recognise the food ecosystem, as it enables us to identify which micro...

  12. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Kyla; Bodas, Manish; Campbell, Ryan John; Swanson, Doug; Sharma, Ajit; Vij, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97) levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) progression. The VCP inhibitor(s) (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface) were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells) proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay) and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay), and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay) as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ) treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting) of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion) as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05). Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay) and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05) as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining) that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001) by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control-DDN. Moreover

  13. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Walworth

    Full Text Available Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97 levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC progression. The VCP inhibitor(s (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay, and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05. Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05 as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001 by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control

  14. Emergent patterns of growth controlled by multicellular form and mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Jean, Ronald P.; Tan, John L.; Liu, Wendy F.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Spector, Alexander A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial patterns of cellular growth generate mechanical stresses that help to push, fold, expand, and deform tissues into their specific forms. Genetic factors are thought to specify patterns of growth and other behaviors to drive morphogenesis. Here, we show that tissue form itself can feed back to regulate patterns of proliferation. Using microfabrication to control the organization of sheets of cells, we demonstrated the emergence of stable patterns of proliferative foci. Regions of concentrated growth corresponded to regions of high tractional stress generated within the sheet, as predicted by a finite-element model of multicellular mechanics and measured directly by using a micromechanical force sensor array. Inhibiting actomyosin-based tension or cadherin-mediated connections between cells disrupted the spatial pattern of proliferation. These findings demonstrate the existence of patterns of mechanical forces that originate from the contraction of cells, emerge from their multicellular organization, and result in patterns of growth. Thus, tissue form is not only a consequence but also an active regulator of tissue growth. PMID:16049098

  15. Growth of scale-free networks under heterogeneous control

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Linjun

    2013-01-01

    Real-life networks often encounter vertex dysfunctions, which are usually followed by recoveries after appropriate maintenances. In this paper we present our research on a model of scale-free networks whose vertices are regularly removed and put back. Both the frequency and length of time of the disappearance of each vertex depend on the degree of the vertex, creating a heterogeneous control over the network. Our simulation results show very interesting growth pattern of this kind of networks. We also find that the scale-free property of the degree distribution is maintained in the proposed heterogeneously controlled networks. However, the overall growth rate of the networks in our model can be remarkably reduced if the inactive periods of the vertices are kept long.

  16. Growth control of sessile microbubbles in PDMS devices

    CERN Document Server

    Volk, Andreas; Kähler, Christian J; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Marin, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    In a microfluidic environment, the presence of bubbles is often detrimental to the functionality of the device, leading to clogging or cavitation, but microbubbles can also be an indispensable asset in other applications such as microstreaming. In either case, it is crucial to understand and control the growth or shrinkage of these bodies of air, in particular in common soft-lithography devices based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is highly permeable to gases. In this work, we study the gas transport into and out of a bubble positioned in a microfluidic device, taking into account the direct gas exchange through PDMS as well as the transport of gas through the liquid in the device. Hydrostatic pressure regulation allows for the quantitative control of growth, shrinkage, or the attainment of a stable equilibrium bubble size. We find that the vapor pressure of the liquid plays an important role for the balance of gas transport, accounting for variability in experimental conditions and suggesting addition...

  17. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  18. Fronts under arrest: Nonlocal boundary dynamics in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, Scott G; von Brecht, James H

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a minimal geometric partial differential equation framework to understand pattern formation from interacting, counterpropagating fronts. Our approach concentrates on the interfaces between different states in a system, and relies on both nonlocal interactions and mean-curvature flow to track their evolution. As an illustration, we use this approach to describe a phenomenon in bacterial colony formation wherein sibling colonies can arrest each other's growth. This arrested motion leads to static separations between healthy, growing colonies. As our minimal model faithfully recovers the geometry of these competing colonies, it captures and elucidates the key leading-order mechanisms responsible for such patterned growth.

  19. Controlled Growth of One-Dimensional Oxide Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng FANG; Lide ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the recent developments in the controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) oxide nanomaterials, including ZnO, SnO2, In2O3, Ga2O3, SiOx, MgO, and Al2O3. The growth of 1D oxide nanomaterials was carried out in a simple chemical vapor transport and condensation system. This article will begin with a survey of nanotechnology and 1D nanomaterials achieved by many researchers, and then mainly discuss on the controlled growth of 1D oxide nanomaterials with their morphologies, sizes, compositions, and microstructures controlled by altering experimental parameters, such as the temperature at the source material and the substrate, temperature gradient in the tube furnace, the total reaction time, the heating rate of the furnace, the gas flow rate, and the starting material. Their roles in the formation of various morphologies are analyzed and discussed. Finally, this review will be concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  20. A palmitoyl conjugate of insect pentapeptide Yamamarin arrests cell proliferation and respiration

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A palmitoyl conjugate of an insect pentapeptide that occurs in diapausing insects causes a reversible cell-cycle arrest and suppresses mitochondrial respiration. This peptide compound also causes growth arrest in murine leukemic cell line expressing human gene Bcr/Abl and a farnesoyl peptide induces embryonic diapause in Bombyx mori. These results demonstrate that the insect peptide compounds can lead to the understanding of a common pathway in developmental arrest in animals and may provide ...

  1. Controlling growth of aligned carbon nanotubes from porous silicon templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fabricating well-aligned carbon nanotubes, especially, on a silicon substrate is very important for their applications. In this paper, an aligned carbon nanotube array has been prepared by pyrolysis of hydrocarbons catalyzed by nickel nanoparticles embedded in porous silicon (PS) templates. High-magnification transmission electron microscopy images confirm that the nanotubes are well graphitized. The PS substrates with pore sizes between 10 and 100 nm play a control role on the growth of carbon nanotubes and the diameters of the tubes increase with the enlargement of the pores of the substrates. However, such a control role cannot be found in the macro-PS substrates.

  2. [Arrest of maturation in spermatogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, S; Bellocci, M; Martini, M; Bruno, B; Moscardelli, S; Fabbrini, A; Properzi, G

    1982-07-30

    The ultrastructural aspects of the germinal epithelium of 10 infertile men affected by maturative arrest of spermatogenesis were studied. We noted an increased number of malformed germinal cells. Marginal nuclear vescicles were present in spermatogonia of patients affected by spermatogonial arrest. The few spermatid present in the germinal epithelium of the patients affected by a spermatidic arrest presented changes of the nuclear condensation, the acrosome, and the tail. The Sertoli cells presented an immature aspect of the nucleus and changes of the "mantle". A possible correlation between the Sertoli cells changes and the altered spermatogenesis was proposed.

  3. Arrest of cytoplasmic streaming induces algal proliferation in green paramecia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Takahashi

    Full Text Available A green ciliate Paramecium bursaria, bearing several hundreds of endosymbiotic algae, demonstrates rotational microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming, in which cytoplasmic granules and endosymbiotic algae flow in a constant direction. However, its physiological significance is still unknown. We investigated physiological roles of cytoplasmic streaming in P. bursaria through host cell cycle using video-microscopy. Here, we found that cytoplasmic streaming was arrested in dividing green paramecia and the endosymbiotic algae proliferated only during the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. Interestingly, arrest of cytoplasmic streaming with pressure or a microtubule drug also induced proliferation of endosymbiotic algae independently of host cell cycle. Thus, cytoplasmic streaming may control the algal proliferation in P. bursaria. Furthermore, confocal microscopic observation revealed that a division septum was formed in the constricted area of a dividing paramecium, producing arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. This is a first report to suggest that cytoplasmic streaming controls proliferation of eukaryotic cells.

  4. How to determine control of growth rate in a chemostat. Using metabolic control analysis to resolve the paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, Jacky L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Groeneveld, Philip

    1994-01-01

    how, paradoxically, one can determine control of growth rate, of growth yield and of other fluxes in a chemostat. We develop metabolic control analysis for the chemostat. this analysis does not depend on the particular way in which specific growth rate varies with the concentration of the growth...

  5. Relationship between Intrauterine Bacterial Infection and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Fei Yan; Xin-Yan Liu; Yun-Fei Cheng; Zhi-Yi Li; Jie Ou; Wei Wang; Feng-Qin Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Early embryonic developmental arrest is the most commonly understudied adverse outcome of pregnancy.The relevance of intrauterine infection to spontaneous embryonic death is rarely studied and remains unclear.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between intrauterine bacterial infection and early embryonic developmental arrest.Methods:Embryonic chorion tissue and uterine swabs for bacterial detection were obtained from 33 patients who underwent artificial abortion (control group) and from 45 patients who displayed early embryonic developmental arrest (trial group).Results:Intrauterine bacterial infection was discovered in both groups.The infection rate was 24.44% (11/45) in the early embryonic developmental arrest group and 9.09% (3/33) in the artificial abortion group.Classification analysis revealed that the highest detection rate for Micrococcus luteus in the early embryonic developmental arrest group was 13.33% (6/45),and none was detected in the artificial abortion group.M.luteus infection was significantly different between the groups (P < 0.05 as shown by Fisher's exact test).In addition,no correlation was found between intrauterine bacterial infection and history of early embryonic developmental arrest.Conclusions:M.luteus infection is related to early embryonic developmental arrest and might be one of its causative factors.

  6. Gelatin methacrylate microspheres for controlled growth factor release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C

    2015-02-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles (MPs) formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15-90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor than conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite the GA MPs having an order of magnitude greater gelatin content. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 and basic fibroblast growth factor and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery.

  7. The TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 and the OMA RNA-binding proteins antagonistically control the prophase-to-metaphase transition and growth of Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Caroline A; Coetzee, Donna; Eichten, Carly; Wang, Xin; Hansen, Dave; Greenstein, David

    2014-12-01

    In many animals, oocytes enter meiosis early in their development but arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this arrest period, enables the acquisition of meiotic competence and the capacity to produce healthy progeny. Meiotic resumption, or meiotic maturation, involves the transition to metaphase I (M phase) and is regulated by intercellular signaling and cyclin-dependent kinase activation. Premature meiotic maturation would be predicted to diminish fertility as the timing of this event, which normally occurs after oocyte growth is complete, is crucial. In the accompanying article in this issue, we identify the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 as a translational repressor that copurifies with OMA-1 and OMA-2, RNA-binding proteins redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. In this article, we show that LIN-41 enables the production of high-quality oocytes and plays an essential role in controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. lin-41 null mutants display a striking defect that is specific to oogenesis: pachytene-stage cells cellularize prematurely and fail to progress to diplotene. Instead, these cells activate CDK-1, enter M phase, assemble spindles, and attempt to segregate chromosomes. Translational derepression of the CDK-1 activator CDC-25.3 appears to contribute to premature M-phase entry in lin-41 mutant oocytes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 exhibit an antagonistic relationship, and we suggest that translational regulation by these proteins could be important for controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation.

  8. An airline cardiac arrest program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Rourke, M F; Donaldson, E; Geddes, J S

    1997-01-01

    ...) available for use on airline passengers with cardiac arrest. AEDs were installed on international Qantas aircraft and at major terminals, selected crew were trained in their use, and all crew members were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation...

  9. Growth arrest specific protein (GAS) 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, T N; Rasmussen, Morten; Jaksch, C A M

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Maternal low-protein (LP) diet during gestation results in a reduced beta cell mass in the offspring at birth and this may hamper the ability to adapt to high-energy food and sedentary lifestyle later in life. To investigate the biology behind the LP-offspring phenotype, this study...... that favours premature maturation of the beta cells....

  10. Associates of Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Perihemodialytic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Flythe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest during and proximate to hemodialysis is rare but highly fatal. Studies have examined peridialytic sudden cardiac event risk factors, but no study has considered associates of cardiopulmonary arrests (fatal and nonfatal events including cardiac and respiratory causes. This study was designed to elucidate patient and procedural factors associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Data for this case-control study were taken from the hemodialysis population at Fresenius Medical Care, North America. 924 in-center cardiopulmonary events (cases and 75,538 controls were identified. Cases and controls were 1 : 5 matched on age, sex, race, and diabetes. Predictors of cardiopulmonary arrest were considered for logistic model inclusion. Missed treatments due to hospitalization, lower body mass, coronary artery disease, heart failure, lower albumin and hemoglobin, lower dialysate potassium, higher serum calcium, greater erythropoietin stimulating agent dose, and normalized protein catabolic rate (J-shaped were associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Of these, lower albumin, hemoglobin, and body mass index; higher erythropoietin stimulating agent dose; and greater missed sessions had the strongest associations with outcome. Patient health markers and procedural factors are associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. In addition to optimizing nutritional status, it may be prudent to limit exposure to low dialysate potassium (<2 K bath and to use the lowest effective erythropoietin stimulating agent dose.

  11. Iterative exponential growth of stereo- and sequence-controlled polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jonathan C; Ehrlich, Deborah J C; Gao, Angela X; Leibfarth, Frank A; Jiang, Yivan; Zhou, Erica; Jamison, Timothy F; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2015-10-01

    Chemists have long sought sequence-controlled synthetic polymers that mimic nature's biopolymers, but a practical synthetic route that enables absolute control over polymer sequence and structure remains a key challenge. Here, we report an iterative exponential growth plus side-chain functionalization (IEG+) strategy that begins with enantiopure epoxides and facilitates the efficient synthesis of a family of uniform >3 kDa macromolecules of varying sequence and stereoconfiguration that are coupled to produce unimolecular polymers (>6 kDa) with sequences and structures that cannot be obtained using traditional polymerization techniques. Selective side-chain deprotection of three hexadecamers is also demonstrated, which imbues each compound with the ability to dissolve in water. We anticipate that these new macromolecules and the general IEG+ strategy will find broad application as a versatile platform for the scalable synthesis of sequence-controlled polymers.

  12. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind,, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2013-10-15

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank–van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  13. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind

    2013-10-01

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank-van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  14. Cross-talk between the fat body and brain regulates insect developmental arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L

    2012-09-04

    Developmental arrest, a critical component of the life cycle in animals as diverse as nematodes (dauer state), insects (diapause), and vertebrates (hibernation), results in dramatic depression of the metabolic rate and a profound extension in longevity. Although many details of the hormonal systems controlling developmental arrest are well-known, we know little about the interactions between metabolic events and the hormones controlling the arrested state. Here, we show that diapause is regulated by an interplay between blood-borne metabolites and regulatory centers within the brain. Gene expression in the fat body, the insect equivalent of the liver, is strongly suppressed during diapause, resulting in low levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates circulating within the blood, and at diapause termination, the fat body becomes activated, releasing an abundance of TCA intermediates that act on the brain to stimulate synthesis of regulatory peptides that prompt production of the insect growth hormone ecdysone. This model is supported by our success in breaking diapause by injecting a mixture of TCA intermediates and upstream metabolites. The results underscore the importance of cross-talk between the brain and fat body as a regulator of diapause and suggest that the TCA cycle may be a checkpoint for regulating different forms of animal dormancy.

  15. Cross-talk between the fat body and brain regulates insect developmental arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental arrest, a critical component of the life cycle in animals as diverse as nematodes (dauer state), insects (diapause), and vertebrates (hibernation), results in dramatic depression of the metabolic rate and a profound extension in longevity. Although many details of the hormonal systems controlling developmental arrest are well-known, we know little about the interactions between metabolic events and the hormones controlling the arrested state. Here, we show that diapause is regulated by an interplay between blood-borne metabolites and regulatory centers within the brain. Gene expression in the fat body, the insect equivalent of the liver, is strongly suppressed during diapause, resulting in low levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates circulating within the blood, and at diapause termination, the fat body becomes activated, releasing an abundance of TCA intermediates that act on the brain to stimulate synthesis of regulatory peptides that prompt production of the insect growth hormone ecdysone. This model is supported by our success in breaking diapause by injecting a mixture of TCA intermediates and upstream metabolites. The results underscore the importance of cross-talk between the brain and fat body as a regulator of diapause and suggest that the TCA cycle may be a checkpoint for regulating different forms of animal dormancy. PMID:22912402

  16. Protein and mRNA levels support the notion that a genetic regulatory circuit controls growth phases in E. coli populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial populations transition between growing and non-growing phases, based on nutrient availability and stresses conditions. The hallmark of a growing state is anabolism, including DNA replication and cell division. In contrast, bacteria in a growth-arrested state acquire a resistant physiology and diminished metabolism. However, there is little knowledge on how this transition occurs at the molecular level. Here, we provide new evidence that a multi-element genetic regulatory circuit might work to maintain genetic control among growth-phase transitions in Escherichia coli. This work contributes to the discovering of design principles behind the performance of biological functions, which could be of relevance on the new disciplines of biological engineering and synthetic biology.

  17. Growth control of sessile microbubbles in PDMS devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Andreas; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Marin, Alvaro

    2015-12-21

    In a microfluidic environment, the presence of bubbles is often detrimental to the functionality of the device, leading to clogging or cavitation, but microbubbles can also be an indispensable asset in other applications such as microstreaming. In either case, it is crucial to understand and control the growth or shrinkage of these bodies of air, in particular in common soft-lithography devices based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is highly permeable to gases. In this work, we study the gas transport into and out of a bubble positioned in a microfluidic device, taking into account the direct gas exchange through PDMS as well as the transport of gas through the liquid in the device. Hydrostatic pressure regulation allows for the quantitative control of growth, shrinkage, or the attainment of a stable equilibrium bubble size. We find that the vapor pressure of the liquid plays an important role for the balance of gas transport, accounting for variability in experimental conditions and suggesting additional means of bubble size control in applications.

  18. Cross-talk between the fat body and brain regulates insect developmental arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental arrest, a critical component of the life cycle in animals as diverse as nematodes (dauer state), insects (diapause), and vertebrates (hibernation), results in dramatic depression of the metabolic rate and a profound extension in longevity. Although many details of the hormonal systems controlling developmental arrest are well-known, we know little about the interactions between metabolic events and the hormones controlling the arrested state. Here, we show that diapause is regul...

  19. Structure–Biological Function Relationship Extended to Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2-Like Protein Mad2 Native and Mutants-New Opportunity for Genetic Disorder Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Speranta; Milac, Adina; Mernea, Maria; Mihailescu, Dan; Putz, Mihai V.; Buiu, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN) and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2) to active closed (C-Mad2) conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) or Mad1) were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided) and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53–0.65) and fitted correlation r2 (0.82–0.90). Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN. PMID:25411801

  20. Structure–Biological Function Relationship Extended to Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2-Like Protein Mad2 Native and Mutants-New Opportunity for Genetic Disorder Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speranta Avram

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2 to active closed (C-Mad2 conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20 or Mad1 were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53–0.65 and fitted correlation r2 (0.82–0.90. Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN.

  1. Berberine inhibits growth, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells by regulating Cdki-Cdk-cyclin cascade, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantena, Sudheer K; Sharma, Som D; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2006-10-01

    Chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic botanicals may be one of the strategies for the management of the skin cancers. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability (3-77%, P berberine-induced G(1) cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of Cdki proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27), a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 and cyclins D1, D2 and E and enhanced binding of Cdki-Cdk. In additional studies, treatment of A431 cells with berberine (15-75 microM) for 72 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis (31-60%, P berberine-treated control (11.7%), which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of caspases 9, 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) significantly blocked the berberine-induced apoptosis in A431 cells confirmed that berberine-induced apoptosis is mediated through activation of caspase 3-dependent pathway. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells in vitro, further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of non-melanoma skin cancers.

