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Sample records for controls cell-cycle progression

  1. SON controls cell-cycle progression by coordinated regulation of RNA splicing.

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    Ahn, Eun-Young; DeKelver, Russell C; Lo, Miao-Chia; Nguyen, Tuyet Ann; Matsuura, Shinobu; Boyapati, Anita; Pandit, Shatakshi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2011-04-22

    It has been suspected that cell-cycle progression might be functionally coupled with RNA processing. However, little is known about the role of the precise splicing control in cell-cycle progression. Here, we report that SON, a large Ser/Arg (SR)-related protein, is a splicing cofactor contributing to efficient splicing of cell-cycle regulators. Downregulation of SON leads to severe impairment of spindle pole separation, microtubule dynamics, and genome integrity. These molecular defects result from inadequate RNA splicing of a specific set of cell-cycle-related genes that possess weak splice sites. Furthermore, we show that SON facilitates the interaction of SR proteins with RNA polymerase II and other key spliceosome components, suggesting its function in efficient cotranscriptional RNA processing. These results reveal a mechanism for controlling cell-cycle progression through SON-dependent constitutive splicing at suboptimal splice sites, with strong implications for its role in cancer and other human diseases.

  2. Control of the cell cycle progression by the MAPK Hog1

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    Josep Clotet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells coordinate various intracellular activities in response to environmental stresses, activating an adaptive program to maximize the probability of survival and proliferation. Cells transduce diverse cellular stimuli by multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPK are key signal transduction kinases required to respond to stress. A prototypical member of the MAPK family is the yeast high osmolarity glycerol (Hog1. Activation of Hog1 results in the generation of a set of adaptive responses that leads to the modulation of several aspects of cell physiology that are essential for cell survival, such as gene expression, translation, and morphogenesis. This review focuses on the control of cell cycle progression by Hog1 which is critical for cell survival in response to stress conditions.

  3. Nonmetabolic functions of pyruvate kinase isoform M2 in controlling cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin Lu

    2012-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the rate-limiting final step of glycolysis,generating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and pyruvate.The M2 tumor-specific isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) promotes glucose uptake and lactate production in the presence of oxygen,known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect.As recently reported in Nature,PKM2,besides its metabolic function,has a nonmetabolic function in the direct control of cell cycle progression by activating β-catenin and inducing expression of the β-catenin downstream gene CCND1 (encoding for cyclin D1).This nonmetabolic function of PKM2 is essential for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation-induced tumorigenesis.

  4. The C. elegans hox gene lin-39 controls cell cycle progression during vulval development.

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    Roiz, Daniel; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan Miguel; Leu, Philipp; Hajnal, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Cell fate specification during organogenesis is usually followed by a phase of cell proliferation to produce the required number of differentiated cells. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva is an excellent model to study how cell fate specification and cell proliferation are coordinated. The six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) are born at the first larval stage, but they arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle until the beginning of the third larval stage, when their fates are specified and the three proximal VPCs proliferate to generate 22 vulval cells. An epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal from the gonadal anchor cell combined with lateral DELTA/NOTCH signaling between the VPCs determine the primary (1°) and secondary (2°) fates, respectively. The hox gene lin-39 plays a key role in integrating these spatial patterning signals and in maintaining the VPCs as polarized epithelial cells. Using a fusion-defective eff-1(lf) mutation to keep the VPCs polarized, we find that VPCs lacking lin-39 can neither activate lateral NOTCH signaling nor proliferate. LIN-39 promotes cell cycle progression through two distinct mechanisms. First, LIN-39 maintains the VPCs competent to proliferate by inducing cdk-4 cdk and cye-1 cyclinE expression via a non-canonical HOX binding motif. Second, LIN-39 activates in the adjacent VPCs the NOTCH signaling pathway, which promotes VPC proliferation independently of LIN-39. The hox gene lin-39 is therefore a central node in a regulatory network coordinating VPC differentiation and proliferation.

  5. DNA topoisomerase II-dependent control of the cell cycle progression in root meristems of Allium cepa.

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    Zabka, Aneta; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Bernasińska, Joanna; Maszewski, Janusz

    2014-03-01

    The catalytic ability of DNA topoisomerases (Topo) to generate short-term DNA breaks allow these enzymes to play crucial functions in managing DNA topology during S-phase replication, transcription, and chromatin-remodelling processes required to achieve commitment for the onset and transition through mitosis. Our experiments on root meristem cells of onion (Allium cepa) were designed to gain insight into the contribution of Topo II to plant-specific progression throughout interphase and mitosis. Irrespective of the position of the cell in interphase, the immunofluorescence of Topo II revealed similar nuclear labelling pattern with well defined signals dispersed in the nucleoplasm and the cortical zone of the nucleolus. Only weak labelling was detected in metaphase and anaphase chromosomes. Experiments with two potent anti-Topo II agents, doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline) and a bisdioxopiperazine derivative, ICRF-193, suggest that the inhibition-mediated increase in Topo II immunofluorescence may represent a compensatory mechanism, by which an up-regulated expression of the enzyme tends to counteract the drug-induced loss of indispensable catalytic and relaxation functions. γ-H2AX immunolabelling seems to indicate that both DOX- and ICRF-193-induced alterations in cell cycle progression reflect primarily the activity of the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint. Our findings provide evidence for the plant-specific cell cycle control mechanism induced by Topo II inhibitors under DNA stress conditions.

  6. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

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    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  7. Ssrp1a controls organogenesis by promoting cell cycle progression and RNA synthesis

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    Koltowska, Katarzyna; Apitz, Holger; Stamataki, Despina; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Verkade, Heather; Salecker, Iris; Ober, Elke A.

    2013-01-01

    Tightly controlled DNA replication and RNA transcription are essential for differentiation and tissue growth in multicellular organisms. Histone chaperones, including the FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) complex, are central for these processes and act by mediating DNA access through nucleosome reorganisation. However, their roles in vertebrate organogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of zebrafish mutants for the gene encoding Structure specific recognition protein 1a (Ssrp1a), which, together with Spt16, forms the FACT heterodimer. Focussing on the liver and eye, we show that zygotic Ssrp1a is essential for proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis. Specifically, gene expression indicative of progressive organ differentiation is disrupted and RNA transcription is globally reduced. Ssrp1a-deficient embryos exhibit DNA synthesis defects and prolonged S phase, uncovering a role distinct from that of Spt16, which promotes G1 phase progression. Gene deletion/replacement experiments in Drosophila show that Ssrp1b, Ssrp1a and N-terminal Ssrp1a, equivalent to the yeast homologue Pob3, can substitute Drosophila Ssrp function. These data suggest that (1) Ssrp1b does not compensate for Ssrp1a loss in the zebrafish embryo, probably owing to insufficient expression levels, and (2) despite fundamental structural differences, the mechanisms mediating DNA accessibility by FACT are conserved between yeast and metazoans. We propose that the essential functions of Ssrp1a in DNA replication and gene transcription, together with its dynamic spatiotemporal expression, ensure organ-specific differentiation and proportional growth, which are crucial for the forming embryo. PMID:23515471

  8. Epigenetics in Apicomplexa: control of gene expression during cell cycle progression, differentiation and antigenic variation.

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    Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Deitsch, Kirk W

    2007-08-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are important disease causing organisms that infect both animals and humans, causing extensive health and economic damage to human populations, particularly those in the developing world. The ability to perform genetic crosses, to engineer transgenic parasites lines, and the wealth of information made available through recent genome sequencing projects have made the laboratory study of these parasites important not only for understanding the diseases that they cause, but also for gaining insights into basic biological processes. The control of gene expression and cellular differentiation are particularly interesting in these organisms, as the apparent lack of large families of recognizable transcription factors typically found in other eukaryotic organisms suggests that they may be unusually reliant on epigenetic mechanisms. Here we review recent advances in the study of epigenetic gene regulation in the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

  9. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

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    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  10. K+ channels and cell cycle progression in tumor cells

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    HALIMA eOUADID-AHIDOUCH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available K+ ions play a major role in many cellular processes. The deregulation of K+ signaling is associated with a variety of diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes. K+ ions are important for setting the membrane potential, the driving force for Ca2+ influx, and regulate volume of growing cells. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that K+ channels control cell proliferation through a novel signaling mechanisms triggered and modulated independently of ion fluxes. In cancer, aberrant expression, regulation and/or sublocalization of K+ channels can alter the downstream signals that converge on the cell cycle machinery. Various K+ channels are involved in cell cycle progression and are needed only at particular stages of the cell cycle. Consistent with this idea, the expression of Eag1 and HERG channels fluctuate along the cell cycle. Despite of acquired knowledge, our understanding of K+ channels functioning in cancer cells requires further studies. These include identifying the molecular mechanisms controling the cell cycle machinery. By understanding how K+ channels regulate cell cycle progression in cancer cells, we will gain insights into how cancer cells subvert the need for K+ signal and its downstream targets to proliferate.

  11. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

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    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  12. Cell cycle progression in response to oxygen levels.

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    Ortmann, Brian; Druker, Jimena; Rocha, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia' or decreases in oxygen availability' results in the activation of a number of different responses at both the whole organism and the cellular level. These responses include drastic changes in gene expression, which allow the organism (or cell) to cope efficiently with the stresses associated with the hypoxic insult. A major breakthrough in the understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia was the discovery of a hypoxia sensitive family of transcription factors known as the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The hypoxia response mounted by the HIFs promotes cell survival and energy conservation. As such, this response has to deal with important cellular process such as cell division. In this review, the integration of oxygen sensing with the cell cycle will be discussed. HIFs, as well as other components of the hypoxia pathway, can influence cell cycle progression. The role of HIF and the cell molecular oxygen sensors in the control of the cell cycle will be reviewed.

  13. DACH1 regulates cell cycle progression of myeloid cells through the control of cyclin D, Cdk 4/6 and p21{sup Cip1}

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    Lee, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Kim, Seonggon; Hwang, Junmo; Kim, Young Hun; Lim, Ga Young [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Wern-Joo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, IHBR, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk-Ran [Cell Therapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Young [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, IHBR, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Sung [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwon Moo [Department of Anatomy, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Ryoo, Zae Young [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sanggyu, E-mail: slee@knu.ac.kr [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DACH1 increases cyclin D, F and Cdk 1, 4, 6 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel effect of DACH1 related with cell cycle regulation and leukemogenesis. -- Abstract: The cell-fate determination factor Dachshund, a component of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), has a role in breast tumor proliferation through the repression of cyclin D1 and several key regulators of embryonic stem cell function, such as Nanog and Sox2. However, little is known about the role of DACH1 in a myeloid lineage as a cell cycle regulator. Here, we identified the differential expression levels of extensive cell cycle regulators controlled by DACH1 in myeloid progenitor cells. The forced expression of DACH1 induced p27{sup Kip1} and repressed p21{sup Cip1}, which is a pivotal characteristic of the myeloid progenitor. Furthermore, DACH1 significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 in myeloid progenitor cells. The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 promyeloblastic cells through the decrease of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 and increase in p21{sup Cip1}, which in turn decreased the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. The expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Klf4 was significantly up-regulated by the forced expression of DACH1 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells.

  14. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in glioma cell cycle control

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    Vlachostergios Panagiotis J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A major determinant of cell fate is regulation of cell cycle. Tight regulation of this process is lost during the course of development and progression of various tumors. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS constitutes a universal protein degradation pathway, essential for the consistent recycling of a plethora of proteins with distinct structural and functional roles within the cell, including cell cycle regulation. High grade tumors, such as glioblastomas have an inherent potential of escaping cell cycle control mechanisms and are often refractory to conventional treatment. Here, we review the association of UPS with several UPS-targeted proteins and pathways involved in regulation of the cell cycle in malignant gliomas, and discuss the potential role of UPS inhibitors in reinstitution of cell cycle control.

  15. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

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    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  16. Quantitative imaging with Fucci and mathematics to uncover temporal dynamics of cell cycle progression.

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    Saitou, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is strictly coordinated to ensure proper tissue growth, development, and regeneration of multicellular organisms. Spatiotemporal visualization of cell cycle phases directly helps us to obtain a deeper understanding of controlled, multicellular, cell cycle progression. The fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) system allows us to monitor, in living cells, the G1 and the S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle in red and green fluorescent colors, respectively. Since the discovery of Fucci technology, it has found numerous applications in the characterization of the timing of cell cycle phase transitions under diverse conditions and various biological processes. However, due to the complexity of cell cycle dynamics, understanding of specific patterns of cell cycle progression is still far from complete. In order to tackle this issue, quantitative approaches combined with mathematical modeling seem to be essential. Here, we review several studies that attempted to integrate Fucci technology and mathematical models to obtain quantitative information regarding cell cycle regulatory patterns. Focusing on the technological development of utilizing mathematics to retrieve meaningful information from the Fucci producing data, we discuss how the combined methods advance a quantitative understanding of cell cycle regulation.

  17. Mechanistic insights into aging, cell cycle progression, and stress response

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    Troy Anthony Alan Harkness

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of an organism depends on the health of its cells. Throughout life cells are exposed to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic stresses, such as free radicals, generated through mitochondrial electron transport, and ultraviolet irradiation. The cell has evolved numerous mechanisms to scavenge free radicals and repair damage induced by these insults. One mechanism employed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to combat stress utilizes the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC, an essential multi-subunit ubiquitin-protein ligase structurally and functionally conserved from yeast to humans that controls progression through mitosis and G1. We have observed that yeast cells expressing compromised APC subunits are sensitive to multiple stresses and have shorter replicative and chronological lifespans. In a pathway that runs parallel to that regulated by the APC, members of the Forkhead box (Fox transcription factor family also regulate stress responses. The yeast Fox orthologues Fkh1 and Fkh2 appear to drive the transcription of stress response factors and slow early G1 progression, while the APC seems to regulate chromatin structure, chromosome segregation, and resetting of the transcriptome in early G1. In contrast, under non-stress conditions, the Fkhs play a complex role in cell cycle progression, partially through activation of the APC. Direct and indirect interactions between the APC and the yeast Fkhs appear to be pivotal for lifespan determination. Here we explore the potential for these interactions to be evolutionarily conserved as a mechanism to balance cell cycle regulation with stress responses.

  18. The influence of reactive oxygen species on cell cycle progression in mammalian cells.

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    Verbon, Eline Hendrike; Post, Jan Andries; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-12-10

    Cell cycle regulation is performed by cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Recently, it has become clear that reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence the presence and activity of these enzymes and thereby control cell cycle progression. In this review, we first describe the discovery of enzymes specialized in ROS production: the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complexes. This discovery led to the recognition of ROS as essential players in many cellular processes, including cell cycle progression. ROS influence cell cycle progression in a context-dependent manner via phosphorylation and ubiquitination of CDKs and cell cycle regulatory molecules. We show that ROS often regulate ubiquitination via intermediate phosphorylation and that phosphorylation is thus the major regulatory mechanism influenced by ROS. In addition, ROS have recently been shown to be able to activate growth factor receptors. We will illustrate the diverse roles of ROS as mediators in cell cycle regulation by incorporating phosphorylation, ubiquitination and receptor activation in a model of cell cycle regulation involving EGF-receptor activation. We conclude that ROS can no longer be ignored when studying cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

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    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  20. Mir-33 regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle progression.

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    Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Pauta, Montse; Allen, Ryan M; Salerno, Alessandro G; Ramírez, Cristina M; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Wanschel, Amarylis C; Lasuncion, Miguel A; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Suarez, Yajaira; Baldan, Ángel; Esplugues, Enric; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level and is essential for cellular growth. microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs, have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, acting predominantly at posttranscriptional level. Recent work from our group and others has shown that hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b, miRNAs located within intronic sequences of the Srebp genes, regulate cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that hsa-miR-33 family members modulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and cell proliferation. MiR-33 inhibits the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), thereby reducing cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Overexpression of miR-33 induces a significant G 1 cell cycle arrest in Huh7 and A549 cell lines. Most importantly, inhibition of miR-33 expression using 2'fluoro/methoxyethyl-modified (2'F/MOE-modified) phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligonucleotides improves liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice, suggesting an important role for miR-33 in regulating hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. Altogether, these results suggest that Srebp/miR-33 locus may cooperate to regulate cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and may also be relevant to human liver regeneration.

  1. Human Cpr (Cell Cycle Progression Restoration) Genes Impart a Far(-) Phenotype on Yeast Cells

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    Edwards, M. C.; Liegeois, N.; Horecka, J.; DePinho, R A; Sprague-Jr., G. F.; Tyers, M; Elledge, S J

    1997-01-01

    Regulated cell cycle progression depends on the proper integration of growth control pathways with the basic cell cycle machinery. While many of the central molecules such as cyclins, CDKs, and CKIs are known, and many of the kinases and phosphatases that modify the CDKs have been identified, little is known about the additional layers of regulation that impinge upon these molecules. To identify new regulators of cell proliferation, we have selected for human and yeast cDNAs that when overexp...

  2. Cell cycle-dependent control of homologous recombination.

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    Zhao, Xin; Wei, Chengwen; Li, Jingjing; Xing, Poyuan; Li, Jingyao; Zheng, Sihao; Chen, Xuefeng

    2017-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious type of DNA lesions threatening genome integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are two major pathways to repair DSBs. HR requires a homologous template to direct DNA repair, and is generally recognized as a high-fidelity pathway. In contrast, NHEJ directly seals broken ends, but the repair product is often accompanied by sequence alterations. The choice of repair pathways is strictly controlled by the cell cycle. The occurrence of HR is restricted to late S to G2 phases while NHEJ operates predominantly in G1 phase, although it can act throughout most of the cell cycle. Deregulation of repair pathway choice can result in genotoxic consequences associated with cancers. How the cell cycle regulates the choice of HR and NHEJ has been extensively studied in the past decade. In this review, we will focus on the current progresses on how HR is controlled by the cell cycle in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals. Particular attention will be given to how cyclin-dependent kinases modulate DSB end resection, DNA damage checkpoint signaling, repair and processing of recombination intermediates. In addition, we will discuss recent findings on how HR is repressed in G1 and M phases by the cell cycle. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Coordinating cell polarity and cell cycle progression: what can we learn from flies and worms?

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    Noatynska, Anna; Tavernier, Nicolas; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2013-08-07

    Spatio-temporal coordination of events during cell division is crucial for animal development. In recent years, emerging data have strengthened the notion that tight coupling of cell cycle progression and cell polarity in dividing cells is crucial for asymmetric cell division and ultimately for metazoan development. Although it is acknowledged that such coupling exists, the molecular mechanisms linking the cell cycle and cell polarity machineries are still under investigation. Key cell cycle regulators control cell polarity, and thus influence cell fate determination and/or differentiation, whereas some factors involved in cell polarity regulate cell cycle timing and proliferation potential. The scope of this review is to discuss the data linking cell polarity and cell cycle progression, and the importance of such coupling for asymmetric cell division. Because studies in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have started to reveal the molecular mechanisms of this coordination, we will concentrate on these two systems. We review examples of molecular mechanisms suggesting a coupling between cell polarity and cell cycle progression.

  4. Visualizing spatiotemporal dynamics of multicellular cell-cycle progressions with fucci technology.

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    Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    The visualization of cell-cycle behavior of individual cells within complex tissues presents an irresistible challenge to biologists studying multicellular structures. However, the transition from G1 to S in the cell cycle is difficult to monitor despite the fact that the process involves the critical decision to initiate a new round of DNA replication. Here, we use ubiquitination oscillators that control cell-cycle transitions to develop genetically encoded fluorescent probes for cell-cycle progression. Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator) probes exploit the regulation of cell-cycle-dependent ubiquitination to effectively label individual nuclei in G1 phase red, and those in S/G2/M phases green. Cultured cells and transgenic mice constitutively expressing the probes have been generated, such that every cell nucleus shows either red or green fluorescence. This protocol details two experiments that use biological samples expressing Fucci probes. One experiment involves time-lapse imaging of cells stably expressing a Fucci derivative (Fucci2), which allows for the exploration of the spatiotemporal patterns of cell-cycle dynamics during structural and behavioral changes of cultured cells. The other experiment involves large-field, high-resolution imaging of fixed sections of Fucci transgenic mouse embryos, which provides maps that illustrate cell proliferation versus differentiation in various developing organs.

  5. The Exon Junction Complex Controls the Efficient and Faithful Splicing of a Subset of Transcripts Involved in Mitotic Cell-Cycle Progression

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    Kazuhiro Fukumura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC that is deposited onto spliced mRNAs upstream of exon–exon junctions plays important roles in multiple post-splicing gene expression events, such as mRNA export, surveillance, localization, and translation. However, a direct role for the human EJC in pre-mRNA splicing has not been fully understood. Using HeLa cells, we depleted one of the EJC core components, Y14, and the resulting transcriptome was analyzed by deep sequencing (RNA-Seq and confirmed by RT–PCR. We found that Y14 is required for efficient and faithful splicing of a group of transcripts that is enriched in short intron-containing genes involved in mitotic cell-cycle progression. Tethering of EJC core components (Y14, eIF4AIII or MAGOH to a model reporter pre-mRNA harboring a short intron showed that these core components are prerequisites for the splicing activation. Taken together, we conclude that the EJC core assembled on pre-mRNA is critical for efficient and faithful splicing of a specific subset of short introns in mitotic cell cycle-related genes.

  6. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

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    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  7. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  8. Cell cycle progression score predicts metastatic progression of clear cell renal cell carcinoma after resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, Eric J; Chehval, Vincent A; Askeland, Ryan W; Fosso, Placede G; Sangale, Zaina; Xu, Nafei; Rajamani, Saradha; Stone, Steven; Brown, James A

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of surgically resected, apparently localized, clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) is uncertain. To evaluate if cell cycle progression (CCP) gene expression can predict future metastasis. Pathologic T2a-T3b tumors at University of Iowa were reviewed. Patients with known or suspected metastasis, lymph node involvement or who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiation, chemotherapy or immunotherapy were excluded. Case and control cohorts were defined as those who did or did not develop metastatic disease within 5 years. Measured levels of 31 cell cycle genes and 15 control genes from the tumor were calculated as a CCP score. Additionally, gene expression data for a separate ccRCC cohort was downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Univariate analysis of 26 cases and 38 controls revealed that the CCP score predicted progression to metastasis (OR 2.65, p = 0.0091). In multivariate logistic regression modeling, CCP expression remained a significant independent predictor for progression (p = 0.026). The CCP score was also significantly associated with distant metastasis in the TCGA renal cancer cohort in both univariate (p = 1.0 × 10-9) and multivariate (p = 5.6 × 10-3) analysis. The CCP score has prognostic value in predicting metastatic progression after resection of organ-confined ccRCC.

  9. Cell-cycle times and the tumour control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Adrian; Lutscher, Frithjof

    2010-12-01

    Mechanistic dynamic cell population models for the tumour control probability (TCP) to date have used a simplistic representation of the cell cycle: either an exponential cell-cycle time distribution (Zaider & Minerbo, 2000, Tumour control probability: a formulation applicable to any temporal protocol of dose delivery. Phys. Med. Biol., 45, 279-293) or a two-compartment model (Dawson & Hillen, 2006, Derivation of the tumour control probability (TCP) from a cell cycle model. Comput. Math. Methods Med., 7, 121-142; Hillen, de Vries, Gong & Yurtseven, 2009, From cell population models to tumour control probability: including cell cycle effects. Acta Oncol. (submitted)). Neither of these simplifications captures realistic cell-cycle time distributions, which are rather narrowly peaked around the mean. We investigate how including such distributions affects predictions of the TCP. At first, we revisit the so-called 'active-quiescent' model that splits the cell cycle into two compartments and explore how an assumption of compartmental independence influences the predicted TCP. Then, we formulate a deterministic age-structured model and a corresponding branching process. We find that under realistic cell-cycle time distributions, lower treatment intensities are sufficient to obtain the same TCP as in the aforementioned models with simplified cell cycles, as long as the treatment is constant in time. For fractionated treatment, the situation reverses such that under realistic cell-cycle time distributions, the model requires more intense treatment to obtain the same TCP.

  10. Cell cycle controls stress response and longevity in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottermusch, Matthias; Lakner, Theresa; Peyman, Tobias; Klein, Marinella; Walz, Gerd; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of genes and mechanisms that influence the rate of aging progression. In this study, we identified cell cycle factors as potent regulators of health and longevity in C. elegans. Focusing on the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk-2) and cyclin E (cye-1), we show that inhibition of cell cycle genes leads to tolerance towards environmental stress and longevity. The reproductive system is known as a key regulator of longevity in C. elegans. We uncovered the gonad as the central organ mediating the effects of cell cycle inhibition on lifespan. In particular, the proliferating germ cells were essential for conferring longevity. Steroid hormone signaling and the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 were required for longevity associated with cell cycle inhibition. Furthermore, we discovered that SKN-1 (ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins) activates protective gene expression and induces longevity when cell cycle genes are inactivated. We conclude that both, germline absence and inhibition through impairment of cell cycle machinery results in longevity through similar pathways. In addition, our studies suggest further roles of cell cycle genes beyond cell cycle progression and support the recently described connection of SKN-1/Nrf to signals deriving from the germline. PMID:27668945

  11. Cell cycle control by a minimal Cdk network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Gérard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In present-day eukaryotes, the cell division cycle is controlled by a complex network of interacting proteins, including members of the cyclin and cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk families, and the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC. Successful progression through the cell cycle depends on precise, temporally ordered regulation of the functions of these proteins. In light of this complexity, it is surprising that in fission yeast, a minimal Cdk network consisting of a single cyclin-Cdk fusion protein can control DNA synthesis and mitosis in a manner that is indistinguishable from wild type. To improve our understanding of the cell cycle regulatory network, we built and analysed a mathematical model of the molecular interactions controlling the G1/S and G2/M transitions in these minimal cells. The model accounts for all observed properties of yeast strains operating with the fusion protein. Importantly, coupling the model's predictions with experimental analysis of alternative minimal cells, we uncover an explanation for the unexpected fact that elimination of inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk is benign in these strains while it strongly affects normal cells. Furthermore, in the strain without inhibitory phosphorylation of the fusion protein, the distribution of cell size at division is unusually broad, an observation that is accounted for by stochastic simulations of the model. Our approach provides novel insights into the organization and quantitative regulation of wild type cell cycle progression. In particular, it leads us to propose a new mechanistic model for the phenomenon of mitotic catastrophe, relying on a combination of unregulated, multi-cyclin-dependent Cdk activities.

  12. Mammalian cryptochromes impinge on cell cycle progression in a circadian clock-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destici, Eugin; Oklejewicz, Małgorzata; Saito, Shoko; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2011-11-01

    By gating cell cycle progression to specific times of the day, the intracellular circadian clock is thought to reduce the exposure of replicating cells to potentially hazardous environmental and endogenous genotoxic compounds. Although core clock gene defects that eradicate circadian rhythmicity can cause an altered in vivo genotoxic stress response and aberrant proliferation rate, it remains to be determined to what extent these cell cycle related phenotypes are due to a cell-autonomous lack of circadian oscillations. We investigated the DNA damage sensitivity and proliferative capacity of cultured primary Cry1(-/- )|Cry2(-/-) fibroblasts. Contrasting previous in vivo studies, we show that the absence of CRY proteins does not affect the cell-autonomous DNA damage response upon exposure of primary cells in vitro to genotoxic agents, but causes cells to proliferate faster. By comparing primary wild-type, Cry1(-/-) |Cry2(-/-), Cry1(+/-)|Cry2(-/-) and Cry1(-/-)|Cry2(+/-) fibroblasts, we provide evidence that CRY proteins influence cell cycle progression in a cell-autonomous, but circadian clock-independent manner and that the accelerated cell cycle progression of Cry-deficient cells is caused by global dysregulation of Bmal1-dependent gene expression. These results suggest that the inconsistency between in vivo and in vitro observations might be attributed to systemic circadian control rather than a direct cell-autonomous control.

  13. Maid (GCIP) is involved in cell cycle control of hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenberg-Riethmacher, Eva; Wüstefeld, Torsten; Miehe, Michaela;

    2007-01-01

    . Therefore, we studied the role of Maid during cell cycle progression after partial hepatectomy (PH). Lack of Maid expression after PH was associated with a delay in G1/S-phase progression as evidenced by delayed cyclinA expression and DNA replication in Maid-deficient mice. However, at later time points...

  14. Nuclear reprogramming: kinetics of cell cycle and metabolic progression as determinants of success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Thomas Balbach

    Full Text Available Establishment of totipotency after somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT requires not only reprogramming of gene expression, but also conversion of the cell cycle from quiescence to the precisely timed sequence of embryonic cleavage. Inadequate adaptation of the somatic nucleus to the embryonic cell cycle regime may lay the foundation for NT embryo failure and their reported lower cell counts. We combined bright field and fluorescence imaging of histone H(2b-GFP expressing mouse embryos, to record cell divisions up to the blastocyst stage. This allowed us to quantitatively analyze cleavage kinetics of cloned embryos and revealed an extended and inconstant duration of the second and third cell cycles compared to fertilized controls generated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Compared to fertilized embryos, slow and fast cleaving NT embryos presented similar rates of errors in M phase, but were considerably less tolerant to mitotic errors and underwent cleavage arrest. Although NT embryos vary substantially in their speed of cell cycle progression, transcriptome analysis did not detect systematic differences between fast and slow NT embryos. Profiling of amino acid turnover during pre-implantation development revealed that NT embryos consume lower amounts of amino acids, in particular arginine, than fertilized embryos until morula stage. An increased arginine supplementation enhanced development to blastocyst and increased embryo cell numbers. We conclude that a cell cycle delay, which is independent of pluripotency marker reactivation, and metabolic restraints reduce cell counts of NT embryos and impede their development.

  15. The circadian mutation PER2(S662G) is linked to cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X; Xing, L; Shi, G; Liu, Z; Wang, X; Qu, Z; Wu, X; Dong, Z; Gao, X; Liu, G; Yang, L; Xu, Y

    2012-03-01

    Circadian oscillation and cell cycle progression are the two most essential rhythmic events present in almost all organisms. Circadian rhythms keep track of time and provide temporal regulation with a period of about 24 h. The cell cycle is optimized for growth and division, but not for time keeping. Circadian gated cell divisions are observed in nearly all organisms. However, the implications of this coupling to the physiology of mammals are unknown. A mutation (S662G) in the clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) is responsible for familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in which sleep onset occurs in the early evening and wakefulness occurs in the early morning. Here, we provide evidence that the PER2(S662) mutation leads to enhanced resistance to X-ray-induced apoptosis and increased E1A- and RAS-mediated oncogenic transformation. Accordingly, the PER2(S662) mutation affects tumorigenesis in cancer-sensitized p53(R172H/+) mice. Finally, analyzing the clock-controlled cell cycle genes p21, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and p27, we found that the relative phases between p21 and Cyclin D expression profiles have been changed significantly in these Per2 allele mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This key role of the Per2-mediated phase alteration of p21 provides what we believe to be a novel mechanism in understanding cell cycle progression, its plasticity and its resistance to interference.

  16. Impairment of cell cycle progression by aflatoxin B1 in human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricordy, R; Gensabella, G; Cacci, E; Augusti-Tocco, G

    2002-05-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticum, which may be present as a food contaminant. It is known to cause acute toxic effects and act as a carcinogenic agent. The carcinogenic action has been related to its ability to form unstable adducts with DNA, which represent possible mutagenic sites. On the other hand, the primary cellular target responsible for its toxic action has not yet been clearly identified. Previous data suggested a possible correlation between cell proliferation and responsiveness to aflatoxin toxicity. These observations led us to investigate the effect of the toxin on cell cycle progression of three human cell lines (HepG2, SK-N-MC and SK-N-SH derived from liver and nervous tissue tumours); they were shown to display different responses to toxin exposure and have different growth kinetics. We performed analysis of the cell cycle, DNA synthesis and expression of p21 and p53 in the presence and absence of the toxin in all cell lines exposed. The results of cell cycle cytofluorometric analysis show significant alterations of cell cycle progression as a result of toxin treatment. In all cell lines exposure to a 24 h toxin treatment causes a dose-dependent accumulation in S phase, however, the ability to recover from impairment to traverse S phase varies in the cell lines under study. SK-N-MC cells appear more prone to resume DNA synthesis when the toxin is removed, while the other two cell lines maintain a significant inhibition of DNA synthesis, as indicated by cytofluorimetry and [(3)H]dTR incorporation. The level of p53 and p21 expression in the three cell lines was examined by western blot analysis and significant differences were detected. The ready resumption of DNA synthesis displayed by SK-N-MC cells could possibly be related to the absence of p53 control of cell cycle progression.

  17. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cycle transition from the G(2) phase into mitosis is regulated by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) in complex with cyclin B. CDK1 activity is controlled by both inhibitory phosphorylation, catalysed by the Myt1 and Wee1 kinases, and activating dephosphorylation, mediated by the CDC...... interference results in delayed cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis. Knockdown of CK2beta causes stabilization of Wee1 and increased phosphorylation of CDK1 at the inhibitory Tyr15. PLK1-Wee1 association is an essential event in the degradation of Wee1 in unperturbed cell cycle. We have found...... regulatory subunit, identifying it as a new component of signaling pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression at the entry of mitosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 12 May 2008; doi:10.1038/onc.2008.146....

  18. NFAT1 transcription factor regulates cell cycle progression and cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Carrossini, Nina; Sécca, Cristiane; Kroll, José E; DaCunha, Déborah C; Faget, Douglas V; Carvalho, Lilian D S; de Souza, Sandro J; Viola, João P B

    2016-09-01

    The NFAT family of transcription factors has been primarily related to T cell development, activation, and differentiation. Further studies have shown that these ubiquitous proteins are observed in many cell types inside and outside the immune system, and are involved in several biological processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. However, the specific role of the NFAT1 family member in naive B cell proliferation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NFAT1 transcription factor controls Cyclin E expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in vivo. Specifically, we show that inducible expression of NFAT1 inhibits cell cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and controls tumor growth in nude mice. We also demonstrate that NFAT1-deficient naive B lymphocytes show a hyperproliferative phenotype and high levels of Cyclin E1 and E2 upon BCR stimulation when compared to wild-type B lymphocytes. NFAT1 transcription factor directly regulates Cyclin E expression in B cells, inhibiting the G1/S cell cycle phase transition. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that low levels of NFAT1 correlate with high expression of Cyclin E1 in different human cancers, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL). Together, our results demonstrate a repressor role for NFAT1 in cell cycle progression and Cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes, and suggest a potential function for NFAT1 protein in B cell malignancies.