  2. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  3. Postembryonic control of root meristem growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali

    2014-02-01

    Organ development in multicellular organisms is dependent on the proper balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. In the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, meristem growth is the result of cell divisions in the proximal meristem and cell differentiation in the elongation and differentiation zones. Hormones, transcription factors and small peptides underpin the molecular mechanisms governing these processes. Computer modeling has aided our understanding of the dynamic interactions involved in stem cell maintenance and meristem activity. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of postembryonic root stem cell maintenance and control of meristem size. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Features of Localization of ARG-X Protease-processing in the Suprastructures of Interphase Chromatin under Conditions of Cell Cycle Arrest by Sodium Butyrate, upon Induction of Growth Morphogenesis of Mature Embryos of Winter and Spring Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov R.S.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental property of many organisms is the ability to feel, to assess direction of the signal action and respond to the environmental conditions. It is known that chromatin plays a major role in organizing the regulation of gene activity. However, our understanding of how state of the suprastructure organization of chromatin and its proteins reacts not only to changes in the environment, but also on the development of specific signals remains largely unclear. In the course of this work, we have analyzed the result of the various ways of chromatin modifications: the regulatory Arg-X protease-processing and inhibition of protein deacetylation with sodium butyrate. Sodium butyrate causes cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase, and promotes of duration of the transcriptional activity of chromatin. Experiments on molecular-genetic state of the chromatin matrix were carried out at the induction of growth morphogenesis in the physiological period of active water absorption of mature seeds and wheat germs, which were purposefully transformed and formed in different environmental conditions. During focused, long-term transforming of spring wheat Artemovka into winter wheat Mironovskaya 808 and the last of them again into Mironovskaya Spring wheat while stopping of the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, mainly occurs the active Arg-X protease-processing at the level of non-histone proteins, and linker histones of suprastructures chromatin. We assume that the regulatory proteolytic processing and prolongation of acetylation of proteins can be interconnected in the regulation of conformational transitions of chromatin at the different levels of its organization: both suprastructures and at the more profound proteomic level of non-histone and histone blocks, and have its peculiarities during the period of transcriptional activation. We hope that the study peculiarities of locations of regulatory proteolysis in the conditions of inhibition of deacetylation in

  5. Characterization of mitochondrial injury after cardiac arrest (COMICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Liu, Xiaowen; Andersen, Lars W; Rittenberger, Jon C; Abella, Benjamin S; Gaieski, David F; Ornato, Joseph P; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Cocchi, Michael N; Abbate, Antonio; Uber, Amy; Clore, John; Peberdy, Mary Anne; Callaway, Clifton W

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial injury post-cardiac arrest has been described in pre-clinical settings but the extent to which this injury occurs in humans remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased levels of mitochondrial biomarkers would be associated with mortality and neurological morbidity in post-cardiac arrest subjects. We performed a prospective multicenter study of post-cardiac arrest subjects. Inclusion criteria were comatose adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mitochondrial biomarkers were measured at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48h after return of spontaneous circulation as well as in healthy controls. Out of 111 subjects enrolled, 102 had evaluable samples at 0h. Cardiac arrest subjects had higher baseline cytochrome c levels compared to controls (2.18ng/mL [0.74, 7.74] vs. 0.16ng/mL [0.03, 0.91], p<0.001), and subjects who died had higher 0h cytochrome c levels compared to survivors (3.66ng/mL [1.40, 14.9] vs. 1.27ng/mL [0.16, 2.37], p<0.001). There were significantly higher Ribonuclease P (RNaseP) (3.3 [1.2, 5.7] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.2], p<0.001) and Beta-2microglobulin (B2M) (12.0 [1.0, 22.9], vs. 0.6 [0.6, 1.3], p<0.001) levels in cardiac arrest subjects at baseline compared to the control subjects. There were no differences between survivors and non-survivors for mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA. Cytochrome c was increased in post- cardiac arrest subjects compared to controls, and in post-cardiac arrest non-survivors compared to survivors. Nuclear DNA and cell free DNA was increased in plasma of post-cardiac arrest subjects. There were no differences in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA between survivors and non-survivors. Mitochondrial injury markers showed mixed results in the post-cardiac arrest period. Future research needs to investigate these differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway induces a senescence-like arrest mediated by p27Kip1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collado, M.; Medema, R.H.; Garcia-Cao, I.; Dubuisson, M.L.N.; Barradas, M.; Glassford, J.; Rivas, C.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Serrano, M.; Lam, E.W.-F.

    2000-01-01

    A senescence-like growth arrest is induced in mouse primary embryo fibroblasts by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). We observed that senescence-like growth arrest is correlated with an increase in p27Kip1 but that down-regulation of other cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, inclu

  7. Desacetyluvaricin induces S phase arrest in SW480 colorectal cancer cells through superoxide overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jun-Yi; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Chen, Tianfeng; Gao, Si; Choi, Mei-Yuk; Wong, Yum-Shing

    2014-03-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs) are a group of fatty acid-derivatives with potent anticancer effects. In the present study, we found desacetyluvaricin (Dau) exhibited notable in vitro antiproliferative effect on SW480 human colorectal carcinoma cells with IC50 value of 14 nM. The studies on the underlying mechanisms revealed that Dau inhibited the cancer cell growth through induction of S phase cell cycle arrest from 11.3% (control) to 33.2% (160 nM Dau), which was evidenced by the decreased protein expression of cyclin A Overproduction of superoxide, intracellular DNA damage, and inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling pathway, were also found involved in cells exposed to Dau. Moreover, pre-treatment of the cells with ascorbic acid significantly prevented the Dau-induced overproduction of superoxide, DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results suggest that Dau induces S phase arrest in cancer cells by firstly superoxide overproduction and subsequently the involvement of various signaling pathways.

  8. Problems of house arrest application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Vladimirovich Kolesnikov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the position of house arrest in the system of preventive measures and to identify the main problems of criminal procedural regulation that prevent its broader use during the preliminary investigation and trial. Methods dialectical approach to the analysis of social phenomena allowing to view them in static and dynamic aspect evolutionarysynergetic paradigm providing the opportunity to explore the phenomenon under investigation with respect to the system subordinate and coordinating relationships within the system. Dialectical approach and the evolutionarysynergetic paradigm determined the choice of specific methods of research historical comparative law comparative formallegal statistical. Results the problems arising with application of house arrest are grouped by author depending on the structure of the provisions of Article 107 of the CriminalProcedural Code of the Russian Federation. The first group of problems includes the determination of the location of the accused suspect under house arrest and the scope of the legal restrictions imposed. The second group includes the establishment of terms of house arrest and their subsequent renewal or change of the preventive measure. The third group is the identification of persons to which the house arrest will be the best preventive measure. The results of the study allow to make proposals to change the current wording of Art. 107 of the CriminalProcedural Code of Russia. Scientific novelty a comprehensive study of current state of the normativelegal regulation of house arrest in the context of its practical application. Practical value the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in scientific and pedagogical activity when considering questions about the nature of preventive measures related to the restraint of personal liberty of the accused. nbsp

  9. Analysis of Crack Arrest Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-15

    vload(m) vp tn(m) Vertical Source Load (kN) on wedge HY80 Finite Element 0.0122 0.0099 3.81x10 -4 144 Steel Calculations Experiment 0.0122 --- 3.74x10-4...curve, are bona fide measures of the fracture arrest capability of tough ductile steels . The second is that the J-values represent the crack driving...fibrous mode of crack extension. (b) A new test method for studying fast fracture and arrest in tough steels . (c) Measurements of fast fracture and crack

  10. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Ferullo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions.

  11. Growth Control by Ethylene: Adjusting Phenotypes to the Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.; Sasidharan, R.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.

    2007-01-01

    Plants phenotypically adjust to environmental challenges, and the gaseous plant hormone ethylene modulates many of these growth adjustments. Ethylene can be involved in environmentally induced growth inhibition as well as growth stimulation. Still, ethylene has long been considered a growth inhibito

  12. Simulation model for plant growth in controlled environment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.; Wann, M.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the mathematical model is to relate the individual processes to environmental conditions and the behavior of the whole plant. Using the controlled-environment facilities of the phytotron at North Carolina State University for experimentation at the whole-plant level and methods for handling complex models, researchers developed a plant growth model to describe the relationships between hierarchial levels of the crop production system. The fundamental processes that are considered are: (1) interception of photosynthetically active radiation by leaves, (2) absorption of photosynthetically active radiation, (3) photosynthetic transformation of absorbed radiation into chemical energy of carbon bonding in solube carbohydrates in the leaves, (4) translocation between carbohydrate pools in leaves, stems, and roots, (5) flow of energy from carbohydrate pools for respiration, (6) flow from carbohydrate pools for growth, and (7) aging of tissues. These processes are described at the level of organ structure and of elementary function processes. The driving variables of incident photosynthetically active radiation and ambient temperature as inputs pertain to characterization at the whole-plant level. The output of the model is accumulated dry matter partitioned among leaves, stems, and roots; thus, the elementary processes clearly operate under the constraints of the plant structure which is itself the output of the model.

  13. Controlled growth of silver nanoparticles in a hydrothermal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Zou; Yao Xu; Bo Hou; Dong Wu; Yuhan Sun

    2007-01-01

    A two-step synthesis was used to control the shape of silver nanoparticles. First, a few spherical silver nanoparticles, ~10 nm in size, were prepared via reduction of Ag+ ions in aqueous Ag(NH3)2NO3 by poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP). Then, in a subsequent hydrothermal treatment,the remaining Ag+ ions were reduced by PVP into polyhedral nanoparticles, or larger spherical nanoparticles formed from the small spherical seed silver nanoparticles in the first step. The morphology and size of the resultant particles depend on the hydrothermal temperature, PVP/Ag molar ratio and concentration of Ag+ ions. By using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), the possible growth mechanism of the silver nanoparticles was discussed.

  14. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  15. Gene expression profile after cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, Marc; Bianchi, Cesario; Khan, Tanveer A; Xu, Shu; Liddicoat, John R; Voisine, Pierre; Araujo, Eugenio; Lyon, Helen; Kohane, Isaac S; Libermann, Towia A; Sellke, Frank W

    2003-11-01

    This study examines the cardiac and peripheral gene expression responses to cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. Atrial myocardium and skeletal muscle were harvested from 16 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting before and after cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. Ten sample pairs were selected for patient similarity, and oligonucleotide microarray analyses of 12,625 genes were performed using matched precardiopulmonary bypass tissues as controls. Array results were validated with Northern blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunoblotting. Statistical analyses were nonparametric. Median durations of cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest were 74 and 60 minutes, respectively. Compared with precardiopulmonary bypass, postcardiopulmonary bypass myocardial tissues revealed 480 up-regulated and 626 down-regulated genes with a threshold P value of.025 or less (signal-to-noise ratio: 3.46); skeletal muscle tissues showed 560 and 348 such genes, respectively (signal-to-noise ratio: 3.04). Up-regulated genes in cardiac tissues included inflammatory and transcription activators FOS; jun B proto-oncogene; nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3; MYC; transcription factor-8; endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1; and cysteine-rich 61; apoptotic genes nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A; and stress genes dual-specificity phosphatase-1, dual-specificity phosphatase-5, and B-cell translocation gene 2. Up-regulated skeletal muscle genes included interleukin 6; interleukin 8; tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 11B; nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3; transcription factor-8; interleukin 13; jun B proto-oncogene; interleukin 1B; glycoprotein Ib, platelet, alpha polypeptide; and Ras-associated protein RAB27A. Down-regulated genes included haptoglobin and numerous immunoglobulins in the heart, and factor H

  16. Grape seed extract induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manjinder; Mandair, Reinuka; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2008-01-01

    One approach to control colorectal cancer (CRC) is its preventive intervention by dietary agents or those consumed as supplements. However, because most of these products are often consumed by patients as an complementary and alternative medicine practice, a scientific base such as efficacy, mechanism, and standardized preparation needs to be developed. Grape seed extract (GSE) is one such supplement widely consumed by humans for its several health benefits. We reported recently that GSE inhibits CRC cell HT29 growth in culture and nude mice xenograft. Because GSE is available commercially through different vendors, here we assessed whether GSE from 2 different manufacturers produces comparable biological effects in a panel of human CRC cell lines. Our results show that irrespective of source, GSE strongly inhibits LoVo, HT29, and SW480 cell growth, with a G1 arrest in LoVo and HT29 cells but an S and/or G2/M arrest in SW480 cell cycle progression. GSE also induced Cip/p21 levels in all 3 cell lines. Furthermore, an induction of apoptosis was observed in all 3 cell lines by GSE. Taken together, our findings suggest that GSE could be an effective CAM agent against CRC possibly due to its strong growth inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects.

  17. 生长停滞特异性基因产物6的2个单核苷酸多态性与缺血性脑卒中的相关性%Relation between two single nucleotide polymorphisms of growth arrest-specific gene 6 and ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高永俊; 李晓峰; 杨旭; 李新毅

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨生长停滞特异性基因产物6(growth arrest-specific gene 6,Gas 6)单核苷酸多态性(single nucleotide polymorphisms,SNP)与缺血性脑卒中(ischemic stroke,IS)及其亚型发生的相关性.方法 选择IS患者119例作为病例组,同期随机抽取无心、脑及周围动脉粥样硬化史的健康体检者217例作为对照组.根据既往研究的阳性结果及HapMap数据库,选择Gas6 rs8191974及rs7400722位点分析.采用PCR-RFLP技术进行2个SNP基因分型.采用logistic多元回归分析IS及其亚型的危险因素.结果 2组2个SNP基因型(P=0.80、0.79)、等位基因频率(P=0.57、0.50)及不同模型基因频率(显性:P=0.93、0.58;隐性:P=0.51、0.58)比较,差异均无统计学意义;以连锁不平衡系数>0.5为判断标准,共构建4个单体型(G-C,G-T,A-C,A-T),2组4个单体型分布频率差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05);校正相关危险因素后,差异仍无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 Gas6 rs8191974及rs7400722位点基因型、等位基因频率及单体型与IS无明显相关性.%Objective To study the relation of single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNP) of growth arrest-specific gene 6(Gas6) with ischemic stroke (IS) and its subtypes. Methods One hundred and nineteen IS patients served as a patient group and 217 subjects with no history of cardiac,cerebral and peripheral athrosclerosis served as a control group in this study. The rs8191974 and rs7400722 polymorphisms of Gas6, selected according to the positive findings in previous studies and in HapMap database,were detected by PCR-RFLP. Risk factors for IS and its subtypes were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results No significant difference was found in the 2 ingle nucleotide SNP,frequency of allele and Gas6 gene in different models,and in the 4 haplotypes(G-C, G-T, A-C, AT) we established with the chain-imbalance factor >0. 05 as a judge criterion between the two groups, even after the related risk factors were

  18. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use....... METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes...

  19. 超声对宫内胚胎停止发育诊断的应用观察%Application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of intrauterine embryo growth arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯树新

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of intrauterine embryo growth arrest, stop the application effect observa-tion of ultrasound in the diagnosis of intrauterine embryo development.Methods:From 2013 to 2014 in our hospital for treat-ment of 30 cases of diagnosed intrauterine embryos stop development of ultrasonic testing images were analyzed retrospectively. Results: 30 cases of embryonic images with different characteristics, in the ultrasonic observation, air sac type 11 cases, accounting for 24.4%, in the ultrasonic observation, no echo area inside the uterus appears irregular oval sacs, and the pregnancy pregnant sac is larger, the size of gestational sac size is 3~4cm. With favorable pregnancy pregnancy, the inner wall of uterus of pregnant women was clear, and the wall of the uterus pregnancy pregnant sac some separation. Pregnancy pregnant sac deformation type is 5 cases, accounting for 11%, patients with intrauterine pregnancies were more irregular shape, with a flat, C, and presents the bleak rough pregnancy pregnant sac state, no embryo. Light spot, wide type in 12 cases, accounting for 26.6%, in the acoustic observation, showed a light or facula echo obvious.Conclusion:Ultrasonic observation on development has a direct, accurate, rapid for intra-uterine embryo stops, miscarriage prevention and treatment of pregnant women without meaning, providing the reliable basis for the clinical treatment of.%目的:分析宫内胚胎停止发育的特点,观察超声在宫内胚胎停止发育诊断中的应用效果。方法选取2013到2014年在本院治疗的30例被诊断为宫内胚胎停止发育的患者的超声检测图片进行回顾分析。结果30例胚胎停止发育的图片各有特点,在超声观察下,空囊型的为11例,占36.6%,在超声观测下,子宫内部呈现出来的椭圆形的不规则囊状物无回声区,而且它的孕娠囊较大,妊娠囊大小为3~4cm,妊娠大小基本与怀孕周期一致,孕妇的

  20. Physical controls on cold-water coral growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floegel, S.; Rueggeberg, A.; Dullo, C.

    2009-04-01

    observation is an Atlantic-wide phenomenon. In areas where coral growth is restricted to some small patches and reefs, or recent mound growth is limited, like in the Gulf of Cadiz or off Mauritania, recent sigma theta values lay outside the envelope of 27.5 ± 0.15 kg m-3. However, it has to be mentioned that corals do not occur everywhere along the European continental margins where sigma theta values are around 27.5 kg m-3. In this case, second order parameters like sedimentation rates, currents, the lack or presence of good settlement substrates, nutrient concentrations, etc. are controlling the coral growth and settlement. Literature Dullo, W.-Chr., Flögel, S., Rüggeberg, A. (in press) Cold-water coral growth in relation to the hydrography of the Celtic and Nordic European Continental Margin. Marine Ecology Progress Series.

  1. Control the invasive growth of gastrointestinal epithelial tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Cunyu

    2014-01-01

    Invasive growth of epithelial tumor is a very complex process. Therefore,clarifying the molecular mechanisms of the invasive growth of tumor cells will help us find new targets for cancer therapy,and suppress tumor growth and development more effectively.

  2. 14 CFR 1203b.103 - Arrest authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1203b.103 Section 1203b.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.103 Arrest authority. (a) NASA...

  3. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides: Growth Mechanism, Controllability, and Scalability

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2017-07-06

    Recently there have been many research breakthroughs in two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, boron nitride (h-BN), black phosphors (BPs), and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). The unique electrical, optical, and thermal properties in 2D materials are associated with their strictly defined low dimensionalities. These materials provide a wide range of basic building blocks for next-generation electronics. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has shown great promise to generate high-quality TMDC layers with scalable size, controllable thickness, and excellent electronic properties suitable for both technological applications and fundamental sciences. The capability to precisely engineer 2D materials by chemical approaches has also given rise to fascinating new physics, which could lead to exciting new applications. In this Review, we introduce the latest development of TMDC synthesis by CVD approaches and provide further insight for the controllable and reliable synthesis of atomically thin TMDCs. Understanding of the vapor-phase growth mechanism of 2D TMDCs could benefit the formation of complicated heterostructures and novel artificial 2D lattices.

  4. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  5. Pressure Control System Design for a Closed Crop Growth Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, K.; Blackwell, C.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) is an area of active research at NASA. CELSS is a plant-based bioregenerative life support system for long term manned space flights where resupply is costly or impractical. The plants in a CELSS will function to convert the carbon dioxide (exhaled by the crew) into oxygen, purify non-potable water into potable quality water, and provide food for the crew. Prior to implementing a CELSS life support system, one must have knowledge on growing plants in a closed chamber under low gravity. This information will come from research to be conducted on the CELSS Test Facility that will operate on the Space Station Freedom. Currently a ground-based CELSS Test Facility is being built at NASA Ames Research Center. It is called the EDU (Engineering Development Unit). This system will allow researchers to identify issues that may cause difficulties in the development of the CELSS Test Facility and aid in the development of new needed technologies. The EDU consists of a 1 m2 crop growth chamber that is surrounded by a containment enclosure. The containment enclosure isolates the system so there is very little mass and thermal exchange with the ambient. The leakage rate is on the order of 1 % of the enclosure's volume per day (with 0.2S psi pressure difference). The thermal leakage is less than 0.5% of the electrical power supplied to the system per degree Celsius difference from the surrounding. The pressure in the containment enclosure is regulated at 62.5 Pa below the ambient by an active controller. The goal is to maintain this set point for a variety of conditions, such as a range of operating temperatures, heat load variations that occur when the lights are turned on and off, and fluctuations in ambient pressure. In addition certain transition tracking performance is required. This paper illustrates the application of some advanced systems control methods to the task of synthesizing the EDU's pressure control system.