  19. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growth and DNA metabolism, respectively. These findings provided the first clues that the E2F transcription factor might be an important regulator of the cell cycle. Since this initial discovery in 1987, several additional E2F family members have been identified, and more than 100 targets genes have been shown to be directly regulated by E2Fs, the majority of these are important for controlling the cell cycle. The progression of a cell through the cell cycle is accompanied with the increased expression of a specific set of genes during one phase of the cell cycle and the decrease of the same set of genes during a later phase of the cell cycle. This roller coaster ride, or oscillation, of gene expression is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle to allow accurate DNA replication and cell division. The E2F transcription factors have been shown to be critical for the temporal expression of the oscillating cell cycle genes. This review will focus on how the oscillation of E2Fs and their targets is regulated by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanism in mammals, yeast, flies, and worms. Furthermore, we will discuss the functional impact of E2Fs on the cell cycle progression and outline the consequences when E2F expression is disturbed.

  20. Macro-management of microRNAs in cell cycle progression of tumor cells and its implications in anti-cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-hui LIANG; Xiang-huo HE

    2011-01-01

    The cell cycle,which is precisely controlled by a number of regulators,including cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs),is crucial for the life cycle of mammals.Cell cycle dysregulation is implicated in many diseases,including cancer.Recently,compelling evidence has been found that microRNAs play important roles in the regulation of cell cycle progression by modulating the expression of cyclins,CDKs and other cell cycle regulators.Herein,the recent findings on the regulation of the cell cycle by microRNAs are summarized,and the potential implications of miRNAs in anti-cancer therapies are discussed.

  1. Evolution of cell cycle control: same molecular machines, different regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Ulrik; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Brunak, Søren

    2007-01-01

    layers of regulation together control the activity of cell cycle complexes and how this regulation has evolved. The results show surprisingly poor conservation of both the transcriptional and the post-translation regulation of individual genes and proteins; however, the changes in one layer of regulation...... or deactivated at specific stages during the cell cycle through a wide variety of mechanisms including transcriptional regulation, phosphorylation, subcellular translocation and targeted degradation. In a series of integrative analyses of different genome-scale data sets, we have studied how these different......Decades of research has together with the availability of whole genomes made it clear that many of the core components involved in the cell cycle are conserved across eukaryotes, both functionally and structurally. These proteins are organized in complexes and modules that are activated...

  2. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina; Marshall, Christopher J

    2016-01-14

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility.

  3. Evolution of cell cycle control: same molecular machines, different regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Ulrik; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Brunak, Søren

    2007-01-01

    are often mirrored by changes in other layers, implying that independent layers of control coevolve. By taking a bird's eye view of the cell cycle, we demonstrate how the modular organization of cellular systems possesses a built-in flexibility, which allows evolution to find many different solutions...

  4. Mitochondrial regulation of cell cycle progression through SLC25A43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielson, Marike; Reizer, Edwin [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden); Stål, Olle [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Tina, Elisabet, E-mail: elisabet.tina@regionorebrolan.se [Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden)

    2016-01-22

    An increasing body of evidence is pointing towards mitochondrial regulation of the cell cycle. In a previous study of HER2-positive tumours we could demonstrate a common loss in the gene encoding for the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43 and also a significant relation between SLC25A43 protein expression and S-phase fraction. Here, we investigated the consequence of suppressed SLC25A43 expression on cell cycle progression and proliferation in breast epithelial cells. In the present study, we suppressed SLC25A43 using siRNA in immortalised non-cancerous breast epithelial MCF10A cells and HER2-positive breast cancer cells BT-474. Viability, apoptosis, cell proliferation rate, cell cycle phase distribution, and nuclear Ki-67 and p21, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle related gene expressions were analysed using real-time PCR. We found that SLC25A43 knockdown in MCF10A cells significantly inhibited cell cycle progression during G{sub 1}-to-S transition, thus significantly reducing the proliferation rate and fraction of Ki-67 positive MCF10A cells. In contrast, suppressed SLC25A43 expression in BT-474 cells resulted in a significantly increased proliferation rate together with an enhanced G{sub 1}-to-S transition. This was reflected by an increased fraction of Ki-67 positive cells and reduced level of nuclear p21. In line with our previous results, we show a role for SLC25A43 as a regulator of cell cycle progression and proliferation through a putative mitochondrial checkpoint. These novel data further strengthen the connection between mitochondrial function and the cell cycle, both in non-malignant and in cancer cells. - Highlights: • Proposed cell cycle regulation through the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43. • SLC25A43 alters cell proliferation rate and cell cycle progression. • Suppressed SLC25A43 influences transcription of cell cycle regulatory genes.

  5. Chloroplast dysfunction causes multiple defects in cell cycle progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudik, Elodie; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Domenichini, Séverine; Bourge, Mickaël; Soubigout-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Yi, Dalong; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; De Veylder, Lieven; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2014-09-01

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  6. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  7. Computational analysis of mammalian cell division gated by a circadian clock: quantized cell cycles and cell size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámborszky, Judit; Hong, Christian I; Csikász Nagy, Attila

    2007-12-01

    Cell cycle and circadian rhythms are conserved from cyanobacteria to humans with robust cyclic features. Recently, molecular links between these two cyclic processes have been discovered. Core clock transcription factors, Bmal1 and Clock (Clk), directly regulate Wee1 kinase, which inhibits entry into the mitosis. We investigate the effect of this connection on the timing of mammalian cell cycle processes with computational modeling tools. We connect a minimal model of circadian rhythms, which consists of transcription-translation feedback loops, with a modified mammalian cell cycle model from Novak and Tyson (2004). As we vary the mass doubling time (MDT) of the cell cycle, stochastic simulations reveal quantized cell cycles when the activity of Wee1 is influenced by clock components. The quantized cell cycles disappear in the absence of coupling or when the strength of this link is reduced. More intriguingly, our simulations indicate that the circadian clock triggers critical size control in the mammalian cell cycle. A periodic brake on the cell cycle progress via Wee1 enforces size control when the MDT is quite different from the circadian period. No size control is observed in the absence of coupling. The issue of size control in the mammalian system is debatable, whereas it is well established in yeast. It is possible that the size control is more readily observed in cell lines that contain circadian rhythms, since not all cell types have a circadian clock. This would be analogous to an ultradian clock intertwined with quantized cell cycles (and possibly cell size control) in yeast. We present the first coupled model between the mammalian cell cycle and circadian rhythms that reveals quantized cell cycles and cell size control influenced by the clock.

  8. Prognostic value of a cell cycle progression score for men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzick, Jack

    2014-01-01

    A new prognostic score called the cell cycle progression or CCP score has been evaluated for predicting outcome in men with prostate cancer. The score is based on 31 cell cycle progression genes and 15 housekeeper control genes. Results on 5 cohorts have been reported. In all cases the CCP score was strongly predictive of outcome both in univariate models and in multvariate models incorporating standard factors such as Gleason grade, PSA levels and extent of disease. Two cohorts evaluated patients managed by active surveillance where the outcome was death from prostate cancer, two cohorts examined patients treated by radical prostatectomy where biochemical recurrence was the primary endpoint, and one smaller cohort looked at patients treated with radiotherapy where again biochemical recurrence was used as the endpoint. In all cases a unit change in CCP score was associated with an approximate doubling of risk of an event. These data provide strong event to support use of the CCP score to help guide clinical management.

  9. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  10. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  11. Patterns of expression of cell cycle/apoptosis genes along the spectrum of thyroid carcinoma progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Saltman; B. Singh; C.V. Hedvat; V.B. Wreesmann; R. Ghossein

    2006-01-01

    Background. Genetic screening studies suggest that genetic changes underlie progression from well differentiated, to anoplastic thyroid cancers. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent cell cycle/apoptosis regulators contribute to cancer progression. Methods. Tissue microarrarys (TMAs)

  12. Feedback regulation between atypical E2Fs and APC/CCdh1 coordinates cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekhout, Michiel; Yuan, Ruixue; Wondergem, Annelotte P; Segeren, Hendrika A; van Liere, Elsbeth A; Awol, Nesibu; Jansen, Imke; Wolthuis, Rob M F; de Bruin, Alain; Westendorp, Bart

    2016-03-01

    E2F transcription factors control the oscillating expression pattern of multiple target genes during the cell cycle. Activator E2Fs, E2F1-3, induce an upswing of E2F targets, which is essential for the G1-to-S phase transition, whereas atypical E2Fs, E2F7 and E2F8, mediate a downswing of the same targets during late S, G2, and M phases. Expression of atypical E2Fs is induced by E2F1-3, but it is unknown how atypical E2Fs are inactivated in a timely manner. Here, we demonstrate that E2F7 and E2F8 are substrates of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Removal of CDH1, or mutating the CDH1-interacting KEN boxes, stabilized E2F7/8 from anaphase onwards and during G1. Expressing KEN mutant E2F7 during G1 impairs S phase entry and eventually results in cell death. Furthermore, we show that E2F8, but not E2F7, interacts also with APC/C(C) (dc20). Importantly, atypical E2Fs can activate APC/C(C) (dh1) by repressing its inhibitors cyclin A, cyclin E, and Emi1. In conclusion, we discovered a feedback loop between atypical E2Fs and APC/C(C) (dh1), which ensures balanced expression of cell cycle genes and normal cell cycle progression.

  13. Effects of (p)ppGpp on the progression of the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria must control the progression of their cell cycle in response to nutrient availability. This regulation can be mediated by guanosine tetra- or pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which are synthesized by enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homologue (Rsh) family, particularly under starvation conditions. Here, we study the effects of (p)ppGpp on the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus, an oligotrophic bacterium with a dimorphic life cycle. C. crescentus divides asymmetrically, producing a motile swarmer cell that cannot replicate its chromosome and a sessile stalked cell that is replication competent. The swarmer cell rapidly differentiates into a stalked cell in appropriate conditions. An artificial increase in the levels of (p)ppGpp in nonstarved C. crescentus cells was achieved by expressing a truncated relA gene from Escherichia coli, encoding a constitutively active (p)ppGpp synthetase. By combining single-cell microscopy, flow cytometry approaches, and swarming assays, we show that an increase in the intracellular concentration of (p)ppGpp is sufficient to slow down the swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation process and to delay the initiation of chromosome replication. We also present evidence that the intracellular levels of two master regulators of the cell cycle of C. crescentus, DnaA and CtrA, are modulated in response to (p)ppGpp accumulation, even in the absence of actual starvation. CtrA proteolysis and DnaA synthesis seem indirectly inhibited by (p)ppGpp accumulation. By extending the life span of the motile nonreproductive swarmer cell and thus promoting dispersal and foraging functions over multiplication under starvation conditions, (p)ppGpp may play a central role in the ecological adaptation of C. crescentus to nutritional stresses.

  14. Cell-size dependent progression of the cell cycle creates homeostasis and flexibility of plant cell size

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Jones, Angharad; Forero-Vargas, Manuel; Withers, Simon P.; Smith, Richard S.; Traas, Jan; Dewitte, Walter; Murray, James A. H.

    2017-01-01

    Mean cell size at division is generally constant for specific conditions and cell types, but the mechanisms coupling cell growth and cell cycle control with cell size regulation are poorly understood in intact tissues. Here we show that the continuously dividing fields of cells within the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis show dynamic regulation of mean cell size dependent on developmental stage, genotype and environmental signals. We show cell size at division and cell cycle length is effectively predicted using a two-stage cell cycle model linking cell growth and two sequential cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) activities, and experimental results concur in showing that progression through both G1/S and G2/M is size dependent. This work shows that cell-autonomous co-ordination of cell growth and cell division previously observed in unicellular organisms also exists in intact plant tissues, and that cell size may be an emergent rather than directly determined property of cells. PMID:28447614

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase deficiency influences normal cell cycle progression and apoptosis in trabecular meshwork cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Liao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To clarify how the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3 make effect on outflow facility through the trabecular meshwork (TM. METHODS: Inhibition of NOS3 gene expression in human TM cells were conducted by three siRNAs. Then the mRNA and protein levels of NOS3 in siRNA-treated and negative control (NC cells were determined, still were the collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1 and fibronectin 1 by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, NOS3 concentrations in culture supernatant fluids of TM cells were measured. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis analysis were performed using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The mRNA level of NOS3 was decreased by three different siRNA interference, similar results were obtained not only of the relative levels of NOS3 protein, but also the expression levels of COL4A1 and fibronectin 1. The number of cells in S phase was decreased, while contrary result was obtained in G2 phase. The number of apoptotic cells in siRNA-treated groups were significant increased compared to the NC samples. CONCLUSION: Abnormal NOS3 expression can make effects on the proteins levels of extracellular matrix component (e.g. fibronectin 1 and COL4A1. Reduced NOS3 restrains the TM cell cycle progression at the G2/M-phase transition and induced cell apoptosis.

  16. NPAT expression is regulated by E2F and is essential for cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Guang; Bracken, Adrian P; Burkard, Karina

    2003-01-01

    NPAT is an in vivo substrate of cyclin E-Cdk2 kinase and is thought to play a critical role in coordinated transcriptional activation of histone genes during the G(1)/S-phase transition and in S-phase entry in mammalian cells. Here we show that NPAT transcription is up-regulated at the G(1)/S...... by small interfering RNA duplexes impedes cell cycle progression and histone gene expression in tissue culture cells. Thus, NPAT is an important E2F target that is required for cell cycle progression in mammalian cells. As NPAT is involved in the regulation of S-phase-specific histone gene transcription...

  17. Rho/ROCK signaling in regulation of corneal epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Guerriero, Emily; Lathrop, Kira; SundarRaj, Nirmala

    2008-01-01

    The authors' previous study showed that the expression of a Rho-associated serine/threonine kinase (ROCK) is regulated during cell cycle progression in corneal epithelial cells. The present study was conducted to determine whether and how Rho/ROCK signaling regulates cell cycle progression. Rabbit corneal epithelial cells (RCECs) in culture were arrested in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle by serum deprivation and then allowed to re-enter the cell cycle in the presence or absence of the ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) in serum-supplemented medium. The number of cells in the S phase, the relative levels of specific cyclins and CDKs and their intracellular distribution, and the relative levels of mRNAs were determined by BrdU labeling, Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses, and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. ROCK inhibition delayed the progression of G(1) to S phase and led to a decrease in the number of RCECs entering the S phase between 12 and 24 hours from 31.5% +/- 4.5% to 8.1% +/- 2.6%. During the cell cycle progression, protein and mRNA levels of cyclin-D1 and -D3 and cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 were significantly lower, whereas the protein levels of the CDK inhibitor p27(Kip1) were higher in ROCK-inhibited cells. Intracellular mRNA or protein levels of cyclin-E and protein levels of CDK2 were not significantly affected, but their nuclear translocation was delayed by ROCK inhibition. ROCK signaling is involved in cell cycle progression in RCECs, possibly by upregulation of cyclin-D1 and -D3 and CDK4, -6, and -2; nuclear translocation of CDK2 and cyclin-E; and downregulation of p27(Kip1).

  18. From START to FINISH: computational analysis of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraikivski, Pavel; Chen, Katherine C; Laomettachit, Teeraphan; Murali, T M; Tyson, John J

    2015-01-01

    In the cell division cycle of budding yeast, START refers to a set of tightly linked events that prepare a cell for budding and DNA replication, and FINISH denotes the interrelated events by which the cell exits from mitosis and divides into mother and daughter cells. On the basis of recent progress made by molecular biologists in characterizing the genes and proteins that control START and FINISH, we crafted a new mathematical model of cell cycle progression in yeast. Our model exploits a natural separation of time scales in the cell cycle control network to construct a system of differential-algebraic equations for protein synthesis and degradation, post-translational modifications, and rapid formation and dissociation of multimeric complexes. The model provides a unified account of the observed phenotypes of 257 mutant yeast strains (98% of the 263 strains in the data set used to constrain the model). We then use the model to predict the phenotypes of 30 novel combinations of mutant alleles. Our comprehensive model of the molecular events controlling cell cycle progression in budding yeast has both explanatory and predictive power. Future experimental tests of the model's predictions will be useful to refine the underlying molecular mechanism, to constrain the adjustable parameters of the model, and to provide new insights into how the cell division cycle is regulated in budding yeast.

  19. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  20. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  1. Mechanisms of cell cycle control revealed by a systematic and quantitative overexpression screen in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Niu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell cycle progression is fundamental to cell health and reproduction, and failures in this process are associated with many human diseases. Much of our knowledge of cell cycle regulators derives from loss-of-function studies. To reveal new cell cycle regulatory genes that are difficult to identify in loss-of-function studies, we performed a near-genome-wide flow cytometry assay of yeast gene overexpression-induced cell cycle delay phenotypes. We identified 108 genes whose overexpression significantly delayed the progression of the yeast cell cycle at a specific stage. Many of the genes are newly implicated in cell cycle progression, for example SKO1, RFA1, and YPR015C. The overexpression of RFA1 or YPR015C delayed the cell cycle at G2/M phases by disrupting spindle attachment to chromosomes and activating the DNA damage checkpoint, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of the transcription factor SKO1 arrests cells at G1 phase by activating the pheromone response pathway, revealing new cross-talk between osmotic sensing and mating. More generally, 92%-94% of the genes exhibit distinct phenotypes when overexpressed as compared to their corresponding deletion mutants, supporting the notion that many genes may gain functions upon overexpression. This work thus implicates new genes in cell cycle progression, complements previous screens, and lays the foundation for future experiments to define more precisely roles for these genes in cell cycle progression.

  2. Function of trehalose and glycogen in cell cycle progression and cell viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silljé, H H; Paalman, J W; ter Schure, E G; Olsthoorn, S Q; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, Johannes; Verrips, C T

    1999-01-01

    Trehalose and glycogen accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when growth conditions deteriorate. It has been suggested that aside from functioning as storage factors and stress protectants, these carbohydrates may be required for cell cycle progression at low growth rates under carbon limitation. B

  3. Function of trehalose and glycogen in cell cycle progression and cell viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silljé, H H; Paalman, J W; ter Schure, E G; Olsthoorn, S Q; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, Johannes; Verrips, C T

    Trehalose and glycogen accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when growth conditions deteriorate. It has been suggested that aside from functioning as storage factors and stress protectants, these carbohydrates may be required for cell cycle progression at low growth rates under carbon limitation.

  4. CCND1-CDK4-mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico; Waskow, Claudia

    2015-07-27

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1-CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1-CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1-CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. © 2015 Mende et al.

  5. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonifati, Serena [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Daly, Michele B. [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Shepard, Caitlin [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kennedy, Edward M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Dong-Hyun [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Schinazi, Raymond F. [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Baek, E-mail: baek.kim@emory.edu [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Li, E-mail: wu.840@osu.edu [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-08-15

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G{sub 1}/G{sub 0} phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection.

  6. STK16 regulates actin dynamics to control Golgi organization and cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juanjuan; Yang, Xingxing; Li, Binhua; Wang, Junjun; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    STK16 is a ubiquitously expressed, myristoylated, and palmitoylated serine/threonine protein kinase with underexplored functions. Recently, it was shown to be involved in cell division but the mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that human STK16 localizes to the Golgi complex throughout the cell cycle and plays important roles in Golgi structure regulation. STK16 knockdown or kinase inhibition disrupts actin polymers and causes fragmented Golgi in cells. In vitro assays show that STK16 directly binds to actin and regulates actin dynamics in a concentration- and kinase activity-dependent way. In addition, STK16 knockdown or kinase inhibition not only delays mitotic entry and prolongs mitosis, but also causes prometaphase and cytokinesis arrest. Therefore, we revealed STK16 as a novel actin binding protein that resides in the Golgi, which regulates actin dynamics to control Golgi structure and participate in cell cycle progression. PMID:28294156

  7. Anandamide drives cell cycle progression through CB1 receptors in a rat model of synchronized liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; Pallottini, Valentina; Martini, Chiara; Petrosino, Stefania; Proto, Maria Chiara; Vitale, Mario; Laezza, Chiara; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid receptor signaling by endocannabinoids, is involved in a wide range of functions and physiopathological conditions. To date, very little is known concerning the role of the endocannabinoids in the control and regulation of cell proliferation. An anti-proliferative action of CB1 signaling blockade in neurogenesis and angiogenesis argues in favor of proliferation-promoting functions of endocannabinoids through CB1 receptors when pro-growth signals are present. Furthermore, liver regeneration, a useful in vivo model of synchronized cell proliferation, is characterized by a peak of anandamide that elicits through CB1 receptor, the expression of critical mitosis genes. The aim of this study was to focus on the timing of endocannabinoid signaling changes during the different phases of the cell cycle, exploiting the rat liver regeneration model following partial hepatectomy, the most useful to study synchronized cell cycle in vivo. Hepatic regeneration led to increased levels of anandamide and endocannabinoid-like molecules oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with a concomitant increase in CB1 mRNA levels, whose protein expression peaked later during the S phase. Blocking of CB1 receptor with a low dose of the selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716 (0.7 mg/kg/dose) affected cell cycle progression reducing the expression of PCNA, and through the inhibition of pERK and pSTAT3 pathways. These results support the notion that the signaling mediated by anandamide through CB1 receptor may be important for the entry and progression of cells into the cell cycle and hence for their proliferation under mitogenic signals.

  8. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  9. Effect of Lithium on Cell Cycle Progression of Pig Airway Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文书; 吴人亮; 王曦; 李媛; 郝天玲

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of lithium on cell cycle progression of airway epithelial cells,primary pig tracheobronchial epithelial cells were incubated with lithium chloride (LiCl) at different concentrations (0, 5 mmol/L, and 10 mmol/L) and time (12 h, 16 h and 24 h). After the treatment, cells were counted, cell cycle profile was measured by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry, and expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 were detected by Western blotting. The results showed that after 24h of 10mmol/L but not 5mmol/L LiCl treatment, proliferation of cells was slowed down as manifested by delayed confluence and cell number accumulation (P<0.05). Lithium did not change the percentage of cells in S phase (P>0.05), but 24 h incubation with 10 mmol/L LiCl induced a G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, 10mmol/L LiCl elevated cyclin D1 expression after 12h treatment, while expression of cyclin B1 increased more significantly after 24h incubation. These data demonstrate that lithium inhibits proliferation of pig airway epithelial cells by inhibiting cell cycle progression, and suggest that lithium-sensitive molecule(s) such as glycogen synthase kinase 3 may have a role in the regulation of growth of airway epithelial cells.

  10. Sinorhizobium meliloti CpdR1 is critical for co-ordinating cell cycle progression and the symbiotic chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hajime; De Nisco, Nicole J; Chien, Peter; Simmons, Lyle A; Walker, Graham C

    2009-08-01

    ATP-driven proteolysis plays a major role in regulating the bacterial cell cycle, development and stress responses. In the nitro -fixing symbiosis with host plants, Sinorhizobium meliloti undergoes a profound cellular differentiation, including endoreduplication of the ome. The regulatory mechanisms governing the alterations of the S. meliloti cell cycle in planta are largely unknown. Here, we report the characterization of two cpdR homologues, cpdR1 and cpdR2, of S. meliloti that encode single-domain response regulators. In Caulobacter crescentus, CpdR controls the polar localization of the ClpXP protease, thereby mediating the regulated proteolysis of key protein(s), such as CtrA, involved in cell cycle progression. The S. meliloti cpdR1-null mutant can invade the host cytoplasm, however, the intracellular bacteria are unable to differentiate into bacteroids. We show that S. meliloti CpdR1 has a polar localization pattern and a role in ClpX positioning similar to C. crescentus CpdR, suggesting a conserved function of CpdR proteins among alpha-proteobacteria. However, in S. meliloti, free-living cells of the cpdR1-null mutant show a striking morphology of irregular coccoids and aberrant DNA replication. Thus, we demonstrate that CpdR1 mediates the co-ordination of cell cycle events, which are critical for both the free-living cell division and the differentiation required for the chronic intracellular infection.

  11. Sam68 exerts separable effects on cell cycle progression and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resnick Ross J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA-binding protein Sam68 has been implicated in a number of cellular processes, including transcription, RNA splicing and export, translation, signal transduction, cell cycle progression and replication of the human immunodeficiency virus and poliovirus. However, the precise impact it has on essential cellular functions remains largely obscure. Results In this report we show that conditional overexpression of Sam68 in fibroblasts results in both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle is associated with decreased levels of cyclins D1 and E RNA and protein, resulting in dramatically reduced Rb phosphorylation. Interestingly, cell cycle arrest does not require the specific RNA binding ability of Sam68. In marked contrast, induction of apoptosis by Sam68 absolutely requires a fully-functional RNA binding domain. Moreover, the anti-cancer agent trichostatin A potentiates Sam68-driven apoptosis. Conclusions For the first time we have shown that Sam68, an RNA binding protein with multiple apparent functions, exerts functionally separable effects on cell proliferation and survival, dependent on its ability to bind specifically to RNA. These findings shed new light on the ability of signal transducing RNA binding proteins to influence essential cell function. Moreover, the ability of a class of anti-cancer therapeutics to modulate its ability to promote apoptosis suggests that Sam68 status may impact some cancer treatments.

  12. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiel Cora S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space.

  13. Human POLD1 modulates cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jing; Hong, Ping; Liu, Chengeng; Zhang, Yueqi; Wang, Jinling; Wang, Peichang

    2015-01-01

    Background The activity of eukaryotic DNA polymerase delta (Pol ?) plays an essential role in genome stability through its effects on DNA replication and repair. The p125 catalytic subunit of Pol ? is encoded by POLD1 gene in human cells. To clarify biological functions of POLD1, we investigated the effects of POLD1 overexpression or downregulation on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, DNA synthesis and oxidative DNA damage induced by H2O2. Methods HEK293 cells were transfected with ...

  14. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our

  15. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Francesco; De Nisco, Nicole J; Ferri, Lorenzo; Penterman, Jon; Fioravanti, Antonella; Brilli, Matteo; Mengoni, Alessio; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Viollier, Patrick H; Walker, Graham C; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2015-05-01

    In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our findings provide valuable

  16. Cell Cycle Control by the Master Regulator CtrA in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Lorenzo; Penterman, Jon; Fioravanti, Antonella; Brilli, Matteo; Mengoni, Alessio; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Viollier, Patrick H.; Walker, Graham C.; Biondi, Emanuele G.

    2015-01-01

    In all domains of life, proper regulation of the cell cycle is critical to coordinate genome replication, segregation and cell division. In some groups of bacteria, e.g. Alphaproteobacteria, tight regulation of the cell cycle is also necessary for the morphological and functional differentiation of cells. Sinorhizobium meliloti is an alphaproteobacterium that forms an economically and ecologically important nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with specific legume hosts. During this symbiosis S. meliloti undergoes an elaborate cellular differentiation within host root cells. The differentiation of S. meliloti results in massive amplification of the genome, cell branching and/or elongation, and loss of reproductive capacity. In Caulobacter crescentus, cellular differentiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle via the activity of the master regulator CtrA, and recent research in S. meliloti suggests that CtrA might also be key to cellular differentiation during symbiosis. However, the regulatory circuit driving cell cycle progression in S. meliloti is not well characterized in both the free-living and symbiotic state. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of CtrA in S. meliloti. We demonstrated that depletion of CtrA cause cell elongation, branching and genome amplification, similar to that observed in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. We also showed that the cell cycle regulated proteolytic degradation of CtrA is essential in S. meliloti, suggesting a possible mechanism of CtrA depletion in differentiated bacteroids. Using a combination of ChIP-Seq and gene expression microarray analysis we found that although S. meliloti CtrA regulates similar processes as C. crescentus CtrA, it does so through different target genes. For example, our data suggest that CtrA does not control the expression of the Fts complex to control the timing of cell division during the cell cycle, but instead it negatively regulates the septum-inhibiting Min system. Our findings provide valuable

  17. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  18. A stress-induced small RNA modulates alpha-rhizobial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Robledo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms adjusting replication initiation and cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions are crucial for microbial survival. Functional characterization of the trans-encoded small non-coding RNA (trans-sRNA EcpR1 in the plant-symbiotic alpha-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti revealed a role of this class of riboregulators in modulation of cell cycle regulation. EcpR1 is broadly conserved in at least five families of the Rhizobiales and is predicted to form a stable structure with two defined stem-loop domains. In S. meliloti, this trans-sRNA is encoded downstream of the divK-pleD operon. ecpR1 belongs to the stringent response regulon, and its expression was induced by various stress factors and in stationary phase. Induced EcpR1 overproduction led to cell elongation and increased DNA content, while deletion of ecpR1 resulted in reduced competitiveness. Computationally predicted EcpR1 targets were enriched with cell cycle-related mRNAs. Post-transcriptional repression of the cell cycle key regulatory genes gcrA and dnaA mediated by mRNA base-pairing with the strongly conserved loop 1 of EcpR1 was experimentally confirmed by two-plasmid differential gene expression assays and compensatory changes in sRNA and mRNA. Evidence is presented for EcpR1 promoting RNase E-dependent degradation of the dnaA mRNA. We propose that EcpR1 contributes to modulation of cell cycle regulation under detrimental conditions.

  19. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose. PMID:28072818

  20. Boolean genetic network model for the control of C. elegans early embryonic cell cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo, cell cycles only have two phases: DNA synthesis and mitosis, which are different from the typical 4-phase cell cycle. Modeling this cell-cycle process into network can fill up the gap in C. elegans cell-cycle study and provide a thorough understanding on the cell-cycle regulations and progressions at the network level. Methods In this paper, C. elegans early embryonic cell-cycle network has been constructed based on the knowledge of key regulators and their interactions from literature studies. A discrete dynamical Boolean model has been applied in computer simulations to study dynamical properties of this network. The cell-cycle network is compared with random networks and tested under several perturbations to analyze its robustness. To investigate whether our proposed network could explain biological experiment results, we have also compared the network simulation results with gene knock down experiment data. Results With the Boolean model, this study showed that the cell-cycle network was stable with a set of attractors (fixed points). A biological pathway was observed in the simulation, which corresponded to a whole cell-cycle progression. The C. elegans network was significantly robust when compared with random networks of the same size because there were less attractors and larger basins than random networks. Moreover, the network was also robust under perturbations with no significant change of the basin size. In addition, the smaller number of attractors and the shorter biological pathway from gene knock down network simulation interpreted the shorter cell-cycle lengths in mutant from the RNAi gene knock down experiment data. Hence, we demonstrated that the results in network simulation could be verified by the RNAi gene knock down experiment data. Conclusions A C. elegans early embryonic cell cycles network was constructed and its properties were analyzed and compared with those of random networks

  1. ELONGATA3 is required for shoot meristem cell cycle progression in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skylar, Anna; Matsuwaka, Sean; Wu, Xuelin

    2013-10-15

    A key feature of the development of a higher plant is the continuous formation of new organs from the meristems. Originally patterned during embryogenesis, the meristems must activate cell division de novo at the time of germination, in order to initiate post-embryonic development. In a mutagenesis screen aimed at finding new players in early seedling cell division control, we identified ELONGATA3 (ELO3) as a key regulator of meristem cell cycle activation in Arabidopsis. Our results show that plants carrying a hypomorphic allele of ELO3 fail to activate cell division in the meristems following germination, which leads to seedling growth arrest and lethality. Further analyses suggest that this is due to a failure in DNA replication, followed by cell cycle arrest, in the meristematic tissue. Interestingly, the meristem cell cycle arrest in elo3 mutants, but not the later leaf developmental defects that have been linked to the loss of ELO3 activities, can be relieved by the addition of metabolic sugars in the growth medium. This finding points to a new role by which carbohydrate availability promotes meristem growth. Furthermore, growth arrested elo3 mutants suffer a partial loss of shoot meristem identity, which provides further evidence that cell cycle activities can influence the control of tissue identity. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. APC/C (Cdh1) controls the proteasome-mediated degradation of E2F3 during cell cycle exit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ping, Z.; Lim, R.; Bashir, T.; Pagano, M.; Guardavaccaro, D.

    2012-01-01

    E2F transcription factors regulate gene expression in concert with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor family. These transcriptional complexes are master regulators of cell cycle progression and, in addition, control the expression of genes involved in DNA repair, G 2/M checkpoint and differentiatio

  3. Nuclear localization of TEF3-1 promotes cell cycle progression and angiogenesis in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Kaixuan; Deng, Cuilan; Xu, Jie; Men, Qiuxu; Lei, Tao; Di, Da; Liu, Ting; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-03-22

    TEF3-1 (transcriptional enhancer factor 3 isoform 1), also known as TEAD4 (TEA domain family member 4), was recently revealed as an oncogenic character in cancer development. However, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. In this paper, we investigated nuclear TEF3-1 could promote G1/S transition in HUVECs, and the expression levels of cyclins and CDKs were upregulated. Additionally, if TEF3-1 was knocked down, the expression of cyclins and CDKs was downregulated while the expression of P21, a negative regulator of the cell cycle, was upregulated. A microarray analysis also confirmed that TEF3-1 overexpression upregulates genes that are related to cell cycle progression and the promotion of angiogenesis. Moreover, we observed that nuclear TEF3-1 was highly expressed during the formation of vascular structures in gastric cancer (GC). Finally, tumor xenograft experiments indicated that, when TEF3-1 was knocked down, tumor growth and angiogenesis were also suppressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that TEF3-1 localization to the nucleus stimulates the cell cycle progression in HUVECs and specifically contributes to tumor angiogenesis. Nuclear TEF3-1 in HUVECs may serve as an oncogenic biomarker, and the suppression of TEF3-1 may be a potential target in anti-tumor therapy.

  4. [An involvement of polokinases in control of progress of the cell-cycle--the mechanism of transient translocation and formation of an activated protein-protein complexes during mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczanowska, Janina; Piwońska, Dominika; Kaczanowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Polokinases are a subfamily of the mitotic serine/threonine kinases involved in coordination of a run of mitosis of eukaryotic cells. The main polo-like-kinase 1p (PLK1) is a passenger protein transiently localized to centrosomes, kinetochores and central spindle during mitosis and is required for bi-orientation of the normal metaphase spindle. Its activity is regulated at the level of protein stability and by action of upstream kinases, so that it peaks in metaphase and drops as cells exit mitosis. Regulation of location and activity of Plk1p is bi-phasic: the COOH terminal polo box domain binds to an array of mitotic phosphoproteins and followed by an allosteric conformation is activated to phosphorylate many its substrates. These mode of action involves polokinases into critical transitions of the cell cycle phases, and in control at some checkpoints of this cycle.