  6. Hydroxylated PBDEs induce developmental arrest in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usenko, Crystal Y., E-mail: Crystal_usenko@baylor.edu; Hopkins, David C.; Trumble, Stephen J., E-mail: Stephen_trumble@baylor.edu; Bruce, Erica D., E-mail: Erica_bruce@baylor.edu

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitous spread of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has led to concerns regarding the metabolites of these congeners, in particular hydroxylated PBDEs. There are limited studies regarding the biological interactions of these chemicals, yet there is some concern they may be more toxic than their parent compounds. In this study three hydroxylated PBDEs were assessed for toxicity in embryonic zebrafish: 3-OH-BDE 47, 5-OH-BDE 47, and 6-OH-BDE 47. All three congeners induced developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner; however, 6-OH-BDE 47 induced adverse effects at lower concentrations than the other congeners. Furthermore, all three induced cell death; however apoptosis was not observed. In short-term exposures (24–28 hours post fertilization), all hydroxylated PBDEs generated oxidative stress in the region corresponding to the cell death at 5 and 10 ppm. To further investigate the short-term effects that may be responsible for the developmental arrest observed in this study, gene regulation was assessed for embryos exposed to 0.625 ppm 6-OH-BDE 47 from 24 to 28 hpf. Genes involved in stress response, thyroid hormone regulation, and neurodevelopment were significantly upregulated compared to controls; however, genes related to oxidative stress were either unaffected or downregulated. This study suggests that hydroxylated PBDEs disrupt development, and may induce oxidative stress and potentially disrupt the cholinergic system and thyroid hormone homeostasis. -- Highlights: ► OH-PBDEs induce developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. ► Hydroxyl group location influences biological interaction. ► OH-PBDEs induce oxidative stress. ► Thyroid hormone gene regulation was disrupted following exposure. ► To our knowledge, this is the first whole organism study of OH-PBDE toxicity.

  7. A method of variable spacing for controlled plant growth systems in spaceflight and terrestrial agriculture applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J.

    1986-01-01

    A higher plant growth system for Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) applications is described. The system permits independent movement of individual plants during growth. Enclosed within variable geometry growth chambers, the system allocates only the volume required by the growing plants. This variable spacing system maintains isolation between root and shoot environments, providing individual control for optimal growth. The advantages of the system for hydroponic and aeroponic growth chambers are discussed. Two applications are presented: (1) the growth of soybeans in a space station common module, and (2) in a terrestrial city greenhouse.

  8. Controllable growth of dielectric/semiconductor integrated films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YangRong; ZHU Jun; LUO WenBo; LIU XingZhao; ZHANG WanLi

    2009-01-01

    Currently,electronic information systems are developing quickly towards further miniaturization and monolithic integration so as to realize smaller volume,higher velocity and lower power consumption.For this purpose,the integration of all sorts of active devices (mainly fabricated by semiconductors) with passive devices (fabricated by functional materials) is particularly important and impendent.Therefore,it is necessary to integrate multifunctional oxide dielectrics possessing electric,magnetic,acoustic,optical and thermal properties characterized by spontaneous polarization with semiconductors bearing the characters of carrier transportation to form artificial structures via deposition of solid films.This kind of integrated films may have two characters,i.e.,the all-in-one multifunction and modulation of electromagnetic properties by hetero-interface.This makes it possible to realize monolithic integration of detecting,processing,transmission,executing and storing of electronic information.Meanwhile,possible integrated coupling effects will be pursued instead of exploring the limited physical properties of the related materials.In this paper,we put forward a new direction of developing electronic devices with higher performances,and demonstrate some results concerning our recent research on the interface-controllable integrated growth of dielectrics and GaN.Recent progresses of the related research in the world are also reviewed.

  9. Controlled growth mechanism of poly (3-hexylthiophene) nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiymaz, D.; Yagmurcukardes, M.; Tomak, A.; Sahin, H.; Senger, R. T.; Peeters, F. M.; Zareie, H. M.; Zafer, C.

    2016-11-01

    Synthesis of 1D-polymer nanowires by a self-assembly method using marginal solvents is an attractive technique. While the formation mechanism is poorly understood, this method is essential in order to control the growth of nanowires. Here we visualized the time-dependent assembly of poly (3-hexyl-thiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) nanowires by atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The assembly of P3HT nanowires was carried out at room temperature by mixing cyclohexanone (CHN), as a poor solvent, with polymer solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB). Both π-π stacking and planarization, obtained at the mix volume ratio of P3HT (in DCB):CHN (10:7), were considered during the investigation. We find that the length of nanowires was determined by the ordering of polymers in the polymer repetition direction. Additionally, our density functional theory calculations revealed that the presence of DCB and CHN molecules that stabilize the structural distortions due to tail group of polymers was essential for the core-wire formation.

  10. Controlled environment life support system: Growth studies with potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experiments conducted to maximize the productivity of potatoes grown under controlled environmental conditions are discussed. A variety of parameters is examined which affect potato growth, specifically, photoperiod, light intensity, temperature, nitrogen nutrition, carbon dioxide concentration and culture techniques. These experiments were conducted using five different cultivars, Russet Burbank, Norchip, Superior, Kennebec and Norland. To achieve high productivity, three specific objectives were explored: (1) to develop effective cultural procedures, (2) to determine the most effective photoperiod and (3) to develop a mist culture system. It is felt that the productivity obtained in this study is below the maximum that can be obtained. High irradiance levels coupled with tuber-promoting conditions such as cooler temperatures, increased CO2 levels and lowered nitrogen concentrations should allow increases in tuber production. Tuberization appears to be accelerated by short daylengths although final yields are not increased. Mist culture techniques have not yet produced fully developed tubers. The use of supporting media and alteration of the nitrogen content of the mist solution are being explored as a way to allow tubers to develop to maturity.

  11. Effects of humeral intraosseous versus intravenous epinephrine on pharmacokinetics and return of spontaneous circulation in a porcine cardiac arrest model: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Johnson

    2015-09-01

    Seven HIO swine, 4 IV swine, and no control swine had ROSC. There were no significant differences in ROSC, maximum concentration; except at 30 s, and time-to-concentration-maximum between the HIO and IV groups. Significant differences existed between the experimental groups and the control. The HIO delivers a higher concentration of epinephrine than the IV route at 30 s which may be a survival advantage. Clinicians may consider using the IO route to administer epinephrine during CA when there is no preexisting IV access or when IV access is unobtainable.

  12. Replicatively senescent cells are arrested in G1 and G2 phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Ke, Zhonghe; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Most human somatic cells do not divide indefinitely but enter a terminal growth arrest termed replicative senescence. Replicatively senescent cells are generally believed to arrest in G1 or G0 stage of the cell cycle. While doing cell cycle analysis on three different lines of normal human fibroblasts we observed that 36-60% of the replicatively senescent cells had 4N DNA content. Only up to 5% of senescent cells had more than one nucleus ruling out the possibility that the 4N cell population were G1-arrested bi-nucleated cells. Furthermore, it is unlikely that the 4N cells are tetraploids, because actively dividing pre-senescent cultures lacked the 8N tetraploid G2 population. Collectively these results suggest that the 4N population consists of G2 arrested cells. The notion that a large fraction of senescent cell population is arrested in G2 is important for understanding the biology of replicative senescence. PMID:22745179

  13. EU Citizenship and European Arrest Warrant: The Same Rights for All?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marguery, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the case Wolzenburg, the principle of non-discrimination of European Union citizens is applied to the European arrest warrant. The implementation of the European arrest warrant by the Member States cannot escape a control of proportional- ity made by the Court. Member States may impose a period o

  14. Kaempferol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma through EGFR/p38 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenbin; Dang, Qiang; Xu, Defeng; Chen, Yule; Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Kaijie; Zeng, Jin; Long, Qingzhi; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in several tumors, but not in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, we investigated the effects of kaempferol and the underlying mechanism(s) on the cell growth of RCC cells. MTT assay and colony formation assay were used to study cell growth, and flow cytometry was used to study apoptosis and cell cycles in different RCC cells treated with various doses of kaempferol. A significant inhibition on cell growth, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were observed in 786-O and 769-P cells after kaempferol treatment compared with the control group. Moreover, the results clearly showed that kaempferol causes a strong inhibition of the activation of the EGFR/p38 signaling pathways, upregulation of p21 expression and downregulation of cyclin B1 expression in human RCC cells, together with activation of PARP cleavages, induction of apoptotic death and inhibition of cell growth. Collectively, our results suggest that kaempferol may serve as a candidate for chemo-preventive or chemotherapeutic agents for RCC.

  15. Neurologic management following cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, N G

    1989-10-01

    Optimal neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest requires careful attention to the details of both intracranial and extracranial homeostasis. A high index of suspicion regarding the potential causes and complications of cardiac arrest facilitates discovery and treatment of problems before they adversely affect neurologic outcome. The future is bright for resuscitation research: Our fundamental understanding of cerebral ischemia and its consequences has dramatically improved, and this knowledge can hopefully be transferred to clinical useful modes of therapy. However, the transition from a promising, therapeutically effective intervention in animals to the demonstration that treatment is effective following cardiac arrest in humans is an important and difficult step. The patient population is heterogeneous before the insult, the duration and severity of the insult are variable, and the effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation varies among institutions. Therefore, the only means of demonstrating clinical efficacy is the performance of a large clinical trial. The Resuscitation Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh has developed and coordinated a multicenter, multinational team of investigators who have completed one definitive trial of postarrest barbiturate therapy and are currently completing a similar trial using a calcium entry blocker. Despite the formidable obstacles posed by such comprehensive efforts, they provide the mechanism for determining whether the cost of a new treatment modality is justified by the likelihood of improved mortality or morbidity.

  16. Flashback Flame Arrester Devices for Fuel Cargo Tank Vapor Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    critical control functions were either manually positi-ned -. tLe c - trois console or automatically operated by tne preset sequence timer. e operations...DATA The tEDAC system is a new digital instrument recently inlst, lied al was still in the process of functional checkolut at the time of thi,; r gr.c...unn est liesults ure 9-9. Dual 20 Iesh Screen Arrester, 25. 4 -cm Diameter, Posttest p a rimel ai~e~ ~eeIRibbon Arrester j-Wl7- f this ai"ster test

  17. Correction: β-Sialon nanowires, nanobelts and hierarchical nanostructures: morphology control, growth mechanism and cathodoluminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juntong; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Yangai; Fang, Minghao; Chen, Kai; Huang, Yaoting; Huang, Saifang; Ji, Haipeng; Yang, Jingzhou; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-07-01

    Correction for `β-Sialon nanowires, nanobelts and hierarchical nanostructures: morphology control, growth mechanism and cathodoluminescence properties' by Juntong Huang, et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 424-432.

  18. Effects of hormone agonists on Sf9 cells, proliferation and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, Maeva; Califano, Jérôme; Hilliou, Frédérique; Tran, Trang; Taquet, Nathalie; Feyereisen, René; Le Goff, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells.

  19. Effects of hormone agonists on Sf9 cells, proliferation and cell cycle arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeva Giraudo

    Full Text Available Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells.

  20. Indium Growth and Island Height Control on Si Submonolayer Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jizhou [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    lithography (EUVL) have a wave length of 13.4 nm so it can curve on the surface of an sample to make structure as small as the order of 10 nm. however, lithograph usually causes permanent damages to the surface and in many cases the QDs are damaged during the lithograph and therefore result in high percentage of defects. Quantum size effect has attracted more and more interests in surface science due to many of its effects. One of its effects is the height preference in film growing and the resulting possibility of uniformly sized self-assemble nanostructure. The experiment of Pb islands on In 4x1 phase shows that both the height and the width can be controlled by proper growth conditions, which expands the growth dimensions from 1 to 2. This discover leads us to study the In/Pb interface. In Ch.3, we found that the Pb islands growing on In 4x1-Si(111) surface which have uniform height due to QSE and uniform width due to the constriction of In 4x1 lattice have unexpected stability. These islands are stable in even RT, unlike usual nanostructures on Pb/Si surface which are stable only at low temperature. Since similar structures are usually grown at low temperature, this discovery makes the grown structures closer to technological applications. It also shows the unusual of In/Pb interface. Then we studied the In islands grown on Pb-α-√3x√3-Si(111) phase in Ch.4. These islands have fcc structure in the first few layers, and then convert to bct structure. The In fcc islands have sharp height preference due to QSE like Pb islands. However, the preferred height is different (7 layer for Pb on Si 7x7 and 4 layer for Pb on In 4x1), due to the difference of interface. The In islands structure prefers to be bct than fcc with coverage increase. It is quantitatively supported by first-principle calculation. Unexpectedly, the In islands grown on various of In interfaces didn't show QSE effects and phase transition from fcc and bct structures as on the Pb-α interface (Ch.6). In

  1. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162...

  2. Programmed cell cycle arrest is required for infection of corn plants by the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Sónia; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a plant pathogen that requires a specific structure called infective filament to penetrate the plant tissue. Although able to grow, this filament is cell cycle arrested on the plant surface. This cell cycle arrest is released once the filament penetrates the plant tissue. The reasons and mechanisms for this cell cycle arrest are unknown. Here, we have tried to address these questions. We reached three conclusions from our studies. First, the observed cell cycle arrest is the result of the cooperation of at least two distinct mechanisms: one involving the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade; and the other relying on the transcriptional downregulation of Hsl1, a kinase that modulates the G2/M transition. Second, a sustained cell cycle arrest during the infective filament step is necessary for the virulence in U. maydis, as a strain unable to arrest the cell cycle was severely impaired in its ability to infect corn plants. Third, production of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, is incompatible with an active cell cycle. The inability to infect plants by strains defective in cell cycle arrest seems to be caused by their failure to induce the appressorium formation process. In summary, our findings uncover genetic circuits to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on the plant surface, thus allowing the penetration into plant tissue.

  3. Controlling Growth Orientation of Phthalocyanine Films by Electrical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; Banks, C. E.; Frazier, D. O.; Ila, D.; Muntele, I.; Penn, B. G.; Sharma, A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Organic Phthalocyanine films have many applications ranging from data storage to various non-linear optical devices whose quality is affected by the growth orientation of Phthalocyanine films. Due to the structural and electrical properties of Phthalocyanine molecules, the film growth orientation depends strongly on the substrate surface states. In this presentation, an electrical field up to 4000 V/cm is introduced during film growth. The Phthalocyanine films are synthesized on quartz substrates using thermal evaporation. An intermediate layer is deposited on some substrates for introducing the electrical field. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used for measuring surface morphology, film structure, and optical properties, respectively. The comparison of Phthalocyanine films grown with and without the electrical field reveals different morphology, film density, and growth orientation, which eventually change optical properties of these films. These results suggest that the growth method in the electrical field can be used to synthesized Phthalocyanine films with a preferred crystal orientation as well as propose an interaction mechanism between the substrate surface and the depositing molecules. The details of growth conditions and of the growth model of how the Phthalocyanine molecules grow in the electrical field will be discussed.

  4. Endocrine interactions in the control of fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, Abigail L; Forhead, Alison J

    2013-01-01

    Hormones are both growth stimulatory and growth inhibitory in utero. They act as environmental and maturational signals in regulating tissue accretion and differentiation during late gestation. They ensure that fetal development is appropriate for the nutrient supply and is optimal for neonatal survival. Growth-stimulatory hormones, such as insulin, the insulin-like growth factors and the thyroid hormones, have anabolic effects on fetal metabolism and increase cellular nutrient uptake and energy production for tissue accretion. Thyroid hormones also have specific effects on tissue differentiation at key developmental milestones. Similarly, leptin appears to affect development of specific fetal tissues and may counterbalance the maturational actions of other hormones near term. Glucocorticoids inhibit growth in utero but are essential for prepartum tissue differentiation in preparation for delivery. They also affect fetal bioavailability of most of the other growth-regulatory hormones. In addition, many of these hormones alter the placental capacity to supply nutrients for fetal growth. In producing a fetoplacental epigenome specific to the prevailing intrauterine environment, hormones interact to produce phenotypical diversity with potential health consequences long after birth.

  5. Warts signaling controls organ and body growth through regulation of ecdysone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Erik; Nagy, Stanislav; Gerlach, Stephan Uwe

    2017-01-01

    under different environmental conditions is poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hippo/Warts signaling functions intrinsically to regulate tissue growth and organ size [3, 4], whereas systemic growth is controlled via antagonistic interactions of the steroid hormone ecdysone and nutrient-dependent insulin....../insulin-like growth factor (IGF) (insulin) signaling [2, 5]. The interplay between insulin and ecdysone signaling regulates systemic growth and controls organismal size. Here, we show that Warts (Wts; LATS1/2) signaling regulates systemic growth in Drosophila by activating basal ecdysone production, which negatively...

  6. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Martin, J.M.; Fernandez Freire, P.; Labrador, V. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hazen, M.J. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mariajose.hazen@uam.es

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells.

  7. Toward Controlled Growth of Helicity-Specific Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elton J G; Nørskov, Jens K; Harutyunyan, Avetik R; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2015-06-18

    The underlying mechanisms for the nucleation of carbon nanotubes as well as their helicity, remain elusive. Here, using van der Waals dispersion force calculations implemented within density functional theory, we study the cap formation, believed to be responsible for the chirality of surface-catalyzed carbon nanotubes. We find the energetics associated with growth along different facets to be independent of the surface orientation and that the growth across an edge along the axis of the metal particle leads to a perfect honeycomb lattice in a curved geometry. The formation of defects in the graphene matrix, which bend the carbon plane, requires that two or more graphene embryos with significantly different growth axis merge. Such scenario is only possible at the front- or back-end of the metal particle where growth symmetry is broken. The graphene embryos reconstruct their hexagonal structure into pentagons, heptagons, and octagons counterpart to accommodate the tube curvature.

  8. The Effectiveness of Antifungal Controlling Aspergillus Niger Growth on Plasterboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parjo Umi Kalthsom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Good indoor environmental quality is desired for a healthy indoor environment. The microbial growth under indoor environments contribute to the poor indoor environmental quality that can cause various of health problems. In this study, the applications of three types of antifungals to prevent microbial migration, subsequent growth and bio-deterioration of the substrates. The aim of this research was to evaluate the coating-bio resistance in remediation of indoor fungal using three types of antifungals with different types of wall finishing materials. The treatment was exposed to optimum temperature and relative humidity at 30°C and 90% respectively. The potassium sorbate, zinc salicylate and calcium benzoate are tested against Aspergillus niger which is collected from indoor rooms. This study has revealed the growth of A. niger are more affected by the potassium sorbate on thick wallpaper, which is the percentage growth are 47%.

  9. A palmitoyl conjugate of insect pentapeptide Yamamarin arrests cell proliferation and respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yosinori; Yang, Ping; An, Ying; Matsukawa, Kazushige; Ito, Kikukatsu; Imanishi, Shigeo; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Uchiyama, Yusuke; Imai, Kunio; Ito, Shigeki; Ishida, Yoji; Suzuki, Koichi

    2010-05-01

    A palmitoyl conjugate of an insect pentapeptide that occurs in diapausing insects causes a reversible cell-cycle arrest and suppresses mitochondrial respiration. This peptide compound also causes growth arrest in murine leukemic cell line expressing human gene Bcr/Abl and a farnesoyl peptide induces embryonic diapause in Bombyx mori. These results demonstrate that the insect peptide compounds can lead to the understanding of a common pathway in developmental arrest in animals and may provide a new peptidominetic analog in the development of biopharmaceuticals and pest management.