  5. The B-MYB transcriptional network guides cell cycle progression and fate decisions to sustain self-renewal and the identity of pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhan

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs are pluripotent and have unlimited self-renewal capacity. Although pluripotency and differentiation have been examined extensively, the mechanisms responsible for self-renewal are poorly understood and are believed to involve an unusual cell cycle, epigenetic regulators and pluripotency-promoting transcription factors. Here we show that B-MYB, a cell cycle regulated phosphoprotein and transcription factor critical to the formation of inner cell mass, is central to the transcriptional and co-regulatory networks that sustain normal cell cycle progression and self-renewal properties of ESCs. Phenotypically, B-MYB is robustly expressed in ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and it is present predominantly in a hypo-phosphorylated state. Knockdown of B-MYB results in functional cell cycle abnormalities that involve S, G2 and M phases, and reduced expression of critical cell cycle regulators like ccnb1 and plk1. By conducting gene expression profiling on control and B-MYB deficient cells, ChIP-chip experiments, and integrative computational analyses, we unraveled a highly complex B-MYB-mediated transcriptional network that guides ESC self-renewal. The network encompasses critical regulators of all cell cycle phases and epigenetic regulators, pluripotency transcription factors, and differentiation determinants. B-MYB along with E2F1 and c-MYC preferentially co-regulate cell cycle target genes. B-MYB also co-targets genes regulated by OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that are significantly associated with stem cell differentiation, embryonic development, and epigenetic control. Moreover, loss of B-MYB leads to a breakdown of the transcriptional hierarchy present in ESCs. These results coupled with functional studies demonstrate that B-MYB not only controls and accelerates cell cycle progression in ESCs it contributes to fate decisions and maintenance of pluripotent stem cell identity.

  6. The B-MYB transcriptional network guides cell cycle progression and fate decisions to sustain self-renewal and the identity of pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming; Riordon, Daniel R; Yan, Bin; Tarasova, Yelena S; Bruweleit, Sarah; Tarasov, Kirill V; Li, Ronald A; Wersto, Robert P; Boheler, Kenneth R

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent and have unlimited self-renewal capacity. Although pluripotency and differentiation have been examined extensively, the mechanisms responsible for self-renewal are poorly understood and are believed to involve an unusual cell cycle, epigenetic regulators and pluripotency-promoting transcription factors. Here we show that B-MYB, a cell cycle regulated phosphoprotein and transcription factor critical to the formation of inner cell mass, is central to the transcriptional and co-regulatory networks that sustain normal cell cycle progression and self-renewal properties of ESCs. Phenotypically, B-MYB is robustly expressed in ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and it is present predominantly in a hypo-phosphorylated state. Knockdown of B-MYB results in functional cell cycle abnormalities that involve S, G2 and M phases, and reduced expression of critical cell cycle regulators like ccnb1 and plk1. By conducting gene expression profiling on control and B-MYB deficient cells, ChIP-chip experiments, and integrative computational analyses, we unraveled a highly complex B-MYB-mediated transcriptional network that guides ESC self-renewal. The network encompasses critical regulators of all cell cycle phases and epigenetic regulators, pluripotency transcription factors, and differentiation determinants. B-MYB along with E2F1 and c-MYC preferentially co-regulate cell cycle target genes. B-MYB also co-targets genes regulated by OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that are significantly associated with stem cell differentiation, embryonic development, and epigenetic control. Moreover, loss of B-MYB leads to a breakdown of the transcriptional hierarchy present in ESCs. These results coupled with functional studies demonstrate that B-MYB not only controls and accelerates cell cycle progression in ESCs it contributes to fate decisions and maintenance of pluripotent stem cell identity.

  7. Reverting p53 activation after recovery of cellular stress to resume with cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Pedro A

    2017-05-01

    The activation of p53 in response to different types of cellular stress induces several protective reactions including cell cycle arrest, senescence or cell death. These protective effects are a consequence of the activation of p53 by specific phosphorylation performed by several kinases. The reversion of the cell cycle arrest, induced by p53, is a consequence of the phosphorylated and activated p53, which triggers its own downregulation and that of its positive regulators. The different down-regulatory processes have a sequential and temporal order of events. The mechanisms implicated in p53 down-regulation include phosphatases, deacetylases, and protein degradation by the proteasome or autophagy, which also affect different p53 protein targets and functions. The necessary first step is the dephosphorylation of p53 to make it available for interaction with mdm2 ubiquitin-ligase, which requires the activation of phosphatases targeting both p53 and p53-activating kinases. In addition, deacetylation of p53 is required to make lysine residues accessible to ubiquitin ligases. The combined action of these downregulatory mechanisms brings p53 protein back to its basal levels, and cell cycle progression can resume if cells have overcome the stress or damage situation. The specific targeting of these down-regulatory mechanisms can be exploited for therapeutic purposes in cancers harbouring wild-type p53.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor activation inhibits cell cycle progression by modulating 14-3-3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hye-Won; Park, Inae; Ghil, Sungho

    2014-09-01

    Cannabinoids display various pharmacological activities, including tumor regression, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, we used a yeast two-hybrid system to screen a mouse brain cDNA library for proteins interacting with type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R). Using the intracellular loop 3 of CB1R as bait, we identified 14-3-3β as an interacting partner of CB1R and confirmed their interaction using affinity-binding assays. 14-3-3β has been reported to induce a cell cycle delay at the G2/M phase. We tested the effects of cannabinoids on cell cycle progression in HeLa cells synchronized using a double-thymidine block-and-release protocol and found an increase in the population of G2/M phase cells. We further found that CB1R activation augmented the interaction of 14-3-3β with Wee1 and Cdc25B, and promoted phosphorylation of Cdc2 at Tyr-15. These results suggest that cannabinoids induce cell cycle delay at the G2/M phase by activating 14-3-3β.

  9. Genistein sensitizes ovarian carcinoma cells to chemotherapy by switching the cell cycle progression in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yanhong; Yuan Peng; Zhang Qinghong; Xin Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address how genistein sensitizes the chemotherapy-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells and promotes apoptosis in the respect of cell cycle and the regulation of survivin expression in the process. Methods: Ovarian SKOV-3 carcinoma cell line was treated with genistein or cisplatin either alone or in combination. Cell viability was showed by MTT method. Cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. Survivin mRNA and protein were revealed by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Results: Genistein could reduce the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, while cisplatin did so at a much higher level. In contrast, if the two agents were treated in combination, half growth inhibition (IC50) value for cisplatin was reduced remarkably and the effect was synergistic as analyzed by isobologram. In particular, the reduced cell viability was exhibited by a switch in cell cycle progression, as the cells were arrested in G2/M phase and the G0/G1 phase-fraction was significantly decreased. The reduced cell viability appeared to involve apoptosis, based on our results from flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. In the meanwhile, genistein performed the inhibitory effect on cisplatin-induced survivin expression. Conclusion: Genistein can sensitize ovarian carcinoma cells to cisplatin therapy with the inhibition of survivin expression as the potential mechanism.

  10. Contribution of CDP/Cux, a Transcription Factor, to Cell Cycle Progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xifeng FEI; Zhenghong QIN; Zhongqin LIANG

    2007-01-01

    CCAAT-displacement protein/Cut homeobox (CDP/Cux) was initially identified as a transcriptional repressor. However, a number of studies have now suggested that CDP/Cux is a transcriptional activator as well. Stable DNA binding activity of CDP/Cux is up-regulated at the G1/S transition by two mechanisms, dephosphorylation by the Cdc25A phosphatase and proteolytic processing to generate a 110 kDa amino-truncated isoform, CDP/Cux p110. The generation of CDP/Cux p110 stimulates the expression of reporter plasmid containing the promoter sequences of some S phase-specific-genes such as DNA polymerase α gene, dihydrofolate reductase gene, carbamoyl-phosphate synthase/aspartate carbamoyltransferase/dihydroorotase gene, and cyclin A gene. However, DNA binding activity of CDP/Cux is downregulated at G2 phase through a binding of cyclin A-cyclin-dependent kinasesl (Cdkl) to CDP/Cux.Furthermore, another CDP/Cux isoform, CDP/Cux p75, has been found to be associated with breast tumors indicating this isoform is involved in the abnormal proliferation of tumor cells. The differences in DNA binding of CDP/Cux isoforms in S and G2 phases suggest important roles of CDP/Cux in cell cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the functions of CDP/Cux with a focus on its roles in cell cycle regulation and its possible potency leading to the cell cycle reentry of neurons.

  11. ATP-binding cassette G-subfamily transporter 2 regulates cell cycle progression and asymmetric division in mouse cardiac side population progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Unno, Kazumasa; Cao, Xin; Qiu, Yiling; Liao, Ronglih

    2013-01-04

    After cardiac injury, cardiac progenitor cells are acutely reduced and are replenished in part by regulated self-renewal and proliferation, which occurs through symmetric and asymmetric cellular division. Understanding the molecular cues controlling progenitor cell self-renewal and lineage commitment is critical for harnessing these cells for therapeutic regeneration. We previously have found that the cell surface ATP-binding cassette G-subfamily transporter 2 (Abcg2) influences the proliferation of cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cells, but through unclear mechanisms. To determine the role of Abcg2 on cell cycle progression and mode of division in mouse CSP cells. Herein, using CSP cells isolated from wild-type and Abcg2 knockout mice, we found that Abcg2 regulates G1-S cell cycle transition by fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicators, cell cycle-focused gene expression arrays, and confocal live-cell fluorescent microscopy. Moreover, we found that modulation of cell cycle results in transition from symmetric to asymmetric cellular division in CSP cells lacking Abcg2. Abcg2 modulates CSP cell cycle progression and asymmetric cell division, establishing a mechanistic link between this surface transporter and cardiac progenitor cell function. Greater understanding of progenitor cell biology and, in particular, the regulation of resident progenitor cell homeostasis is vital for guiding the future development of cell-based therapies for cardiac regeneration.

  12. Butyrate induces reactive oxygen species production and affects cell cycle progression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M-C; Tsai, Y-L; Chen, Y-W; Chan, C-P; Huang, C-F; Lan, W-C; Lin, C-C; Lan, W-H; Jeng, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, such as butyric acid and propionic acid, are metabolic by-products generated by periodontal microflora such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, the effects of butyrate on the biological activities of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) are not well elucidated. Human GFs were exposed to various concentrations of butyrate (0.5-16 mm) for 24 h. Viable cells that excluded trypan blue were counted. Cell cycle distribution of GFs was analyzed by propidium iodide-staining flow cytometry. Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). Total RNA and protein lysates were isolated and subjected to RT-PCR using specific primers or to western blotting using specific antibodies, respectively. Butyrate inhibited the growth of GFs, as indicated by a decrease in the number of viable cells. This event was associated with an induction of G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest by butyrate (4-16 mm) in GFs. However, no marked apoptosis of GFs was noted in this experimental condition. Butyrate (> 2 mm) inhibited the expression of cdc2, cdc25C and cyclinB1 mRNAs and reduced the levels of Cdc2, Cdc25C and cyclinB1 proteins in GFs, as determined using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. This toxic effect of butyrate was associated with the production of ROS. These results suggest that butyrate generated by periodontal pathogens may be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases via the induction of ROS production and the impairment of cell growth, cell cycle progression and expression of cell cycle-related genes in GFs. These events are important in the initiation and prolongation of inflammatory processes in periodontal diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudik, Elodie; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Domenichini, Séverine; Bourge, Mickaël; Soubigout-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Yi, Dalong; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; De Veylder, Lieven; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants. PMID:25037213

  14. WNT5A modulates cell cycle progression and contributes to the chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wei; Hui-Hui Sun; Na Li; Hong-Yue Li; Xin Li; Qiang Li; Xiao-Hong Shen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although there are many studies on the mechanism of chemoresistance in cancers, studies on the relations between WNT5A and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer are rare. The present study was to examine the role of WNT5A in the regulation of cell cycle progression and in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. METHODS: Fresh pancreatic cancer and paracarcinoma tissues were obtained from 32 patients. The expressions of WNT5A, AKT/p-AKT and Cyclin D1 were detected by immunohistochemistry, and the correlation between WNT5A expression and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. The relationship between WNT5A expression and gemcitabine resistance was studied in PANC-1 and MIAPaCa2 cell lines. The effect of WNT5A on the regulation of cell cycle and gemcitabine cytotoxicity were investigated. The associations among the expressions of p-AKT, Cyclin D1 and WNT5A were also analyzed in cell lines and the effect of WNT5A on restriction-point (R-point) progression was evaluated. RESULTS: WNT5A, p-AKT and Cyclin D1 were highly expressed in pancreatic cancer tissues, and the WNT5A expression was correlated with the TNM stages. In vitro, WNT5A expression was associated with gemcitabine chemoresistance. The percentage of cells was increased in G0/G1 phase and decreased in S phase after knockdown of WNT5A in PANC-1. WNT5A promoted Cyclin D1 expression through phosphorylation of AKT which consequently enhanced G1-S transition and gemcitabine resistance. Furthermore, WNT5A enhanced the cell cycle progression toward R-point through regulation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and pRb-E2F complex formation. CONCLUSIONS: WNT5A induced chemoresistance by regulation of G1-S transition in pancreatic cancer cells. WNT5A might serve as a predictor of gemcitabine response and as a potential target for tumor chemotherapy.

  15. Human POLD1 modulates cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jing; Hong, Ping; Liu, Chengeng; Zhang, Yueqi; Wang, Jinling; Wang, Peichang

    2015-01-01

    Background The activity of eukaryotic DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) plays an essential role in genome stability through its effects on DNA replication and repair. The p125 catalytic subunit of Pol δ is encoded by POLD1 gene in human cells. To clarify biological functions of POLD1, we investigated the effects of POLD1 overexpression or downregulation on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, DNA synthesis and oxidative DNA damage induced by H2O2. Methods HEK293 cells were transfected with ...

  16. PLZF mutation alters mouse hematopoietic stem cell function and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Platet, Nadine; Vandevelde, Amelle; Poplineau, Mathilde; Koubi, Myriam; Finetti, Pascal; Tiberi, Guillaume; Imbert, Anne-Marie; Bertucci, François; Duprez, Estelle

    2016-04-14

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood populations due to their long-term self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capacities. Because they have to persist throughout an organism's life span, HSCs tightly regulate the balance between proliferation and quiescence. Here, we investigated the role of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (plzf) in HSC fate using the Zbtb16(lu/lu)mouse model, which harbors a natural spontaneous mutation that inactivates plzf. Regenerative stress revealed that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs had a lineage-skewing potential from lymphopoiesis toward myelopoiesis, an increase in the long-term-HSC pool, and a decreased repopulation potential. Furthermore, oldplzf-mutant HSCs present an amplified aging phenotype, suggesting that plzf controls age-related pathway. We found that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs harbor a transcriptional signature associated with a loss of stemness and cell cycle deregulation. Lastly, cell cycle analyses revealed an important role for plzf in the regulation of the G1-S transition of HSCs. Our study reveals a new role for plzf in regulating HSC function that is linked to cell cycle regulation, and positions plzf as a key player in controlling HSC homeostasis.

  17. Molecular Network Dynamics of Cell Cycle Control: Periodicity of Start and Finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Alida; Zámborszky, Judit; Oguz, Cihan; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2017-01-01

    The cell division cycle is controlled by a complex regulatory network which ensures that the phases of the cell cycle are executed in the right order. This regulatory network receives signals from the environment, monitors the state of the DNA, and decides timings of cell cycle events. The underlying transcriptional and post-translational regulatory interactions lead to complex dynamical responses, such as the oscillations in the levels of cell cycle proteins driven by intertwined biochemical reactions. A cell moves between different phases of its cycle similar to a dynamical system switching between its steady states. The complex molecular network driving these phases has been investigated in previous computational systems biology studies. Here, we review the critical physiological and molecular transitions that occur in the cell cycle and discuss the role of mathematical modeling in elucidating these transitions and understand cell cycle synchronization.

  18. Impaired germ cell development due to compromised cell cycle progression in Skp2-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Keiko

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gonads are responsible for the production of germ cells through both mitosis and meiosis. Skp2 is the receptor subunit of an SCF-type ubiquitin ligase and is a major regulator of the progression of cells into S phase of the cell cycle, which it promotes by mediating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of p27, an inhibitor of cell proliferation. However, the role of the Skp2-p27 pathway in germ cell development remains elusive. Results We now show that disruption of Skp2 in mice results in a marked impairment in the fertility of males, with the phenotypes resembling Sertoli cell-only syndrome in men. Testes of Skp2-/- mice manifested pronounced germ cell hypoplasia accompanied by massive apoptosis in spermatogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed an increased prevalence of polyploidy in spermatozoa, suggesting that the aneuploidy of these cells is responsible for the induction of apoptosis. Disruption of the p27 gene of Skp2-/- mice restored germ cell development, indicating that the testicular hypoplasia of Skp2-/- animals is attributable to the antiproliferative effect of p27 accumulation. Conclusion Our results thus suggest that compromised cell cycle progression caused by the accumulation of p27 results in aneuploidy and the induction of apoptosis in gonadal cells of Skp2-/- mice. The consequent reduction in the number of mature gametes accounts for the decreased fertility of these animals. These findings reinforce the importance of the Skp2-p27 pathway in cell cycle regulation and in germ cell development.

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Berberine on the Activation and Cell Cycle Progression of Human Peripheral Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihui Xu; Yi Liu; Xianhui He

    2005-01-01

    The immunosuppressive property of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been well documented, but the mechanism of its action on lymphocytes has not been completely elucidated. The present study is to investigate the effect of berberine on the activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, in particular T lymphocytes. Whole peripheral blood from healthy donors was stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) alone or phorbol dibutyrate (PDB) plus ionomycin, and the expression of CD69 and CD25 on T lymphocytes was evaluated with flow cytometry.The distribution of cell cycles and cell viability were analyzed by staining with propidium iodide (PI) and 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD), respectively. The results showed that 100 μmol/L and 50 μmol/L of berberine significantly inhibited CD69 expression on T cells stimulated with PDB plus ionomycin or PHA, whereas the effect of 25 μmol/L berberine was not significant. As the incubation time increased, the extent of inhibition decreased.Similarly, the expression of CD25 was also reduced by berberine in a dose-dependent manner over the concentration range of 25-100 μmol/L. Besides, this alkaloid could block lymphocyte cell cycle progression from G0/G1 phase to S and G2/M phase without phase specificity. Moreover, analysis following 7-AAD staining revealed that berberine had no significant cytotoxicity on lymphocytes. Taken together, berberine significantly inhibits the expression of activation antigens on T lymphocytes and also blocks the progression of cell cycles of lymphocytes,suggesting that berberine may exert immunosuppressive effect through inhibiting the activation and proliferation of T cells.

  20. Hepatocytes Polyploidization and Cell Cycle Control in Liver Physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Gentric

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of “diploid-polyploid conversion” during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels, oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.. Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  1. Oncogenic Ras pushes (and pulls) cell cycle progression through ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling cascade is capable of channeling a wide variety of extracellular signals into control of cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and death. Because aberrant regulation at all steps of this signaling axis is observed in cancer, it remains an area of great interest in the field of tumor biology. Here we present evidence of the intricate and delicate levels of control of this pathway as it pertains to cell cycle regulation and illustrate how this control is not simply a rheostat.

  2. Valproate inhibits MAP kinase signalling and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfossés-Baron, Kristelle; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Simoneau, Antoine; Sellam, Adnane; Roberts, Stephen; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of valproate (VPA), a widely prescribed short chain fatty acid with anticonvulsant and anticancer properties, remains poorly understood. Here, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model to investigate the biological consequences of VPA exposure. We found that low pH strongly potentiates VPA-induced growth inhibition. Transcriptional profiling revealed that under these conditions, VPA modulates the expression of genes involved in diverse cellular processes including protein folding, cell wall organisation, sexual reproduction, and cell cycle progression. We further investigated the impact of VPA on selected processes and found that this drug: i) activates markers of the unfolded protein stress response such as Hac1 mRNA splicing; ii) modulates the cell wall integrity pathway by inhibiting the activation of the Slt2 MAP kinase, and synergizes with cell wall stressors such as micafungin and calcofluor white in preventing yeast growth; iii) prevents activation of the Kss1 and Fus3 MAP kinases of the mating pheromone pathway, which in turn abolishes cellular responses to alpha factor; and iv) blocks cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Overall, our data identify heretofore unknown biological responses to VPA in budding yeast, and highlight the broad spectrum of cellular pathways influenced by this chemical in eukaryotes. PMID:27782169

  3. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal.

  4. Human folliculin delays cell cycle progression through late S and G2/M-phases: effect of phosphorylation and tumor associated mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Laviolette

    Full Text Available The Birt-Hogg-Dube disease occurs as a result of germline mutations in the human Folliculin gene (FLCN, and is characterized by clinical features including fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts and multifocal renal neoplasia. Clinical and genetic evidence suggest that FLCN acts as a tumor suppressor gene. The human cell line UOK257, derived from the renal cell carcinoma of a patient with a germline mutation in the FLCN gene, harbors a truncated version of the FLCN protein. Reconstitution of the wild type FLCN protein into UOK257 cells delays cell cycle progression, due to a slower progression through the late S and G2/M-phases. Similarly, Flcn (-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts progress more rapidly through the cell cycle than wild type controls (Flcn (flox/flox. The reintroduction of tumor-associated FLCN mutants (FLCN ΔF157, FLCN 1-469 or FLCN K508R fails to delay cell cycle progression in UOK257 cells. Additionally, FLCN phosphorylation (on Serines 62 and 73 fluctuates throughout the cell cycle and peaks during the G2/M phase in cells treated with nocodazole. In keeping with this observation, the reintroduction of a FLCN phosphomimetic mutant into the UOK257 cell line results in faster progression through the cell cycle compared to those expressing the wild type FLCN protein. These findings suggest that the tumor suppression function of FLCN may be linked to its impact on the cell cycle and that FLCN phosphorylation is important for this activity. Additionally, these observations describe a novel in vitro assay for testing the functional significance of FLCN mutations and/or genetic polymorphisms.

  5. Translation-independent circadian control of the cell cycle in a unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Sumiya, Nobuko; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Nakano, Akihiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Mami

    2014-05-08

    Circadian rhythms of cell division have been observed in several lineages of eukaryotes, especially photosynthetic unicellular eukaryotes. However, the mechanism underlying the circadian regulation of the cell cycle and the nature of the advantage conferred remain unknown. Here, using the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, we show that the G1/S regulator RBR-E2F-DP complex links the G1/S transition to circadian rhythms. Time-dependent E2F phosphorylation promotes the G1/S transition during subjective night and this phosphorylation event occurs independently of cell cycle progression, even under continuous dark or when cytosolic translation is inhibited. Constitutive expression of a phospho-mimic of E2F or depletion of RBR unlinks cell cycle progression from circadian rhythms. These transgenic lines are exposed to higher oxidative stress than the wild type. Circadian inhibition of cell cycle progression during the daytime by RBR-E2F-DP pathway likely protects cells from photosynthetic oxidative stress by temporally compartmentalizing photosynthesis and cell cycle progression.

  6. Transcription-independent function of Polycomb group protein PSC in cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Sarip, Adone; Lagarou, Anna; Doyen, Cecile M; van der Knaap, Jan A; Aslan, Ülkü; Bezstarosti, Karel; Yassin, Yasmin; Brock, Hugh W; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2012-05-11

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins control development and cell proliferation through chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression. We describe a transcription-independent function for PcG protein Posterior sex combs (PSC) in regulating the destruction of cyclin B (CYC-B). A substantial portion of PSC was found outside canonical PcG complexes, instead associated with CYC-B and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). Cell-based experiments and reconstituted reactions established that PSC and Lemming (LMG, also called APC11) associate and ubiquitylate CYC-B cooperatively, marking it for proteosomal degradation. Thus, PSC appears to mediate both developmental gene silencing and posttranslational control of mitosis. Direct regulation of cell cycle progression might be a crucial part of the PcG system's function in development and cancer.

  7. p53 functions as a cell cycle control protein in osteosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, L; Kassel, J; Nelson, C E; Gryka, M A; Litwak, G; Gebhardt, M; Bressac, B; Ozturk, M; Baker, S J; Vogelstein, B

    1990-11-01

    Mutations in the p53 gene have been associated with a wide range of human tumors, including osteosarcomas. Although it has been shown that wild-type p53 can block the ability of E1a and ras to cotransform primary rodent cells, it is poorly understood why inactivation of the p53 gene is important for tumor formation. We show that overexpression of the gene encoding wild-type p53 blocks the growth of osteosarcoma cells. The growth arrest was determined to be due to an inability of the transfected cells to progress into S phase. This suggests that the role of the p53 gene as an antioncogene may be in controlling the cell cycle in a fashion analogous to the check-point control genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  8. Amygdalin delays cell cycle progression and blocks growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Tsaur, Igor; Juengel, Eva; Borgmann, Hendrik; Nelson, Karen; Thomas, Christian; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-02-15

    Despite impressive survival benefits from new agents to treat metastasized prostate cancer (PCa), progressive drug resistance hinders long-term response and restricts the efficacy of subsequent therapy. Due to reported antitumor activity of amygdalin and growing popularity for complementary and alternative medicine the potential of this natural, widely used substance to exert antineoplastic effects on prostate cancer cells has been assessed. LNCaP (castration-sensitive), DU-145 and PC3 cells (castration-resistant) were exposed to different concentrations of amygdalin for 24h or 2weeks. Cell growth was measured by the MTT test, clonal formation by the clonogenic assay. Flow cytometry served to investigate apoptosis and cell cycle phases. Cell cycle regulating proteins and the mTOR-akt signaling axis were analyzed by western blotting. Amygdalin dose-dependently diminished tumor cell growth with maximum effects at 10mg/ml. Apoptosis of PC3 and LNCaP but not of DU-145 cells was reduced, whereas colony formation was suppressed in all cell lines. A decrease in the number of G2/M- and S-phase cells along with an elevated number of G0/G1-phase cells was recorded. The cell cycle proteins cdk 1, cdk 2 and cdk 4 as well as cyclin A, cyclin B and cyclin D3 were modulated by amygdalin after both 24h and 2weeks. Distinct effects on p19 and p27 expression and on Akt, Rictor and Raptor activation became evident only after 2weeks. Amygdalin exhibits significant antitumor activity in both castration-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa cell lines and merits further evaluation for therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An Application of Invertibility of Boolean Control Networks to the Control of the Mammalian Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuize; Zhang, Lijun; Mou, Shaoshuai

    2017-01-01

    In Fauré et al. (2006), the dynamics of the core network regulating the mammalian cell cycle is formulated as a Boolean control network (BCN) model consisting of nine proteins as state nodes and a tenth protein (protein CycD) as the control input node. In this model, one of the state nodes, protein Cdc20, plays a central role in the separation of sister chromatids. Hence, if any Cdc20 sequence can be obtained, fully controlling the mammalian cell cycle is feasible. Motivated by this fact, we study whether any Cdc20 sequence can be obtained theoretically. We formulate the foregoing problem as the invertibility of BCNs, that is, whether one can obtain any Cdc20 sequence by designing input (i.e., protein CycD) sequences. We give an algorithm to verify the invertibility of any BCN, and find that the BCN model for the core network regulating the mammalian cell cycle is not invertible, that is, one cannot obtain any Cdc20 sequence. We further present another algorithm to test whether a finite Cdc20 sequence can be generated by the BCN model, which leads to a series of periodic infinite Cdc20 sequences with alternately active and inactive Cdc20 segments. States of these sequences are alternated between the two attractors in the proposed model, which reproduces correctly how a cell exits the cell cycle to enter the quiescent state, or the opposite.

  10. Epigenetic dynamics across the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Tony Bou; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of the mammalian cell cycle depends on correct timing and co-ordination of a series of events, which are managed by the cellular transcriptional machinery and epigenetic mechanisms governing genome accessibility. Epigenetic chromatin modifications are dynamic across the cell cycle......, and are shown to influence and be influenced by cell-cycle progression. Chromatin modifiers regulate cell-cycle progression locally by controlling the expression of individual genes and globally by controlling chromatin condensation and chromosome segregation. The cell cycle, on the other hand, ensures...... a correct inheritance of epigenetic chromatin modifications to daughter cells. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on the dynamics of epigenetic chromatin modifications during progression of the cell cycle....

  11. Ras protein participated in histone acetylation-mediated cell cycle control in Physarum polycephalum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoxue; LU Jun; ZHAO Yanmei; WANG Xiuli; HUANG Baiqu

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that in Physarum polycephalum, a naturally synchronized slime mold, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA), arrestes the cell cycle at the checkpoints of S/G2, G2/M and mitosis exit, and influences the transcription of two ras genes Ppras1 and Pprap1, as well as the Ras protein level. Antibody neutralization experiment using anti-Ras antibody treatment showed that Ras protein played an important role in cell cycle checkpoint control through regulation of the level of Cyclin B1, suggesting that Ras protein might be a key factor for histone acetylation-mediated cell cycle regulation in P. polycephalum.

  12. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  13. ATM prevents DSB formation by coordinating SSB repair and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoronenkova, Svetlana V; Dianov, Grigory L

    2015-03-31

    DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) arise as a consequence of spontaneous DNA instability and are also formed as DNA repair intermediates. Their repair is critical because they otherwise terminate gene transcription and generate toxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on replication. To prevent the formation of DSBs, SSB repair must be completed before DNA replication. To accomplish this, cells should be able to detect unrepaired SSBs, and then delay cell cycle progression to allow more time for repair; however, to date there is no evidence supporting the coordination of SSB repair and replication in human cells. Here we report that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) plays a major role in restricting the replication of SSB-containing DNA and thus prevents DSB formation. We show that ATM is activated by SSBs and coordinates their repair with DNA replication. SSB-mediated ATM activation is followed by a G1 cell cycle delay that allows more time for repair and thus prevents the replication of damaged DNA and DSB accrual. These findings establish an unanticipated role for ATM in the signaling of DNA SSBs and provide important insight into the molecular defects leading to genetic instability in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia.

  14. Cell cycle control as a basis for cancer chemoprevention through dietary agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeran, Syed Musthapa; Katiyar, Santosh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    The development of cancer is associated with disorders in the regulation of the cell cycle. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the known sequence of events that regulate cell cycle progression with an emphasis on the checkpoints and the mechanisms cell employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) molecules. The cyclins are CDK binding partners which are required for kinase activity and their protein levels are intimately linked to the cell cycle stage. CDK activity can be regulated by other mechanisms, such as phosphorylation events, that may contribute to deregulation of cell cycle and the development of cancer. While fruits and vegetables are recommended for prevention of cancer, their active ingredients and mechanisms of action are less well understood. Here, we briefly present evidence that dietary agents identified from fruits and vegetables can act to modulate the effects of deregulated cell cycle checkpoints, and that this may contribute to the prevention of cancer. The agents include apigenin (celery, parsley), curcumin (turmeric), (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (green tea), resveratrol (red grape, peanuts and berries), genistein (soybean), and silymarin (milk thistle). The teachings of Hippocrates are still true “let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food”. PMID:17981702

  15. Cyclin F suppresses B-Myb activity to promote cell cycle checkpoint control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard; Hoffmann, Saskia; Ahlskog, Johanna K

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to DNA damage by activating cell cycle checkpoints to delay proliferation and facilitate DNA repair. Here, to uncover new checkpoint regulators, we perform RNA interference screening targeting genes involved in ubiquitylation processes. We show that the F-box protein cyclin F plays...... an important role in checkpoint control following ionizing radiation. Cyclin F-depleted cells initiate checkpoint signalling after ionizing radiation, but fail to maintain G2 phase arrest and progress into mitosis prematurely. Importantly, cyclin F suppresses the B-Myb-driven transcriptional programme...... that promotes accumulation of crucial mitosis-promoting proteins. Cyclin F interacts with B-Myb via the cyclin box domain. This interaction is important to suppress cyclin A-mediated phosphorylation of B-Myb, a key step in B-Myb activation. In summary, we uncover a regulatory mechanism linking the F-box protein...

  16. Analysis of Factors Controlling Cell Cycle that Can Be Synchronized Nondestructively During Root Cap Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha Hawes

    2011-02-04

    Publications and presentations during the final funding period, including progress in defining the substrate specificity, the primary goal of the project, are listed below. Both short-term and long-term responses mediated by PsUGT1 have been characterized in transgenic or mutant pea, alfalfa, and Arabidopsis with altered expression of PsUGT1. Additional progress includes evaluation of the relationship between control of the cell cycle by PsUGT1 and other glycosyltransferase and glycosidase enzymes that are co-regulated in the legume root cap during the onset of mitosis and differentiation. Transcriptional profiling and multidimensional protein identification technology ('MudPIT') have been used to establish the broader molecular context for the mechanism by which PsUGT1 controls cell cycle in response to environmental signals. A collaborative study with the Norwegian Forest Research Institute (who provided $10,000.00 in supplies and travel funds for collaborator Dr. Toril Eldhuset to travel to Arizona and Dr. H. H. Woo to travel to Norway) made it possible to establish that the inducible root cap system for studying carbohydrate synthesis and solubilization is expressed in gymnosperm as well as angiosperm species. This discovery provides an important tool to amplify the potential applications of the research in defining conserved cell cycle machinery across a very broad range of plant species and habitats. The final work, published during 2009, revealed an additional surprising parallel with mammalian immune responses: The cells whose production is controlled by PsUGT1 appear to function in a manner which is analogous to that of white blood cells, by trapping and killing in an extracellular manner. This may explain why mutation within the coding region of PsUGT1 and its homolog in humans (UGT1) is lethal to plants and animals. The work has been the subject of invited reviews. A postdoctoral fellow, eight undergraduate students, four M.S. students and

  17. PHD1 links cell-cycle progression to oxygen sensing through hydroxylation of the centrosomal protein Cep192.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Sandra C; Bensaddek, Dalila; Ortmann, Brian; Maure, Jean-Francois; Mudie, Sharon; Blow, J Julian; Lamond, Angus I; Swedlow, Jason R; Rocha, Sonia

    2013-08-26

    PHD1 belongs to the family of prolyl-4-hydroxylases (PHDs) that is responsible for posttranslational modification of prolines on specific target proteins. Because PHD activity is sensitive to oxygen levels and certain byproducts of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, PHDs act as sensors of the cell's metabolic state. Here, we identify PHD1 as a critical molecular link between oxygen sensing and cell-cycle control. We show that PHD1 function is required for centrosome duplication and maturation through modification of the critical centrosome component Cep192. Importantly, PHD1 is also required for primary cilia formation. Cep192 is hydroxylated by PHD1 on proline residue 1717. This hydroxylation is required for binding of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(Skp2), which ubiquitinates Cep192, targeting it for proteasomal degradation. By modulating Cep192 levels, PHD1 thereby affects the processes of centriole duplication and centrosome maturation and contributes to the regulation of cell-cycle progression. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro alterations do not reflect a requirement for host cell cycle progression during Plasmodium liver stage infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kirsten K; March, Sandra; Ng, Shengyong; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Mota, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    Prior to invading nonreplicative erythrocytes, Plasmodium parasites undergo their first obligate step in the mammalian host inside hepatocytes, where each sporozoite replicates to generate thousands of merozoites. While normally quiescent, hepatocytes retain proliferative capacity and can readily reenter the cell cycle in response to diverse stimuli. Many intracellular pathogens, including protozoan parasites, manipulate the cell cycle progression of their host cells for their own benefit, but it is not known whether the hepatocyte cell cycle plays a role during Plasmodium liver stage infection. Here, we show that Plasmodium parasites can be observed in mitotic hepatoma cells throughout liver stage development, where they initially reduce the likelihood of mitosis and ultimately lead to significant acquisition of a binucleate phenotype. However, hepatoma cells pharmacologically arrested in S phase still support robust and complete Plasmodium liver stage development, which thus does not require cell cycle progression in the infected cell in vitro. Furthermore, murine hepatocytes remain quiescent throughout in vivo infection with either Plasmodium berghei or Plasmodium yoelii, as do Plasmodium falciparum-infected primary human hepatocytes, demonstrating that the rapid and prodigious growth of liver stage parasites is accomplished independent of host hepatocyte cell cycle progression during natural infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Api5 contributes to E2F1 control of the G1/S cell cycle phase transition.

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    Marina Garcia-Jove Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E2f transcription factor family has a pivotal role in controlling the cell fate in general, and in particular cancer development, by regulating the expression of several genes required for S phase entry and progression through the cell cycle. It has become clear that the transcriptional activation of at least one member of the family, E2F1, can also induce apoptosis. An appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators appears to be necessary to modulate E2F1 transcriptional activity, and thus cell fate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we show that Api5, already known as a regulator of E2F1 induced-apoptosis, is required for the E2F1 transcriptional activation of G1/S transition genes, and consequently, for cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Api5 appears to be a cell cycle regulated protein. Removal of Api5 reduces cyclin E, cyclin A, cyclin D1 and Cdk2 levels, causing G1 cell cycle arrest and cell cycle delay. Luciferase assays established that Api5 directly regulates the expression of several G1/S genes under E2F1 control. Using protein/protein and protein/DNA immunoprecipitation studies, we demonstrate that Api5, even if not physically interacting with E2F1, contributes positively to E2F1 transcriptional activity by increasing E2F1 binding to its target promoters, through an indirect mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results described here support the pivotal role of cell cycle related proteins, that like E2F1, may act as tumor suppressors or as proto-oncogenes during cancer development, depending on the behavior of their positive and negative regulators. According to our findings, Api5 contributes to E2F1 transcriptional activation of cell cycle-associated genes by facilitating E2F1 recruitment onto its target promoters and thus E2F1 target gene transcription.

  20. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles alter cell cycle progression through CCND1 and EGR1 gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2 O3 -NPs) are important ceramic materials that have been used in a variety of commercial and industrial applications. However, the impact of acute and chronic exposure to Al2 O3 -NPs on the environment and on human health has not been well studied. In this investigation, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of Al2 O3 -NPs on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by using a cell viability assay and observing cellular morphological changes, analyzing cell cycle progression, and monitoring the expression of cell cycle response genes (PCNA, EGR1, E2F1, CCND1, CCNC, CCNG1, and CYCD3). The Al2 O3 -NPs reduced hMSC viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation, chromosomal DNA fragmentation, and cytoplasmic vacuolization were observed in Al2 O3 -NP-exposed cells. The nuclear morphological changes indicated that Al2 O3 -NPs alter cell cycle progression and gene expression. The cell cycle distribution revealed that Al2 O3 -NPs cause cell cycle arrest in the sub-G0-G1 phase, and this is associated with a reduction in the cell population in the G2/M and G0/G1 phases. Moreover, Al2 O3 -NPs induced the upregulation of cell cycle response genes, including EGR1, E2F1, and CCND1. Our results suggested that exposure to Al2 O3 -NPs could cause acute cytotoxic effects in hMSCs through cell cycle regulatory genes.

  1. Transcriptional regulation is a major controller of cell cycle transition dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Cardelli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    in various organisms showed the importance of positive feedbacks in other transitions as well. Here we investigate if a universal control system with transcriptional regulation(s) and post-translational positive feedback(s) can be proposed for the regulation of all cell cycle transitions. Through...... computational modeling, we analyze the transition dynamics in all possible combinations of transcriptional and post-translational regulations. We find that some combinations lead to 'sloppy' transitions, while others give very precise control. The periodic transcriptional regulation through the activator...... or the inhibitor leads to radically different dynamics. Experimental evidence shows that in cell cycle transitions of organisms investigated for cell cycle dependent periodic transcription, only the inhibitor OR the activator is under cyclic control and never both of them. Based on these observations, we propose...

  2. Cell-cycle control by protein kinase B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, G.J.P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Numerous cells in the body divide, and do so in a well-controlled manner. In some situations where this control is deregulated, cells may divide continuously. Such uncontrolled proliferation of cells is thought to be responsible for the onset of cancer. In order for a cell to divide in a normal set

  3. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  4. Two-Component Signal Transduction Pathways Regulating Growth and Cell Cycle Progression in a Bacterium: A System-Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Prasol, Melanie S; Perchuk, Barrett S; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2005-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein–protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK–CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this system

  5. CCND1–CDK4–mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E.; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1–CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1–CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1–CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. PMID:26150472

  6. TRPV3 Channel Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Safeguards the Pluripotency of Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Iek Chi; Chan, Hing Chung; Qi, Zenghua; Ng, Kwun Lam; So, Chun; Tsang, Suk Ying

    2016-02-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have tremendous potential for research and future therapeutic purposes. However, the calcium handling mechanism in ESCs is not fully elucidated. Aims of this study are (1) to investigate if transient receptor potential vanilloid-3 (TRPV3) channels are present in mouse ESCs (mESCs) and their subcellular localization; (2) to investigate the role of TRPV3 in maintaining the characteristics of mESCs. Western blot and immunocytochemistry showed that TRPV3 was present at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of mESCs. Calcium imaging showed that, in the absence of extracellular calcium, TRPV3 activators camphor and 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol increased the cytosolic calcium. However, depleting the ER store in advance of activator addition abolished the calcium increase, suggesting that TRPV3 released calcium from the ER. To dissect the functional role of TRPV3, TRPV3 was activated and mESC proliferation was measured by trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays. The results showed that TRPV3 activation led to a decrease in mESC proliferation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that TRPV3 activation increased the percentage of cells in G2 /M phase; consistently, Western blot also revealed a concomitant increase in the expression of inactive form of cyclin-dependent kinase 1, suggesting that TRPV3 activation arrested mESCs at G2 /M phase. TRPV3 activation did not alter the expression of pluripotency markers Oct-4, Klf4 and c-Myc, suggesting that the pluripotency was preserved. Our study is the first study to show the presence of TRPV3 at ER. Our study also reveals the novel role of TRPV3 in controlling the cell cycle and preserving the pluripotency of ESCs.

  7. p53 as Batman: using a movie plot to understand control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadi, Nikhita; Foley, Sage E; Nowey, Mark; Plopper, George E

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides and describes a two-part classroom exercise to help students understand control of the cell cycle, with a focus on the transcription factor p53, the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, the Mdm2 inhibitor ARF, the kinases ATM and ATR, the kinase Chk2, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1). Students use characters and scenes from the movie The Dark Knight to represent elements of the cell cycle control machinery, then they apply these characters and scenes to translate a primary research article on p53 function into a new movie scene in the "Batman universe." This exercise is appropriate for college-level courses in cell biology and cancer biology and requires students to have a background in introductory cell biology. Explicit learning outcomes and associated assessment methods are provided, as well as slides, student assignments, the primary research article, and an instructor's guide for the exercise.

  8. Restrictions in cell cycle progression of adult vestibular supporting cells in response to ectopic cyclin D1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Loponen

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells and supporting cells of the mammalian inner ear are quiescent cells, which do not regenerate. In contrast, non-mammalian supporting cells have the ability to re-enter the cell cycle and produce replacement hair cells. Earlier studies have demonstrated cyclin D1 expression in the developing mouse supporting cells and its downregulation along maturation. In explant cultures of the mouse utricle, we have here focused on the cell cycle control mechanisms and proliferative potential of adult supporting cells. These cells were forced into the cell cycle through adenoviral-mediated cyclin D1 overexpression. Ectopic cyclin D1 triggered robust cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells, accompanied by changes in p27(Kip1 and p21(Cip1 expressions. Main part of cell cycle reactivated supporting cells were DNA damaged and arrested at the G2/M boundary. Only small numbers of mitotic supporting cells and rare cells with signs of two successive replications were found. Ectopic cyclin D1-triggered cell cycle reactivation did not lead to hyperplasia of the sensory epithelium. In addition, a part of ectopic cyclin D1 was sequestered in the cytoplasm, reflecting its ineffective nuclear import. Combined, our data reveal intrinsic barriers that limit proliferative capacity of utricular supporting cells.

  9. Akt1 intramitochondrial cycling is a crucial step in the redox modulation of cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Gabriela Antico Arciuch

    Full Text Available Akt is a serine/threonine kinase involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. Akt is differentially activated by growth factors and oxidative stress by sequential phosphorylation of Ser(473 by mTORC2 and Thr(308 by PDK1. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of H(2O(2 yield, mitochondrial activation of Akt1 and cell cycle progression in NIH/3T3 cell line with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging, and directed mutagenesis. We demonstrate that modulation by H(2O(2 entails the entrance of cytosolic P-Akt1 Ser(473 to mitochondria, where it is further phosphorylated at Thr(308 by constitutive PDK1. Phosphorylation of Thr(308 in mitochondria determines Akt1 passage to nuclei and triggers genomic post-translational mechanisms for cell proliferation. At high H(2O(2, Akt1-PDK1 association is disrupted and P-Akt1 Ser(473 accumulates in mitochondria in detriment to nuclear translocation; accordingly, Akt1 T308A is retained in mitochondria. Low Akt1 activity increases cytochrome c release to cytosol leading to apoptosis. As assessed by mass spectra, differential H(2O(2 effects on Akt1-PDK interaction depend on the selective oxidation of Cys(310 to sulfenic or cysteic acids. These results indicate that Akt1 intramitochondrial-cycling is central for redox modulation of cell fate.

  10. Local circadian clock gates cell cycle progression of transient amplifying cells during regenerative hair cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V; Vollmers, Christopher; de la Cruz, Damon; Chaix, Amandine; Ramos, Raul; Panda, Satchidananda; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-06-04

    Regenerative cycling of hair follicles offers an unique opportunity to explore the role of circadian clock in physiological tissue regeneration. We focused on the role of circadian clock in actively proliferating transient amplifying cells, as opposed to quiescent stem cells. We identified two key sites of peripheral circadian clock activity specific to regenerating anagen hair follicles, namely epithelial matrix and mesenchymal dermal papilla. We showed that peripheral circadian clock in epithelial matrix cells generates prominent daily mitotic rhythm. As a consequence of this mitotic rhythmicity, hairs grow faster in the morning than in the evening. Because cells are the most susceptible to DNA damage during mitosis, this cycle leads to a remarkable time-of-day-dependent sensitivity of growing hair follicles to genotoxic stress. Same doses of γ-radiation caused dramatic hair loss in wild-type mice when administered in the morning, during mitotic peak, compared with the evening, when hair loss is minimal. This diurnal radioprotective effect becomes lost in circadian mutants, consistent with asynchronous mitoses in their hair follicles. Clock coordinates cell cycle progression with genotoxic stress responses by synchronizing Cdc2/Cyclin B-mediated G2/M checkpoint. Our results uncover diurnal mitotic gating as the essential protective mechanism in highly proliferative hair follicles and offer strategies for minimizing or maximizing cytotoxicity of radiation therapies.

  11. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  12. Immunological control of cell cycle aberrations for the avoidance of oncogenesis: the case of tetraploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-05-01

    Tetraploid cells--cells that contain twice the normal amount of DNA--are more prone to neoplastic transformation than their normal, diploid counterparts since they are genomically unstable and frequently undergo asymmetric, multipolar cell divisions. Similar to many other genomic aberrations, tetraploidization is normally avoided by multiple, nonredundant cell-intrinsic mechanisms that are tied to cell cycle checkpoints. Unexpectedly, tetraploidization is also under the control of a cell-extrinsic mechanism determined by the immune system. Indeed, oncogene- or carcinogen-induced cancers developing in immunodeficient mice contain cells with a higher DNA content than similar tumors growing in immunocompetent hosts. Moreover, cancer cell lines that have been rendered tetraploid in vitro grow normally in immunodeficient mice, yet almost fail to generate tumors in immunocompetent animals. One of the mechanisms whereby the immune system recognizes tetraploid cells originates from tetraploidy causing an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that culminates in the exposure of the ER protein calreticulin on the cell surface. Hence, tetraploidy exemplifies a potentially oncogenic alteration that is repressed by a combination of cell-autonomous mechanisms and immunosurveillance. Oncogenesis and tumor progression require the simultaneous failure of both such control systems.

  13. Role of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in the cell cycle progression of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ning; Zhang, Zhuo; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Shi, Xianglin

    2003-10-31

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men. Recent studies demonstrated that PI3K signaling is an important intracellular mediator which is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, anti-apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis. In the present study, we demonstrate that the inhibition of PI3K activity by LY294002, inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation and induced the G(1) cell cycle arrest. This effect was accompanied by the decreased expression of G(1)-associated proteins including cyclin D1, CDK4, and Rb phosphorylation at Ser780, Ser795, and Ser807/811, whereas expression of CDK6 and beta-actin was not affected by LY294002. The expression of cyclin kinase inhibitor, p21(CIP1/WAF1), was induced by LY294002, while levels of p16(INK4) were decreased in the same experiment. The inhibition of PI3K activity also inhibited the phosphorylation and p70(S6K), but not MAPK. PI3K regulates cell cycle through AKT, mTOR to p70(S6K). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has similar inhibitory effects on G(1) cell cycle progression and expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and Rb phosphorylation. These results suggest that PI3K mediates G(1) cell cycle progression and cyclin expression through the activation of AKT/mTOR/p70(S6K) signaling pathway in the prostate cancer cells.

  14. Inhibition of cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells by andrographolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Der; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Lee, Yi-Che; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lin, Rong-An; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2008-08-11

    In recent years, attention has been focused on the anti-cancer properties of pure components, an important role in the prevention of disease. Andrographolide (Andro), the major constituent of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F.) Nees plant, is implicated towards its pharmacological activity. To investigate the mechanism basis for the anti-tumor properties of Andro, Andro was used to examine its effect on cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells. The data from cell growth experiment showed that Andro exhibited the anti-proliferation effect on Lovo cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This event was accompanied the arrest of the cells at the G1-S phase by Andro at the tested concentrations of 0-30 microM. Cellular uptake of Andro and Andro was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis analysis and the intracellular accumulation of Andro (0.61+/-0.07 microM/mg protein) was observed when treatment of Lovo cells with Andro for 12h. In addition, an accumulation of the cells in G1 phase (15% increase for 10 microM of Andro) was observed as well as by the association with a marked decrease in the protein expression of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cdk2 and Cdk4. Andro also inducted the content of Cdk inhibitor p21 and p16, and the phosphorylation of p53. Further immunoprecipitation studies found that, in response to the treatment, the formation of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and Cyclin A/Cdk2 complexes had declined, preventing the phosphorylation of Rb and the subsequent dissociation of Rb/E2F complex. These results suggested Andro can inhibit Lovo cell growth by G1-S phase arrest, and was exerted by inducing the expression of p53, p21 and p16 that, in turn, repressed the activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and/or Cyclin A/Cdk2, as well as Rb phosphorylation.

  15. Interaction of PTPIP51 with Tubulin, CGI-99 and Nuf2 During Cell Cycle Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Wimmer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase interacting protein 51 (PTPIP51, also known as regulator of microtubule dynamics protein 3, was identified as an in vitro and in vivo interaction partner of CGI-99 and Nuf-2. PTPIP51 mRNA is expressed in all stages of the cell cycle; it is highly expressed six hours post-nocodazole treatment and minimally expressed one hour post-nocodazole treatment. Recent investigations located PTPIP51 protein at the equatorial plate. This study reports the localization of the PTPIP51/CGI-99 and the PTPIP51/Nuf-2 complex at the equatorial region during mitosis. Moreover, Duolink proximity ligation assays revealed an association of PTPIP51 with the microtubular cytoskeleton and the spindle apparatus. High amounts of phosphorylated PTPIP51 associated with the spindle poles was seen by confocal microscopy. In parallel a strong interaction of PTPIP51 with the epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylating PTPIP51 at the tyrosine 176 residue was seen. In the M/G1 transition a high level of interaction between PTPIP51 and PTP1B was registered, thus restoring the interaction of PTPIP51 and Raf-1, depleted in mitotic cells. Summarizing these new facts, we conclude that PTPIP51 is necessary for normal mitotic processes, impacting on chromosomal division and control of the MAPK pathway activity.

  16. A microbial avenue to cell cycle control in the plant superkingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin, Frej; Cross, Frederick R

    2014-10-01

    Research in yeast and animals has resulted in a well-supported consensus model for eukaryotic cell cycle control. The fit of this model to early diverging eukaryotes, such as the plant kingdom, remains unclear. Using the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed an efficient pipeline, incorporating robotics, semiautomated image analysis, and deep sequencing, to molecularly identify >50 genes, mostly conserved in higher plants, specifically required for cell division but not cell growth. Mutated genes include the cyclin-dependent kinases CDKA (resembling yeast and animal Cdk1) and the plant-specific CDKB. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle consists of a long G1 during which cells can grow >10-fold, followed by multiple rapid cycles of DNA replication and segregation. CDKA and CDKB execute nonoverlapping functions: CDKA promotes transition between G1 and entry into the division cycle, while CDKB is essential specifically for spindle formation and nuclear division, but not for DNA replication, once CDKA-dependent initiation has occurred. The anaphase-promoting complex is required for similar steps in the Chlamydomonas cell cycle as in Opisthokonts; however, the spindle assembly checkpoint, which targets the APC in Opisthokonts, appears severely attenuated in Chlamydomonas, based on analysis of mutants affecting microtubule function. This approach allows unbiased integration of the consensus cell cycle control model with innovations specific to the plant lineage.

  17. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p20 controls circadian cell-cycle timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeiro, Ricardo; Tamai, T Katherine; Peyric, Elodie; Krusche, Peter; Ott, Sascha; Whitmore, David

    2013-04-23

    Specific stages of the cell cycle are often restricted to particular times of day because of regulation by the circadian clock. In zebrafish, both mitosis (M phase) and DNA synthesis (S phase) are clock-controlled in cell lines and during embryo development. Despite the ubiquitousness of this phenomenon, relatively little is known about the underlying mechanism linking the clock to the cell cycle. In this study, we describe an evolutionarily conserved cell-cycle regulator, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1d (20 kDa protein, p20), which along with p21, is a strongly rhythmic gene and directly clock-controlled. Both p20 and p21 regulate the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. However, their expression patterns differ, with p20 predominant in developing brain and peak expression occurring 6 h earlier than p21. p20 expression is also p53-independent in contrast to p21 regulation. Such differences provide a unique mechanism whereby S phase is set to different times of day in a tissue-specific manner, depending on the balance of these two inhibitors.

  18. Effects of seawater acidification on cell cycle control mechanisms in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Place

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown fertilization and development of marine species can be significantly inhibited when the pH of sea water is artificially lowered. Little mechanistic understanding of these effects exists to date, but previous work has linked developmental inhibition to reduced cleavage rates in embryos. To explore this further, we tested whether common cell cycle checkpoints were involved using three cellular biomarkers of cell cycle progression: (1 the onset of DNA synthesis, (2 production of a mitotic regulator, cyclin B, and (3 formation of the mitotic spindle. We grew embryos of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, in seawater artifically buffered to a pH of ∼7.0, 7.5, and 8.0 by CO(2 infusion. Our results suggest the reduced rates of mitotic cleavage are likely unrelated to common cell cycle checkpoints. We found no significant differences in the three biomarkers assessed between pH treatments, indicating the embryos progress through the G(1/S, G(2/M and metaphase/anaphase transitions at relatively similar rates. These data suggest low pH environments may not impact developmental programs directly, but may act through secondary mechanisms such as cellular energetics.

  19. Does MW Radiation Affect Gene Expression, Apoptotic Level, and Cell Cycle Progression of Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Handan; Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Saglam, Atiye Seda Yar; Tuysuz, Mehmed Zahid; Canseven, Ayşe Gulnihal; Yagci, Abdullah Munci; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-06-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a cancer that occurs in sympathetic nervous system arising from neuroblasts and nerve tissue of the adrenal gland, neck, chest, or spinal cord. It is an embryonal malignancy and affects infants and children. In this study, we investigated the effects of microwave (MW) radiation on apoptotic activity, cell viability, and cell cycle progression in human SH-SY5Y NB cells which can give information about MW radiation effects on neural cells covering the period from the embryonic stages to infants. SH-SY5Y NB cells were exposed to 2.1 GHz W-CDMA modulated MW radiation for 24 h at a specific absorption rate of 0.491 W/kg. Control samples were in the same conditions with MW-exposed samples but they were not exposed to MW radiation. The apoptotic activity of cells was measured by Annexin-V-FITC and propidium iodide staining. Moreover, mRNA levels of proliferative and cell cycle proteins were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The change in cell cycle progression was observed by using CycleTest-Plus DNA reagent. No significant change was observed in apoptotic activity of MW-exposed cells compared to control cells. The mRNA levels of c-myc and cyclin D1 were significantly reduced in MW group (p CDMA modulated MW radiation did not cause apoptotic cell death but changed cell cycle progression.

  20. ROCK inhibition with Y27632 promotes the proliferation and cell cycle progression of cultured astrocyte from spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Liu, Miao; Fu, Peicai; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Rho-associated Kinase (ROCK) has been identified as an important regulator of proliferation and cell cycle progression in a number of cell types. Although its effects on astrocyte proliferation have not been well characterized, ROCK has been reported to play important roles in gap junction formation, morphology, and migration of astrocytes. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effect of ROCK inhibition by [(+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride] (Y27632) on proliferation and DNA synthesis in cultured astrocytes from rat spinal cord and the possible mechanism involved. Western blots showed that treatment of astrocytes with Y27632 increased their expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and cyclin E, thereby causing cell cycle progression. Furthermore, Y27632-induced astrocyte proliferation was mediated through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase signaling cascade. These results indicate the importance of ROCK in astrocyte proliferation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Notch3 overexpression causes arrest of cell cycle progression by inducing Cdh1 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Fa; Dou, Xiao-Wei; Liang, Yuan-Ke; Lin, Hao-Yu; Bai, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Xi-Xun; Wei, Xiao-Long; Li, Yao-Chen; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation, genomic instability and cancer are closely related to the abnormal activation of the cell cycle. Therefore, blocking the cell cycle of cancer cells has become one of the key goals for treating malignancies. Unfortunately, the factors affecting cell cycle progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we have explored the effects of Notch3 on the cell cycle in breast cancer cell lines by 3 methods: overexpressing the intra-cellular domain of Notch3 (N3ICD), knocking-down Notch3 by RNA interference, and using X-ray radiation exposure. The results revealed that overexpression of Notch3 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, and inhibited the proliferation and colony-formation rate in the breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, overexpressing N3ICD upregulated Cdh1 expression and resulted in p27(Kip) accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation. Conversely, silencing of Notch3 in the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, caused a decrease in expression levels of Cdh1 and p27(Kip) at both the protein and mRNA levels, while the expression of Skp2 only increased at the protein level. Correspondingly, there was an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and an elevated proliferative ability and colony-formation rate, which may be caused by alterations of the Cdh1/Skp2/p27 axis. These results were also supported by exposing MDA-MB-231 cells or MCF-7 treated with siN3 to X-irradiation at various doses. Overall, our data showed that overexpression of N3ICD upregulated the expression of Cdh1 and caused p27(Kip) accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation, which in turn led to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, in the context of proliferating breast cancer cell lines. These findings help to illuminate the precision therapy targeted to cell cycle progression, required for cancer treatment.

  2. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  3. Regulated proteolysis of a transcription factor complex is critical to cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Kasia G; Cantin, Amber; Wohlever, Matthew; Joshi, Kamal K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle transitions are often triggered by the proteolysis of key regulatory proteins. In Caulobacter crescentus, the G1-S transition involves the degradation of an essential DNA-binding response regulator, CtrA, by the ClpXP protease. Here, we show that another critical cell cycle regulator, SciP, is also degraded during the G1-S transition, but by the Lon protease. SciP is a small protein that binds directly to CtrA and prevents it from activating target genes during G1. We demonstrate that SciP must be degraded during the G1-S transition so that cells can properly activate CtrA-dependent genes following DNA replication initiation and the reaccumulation of CtrA. These results indicate that like CtrA, SciP levels are tightly regulated during the Caulobacter cell cycle. In addition, we show that formation of a complex between CtrA and SciP at target promoters protects both proteins from their respective proteases. Degradation of either protein thus helps trigger the destruction of the other, facilitating a cooperative disassembly of the complex. Collectively, our results indicate that ClpXP and Lon each degrade an important cell cycle regulator, helping to trigger the onset of S phase and prepare cells for the subsequent programmes of gene expression critical to polar morphogenesis and cell division.

  4. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook John A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histamine receptor-1 (H1-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29. Methods Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1ser345, and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Results Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1ser345, however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1 directly damages DNA, 2 activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3 downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of

  5. Autocrine regulation of glioblastoma cell cycle progression, viability and radioresistance through the VEGF-VEGFR2 (KDR) interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizetova, Petra; Ehrmann, Jiri; Hlobilkova, Alice; Vancova, Iveta; Kalita, Ondrej; Kolar, Zdenek; Bartek, Jiri

    2008-08-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a crucial role in angiogenesis and progression of malignant brain tumors. Given the significance of tumor microenvironment in general, and the established role of paracrine VEGF signaling in glioblastoma (GBM) biology in particular, we explored the potential autocrine control of human astrocytoma behavior by VEGF. Using a range of cell and molecular biology approaches to study a panel of astrocytoma (grade III and IV/GBM)-derived cell lines and a series of clinical specimens from low- and high-grade astrocytomas, we show that co-expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) occurs commonly in astrocytoma cells. We found VEGF secretion and VEGF-induced biological effects (modulation of cell cycle progression and enhanced viability of glioblastoma cells) to function in an autocrine manner. Morevover, we demonstrated that the autocrine VEGF signaling is mediated via VEGFR2 (KDR), and involves co-activation of the c-Raf/MAPK, PI3K/Akt and PLC/PKC pathways. Blockade of VEGFR2 by the selective inhibitor (SU1498) abrogated the VEGF-mediated enhancement of astrocytoma cell growth and viability under unperturbed culture conditions. In addition, such interference with VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling potentiated the ionizing radiation-induced tumor cell death. In clinical specimens, both VEGFRs and VEGF were co-expressed in astroglial tumor cells, and higher VEGF expression correlated with tumor progression, thereby supporting the relevance of functional VEGF-VEGFR signaling in vivo. Overall, our results are consistent with a potential autocrine role of the VEGF-VEGFR2 (KDR) interplay as a factor contributing to malignant astrocytoma growth and radioresistance, thereby supporting the candidacy of this signaling cascade as a therapeutic target, possibly in combination with radiotherapy.

  6. ARTD1 regulates cyclin E expression and consequently cell-cycle re-entry and G1/S progression in T24 bladder carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Karolin; Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Fey, Monika; Hottiger, Michael O

    2016-08-02

    ADP-ribosylation is involved in a variety of biological processes, many of which are chromatin-dependent and linked to important functions during the cell cycle. However, any study on ADP-ribosylation and the cell cycle faces the problem that synchronization with chemical agents or by serum starvation and subsequent growth factor addition already activates ADP-ribosylation by itself. Here, we investigated the functional contribution of ARTD1 in cell cycle re-entry and G1/S cell cycle progression using T24 urinary bladder carcinoma cells, which synchronously re-enter the cell cycle after splitting without any additional stimuli. In synchronized cells, ARTD1 knockdown, but not inhibition of its enzymatic activity, caused specific down-regulation of cyclin E during cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression through alterations of the chromatin composition and histone acetylation, but not of other E2F-1 target genes. Although Cdk2 formed a functional complex with the residual cyclin E, p27(Kip 1) protein levels increased in G1 upon ARTD1 knockdown most likely due to inappropriate cyclin E-Cdk2-induced phosphorylation-dependent degradation, leading to decelerated G1/S progression. These results provide evidence that ARTD1 regulates cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression via cyclin E expression and p27(Kip 1) stability independently of its enzymatic activity, uncovering a novel cell cycle regulatory mechanism.

  7. Casein Kinase Iγ2 Impairs Fibroblasts Actin Stress Fibers Formation and Delays Cell Cycle Progression in G1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Latreille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actin cytoskeleton remodeling is under the regulation of multiple proteins with various activities. Here, we demonstrate that the γ2 isoform of Casein Kinase I (CKIγ2 is part of a novel molecular path regulating the formation of actin stress fibers. We show that overexpression of CKIγ2 in fibroblasts alters cell morphology by impairing actin stress fibers formation. We demonstrate that this is concomitant with increased phosphorylation of the CDK inhibitor p27Kip and lower levels of activated RhoA, and is dependent on CKIγ2 catalytic activity. Moreover, we report that roscovitine, a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, including Cdk5, decreases p27Kip protein levels and restores actin stress fibers formation in CKIγ2 overexpressing cells, suggesting the existence of a CKIγ2-Cdk5-p27Kip-RhoA pathway in regulating actin remodeling. On the other hand, we also show that in a manner independent of its catalytic activity, CKIγ2 delays cell cycle progression through G1. Collectively our findings reveal that CKIγ2 is a novel player in the control of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and cell proliferation.

  8. A DDB2 mutant protein unable to interact with PCNA promotes cell cycle progression of human transformed embryonic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Paola; Sommatis, Sabrina; Mocchi, Roberto; Prosperi, Ennio; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Cazzalini, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2) is a protein involved in the early step of DNA damage recognition of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. Recently, it has been suggested that DDB2 may play a role in DNA replication, based on its ability to promote cell proliferation. We have previously shown that DDB2 binds PCNA during NER, but also in the absence of DNA damage; however, whether and how this interaction influences cell proliferation is not known. In this study, we have addressed this question by using HEK293 cell clones stably expressing DDB2(Wt) protein, or a mutant form (DDB2(Mut)) unable to interact with PCNA. We report that overexpression of the DDB2(Mut) protein provides a proliferative advantage over the wild type form, by influencing cell cycle progression. In particular, an increase in the number of S-phase cells, together with a reduction in p21(CDKN1A) protein level, and a shorter cell cycle length, has been observed in the DDB2(Mut) cells. These results suggest that DDB2 influences cell cycle progression thanks to its interaction with PCNA.

  9. RB1 Methylation by SMYD2 Enhances Cell Cycle Progression through an Increase of RB1 Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Soo Cho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that RB functions are regulated by posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, but the significance of lysine methylation on RB has not been fully elucidated. Our expression analysis of SMYD2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that expression levels of SMYD2 are significantly elevated in human bladder carcinomas compared with nonneoplastic bladder tissues (P < .0001, and its expression levels in tumor tissues were much higher than those of any other normal tissues. SMYD2 knockdown resulted in the suppression of cancer cell growth, and cell cycle analysis indicated that SMYD2 might play a crucial role in the G1/S transition. According to an in vitro methyltransferase assay, we found that SMYD2 methylates RB1 protein, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed lysine 810 of RB1 to be methylated by SMYD2. Importantly, this methylation enhanced Ser 807/811 phosphorylation of RB1 both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that methylated RB1 accelerates E2F transcriptional activity and promotes cell cycle progression. SMYD2 is an important oncoprotein in various types of cancer, and SMYD2-dependent RB1 methylation at lysine 810 promotes cell cycle progression of cancer cells. Further study may explore SMYD2-dependent RB1 methylation as a potential therapeutic target in human cancer.

  10. WDR55 is a nucleolar modulator of ribosomal RNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, and teleost organ development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Iwanami

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The thymus is a vertebrate-specific organ where T lymphocytes are generated. Genetic programs that lead to thymus development are incompletely understood. We previously screened ethylnitrosourea-induced medaka mutants for recessive defects in thymus development. Here we report that one of those mutants is caused by a missense mutation in a gene encoding the previously uncharacterized protein WDR55 carrying the tryptophan-aspartate-repeat motif. We find that WDR55 is a novel nucleolar protein involved in the production of ribosomal RNA (rRNA. Defects in WDR55 cause aberrant accumulation of rRNA intermediates and cell cycle arrest. A mutation in WDR55 in zebrafish also leads to analogous defects in thymus development, whereas WDR55-null mice are lethal before implantation. These results indicate that WDR55 is a nuclear modulator of rRNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, and embryonic organogenesis including teleost thymus development.

  11. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation.

  12. ppGpp and polyphosphate modulate cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutte, Cara C; Henry, Jonathan T; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus differentiates from a motile, foraging swarmer cell into a sessile, replication-competent stalked cell during its cell cycle. This developmental transition is inhibited by nutrient deprivation to favor the motile swarmer state. We identify two cell cycle regulatory signals, ppGpp and polyphosphate (polyP), that inhibit the swarmer-to-stalked transition in both complex and glucose-exhausted media, thereby increasing the proportion of swarmer cells in mixed culture. Upon depletion of available carbon, swarmer cells lacking the ability to synthesize ppGpp or polyP improperly initiate chromosome replication, proteolyze the replication inhibitor CtrA, localize the cell fate determinant DivJ, and develop polar stalks. Furthermore, we show that swarmer cells produce more ppGpp than stalked cells upon starvation. These results provide evidence that ppGpp and polyP are cell-type-specific developmental regulators.