  10. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M.; Alam, Sardar B.; Hofmann, Stephan; Mølhave, Kristian; Ross, Frances M.

    2016-07-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters such as source gas pressure, gas composition and growth temperature. Here we describe a more local approach to the control of nanowire structure. We apply an electric field during growth to control nanowire diameter and growth direction. Growth experiments carried out while imaging within an in situ transmission electron microscope show that the electric field modifies growth by changing the shape, position and contact angle of the catalytic droplet. This droplet engineering can be used to modify nanowires into three dimensional structures, relevant to a range of applications, and also to measure the droplet surface tension, important for quantitative development of strategies to control nanowire growth.

  11. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp.

  12. Temperature control and calibration issues in the growth, processing and characterization of electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1989-01-01

    The temperature control and calibration issues encountered in the growth, processing, and characterization of electronic materials are summarized. The primary problem area is identified as temperature control during epitaxial materials growth. While qualitative thermal measurements are feasible and reproducibility is often achievable within a given system, absolute calibration is essentially impossible in many cases, precluding the possibility of portability from one system to another. The procedures utilized for thermal measurements during epitaxial growth are described, and their limitations discussed.

  13. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: a systems biology study in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrillo Juan I

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell growth underlies many key cellular and developmental processes, yet a limited number of studies have been carried out on cell-growth regulation. Comprehensive studies at the transcriptional, proteomic and metabolic levels under defined controlled conditions are currently lacking. Results Metabolic control analysis is being exploited in a systems biology study of the eukaryotic cell. Using chemostat culture, we have measured the impact of changes in flux (growth rate on the transcriptome, proteome, endometabolome and exometabolome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each functional genomic level shows clear growth-rate-associated trends and discriminates between carbon-sufficient and carbon-limited conditions. Genes consistently and significantly upregulated with increasing growth rate are frequently essential and encode evolutionarily conserved proteins of known function that participate in many protein-protein interactions. In contrast, more unknown, and fewer essential, genes are downregulated with increasing growth rate; their protein products rarely interact with one another. A large proportion of yeast genes under positive growth-rate control share orthologs with other eukaryotes, including humans. Significantly, transcription of genes encoding components of the TOR complex (a major controller of eukaryotic cell growth is not subject to growth-rate regulation. Moreover, integrative studies reveal the extent and importance of post-transcriptional control, patterns of control of metabolic fluxes at the level of enzyme synthesis, and the relevance of specific enzymatic reactions in the control of metabolic fluxes during cell growth. Conclusion This work constitutes a first comprehensive systems biology study on growth-rate control in the eukaryotic cell. The results have direct implications for advanced studies on cell growth, in vivo regulation of metabolic fluxes for comprehensive metabolic engineering, and for

  14. Human glioma growth is controlled by microRNA-10b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriely, Galina; Yi, Ming; Narayan, Ravi S; Niers, Johanna M; Wurdinger, Thomas; Imitola, Jaime; Ligon, Keith L; Kesari, Santosh; Esau, Christine; Stephens, Robert M; Tannous, Bakhos A; Krichevsky, Anna M

    2011-05-15

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiling studies revealed a number of miRNAs dysregulated in the malignant brain tumor glioblastoma. Molecular functions of these miRNAs in gliomagenesis are mainly unknown. We show that inhibition of miR-10b, a miRNA not expressed in human brain and strongly upregulated in both low-grade and high-grade gliomas, reduces glioma cell growth by cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. These cellular responses are mediated by augmented expression of the direct targets of miR-10b, including BCL2L11/Bim, TFAP2C/AP-2γ, CDKN1A/p21, and CDKN2A/p16, which normally protect cells from uncontrolled growth. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas expression data set reveals a strong positive correlation between numerous genes sustaining cellular growth and miR-10b levels in human glioblastomas, while proapoptotic genes anticorrelate with the expression of miR-10b. Furthermore, survival of glioblastoma patients expressing high levels of miR-10 family members is significantly reduced in comparison to patients with low miR-10 levels, indicating that miR-10 may contribute to glioma growth in vivo. Finally, inhibition of miR-10b in a mouse model of human glioma results in significant reduction of tumor growth. Altogether, our experiments validate an important role of miR-10b in gliomagenesis, reveal a novel mechanism of miR-10b-mediated regulation, and suggest the possibility of its future use as a therapeutic target in gliomas. ©2011 AACR

  15. Ent-11α-Hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer A549 Cells by Arresting Cell Cycle and Triggering Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; George G Chen; Ying-nian Lu; Yi Liu; Ke-feng Wu; Xian-ling Gong; Zhan-ping Gou; Ming-yue Li; Nian-ci Liang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To examine the apoptotic effect of ent-11α-hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid (5F),a compound isolated from Pteris semipinnata L(PsL),in human lung cancer A549 cells.Methods:A549 cells were treated with 5F (0-80 μg/ml) for different time periods.Cytotoxicity was examined using a MTT method.Cell cycle was examined using propidium iodide staining.Apoptosis was examined using Hoechst 33258 staining,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and caspase-3 activity analysis.Expression of representative apoptosis-related proteins was evaluated by Western blot analysis.Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was measured using standard protocols.Potential interaction of 5F with cisplatin was also examined.Results:5F inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.5F increased the accumulation of cells in sub-G1 phase and arrested the cells in the G2 phase.Exposure to 5F induced morphological changes and DNA fragmentation that are characteristic of apoptosis.The expression of p21 was increased.5F exposure also increased Bax expression,release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF),and activation of caspase-3.5F significantly sensitized the cells to cisplatin toxicity Interestingly,treatment with 5F did not increase ROS,but reduced ROS production induced by cisplatin.Conclusion:SF could inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells by arresting the cells in G2 phase and by inducing mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

  16. Cholera toxin, a typical protein kinase A activator, induces G1 phase growth arrest in human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cells via inhibiting the c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoke; Ou, Yanqiu; Shu, Minfeng; Wang, Youqiong; Zhou, Yuxi; Su, Xingwen; Zhu, Wenbo; Yin, Wei; Li, Shifeng; Qiu, Pengxin; Yan, Guangmei; Zhang, Jingxia; Hu, Jun; Xu, Dong

    2014-05-01

    The biotoxin cholera toxin has been demonstrated to have anti-tumor activity in numerous types of cancer, including glioma. However, the role of cholera toxin in the tumorigenesis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), the most common malignant tumor of the bladder, remains to be elucidated. To address this, in the present study, two TCC cell lines, T24 and UM-UC-3, were treated with cholera toxin [protein kinase A (PKA) activator] and KT5720 (PKA inhibitor). Cell survival and proliferation, cell cycle alterations and apoptosis were analyzed using Hoechst staining, the MTT assay, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation. The results revealed that cholera toxin significantly induced G1 arrest and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 in the TCC cell lines, and this was rescued by KT5720. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that cholera toxin downregulated the activation of the c-Raf/Mek/Erk cascade, an important mediator of tumor cell proliferation, via the PKA-dependent c-Raf phosphorylation at Ser-43. Furthermore, inhibition of Mek activity with UO126 mimicked the effects of cholera toxin. In conclusion, these results confirmed that cholera toxin specifically inhibited proliferation and induced G1 phase arrest in human bladder TCC cells. This effect was due to PKA-dependent inactivation of the c-Raf/Mek/Erk pathway. This suggested that cholera toxin may be a viable therapeutic treatment against tumorigenesis and proliferation in bladder cancer.

  17. Synthetic phosphoethanolamine a precursor of membrane phospholipids reduce tumor growth in mice bearing melanoma B16-F10 and in vitro induce apoptosis and arrest in G2/M phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Meneguelo, Renato; Marques, Fabio Luiz Navarro; Radin, Adriano; Filho, Otaviano Mendonça R; Neto, Salvador Claro; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; Maria, Durvanei Augusto

    2012-10-01

    Phosphoethanolamine (Pho-s) is a compound involved in phospholipid turnover, acting as a substrate for many phospholipids of the cell membranes, especially phosphatidylcholine. We recently reported that synthetic Pho-s has potent effects on a wide variety of tumor cells. To determine if Pho-s has a potential antitumor activity, in this study we evaluated the activity of Pho-s against the B16-F10 melanoma both in vitro and in mice bearing a dorsal tumor. The treatment of B16F10 cells with Pho-s resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. At low concentrations, this activity appears to be involved in the arrest of the cell cycle at G2/M, while at high concentrations Pho-s induces apoptosis. In accordance with these results, the loss of mitochondrial potential and increased caspase-3 activity suggest that Pho-s has dual antitumor effects; i.e. it induces apoptosis at high concentrations and modulates the cell cycle at lower concentrations. In vivo, we evaluated the effect of Pho-s in mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma. The results show that Pho-s reduces the tumoral volume increasing survival rate. Furthermore, the tumor doubling time and tumor delays were substantially reduced when compared with untreated mice. Histological analyses reveal that Pho-s induces changes in cell morphology, typical characteristics of apoptosis, in addition the large areas of necrosis correlating with a reduction of tumor size. The results presented here support the hypothesis that Pho-s has antitumor effects by the induction of apoptosis as well as the inhibition of cell proliferation by arrest at G2/M. Thus, Pho-s can be regarded as a promising agent for the treatment of melanoma. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. Indium Growth and Island Height Control on Si Submonolayer Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jizhou [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    lithography (EUVL) have a wave length of 13.4 nm so it can curve on the surface of an sample to make structure as small as the order of 10 nm. however, lithograph usually causes permanent damages to the surface and in many cases the QDs are damaged during the lithograph and therefore result in high percentage of defects. Quantum size effect has attracted more and more interests in surface science due to many of its effects. One of its effects is the height preference in film growing and the resulting possibility of uniformly sized self-assemble nanostructure. The experiment of Pb islands on In 4x1 phase shows that both the height and the width can be controlled by proper growth conditions, which expands the growth dimensions from 1 to 2. This discover leads us to study the In/Pb interface. In Ch.3, we found that the Pb islands growing on In 4x1-Si(111) surface which have uniform height due to QSE and uniform width due to the constriction of In 4x1 lattice have unexpected stability. These islands are stable in even RT, unlike usual nanostructures on Pb/Si surface which are stable only at low temperature. Since similar structures are usually grown at low temperature, this discovery makes the grown structures closer to technological applications. It also shows the unusual of In/Pb interface. Then we studied the In islands grown on Pb-α-√3x√3-Si(111) phase in Ch.4. These islands have fcc structure in the first few layers, and then convert to bct structure. The In fcc islands have sharp height preference due to QSE like Pb islands. However, the preferred height is different (7 layer for Pb on Si 7x7 and 4 layer for Pb on In 4x1), due to the difference of interface. The In islands structure prefers to be bct than fcc with coverage increase. It is quantitatively supported by first-principle calculation. Unexpectedly, the In islands grown on various of In interfaces didn't show QSE effects and phase transition from fcc and bct structures as on the Pb-α interface (Ch.6). In

  19. Cognitive impairment after sudden cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Jaszke-Psonka, Magdalena; Piegza, Magdalena; Ścisło, Piotr; Pudlo, Robert; Piegza, Jacek; Badura-Brzoza, Karina; Leksowska, Aleksandra; Hese, Robert T.; Gorczyca, Piotr W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the incidence and severity of the impairment of selected cognitive functions in patients after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in comparison to patients after myocardial infarction without SCA and healthy subjects and to analyze the influence of sociodemographic and clinical parameters and the duration of cardiac arrest on the presence and severity of the described disorders. Material and methods The study group comprised 30 cardiac arrest survivors, the reference group comprised ...

  20. Controlling nanowire growth through electric field-induced deformation of the catalyst droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panciera, Federico; Norton, Michael M.; Alam, Sardar Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters s...... surface tension, important for quantitative development of strategies to control nanowire growth.......Semiconductor nanowires with precisely controlled structure, and hence well-defined electronic and optical properties, can be grown by self-assembly using the vapour-liquid-solid process. The structure and chemical composition of the growing nanowire is typically determined by global parameters...... such as source gas pressure, gas composition and growth temperature. Here we describe a more local approach to the control of nanowire structure. We apply an electric field during growth to control nanowire diameter and growth direction. Growth experiments carried out while imaging within an in situ transmission...

  1. Up-regulation of stathmin induces growth arrest of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma EC9706 cell%上调stathmin基因表达对食管鳞癌EC9706细胞的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王峰; 王留兴; 何炜; 李克; 王瑞林; 赵培荣; 樊青霞

    2010-01-01

    proliferation of transfected cells was measured by cell counting, MTT and in vitro formation assay of flat Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle. Nude mice were adopted to investigate the in vivo tumorigenic characteristics of the transfected cells. Results A 450 bp coding sequence of stathmin cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR and then cloned into pcDNA3. 1 ( + ) plasmid to harvest the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3. 1-stathmin. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3. 1-stathmin and blank vector were transfected respectively into EC9706 cells. The up-regulated expression of stathmin protein was validated by Western blot ( P < 0. 01 ) . Compared with control, EC9706 cells transfected with pcDNA3. 1-stathmin appeared swollen and multi-nuclear with a cell mitotic arrest; doubling generation time of pcDNA3. 1stathmin transfectants was prolonged(25 -28 h); The in vitro cell proliferation ability and clone formation rate (34.5% +-6.9%) decreased, cell cleavage was blocked at G2/M phase (21. 7% +- 3. 4% ) and the oncogenicity of inoculated cells in nude mice decreased ( all P < 0. 01). Conclusions The up-regulated expression of stathmin protein triggered by the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3. 1-stathmin can inhibit the proliferation and oncogenicity of ESCC EC9706 cells. TTiis molecule may be a promising therapeutic target in ESCC patients.

  2. Anion-switchable supramolecular gels for controlling pharmaceutical crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jonathan A.; Piepenbrock, Marc-Oliver M.; Lloyd, Gareth O.; Clarke, Nigel; Howard, Judith A. K.; Steed, Jonathan W.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the use of low-molecular-weight supramolecular gels as media for the growth of molecular crystals. Growth of a range of crystals of organic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, was achieved in bis(urea) gels. Low-molecular-weight supramolecular gelators allow access to an unlimited range of solvent systems, in contrast to conventional aqueous gels such as gelatin and agarose. A detailed study of carbamazepine crystal growth in four different bis(urea) gelators, including a metallogelator, is reported. The crystallization of a range of other drug substances, namely sparfloxacin, piroxicam, theophylline, caffeine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen (paracetamol), sulindac and indomethacin, was also achieved in supramolecular gel media without co-crystal formation. In many cases, crystals can be conveniently recovered from the gels by using supramolecular anion-triggered gel dissolution; however, crystals of substances that themselves bind to anions are dissolved by them. Overall, supramolecular gel-phase crystallization offers an extremely versatile new tool in pharmaceutical polymorph screening.

  3. Growth strategies to control tapering in Ge nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Periwal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of PH3 on the morphology of Au catalyzed Ge nanowires (NWs. Ge NWs were grown on Si (111 substrate at 400 °C in the presence of PH3, using vapor-liquid-solid method by chemical vapor deposition. We show that high PH3/GeH4 ratio causes passivation at NW surface. At high PH3 concentration phosphorous atoms attach itself on NW surface and form a self-protection coating that prevents conformal growth and leads to taper free nanostructures. However, in case of low PH3 flux the combination of axial and radial growth mechanism occurs resulting in conical structure. We have also investigated axial PH3-intrinsic junctions in Ge NWs. The unusual NW shape is attributed to a combination of catalyzed, uncatalyzed and diffusion induced growth.

  4. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  5. Effect of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria on Growth,Nodulation and Nutrient Accumulation of Lentil Under Controlled Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.ZAFAR; M.K.ABBASI; M.A.KHAN; A.KHALIQ; T.SULTAN; M.ASLAM

    2012-01-01

    Application of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has been shown to increase legume growth and development under field and controlled environmental conditions.The present study was conducted to isolate plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) from the root nodules of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) grown in arid/semi-arid region of Punjab,Pakistan and examined their plant growth-promoting abilities.Five bacterial isolates were isolated,screened in vitro for plant growth-promoting (PGP)characteristics and their effects on the growth of lentil were assessed under in vitro,hydroponic and greenhouse (pot experiment)conditions.All the isolates were Gram negative,rod-shaped and circular in form and exhibited the plant growth-promoting attributes of phosphate solubilization and auxin (indole acetic acid,IAA) production.The IAA production capacity ranged in 0.5-11.0 μgmL-1and P solubilization ranged in 3 16 mg L-1.When tested for their effects on plant growth,the isolated strains had a stimulatory effect on growth,nodulation and nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake in plants on nutrient-deficient soil.In the greenhouse pot experiment,application of PGPR significantly increased shoot length,fresh weight and dry weight by 65%,43% and 63% and the increases in root length,fresh weight and dry weight were 74%,54% and 92%,respectively,as compared with the uninoculated control.The relative increases in growth characteristics under in vitro and hydroponic conditions were even higher.PGPR also increased the number of pods per plant,1000-grain weight,dry matter yield and grain yield by 50%,13%,28% and 29%,respectively,over the control.The number of nodules and nodule dry mass increased by 170% and 136%,respectively.After inoculation with effective bacterial strains,the shoot,root and seed N and P contents increased,thereby increasing both N and P uptake in plants. The root elongation showed a positive correlation (R2 =0.67) with the IAA

  6. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  7. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin’s Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment. PMID:26958858

  8. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Giordano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment.

  9. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in plant cell growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussey, P.J.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Deeks, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Plant cells grow through increases in volume and cell wall surface area. The mature morphology of a plant cell is a product of the differential rates of expansion between neighboring zones of the cell wall during this process. Filamentous actin arrays are associated with plant cell growth, and the a

  10. PEALD AlN: controlling growth and film crystallinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, Sourish; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kruijs, van de Robbert; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    We report on the growth kinetics and material properties of aluminium nitride (AlN) films deposited on Si(111), with plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). Tri-methyl aluminium (TMA) and NH3-plasma were used as the precursors. The ALD window was identified in terms of the process parameter

  11. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  12. RPR-115135, a new non peptidomimetic farnesyltransferase inhibitor, induces G0/G1 arrest only in serum starved cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P; Ottoboni, C; Crippa, A; Riou, J F; O'Connor, P M

    2001-04-01

    A new non peptidomimetic farnesyltransferase inhibitor, RPR-115135, was studied in an isogenic cell model system consisting of human colon cancer HCT-116 line. HCT-116 cells were transfected with an empty control pCMV vector or with a dominant-negative mutated p53 transgene to disrupt p53 function. Growth inhibitory effects of RPR-115135 were evaluated on cells growing under different conditions (serum starvation, serum starvation and recovery, nocodazole treatment). The cytotoxic activity of RPR-115135 was independent of the cell cycle status of the target cells. Addition of RPR-115135 only to cells exposed to reduced serum conditions (0.1% FCS) resulted in an enhanced ability of HCT-116 cells to arrest in the G0/G1 phase. This arrest response appeared independent of p53/p21cip1/waf-1 function. A reduction of Cyclin A protein amount by RPR-115135 was observed in both clones. These latter results suggest that RPR-115135 might down-regulate the cell cycle factor that would normally impede G0/G1 arrest.