  13. S100A8/A9 (calprotectin negatively regulates G2/M cell cycle progression and growth of squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khammanivong

    Full Text Available Malignant transformation results in abnormal cell cycle regulation and uncontrolled growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and other cancers. S100A8/A9 (calprotectin is a calcium-binding heterodimeric protein complex implicated in cell cycle regulation, but the specific mechanism and role in cell cycle control and carcinoma growth are not well understood. In HNSCC, S100A8/A9 is downregulated at both mRNA and protein levels. We now report that downregulation of S100A8/A9 correlates strongly with a loss of cell cycle control and increased growth of carcinoma cells. To show its role in carcinogenesis in an in vitro model, S100A8/A9 was stably expressed in an S100A8/A9-negative human carcinoma cell line (KB cells, HeLa-like. S100A8/A9 expression increases PP2A phosphatase activity and p-Chk1 (Ser345 phosphorylation, which appears to signal inhibitory phosphorylation of mitotic p-Cdc25C (Ser216 and p-Cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15 to inactivate the G2/M Cdc2/cyclin B1 complex. Cyclin B1 expression then downregulates and the cell cycle arrests at the G2/M checkpoint, reducing cell division. As expected, S100A8/A9-expressing cells show both decreased anchorage-dependent and -independent growth and mitotic progression. Using shRNA, silencing of S100A8/A9 expression in the TR146 human HNSCC cell line increases growth and survival and reduces Cdc2 inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr14/Tyr15. The level of S100A8/A9 endogenous expression correlates strongly with the reduced p-Cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr14 level in HNSCC cell lines, SCC-58, OSCC-3 and UMSCC-17B. S100A8/A9-mediated control of the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint is, therefore, a likely suppressive mechanism in human squamous cell carcinomas and may suggest new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Impairment of cell cycle progression by sterigmatocystin in human pulmonary cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shujuan; Wang, Juan; Xing, Lingxiao; Shen, Haitao; Yan, Xia; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Xianghong

    2014-04-01

    Sterigmatocystin (ST) is a carcinogenic mycotoxin that is commonly found in human food, animal feed and in the indoor environment. Although the correlation between ST exposure and lung cancer has been widely reported in many studies, the cytotoxicity of ST on human pulmonary cells is not yet fully understood. In the current study, we found that ST could induce DNA double-strand breaks in a human immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B cells) and a human lung cancer cell line (A549 cells). In addition, the effects of ST on cell cycle arrest were complex and dependent on the tested ST concentration and cell type. Low concentrations of ST arrested cells in the G2/M phase in BEAS-2B cells and in the S phase in A549 cells, while at high concentration both cells lines were arrested in S and G2/M phases. Furthermore, we observed that the modulation of cyclins and CDK expression showed concomitant changes with cell cycle arrest upon ST exposure in BEAS-2B and A549 cells. In conclusion, ST induced DNA damage and affected key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability, which may be a potential mechanism underlying the developmental basis of lung carcinogenesis.

  15. Chapter 10 the primary cilium coordinates signaling pathways in cell cycle control and migration during development and tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Stine F; Satir, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell cycle control and migration are critical processes during development and maintenance of tissue functions. Recently, primary cilia were shown to take part in coordination of the signaling pathways that control these cellular processes in human health and disease. In this review, we present...... with the extracellular matrix, coordinate Wnt signaling, and modulate cytoskeletal changes that impinge on both cell cycle control and cell migration....... an overview of the function of primary cilia and the centrosome in the signaling pathways that regulate cell cycle control and migration with focus on ciliary signaling via platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha). We also consider how the primary cilium and the centrosome interact...

  16. A general G1/S-phase cell-cycle control module in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin'Ai Zhao

    Full Text Available The decision to replicate its DNA is of crucial importance for every cell and, in many organisms, is decisive for the progression through the entire cell cycle. A comparison of animals versus yeast has shown that, although most of the involved cell-cycle regulators are divergent in both clades, they fulfill a similar role and the overall network topology of G1/S regulation is highly conserved. Using germline development as a model system, we identified a regulatory cascade controlling entry into S phase in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which, as a member of the Plantae supergroup, is phylogenetically only distantly related to Opisthokonts such as yeast and animals. This module comprises the Arabidopsis homologs of the animal transcription factor E2F, the plant homolog of the animal transcriptional repressor Retinoblastoma (Rb-related 1 (RBR1, the plant-specific F-box protein F-BOX-LIKE 17 (FBL17, the plant specific cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors KRPs, as well as CDKA;1, the plant homolog of the yeast and animal Cdc2⁺/Cdk1 kinases. Our data show that the principle of a double negative wiring of Rb proteins is highly conserved, likely representing a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cell-cycle control. However, this negative feedback of Rb proteins is differently implemented in plants as it is brought about through a quadruple negative regulation centered around the F-box protein FBL17 that mediates the degradation of CDK inhibitors but is itself directly repressed by Rb. Biomathematical simulations and subsequent experimental confirmation of computational predictions revealed that this regulatory circuit can give rise to hysteresis highlighting the here identified dosage sensitivity of CDK inhibitors in this network.

  17. The transcription factor NFAT5 is required for cyclin expression and cell cycle progression in cells exposed to hypertonic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Drews-Elger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertonicity can perturb cellular functions, induce DNA damage-like responses and inhibit proliferation. The transcription factor NFAT5 induces osmoprotective gene products that allow cells to adapt to sustained hypertonic conditions. Although it is known that NFAT5-deficient lymphocytes and renal medullary cells have reduced proliferative capacity and viability under hypertonic stress, less is understood about the contribution of this factor to DNA damage responses and cell cycle regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated conditional knockout mice to obtain NFAT5(-/- T lymphocytes, which we used as a model of proliferating cells to study NFAT5-dependent responses. We show that hypertonicity triggered an early, NFAT5-independent, genotoxic stress-like response with induction of p53, p21 and GADD45, downregulation of cyclins, and cell cycle arrest. This was followed by an NFAT5-dependent adaptive phase in wild-type cells, which induced an osmoprotective gene expression program, downregulated stress markers, resumed cyclin expression and proliferation, and displayed enhanced NFAT5 transcriptional activity in S and G2/M. In contrast, NFAT5(-/- cells failed to induce osmoprotective genes and exhibited poorer viability. Although surviving NFAT5(-/- cells downregulated genotoxic stress markers, they underwent cell cycle arrest in G1/S and G2/M, which was associated with reduced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1. We also show that pathologic hypertonicity levels, as occurring in plasma of patients and animal models of osmoregulatory disorders, inhibited the induction of cyclins and aurora B kinase in response to T cell receptor stimulation in fresh NFAT5(-/- lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that NFAT5 facilitates cell proliferation under hypertonic conditions by inducing an osmoadaptive response that enables cells to express fundamental regulators needed for cell cycle progression.

  18. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle. PMID:27158371

  19. PKCeta enhances cell cycle progression, the expression of G1 cyclins and p21 in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fima, E; Shtutman, M; Libros, P; Missel, A; Shahaf, G; Kahana, G; Livneh, E

    2001-10-11

    Protein kinase C encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control and tumor promotion. However, not much is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that the expression of PKCeta in MCF-7 cells, under the control of a tetracycline-responsive inducible promoter, enhanced cell growth and affected the cell cycle at several points. The induced expression of another PKC isoform, PKCdelta, in MCF-7 cells had opposite effects and inhibited their growth. PKCeta expression activated cellular pathways in these cells that resulted in the increased expression of the G1 phase cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1) was also specifically elevated in PKCeta expressing cells, but its overall effects were not inhibitory. Although, the protein levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) were not altered by the induced expression of PKCeta, the cyclin E associated Cdk2 kinase activity was in correlation with the p27(KIP1) bound to the cyclin E complex and not by p21(WAF1) binding. PKCeta expression enhanced the removal of p27(KIP1) from this complex, and its re-association with the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex. Reduced binding of p27(KIP1) to the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex at early time points of the cell cycle also enhanced the activity of this complex, while at later time points the decrease in bound p21(WAF1) correlated with its increased activity in PKCeta-expressing cells. Thus, PKCeta induces altered expression of several cell cycle functions, which may contribute to its ability to affect cell growth.

  20. Effects of ethanol on hepatic cellular replication and cell cycle progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ethanol is a hepatotoxin. It appears that the liver is the target of ethanol induced toxicity primarily because it is the major site of ethanol metabolism. Metabolism of ethanol results in a number of biochemical changes that are thought to mediate the toxicity associated with ethanol abuse. These include the production of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species, as well as an accumulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide(NADH). These biochemical changes are associated with the accumulation of fat and mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver. If these changes are severe enough they can themselves cause hepatotoxicity, or they can sensitize the liver to more severe damage by other hepatotoxins.Whether liver damage is the result of ethanol metabolism or some other hepatotoxin, recovery of the liver from damage requires replacement of cells that have been destroyed. It is now apparent that ethanol metabolism not only causes hepatotoxicity but also impairs the replication of normal hepatocytes. This impairment has been shown to occur at both the G1/S, and the G2/M transitions of the cell cycle. These impairments may be the result of activation of the checkpoint kinases, which can mediate cell cycle arrest at both of these transitions.Conversely, because ethanol metabolism results in a number of biochemical changes, there may be a number of mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism impairs cellular replication. It is the goal of this article to review the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates impairment of hepatic replication.

  1. CIP2A modulates cell-cycle progression in human cancer cells by regulating the stability and activity of Plk1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Eun Ju; Oh, Jeong Su; Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2013-11-15

    Abnormal cell-cycle control can lead to aberrant cell proliferation and cancer. The oncoprotein cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) that stabilizes c-Myc. However, the precise role of CIP2A in cell division is not understood. Herein, we show that CIP2A is required for mitotic progression by regulating the polo-like kinase (Plk1). With mitotic entry, CIP2A translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it was enriched at spindle poles. CIP2A depletion delayed mitotic progression, resulting in mitotic abnormalities independent of PP2A activity. Unexpectedly, CIP2A interacted directly with the polo-box domain of Plk1 during mitosis. This interaction was required to maintain Plk1 stability by blocking APC/C-Cdh1-dependent proteolysis, thereby enhancing the kinase activity of Plk1 during mitosis. We observed strong correlation and in vivo interactions between these two proteins in multiple human cancer specimens. Overall, our results established a novel function for CIP2A in facilitating the stability and activity of the pivotal mitotic kinase Plk1 in cell-cycle progression and tumor development.

  2. Piperine blocks interleukin-2-driven cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes by inhibiting multiple signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Carolyn D; Greenshields, Anna L; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2015-04-02

    Piperine, a pungent alkaloid found in the fruits of black pepper plants, has diverse physiological effects, including the ability to inhibit immune cell-mediated inflammation. Since the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the clonal expansion and differentiation of T lymphocytes, we investigated the effect of piperine on IL-2 signaling in IL-2-dependent mouse CTLL-2 T lymphocytes. Tritiated-thymidine incorporation assays and flow cytometric analysis of Oregon Green 488-stained cells showed that piperine inhibited IL-2-driven T lymphocyte proliferation; however, piperine did not cause T lymphocytes to die or decrease their expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor, as determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that piperine blocked the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and STAT5 without affecting the upstream phosphorylation of Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK3. In addition, piperine inhibited the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt, which are signaling molecules that regulate cell cycle progression. Piperine also suppressed the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1, Cdk4, Cdk6, cyclin B, cyclin D2, and Cdc25c protein phosphatase by IL-2-stimulated T lymphocytes, indicating G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Piperine-mediated inhibition of IL-2 signaling and cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes suggests that piperine should be further investigated in animal models as a possible natural source treatment for T lymphocyte-mediated transplant rejection and autoimmune disease.

  3. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M. C.; Brum, Felipe L.; da Silva, Camila C.; Zuma, Aline A.; Elias, Maria C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  4. Deregulated expression of circadian clock and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sobia; Munawar, Mustafa; Shahid, Adeela; Malik, Meera; Ullah, Hafeez; Fatima, Warda; Mohsin, Shahida; Mahmood, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous and self-sustained oscillations of multiple biological processes with approximately 24-h rhythmicity. Circadian genes and their protein products constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator that form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends from core clock genes to various clock-controlled genes that include various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes, therefore, may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The current study encompasses the investigation of simultaneous expression of four circadian clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) and three clock-controlled cell cycle genes (Myc, Cyclin D1 and Wee1) at mRNA level and determination of serum melatonin levels in peripheral blood samples of 37 CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) patients and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to indicate association between deregulated circadian clock and manifestation of CLL. Results showed significantly down-regulated expression of Bmal1, Per1, Per2 and Wee1 and significantly up-regulated expression of Myc and Cyclin D1 (P circadian clock genes can lead to aberrant expression of their downstream targets that are involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis and hence may result in manifestation of CLL. Moreover, shift-work and low melatonin levels may also contribute in etiology of CLL by further perturbing of circadian clock.

  5. Theabrownin Inhibits Cell Cycle Progression and Tumor Growth of Lung Carcinoma through c-myc-Related Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wu, Feifei; Jin, Wangdong; Yan, Bo; Chen, Xin; He, Yingfei; Yang, Weiji; Du, Wenlin; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Yonghua; Yuan, Qiang; Dong, Xiaoqiao; Yu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jin; Xiao, Luwei; Tong, Peijian; Shan, Letian; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Green tea, the fresh leaves of Camellia sinensis, is not only a health-promoting beverage but also a traditional Chinese medicine used for prevention or treatment of cancer, such as lung cancer. Theabrownin (TB) is the main fraction responsible for the medicinal effects of green tea, but whether it possesses anti-cancer effect is unknown yet. This study aimed to determine the in vitro and in vivo anti-lung cancer effect of TB and explore the underlying molecular mechanism, by using A549 cell line and Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice. In cellular experiment, MTT assay was performed to evaluate the inhibitory effect and IC50 values of TB, and flow cytometry was conducted to analyze the cell cycle progression affected by TB. In animal experiment, mice body mass, tumor incidence, tumor size and tumor weight were measured, and histopathological analysis on tumor was performed with Transferase dUTP nick-end labeling staining. Real time PCR and western blot assays were adopted to detect the expression of C-MYC associated genes and proteins for mechanism clarification. TB was found to inhibit A549 cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner and block A549 cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. Down-regulation of c-myc, cyclin A, cyclin D, cdk2, cdk4, proliferation of cell nuclear antigen and up-regulation of p21, p27, and phosphate and tension homolog in both gene and protein levels were observed with TB treatment. A c-myc-related mechanism was thereby proposed, since c-myc could transcriptionally regulate all other genes in its downstream region for G1/S transitions of cell cycle and proliferation of cancer cells. This is the first report regarding the anti-NSCLC effect and the underlying mechanism of TB on cell cycle progression and proliferation of A549 cells. The in vivo data verified the in vitro result that TB could significantly inhibit the lung cancer growth in mice and induce apoptosis on tumors in a dose-dependent manner. It provides a promising candidate of natural

  6. The plant cell cycle: Pre-Replication complex formation and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Juliana Nogueira; Costa, Carinne N Monteiro; Cabral, Luiz Mors; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2017-01-01

    The multiplication of cells in all living organisms requires a tight regulation of DNA replication. Several mechanisms take place to ensure that the DNA is replicated faithfully and just once per cell cycle in order to originate through mitoses two new daughter cells that contain exactly the same information from the previous one. A key control mechanism that occurs before cells enter S phase is the formation of a pre-replication complex (pre-RC) that is assembled at replication origins by the sequential association of the origin recognition complex, followed by Cdt1, Cdc6 and finally MCMs, licensing DNA to start replication. The identification of pre-RC members in all animal and plant species shows that this complex is conserved in eukaryotes and, more importantly, the differences between kingdoms might reflect their divergence in strategies on cell cycle regulation, as it must be integrated and adapted to the niche, ecosystem, and the organism peculiarities. Here, we provide an overview of the knowledge generated so far on the formation and the developmental controls of the pre-RC mechanism in plants, analyzing some particular aspects in comparison to other eukaryotes.

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors SAHA and sodium butyrate block G1-to-S cell cycle progression in neurosphere formation by adult subventricular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doughty Martin L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs are enzymes that modulate gene expression and cellular processes by deacetylating histones and non-histone proteins. While small molecule inhibitors of HDAC activity (HDACi are used clinically in the treatment of cancer, pre-clinical treatment models suggest they also exert neuroprotective effects and stimulate neurogenesis in neuropathological conditions. However, the direct effects of HDACi on cell cycle progression and proliferation, two properties required for continued neurogenesis, have not been fully characterized in adult neural stem cells (NSCs. In this study, we examined the effects of two broad class I and class II HDACi on adult mouse NSCs, the hydroxamate-based HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (vorinostat, SAHA and the short chain fatty acid HDACi sodium butyrate. Results We show that both HDACi suppress the formation of neurospheres by adult mouse NSCs grown in proliferation culture conditions in vitro. DNA synthesis is significantly inhibited in adult mouse NSCs exposed to either SAHA or sodium butyrate and inhibition is associated with an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. HDACi exposure also resulted in transcriptional changes in adult mouse NSCs. Cdk inhibitor genes p21 and p27 transcript levels are increased and associated with elevated H3K9 acetylation levels at proximal promoter regions of p21 and p27. mRNA levels for notch effector Hes genes and Spry-box stem cell transcription factors are downregulated, whereas pro-neural transcription factors Neurog1 and Neurod1 are upregulated. Lastly, we show HDAC inhibition under proliferation culture conditions leads to long-term changes in cell fate in adult mouse NSCs induced to differentiate in vitro. Conclusion SAHA and sodium butyrate directly regulate cdk inhibitor transcription to control cell cycle progression in adult mouse NSCs. HDAC inhibition results in G1 arrest in adult mouse NSCs and transcriptional changes

  8. Protein SUMOylation is Involved in Cell-cycle Progression and Cell Morphology in Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Genova, Bruno M; da Silva, Richard C; da Cunha, Júlia P C; Gargantini, Pablo R; Mortara, Renato A; Tonelli, Renata R

    2017-07-01

    The unicellular protozoa Giardia lamblia is a food- and waterborne parasite that causes giardiasis. This illness is manifested as acute and self-limited diarrhea and can evolve to long-term complications. Successful establishment of infection by Giardia trophozoites requires adhesion to host cells and colonization of the small intestine, where parasites multiply by mitotic division. The tight binding of trophozoites to host cells occurs by means of the ventral adhesive disc, a spiral array of microtubules and associated proteins such as giardins. In this work we show that knock down of the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO) results in less adhesive trophzoites, decreased cell proliferation and deep morphological alterations, including at the ventral disc. Consistent with the reduced proliferation, SUMO knocked-down trophozoites were arrested in G1 and in S phases of the cell cycle. Mass spectrometry analysis of anti-SUMO immunoprecipitates was performed to identify SUMO substrates possibly involved in these events. Among the identified SUMOylation targets, α-tubulin was further validated by Western blot and confirmed to be a SUMO target in Giardia trophozoites. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  9. HnRNP-L promotes prostate cancer progression by enhancing cell cycling and inhibiting apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xumin; Li, Qi; He, Jincan; Zhong, Liren; Shu, Fangpeng; Xing, Rongwei; Lv, Daojun; Lei, Bin; Wan, Bo; Yang, Yu; Wu, Huayan; Mao, Xiangming; Zou, Yaguang

    2016-12-27

    Expression of the RNA-binding protein HnRNP-L was previously shown to associate with tumorigenesis in liver and lung cancer. In this study, we examined the role of HnRNP-L in prostate cancer (Pca). We found that HnRNP-L is overexpressed in prostate tissue samples from 160 PC patients compared with tissue samples from 32 donors with cancers other than Pca. Moreover, HnRNP-L positively correlated with aggressive tumor characteristics. HnRNP-L knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis of Pca cell lines in vitro, and suppressed tumor growth when the cells were subcutaneously implanted in an athymic mouse model. Conversely, overexpression of HnRNP-L promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth while prohibiting cell apoptosis. HnRNP-L promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth in Pca in part by interacting with endogenous p53 mRNA, which was closely associated with cyclin p21. In addition, HnRNP-L affected cell apoptosis by directly binding the classical apoptosis protein BCL-2. These observations suggest HnRNP-L is an important regulatory factor that exerts pro-proliferation and anti-apoptosis effects in Pca through actions affecting the cell cycle and intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus HnRNP-L could potentially serve as a valuable molecular biomarker or therapeutic target in the treatment of Pca.

  10. Effects of 3-aminobenzamide on poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase expression,apoptosis and cell cycle progression of HeLa cells after X-ray irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the changes of apoptosis and cell cycle progression in HeLa cells after the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase(PARP)was inhibited by its inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide(3-AB)and the mechanisms of PARP action on HeLa cells damaged by irradiation.Flow cytometry(FCM)was used to examine the PARP expression and the percentage of apoptotic cells and cell cycle progression.The percentage of HeLa cells with positive expression of PARP protein 2,4,8 and 12 h after administrated with 3-AB was significantly lower than that of the control(P<0.01).The percentages of apoptotic cells in the 3-AB plus irradiation group at the time points of 2,8,12 and 24 h after 2 Gy irradiation were higher than that in the irradiation group(P<0.01 or P<0.05)and the percentage of G2 cells decreased significantly(P<0.01 or P<0.05).It indicates that 3-AB can rapidly inhibit PARP expression of HeLa cells,promote cell apoptosis and block G2 arrest induced by irradiation.

  11. Xanthohumol inhibits cell cycle progression and proliferation of larynx cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sławińska-Brych, Adrianna; Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Zdzisińska, Barbara; Stepulak, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2015-10-05

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylflavonoid derived from the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.) has been found to exhibit a broad spectrum of biological properties, including anti-cancer activity. In this study, the mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity of XN in human RK33 and RK45 larynx cancer cell lines were investigated. The effect of XN on the viability of larynx cancer and normal cells (human skin fibroblasts HSF and rat oligodendroglia-derived cells, OLN-93) was compared. Additionally, the influence of XN on proliferation, cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis in larynx cancer cells, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying in these processes were analyzed. XN promoted the reduction of cell viability in cancer cells, but showed low cytotoxicity to normal cells. The decrease in cell viability in the cancer cells was coupled with induction of apoptosis via two pathways. The mechanisms involved in these effects of XN were associated with cell growth inhibition by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, increased p53 and p21/WAF1 expression levels, downregulation of cyclin D1 and Bcl-2, and activation of caspases-9, -8, and -3. Moreover, this compound inhibited phosphorylation of ERK1/2, suggesting a key role of the ERKs pathway in the XN-mediated growth suppressing effects against the studied cells. These results indicate that XN could be used as a potential agent for the treatment of patients with larynx cancer.

  12. Estrogen-mediated upregulation of Noxa is associated with cell cycle progression in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wensheng; Swetzig, Wendy M; Medisetty, Rajesh; Das, Gokul M

    2011-01-01

    Noxa is a Bcl-2-homology domain (BH3)-only protein reported to be a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Estrogen has been well documented to stimulate cell growth and inhibit apoptosis in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells. Intriguingly, recent reports have shown that 17β-estradiol (E2) induces Noxa expression, although the mechanisms underlying E2-mediated induction of Noxa and its functional significance are unknown. Using MCF7 human breast cancer cells as an experimental model, we show that Noxa is upregulated by E2 via p53-independent processes that involve c-Myc and ERα. Experiments using small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNA) to specifically knock down p53, c-Myc, and ERα demonstrated that c-Myc and ERα, but not p53, are involved in the transcriptional upregulation of Noxa following E2 treatment. Furthermore, while E2 promoted the recruitment of c-Myc and ERα to the NOXA promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, E2 did not induce p53 recruitment. Interestingly, E2-mediated upregulation of Noxa was not associated with apoptosis. However, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Noxa resulted in cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1)-phase and significantly delayed the G(1)-to-S-phase transition following E2 treatment, indicating that Noxa expression is required for cell cycle progression in ER-positive breast cancer cells.

  13. Estrogen-mediated upregulation of Noxa is associated with cell cycle progression in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Liu

    Full Text Available Noxa is a Bcl-2-homology domain (BH3-only protein reported to be a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Estrogen has been well documented to stimulate cell growth and inhibit apoptosis in estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancer cells. Intriguingly, recent reports have shown that 17β-estradiol (E2 induces Noxa expression, although the mechanisms underlying E2-mediated induction of Noxa and its functional significance are unknown. Using MCF7 human breast cancer cells as an experimental model, we show that Noxa is upregulated by E2 via p53-independent processes that involve c-Myc and ERα. Experiments using small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNA to specifically knock down p53, c-Myc, and ERα demonstrated that c-Myc and ERα, but not p53, are involved in the transcriptional upregulation of Noxa following E2 treatment. Furthermore, while E2 promoted the recruitment of c-Myc and ERα to the NOXA promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays, E2 did not induce p53 recruitment. Interestingly, E2-mediated upregulation of Noxa was not associated with apoptosis. However, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Noxa resulted in cell cycle arrest in G(0/G(1-phase and significantly delayed the G(1-to-S-phase transition following E2 treatment, indicating that Noxa expression is required for cell cycle progression in ER-positive breast cancer cells.

  14. Palladium Nanoparticles Induce Disturbances in Cell Cycle Entry and Progression of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Paramount Role of Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Petrarca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is concern about the possible toxicity of palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NP, as they are released in the environment through many applications. We previously studied the toxicity of Pd-NP at high concentrations; here we address the possible toxicity of Pd-NP at low, subtoxic doses. In particular, we have exposed normal human PBMC entering into the first in vitro mitotic division to Pd-NP and to Pd(IV ions to evaluate ROS generation and cell cycle progression. We have measured a statistically significant increase of intracellular ROS in Pd(IV exposed cells, but not in Pd-NP exposed cells. TEM revealed accumulation of lipid droplets and autophagic and mitophagic vacuoles, which appeared more conspicuous in cells exposed to Pd(IV ions than to Pd-NP. Pd-NP were visible in the cytoplasm of Pd-NP exposed cells. Pd-NP addition was associated with a significant increase of cells within the G0/G1-phase and a significant reduction in GS- and G2/M-phases. Cells exposed to Pd(IV ions showed a significant amplification of these cell cycle alterations. These results suggest that ions, per se or released by NPs, are the true inducers of Pd toxicity. It will be essential to verify whether the observed disturbance represents a temporary response or might result in permanent alterations.

  15. Phosphorylation of Def Regulates Nucleolar p53 Turnover and Cell Cycle Progression through Def Recruitment of Calpain3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ting; Shi, Hui; Lo, Li Jan; Wang, Yingchun; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Digestive organ expansion factor (Def) is a nucleolar protein that plays dual functions: it serves as a component of the ribosomal small subunit processome for the biogenesis of ribosomes and also mediates p53 degradation through the cysteine proteinase calpain-3 (CAPN3). However, nothing is known about the exact relationship between Def and CAPN3 or the regulation of the Def function. In this report, we show that CAPN3 degrades p53 and its mutant proteins p53A138V, p53M237I, p53R248W, and p53R273P but not the p53R175H mutant protein. Importantly, we show that Def directly interacts with CAPN3 in the nucleoli and determines the nucleolar localisation of CAPN3, which is a prerequisite for the degradation of p53 in the nucleolus. Furthermore, we find that Def is modified by phosphorylation at five serine residues: S50, S58, S62, S87, and S92. We further show that simultaneous phosphorylations at S87 and S92 facilitate the nucleolar localisation of Capn3 that is not only essential for the degradation of p53 but is also important for regulating cell cycle progression. Hence, we propose that the Def-CAPN3 pathway serves as a nucleolar checkpoint for cell proliferation by selective inactivation of cell cycle-related substrates during organogenesis. PMID:27657329

  16. DNA damage signaling, impairment of cell cycle progression, and apoptosis triggered by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorporated into DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H Dorota; Li, Jiangwei; Biela, Ewa; Berniak, Krzysztof; Dobrucki, Jurek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-11-01

    The "click chemistry" approach utilizing 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) as a DNA precursor was recently introduced to assess DNA replication and adapted to flow- and imaging-cytometry. In the present study, we observed that EdU, once incorporated into DNA, induces DNA damage signaling (DDS) such as phosphorylation of ATM on Ser1981, of histone H2AX on Ser139, of p53 on Ser15, and of Chk2 on Thr68. It also perturbs progression of cells through the cell cycle and subsequently induces apoptosis. These effects were observed in non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma A549 as well as in B-cell human lymphoblastoid TK6 and WTK1 cells, differing in the status of p53 (wt versus mutated). After 1 h EdU pulse-labeling, the most affected was cells progression through the S phase subsequent to that at which they had incorporated EdU. This indicates that DNA replication using the template containing incorporated EdU is protracted and triggers DDS. Furthermore, progression of cells having DNA pulse-labeled with EdU led to accumulation of cells in G2 , likely by activating G2 checkpoint. Consistent with the latter was activation of p53 and Chk2. Although a correlation was observed in A549 cells between the degree of EdU incorporation and the extent of γH2AX induction, such correlation was weak in TK6 and WTK1 cells. The degree of perturbation of the cell cycle kinetics by the incorporated EdU was different in the wt p53 TK6 cells as compared to their sister WTK1 cell line having mutated p53. The data are thus consistent with the role of p53 in modulating activation of cell cycle checkpoints in response to impaired DNA replication. The confocal microscopy analysis of the 3D images of cells exposed to EdU for 1 h pulse and then grown for 24 or 48 h revealed an increased number of colocalized γH2AX and p53BP1 foci considered to be markers of DNA double-strand breaks and enlarged nuclei.

  17. Polymorphisms in apoptosis and cell cycle control genes and risk of brain tumors in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaraman, Preetha; Wang, Sophia S; Rothman, Nathaniel; Brown, Merideth M; Black, Peter M; Fine, Howard A; Loeffler, Jay S; Selker, Robert G; Shapiro, William R; Chanock, Stephen J; Inskip, Peter D

    2007-08-01

    Despite the potential importance of the cell cycle and apoptosis pathways in brain tumor etiology, little has been published regarding brain tumor risk associated with common gene variants in these pathways. Using data from a hospital-based case-control study conducted by the National Cancer Institute between 1994 and 1998, we evaluated risk of glioma (n = 388), meningioma (n = 162), and acoustic neuroma (n = 73) with respect to 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 10 genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle control: CASP8, CCND1, CCNH, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, CHEK1, CHEK2, MDM2, PTEN, and TP53. We observed significantly decreased risk of meningioma with the CASP8 Ex14-271A>T variant [odds ratio (OR)(AT), 0.8; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.5-1.2; OR(AA), 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9; P(trend) = 0.03] and increased risk of meningioma with the CASP8 Ex13+51G>C variant (OR(GC), 1.4; 95% CI, 0.9-2.1; OR(CC), 3.6; 95% CI, 1.0-13.1; P(trend) = 0.04). The CT haplotype of the two CASP8 polymorphisms was associated with significantly increased risk of meningioma (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.6), but was not associated with risk of glioma or acoustic neuroma. The CCND1 Ex4-1G>A variant was associated with increased risk for glioma, and the Ex8+49T>C variant of CCNH was associated with increased risk of glioma and acoustic neuroma. The MDM2 Ex12+162A>G variant was associated with significantly reduced risk of glioma. Our results suggest that common variants in the CASP8, CCND1, CCNH, and MDM2 genes may influence brain tumor risk. Future research in this area should include more detailed coverage of genes in the apoptosis/cell cycle control pathways.

  18. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooderham Nigel J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent, cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid, benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular

  19. Live-cell monitoring of periodic gene expression in synchronous human cells identifies Forkhead genes involved in cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gavin D; Gamsby, Joshua; Martyanov, Viktor; Brooks, Lionel; George, Lacy K; Mahoney, J Matthew; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C; Whitfield, Michael L

    2012-08-01

    We developed a system to monitor periodic luciferase activity from cell cycle-regulated promoters in synchronous cells. Reporters were driven by a minimal human E2F1 promoter with peak expression in G1/S or a basal promoter with six Forkhead DNA-binding sites with peak expression at G2/M. After cell cycle synchronization, luciferase activity was measured in live cells at 10-min intervals across three to four synchronous cell cycles, allowing unprecedented resolution of cell cycle-regulated gene expression. We used this assay to screen Forkhead transcription factors for control of periodic gene expression. We confirmed a role for FOXM1 and identified two novel cell cycle regulators, FOXJ3 and FOXK1. Knockdown of FOXJ3 and FOXK1 eliminated cell cycle-dependent oscillations and resulted in decreased cell proliferation rates. Analysis of genes regulated by FOXJ3 and FOXK1 showed that FOXJ3 may regulate a network of zinc finger proteins and that FOXK1 binds to the promoter and regulates DHFR, TYMS, GSDMD, and the E2F binding partner TFDP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing analysis identified 4329 genomic loci bound by FOXK1, 83% of which contained a FOXK1-binding motif. We verified that a subset of these loci are activated by wild-type FOXK1 but not by a FOXK1 (H355A) DNA-binding mutant.

  20. Nuclear FAK and Runx1 Cooperate to Regulate IGFBP3, Cell-Cycle Progression, and Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canel, Marta; Byron, Adam; Sims, Andrew H; Cartier, Jessy; Patel, Hitesh; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G; Serrels, Bryan; Serrels, Alan

    2017-08-14

    Nuclear focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a potentially important regulator of gene expression in cancer, impacting both cellular function and the composition of the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Here, we report in a murine model of skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that nuclear FAK regulates Runx1-dependent transcription of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), and that this regulates SCC cell-cycle progression and tumor growth in vivo Furthermore, we identified a novel molecular complex between FAK and Runx1 in the nucleus of SCC cells and showed that FAK interacted with a number of Runx1-regulatory proteins, including Sin3a and other epigenetic modifiers known to alter Runx1 transcriptional function through posttranslational modification. These findings provide important new insights into the role of FAK as a scaffolding protein in molecular complexes that regulate gene transcription. Cancer Res; 77(19); 1-12. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Regulators of Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle progression and differentiation identified using a kinome-wide RNAi screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G Jones

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, maintains an integral link between cell cycle regulation and differentiation during its intricate life cycle. Whilst extensive changes in phosphorylation have been documented between the mammalian bloodstream form and the insect procyclic form, relatively little is known about the parasite's protein kinases (PKs involved in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation. To address this, a T. brucei kinome-wide RNAi cell line library was generated, allowing independent inducible knockdown of each of the parasite's 190 predicted protein kinases. Screening of this library using a cell viability assay identified ≥42 PKs that are required for normal bloodstream form proliferation in culture. A secondary screen identified 24 PKs whose RNAi-mediated depletion resulted in a variety of cell cycle defects including in G1/S, kinetoplast replication/segregation, mitosis and cytokinesis, 15 of which are novel cell cycle regulators. A further screen identified for the first time two PKs, named repressor of differentiation kinase (RDK1 and RDK2, depletion of which promoted bloodstream to procyclic form differentiation. RDK1 is a membrane-associated STE11-like PK, whilst RDK2 is a NEK PK that is essential for parasite proliferation. RDK1 acts in conjunction with the PTP1/PIP39 phosphatase cascade to block uncontrolled bloodstream to procyclic form differentiation, whilst RDK2 is a PK whose depletion efficiently induces differentiation in the absence of known triggers. Thus, the RNAi kinome library provides a valuable asset for functional analysis of cell signalling pathways in African trypanosomes as well as drug target identification and validation.