  13. Metal oxide surge arrester research at the University of South Australia: An evaluation of polymer housed arresters and a new device for condition monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghurst, A.H. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Buratto, F. [Powercor Australia Ltd., Southbank, VIC (Australia); Krieg, T.W. [ETSA Transmission, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    The use of polymer housed surge arresters within Australia has dramatically increased over the last 2-3 years. Unfortunately, the development of standards for testing polymer housed arresters has not kept pace with the development of these components. This paper describes on-going research at the Australian Electrical Testing Centre, University of South Australia, aimed at furthering knowledge about the performance of metal oxide surge arresters in the field. One project seeks to evaluate a range of polymer-housed arresters from different manufacturers with respect to seal integrity and accelerated ageing under a variety of environmental conditions. Test equipment being developed to perform the tests is described, and those parts of the new draft Australia standard relating to the performance of polymer-housed arresters critically reviewed. A second project involves the development of a new hand-held device for the measurement of that component of arrester leakage current which is in phase with the applied voltage. This parameter is widely accepted as a key indicator of the condition of a metal oxide arrester. The new device should be an order of magnitude cheaper than comparable commercial equipment currently available, and employs a micro controller to perform the required signal processing. (author). 1 tab., 2 figs., 11 refs.

  14. Genetic control of root growth: from genes to networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Radka; Ogura, Takehiko; Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Roots are essential organs for higher plants. They provide the plant with nutrients and water, anchor the plant in the soil, and can serve as energy storage organs. One remarkable feature of roots is that they are able to adjust their growth to changing environments. This adjustment is possible through mechanisms that modulate a diverse set of root traits such as growth rate, diameter, growth direction and lateral root formation. The basis of these traits and their modulation are at the cellular level, where a multitude of genes and gene networks precisely regulate development in time and space and tune it to environmental conditions. This review first describes the root system and then presents fundamental work that has shed light on the basic regulatory principles of root growth and development. It then considers emerging complexities and how they have been addressed using systems-biology approaches, and then describes and argues for a systems-genetics approach. For reasons of simplicity and conciseness, this review is mostly limited to work from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in which much of the research in root growth regulation at the molecular level has been conducted. While forward genetic approaches have identified key regulators and genetic pathways, systems-biology approaches have been successful in shedding light on complex biological processes, for instance molecular mechanisms involving the quantitative interaction of several molecular components, or the interaction of large numbers of genes. However, there are significant limitations in many of these methods for capturing dynamic processes, as well as relating these processes to genotypic and phenotypic variation. The emerging field of systems genetics promises to overcome some of these limitations by linking genotypes to complex phenotypic and molecular data using approaches from different fields, such as genetics, genomics, systems biology and phenomics. © The Author 2015. Published by

  15. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Promotes Tumoricidal CD8(+) T Cell Tumor Infiltration and Arrests Growth and Metastasis in a Syngeneic Pancreatic-Cancer Orthotopic Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Miyake, Kentaro; Homma, Yuki; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-06-19

    The present study determined the effect of the tumor-targeting strain Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) on CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a syngeneic pancreatic-cancer orthotopic mouse model. The effect of tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R on CD8(+) TILs was determined on the Pan02 murine pancreatic-adenocarcinoma implanted orthotopically in the pancreatic tail of C57BL/6 immunocompromised mice. Three weeks after orthotopic implantation, mice were randomized as follows G1: untreated control group (n = 8); and G2: S. typhimurium A1-R-treatment group (n = 8, 1 × 10(7) colony forming units [CFU]/body, iv, weekly, 3 weeks). On the 22nd day from initial treatment, all mice were sacrificed and tumors were harvested. The tumor-volume ratio was defined as ratio of tumor volume on the 22nd day relative to the 1st day. The tumor volume ratio was significantly lower in the S. typhimurium A1-R-treated group (G2) (3.0 ± 2.8) than the untreated control (G1) (39.9 ± 30.7, P R-treated mice (G2). Six mice in G1 had peritoneal dissemination, whereas no mice showed peritoneal dissemination in G2 (P R promotes CD8(+) T cell infiltration and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-6, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The arresting phase determines the total healing time of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Ping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Radiation is an important cause of delayed wound healing, and there still exist many questions regarding the patterns and mechanisms of wound healing. This study investigated the characteristics of wound healing after varying doses of local radiation and explored possible causes of the delay in healing caused by radiation. Methods: A full-thickness dorsal longitudinal skin tissue, 2 cm in diameter, was excised after local irradiation on one side of the back of swine, and the other side was wounded as a control. The size of the wound area was re-corded every two days after injury. Pathological changes, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, immunohisto-chemistry and apoptosis levels (TUNEL assay were mea-sured at different time points after wounding. Results: The course of wound healing can be divided into four phases, namely: the arresting phase, the healing priming phase, the fast healing phase, and the healed phase. Although the total wound healing time was closely corre-lated to the dose of irradiation (R 2 = 0.9758, it was more dependent on the length of the arresting phase (R 2 =0.9903 because once the arresting phase ended, the wound healed at a similar speed regardless of radiation doses. Pathologi-cal analysis showed that compared with the control side there were more necrotic tissues, slower epithelial crawling, as well as fewer blood vessels and cellular components in the irradiated side at the arresting phase, while other phases revealed no significant difference concerning these measurements. Immunohistochemistry showed that the ir-radiated wounds had significantly less PCNA-positive and more TUNEL-positive labeling of cells in the arresting phase than in other phases. Moreover, the changes were posi-tively related to the radiation doses, but there was no obvi-ous difference in cell proliferation or apoptosis among the healing priming phase, fast healing phase or healed phase, whether on the control side

  17. Induction of ribosomal subunits misassembly by antisense RNAs to control cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, G

    2000-08-25

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits starting from free ribosomal RNA and protein of Dictyostelium discoideum was induced in vitro in the presence of several oligoribonucleotides complementary to defined sequences of ribosomal RNA. The reconstituted particles had a full complement of ribosomal proteins, but did not function in an in vitro protein synthesis system and were disassembled following interaction with mRNA. The same result was obtained in vivo by fusing the oligodeossiribonucleotides coding for the selected oligoribonucleotides to the promoter of the gene coding for contact site A protein. This gene is expressed only in the first part of development. Transfected growing cells, transferred in developing buffer in the presence of pulses of cAMP, accumulated significant amounts of the oligoribonucleotides. When retransferred to the growth medium, they grew progressively more slowly, until their doubling time doubled, apparently due to the availability of a limiting amount of functional ribosomes. To avoid disassembly of misassembled subunits (G. Mangiarotti et al., 1997, J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27818-27822), two oligoribonucleotides complementary to sequences present at the 5' ends of pre-17S and pre-26S RNAs were also induced to accumulate during early development with the same technique. When transfected cells were retransferred to the growth medium, their rate of growth declined rapidly to zero and cells died, apparently because they were unable to disassemble misassembled ribosomal subunits and avoid their entry into polyribosomes. This technique to perturb protein synthesis, arrest cell growth, and cause cell suicide will be tested in abnormally growing animal cells.

  18. Arrest functions of the MIF ligand/receptor axes in atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eTillmann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF has been defined as an important chemokine-like function (CLF chemokine with an essential role in monocyte recruitment and arrest. Adhesion of monocytes to the vessel wall and their transendothelial migration are critical in atherogenesis and many other inflammatory diseases. Chemokines carefully control all steps of the monocyte recruitment process. Those chemokines specialized in controlling arrest are typically immobilized on the endothelial surface, mediating the arrest of rolling monocytes by chemokine receptor-triggered pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 functions as an important arrest receptor on monocytes. An arrest function has been revealed for the bona fide CXCR2 ligands CXCL1 and CXCL8, but genetic studies also suggested that additional arrest chemokines are likely to be involved in atherogenic leukocyte recruitment. While CXCR2 is known to interact with numerous CXC chemokine ligands, the CLF-chemokine MIF, which structurally does not belong to the CXC chemokine sub-family, was surprisingly identified as a non-cognate ligand of CXCR2, responsible for critical arrest functions during the atherogenic process. MIF was originally identified as macrophage migration inhibitory factor, but is now known as a potent inflammatory cytokine with chemokine-like functions including chemotaxis and leukocyte arrest. This review will cover the mechanisms underlying these functions, including MIF’s effects on LFA1 integrin activity and signal transduction, and will discuss the structural similarities between MIF and the bona fide CXCR2 ligand CXCL8 while emphasizing the structural differences. As MIF also interacts with CXCR4, a chemokine receptor implicated in CXCL12-elicited lymphocyte arrest, the arrest potential of the MIF/CXCR4 axis will also be scrutinized as well as the recently identified role of pericyte MIF in attracting leukocytes exiting through venules as part of the pericyte 'motility

  19. Influence of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest on hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Greetje; Brinkman, Sylvia; Bisschops, Laurens L. A.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; de Lange, Dylan W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Following two randomized controlled trials that demonstrated reduced mortality and better neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients, mild therapeutic hypothermia was implemented in many intensive care units. Up to now, no large observational studies have confirmed the beneficial eff

  20. TEAD mediates YAP-dependent gene induction and growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Ye, Xin; Yu, Jindan; Li, Li; Li, Weiquan; Li, Siming; Yu, Jianjun; Lin, Jiandie D; Wang, Cun-Yu; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Lai, Zhi-Chun; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2008-07-15

    The YAP transcription coactivator has been implicated as an oncogene and is amplified in human cancers. Recent studies have established that YAP is phosphorylated and inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Here we demonstrate that the TEAD family transcription factors are essential in mediating YAP-dependent gene expression. TEAD is also required for YAP-induced cell growth, oncogenic transformation, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. CTGF is identified as a direct YAP target gene important for cell growth. Moreover, the functional relationship between YAP and TEAD is conserved in Drosophila Yki (the YAP homolog) and Scalloped (the TEAD homolog). Our study reveals TEAD as a new component in the Hippo pathway playing essential roles in mediating biological functions of YAP.

  1. The role of lipids in controlling microbial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson, Peter D.G.

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Many foods are, or contain, emulsions. Growth of microorganisms in emulsions may lend to spoilage by bacteria, yeasts, moulds or food-poisoning bacteria. In biphasic foods (e.g. oil-in-water or water-in-oil emulsions, food structure may influence both rate of growth and conditions under which growth is initiated. The site of occupancy of microorganisms is the aqueous phase. Therefore the chemical composition of this phase is what has a direct influence on the survival and growth of microorganisms. This paper describes the chemical effects of organic acids used as preservatives in oil-in-water (acetic and lactic acids and water-in-oil (sorbic and benzoic acids emulsions as well as the influence of their structures on the food stability.Numerosos alimentos son, o contienen, emulsiones. El crecimiento de bacterias en las emulsiones da lugar a alteraciones debido a bacterias, levaduras, mohos o bacterias que producen intoxicaciones alimentarias. En los alimentos constituidos por dos fases (por ejemplo emulsiones aceite-agua o agua-aceite la estructura del alimento puede influir tanto en el ritmo de crecimiento como en las condiciones en las que se inicia el crecimiento. El lugar en el que se encuentran los microorganismos es la fase acuosa. Y, por tanto, es la composición química de esta la que influye directamente en la supervivencia y el crecimiento de los microorganismos. En esta contribución se describe el efecto de los ácidos orgánicos utilizados como conservantes en las emulsiones aceite-agua (ácidos acético y lácticos y en las de agua-aceite (ácidos sórbico y benzoicos así como la influencia de sus estructuras en la estabilidad del alimento.

  2. Compulsive carnival song whistling following cardiac arrest: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, A Rosaura; van der Paardt, Jasper W; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke; de Koning, Pelle; Olff, Miranda; Denys, Damiaan

    2012-07-03

    Compulsivity is the repetitive, irresistible urge to perform a behavior, the experience of loss of voluntary control over this intense urge and the tendency to perform repetitive acts in a habitual or stereotyped manner. Compulsivity is part of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but may occasionally occur as stand-alone symptom following brain damage induced by cardiac arrest. In this case report, we describe a patient who developed compulsivity following cardiac arrest. We review diagnostic options, underlying mechanisms and possible treatments. A 65-year-old man presented at our clinic with continuous compulsive whistling following cardiac arrest. Neither obsessive-compulsive symptoms, nor other psychiatric complaints were present prior to the hypoxic incident. An EEG showed diffuse hypofunction, mainly in baso-temporal areas. Treatment with clomipramine resulted in a decrease of whistling. This case report illustrates de novo manifestation of compulsivity following cardiac arrest and subsequent brain damage and gives additional information on diagnostic options, mechanisms and treatment options. Differential diagnosis between stereotypies, punding, or OCD is difficult. Compulsivity following brain damage may benefit from treatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This finding enhances our knowledge of treatments in similar cases.

  3. Psychopathology in Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Gregory L.; Moore, Todd M.; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of psychopathology among women arrested for violence and whether the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with Axis I psychopathology. Women who were arrested for domestic violence perpetration and court referred to violence intervention programs (N=103) completed measures of IPV…

  4. Arrested segregative phase separation in capillary tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, R. Hans; Lindhoud, Saskia

    2006-01-01

    Phase separation in a capillary tube with one of the phases fully wetting the capillary wall is arrested when the typical size of the phase domains reaches the value of the diameter of the tube. The arrested state consists of an alternating sequence of concave-capped and convex-capped cylindrical

  5. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  6. ppGpp is the major source of growth rate control in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrykus, Katarzyna; Murphy, Helen; Philippe, Nadège; Cashel, Michael

    2011-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the DNA, RNA and protein content of Enterobacteriaceae is regulated as a function of exponential growth rates; macromolecular content increases with faster growth regardless of specific composition of the growth medium. This phenomenon, called growth rate control, primarily involves regulation of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein synthesis. However, it was uncertain whether the global regulator ppGpp is the major determinant for growth rate control. Therefore, here we re-evaluate the effect of ppGpp on macromolecular content for different balanced growth rates in defined media. We find that when ppGpp is absent, RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios are equivalent in fast and slow growing cells. Moreover, slow growing ppGpp-deficient cells with increased RNA content, display a normal ribosomal subunit composition although polysome content is reduced when compared with fast growing wild-type cells. From this we conclude that growth rate control does not occur in the absence of ppGpp. Also, artificial elevation of ppGpp or introduction of stringent RNA polymerase mutants in ppGpp-deficient cells restores this control. We believe these findings strongly argue in favour of ppGpp and against redundant regulation of growth rate control by other factors in Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria.

  7. Diffusion-controlled spherulite growth in obsidian inferred from H2O concentration profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Jim; Watkins, Jim; Manga, Michael; Huber, Christian; Martin, Michael C.

    2007-11-02

    Spherulites are spherical clusters of radiating crystals that occur naturally in rhyolitic obsidian. The growth of spherulites requires diffusion and uptake of crystal forming components from the host rhyolite melt or glass, and rejection of non-crystal forming components from the crystallizing region. Water concentration profiles measured by synchrotron-source Fourier transform spectroscopy reveal that water is expelled into the surrounding matrix during spherulite growth, and that it diffuses outward ahead of the advancing crystalline front. We compare these profiles to models of water diffusion in rhyolite to estimate timescales for spherulite growth. Using a diffusion-controlled growth law, we find that spherulites can grow on the order of days to months at temperatures above the glass transition. The diffusion-controlled growth law also accounts for spherulite size distribution, spherulite growth below the glass transition, and why spherulitic glasses are not completely devitrified.

  8. Direction-specific interactions control crystal growth by oriented attachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dongsheng; Nielsen, Michael H; Lee, Jonathan R.I.

    2012-01-01

    initiated at the contact point. Interface elimination proceeds at a rate consistent with the curvature dependence of the Gibbs free energy. Measured translational and rotational accelerations show that strong, highly direction-specific interactions drive crystal growth via oriented attachment....... using a fluid cell to directly observe oriented attachment of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles. The particles undergo continuous rotation and interaction until they find a perfect lattice match. A sudden jump to contact then occurs over less than 1 nanometer, followed by lateral atom-by-atom addition...

  9. Measuring System for Growth Control of the Spirulina Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce S., Claudio; Ponce L., Ernesto; Bernardo S., Barraza

    2008-11-01

    It describes the workings of a data-logging instrument that measures growth levels of the Spirulina aquaculture. The Spirulina is a very delicate algae and its culture may be suddenly lost due to overgrowth. This kind of instrument is not at present available in the market. The transduction is a submergible laser device whose measuring margin of error is near to 0.28%. The advantage of this new instrument is the improvement in the measurement and the low cost. The future application of this work is related to the industrial production of food and fuel from micro algae culture, for the growing world population.

  10. Control of expansive growth in water deficit: from phenotyping to field simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Parent, Boris; Cabrera Bosquet, Llorenç; Cané, Maria Angela; Chaumont, François; Alvarez Prado, Santiago; Caldeira, Cecilio Frois; Lacube, Sébastien; Fleury, Delphine; Welcker, Claude; Tuberosa, Roberto; Tardieu, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of expansive growth under water deficit has been selected as a key target trait of DROPS because of its early response in drying conditions, its large genetic variability, its partially common control with reproductive growth and its consequences on light interception and transpiration. Development of methods to measure shoot growth in Phenotyping platforms (PhenoArch and Phenodyn, M3P, Montpellier, France; The Plant Accelerator, Adelaide, Australia) allowed identification of a...

  11. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  12. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2017-02-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  13. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2016-08-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  14. Cell Cycle Arrest in Archaea by the Hypusination Inhibitor N1-Guanyl-1,7-Diaminoheptane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, B. P. Mattias; Malandrin, Laurence; Johansson, Hans E.

    2000-01-01

    Hypusination is an essential posttranslational modification unique to archaeal and eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 5A (aIF5A and eIF5A, respectively). We have investigated the effect of the efficient hypusination inhibitor N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane (GC7) on four archaeal and one bacterial species. We found that (i) archaea are sensitive to GC7, whereas the bacterium Escherichia coli is not, (ii) GC7 causes rapid and reversible arrest of growth of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and (iii) the growth arrest is accompanied by a specific reversible arrest of the cell cycle prior to cell division. Our findings establish a link between hypusination and sustained growth of archaea and thereby provide the framework to study molecular details of archaeal cell cycle in connection with in vivo functions of hypusine and of aIF5A and eIF5A. PMID:10648545

  15. Ten-Year Growth of Five Planted Hardwood Species Mechanical Weed Control on Sharkey Clay Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Krinard; Harvey E. Kennedy

    1983-01-01

    Five hardwood species planted on Sharkey clay soil showed little practical difference in growth whether plots were mowed or diskedfor weed control in years 6 to 10, although disking had given better growth in the first 5 years. After 10 years, cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) stem volume was at least three times greater than other species. Changes in...

  16. Deficiency of G1 regulators P53, P21Cip1 and/or pRb decreases hepatocyte sensitivity to TGFβ cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison David J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGFβ is critical to control hepatocyte proliferation by inducing G1-growth arrest through multiple pathways leading to inhibition of E2F transcription activity. The retinoblastoma protein pRb is a key controller of E2F activity and G1/S transition which can be inhibited in viral hepatitis. It is not known whether the impairment of pRb would alter the growth inhibitory potential of TGFβ in disease. We asked how Rb-deficiency would affect responses to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. Results Primary hepatocytes isolated from Rb-floxed mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing CRE-recombinase to delete the Rb gene. In control cells treatment with TGFβ prevented cells to enter S phase via decreased cMYC activity, activation of P16INK4A and P21Cip and reduction of E2F activity. In Rb-null hepatocytes, cMYC activity decreased slightly but P16INK4A was not activated and the great majority of cells continued cycling. Rb is therefore central to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest in hepatocytes. However some Rb-null hepatocytes remained sensitive to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. As these hepatocytes expressed very high levels of P21Cip1 and P53 we investigated whether these proteins regulate pRb-independent signaling to cell cycle arrest by evaluating the consequences of disruption of p53 and p21Cip1. Hepatocytes deficient in p53 or p21Cip1 showed diminished growth inhibition by TGFβ. Double deficiency had a similar impact showing that in cells containing functional pRb; P21Cip and P53 work through the same pathway to regulate G1/S in response to TGFβ. In Rb-deficient cells however, p53 but not p21Cip deficiency had an additive effect highlighting a pRb-independent-P53-dependent effector pathway of inhibition of E2F activity. Conclusion The present results show that otherwise genetically normal hepatocytes with disabled p53, p21Cip1 or Rb genes respond less well to the antiproliferative effects of TGFβ. As the function of

  17. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O(3Pj) from 1.3 × 1016 to 2.3 × 1017 cm-2 s-1. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O(3Pj) ranging from 6 × 1016 to 2 × 1017 cm-3, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 1017 to 1 × 1018 cm-3; cells were inactivated by O(3Pj) doses exceeding 1 × 1018 cm-3, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O(3Pj).

  18. Physical Growth and Body Composition of Controlled Versus Uncontrolled Type 1 Egyptian Diabetic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayera E. Hassan

    2014-12-01

    CONCLUSION: Growth was compromised in uncontrolled T1DM children. This is of utmost importance since most of the clinical features are reversible with better glycemic control and appropriate insulin management.

  19. Aqueous Extracts of the Edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata are Protective Against H2O2-Induced DNA Damage, Growth Inhibition, and Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chen Yeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Potential antioxidant properties of an aqueous extract of the edible red seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT against oxidative DNA damage were evaluated. The AEGT revealed several antioxidant molecules, including phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid. In a cell-free assay, the extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity that significantly reduced H2O2-induced plasmid DNA breaks in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001. The AEGT also suppressed H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in H1299 cells by reducing the percentage of damaged DNA in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001 as measured by a modified alkaline comet-nuclear extract (comet-NE assay. The MTT assay results showed that AEGT confers significant protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and that AEGT itself is not cytotoxic (P < 0.001. Moreover, H2O2-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest was significantly released when cells were co-treated with different concentrations of AEGT (P < 0.001. Taken together, these findings suggest that edible red algae Gracilaria water extract can prevent H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage and its related cellular responses.

  20. Controlled growth of large-scale silver nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Cong-Wen; Yang Hai-Tao; Shen Cheng-Min; Li Zi-An; Zhang Huai-Ruo; Liu Fei; Yang Tian-Zhong; Chen Shu-Tang; Gao Hong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale silver nanowires with controlled aspect ratio were synthesized via reducing silver nitrate with 1, 2-propanediol in the presence of poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were employed to characterize these silver nanowires. The diameter of the silver nanowires can be readily controlled in the range of 100 to 400 nm by varying the experimental conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results show that there exists no chemical bond between the silver and the nitrogen atoms. The interaction between PVP and silver nanowires is mainly through the oxygen atom in the carbonyl group.

  1. Solvent engineering towards controlled grain growth in perovskite planar heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yaoguang; Tang, Zhongjia; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhong, Xin; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Graham, Harrison; Patton, Matthew; Jing, Yan; Guloy, Arnold M; Yao, Yan

    2015-06-28

    We report an effective solvent engineering process to enable controlled perovskite crystal growth and a wider window for processing uniform and dense methyl ammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite films. Planar heterojunction solar cells fabricated with this method demonstrate hysteresis-free performance with a power conversion efficiency around 10%. The crystal structure of an organic-based Pb iodide intermediate phase is identified for the first time, which is critical in controlling the crystal growth and optimizing thin film morphology.

  2. Potential for the G2/M arrest assay to predict patient susceptibility to severe reactions following radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, A.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.V.R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Sprung, C.N. [Div. of Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Melbourne Univ., VIC (Australia)

    2007-02-15

    Background and purpose: cell-cycle regulation and checkpoint activation are crucial factors for radiation-induced DNA damage processing. The G2/M phase arrest was assessed in lymphoblastoid cell lines and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-lymphocytes of different radiosensitivities to study the relationship of G2/M arrest to radiosensitivity. Material and methods: G2/M arrest was analyzed after in vitro irradiation by 2 and 5 Gy of ionizing radiation up to 6 days using 17 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy individuals, ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patients, Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) patients and cancer patients with clinically increased radiosensitivity. In a second approach, phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-lymphocytes from 15 healthy individuals, twelve cancer patients, and five cancer patients hypersensitive to ionizing radiation were studied. Image cytometry was performed to analyze G2/M arrest. Results: two of the three AT cell lines showed markedly increased G2/M arrest compared to controls. NBS cells were comparable to controls up to day 3, but then demonstrated a slightly increased G2/M arrest. Two of the six radiosensitive lymphoblast cell lines and the five radiosensitive cancer patients' T-lymphocytes assayed showed a reduction in G2/M arrest, while healthy individuals showed no difference from cancer patients. Conclusion: the interrelation between G2/M arrest and radiosensitivity is not readily apparent since a variety of radiosensitive cells from patients with radiosensitive syndromes and patients identified as radiosensitive following radiation treatment showed inconsistent G2/M arrest dynamics. Secondary effects, like loss of clonogenicity, G1/S phase arrest and failure of G2/M arrest may contribute to variation of the G2/M arrest endpoint and obscure assessment of cellular radiosensitivity using this method. (orig.)

  3. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  4. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R; Medina-Noyola, M

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the ("bifurcation" or fixed-point") equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  5. Cyclic mechanical load causes global translational arrest in articular chondrocytes: a process which is partially dependent upon PKR phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lomas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available he cellular mechanisms by which articular cartilage responds to load are poorly understood, but such responses may involve regulation at the level of protein translation rather than synthesis of mRNA. We investigated the role of translational control in cyclically (0.5 Hz, 0.1 Hz and 0.05 Hz and statically loaded porcine articular cartilage explants. Messenger RNA was extracted for real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and newly synthesised proteins were measured by their incorporation of radiolabelled 35S[methionine/cysteine] or 35SO4. Some medium from loaded and unloaded explants was immunoblotted for type II collagen, CTGF and TIMP3. The pathways that control protein translation were investigated by immunoblotting explant lysates for PKR, PERK (PKR like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, eIF2a (eukaryotic initiation factor 2a, eEFs (eukaryotic elongation factors, and AMP-dependent kinase. Explants were also loaded in the presence of inhibitors of PKR, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF receptor and PI3 kinase. Cyclic loading caused complete global translational arrest as evidenced by a total suppression of new protein synthesis whilst maintaining mRNA levels. Translational arrest did not occur following static loading and was partly dependent upon the load frequency. There was a rebound increase in protein synthesis when labelling was performed after load had been withdrawn. Phosphorylation of PKR occurred in explants following cyclic load and inhibition of PKR modestly reversed suppression of newly synthesised proteins suggesting that PKR, at least in part, was responsible for loading induced translational arrest. These results show that translational control provides a rapid and potentially important mechanism for controlling the synthetic responses of articular chondrocytes in response to different types of mechanical load.

  6. Evaluation of the control of mosquitoes with insect growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C M; Wu, S H; Wu, C C

    1990-07-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of eight insect growth regulators (IGRs) (chlorfluazuron, diflubenzuron, EL-494, flufenoxuron, teflubenzuron, juglone, plumbagin and methoprene) against five mosquito vectors (Armigeres subalbatus, Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, and Culex quinquefasciatus) was investigated in the laboratory. The EC50s of chlorfluazuron, diflubenzuron, EL-494, flufenoxuron, teflubenzuron, and methoprene against the five mosquitoes ranged from 0.0001 to 0.3 ppm and those of juglone and plumbagin from 3-25 ppm. The five mosquito species had similar tolerances to the test IGRs. At pH 5 to 9, the effectiveness of the first five chemicals was very stable. After ultraviolet irradiation or heat management (45 degrees C-60 degrees C), diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron were very stable. EL-494 was not stable when exposed to ultraviolet irradiation or heat. Under 0.1 ppm, teflubenzuron was not stable upon exposure to heat and chlorfluazuron and methoprene were not stable when exposed to ultraviolet irradiation. Piperonyl butoxide reduces the effectiveness of the five IGRs. Administration of diflubenzuron (1-5 ppm), flufenoxuron (0.025 ppm), and teflubenzuron (1-5 ppm) reduced Culex quinquefasciatus larvae in ditches by 40-90%. The administration of diflubenzuron (0.5 ppm) to containers reduced 97% of the Aedes albopictus larvae.

  7. Controlled Growth of Metal-Organic Frameworks on Polymer Brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liman; Zhou, Mingdong; Dong, Xiaozhe; Wang, Lei; Xie, Zhigang; Dong, Dewen; Zhang, Ning

    2017-08-17

    Polymer brushes are for the first time used to induce the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The semi-fixed polymer chains provide a confined environment, which allows a mild growth of MOFs in between polymer chains to give surface-attached spherical MOF nanoparticles, in contrast to the larger MOF cubes/plates formed simultaneously in solution. Polymer brushes bearing carboxylate acid functionalities are indispensable for the formation of surface bound MOFs, while no MOF nanoparticles are observed on neutral polymer brushes. Characterization of the resultant MOF/polymer brushes hybrid film indicates the formation of crystalline MOF structure. The dimension of surface-attached MOFs can be fine-tuned from 20 nm to 1.4 μm simply by varying the structural parameter of polymer brushes and the nucleation duration. The method is not only applicable to the synthesis of MOF-5 and MIL-125, but shows great potential for the preparation of other surface-attached MOFs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. [Transforming growth factor-beta controls pathogenesis of Crohn disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, H; di Mola, F F; Egger, B; Scheuren, A; Kleeff, J; Zimmermann, A; Büchler, M W

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms which contribute to the progression of Crohn's disease are still not known. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and its subtypes are multifunctional polypeptides which regulate immunological processes as well as the synthesis of the extracellular matrix and fibrogenesis. In the present study, Crohn's disease tissue samples of 18 patients undergoing intestinal resection were analyzed by Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization and immunostaining for TGF-beta 1-3 and the TGF-beta receptors type I-III (T beta R-I, T beta R-II, T beta R-III). There was a marked overexpression of TGF-beta 1, TGF-beta 3 and T beta R-II in 94% of the Crohn's disease tissue samples. TGF-beta 2 and T beta R-I ALK5 and T beta R-III were enhanced in 72%, 72% and 82% of the Crohn tissue samples, respectively. In situ hybridization and immunostaining revealed that there was frequent coexpression of TGF-beta with its signaling receptors. Our data indicate that TGF-beta and their receptors seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Their enhanced expression might contribute to the increase in extracellular matrix resulting in fibrosis and subsequently in intestinal obstruction.

  9. Growth control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through dose of oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi, E-mail: hashizume@plasma.engg.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-08-31

    To investigate the dose-dependent effects of neutral oxygen radicals on the proliferation as well as the inactivation of microorganisms, we treated suspensions of budding yeast cells with oxygen radicals using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, varying the fluxes of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) from 1.3 × 10{sup 16} to 2.3 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Proliferation was promoted at doses of O({sup 3}P{sub j}) ranging from 6 × 10{sup 16} to 2 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}, and suppressed at doses ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} to 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}; cells were inactivated by O({sup 3}P{sub j}) doses exceeding 1 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, even when the flux was varied over the above flux range. These results showed that the growth of cells was regulated primarily in response to the total dose of O({sup 3}P{sub j})

  10. Interface-controlled growth of organic semiconductors on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jinta; Emin, Saim; Pavlica, Egon; Valant, Matjaž; Bratina, Gvido

    2017-10-01

    We have studied submonolayer coverages of N,N-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN2) on mechanically exfoliated graphene transferred onto SiO2 substrates. Our atomic force microscopy (AFM) data show that PDIF-CN2 forms irregularly-shaped 1.4 nm-high islands. From the selected area diffraction performed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) we conclude that this height corresponds to π - π stacks of molecules, which are inclined for 43° relative to the graphene surface. AFM also showed complete absence of PDIF-CN2 on single-layer graphene (SLG). Electric force microscopy revealed a marked difference in surface charge density between a single-layer graphene and bilayer graphene, with a higher surface charge on SLG than on the bilayer graphene. We associate this behavior with p - type doping of graphene due to the electrostatic dipole induced by the molecular water layer present at the graphene/SiO2 interface. The crucial role of the graphene/SiO2 interface in determining growth of PDIF-CN2 was further confirmed by TEM examination of PDIF-CN2 deposited onto unsupported SLG.

  11. Climate Controls on Tree Growth in the Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchan, Ramzi; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.; Meko, David M.; Kerchouche, Dalila; Slimani, Said; Ilmen, Rachid; Hasnaoui, Fouad; Guibal, Frederic; Canarerim Hesys Hykui; Sanchez-Salguero, Raul; Piermattei, Alma; Sesbou, Abdessadek; Cook, Benjamin I.; Sabir, Mohamed; Touchane, Hayat

    2017-01-01

    The first large-scale network of tree-ring chronologies from the western Mediterranean (WM; 32 deg N-43 deg N, 10 deg W-17 deg E) is described and analyzed to identify the seasonal climatic signal in indices of annual ring width. Correlation and rotated empirical orthogonal function analyses are applied to 85 tree-ring series and corresponding gridded climate data to assess the climate signal embedded in the network. Chronologies range in length from 80 to 1129 years. Monthly correlations and partial correlations show overall positive associations for Pinus halepensis (PIHA) and Cedrus atlantica (CDAT) with winter (December-February) and spring (March-May) precipitation across this network. In both seasons, the precipitation correlation with PIHA is stronger, while CDAT chronologies tend to be longer. A combination of positive correlations between growth and winter-summer precipitation and negative partial correlations with growing season temperatures suggests that chronologies in at least part of the network reflect soil moisture and the integrated effects of precipitation and evapotranspiration signal. The range of climate response observed across this network reflects a combination of both species and geographic influences. Western Moroccan chronologies have the strongest association with the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  12. Climate Controls on Tree Growth in the Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchan, Ramzi; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.; Meko, David M.; Kerchouche, Dalila; Slimani, Said; Ilmen, Rachid; Hasnaoui, Fouad; Guibal, Frederic; Canarerim Hesys Hykui; Sanchez-Salguero, Raul; hide

    2017-01-01

    The first large-scale network of tree-ring chronologies from the western Mediterranean (WM; 32 deg N-43 deg N, 10 deg W-17 deg E) is described and analyzed to identify the seasonal climatic signal in indices of annual ring width. Correlation and rotated empirical orthogonal function analyses are applied to 85 tree-ring series and corresponding gridded climate data to assess the climate signal embedded in the network. Chronologies range in length from 80 to 1129 years. Monthly correlations and partial correlations show overall positive associations for Pinus halepensis (PIHA) and Cedrus atlantica (CDAT) with winter (December-February) and spring (March-May) precipitation across this network. In both seasons, the precipitation correlation with PIHA is stronger, while CDAT chronologies tend to be longer. A combination of positive correlations between growth and winter-summer precipitation and negative partial correlations with growing season temperatures suggests that chronologies in at least part of the network reflect soil moisture and the integrated effects of precipitation and evapotranspiration signal. The range of climate response observed across this network reflects a combination of both species and geographic influences. Western Moroccan chronologies have the strongest association with the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  13. Morphology-Controlled Growth of AIN One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting XIE; Min YE; Xiaosheng FANG; Zhi JIANG; Li CHEN; Mingguang KONG; Yucheng WU; Lide ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AIN) nanowires, serrated nanoribbons, and nanoribbons were selectively obtained through a simple chloride assisted chemical vapor deposition process. The morphologies of the products could be controlled by adjusting the deposition position and the flux of the reactant gas. The morphologies and structures of the AIN products were investigated in detail. The formation mechanism of the as-prepared different morphologies of AIN one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures was discussed on the basis of the experimental results.

  14. Cardiac Arrest: Obstetric CPR/ACLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Benjamin; Lipman, Steven

    2017-01-10

    In contrast with other high-resource countries, maternal mortality has seen an increase in the United States. Caring for pregnant women in cardiac arrest may prove uniquely challenging given the rarity of the event coupled by the physiological changes of pregnancy. Optimization of resuscitative efforts warrants special attention as described in the 2015 American Heart Association's "Scientific Statement on Maternal Cardiac Arrest." Current recommendations address a variety of topics ranging from the basic components of chest compressions and airway management to some of the logistical complexities and operational challenges involved in maternal cardiac arrest.

  15. Optimal control on bladder cancer growth model with BCG immunotherapy and chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, C.; Trisilowati

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, an optimal control model of the growth of bladder cancer with BCG (Basil Calmate Guerin) immunotherapy and chemotherapy is discussed. The purpose of this optimal control is to determine the number of BCG vaccine and drug should be given during treatment such that the growth of bladder cancer cells can be suppressed. Optimal control is obtained by applying Pontryagin principle. Furthermore, the optimal control problem is solved numerically using Forward-Backward Sweep method. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the vaccine and drug in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Hence, it can reduce the number of cancer cells that is not infected with BCG as well as minimize the cost of the treatment.

  16. Effects of Control Release Fertilizers on Nutrient Leaching, Palm Growth and Production Cost

    OpenAIRE

    Pushpa Soti; Angie Fleurissaint; Stewart Reed; Krish Jayachandran

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different controlled release fertilizer technologies on nutrient leaching and plant growth parameters of two palm species, Chinese Fan (Livistona chinensis) and Queen (Syagrus romanzoffiana). We compared Nutri-Pak (12-4-12 controlled release packet) and Harrell’s (12-4-12 controlled release polymer coated urea) against Atlantic (8-4-12 controlled release polymer coated urea, coated sulfate of potash), the most commonly used palm fertilize...

  17. Controlled multiple growth factor delivery from bone tissue engineering scaffolds via designed affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Lee, Jae Sung; Diggs, Alisha; Lu, Yan; Nemke, Brett; Markel, Mark; Hollister, Scott J; Murphy, William L

    2014-08-01

    It is known that angiogenesis plays an important role in bone regeneration and that release of angiogenic and osteogenic growth factors can enhance bone formation. Multiple growth factors play key roles in processes that lead to tissue formation/regeneration during natural tissue development and repair. Therefore, treatments aiming to mimic tissue regeneration can benefit from multiple growth factor release, and there remains a need for simple clinically relevant approaches for dual growth factor release. We hypothesized that mineral coatings could be used as a platform for controlled incorporation and release of multiple growth factors. Specifically, mineral-coated scaffolds were "dip coated" in multiple growth factor solutions, and growth factor binding and release were dictated by the growth factor-mineral binding affinity. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds were fabricated using indirect solid-free form fabrication techniques and coated with a thin conformal mineral layer. Mineral-coated β-TCP scaffolds were sequentially dipped in recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) and a modular bone morphogenetic peptide, a mineral-binding version of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), solutions to allow for the incorporation of each growth factor. The dual release profile showed sustained release of both growth factors for over more than 60 days. Scaffolds releasing either rhVEGF alone or the combination of growth factors showed an increase in blood vessel ingrowth in a dose-dependent manner in a sheep intramuscular implantation model. This approach demonstrates a "modular design" approach, in which a controllable biologics carrier is integrated into a structural scaffold as a thin surface coating.