  2. Role of PSMA in Aberrant Cell Cycle Progression in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    development and progression. While a high- fat diet has 10 been linked to prostate cancer the identity of other food products contributing to...m etastatic PCa. One of the critical ingredients of processed m eat is the high level of sodium from salt, food preservatives, and flavoring

  3. Robust reconstitution of active cell-cycle control complexes from co-expressed proteins in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harashima Hirofumi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell proliferation is an important determinant of plant growth and development. In addition, modulation of cell-division rate is an important mechanism of plant plasticity and is key in adapting of plants to environmental conditions. One of the greatest challenges in understanding the cell cycle of flowering plants is the large families of CDKs and cyclins that have the potential to form many different complexes. However, it is largely unclear which complexes are active. In addition, there are many CDK- and cyclin-related proteins whose biological role is still unclear, i.e. whether they have indeed enzymatic activity. Thus, a biochemical characterization of these proteins is of key importance for the understanding of their function. Results Here we present a straightforward system to systematically express and purify active CDK-cyclin complexes from E. coli extracts. Our method relies on the concomitant production of a CDK activating kinase, which catalyzes the T-loop phosphorylation necessary for kinase activity. Taking the examples of the G1-phase cyclin CYCLIN D3;1 (CYCD3;1, the mitotic cyclin CYCLIN B1;2 (CYCB1;2 and the atypical meiotic cyclin SOLO DANCERS (SDS in conjunction with A-, B1- and B2-type CDKs, we show that different CDKs can interact with various cyclins in vitro but only a few specific complexes have high levels of kinase activity. Conclusions Our work shows that both the cyclin as well as the CDK partner contribute to substrate specificity in plants. These findings refine the interaction networks in cell-cycle control and pinpoint to particular complexes for modulating cell proliferation activity in breeding.

  4. Stimulative Effects of Low Intensity He-Ne Laser Irradiation on the Proliferative Potential and Cell-Cycle Progression of Myoblasts in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-Ping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI was found to promote the regeneration of skeletal muscle in vivo but the cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. Myoblasts, normally quiescent and inactivated in adult skeletal muscle, are a type of myogenic progenitor cells and considered as the major candidates responsible for muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of LILI on the growth potential and cell-cycle progression of the cultured myoblasts. Primary myoblasts isolated from rat hind legs were cultured in nutrient-deficient medium for 36 hours and then irradiated by helium-neon laser at a certain energy density. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis revealed that laser irradiation could increase the expression of cellular proliferation marker and the amount of cell subpopulations in the proliferative phase as compared with the nonirradiated control group. Meanwhile, the expressions of cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the laser-treated myoblasts were markedly upregulated as compared to the unirradiated cells, indicating that LILI could promote the reentry of quiescent myoblasts into the cell division cycle. These results suggest that LILI at certain fluences could promote their proliferation, thus contributing to the skeletal muscle regeneration following trauma and myopathic diseases.

  5. The function of the chicken p34CDC2 protein kinase in fission yeast is cold sensitive for cell cycle progression through the G1 phase and temperature sensitive for traversal of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, N

    1999-06-01

    The protein kinase p34cdc2 is required at the onset of DNA replication and for entry into mitosis. The catalytic subunit and its regulatory proteins, notably the cyclins, are conserved from yeast to man. This suggests that the control mechanisms necessary for progression through the cell cycle in fission yeast are conserved throughout evolution. This work describes the characterization of a fission yeast strain that is dependent for cell cycle progression on the activity of the p34CDC2 protein kinase from chicken. The response of the chicken p34CDC2 protein kinase to cell cycle components of fission yeast was examined. Cells expressing the chicken p34CDC2 protein divide at reduced size at 31 degrees C. Cells are temperature sensitive at 35.5 degrees C and die as a result of mitotic catastrophe. This phenotype can be rescued by delaying cell cycle progression at the G1-S transition by adding low concentrations of hydroxyurea. Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells that are dependent on chicken p34CDC2 are cold sensitive. At 19 degrees C to 25 degrees C cells arrest in the G1 phase, while traversal of the G2-M transition is not blocked at low temperature. Expression of chicken p34CDC2 in the cold-sensitive G2-M mutant cdc2A21 suppresses the G1 arrest.

  6. The Circadian Molecular Clock Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis by Controlling the Timing of Cell-Cycle Entry and Exit

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    Pascale Bouchard-Cannon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The subgranular zone (SGZ of the adult hippocampus contains a pool of quiescent neural progenitor cells (QNPs that are capable of entering the cell cycle and producing newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control the timing and extent of adult neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we show that QNPs of the adult SGZ express molecular-clock components and proliferate in a rhythmic fashion. The clock proteins PERIOD2 and BMAL1 are critical for proper control of neurogenesis. The absence of PERIOD2 abolishes the gating of cell-cycle entrance of QNPs, whereas genetic ablation of bmal1 results in constitutively high levels of proliferation and delayed cell-cycle exit. We use mathematical model simulations to show that these observations may arise from clock-driven expression of a cell-cycle inhibitor that targets the cyclin D/Cdk4-6 complex. Our findings may have broad implications for the circadian clock in timing cell-cycle events of other stem cell populations throughout the body.

  7. The circadian molecular clock regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis by controlling the timing of cell-cycle entry and exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard-Cannon, Pascale; Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Yuen, Andrew; Kærn, Mads; Cheng, Hai-Ying M

    2013-11-27

    The subgranular zone (SGZ) of the adult hippocampus contains a pool of quiescent neural progenitor cells (QNPs) that are capable of entering the cell cycle and producing newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control the timing and extent of adult neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we show that QNPs of the adult SGZ express molecular-clock components and proliferate in a rhythmic fashion. The clock proteins PERIOD2 and BMAL1 are critical for proper control of neurogenesis. The absence of PERIOD2 abolishes the gating of cell-cycle entrance of QNPs, whereas genetic ablation of bmal1 results in constitutively high levels of proliferation and delayed cell-cycle exit. We use mathematical model simulations to show that these observations may arise from clock-driven expression of a cell-cycle inhibitor that targets the cyclin D/Cdk4-6 complex. Our findings may have broad implications for the circadian clock in timing cell-cycle events of other stem cell populations throughout the body.

  8. Virus-induced non-specific signals cause cell cycle progression of primed CD8(+) T cells but do not induce cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O;

    1999-01-01

    with known specificity and priming history in an environment also containing a normal heterogeneous CD8(+) population which served as an intrinsic control. Three parameters of T cell activation were analyzed: cell cycle progression, phenotypic conversion and cytolytic activity. Following injection of the IFN......In this report the significance of virus-induced non-specific T cell activation was re-evaluated using transgenic mice in which about half of the CD8(+) T cells expressed a TCR specific for amino acids 33-41 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein I. This allowed tracing of cells...... inducer poly(I:C), proliferation of memory (CD44(hi)) CD8(+) T cells but no phenotypic or functional activation was observed. Following injection of an unrelated virus [vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)], naive TCR transgenic cells did not become significantly activated with respect to any...

  9. A conserved cyclin-binding domain determines functional interplay between anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 and cyclin A-Cdk2 during cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Kramer, E R; Peters, J M;

    2001-01-01

    Periodic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) ubiquitin ligase determines progression through multiple cell cycle transitions by targeting cell cycle regulators for destruction. At the G(1)/S transition, phosphorylation-dependent dissociation of the Cdh1-activating subunit inhibits...... the APC, allowing stabilization of proteins required for subsequent cell cycle progression. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that initiate and maintain Cdh1 phosphorylation have been identified. However, the issue of which cyclin-CDK complexes are involved has been a matter of debate, and the mechanism...... of how cyclin-CDKs interact with APC subunits remains unresolved. Here we substantiate the evidence that mammalian cyclin A-Cdk2 prevents unscheduled APC reactivation during S phase by demonstrating its periodic interaction with Cdh1 at the level of endogenous proteins. Moreover, we identified...

  10. Characterisation of the histone methyltransferase SET8 in cell cycle progression and the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine

    2008-01-01

    component of the replication fork, further supporting the involvement of SET8 in replication, suggesting that SET8 may be required to support replication fork progression. Finally, we showed that SET8 was rapidly degraded by DNA damage such as UV and ionizing radiation (IR), which was accompanied...... by a decrease in H4K20me1. The removal of SET8 could be rescued by addition of a proteasomal inhibitor. Combined with data showing in vivo ubiquitylation of SET8, we suggest that the degradation of SET8 is mediated via the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway. Collectively, these data suggest that SET8, during normal...... cellular homeostasis, has a role in supporting the chromatin structure to facilitate DNA replication. However, when cells are challenged by DNA damage efficient repair may be dependent on rapid degradation of SET8 and a reduction of the monomethyl mark on histone H4 lysine 20....

  11. Sarcosine Up-Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Cycle Progression of Metastatic Models of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Zbynek; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Michalek, Petr; Polanska, Hana; Masarik, Michal; Vit, Vitezslav; Plevova, Mariana; Pacik, Dalibor; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The effects of sarcosine on the processes driving prostate cancer (PCa) development remain still unclear. Herein, we show that a supplementation of metastatic PCa cells (androgen independent PC-3 and androgen dependent LNCaP) with sarcosine stimulates cells proliferation in vitro. Similar stimulatory effects were observed also in PCa murine xenografts, in which sarcosine treatment induced a tumor growth and significantly reduced weight of treated mice (p < 0.05). Determination of sarcosine metabolism-related amino acids and enzymes within tumor mass revealed significantly increased glycine, serine and sarcosine concentrations after treatment accompanied with the increased amount of sarcosine dehydrogenase. In both tumor types, dimethylglycine and glycine-N-methyltransferase were affected slightly, only. To identify the effects of sarcosine treatment on the expression of genes involved in any aspect of cancer development, we further investigated expression profiles of excised tumors using cDNA electrochemical microarray followed by validation using the semi-quantitative PCR. We found 25 differentially expressed genes in PC-3, 32 in LNCaP tumors and 18 overlapping genes. Bioinformatical processing revealed strong sarcosine-related induction of genes involved particularly in a cell cycle progression. Our exploratory study demonstrates that sarcosine stimulates PCa metastatic cells irrespectively of androgen dependence. Overall, the obtained data provides valuable information towards understanding the role of sarcosine in PCa progression and adds another piece of puzzle into a picture of sarcosine oncometabolic potential. PMID:27824899

  12. The human RNA polymerase II-associated factor 1 (hPaf1): a new regulator of cell-cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniaux, Nicolas; Nemos, Christophe; Deb, Shonali; Zhu, Bing; Dornreiter, Irena; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Batra, Surinder K

    2009-09-22

    The human PAF (hPAF) complex is part of the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus and regulates multiple steps in gene expression. Further, the yeast homolog of hPaf1 has a role in regulating the expression of a subset of genes involved in the cell-cycle. We therefore investigated the role of hPaf1 during progression of the cell-cycle. Herein, we report that the expression of hPaf1, a subunit of the hPAF complex, increases with cell-cycle progression and is regulated in a cell-cycle dependant manner. hPaf1 specifically regulates a subclass of genes directly implicated in cell-cycle progression during G1/S, S/G2, and G2/M. In prophase, hPaf1 aligns in filament-like structures, whereas in metaphase it is present within the pole forming a crown-like structure, surrounding the centrosomes. Moreover, hPaf1 is degraded during the metaphase to anaphase transition. In the nucleus, hPaf1 regulates the expression of cyclins A1, A2, D1, E1, B1, and Cdk1. In addition, expression of hPaf1 delays DNA replication but favors the G2/M transition, in part through microtubule assembly and mitotic spindle formation. Our results identify hPaf1 and the hPAF complex as key regulators of cell-cycle progression. Mutation or loss of stoichiometry of at least one of the members may potentially lead to cancer development.

  13. Host Cell Factor-1 Recruitment to E2F-Bound and Cell-Cycle-Control Genes Is Mediated by THAP11 and ZNF143

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    J. Brandon Parker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Host cell factor-1 (HCF-1 is a metazoan transcriptional coregulator essential for cell-cycle progression and cell proliferation. Current models suggest a mechanism whereby HCF-1 functions as a direct coregulator of E2F proteins, facilitating the expression of genes necessary for cell proliferation. In this report, we show that HCF-1 recruitment to numerous E2F-bound promoters is mediated by the concerted action of zinc finger transcription factors THAP11 and ZNF143, rather than E2F proteins directly. THAP11, ZNF143, and HCF-1 form a mutually dependent complex on chromatin, which is independent of E2F occupancy. Disruption of the THAP11/ZNF143/HCF-1 complex results in altered expression of cell-cycle control genes and leads to reduced cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and cell viability. These data establish a model in which a THAP11/ZNF143/HCF-1 complex is a critical component of the transcriptional regulatory network governing cell proliferation.

  14. Tandem E2F binding sites in the promoter of the p107 cell cycle regulator control p107 expression and its cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah L Burkhart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb is a potent and ubiquitously expressed cell cycle regulator, but patients with a germline Rb mutation develop a very specific tumor spectrum. This surprising observation raises the possibility that mechanisms that compensate for loss of Rb function are present or activated in many cell types. In particular, p107, a protein related to Rb, has been shown to functionally overlap for loss of Rb in several cellular contexts. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this functional redundancy between Rb and p107 in vivo, we used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to engineer point mutations in two consensus E2F binding sites in the endogenous p107 promoter. Analysis of normal and mutant cells by gene expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that members of the Rb and E2F families directly bound these two sites. Furthermore, we found that these two E2F sites controlled both the repression of p107 in quiescent cells and also its activation in cycling cells, as well as in Rb mutant cells. Cell cycle assays further indicated that activation of p107 transcription during S phase through the two E2F binding sites was critical for controlled cell cycle progression, uncovering a specific role for p107 to slow proliferation in mammalian cells. Direct transcriptional repression of p107 by Rb and E2F family members provides a molecular mechanism for a critical negative feedback loop during cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. These experiments also suggest novel therapeutic strategies to increase the p107 levels in tumor cells.

  15. Effects of Auraptene on IGF-1 Stimulated Cell Cycle Progression in the Human Breast Cancer Cell Line, MCF-7

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    Prasad Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Auraptene is being investigated for its chemopreventive effects in many models of cancer including skin, colon, prostate, and breast. Many mechanisms of action including anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiapoptotic effects are being suggested for the chemopreventive properties of auraptene. We have previously shown in the N-methylnitrosourea induced mammary carcinogenesis model that dietary auraptene (500 ppm significantly delayed tumor latency. The delay in time to tumor corresponded with a significant reduction in cyclin D1 protein expression in the tumors. Since cyclin D1 is a major regulator of cell cycle, we further studied the effects of auraptene on cell cycle and the genes related to cell cycle in MCF-7 cells. Here we show that auraptene significantly inhibited IGF-1 stimulated S phase of cell cycle in MCF-7 cells and significantly changed the transcription of many genes involved in cell cycle.

  16. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    K?mper, S; Mardakheh, FK; McCarthy, A; Yeo, M.; Stamp, GW; Paul, A.; Worboys, J; Sadok, A; J?rgensen, C; Guichard, S; Marshall, CJ

    2016-01-01

    eLife digest Animal cells contain a structure called the cytoskeleton, which helps give the cells their shape. This structure can rapidly disassemble and reassemble, which enables cells to change their shape, move and divide into two. Many proteins are involved in controlling these processes. In particular, two proteins called ROCK1 and ROCK2 are known to be important for helping cancer cells move. However, investigations into the exact roles of these proteins have so far produced contradicto...

  17. Enzymatically-tailored pectins differentially influence the morphology, adhesion, cell cycle progression and survival of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Verhoef, René; Schols, Henk; Morra, Marco; Knox, J Paul; Ceccone, Giacomo; Della Volpe, Claudio; Vigneron, Pascale; Bussy, Cyrill; Gallet, Marlène; Velzenberger, Elodie; Vayssade, Muriel; Cascardo, Giovanna; Cassinelli, Clara; Haeger, Ash; Gilliland, Douglas; Liakos, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel; Siboni, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Improved biocompatibility and performance of biomedical devices can be achieved through the incorporation of bioactive molecules on device surfaces. Five structurally distinct pectic polysaccharides (modified hairy regions (MHRs)) were obtained by enzymatic liquefaction of apple (MHR-B, MHR-A and MHR-alpha), carrot (MHR-C) and potato (MHR-P) cells. Polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes, aminated by a plasma deposition process, were surface modified by the covalent linking of the MHRs. Results clearly demonstrate that MHR-B induces cell adhesion, proliferation and survival, in contrast to the other MHRs. Moreover, MHR-alpha causes cells to aggregate, decrease proliferation and enter into apoptosis. Cells cultured in standard conditions with 1% soluble MHR-B or MHR-alpha show the opposite behaviour to the one observed on MHR-B and -alpha-grafted PS. Fibronectin was similarly adsorbed onto MHR-B and tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) control, but poorly on MHR-alpha. The Fn cell binding site (RGD sequence) was more accessible on MHR-B than on TCPS control, but poorly on MHR-alpha. The disintegrin echistatin inhibited fibroblast adhesion and spreading on MHR-B-grafted PS, which suggests that MHRs control fibroblast behaviour via serum-adhesive proteins. This study provides a basis for the design of intelligently-tailored biomaterial coatings able to induce specific cell functions.

  18. Connecting the nucleolus to the cell cycle and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Robert Y L; Pederson, Thoru

    2014-08-01

    Long known as the center of ribosome synthesis, the nucleolus is connected to cell cycle regulation in more subtle ways. One is a surveillance system that reacts promptly when rRNA synthesis or processing is impaired, halting cell cycle progression. Conversely, the nucleolus also acts as a first-responder to growth-related stress signals. Here we review emerging concepts on how these "infraribosomal" links between the nucleolus and cell cycle progression operate in both forward and reverse gears. We offer perspectives on how new cancer therapeutic designs that target this infraribosomal mode of cell growth control may shape future clinical progress.

  19. Effects of BKCa and Kir2.1 Channels on Cell Cycling Progression and Migration in Human Cardiac c-kit+ Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Li, Gang; Che, Hui; Sun, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that a large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ current (BKCa), a voltage-gated TTX-sensitive sodium current (INa.TTX), and an inward rectifier K+ current (IKir) were heterogeneously present in most of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of these ion channels on cell cycling progression and migration of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells with approaches of cell proliferation and mobility assays, siRNA, RT-PCR, Western blots, flow cytometry analysis, etc. It was found that inhibition of BKCa with paxilline, but not INa.TTX with tetrodotoxin, decreased both cell proliferation and migration. Inhibition of IKir with Ba2+ had no effect on cell proliferation, while enhanced cell mobility. Silencing KCa.1.1 reduced cell proliferation by accumulating the cells at G0/G1 phase and decreased cell mobility. Interestingly, silencing Kir2.1 increased the cell migration without affecting cell cycling progression. These results demonstrate the novel information that blockade or silence of BKCa channels, but not INa.TTX channels, decreases cell cycling progression and mobility, whereas inhibition of Kir2.1 channels increases cell mobility without affecting cell cycling progression in human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells.

  20. Effects of BKCa and Kir2.1 Channels on Cell Cycling Progression and Migration in Human Cardiac c-kit+ Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that a large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ current (BKCa, a voltage-gated TTX-sensitive sodium current (INa.TTX, and an inward rectifier K+ current (IKir were heterogeneously present in most of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of these ion channels on cell cycling progression and migration of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells with approaches of cell proliferation and mobility assays, siRNA, RT-PCR, Western blots, flow cytometry analysis, etc. It was found that inhibition of BKCa with paxilline, but not INa.TTX with tetrodotoxin, decreased both cell proliferation and migration. Inhibition of IKir with Ba2+ had no effect on cell proliferation, while enhanced cell mobility. Silencing KCa.1.1 reduced cell proliferation by accumulating the cells at G0/G1 phase and decreased cell mobility. Interestingly, silencing Kir2.1 increased the cell migration without affecting cell cycling progression. These results demonstrate the novel information that blockade or silence of BKCa channels, but not INa.TTX channels, decreases cell cycling progression and mobility, whereas inhibition of Kir2.1 channels increases cell mobility without affecting cell cycling progression in human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells.

  1. Meiotic regulation of TPX2 protein levels governs cell cycle progression in mouse oocytes.

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    Stéphane Brunet

    Full Text Available Formation of female gametes requires acentriolar spindle assembly during meiosis. Mitotic spindles organize from centrosomes and via local activation of the RanGTPase on chromosomes. Vertebrate oocytes present a RanGTP gradient centred on chromatin at all stages of meiotic maturation. However, this gradient is dispensable for assembly of the first meiotic spindle. To understand this meiosis I peculiarity, we studied TPX2, a Ran target, in mouse oocytes. Strikingly, TPX2 activity is controlled at the protein level through its accumulation from meiosis I to II. By RNAi depletion and live imaging, we show that TPX2 is required for spindle assembly via two distinct functions. It controls microtubule assembly and spindle pole integrity via the phosphorylation of TACC3, a regulator of MTOCs activity. We show that meiotic spindle formation in vivo depends on the regulation of at least a target of Ran, TPX2, rather than on the regulation of the RanGTP gradient itself.

  2. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia

    2010-01-01

    , elongation factor Tu3, and the cell-cycle control proteins DasR, SsgA, SsgF and SsgR. Although tmRNA-tagged proteins are degraded swiftly, the translation of dnaK and dasR messenger RNAs (mRNAs) depends fully on tmRNA, whereas transcription is unaffected. The data unveil a surprisingly dedicated......The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-mediated trans-translation mechanism is highly conserved in bacteria and functions primarily as a system for the rescue of stalled ribosomes and the removal of aberrantly produced proteins. Here, we show that in the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces...... coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A...

  3. Oocyte-specific differences in cell-cycle control create an innate susceptibility to meiotic errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, So Iha; Hodges, Craig A; Albertini, David F; Hunt, Patricia Ann

    2011-04-26

    Segregation of homologs at the first meiotic division (MI) is facilitated by crossovers and by a physical constraint imposed on sister kinetochores that facilitates monopolar attachment to the MI spindle. Recombination failure or premature separation of homologs results in univalent chromosomes at MI, and univalents constrained to form monopolar attachments should be inherently unstable and trigger the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Although univalents trigger cell-cycle arrest in the male, this is not the case in mammalian oocytes. Because the spindle assembly portion of the SAC appears to function normally, two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the lack of response to univalents: (1) reduced stringency of the oocyte SAC to aberrant chromosome behavior, and (2) the ability of univalents to satisfy the SAC by forming bipolar attachments. The present study of Mlh1 mutant mice demonstrates that metaphase alignment is not a prerequisite for anaphase onset and provides strong evidence that MI spindle stabilization and anaphase onset require stable bipolar attachment of a critical mass--but not all--of chromosomes. We postulate that subtle differences in SAC-mediated control make the human oocyte inherently error prone and contribute to the age-related increase in aneuploidy.

  4. Reduced expression of DNA repair and redox signaling protein APE1/Ref-1 impairs human pancreatic cancer cell survival, proliferation, and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanlin; Zhou, Shaoyu; Sandusky, George E; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that is virtually never cured. Understanding the chemoresistance intrinsic to this cancer will aid in developing new regimens. High expression of APE1/Ref-1, a DNA repair and redox signaling protein, is associated with resistance, poor outcome, and angiogenesis; little is known in pancreatic cancer. Immunostaining of adenocarcinoma shows greater APE1/Ref-1 expression than in normal pancreas tissue. A decrease in APE1/Ref-1 protein levels results in pancreatic cancer cell growth inhibition, increased apoptosis, and altered cell cycle progression. Endogenous cell cycle inhibitors increase when APE1/ Ref-1 is reduced, demonstrating its importance to proliferation and growth of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Effects of ARHI on cell cycle progression and apoptosis levels of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Shi, Li; Han, Chun; Wang, Yishang; Yang, Junlan; Cao, Cheng; Jiao, Shunchang

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the role of Aplysia Ras Homolog I (ARHI) on cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and other biological characteristics of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Our goal was to provide experimental evidence for the development of future effective treatments of HER2-positive breast cancer. A pcDNA3.1-ARHI eukaryotic expression vector was constructed and transfected into the human HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 and JIMT-1. Then, various experimental methods were utilized to analyze the biological characteristics of ARHI-expressing breast cancer cells and to examine the impact of expression of the ARHI gene on cyclin D1, p27(Kip1), and calpain1 expression. We further analyzed the cells in each group after treatment with trastuzumab to examine the effects of this drug on various cellular characteristics. When we compared pcDNA3.1-ARHI-expressing SK-BR-3 and JIMT-1 cells to their respective empty vector and control groups, we found that cell viability was significantly lower (p SK-BR-3 cells, trastuzumab treatment significantly decreased cell growth (p SK-BR-3 cells and JIMT-1 cells, while it promoted p27(Kip1) and calpain1 expression in these cells. ARHI expression inhibits the growth and proliferation of HER2-positive breast cancer cells, while it also promotes apoptosis in these cells. ARHI expression also improves the sensitivity of JIMT-1 cells to trastuzumab by inducing apoptosis.

  6. Detection of Changes in the Medicago sativa Retinoblastoma-Related Protein (MsRBR1) Phosphorylation During Cell Cycle Progression in Synchronized Cell Suspension Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaydin, Ferhan; Kotogány, Edit; Ábrahám, Edit; Horváth, Gábor V

    2017-01-01

    Deepening our knowledge on the regulation of the plant cell division cycle depends on techniques that allow for the enrichment of cell populations in defined cell cycle phases. Synchronization of cell division can be achieved using different plant tissues; however, well-established cell suspension cultures provide large amount of biological sample for further analyses. Here, we describe the methodology of the establishment, propagation, and analysis of a Medicago sativa suspension culture that can be used for efficient synchronization of the cell division. A novel 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU)-based method is used for the estimation of cell fraction that enters DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle and we also demonstrate the changes in the phosphorylation level of Medicago sativa retinoblastoma-related protein (MsRBR1) during cell cycle progression.

  7. Antiproliferative effect of ascorbic acid is associated with the inhibition of genes necessary to cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Belin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ascorbic acid (AA, or Vitamin C, is most well known as a nutritional supplement with antioxidant properties. Recently, we demonstrated that high concentrations of AA act on PMP22 gene expression and partially correct the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotype in a mouse model. This is due to the capacity of AA, but not other antioxidants, to down-modulate cAMP intracellular concentration by a competitive inhibition of the adenylate cyclase enzymatic activity. Because of the critical role of cAMP in intracellular signalling, we decided to explore the possibility that ascorbic acid could modulate the expression of other genes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using human pangenomic microarrays, we found that AA inhibited the expression of two categories of genes necessary for cell cycle progression, tRNA synthetases and translation initiation factor subunits. In in vitro assays, we demonstrated that AA induced the S-phase arrest of proliferative normal and tumor cells. Highest concentrations of AA leaded to necrotic cell death. However, quiescent cells were not susceptible to AA toxicity, suggesting the blockage of protein synthesis was mainly detrimental in metabolically-active cells. Using animal models, we found that high concentrations of AA inhibited tumor progression in nude mice grafted with HT29 cells (derived from human colon carcinoma. Consistently, expression of tRNA synthetases and ieF2 appeared to be specifically decreased in tumors upon AA treatment. CONCLUSIONS: AA has an antiproliferative activity, at elevated concentration that could be obtained using IV injection. This activity has been observed in vitro as well in vivo and likely results from the inhibition of expression of genes involved in protein synthesis. Implications for a clinical use in anticancer therapies will be discussed.

  8. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell division, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth and the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole-basal body-flagellar cycle. Here, we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell-cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell-cycle control, compared with this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple-fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly, we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell-cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nuclear cathepsin D enhances TRPS1 transcriptional repressor function to regulate cell cycle progression and transformation in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Derocq, Danielle; Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Montcourrier, Philippe; Sebti, Salwa; Orsetti, Béatrice; Theillet, Charles; Gongora, Céline; Pattingre, Sophie; Ibing, Eva; Roger, Pascal; Linares, Laetitia K; Reinheckel, Thomas; Meurice, Guillaume; Kaiser, Frank J; Gespach, Christian; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-29

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (Cath-D) is overproduced in breast cancer cells (BCC) and supports tumor growth and metastasis formation. Here, we describe the mechanism whereby Cath-D is accumulated in the nucleus of ERα-positive (ER+) BCC. We identified TRPS1 (tricho-rhino-phalangeal-syndrome 1), a repressor of GATA-mediated transcription, and BAT3 (Scythe/BAG6), a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling chaperone protein, as new Cath-D-interacting nuclear proteins. Cath-D binds to BAT3 in ER+ BCC and they partially co-localize at the surface of lysosomes and in the nucleus. BAT3 silencing inhibits Cath-D accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that Cath-D nuclear targeting is controlled by BAT3. Fully mature Cath-D also binds to full-length TRPS1 and they co-localize in the nucleus of ER+ BCC where they are associated with chromatin. Using the LexA-VP16 fusion co-activator reporter assay, we then show that Cath-D acts as a transcriptional repressor, independently of its catalytic activity. Moreover, microarray analysis of BCC in which Cath-D and/or TRPS1 expression were silenced indicated that Cath-D enhances TRPS1-mediated repression of several TRPS1-regulated genes implicated in carcinogenesis, including PTHrP, a canonical TRPS1 gene target. In addition, co-silencing of TRPS1 and Cath-D in BCC affects the transcription of cell cycle, proliferation and transformation genes, and impairs cell cycle progression and soft agar colony formation. These findings indicate that Cath-D acts as a nuclear transcriptional cofactor of TRPS1 to regulate ER+ BCC proliferation and transformation in a non-proteolytic manner.

  10. A rapid and robust assay for detection of S-phase cell cycle progression in plant cells and tissues by using ethynyl deoxyuridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horváth Gábor V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progress in plant cell cycle research is highly dependent on reliable methods for detection of cells replicating DNA. Frequency of S-phase cells (cells in DNA synthesis phase is a basic parameter in studies on the control of cell division cycle and the developmental events of plant cells. Here we extend the microscopy and flow cytometry applications of the recently developed EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-based S-phase assay to various plant species and tissues. We demonstrate that the presented protocols insure the improved preservation of cell and tissue structure and allow significant reduction in assay duration. In comparison with the frequently used detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and tritiated-thymidine incorporation, this new methodology offers several advantages as we discuss here. Results Applications of EdU-based S-phase assay in microscopy and flow cytometry are presented by using cultured cells of alfalfa, Arabidopsis, grape, maize, rice and tobacco. We present the advantages of EdU assay as compared to BrdU-based replication assay and demonstrate that EdU assay -which does not require plant cell wall digestion or DNA denaturation steps, offers reduced assay duration and better preservation of cellular, nuclear and chromosomal morphologies. We have also shown that fast and efficient EdU assay can also be an efficient tool for dual parameter flow cytometry analysis and for quantitative assessment of replication in thick root samples of rice. Conclusions In plant cell cycle studies, EdU-based S-phase detection offers a superior alternative to the existing S-phase assays. EdU method is reliable, versatile, fast, simple and non-radioactive and it can be readily applied to many different plant systems.

  11. Rapid G0/1 transition and cell cycle progression in CD8(+) T cells compared to CD4(+) T cells following in vitro stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Takuya; Fukaya, Shotaro; Toda, Shoko; Ando, Yoshiaki; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Inobe, Manabu

    2017-04-01

    T cell population consists of two major subsets, CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which can be distinguished by the expression of CD4 or CD8 molecules, respectively. Although they play quite different roles in an immune system, many of their basic cellular processes such as proliferation following stimulation are presumably common. In this study, we have carefully analyzed time course of G0/1 transition as well as cell cycle progression in the two subsets of quiescent T cell population following in vitro growth stimulation. We found that CD8(+) T cells promote G0/1 transition more rapidly and drive their cell cycle progression faster compared to CD4(+) T cells. In addition, expression of CD25 and effects of its blockade revealed that IL-2 is implicated in the rapid progression, but not the earlier G0/1 transition, of CD8(+) T cells.

  12. Controlled light exposure microscopy reveals dynamic telomere microterritories throughout the cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, W.H.; Hoebe, R.A.; Joss, G.H.; Haffmans, W.; Baatout, S.; van Oostveldt, P.; Manders, E.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres are complex end structures that confer functional integrity and positional stability to human chromosomes. Despite their critical importance, there is no clear view on telomere organization in cycling human cells and their dynamic behavior throughout the cell cycle. We investigated

  13. Soy isoflavone genistein modulates cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis in HER-2/neu oncogene expressing human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katdare, Meena; Osborne, Michael; Telang, Nitin T

    2002-10-01

    In the multistep progressive pathogenesis of human breast cancer, comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) represents a preinvasive precursor lesion for therapy resistant invasive cancer. Human tissue derived cell culture models exhibiting molecular similarities to clinical DCIS facilitate an important preclinical mechanistic approach for evaluation of preventive efficacy of natural and synthetic chemopreventive compounds. Natural phytochemicals present in fresh fruits, vegetables and grain products are likely to offer protection against cancer. The clinical efficacy of these natural phytochemicals, however, depends on extrapolation, and is therefore equivocal. The present study determined whether the natural soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) inhibited aberrant proliferation in 184-B5/HER cells (a model for human comedo DCIS) and identified possible mechanisms responsible for its efficacy. Human reduction mammoplasty derived HER-2/neu oncogene expressing preneoplastic 184-B5/HER cells represented the experimental system. Flow cytometry and cellular epifluorescence based assays were utilized to quantitate the alterations in cell cycle progression, cellular apoptosis, and in the status of cell cycle regulatory and apoptosis-associated gene product expression. The 184-B5/HER cells exhibited specific immunofluorescence to p185HER, p53, EGFR, but not to ERalpha, thus resembling comedo DCIS. Treatment of 184-B5/HER cells with GEN resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the viable cell population, increase in the G0/G1:S + G2/M ratio and enhancement of sub G0/G1 (apoptotic population). Exposure to the maximum cytostatic 10 microM dose of GEN down-regulated HER-2/neu mediated signal transduction as evidenced by a 73.9% decrease (p=0.001) in p185HER specific, and a 89.8% decrease (p=0.001) in phosphotyrosine specific immunofluorescence. The increase in G0/G1:S + G2/M ratio in response to the treatment with 10 microM GEN was associated with a 85.5% decrease (p=0.001) in

  14. TSPY potentiates cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by promoting cell cycle progression in HeLa and NIH3T3 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Wai-Yee

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TSPY is a repeated gene mapped to the critical region harboring the gonadoblastoma locus on the Y chromosome (GBY, the only oncogenic locus on this male-specific chromosome. Elevated levels of TSPY have been observed in gonadoblastoma specimens and a variety of other tumor tissues, including testicular germ cell tumors, prostate cancer, melanoma, and liver cancer. TSPY contains a SET/NAP domain that is present in a family of cyclin B and/or histone binding proteins represented by the oncoprotein SET and the nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1, involved in cell cycle regulation and replication. Methods To determine a possible cellular function for TSPY, we manipulated the TSPY expression in HeLa and NIH3T3 cells using the Tet-off system. Cell proliferation, colony formation assays and tumor growth in nude mice were utilized to determine the TSPY effects on cell growth and tumorigenesis. Cell cycle analysis and cell synchronization techniques were used to determine cell cycle profiles. Microarray and RT-PCR were used to investigate gene expression in TSPY expressing cells. Results Our findings suggest that TSPY expression increases cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Ectopic expression of TSPY results in a smaller population of the host cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Using cell synchronization techniques, we show that TSPY is capable of mediating a rapid transition of the cells through the G2/M phase. Microarray analysis demonstrates that numerous genes involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis are affected by TSPY expression in the HeLa cells. Conclusion These data, taken together, have provided important insights on the probable functions of TSPY in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis.