  18. The growth of stability: postural control from a development perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway-Cook, A; Woollacott, M H

    1985-06-01

    This study compared central nervous system organizational processes underlying balance in children of three age groups: 15-31 months, 4-6 years, and 7-10 years, using a movable platform capable of antero-posterior (A-P) displacements or dorsi-plantar flexing rotations of the ankle joint. A servo system capable of linking platform rotations to A-P sway angle allowed disruption of ankle joint inputs, to test the effects of incongruent sensory inputs on response patterns. Surface electromyography was used to quantify latency and response patterns. Surface electromyography was used to quantify latency and amplitude of the gastrocnemius, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and quadriceps muscle responses. Cinematography provided biomechanical analysis of the sway motion. Results demonstrated that while directionally specific response synergies are present in children under the age of six, structured organization of the synergies is not yet fully developed since variability in timing and amplitude relationships between proximal and distal muscles is high. Transition from immature to mature response patterns was not linear but stage-like with greatest variability in the 4- to 6- year-old children. Results from balance tests under altered sensory conditions (eyes closed and/or ankle joint inputs altered) suggested that: (a) with development a shift in controlling inputs to posture from visual dependence to more adult-like dependence on a combination of ankle joint and visual inputs occurred in the 4- to 6-year-old, and reached adult form in the 7- to 10-year-old age group. It is proposed that the age 4-6 is a transition period in the development of posture control. At this time the nervous system (a) uses visual-vestibular inputs to fine tune ankle-joint proprioception in preparation for its increased importance in posture control and (b) fine tunes the structural organization of the postural synergies themselves.

  19. Calorimetric control of the specific growth rate during fed-batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Richard; Steinkämper, Anne; Horn, Thomas

    2012-08-31

    The specific growth rate of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with glucose as limiting C-source was estimated from the measured heat flow produced by the cells. For the cultivation a standard 30 l laboratory bioreactor was used, which was extended in such a way that heat balancing is possible. The feed rate was adjusted by a feedforward/feedback controller such that the specific growth rate was kept on the desired set-point value. On the basis of experimental investigations it was demonstrated that the specific growth rate can be controlled at a given set point value below the critical value to prevent the production of growth-inhibitory ethanol due to the Crabtree effect. With this control strategy high biomass concentrations of more than 110 g l(-1) can be obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy analysis of intravenous thrombolysis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of intravenous thrombolysis in the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction(AMI)and cardiac arrest after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Methods 120 patients with AMI and cardiac arrest admitted in our hospital from Mar2009 to Mar 2013 were divided into thrombolytic group(n=50)and control group(n=70)according to the

  1. The effect of plant growth regulators on height control in potted Arundina graminifolia orchids (Growth regulators in Arundina graminifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina da Silva Wanderley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Orchids have become an important portion of the international floriculture market.  Arundina graminifolia is a terrestrial orchid that produces attractive flowers, and, although the species could be a potential candidate for the floriculture market, its considerable height makes it difficult to transport and commercialize.  A number of plant growth regulators have been utilized to control plant height in ornamentals and other species.  Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of growth regulators, paclobutrazol and chlormequat chloride on the vegetative development of containerized A. graminifolia orchid aiming at height control.  Paclobutrazol (Cultar was applied at 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg L-1, and CCC (Cycocel was applied at 0, 2000, 4000, and 6000 mg L-1. The plants were assessed monthly for the plant height and number of shoots per container. CCC had no effect on the final height of plants at the concentrations applied. In contrast, paclobutrazol was effective in controlling plant height at a concentration of 5 mg L-1, but higher concentrations (10 and 20 mg L-1 proved to be toxic to the plants, causing death to the new shoots. Paclobutrazol at lower concentrations offers a viable means for height control in A. graminifolia.

  2. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  3. Controlled growth of iron oxide nanoparticles in the aqueous microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bong-sik; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2008-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous aqueous solutions via regulation of the microenvironment at ambient conditions. Nanocrystals having an average diameter of 6 to 12 nm were obtained by picoliter droplets, whereas only 9 nm diameter nanocrystals were prepared by microliter droplets. The size of the nanocrystals was controlled by a precise balance of reactions of hydroxide ions with positive ions at the surface layer and inner layers of the droplets. The crystal structure and average size were analyzed by X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscope images. The field dependence and temperature dependence on magnetization measured by a superconducting quantum interference device demonstrate that the as-synthesized particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature and have a size-dependent magnetic property. The anisotropy constant calculated by the blocking temperature and particle size was found to decrease with increasing particle size.

  4. Template-Based Electrochemically Controlled Growth of Segmented Multimetal Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mee Rahn Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multisegmented one-dimensional nanostructures composed of gold, copper, and nickel have been fabricated by depositing metals electrochemically in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO templates. The electrodeposition process has been carried out using a direct current in a two-electrode electrochemical cell, where a silver-evaporated AAO membrane and a platinum plate have served as a working electrode and a counter electrode, respectively. The striped multimetal rods with an average diameter of about 300 nm have tunable lengths ranging from a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers. The lengths and the sequence of metal segments in a striped rod can be tailored readily by controlling the durations of electrodeposition and the order of electroplating solutions, respectively.

  5. Application of a microcomputer-based system to control and monitor bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, J A; Luli, G W; Dekleva, M L; Strohl, W R

    1984-02-01

    A modular microcomputer-based system was developed to control and monitor various modes of bacterial growth. The control system was composed of an Apple II Plus microcomputer with 64-kilobyte random-access memory; a Cyborg ISAAC model 91A multichannel analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter; paired MRR-1 pH, pO(2), and foam control units; and in-house-designed relay, servo control, and turbidimetry systems. To demonstrate the flexibility of the system, we grew bacteria under various computer-controlled and monitored modes of growth, including batch, turbidostat, and chemostat systems. The Apple-ISAAC system was programmed in Labsoft BASIC (extended Applesoft) with an average control program using ca. 6 to 8 kilobytes of memory and up to 30 kilobytes for datum arrays. This modular microcomputer-based control system was easily coupled to laboratory scale fermentors for a variety of fermentations.

  6. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  7. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  8. The obesity paradox in cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from clinical cohorts indicates an obesity paradox in overweight and obese patients who seem to have a more favorable short-term and long-term prognosis than leaner patients. Although obese cardiac arrest victims are theoretically more difficult to be resuscitated due to difficulties in providing adequate chest compressions, ventilation, and oxygenation, research so far has shown that there is an obesity paradox in cardiac arrest.

  9. Control of Perovskite Crystal Growth by Methylammonium Lead Chloride Templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Andreas; Grill, Irene; Huber, Niklas; Peters, Kristina; Hufnagel, Alexander G; Handloser, Matthias; Docampo, Pablo; Hartschuh, Achim; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-20

    State-of-the-art solar cells based on methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3 ) now reach efficiencies over 20 %. This fast improvement was possible with intensive research in perovskite processing. In particular, chloride-based precursors are known to have a positive influence on the crystallization of the perovskite. Here, we used a combination of in-situ X-ray diffraction and charge-transport measurements to understand the influence of chloride during perovskite crystallization in planar heterojunction solar cells. We show that MAPbCl3 crystallizes directly after the deposition of the starting solution and acts as a template for the formation of MAPbI3 . Additionally, we show that the charge-carrier mobility doubles by extending the time for the template formation. Our results give a deeper understanding of the influence of chloride in the synthesis of MAPbI3 and illustrate the importance of carefully controlling crystallization for reproducible, high-efficiency solar cells.

  10. Surface Electrocardiogram Predictors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Samy A.; Rosenthal, Todd M.; Morin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is a major cause of death in industrialized nations, with approximately 50% of these deaths attributable to sudden cardiac arrest. If patients at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest can be identified, their odds of surviving fatal arrhythmias can be significantly improved through prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. This review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to surface electrocardiogram (ECG) predictors of sudden cardiac arrest. Methods: We conducted a literature review focused on methods of predicting sudden cardiac arrest through noninvasive electrocardiographic testing. Results: Several electrocardiographic-based methods of risk stratification of sudden cardiac arrest have been studied, including QT prolongation, QRS duration, fragmented QRS complexes, early repolarization, Holter monitoring, heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence, signal-averaged ECG, T wave alternans, and T-peak to T-end. These ECG findings have shown variable effectiveness as screening tools. Conclusion: At this time, no individual ECG finding has been found to be able to adequately stratify patients with regard to risk for sudden cardiac arrest. However, one or more of these candidate surface ECG parameters may become useful components of future multifactorial risk stratification calculators. PMID:27660578

  11. Trial of Growth Control of Farm-raised Fish by Plasma-generated Reactive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Hideki; Kubota, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Ryo; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    As one of the biological applications of plasmas, growth control of agricultural products attracts attentions. There are many papers on growth enhancement of crops by plasma treatment. However, there are few published papers concerning growth enhancement of fishery products excepting reports of goldfish growth enhancement in 1980s. In this study, growth characteristics of edible fish (tilapia) under the plasma treatment has been investigated. An arc discharge reactor was employed and plasma treated air was introduced to two aquariums with a flow rate of 2.5 L/min. Measured concentrations of main reactive species were 43 ppm for NO, 23 ppm for NO2 and 7.5 ppm for O3. Each aquarium had 60 L capacity and contained 15 tilapia fish. The plasma treated air was supplied to an aquarium once a day and to the other aquarium twice a day with total duration of 10 min. Compared to no plasma treatment case, the growth rate decreased by 18% by once a day plasma treatment, whereas almost same growth rate was observed by twice a day plasma treatment. A possible reason of growth suppression is excess concentrations of nitrite and nitrate in water. The relationship between their concentrations and growth characteristics under several treatment conditions will be shown at the conference. Tirapia fish was supplied from SEFREC of Ehime University.

  12. Growth rate and resource imbalance interactively control biomass stoichiometry and elemental quotas of aquatic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Casey M; Whitaker, Emily A; Cotner, James B

    2017-03-01

    The effects of resource stoichiometry and growth rate on the elemental composition of biomass have been examined in a wide variety of organisms, but the interaction among these effects is often overlooked. To determine how growth rate and resource imbalance affect bacterial carbon (C): nitrogen (N): phosphorus (P) stoichiometry and elemental content, we cultured two strains of aquatic heterotrophic bacteria in chemostats at a range of dilution rates and P supply levels (C:P of 100:1 to 10,000:1). When growing below 50% of their maximum growth rate, P availability and dilution rate had strong interactive effects on biomass C:N:P, elemental quotas, cell size, respiration rate, and growth efficiency. In contrast, at faster growth rates, biomass stoichiometry was strongly homeostatic in both strains (C:N:P of 70:13:1 and 73:14:1) and elemental quotas of C, N, and P were tightly coupled (but not constant). Respiration and cell size increased with both growth rate and P limitation, and P limitation induced C accumulation and excess respiration. These results show that bacterial biomass stoichiometry is relatively constrained when all resources are abundant and growth rates are high, but at low growth rates resource imbalance is relatively more important than growth rate in controlling bacterial biomass composition. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  13. Sex Disparities in Arrest Outcomes for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Melissa; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence arrests have been historically focused on protecting women and children from abusive men. Arrest patterns continue to reflect this bias with more men arrested for domestic violence compared to women. Such potential gender variations in arrest patterns pave the way to the investigation of disparities by sex of the offender in…

  14. Selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, suppresses cellular proliferation in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines via cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Yeon Baek; Wonhee Hur; Jin Sang Wang; Si Hyun Bae; Seung Kew Yoon

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth inhibitory mechanism of NS-398, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor,in two hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines (HepG2and Huh7).METHODS: HepG2 and Huh7 cells were treated with NS-398. Its effects on cell viability, cell proliferation,cell cycles, and gene expression were respectively evaluated by water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1)assay, 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining,flow cytometer analysis, and Western blotting,with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as positive control.RESULTS: NS-398 showed dose- and time-dependent growth-inhibitory effects on the two cell lines.Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expressions in HepG2 and Huh7 cells, particularly in Huh7 cells were inhibited in a time- and dose-independent manner.NS-398 caused cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase with cell accumulation in the sub-G1 phase in HepG2 and Huh7cell lines. No evidence of apoptosis was observed in two cell lines.CONCLUSION: NS-398 reduces cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest in HepG2 and Huh7 cell lines,and COX-2 inhibitors may have potent chemoprevention effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Digital Control of the Czochralski Growth of Gallium Arsenide-Controller Software Reference Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-15

    response by means of two stacked PID controllers . The setpoint and actual data inputs of both controllers are to be connected in parallel; the output of...setpoints is obtained from two stacked PID controllers which permit to obtain a non- linear control response (compare chapter 4.5.1). The first PID...the "manu- al" setpoint can be chosen to lie close to the actually re- quired controller output, the PID controllers need only make small

  16. The TOR Signaling Pathway in Spatial and Temporal Control of Cell Size and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suam Gonzalez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell size is amenable by genetic and environmental factors. The highly conserved nutrient-responsive Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling pathway regulates cellular metabolic status and growth in response to numerous inputs. Timing and duration of TOR pathway activity is pivotal for both cell mass built up as well as cell cycle progression and is controlled and fine-tuned by the abundance and quality of nutrients, hormonal signals, growth factors, stress, and oxygen. TOR kinases function within two functionally and structurally discrete multiprotein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, that are implicated in temporal and spatial control of cell size and growth respectively; however, recent data indicate that such functional distinctions are much more complex. Here, we briefly review roles of the two complexes in cellular growth and cytoarchitecture in various experimental model systems.

  17. Controllable Growth of Ultrathin P-doped ZnO Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuankun; Yang, Hengyan; Sun, Feng; Wang, Xianying

    2016-12-01

    Ultrathin phosphor (P)-doped ZnO nanosheets with branched nanowires were controllably synthesized, and the effects of oxygen and phosphor doping on the structural and optical properties were systematically studied. The grown ZnO nanosheet exhibits an ultrathin nanoribbon backbone with one-side-aligned nanoteeth. For the growth of ultrathin ZnO nanosheets, both oxygen flow rate and P doping are essential, by which the morphologies and microstructures can be finely tuned. P doping induces strain relaxation to change the growth direction of ZnO nanoribbons, and oxygen flow rate promotes the high supersaturation degree to facilitate the growth of nanoteeth and widens the nanoribbons. The growth of P-doped ZnO in this work provides a new progress towards the rational control of the morphologies for ZnO nanostructures.

  18. Control of cell growth: Rag GTPases in activation of TORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huirong; Gong, Rui; Xu, Yanhui

    2013-08-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central regulator controlling cell growth. TOR is highly conserved from yeast to mammals, and is deregulated in human cancers and diabetes. TOR complex 1 (TORC1) integrates signals from growth factors, cellular energy status, stress, and amino acids to control cell growth, mitochondrial metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis. The mechanisms of growth factors and cellular energy status in regulating TORC1 have been well established, whereas the mechanism by which amino acid induces TORC1 remains largely unknown. Recent studies revealed that Rag GTPases play a central role in the regulation of TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress in our understanding of Rag GTPase-regulated TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. Particular focus will be given to the function of Rag GTPases in TORC1 activation and how Rag GTPases are regulated by amino acids.

  19. Control growth of silicon nanocolumns' epitaxy on silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Su Kong, E-mail: sukong1985@yahoo.com.my [University of Malaya, Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics (Malaysia); Dee, Chang Fu [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN) (Malaysia); Yahya, Noorhana [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Faculty of Science and Information Technology (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul [University of Malaya, Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics (Malaysia)

    2013-04-15

    The epitaxial growth of Si nanocolumns on Si nanowires was studied using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. A single-crystalline and surface oxide-free Si nanowire core (core radius {approx}21 {+-} 5 nm) induced by indium crystal seed was used as a substance for the vapor phase epitaxial growth. The growth process is initiated by sidewall facets, which then nucleate upon certain thickness to form Si islands and further grow to form nanocolumns. The Si nanocolumns with diameter of 10-20 nm and aspect ratio up to 10 can be epitaxially grown on the surface of nanowires. The results showed that the radial growth rate of the Si nanocolumns remains constant with the increase of deposition time. Meanwhile, the radial growth rates are controllable by manipulating the hydrogen to silane gas flow rate ratio. The optical antireflection properties of the Si nanocolumns' decorated SiNW arrays are discussed in the text.

  20. Controlled isotropic or anisotropic nanoscale growth of coordination polymers: formation of hybrid coordination polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Yea Jin; Cho, Won; Oh, Moonhyun

    2013-01-22

    The ability to fabricate multicompositional hybrid materials in a precise and controlled manner is one of the primary goals of modern materials science research. In addition, an understanding of the phenomena associated with the systematic growth of one material on another can facilitate the evolution of multifunctional hybrid materials. Here, we demonstrate precise manipulation of the isotropic and/or anisotropic nanoscale growth of various coordination polymers (CPs) to obtain heterocompositional hybrid coordination polymer particles. Chemical composition analyses conducted at every growth step reveal the formation of accurately assembled hybrid nanoscale CPs, and microscopy images are used to examine the morphology of the particles and visualize the hybrid structures. The dissimilar growth behavior, that is, growth in an isotropic or anisotropic fashion, is found to be dependent on the size of the metal ions involved within the CPs.

  1. Overexpression of cyclin L2 induces apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human lung cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-li; WANG Tong-shan; LI Xiao-yu; LI Nan; HUANG Ding-zhi; CHEN Qi; BA Yi

    2007-01-01

    Background Uncontrolled cell division is one of the hallmarks of tumor growth. Researches have been focused on numerous molecules involved in this process. Cyclins are critical regulatory proteins of cell cycle progression and/or transcription. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative effect of cyclin L2, and to define its growth regulatory mechanisms using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549.Methods Human cyclin L2 was transfected into human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cell), and was expressed in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA3.1. The effects and mechanisms of the cyclin L2 in cell growth, cell cycle analysis and apoptosis were studied by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry or Western blot, respectively.Results Overexpression of cyclin L2 inhibited the growth of A549 cells. Cell cycle analysis in cells transfected with pCCNL2 revealed an increment in proportion in G0/G1 phase ((68.07 ± 4.2)%) in contrast to (60.39 ± 2.82)% of the cells transfected with mock vector. Apoptosis occurred in (7.25 ± 0.98)% cells transfected with pCCNL2, as compared with (1.25 ± 0.21)% of the mock vector control group. Cyclin L2-induced-G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis involved upregulation of caspase-3 and downregulation of Bcl-2 and survivin.Conclusion The results indicate that overexpression of cyclin L2 protein may promote efficient growth inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  2. Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar; Monje, Oscar; Shellack, James; Mortenson, Todd; Wells, Howard

    Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility. O. Monje Space Life Sciences Laboratory, Dynamac Corp., DYN-3, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA J.L. Shellack, T.E. Mortenson, and H.W. Wells. Bionetics Corporation, BIO-1, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA The Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) is a rear-breathing, single middeck locker equivalent plant growth system. ABRS is composed of two independently controlled growth chambers (each with 330 cm2 of growth area). The air revitalization system in each chamber is composed of two subsystems: CO2 Control and a Ethylene/VOC Control. The CO2 Control subsystem must control chamber [CO2] within a range of 300-2000 ppm, with a nominal setpoint of 1500 ppm. The Ethylene/VOC Control subsystem is required to maintain chamber ethylene concentration at ¡50 ppb. Previous spaceflight plant payloads have used non-regenerable cartridges for CO2 control and photocatalytic scrubbers for controlling concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Non-regenerable systems have used LiOH cartridges for [CO2] control with a combination of Purafil (KMnO4)/Activated charcoal for scrubbing VOCs. Regenerable air revitalization systems offer the potential for reducing the mass and volume of consumables used during spaceflight plant experiments. A system utilizing technologies employing regenerable adsorbents: zeolites 13X and 5A for CO2 control and Carbosieve SIII (C molecular sieve) for VOC control has been designed for ABRS. The filter cartridges were sized using expected chamber leak rates, measurements of adsorptive capacities, and measured CO2 consumption and VOC generation rates.

  3. Impact of substance abuse treatment on arrests among opiate users in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kevin M; Deck, Dennis; Krupski, Antoinette

    2007-01-01

    Administrative data from Washington State's Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse drive this three-year prospective study of the impact of substance abuse treatment on arrests among 12,962 opiate users receiving publicly funded substance abuse services. Using survival analysis, the risk of arrest among opiate users who receive substance abuse treatment is compared to those who do not receive treatment. Propensity scores control for client characteristics associated with admission to substance abuse treatment. Overall, a reduction in the risk of arrest was found among subjects in treatment (Hazard Ratio = 0.59-0.78, p < .05) and subjects successfully completing treatment (Hazard Ratio = 0.75, p < .05). Risk of arrest was elevated among those with a negative outcome to treatment (Hazard Ratio = 1.23, p < .05).

  4. EU Citizenship and European Arrest Warrant: The Same Rights for All?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Marguery

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the case Wolzenburg, the principle of non-discrimination of European Union citizens is applied to the European arrest warrant. The implementation of the European arrest warrant by the Member States cannot escape a control of proportional- ity made by the Court. Member States may impose a period of residence of five years to foreign Europeans citizens in order for them to rely on an optional ground for non-execution of a European arrest warrant (Article 4(6 of the Framework Deci- sion on the European arrest warrant. Home nationals are not obliged to comply with a residence requirement. It is possible for Member States to justify an exception to the principle of non-discrimination of European citizens with a legitimate inter- est. The chances of social reintegration of a person convicted constitute such an interest. The national measure resulting in a difference of treatment must be proportional to that interest.

  5. Functional analysis of a biosynthetic cluster essential for production of 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a germination-arrest factor from Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizosphere-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6 produces the germination-arrest factor, 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine (FVG). FVG has previously been shown to both arrest the germination of weedy grasses and to inhibit the growth of the bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Very little is kno...

  6. Arabidopsis TCP20 links regulation of growth and cell division control pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    During postembryonic plant development, cell division is coupled to cell growth. There is a stringent requirement to couple these processes in shoot and root meristems. As cells pass through meristems, they transit through zones with high rates of cell growth and proliferation during organogenesis. This transition implies a need for coordinate regulation of genes underpinning these two fundamental cell functions. Here, we report a mechanism for coregulation of cell division control genes and ...

  7. Control of structure and growth of polymorphic crystalline thin films of amphiphilic molecules on liquid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinbach, S.P.; Kjær, K.; Bouwman, W.G.;

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous formation and coexistence of crystalline polymorphic trilayer domains in amphiphilic films at air-liquid interfaces is demonstrated by grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray diffraction. These polymorphic crystallites may serve as models for the early stages of crystal nucleation...... and growth, helping to elucidate the manner in which additives influence the progress of crystal nucleation, growth, and polymorphism and suggesting ways of selectively generating and controlling multilayers on liquid surfaces. Auxiliary molecules have been designed to selectively inhibit development...

  8. Glucose and auxin signaling interaction in controlling Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings root growth and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuwaneshwar S Mishra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant root growth and development is highly plastic and can adapt to many environmental conditions. Sugar signaling has been shown to affect root growth and development by interacting with phytohormones such as gibberellins, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Auxin signaling and transport has been earlier shown to be controlling plant root length, number of lateral roots, root hair and root growth direction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Increasing concentration of glucose not only controls root length, root hair and number of lateral roots but can also modulate root growth direction. Since root growth and development is also controlled by auxin, whole genome transcript profiling was done to find out the extent of interaction between glucose and auxin response pathways. Glucose alone could transcriptionally regulate 376 (62% genes out of 604 genes affected by IAA. Presence of glucose could also modulate the extent of regulation 2 fold or more of almost 63% genes induced or repressed by IAA. Interestingly, glucose could affect induction or repression of IAA affected genes (35% even if glucose alone had no significant effect on the transcription of these genes itself. Glucose could affect auxin biosynthetic YUCCA genes family members, auxin transporter PIN proteins, receptor TIR1 and members of a number of gene families including AUX/IAA, GH3 and SAUR involved in auxin signaling. Arabidopsis auxin receptor tir1 and response mutants, axr2, axr3 and slr1 not only display a defect in glucose induced change in root length, root hair elongation and lateral root production but also accentuate glucose induced increase in root growth randomization from vertical suggesting glucose effects on plant root growth and development are mediated by auxin signaling components. CONCLUSION: Our findings implicate an important role of the glucose interacting with auxin signaling and transport machinery to control seedling root growth and development in changing nutrient

  9. Shape controlled synthesis and growth mechanism of one-dimensional zinc oxide nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Zhang; Ying Dai; Yunhua Huang; Cheng Zhou

    2004-01-01

    Some types of ZnO nanostructures with various shape and size, including tetrapod-like ZnO (T-ZnO) nanorods, nanowiresand nanoribbons, have been obtained by controlled growth process. The nanostructures of ZnO have been investigated by means offield-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron micros-copy. The growth mechanisms of various ZnO nanosttrctures were proposed and discussed.

  10. Influence of pesticides used potatoes control on the growth of entomopathogenic fungi isolated from potatoes fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Miętkiewicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of Metarhizium anisopliae, M.flavoviridae and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus was estimated on Sabouraud's medium to which insecticides and herbicides were added in three doses: A - 10 times higher from recommended field dose, B - as recommended field dose, C - 10 timer lower than recommended. Fungicides were used in B and C doses as well as in dose D - 100 times lower than recomended one. The fungi were obtained from soil under potatoes using Galleria mellonella as bait insect. Chlorothalonil and copper oxychloride were chosen from fungicides, linuron, MCPA, fluazifop-P-butyl and dikwat - from herbicides and deltamethrin, teflubenzuron and fozalon from insecticides. The growth of both species of Metarhizium was stronger inhibited than of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus by fungicides however colonies of Metarhizium always overpassed 50% controls colonies apart from M. flavoviridae on medium with copper oxychloride at concentration B. Herbicide linuron was more toxic to fungi than fungicides. M. anisopliae and M. fluvoviridae did not grow on medium containing dose A and dose B this herbicide but the colonies of P. fumosoroseus at dose B did not overpass 20% of controlled ones. MCPA and fluazifop-P-butyl inhibited fungal colonies in approximated way. On the medium with these herbicides in concentration A fungal colonies were strongly inhibited and the growth of fungi on medium with MCPA at this concentration appeared not before 5 days after inoculation. Dikwat in dose A strongly inhibited the growth of M. anisopliae but in remaining combinations growth of fungal colonies was similar to controlled ones. Fozalon, among insecticides, inhibited the growth of inwestigated fungi strongest. On the medium containing this insecticide in dose A all fungi did not grow, and in dose B colonies of both species of Metarhizium did not overpass 40% of controlled ones. Deltamethrin in dose A and B inhibited the growth of M. anisopliae and M. flavoviridae, but

  11. Control of fluid flow during Bridgman crystal growth using low-frequency vibrational stirring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawilski, Kevin Thomas

    The goal of this research program was to develop an in depth understanding of a promising new method for stirring crystal growth melts called coupled vibrational stirring (CVS). CVS is a mixing technique that can be used in sealed systems and produces rapid mixing through vortex flows. Under normal operating conditions, CVS uses low-frequency vibrations to move the growth crucible along a circular path, producing a surface wave and convection in the melt. This research focused on the application of CVS to the vertical Bridgman technique. CVS generated flows were directly studied using a physical modeling system containing water/glycerin solutions. Sodium nitrate was chosen as a model growth system because the growth process could be directly observed using a transparent furnace. Lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMNT) was chosen as the third system because of its potential application for high performance solid state transducers and actuators. In this study, the critical parameters for controlling CVS flows in cylindrical Bridgman systems were established. One of the most important results obtained was the dependence of an axial velocity gradient on the vibrational frequency. By changing the frequency, the intensity of fluid flow at a given depth can be easily manipulated. The intensity of CVS flows near the crystal-melt interface was found to be important. When flow intensity near the interface increased during growth, large growth rate fluctuations and significant changes in interface shape were observed. To eliminate such fluctuations, a constant flow rate near the crystal-melt interface was maintained by decreasing the vibrational frequency. A continuous frequency ramp was found to be essential to grow crystals of good quality under strong CVS flows. CVS generated flows were also useful in controlling the shape of the growth interface. In the sodium nitrate system without stirring, high growth rates produced a very concave interface. By adjusting the flow

  12. Voltage Sharing Method for Series-Connected Thyristor Valves of Controllable Metal Oxide Arrester%可控避雷器晶闸管阀串联均压方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秀娟; 陈维江; 沈海滨; 李国富; 贺子鸣

    2012-01-01

    可控避雷器晶闸管阀主要由反并联晶闸管对串联而成,为保证各个晶闸管承受电压的一致性,必须采取适当的均压措施。根据晶闸管阀串联均压的技术要求,利用电力电子系统设计程序,对传统Rd均压方法的可行性进行了计算分析。研究得出RC均压方法可能严重破坏可控避雷器的静态电位分布,不适用于晶闸管阀。提出采用晶闸管与金属氧化物电阻片一对一并联的均压方法,利用金属氧化物电阻片良好的非线性伏安特性限制晶闸管的过电压,并对电阻片的均压效果进行了仿真计算。结果表明,合理选择电阻片的串、并联数和尺寸参数,可以将串联晶闸管的开通过冲电压均限制在要求的范围内。%Thyristor valve of the controllable metal oxide arrester (CMOA) was mainly composed of series-connected inverse parallel thyristor pairs. To ensure the consistency of withstanding voltages of all thyristors, it was necessary to take proper measure of voltage sharing. According to technical requirements of voltage sharing for series-connected thyristor valves and using design program for power electronic system, the feasibility of traditional RC voltage sharing method was calculated and analyzed, and analysis results showed that in view of the fact that the static state potential distribution of CMOA might be seriously affected by RC voltage sharing, therefore it was inapplicable to thyristor valves. A new voltage sharing measure for CMOA was proposed: by means of adopting the voltage sharing method based on one-to-one parallel connection of thyristor with metal oxide resistor (MOR) the overvoltage of thyristors could be effectively restricted by the good nonlinear VA characteristic of MOR. The voltage sharing effect of MOR was simulated, and simulation results showed that as long as reasonably choosing the number of parallel-connected MOA and the number of series-connected MOA as

  13. Limitations in direct and indirect methods for solving optimal control problems in growth theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratković Kruna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is on a comprehensive analysis of different methods and mathematical techniques used for solving optimal control problems (OCP in growth theory. Most important methods for solving dynamic non-linear infinite-horizon growth models using optimal control theory are presented and a critical view of the limitations of different methods is given. The main problem is to determine the optimal rate of growth over time in a way that maximizes the welfare function over an infinite horizon. The welfare function depends on capital-labor ratio, the state variable, and the per-capita consumption, the control variable. Numerical methods for solving OCP are divided into two classes: direct and indirect approach. How the indirect approach can be used is given in the example of the neo-classical growth model. In order to present the indirect and the direct approach simultaneously, two endogenous growth models, one written by Romer and another by Lucas and Uzawa, are studied. Advantages and efficiency of these different approaches will be discussed. Although the indirect methods for solving OCP are still the most expanded in growth theory, it will be seen that using direct methods can also be very efficient and help to overcome problems that can occur by using the indirect approach.

  14. Electromagnetic induction heating for single crystal graphene growth: morphology control by rapid heating and quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan; Chen, Wei; Veeramalai, Chandrasekar Perumal; Ooi, Poh Choon; Guo, Tailiang

    2015-03-12

    The direct observation of single crystal graphene growth and its shape evolution is of fundamental importance to the understanding of graphene growth physicochemical mechanisms and the achievement of wafer-scale single crystalline graphene. Here we demonstrate the controlled formation of single crystal graphene with varying shapes, and directly observe the shape evolution of single crystal graphene by developing a localized-heating and rapid-quenching chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system based on electromagnetic induction heating. Importantly, rational control of circular, hexagonal, and dendritic single crystalline graphene domains can be readily obtained for the first time by changing the growth condition. Systematic studies suggest that the graphene nucleation only occurs during the initial stage, while the domain density is independent of the growth temperatures due to the surface-limiting effect. In addition, the direct observation of graphene domain shape evolution is employed for the identification of competing growth mechanisms including diffusion-limited, attachment-limited, and detachment-limited processes. Our study not only provides a novel method for morphology-controlled graphene synthesis, but also offers fundamental insights into the kinetics of single crystal graphene growth.

  15. Effect of cell cycle arrest on intermediate metabolism in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joomi; Brown, Christopher M; Kim, Min Kyung; Burrows, Elizabeth H; Bach, Stéphane; Lun, Desmond S; Falkowski, Paul G

    2017-09-05

    The inhibitor NU 2058 [6-(cyclohexylmethoxy)-9H-purin-2-amine] leads to G1-phase cell cycle arrest in the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, by binding to two cyclin-dependent kinases, CDKA1 and CDKA2. NU 2058 has no effect on photosynthetic attributes, such as Fv/Fm, chlorophyll a/cell, levels of D2 PSII subunits, or RbcL; however, cell cycle arrest leads to unbalanced growth whereby photosynthetic products that can no longer be used for cell division are redirected toward carbohydrates and triacylglycerols (TAGs). Arrested cells up-regulate most genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and three out of five putative type II diglyceride acyltransferases (DGATs), the enzymes that catalyze TAG production. Correlation of transcriptomes in arrested cells with a flux balance model for P. tricornutum predicts that reactions in the mitochondrion that supply glycerate may support TAG synthesis. Our results reveal that sources of intermediate metabolites and macromolecular sinks are tightly coupled to the cell cycle in a marine diatom, and that arresting cells in the G1 phase leads to remodeling of intermediate metabolism and unbalanced growth.

  16. Automatic Control System for the High Pressure CdTe Crystal Growth Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Praus

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available CdTe and (CdZnTe bulk single crystals have been widely used as substrates for MBE and LPE epitaxy of infrared (HgCdTe as well as gamma- and X-ray detectors. The Cd1-xZnxTe (x = 0.04-0.1 single crystals with diameter up to 100 mm and height at most 40 mm were prepared in our laboratory in a vertical arrangement by gradual cooling of the melt (the Vertical Gradient Freezing method. Achievement of excellent crystal quality required full control of Cd pressure during the growth process and application of high Cd pressures (up to 4 bar at growth temperature. An electronic control system was designed to control both temperature and internal pressure of two zones CZT crystal growth furnace by using two high performance PID controllers/setpoint programmers. Two wire current loop serial communication bus was used for the data exchange and computer control of the furnace electronics setup. Control software was written to supervise the crystal growth process and to collect all important data and parameters.

  17. Cardiac arrest leadership: in need of resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip S; Shall, Emma; Rakhit, Roby

    2016-12-01

    Leadership skills directly correlate with the quality of technical performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and clinical outcomes. Despite an improved focus on non-technical skills in CPR training, the leadership of cardiac arrests is often variable. To assess the perceptions of leadership and team working among members of a cardiac arrest team and to evaluate future training needs. Cross-sectional survey of 102 members of a cardiac arrest team at an Acute Hospital Trust in the UK with 892 inpatient beds. Responses sought from doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to 12 rated statements and 4 dichotomous questions. Of 102 responses, 81 (79%) were from doctors and 21 (21%) from nurses. Among specialist registrars 90% agreed or strongly agreed that there was clear leadership at all arrests compared with between 28% and 49% of nurses and junior doctors respectively. Routine omission of key leadership tasks was reported by as many as 80% of junior doctors and 50% of nurses. Almost half of respondents reported non-adherence with Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines. Among junior members of the team, 36% felt confident to lead an arrest and 75% would welcome further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training. Leadership training is integrated into the ALS (Resus Council, UK) qualification. However, this paper found that in spite of this training; standards of leadership are variable. The findings suggest a pressing need for further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training with a focus on improving key leadership tasks such as role assignment, team briefing and debriefing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Stathmin inhibition enhances okadaic acid-induced mitotic arrest: a potential role for stathmin in mitotic exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, S J; Atweh, G F

    2001-08-17

    Stathmin is a microtubule-destabilizing phosphoprotein that plays a critical role in the regulation of mitosis. The microtubule-depolymerizing activity of stathmin is lost upon phosphorylation in mitosis. Although the role of phosphorylation of stathmin by p34(cdc2) kinase in the assembly of the mitotic spindle is well established, the role of dephosphorylation of stathmin in mitosis is unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that dephosphorylation of stathmin may be critically important for the depolymerization of the mitotic spindle and the exit from mitosis. We compared the effects of okadaic acid, a specific inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, on different parameters of mitotic progression in the presence or absence of stathmin deficiency. Because okadaic acid prevents dephosphorylation of stathmin and results in accumulation of the inactive phosphorylated form, exposure to okadaic acid would be expected to have a more profound effect on mitosis in the presence of relative stathmin deficiency. We found that inhibition of stathmin expression results in increased sensitivity to the antimitotic effects of okadaic acid. This was reflected by increased growth inhibition associated with mitotic arrest. A vast majority of the stathmin-inhibited cells were found to be arrested in late metaphase/anaphase and had severe mitotic spindle abnormalities. Exposure to okadaic acid also resulted in a bigger ratio of polymerized/unpolymerized tubulin in stathmin-inhibited cells relative to control cells. Because the only difference between the control and the stathmin-inhibited cells is the deficiency of stathmin in the latter, the increased susceptibility of the stathmin-inhibited cells to okadaic acid-induced mitotic arrest implies a role for stathmin in the later stages of mitosis.

  19. Action selection in growing state spaces: control of network structure growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Gómez, Vicenç; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical processes taking place on a network depend on its topology. Influencing the growth process of a network therefore has important implications on such dynamical processes. We formulate the problem of influencing the growth of a network as a stochastic optimal control problem in which a structural cost function penalizes undesired topologies. We approximate this control problem with a restricted class of control problems that can be solved using probabilistic inference methods. To deal with the increasing problem dimensionality, we introduce an adaptive importance sampling method for approximating the optimal control. We illustrate this methodology in the context of formation of information cascades, considering the task of influencing the structure of a growing conversation thread, as in Internet forums. Using a realistic model of growing trees, we show that our approach can yield conversation threads with better structural properties than the ones observed without control.

  20. Oscillatory, stochastic and chaotic growth rate fluctuations in permittistatically controlled yeast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, H M; Davey, C L; Woodward, A M; Edmonds, A N; Lee, A W; Kell, D B

    1996-01-01

    We describe a continuous culture system related to the turbidostat, but using a feedback system based on biomass estimation from the dielectric permittivity of the cell suspension rather than its optical density. It is shown that this system provides an excellent method of maintaining a constant biomass level within a fermentor. The computer-controlled system was able to effect the essentially continuous registration of growth rate by monitoring the rate of medium addition via the time-dependent activity of the pump. At some biomass setpoints for aerobically grown cultures of baker's yeast substantial time-dependent fluctuations in the growth rate of the culture were thereby observed. At some biomass setpoints, however, or under anaerobic conditions, or when using a non-Crabtree yeast, the growth rate was constant, indicating that the fluctuations were inherent to the biological system and not simply a property of the fermentor and control system. A variety of time series analyses (Fourier transformations, Hurst and Lyapunov exponents, the determination of embedding dimension, and non-linear time series predictions based on the methodology of Sugihara and May) were used to demonstrate, for the first time, that as well as stochastic and periodic components these fluctuations exhibited deterministic chaos. 'Trivial predictors' were unable to give accurate predictions of the growth rate in these cultures. The growth rate fluctuations were studied further by means of offline measurements of changes in percentage viability, bud count, and in the external ethanol and glucose concentrations; these data and other evidence suggested that the growth rate fluctuations were closely linked to the primary respiro-fermentative metabolism of this organism. The identification of chaotic growth rates in cell cultures suggests that there may be novel methods for controlling the growth of such cultures.

  1. Environmental control of daily stem growth patterns in five temperate broad-leaved tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köcher, Paul; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Tree ring analysis investigates growth processes at time horizons of several weeks to millennia, but lacks the detail of short-term fluctuation in cambial activity. T