  15. Fucoidan Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Urinary Bladder Cancer T24 Cells by Blocking Cell Cycle Progression and Inducing Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Young Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although fucoidan has been shown to exert anticancer activity against several types of cancer cell lines, no reports have explored fucoidan-affected cell growth in human urinary bladder cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of fucoidan in human bladder cancer T24 cells. Our results indicated that fucoidan decreased the viability of T24 cells through the induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis. Fucoidan-induced G1 arrest is associated with the enhanced expression of the Cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and dephosphorylation of the pRB along with enhanced binding of p21 to Cdk4/6 as well as pRB to the transcription factor E2Fs. Further investigations showed the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, proving mitochondrial dysfunction upon fucoidan treatment with a corresponding increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio. Fucoidan-triggered apoptosis was also accompanied by the up-regulation of Fas and truncated Bid as well as the sequential activation of caspase-8. Furthermore, a significant increased activation of caspase-9/-3 was detected in response to fucoidan treatment with the decreased expression of IAPs and degradation of PARP, whereas a pan-caspase inhibitor significantly suppressed apoptosis and rescued the cell viability reduction. In conclusion, these observations suggest that fucoidan attenuates G1-S phase cell cycle progression and serves as an important mediator of crosstalk between caspase-dependent intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in T24 cells.

  16. T-cell intracellular antigen (TIA-proteins deficiency in murine embryonic fibroblasts alters cell cycle progression and induces autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sánchez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Mice lacking either T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1 or TIA1 related/like protein (TIAR/TIAL1 show high rates of embryonic lethality, suggesting a relevant role for these proteins during embryonic development. However, intrinsic molecular and cellular consequences of either TIA1 or TIAR deficiency remain poorly defined. By using genome-wide expression profiling approach, we demonstrate that either TIA1 or TIAR inactivation broadly alter normal development-associated signalling pathways in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF. Indeed, these analyses highlighted alterations of cytokine-cytokine and ECM-receptor interactions and Wnt, MAPK, TGF-beta dependent signalling pathways. Consistent with these results, TIA1 and TIAR knockout (KO MEF show reduced rates of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression delay and increased cell size. Furthermore, TIA-proteins deficiency also caused metabolic deficiencies, increased ROS levels and DNA damage, promoting a gentle rise of cell death. Concomitantly, high rates of autophagy were detected in both TIA1 and TIAR KO MEF with induction of the formation of autophagosomes, as evidenced by the up-regulation of the LC3B protein, and autolysosomes, measured by colocalization of LC3B and LAMP1, as a survival mechanism attempt. Taken together, these observations support that TIA proteins orchestrate a transcriptome programme to activate specific developmental decisions. This program is likely to contribute to mouse physiology starting at early stages of the embryonic development. TIA1/TIAR might function as cell sensors to maintain homeostasis and promote adaptation/survival responses to developmental stress.

  17. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  18. Fe3 O4 nanoparticle redox system modulation via cell-cycle progression and gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Vaiyapuri S; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alhazmi, Mohammad; Alatiah, Khalid A; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2016-08-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) across multiple fields and applications has rapidly increased over the last decade owing to their unusual properties. However, there is an increased need in understanding their toxicological effect on human health. Particularly, iron oxide (Fe3 O4 ) have been used in various sectors, including biomedical, food, and agriculture, but the current understanding of their impact on human health is inadequate. In this investigation, we assessed the toxic effect of Fe3 O4 NPs on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) adopting cell viability, cellular morphological changes, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and cell-cycle progression assessment methodologies. Furthermore, the expression of oxidative stress, cell death, and cell-cycle regulatory genes was assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The Fe3 O4 NPs induced cytotoxicity and nuclear morphological changes in hMSCs by dose and time exposure. Cell-cycle analysis indicated that Fe3 O4 NPs altered the cell-cycle progression through a decrease in the proportion of cells in the G0 -G1 phase. The hMSC mitochondrial membrane potential loss increased with an increase in the concentration of Fe3 O4 NPs exposure. The observed expression levels of the CYP1A, TNF3, TNFSF10, E2F1, and CCNC genes were significantly upregulated in hMSCs in response to Fe3 O4 NPs exposure. Our findings suggest that Fe3 O4 NPs caused metabolic stress through altered cell cycle, oxidative stress, and cell death regulatory gene expression in hMSCs. The results of this investigation revealed that Fe3 O4 NPs exhibited moderate toxicity on hMSCs and that Fe3 O4 NPs may have biomedical applications at low concentrations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 901-912, 2016.

  19. Cell cycle and aging, morphogenesis, and response to stimuli genes are individualized biomarkers of glioblastoma progression and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southey Bruce R

    2011-06-01

    . Biological processes associated glioblastoma survival included morphogenesis, cell cycle, aging, response to stimuli, and programmed cell death. Conclusions Known biomarkers of glioblastoma survival were confirmed, and new general and clinical-dependent gene profiles were uncovered. The comparison of biomarkers across glioblastoma phases and functional analyses offered insights into the role of genes. These findings support the development of more accurate and personalized prognostic tools and gene-based therapies that improve the survival and quality of life of individuals afflicted by glioblastoma multiforme.

  20. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  1. The biochemical control of the cell cycle by growth regulators in higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGWei; LatoyaHarris; RonaldJ.Newton

    2004-01-01

    The cell cycle is an important research field in cell biology and it is genetically and developmentally regulated in animals and plants. The aim of this study was to review knowledge about the biochemical regulation of the cell cycle by plant growth regulators through molecular checkpoints that regulate the transition from G0-G1-S-phase and G2-M in higher plants.Recent research has shown that zeatin treatment led to the up-regulation of CycD3 in Arabidopsis. Benzyladenine treatment can also shorten the duration of S-phase through recruitment of latent origins of DNA replication. Kinetin is involved in the phosphoregulation of the G2-M checkpoint; the major cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) at this checkpoint has recently shown to be dephosphorylated as a result of cytokinin treatment, an effect that can also be mimicked by the fission yeast Cdc25 phosphatase. Gibberellic acid (GA) treatment induces internode elongation in deepwater rice, this response is mediated by a GA-induced up-regulation of a cyclin-Cdk at the G2-M checkpoint. Recent evidence has also linked abscisic acid to a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. A new D-type cyclin, recently discovered in Arabidopsis may have a key role in this process. A brief review on plant growth regulator-cell cycle interfacing during development and a cytokinin-induced continuum of cell cycle activation through the up-regulation of a plant D-type cyclin at the G1 checkpoint and the phosphoregulation of the Cdk at the G2/M checkpoint had been concluded. This review could be valuable to research on cell and developmental biology in plants.

  2. Wagging the dogma; tissue-specific cell cycle control in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Michele; Jackson, Peter K

    2004-09-03

    The family of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) lies at the core of the machinery that drives the cell division cycle. Studies in cultured mammalian cells have provided insight into the cellular functions of many Cdks. Recent Cdk and cyclin knockouts in the mouse show that the functions of G1 cell cycle regulatory genes are often essential only in specific cell types, pointing to our limited understanding of tissue-specific expression, redundancy, and compensating mechanisms in the Cdk network.

  3. [Hepatitis B virus X promotes HepG2 cell cycle progression and growth via downregulation expression of p16 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Li; Yang, Lin; Kuang, Jian-yu; Zhu, Jian-yun; Kang, Yan-hong; Zhang, Fu-cheng; Xie, Qi-feng; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects and related mechanisms of hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein on cell cycle and growth in hepatocellular carcinoma. A human hepatocyte HepG2 cell line stably expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged HBx (HepG2/GFP-HBx cells) was used for the experiment, and HepG2 parental and HepG2/GFP cells was used as the controls. Effect of HBx on cell growth was evaluated by the MTT cell proliferation assay and on cell cycle progression by flow cytometry analysis of cells with or without treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR; 5 pmol/L). Effect of HBx expression on promoter methylation status of the p16INK4A tumor-suppressor gene was detected by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and on p16 protein level was analyzed with western blotting. The HepG2/GFP-HBx cells showed significantly higher cell proliferation at 72 hrs of culture (3.225+/-0.038 A490) than either control (HepG2: 2.012+/-0.022 A490, t = -46.86, P less than 0.001; HepG2/GFP: 2.038+/-0.029 A490, t = 42.51, P less than 0.001). The HepG2/GFP-HBx cells also showed significantly lower proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase (16.45%+/-0.45%) than either control (HepG2: 44.81%+/-1.36%, t = -34.202, P less than 0.001; HepG2/GFP: 42.76%+/-1.58%, t = -28.88, P less than 0.001). However, 5-Aza-CdR treatment did lead to a significant amount of HepG2/GFP-HBx cells being arrested in the G0/G1 phase (33.25%+/-0.79%, t = 31.85, P less than 0.001). The p16INK4A promoter was methylated in the HepG2/GFP-HBx cells, and became demethylation after treatment with 5-Aza-CdR. However, no methylation of p16INK4A promoter was observed in both HepG2 and HepG2/GFP cells. The p16 protein level was significantly lower in the HepG2/GFP-HBx (vs. HepG2 and HepG2/GFP cells) and this level increased after treatment with 5-Aza-CdR. HBx protein promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell cycle progression and growth by shortening the G0/G1 phase, and the underlying mechanism may involve inducing p16

  4. Modulation of pentose phosphate pathway during cell cycle progression in human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vizan; G. Alcarraz-Vizan; S. Diaz-Moralli; O.N. Solovjeva; W.M. Frederiks; M. Cascante

    2009-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is dependent on multiple cellular and molecular events. Cell proliferation requires metabolic sources for the duplication of DNA and cell size. However, nucleotide reservoirs are not sufficient to support cell duplication and, therefore, bio-synthetic pathways should be upregul

  5. Fangchinoline inhibits the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells by blocking cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xue; Peng, Jian-Ming; Su, Lan-DI; Wang, Dong-Yan; Yu, You-Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Fangchinoline (Fan) is a bioactive compound isolated from the Chinese herb Stephania tetrandra S. Moore (Fen Fang Ji). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Fan on the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells, and to define the associated molecular mechanisms. Following treatment with Fan, Cell Counting Kit-8, phase contrast imaging and Giemsa staining assays were used to detect cell viability; flow cytometry was performed to analyze the cell cycle distribution; and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to investigate changes in the expression levels of cell cycle-associated genes and proteins. In the present study, treatment with Fan markedly inhibited the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells and significantly increased the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle in a dose-dependent manner (PSPC-A-1 lung cancer cells and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. These effects may be mediated by the downregulation of cellular CDK4, CDK6 and cyclin D1 levels, thus leading to hypophosphorylation of Rb and subsequent suppression of E2F-1 activity. Therefore, the present results suggest that Fan may be a potential drug candidate for the prevention of lung cancer.

  6. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection.

  7. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Mohammadi, Saeed; Yazdani, Yaghoub; Sedighi, Sima; Memarian, Ali; Aghaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA) as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ) as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after 24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A) phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27) expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies. PMID:27635203

  8. Effects of valproic acid and pioglitazone on cell cycle progression and proliferation of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Saghaeian Jazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is an aggressive hematologic malignant tumor. Administration of chemical compounds influencing apoptosis and T cell development has been discussed as promising novel therapeutic strategies. Valproic acid (VPA as a recently emerged anti-neoplastic histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor and pioglitazone (PGZ as a high-affinity peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ agonist have been shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in different studies. Here, we aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in anti-proliferative effects of these compounds on human Jurkat cells. Materials and Methods: Treated cells were evaluated for cell cycle progression and apoptosis using flowcytometry and MTT viability assay. Real-time RT-PCR was carried out to measure the alterations in key genes associated with cell death and cell cycle arrest. Results: Our findings illustrated that both VPA and PGZ can inhibit Jurkat E6.1 cells in vitro after   24 hr; however, PGZ 400 μM presents the most anti-proliferative effect. Interestingly, treated cells have been arrested in G2/M with deregulated cell division cycle 25A (Cdc25A phosphatase and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B or p27 expression. Expression of cyclin D1 gene was inhibited when DNA synthesis entry was declined. Cell cycle deregulation in PGZ and VPA-exposed cells generated an increase in the proportion of aneuploid cell population, which has not reported before. Conclusion: These findings define that anti-proliferative effects of PGZ and VPA on Jurkat cell line are mediated by cell cycle deregulation. Thus, we suggest PGZ and VPA may relieve potential therapeutic application against apoptosis-resistant malignancies.

  9. Epigenetic modification regulates both expression of tumor-associated genes and cell cycle progressing in human colon cancer cell lines:Colo-320 and SW1116

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yuan FANG; Ying Xuan CHEN; Juan LU; Rong LU; Li YANG; Hong Yin ZHU; Wei Qi GU; Lun Gen LU

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effects of DNA methylation and histone acetylation, alone or in combination, on the expression of several tumor-associated genes and cell cycle progression in two established human colon cancer cell lines: Colo-320 and SW1116. Treatments with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and trichostatin A, alone or in combination, were applied respectively. The methylation status of the CDKN2A promoter was determined by methylation-specific PCR, and the acetylated status of the histones associated with the p21wAF1 and CDKN2A genes was examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The expression of the CDKN2A, p21WAF1, p53, p73, APC, c-myc, c-Ki-ras and survivin genes was detected by real-time RT-PCR and RT-PCR. The cell cycle profile was established by flow cytometry.We found that along with the demethylation of the CDKN2A gene promoter in both cell lines induced by 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA, the expression of both CDKN2A and APC genes increased. The treatment of TSA or sodium butyrate up-regulated the transcription of p21 WAF1 significantly by inducing the acetylation of histones H4 and H3, but failed to alter the acetylation level of CDKN2A-associated histones. No changes in transcription of p53, p73,c-myc, c-Ki-ras and survivin genes were observed. In addition, TSA or sodium butyrate was shown to arrest cells at the G1 phase. However, 5-aza-dC was not able to affect the cell cycle progression. In conclusion, regulation by epigenetic modification of the transcription of tumor-associated genes and the cell cycle progression in both human colon cancer cell lines Colo-320 and SW1116 is gene-specific.

  10. N-glycosylation at Asn residues 554 and 566 of E-cadherin affects cell cycle progression through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Zhao; Xiliang Zha; Lidong Sun; Liying Wang; Zhibin Xu; Feng Zhou; Jianmin Su; Jiawei Jin; Yong Yang; Yali Hu

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin, which has a widely acknowledged role in mediating calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion between epithelial cells, also functions as a tumor suppressor. The ectodomain of human E-cadherin contains four potential N-glycosylation sites at Asn residues 554, 566, 618, and 633.We investigated the role of E-cadherin N-glycosylation in cell cycle progression by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed previously that all four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin were N-glycosylated in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Removal of N-glycan at Asn633 dramatically affected E-cadherin stability. In this study we showed that E-cadherin mutant missing N-glycans at Asn554, Asn566 and Asn618 failed to induce cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and to suppress cell proliferation in comparison with wild-type E-cadherin. Moreover, N-glycans at Asn554 and Asn566, but not at Asn618, seemed to be indispensable for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.Removal of N-glycans at either Asn554 or Asn566 of E-cadherin was accompanied with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway. After treatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of the extraceilular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway, wild-type E-cadherin transfected MDA-MB-435 and E-cadherin N-glycosylation-deficient mutant transfected MDA-MB-435 cells had equivalent numbers of cells in G1 phase. These findings implied that N-glycosylation might be crucial for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.

  11. Cell-cycle-regulated control of VSG expression site silencing by histones and histone chaperones ASF1A and CAF-1b in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsford, Sam; Horn, David

    2012-11-01

    Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes involves monoallelic expression and reversible silencing of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes found adjacent to telomeres in polycistronic expression sites (ESs). We assessed the impact on ES silencing of five candidate essential chromatin-associated factors that emerged from a genome-wide RNA interference viability screen. Using this approach, we demonstrate roles in VSG ES silencing for two histone chaperones. Defects in S-phase progression in cells depleted for histone H3, or either chaperone, highlight in particular the link between chromatin assembly and DNA replication control. S-phase checkpoint arrest was incomplete, however, allowing G2/M-specific VSG ES derepression following knockdown of histone H3. In striking contrast, knockdown of anti-silencing factor 1A (ASF1A) allowed for derepression at all cell cycle stages, whereas knockdown of chromatin assembly factor 1b (CAF-1b) revealed derepression predominantly in S-phase and G2/M. Our results support a central role for chromatin in maintaining VSG ES silencing. ASF1A and CAF-1b appear to play constitutive and DNA replication-dependent roles, respectively, in the recycling and assembly of chromatin. Defects in these functions typically lead to arrest in S-phase but defective cells can also progress through the cell cycle leading to nucleosome depletion and derepression of telomeric VSG ESs.

  12. Long Noncoding RNA HOTAIR Controls Cell Cycle by Functioning as a Competing Endogenous RNA in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewei Ren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs play pivotal roles in the initiation and progression of cancer, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. The lncRNA HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR was reported to be dysregulated and correlated with the progression of ESCC. However, the biological role and the underlying mechanism of HOTAIR in the development of ESCC remain unclear. Herein, we found that HOTAIR was aberrantly upregulated in ESCC cells and that HOTAIR depletion inhibited proliferation and led to G1 cell cycle arrest in ESCC cells. Besides, we found that HOTAIR acted as an endogenous sponge to downregulate miR-1 expression by directly binding to miR-1. Furthermore, HOTAIR overturned the effect of miR-1 on the proliferation and cell cycle profile in ESCC cells, which involved the derepression of cyclin D1 (CCND1 expression, a target of miR-1. Taken together, our study elucidated a novel HOTAIR /miR-1/CCND1 regulatory axis in which HOTAIR acted as a competing endogenous RNA by sponging miR-1 and upregulated CCND1 expression, thereby facilitating the tumorigenesis of ESCC. Investigation of this lncRNA/miRNA/mRNA pathway may contribute to a better understanding of ESCC pathogenesis and facilitate the development of lncRNA-directed therapy against this disease.

  13. Transient expression of RAD51 in the late G2-phase is required for cell cycle progression in synchronous Physarum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cigne, Anthony; Menil-Philippot, Vanessa; Fleury, Fabrice; Takahashi, Masayuki; Thiriet, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    The homologous recombination factor RAD51 is highly conserved. This criterion enabled us to identify a RAD51 ortholog in Physarum polycephalum. We found that the Physarum protein presents a high homology to the human protein and cross-reacted with antibodies directed against the human RAD51. Taking advantage of the natural synchrony of millions of nuclei within a single cell of Physarum, we investigated the fluctuation of the amount of the PpRAD51 throughout the cell cycle. Our results showed that in the late G2-phase, RAD51 was transiently expressed in a large quantity. Furthermore, knocking-down RAD51 in the G2-phase abolished this transient expression before mitosis and affected cell cycle progression. These results support the idea that RAD51 plays a role in the progression of the cell cycle in the late G2-phase. © 2014 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2014 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. The cell-cycle state of stem cells determines cell fate propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauklin, Siim; Vallier, Ludovic

    2013-09-26

    Self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells are fundamentally associated with cell-cycle progression to enable tissue specification, organ homeostasis, and potentially tumorigenesis. However, technical challenges have impaired the study of the molecular interactions coordinating cell fate choice and cell-cycle progression. Here, we bypass these limitations by using the FUCCI reporter system in human pluripotent stem cells and show that their capacity of differentiation varies during the progression of their cell cycle. These mechanisms are governed by the cell-cycle regulators cyclin D1-3 that control differentiation signals such as the TGF-β-Smad2/3 pathway. Conversely, cell-cycle manipulation using a small molecule directs differentiation of hPSCs and provides an approach to generate cell types with a clinical interest. Our results demonstrate that cell fate decisions are tightly associated with the cell-cycle machinery and reveal insights in the mechanisms synchronizing differentiation and proliferation in developing tissues.

  15. DNA damage during G2 phase does not affect cell cycle progression of the green alga Scenedesmus quadricauda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hlavová

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a threat to genomic integrity in all living organisms. Plants and green algae are particularly susceptible to DNA damage especially that caused by UV light, due to their light dependency for photosynthesis. For survival of a plant, and other eukaryotic cells, it is essential for an organism to continuously check the integrity of its genetic material and, when damaged, to repair it immediately. Cells therefore utilize a DNA damage response pathway that is responsible for sensing, reacting to and repairing damaged DNA. We have studied the effect of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, zeocin, caffeine and combinations of these on the cell cycle of the green alga Scenedesmus quadricauda. The cells delayed S phase and underwent a permanent G2 phase block if DNA metabolism was affected prior to S phase; the G2 phase block imposed by zeocin was partially abolished by caffeine. No cell cycle block was observed if the treatment with zeocin occurred in G2 phase and the cells divided normally. CDKA and CDKB kinases regulate mitosis in S. quadricauda; their kinase activities were inhibited by Wee1. CDKA, CDKB protein levels were stabilized in the presence of zeocin. In contrast, the protein level of Wee1 was unaffected by DNA perturbing treatments. Wee1 therefore does not appear to be involved in the DNA damage response in S. quadricauda. Our results imply a specific reaction to DNA damage in S. quadricauda, with no cell cycle arrest, after experiencing DNA damage during G2 phase.

  16. CSN5 silencing inhibits invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer SW480 and LS174T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Gang; Li, Huikai; Shan, Tao; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    CSN5 has been implicated as a candidate oncogene in human cancers by genetic linkage with activation of the poor-prognosis, wound response gene expression signature. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing CSN5 on invasion and cell cycle progression of human colorectal cancer cells, and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms that are involved. The CSN5 specific small interfering RNA (shRNA) plasmid vector was constructed and then transfected into colorectal cancer cells. The expression of CSN5 mRNA and protein was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell adhesion and invasion were analyzed using MTS and Transwell assays, respectively, and cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Adhesion, invasion, and cell cycle distribution were assessed following knockdown of CSN5 by RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, knockdown of CSN5 significantly inhibited cell adhesion and reduced the number of invasive cells, while increasing the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase (Pcell cycle associated proteins in cells with silenced CSN5. The expression levels of CSN5 in colorectal cancer cells transfected with siRNA were decreased, leading to a significant inhibition of colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of CSN5 may inhibit CD44, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP 9 protein expression, significantly promoted cell cycle-related genes P53 and P27 expression. In addition, CSN5 silencing may induce activation PI3K/AKT signal regulated cell invasion. Moreover, CSN5 silencing inhibited the secretion of TGF-β, IL-1β and IL-6 and the transcriptional activity of transcription factor NF-κB and Twist in human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, down regulation of CSN5 may inhibit invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in colorectal cancer via PI3K/AKT/NF-κB signal pathway, which indicates that there is a

  17. Host plant peptides elicit a transcriptional response to control the Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle during symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penterman, Jon; Abo, Ryan P; De Nisco, Nicole J; Arnold, Markus F F; Longhi, Renato; Zanda, Matteo; Walker, Graham C

    2014-03-04

    The α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti establishes a chronic intracellular infection during the symbiosis with its legume hosts. Within specialized host cells, S. meliloti differentiates into highly polyploid, enlarged nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This differentiation is driven by host cells through the production of defensin-like peptides called "nodule-specific cysteine-rich" (NCR) peptides. Recent research has shown that synthesized NCR peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity at high concentrations but cause bacterial endoreduplication at sublethal concentrations. We leveraged synchronized S. meliloti populations to determine how treatment with a sublethal NCR peptide affects the cell cycle and physiology of bacteria at the molecular level. We found that at sublethal levels a representative NCR peptide specifically blocks cell division and antagonizes Z-ring function. Gene-expression profiling revealed that the cell division block was produced, in part, through the substantial transcriptional response elicited by sublethal NCR treatment that affected ∼15% of the genome. Expression of critical cell-cycle regulators, including ctrA, and cell division genes, including genes required for Z-ring function, were greatly attenuated in NCR-treated cells. In addition, our experiments identified important symbiosis functions and stress responses that are induced by sublethal levels of NCR peptides and other antimicrobial peptides. Several of these stress-response pathways also are found in related α-proteobacterial pathogens and might be used by S. meliloti to sense host cues during infection. Our data suggest a model in which, in addition to provoking stress responses, NCR peptides target intracellular regulatory pathways to drive S. meliloti endoreduplication and differentiation during symbiosis.

  18. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration effects and accelerates cell cycle progression in multiple myeloma cells via activating the Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Chen, Ziang; Chen, Jingfu; Zhuang, Xiaomin; Feng, Jianqiang; Li, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), regarded as the third gaseous transmitter, mediates and induces various biological effects. The present study investigated the effects of H2S on multiple myeloma cell progression via amplifying the activation of Akt pathway in multiple myeloma cells. The level of H2S produced in multiple myeloma (MM) patients and healthy subjects was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MM cells were treated with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were measured by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that the concentration of H2S was higher in MM patients and that it increased in parallel with disease progression. Treating MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS for 24 h markedly increased the expression level of Bcl-2 and the activation of p-Akt, however, the expression level of caspase-3 was decreased, cell viability was increased, and cell cycle progression was accelerated in MM cells. NaHS also induced migration in MM cells in transwell migration assay. Furthermore, co-treatment of MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS and 50 µmol/l LY294002 for 24 h significantly overset these effects. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Akt pathway contributes to NaHS-induced cell proliferation, migration and acceleration of cell cycle progression in MM cells.

  19. [The irido-corneo-endothelial syndrome. The loss of the control of corneal endothelial cell cycle. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, A M; Renard, G; Robert, L; Bourges, J-L

    2013-04-01

    The three major symptoms of the irido-corneo-endothelial syndrome are the alterations of the corneal endothelium and of the iris with a loss of the regulation of the cell cycle, and the progressive obstruction of the irido-corneal angle. This rare pathology attacks mainly young adult women. Most of the symptoms and complications originate from the excessive proliferation of the corneal endothelial cells accompanied by the evolution of their phenotype towards that of the epithelial cells. In normal conditions the corneal endothelial cells do not divide, they are blocked in the G1 stage of the cell cycle, mainly because of the action of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases. Still these cells retain a good capacity for proliferation, which can be induced by the down-regulation of the expression of the inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases. This proliferative capacity declines with age and is also different according to the localization of the cells: it is more intense with those originating from the central area then in those from the peripheral area of the cornea. The age-related decline of the proliferative capacity is not due to the shortening of the telomers, but to the stress-induced accelerated senescence of the cells.

  20. The rotamase Pin1 is up-regulated, hypophosphorylated and required for cell cycle progression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Susanne; Dakic, Branka; Rath, Ariane F E; Makarova, Galina; Sterz, Carolina; Meissner, Wolfgang; Bette, Michael; Adamkiewicz, Jürgen; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf; Werner, Jochen A; Mandic, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 has been implicated in malignant transformation in multiple studies, however, little is known about its potential impact in head and neck cancer. This study evaluates the role of Pin1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Pin1 expression and level of phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blot analysis and 2D-gel-electrophoresis. Pin1 was inhibited with juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthalenedione) or Pin1 specific siRNA and its influence on cell cycle checkpoint distribution was assessed by FACS analysis. Pin1 overexpression was found in HNSCC tissues and cell lines. 2D-gel-electrophoresis data pointed to Pin1 being hypophosphorylated in HNSCC cells which is consistent with overactivation of this rotamase. Inhibition of HNSCC cells with juglone or Pin1 siRNA induced the cell cycle inhibitor p21(WAF1/Cip1) with a concomitant reduction of cells in G2/M and an increased fraction of cells with fragmented DNA. Cell death did not correlate with significant levels of apoptosis in Pin1 depleted HNSCC cells. In summary, the data shows that Pin1 is overexpressed and hypophosphorylated in HNSCC, and that inhibition of Pin1 blocks cell cycle progression and triggers tumor cell death. Pin1 therefore could represent a new target for the development of improved HNSCC targeting drugs.

  1. Circadian clock gene Per2 plays an important role in cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle progression in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Ao, Yiran; Yang, Kai; Tang, Hong; Chen, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the aberrant expression of period circadian clock 2 (Per2) is closely related to the occurrence and development of cancers, but the specific mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we used shRNA to downregulate Per2 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) Tca8113 cells, and then detected the alterations in cell cycle, cell proliferation and apoptosis by flow cytometric analysis and mRNA expression alterations in all the important genes in the cyclin/cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)/cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) cell cycle network by RT-qPCR. We found that in the Tca8113 cells, after Per2 downregulation, the mRNA expression levels of cyclin A2, B1 and D1, CDK4, CDK6 and E2F1 were significantly increased (Pcycle progression and the balance of cell proliferation and apoptosis by regulation of the cyclin/CDK/CKI cell cycle network. Further research on Per2 may provide a new effective molecular target for cancer treatments.

  2. The cell cycle regulated transcriptome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Archer

    Full Text Available Progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle requires the regulation of hundreds of genes to ensure that they are expressed at the required times. Integral to cell cycle progression in yeast and animal cells are temporally controlled, progressive waves of transcription mediated by cell cycle-regulated transcription factors. However, in the kinetoplastids, a group of early-branching eukaryotes including many important pathogens, transcriptional regulation is almost completely absent, raising questions about the extent of cell-cycle regulation in these organisms and the mechanisms whereby regulation is achieved. Here, we analyse gene expression over the Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle, measuring changes in mRNA abundance on a transcriptome-wide scale. We developed a "double-cut" elutriation procedure to select unperturbed, highly synchronous cell populations from log-phase cultures, and compared this to synchronization by starvation. Transcriptome profiling over the cell cycle revealed the regulation of at least 430 genes. While only a minority were homologous to known cell cycle regulated transcripts in yeast or human, their functions correlated with the cellular processes occurring at the time of peak expression. We searched for potential target sites of RNA-binding proteins in these transcripts, which might earmark them for selective degradation or stabilization. Over-represented sequence motifs were found in several co-regulated transcript groups and were conserved in other kinetoplastids. Furthermore, we found evidence for cell-cycle regulation of a flagellar protein regulon with a highly conserved sequence motif, bearing similarity to consensus PUF-protein binding motifs. RNA sequence motifs that are functional in cell-cycle regulation were more widespread than previously expected and conserved within kinetoplastids. These findings highlight the central importance of post-transcriptional regulation in the proliferation of parasitic kinetoplastids.

  3. Glucose-stimulated DNA synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is regulated by KATP channels: effects on cell cycle progression in rodent islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Guim; Marshall, Connie A; Liu, Hui; Pappan, Kirk L; Remedi, Maria S; McDaniel, Michael L

    2006-02-10

    The aim of this study was to define metabolic signaling pathways that mediate DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in adult rodent islets to devise strategies to enhance survival, growth, and proliferation. Since previous studies indicated that glucose-stimulated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to [3H]thymidine incorporation and that mTOR activation is mediated, in part, through the K(ATP) channel and changes in cytosolic Ca2+, we determined whether glyburide, an inhibitor of K(ATP) channels that stimulates Ca2+ influx, modulates [3H]thymidine incorporation. Glyburide (10-100 nm) at basal glucose stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation to the same magnitude as elevated glucose and further enhanced the ability of elevated glucose to increase [3H]thymidine incorporation. Diazoxide (250 microm), an activator of KATP channels, paradoxically potentiated glucose-stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation 2-4-fold above elevated glucose alone. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that chronic exposure of islets to basal glucose resulted in a typical cell cycle progression pattern that is consistent with a low level of proliferation. In contrast, chronic exposure to elevated glucose or glyburide resulted in progression from G0/G1 to an accumulation in S phase and a reduction in G2/M phase. Rapamycin (100 nm) resulted in an approximately 62% reduction of S phase accumulation. The enhanced [3H]thymidine incorporation with chronic elevated glucose or glyburide therefore appears to be associated with S phase accumulation. Since diazoxide significantly enhanced [3H]thymidine incorporation without altering S phase accumulation under chronic elevated glucose, this increase in DNA synthesis also appears to be primarily related to an arrest in S phase and not cell proliferation.

  4. Developmental Control of Cell-Cycle Compensation Provides a Switch for Patterned Mitosis at the Onset of Chordate Neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yosuke; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2016-04-18

    During neurulation of chordate ascidians, the 11th mitotic division within the epidermal layer shows a posterior-to-anterior wave that is precisely coordinated with the unidirectional progression of the morphogenetic movement. Here we show that the first sign of this patterned mitosis is an asynchronous anterior-to-posterior S-phase length and that mitotic synchrony is reestablished by a compensatory asynchronous G2-phase length. Live imaging combined with genetic experiments demonstrated that compensatory G2-phase regulation requires transcriptional activation of the G2/M regulator cdc25 by the patterning genes GATA and AP-2. The downregulation of GATA and AP-2 at the onset of neurulation leads to loss of compensatory G2-phase regulation and promotes the transition to patterned mitosis. We propose that such developmentally regulated cell-cycle compensation provides an abrupt switch to spatially patterned mitosis in order to achieve the coordination between mitotic timing and morphogenesis.

  5. DNA Damage Signaling, Impairment of Cell Cycle Progression, and Apoptosis Triggered by 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine Incorporated into DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H. Dorota; Li, Jiangwei; Biela, Ewa; Berniak, Krzysztof; Dobrucki, Jurek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    The “click chemistry” approach utilizing 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) as a DNA precursor was recently introduced to assess DNA replication and adapted to flow- and imaging-cytometry. In the present study, we observed that EdU, once incorporated into DNA, induces DNA damage signaling (DDS) such as phosphorylation of ATM on Ser1981, of histone H2AX on Ser139, of p53 on Ser15, and of Chk2 on Thr68. It also perturbs progression of cells through the cell cycle and subsequently induces apoptosis...

  6. Lectin from Agaricus Bisporus Suppresses Akt Phosphorylation and Arrests Cell Cycle Progression in Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

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    Y. H. Cheung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells have been implicated in the development of retinal diseases. Lectin from the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus (ABL was found to inhibit growth of RPE cells. To elucidate the mechanism through which ABL inhibits RPE cell proliferation, we investigated the changes in cell proliferation-related signaling pathways and cell cycle distribution patterns. Primary human RPE cells were grown with or without the lectin (ABL supplement (20ug or 90ug/ml for three days. Phosphorylation statuses of Akt, Jnk and p38 as well as p53 expression level were investigated by Western blotting. Cellular distributions in various cell cycle phases were investigated using flow cytometry. After ABL treatment (90ug/ml, Akt was found to be hypo-phosphorylated while the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated-Jnk and phosphorylated-p38 were not altered. The amount of cells present at S phase was reduced. Our results showed that ABL hypo-phosphorylated Akt and this observation is in line with the finding that ABL could attenuate cell proliferation. As the level of p53 was not significantly altered by ABL, this suggested that the mechanism in which ABL arrested cell proliferation was independent of Akt-mediated MDM2 activation but was possibly mediated by altering G1 to S phase transition.

  7. Structures of inactive retinoblastoma protein reveal multiple mechanisms for cell cycle control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Jason R.; Hura, Greg L.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (LBNL)

    2012-07-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) phosphorylation of the Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) drives cell proliferation through inhibition of Rb complexes with E2F transcription factors and other regulatory proteins. We present the first structures of phosphorylated Rb that reveal the mechanism of its inactivation. S608 phosphorylation orders a flexible 'pocket' domain loop such that it mimics and directly blocks E2F transactivation domain (E2F{sup TD}) binding. T373 phosphorylation induces a global conformational change that associates the pocket and N-terminal domains (RbN). This first multidomain Rb structure demonstrates a novel role for RbN in allosterically inhibiting the E2F{sup TD}-pocket association and protein binding to the pocket 'LxCxE' site. Together, these structures detail the regulatory mechanism for a canonical growth-repressive complex and provide a novel example of how multisite Cdk phosphorylation induces diverse structural changes to influence cell cycle signaling.

  8. Physiological electric fields control the G1/S phase cell cycle checkpoint to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Entong; Yin, Yili; Zhao, Min; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation is a key event in angiogenesis and is tightly regulated. Electric potential differences exist around the vascular endothelium and give rise to endogenous electric fields (EFs), whether these EFs influence VEC proliferation is unclear. We exposed cultured VECs to applied EFs of physiological strengths for up to 72 h. EF at 50 or 100 mV/mm did not influence cell proliferation, but at 200 mV/mm, cell density, cell growth rate, and mitosis index decreased significantly. EF-induced reduction in VEC proliferation was not due to increased apoptosis, because caspase apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (20 microM), had no effect on this response. Rather, EF responses were mediated via decreased entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase, as shown by flow cytometry. Western blot showed that EFs decreased G1-specific cyclin E expression and increased cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitor p27kipl expression. Thus EFs controlled VEC proliferation through induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 by down-regulation of cyclin E expression and up-regulation of p27kipl expression, rather than by promoting apoptosis. If control of the cell cycle by endogenous EFs extends beyond VECs, this would be of widespread biological significance in vivo.

  9. p21 is decreased in polycystic kidney disease and leads to increased epithelial cell cycle progression: roscovitine augments p21 levels

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    Park Jin-Young

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a common genetic disease with few treatment options other than renal replacement therapy. p21, a cyclin kinase inhibitor which has pleiotropic effects on the cell cycle, in many cases acts to suppress cell cycle progression and to prevent apoptosis. Because defects in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells occur in PKD, and in light of earlier reports that polycystin-1 upregulates p21 and that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine arrests progression in a mouse model, we asked whether (1 p21 deficiency might underlie ADPKD and (2 the mechanism of the salutary roscovitine effect on PKD involves p21. Methods p21 levels in human and animal tissue samples as well as cell lines were examined by immunoblotting and/or immunohistochemisty. Apoptosis was assessed by PARP cleavage. p21 expression was attenuated in a renal tubular epithelial cell line by antisense methods, and proliferation in response to p21 attenuation and to roscovitine was assessed by the MTT assay. Results We show that p21 is decreased in human as well as a non-transgenic rat model of ADPKD. In addition, hepatocyte growth factor, which induces transition from a cystic to a tubular phenotype, increases p21 levels. Furthermore, attenuation of p21 results in augmentation of cell cycle transit in vitro. Thus, levels of p21 are inversely correlated with renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation. Roscovitine, which has been shown to arrest progression in a murine model of PKD, increases p21 levels and decreases renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation, with no affect on apoptosis. Conclusion The novelty of our study is the demonstration in vivo in humans and rat models of a decrement of p21 in cystic kidneys as compared to non-cystic kidneys. Validation of a potential pathogenetic model of increased cyst formation due to enhanced epithelial proliferation and apoptosis

  10. Overexpression of Lin28 inhibits the proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis of BGC-823 gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hu; Xu, Wei; Song, Jun; Liang, Yong; Fu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Cheng; Li, Chao; Peng, Jun-Sheng; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-02-01

    Lin28 plays important roles in the development, maintenance of pluripotency and progression of various types of cancers. Lin28 represses the biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and is implicated in both development and tumorigenesis. Oncogenic regulation of let-7 microRNAs has been demonstrated in several human malignancies, yet their correlation with Lin28 has not yet been studied in gastric cancer. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the possible mechanisms involved in the effects by Lin28 on the proliferation, migration, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via alteration of let-7 miRNA. The expression levels of Lin28 and let-7 were detected by real-time PCR in gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. Lin28 was overexpressed in the BGC-823 cells via lentiviral transfection, and let-7 expression was assessed. Cell proliferation and migration capabilities were investigated by MTT and Transwell assays, while cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis rate were detected using flow cytometry. The expression of Lin28 was moderately expressed in the GES cells while underexpressed in the BGC-823, SGC-7901 and HGC-27 cells. Let-7a miRNA was highly expressed in the GES, BGC-823, SGC-7901 and HGC-27 cells. Overexpression of Lin28 was inversely correlated with the downregulated expression of let-7a, and markedly suppressed the proliferation, migration, cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in the BGC-823 cells. These findings demonstrated that overexpression of Lin28 can suppress the biological behavior of gastric cancer in vitro, and let-7 miRNA may play an important role in the process. We suggest that Lin28 may be a candidate predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for gastric cancer patients.

  11. Role of different vehicles in carotenoids delivery and their influence on cell viability, cell cycle progression, and induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, Poorigali Raghavendra-Rao; Arathi, Bangalore Prabhashankar; Vijay, Kariyappa; Baskaran, Vallikannan; Lakshminarayana, Rangaswamy

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the role of different vehicles in carotenoids delivery and their influence on cell viability, cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells. Cells (5 × 10(3)) were treated with different concentrations (25-100 µM) of β-carotene (BC) or lutein (L) or astaxanthin (AST) dissolved in 0.5% of tetrahydrofuran (THF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and fetal bovine serum (FBS), respectively. The effect of delivery vehicle on carotenoids uptake, cytotoxicity, oxidative status, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis was examined after 48 h of incubation. The results shown that, cell viability reduced significantly in a dose- and time-dependent manner irrespective of carotenoid delivered in vehicles. Cellular uptake of BC delivered in THF was higher by 49.1, 29.7% and L delivered through THF was higher by 41.7 and 37.5% than DMSO and FBS, respectively. While, AST delivered through DMSO was higher by 36.1 and 43.7% than the THF and FBS, respectively. In case of cells treated either with BC or L delivered through THF and AST in DMSO decreased the glutathione and increased the malondialdehyde levels. The net increase in the G 2/M phase percentage of cell cycle progression was observed in carotenoid-treated cells. The % induction of apoptosis by BC or L delivered with THF and AST in DMSO was higher than other treated groups. In conclusion, choice of suitable vehicle for specific carotenoids delivery is essential that in turn may influence on cell proliferation and cell-based assays.

  12. Increase of Intracellular Cyclic AMP by PDE4 Inhibitors Affects HepG2 Cell Cycle Progression and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Mara; Cardarelli, Silvia; Galli, Francesca; Giardi, Maria Federica; Ragusa, Federica; Panera, Nadia; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Biagioni, Stefano; Giorgi, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are major members of a superfamily of enzymes (PDE) involved in modulation of intracellular signaling mediated by cAMP. Broadly expressed in most human tissues and present in large amounts in the liver, PDEs have in the last decade been key therapeutic targets for several inflammatory diseases. Recently, a significant body of work has underscored their involvement in different kinds of cancer, but with no attention paid to liver cancer. The present study investigated the effects of two PDE4 inhibitors, rolipram and DC-TA-46, on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with these inhibitors caused a marked increase of intracellular cAMP level and a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell growth. The concentrations of inhibitors that halved cell proliferation to about 50% were used for cell cycle experiments. Rolipram (10 μM) and DC-TA-46 (0.5 μM) produced a decrease of cyclin expression, in particular of cyclin A, as well as an increase in p21, p27 and p53, as evaluated by Western blot analysis. Changes in the intracellular localization of cyclin D1 were also observed after treatments. In addition, both inhibitors caused apoptosis, as demonstrated by an Annexin-V cytofluorimetric assay and analysis of caspase-3/7 activity. Results demonstrated that treatment with PDE4 inhibitors affected HepG2 cell cycle and survival, suggesting that they might be useful as potential adjuvant, chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1401-1411, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition via Up-regulation of Survivin in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Anyan; Shi, Ranran; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing; Li, Panpan; Song, Fuxi; Qu, Yalan; Li, Jinna; Yun, Haiqin; Yang, Xiangshan

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/CXCR4 ligand-receptor axis is widely recommended as an attractive target for cancer therapy. Meanwhile, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is linked to disease pathophysiology. As one of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins, survivin is implicated in the onset and development of cancer. In the present study, we tried to determine the cause-effect associations between SDF-1/CXCR4 axis and survivin expression in glioblastoma U-251 cell line. Survivin activation and inhibition were induced with exogenous SDF-1 and survivin small interfering RNA (survivin siRNA), respectively. Western blot was used to detect relevant proteins in SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Western blot analysis revealed that survivin expression in U-251 increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner in response to SDF-1 treatment. However, the interference with MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathway prohibited SDF-1-induced survivin up-regulation. Importantly, survivin knockdown abrogated cell cycle progression and the expression of snail and N-cadherin, compared with non-transfectants. In conclusion, the present study shows that SDF-1 up-regulates survivin via MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathway, leading to cell cycle progression and EMT occurrence dependent on survivin. The blockade of survivin will allow for the treatment of glioblastoma.

  14. NPM-ALK oncogenic kinase promotes cell-cycle progression through activation of JNK/cJun signaling in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventaki, Vasiliki; Drakos, Elias; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S; Claret, Francois X; Rassidakis, George Z

    2007-09-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) frequently carries the t(2;5)(p23;q35), resulting in aberrant expression of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK). We show that in 293T and Jurkat cells, forced expression of active NPM-ALK, but not kinase-dead mutant NPM-ALK (210K>R), induced JNK and cJun phosphorylation, and this was linked to a dramatic increase in AP-1 transcriptional activity. Conversely, inhibition of ALK activity in NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells resulted in a concentration-dependent dephosphorylation of JNK and cJun and decreased AP-1 DNA-binding. In addition, JNK physically binds NPM-ALK and is highly activated in cultured and primary NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells. cJun phosphorylation in NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells is mediated by JNKs, as shown by selective knocking down of JNK1 and JNK2 genes using siRNA. Inhibition of JNK activity using SP600125 decreased cJun phosphorylation and AP-1 transcriptional activity and this was associated with decreased cell proliferation and G2/M cell-cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Silencing of the cJun gene by siRNA led to a decreased S-phase cell-cycle fraction associated with upregulation of p21 and downregulation of cyclin D3 and cyclin A. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel function of NPM-ALK, phosphorylation and activation of JNK and cJun, which may contribute to uncontrolled cell-cycle progression and oncogenesis.

  15. Glutathione transferases P1/P2 regulate the timing of signaling pathway activations and cell cycle progression during mouse liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaud, J; Ribault, C; Ben Mosbah, I; Rauch, C; Henderson, C; Bellaud, P; Aninat, C; Loyer, P; Morel, F; Corlu, A

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are phase II enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of endogenous noxious compounds and xenobiotics. They also regulate phosphorylation activities of MAPKinases in a catalytic-independent manner. Previous studies have demonstrated the regulation of JNK-dependent pathway by GSTP1/2. Considering the crucial role of JNK in the early steps of the hepatocyte cell cycle, we sought to determine whether GSTP1/2 were essential for hepatocyte proliferation following partial hepatectomy (PH). Using a conventional double knockout mouse model for the Gstp1 and Gstp2 genes, we found that the lack of GSTP1/P2 reduced the rate of DNA replication and mitotic index during the first wave of hepatocyte proliferation. The lowered proliferation was associated with the decrease in TNFalpha and IL-6 plasma concentrations, reduced hepatic HGF expression and delayed and/or altered activation of STAT3, JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. In addition, the expression and/or activation of cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1 and MCM7 was postponed demonstrating that the absence of GSTP1/2 delayed the entry into and progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle and impaired the synchrony of proliferation in hepatocytes following PH. Furthermore, while JNK and its downstream targets c-Jun and ATF2 were activated during the early steps of the liver regeneration in wild-type animals, the constitutively active JNK found in the quiescent liver of Gstp1/2 knockout mice underwent a decrease in its activity after PH. Transient induction of antioxidant enzymes and nitric oxide synthase were also delayed or repressed during the regenerative response. Altogether our results demonstrate that GSTP1/2 are a critical regulators of hepatocyte proliferation in the initial phases of liver regeneration.

  16. Sox17 promotes cell cycle progression and inhibits TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling to initiate progenitor cell behavior in the respiratory epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Lange

    Full Text Available The Sry-related high mobility group box transcription factor Sox17 is required for diverse developmental processes including endoderm formation, vascular development, and fetal hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Expression of Sox17 in mature respiratory epithelial cells causes proliferation and lineage respecification, suggesting that Sox17 can alter adult lung progenitor cell fate. In this paper, we identify mechanisms by which Sox17 influences lung epithelial progenitor cell behavior and reprograms cell fate in the mature respiratory epithelium. Conditional expression of Sox17 in epithelial cells of the adult mouse lung demonstrated that cell cluster formation and respecification of alveolar progenitor cells toward proximal airway lineages were rapidly reversible processes. Prolonged expression of Sox17 caused the ectopic formation of bronchiolar-like structures with diverse respiratory epithelial cell characteristics in alveolar regions of lung. During initiation of progenitor cell behavior, Sox17 induced proliferation and increased the expression of the progenitor cell marker Sca-1 and genes involved in cell cycle progression. Notably, Sox17 enhanced cyclin D1 expression in vivo and activated cyclin D1 promoter activity in vitro. Sox17 decreased the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta-responsive cell cycle inhibitors in the adult mouse lung, including p15, p21, and p57, and inhibited TGF-beta1-mediated transcriptional responses in vitro. Further, Sox17 interacted with Smad3 and blocked Smad3 DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Together, these data show that a subset of mature respiratory epithelial cells retains remarkable phenotypic plasticity and that Sox17, a gene required for early endoderm formation, activates the cell cycle and reinitiates multipotent progenitor cell behavior in mature lung cells.

  17. Kv3.4 potassium channel-mediated electrosignaling controls cell cycle and survival of irradiated leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Daniela; Misovic, Milan; Schmid, Evi; Klumpp, Dominik; Salih, Helmut R; Rudner, Justine; Huber, Stephan M

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant ion channel expression in the plasma membrane is characteristic for many tumor entities and has been attributed to neoplastic transformation, tumor progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance. The present study aimed to define the function of these "oncogenic" channels for radioresistance of leukemia cells. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells were irradiated (0-6 Gy X ray), ion channel expression and activity, Ca(2+)- and protein signaling, cell cycle progression, and cell survival were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, patch-clamp recording, fura-2 Ca(2+)-imaging, immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and clonogenic survival assays, respectively. Ionizing radiation-induced G2/M arrest was preceded by activation of Kv3.4-like voltage-gated potassium channels. Channel activation in turn resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) entry and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase-II, and inactivation of the phosphatase cdc25B and the cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2. Accordingly, channel inhibition by tetraethylammonium and blood-depressing substance-1 and substance-2 or downregulation by RNA interference led to release from radiation-induced G2/M arrest, increased apoptosis, and decreased clonogenic survival. Together, these findings indicate the functional significance of voltage-gated K(+) channels for the radioresistance of myeloid leukemia cells.

  18. Polycomb proteins control proliferation and transformation independently of cell cycle checkpoints by regulating DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piunti, Andrea; Rossi, Alessandra; Cerutti, Aurora;

    2014-01-01

    that PRCs regulate cellular proliferation and transformation independently of the Ink4a/Arf-pRb-p53 pathway. We provide evidence that PRCs localize at replication forks, and that loss of their function directly affects the progression and symmetry of DNA replication forks. Thus, we have identified a novel...

  19. Extra-virgin olive oil phenols block cell cycle progression and modulate chemotherapeutic toxicity in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, Andrea; Mosca, Luciana; Puca, Rosa; Mangino, Giorgio; Rossi, Alessandro; Lendaro, Eugenio

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that the daily consumption of extra‑virgin olive oil (EVOO), a common dietary habit of the Mediterranean area, lowers the incidence of certain types of cancer, in particular bladder neoplasm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of polyphenols extracted from EVOO on bladder cancer (BCa), and to clarify the biological mechanisms that trigger cell death. Furthermore, we also evaluated the ability of low doses of extra‑virgin olive oil extract (EVOOE) to modulate the in vitro activity of paclitaxel or mitomycin, two antineoplastic drugs used in the management of different types of cancer. Our results showed that EVOOE significantly inhibited the proliferation and clonogenic ability of T24 and 5637 BCa cells in a dose‑dependent manner. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis after EVOOE treatment showed a marked growth arrest prior to mitosis in the G2/M phase for both cell lines, with the subsequent induction of apoptosis only in the T24 cells. Notably, simultaneous treatment of mitomycin C and EVOOE reduced the drug cytotoxicity due to inhibition of ROS production. Conversely, the co‑treatment of T24 cells with paclitaxel and the polyphenol extract strongly increased the apoptotic cell death at each tested concentration compared to paclitaxel alone. Our results support the epidemiological evidence indicating that olive oil consumption exerts health benefits and may represent a starting point for the development of new anticancer strategies.

  20. Tetramethoxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, suppresses proliferation, blocks cell cycle progression, and induces apoptosis of human ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zihao; Liu, Mingming; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Meiqin; Yang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor functions of a synthetic chalcone derivative 4,3',4',5'- tetramethoxychalcone (TMOC) in ovarian cancer cells. We found that TMOC inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of cisplatin sensitive cell line A2780 and resistant cell line A2780/CDDP, as well as ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of A2780 cells with TMOC resulted in G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4, and the up-regulation of p16, p21 and p27 proteins. We demonstrated that TMOC might induce cell apoptosis through suppressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but enhancing the expression of Bax and the cleavage of PARP-1. Treatment of TMOC also reduced the invasion and migration of A2780 cells. Finally, we found that TMOC inhibited the constitutive activation of STAT3 signaling pathway and induced the expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN regardless of the p53 status in cell lines. These data suggest that TMOC may be developed as a potential chemotherapeutic agent to effectively treat certain cancers including ovarian cancer.

  1. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L.F. Ho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability.

  2. A novel class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, I-7ab, induces apoptosis and arrests cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyan; Liang, Qiannan; Shen, Ke; Ma, Li; An, Na; Deng, Weiping; Fei, Zhewei; Liu, Jianwen

    2015-04-01

    Epigenetic mutations are closely associated with human diseases, especially cancers. Among them, dysregulations of histone deacetylases (HDACs) are commonly observed in human cancers. Recent years, HDAC inhibitors have been identified as promising anticancer agents; several HDAC inhibitors have been applied in clinical practice. In this study, we synthesized a novel N-hydroxyacrylamide-derived HDAC inhibitor, I-7ab, and examined its antitumor activity. Our investigations demonstrated that I-7ab exerted cytotoxicity toward and inhibited the growth of human cancer cell lines at micromolar concentrations. Among tested cells, HCT116 was the most sensitive one to the treatment of I-7ab. However, I-7ab displayed far less cytotoxicity in human normal cells. In HCT116 cells, I-7ab inhibited the expression of class I HDACs, especially that of HDAC3, and suppressed EGFR signaling pathway. With respect to the cytotoxic effect of I-7ab, it induced apoptosis via increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and suppressing the translocation of NF-κB. Other than inducing apoptosis, I-7ab inhibited the expression of cyclin B1 and thereby arrests cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Further analyses revealed potential role of p53 and p21 in I-7ab-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. According to our findings, I-7ab may serve as a lead compound for potential antitumor drugs.

  3. Inhibition of nuclear import and cell-cycle progression by mutated forms of the dynamin-like GTPase MxB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Megan C; Raposo, Graça; Lemmon, Mark A

    2004-06-15

    Mx proteins form a subfamily of the dynamin-like GTPases, which have well established roles in cellular trafficking. Some Mx proteins (e.g., human MxA) have antiviral activity and are tightly regulated by type I IFNs. Others (e.g., human MxB) lack antiviral activity and are thought to have normal cellular functions that remain undefined. Consistent with this hypothesis, we report that MxB is expressed without IFN treatment. MxB seems to be exclusively extranuclear and is concentrated at the cytoplasmic face of nuclear pores, suggesting a role in their regulation. We find that expression of dominant negative (GTPase-defective) MxB mutants efficiently blocks nuclear import and causes a delay in G(1)/S cell-cycle progression. MxB depletion using RNA interference (RNAi) leads to a similar cell-cycle defect but does not block nuclear import. MxB therefore seems not to be required for nuclear import per se but may instead regulate its efficiency and/or kinetics. These studies indicate an unexpected role for a dynamin-like protein in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and suggest that a related function might be usurped by its antiviral relatives.

  4. Statistical estimation of cell-cycle progression and lineage commitment in Plasmodium falciparum reveals a homogeneous pattern of transcription in ex vivo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Jacob E; Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Feller, Avi; Carret, Celine; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Pinches, Robert; Day, Felix; Kyes, Sue A; Conway, David J; Holmes, Chris C; Newbold, Chris I

    2009-05-05

    We have cultured Plasmodium falciparum directly from the blood of infected individuals to examine patterns of mature-stage gene expression in patient isolates. Analysis of the transcriptome of P. falciparum is complicated by the highly periodic nature of gene expression because small variations in the stage of parasite development between samples can lead to an apparent difference in gene expression values. To address this issue, we have developed statistical likelihood-based methods to estimate cell cycle progression and commitment to asexual or sexual development lineages in our samples based on microscopy and gene expression patterns. In cases subsequently matched for temporal development, we find that transcriptional patterns in ex vivo culture display little variation across patients with diverse clinical profiles and closely resemble transcriptional profiles that occur in vitro. These statistical methods, available to the research community, assist in the design and interpretation of P. falciparum expression profiling experiments where it is difficult to separate true differential expression from cell-cycle dependent expression. We reanalyze an existing dataset of in vivo patient expression profiles and conclude that previously observed discrete variation is consistent with the commitment of a varying proportion of the parasite population to the sexual development lineage.

  5. Irreversibility of cellular senescence: dual roles of p16INK4a/Rb-pathway in cell cycle control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hara Eiji

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor gene product, pRb, has an established role in the implementation of cellular senescence, the state of irreversible G1 cell cycle arrest provoked by diverse oncogenic stresses. In murine cells, senescence cell cycle arrest can be reversed by subsequent inactivation of pRb, indicating that pRb is required not only for the onset of cellular senescence, but also for the maintenance of senescence program in murine cells. However, in human cells, once pRb is fully activated by p16INK4a, senescence cell cycle arrest becomes irreversible and is no longer revoked by subsequent inactivation of pRb, suggesting that p16INK4a/Rb-pathway activates an alternative mechanism to irreversibly block the cell cycle in human senescent cells. Here, we discuss the molecular mechanism underlying the irreversibility of senescence cell cycle arrest and its potential towards tumor suppression.

  6. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA PRNCR1 in colorectal cancer promotes cell proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Qiu, Mantang; Xu, Youtao; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Yanyan; Li, Ming; Xu, Lin; Yin, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been confirmed to play a critical regulatory role in various biological processes including carcinogenesis, which indicates that lncRNAs are valuable biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The novel lncRNA prostate cancer non-coding RNA 1 (PRNCR1) is located in the susceptible genomic area of CRC, however the functional role of PRNCR1 remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to investigate the clinical significance and biological function of PRNCR1 in CRC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to assess the expression profile of PRNCR1 in CRC tissues and cell lines. An antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was designed to knock down PRNCR1. In a cohort of 63 patients, PRNCR1 was significantly overexpressed in CRC tissues compared with the expression in adjacent tissues, with an average fold increase of 10.55 (P=0.006). Additionally, a high level of PRNCR1 was associated with large tumor volume (Pline (FHC), PRNCR1 was upregulated in most CRC cell lines (HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29). After knockdown of PRNCR1 by ASO, CRC cell proliferation ability was significantly inhibited. We further found that PRNCR1 knockdown induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in the S phases. In contrast, PRNCR1 knockdown did not affect cell apoptosis or invasive ability. Hence, these data indicate that PRNCR1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells and is a potential oncogene of CRC.

  7. MMP13 mediates cell cycle progression in melanocytes and melanoma cells: in vitro studies of migration and proliferation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meierjohann, S.; Hufnagel, A.; Wende, E.; Kleinschmidt, M.A.; Wolf, K. van der; Friedl, P.H.A.; Gaubatz, S.; Schartl, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melanoma cells are usually characterized by a strong proliferative potential and efficient invasive migration. Among the multiple molecular changes that are recorded during progression of this disease, aberrant activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) is often observed. Activation o

  8. Blockage of PI3K/PKB/P27kip1 signaling pathway can antagonize 17β-estradiol-induced Ishikawa proliferation and cell cycle progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ It is well-known that risk for endometrial adenocar- cinoma increases in patients with high level of estrogen that is unopposed by progestin. And activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/PKB) pathway are responsible for hormone-dependent cell growth in endometrial carcinoma.2-4 PI3K produces phosphatidylinositol- 3-phosphates by phosphory- lating the D3 hydroxyl of phosphoinositides, leading to membrane translocation of PKB, on which PKB is phosphorylated and activated. Then the activated PKB can stimulate antiapoptotic cellular responses and block apoptotic functions of the cells, thus regulate the apoptosis and proliferation of cell, cell cycle progression, glucose usage, and angiogenesis.

  9. Global analysis of cell cycle gene expression of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nisco, Nicole J; Abo, Ryan P; Wu, C Max; Penterman, Jon; Walker, Graham C

    2014-03-04

    In α-proteobacteria, strict regulation of cell cycle progression is necessary for the specific cellular differentiation required for adaptation to diverse environmental niches. The symbiotic lifestyle of Sinorhizobium meliloti requires a drastic cellular differentiation that includes genome amplification. To achieve polyploidy, the S. meliloti cell cycle program must be altered to uncouple DNA replication from cell division. In the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle-regulated transcription plays an important role in the control of cell cycle progression but this has not been demonstrated in other α-proteobacteria. Here we describe a robust method for synchronizing cell growth that enabled global analysis of S. meliloti cell cycle-regulated gene expression. This analysis identified 462 genes with cell cycle-regulated transcripts, including several key cell cycle regulators, and genes involved in motility, attachment, and cell division. Only 28% of the 462 S. meliloti cell cycle-regulated genes were also transcriptionally cell cycle-regulated in C. crescentus. Furthermore, CtrA- and DnaA-binding motif analysis revealed little overlap between the cell cycle-dependent regulons of CtrA and DnaA in S. meliloti and C. crescentus. The predicted S. meliloti cell cycle regulon of CtrA, but not that of DnaA, was strongly conserved in more closely related α-proteobacteria with similar ecological niches as S. meliloti, suggesting that the CtrA cell cycle regulatory network may control functions of central importance to the specific lifestyles of α-proteobacteria.

  10. PTEN insufficiency modulates ER+ breast cancer cell cycle progression and increases cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang KC

    2015-08-01

    , cell cycle, tumor growth, target therapy

  11. HDAC8 Inhibition Blocks SMC3 Deacetylation and Delays Cell Cycle Progression without Affecting Cohesin-dependent Transcription in MCF7 Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Tanushree; Antony, Jisha; Braithwaite, Antony W; Horsfield, Julia A

    2016-06-10

    Cohesin, a multi-subunit protein complex involved in chromosome organization, is frequently mutated or aberrantly expressed in cancer. Multiple functions of cohesin, including cell division and gene expression, highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target. The SMC3 subunit of cohesin is acetylated (ac) during S phase to establish cohesion between replicated chromosomes. Following anaphase, ac-SMC3 is deacetylated by HDAC8. Reversal of SMC3 acetylation is imperative for recycling cohesin so that it can be reloaded in interphase for both non-mitotic and mitotic functions. We blocked deacetylation of ac-SMC3 using an HDAC8-specific inhibitor PCI-34051 in MCF7 breast cancer cells, and examined the effects on transcription of cohesin-dependent genes that respond to estrogen. HDAC8 inhibition led to accumulation of ac-SMC3 as expected, but surprisingly, had no influence on the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes that are altered by siRNA targeting of RAD21 or SMC3. Knockdown of RAD21 altered estrogen receptor α (ER) recruitment at SOX4 and IL20, and affected transcription of these genes, while HDAC8 inhibition did not. Rather, inhibition of HDAC8 delayed cell cycle progression, suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that HDAC8 inhibition does not change the estrogen-specific transcriptional role of cohesin in MCF7 cells, but instead, compromises cell cycle progression and cell survival. Our results argue that candidate inhibitors of cohesin function may differ in their effects depending on the cellular genotype and should be thoroughly tested for predicted effects on cohesin's mechanistic roles.

  12. Lamin b1 polymorphism influences morphology of the nuclear envelope, cell cycle progression, and risk of neural tube defects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C P De Castro

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs, including spina bifida and anencephaly, are common birth defects whose complex multigenic causation has hampered efforts to delineate their molecular basis. The effect of putative modifier genes in determining NTD susceptibility may be investigated in mouse models, particularly those that display partial penetrance such as curly tail, a strain in which NTDs result from a hypomorphic allele of the grainyhead-like-3 gene. Through proteomic analysis, we found that the curly tail genetic background harbours a polymorphic variant of lamin B1, lacking one of a series of nine glutamic acid residues. Lamins are intermediate filament proteins of the nuclear lamina with multiple functions that influence nuclear structure, cell cycle properties, and transcriptional regulation. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching showed that the variant lamin B1 exhibited reduced stability in the nuclear lamina. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the variant also affects neural tube closure: the frequency of spina bifida and anencephaly was reduced three-fold when wild-type lamin B1 was bred into the curly tail strain background. Cultured fibroblasts expressing variant lamin B1 show significantly increased nuclear dysmorphology and diminished proliferative capacity, as well as premature senescence, associated with reduced expression of cyclins and Smc2, and increased expression of p16. The cellular basis of spinal NTDs in curly tail embryos involves a proliferation defect localised to the hindgut epithelium, and S-phase progression was diminished in the hindgut of embryos expressing variant lamin B1. These observations indicate a mechanistic link between altered lamin B1 function, exacerbation of the Grhl3-mediated cell proliferation defect, and enhanced susceptibility to NTDs. We conclude that lamin B1 is a modifier gene of major effect for NTDs resulting from loss of Grhl3 function, a role that is likely mediated via the key function of lamin B1

  13. Molecular control of the cell cycle in cancer: biological and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2003-01-01

    DLCLs showed aberration of more than one of the components cyclin D3, p16INK4A, and pRB. An intriguing novel observation was that p16INK4A inactivation was associated with increased expression of cdk4, a kinase target of p16INK4A inhibitory function. This could indicate the existence of a regulatory...... feedback loop between p16INK4A and cdk4. Cyclin D3 has yet to be established as an oncoprotein. Our finding of cyclin D3 overexpression in a significant number of DLCLs (including all thyroid lymphomas analyzed), as well as the intimate inverse relation to other RB1 pathway alterations suggest, that cyclin...... D3 is important in lymphomagenesis. However, further studies are needed to implicate cyclin D3 definitively as an oncoprotein. Our data contain several lines of evidence supporting roles of CDKN2A and MDM2 in progression of neoplastic disease. We found that loss of p16INK4A coincided...

  14. Loss of cell cycle checkpoint control in Drosophila Rfc4 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S A; Loupart, M L; Vass, S; Schoenfelder, S; Harrison, S; Heck, M M

    2001-08-01

    Two alleles of the Drosophila melanogaster Rfc4 (DmRfc4) gene, which encodes subunit 4 of the replication factor C (RFC) complex, cause striking defects in mitotic chromosome cohesion and condensation. These mutations produce larval phenotypes consistent with a role in DNA replication but also result in mitotic chromosomal defects appearing either as premature chromosome condensation-like or precocious sister chromatid separation figures. Though the DmRFC4 protein localizes to all replicating nuclei, it is dispersed from chromatin in mitosis. Thus the mitotic defects appear not to be the result of a direct role for RFC4 in chromosome structure. We also show that the mitotic defects in these two DmRfc4 alleles are the result of aberrant checkpoint control in response to DNA replication inhibition or damage to chromosomes. Not all surveillance function is compromised in these mutants, as the kinetochore attachment checkpoint is operative. Intriguingly, metaphase delay is frequently observed with the more severe of the two alleles, indicating that subsequent chromosome segregation may be inhibited. This is the first demonstration that subunit 4 of RFC functions in checkpoint control in any organism, and our findings additionally emphasize the conserved nature of RFC's involvement in checkpoint control in multicellular eukaryotes.

  15. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gene transcription.

  16. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gen...

  17. CtrA response regulator binding to the Caulobacter chromosome replication origin is required during nutrient and antibiotic stress as well as during cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastedo, D Patrick; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2009-04-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication origin (Cori) has five binding sites for CtrA, an OmpR/PhoB family 'response regulator'. CtrA is degraded in replicating 'stalked' cells but is abundant in the non-replicating 'swarmer' cells, where it was proposed to repress replication by binding to Cori. We systematically mutated all Cori CtrA binding sites, and examined their consequences in the contexts of autonomous Cori-plasmid replication and in the natural chromosome locus. Remarkably, the C. crescentus chromosome tolerates severe mutations in all five CtrA binding sites, demonstrating that CtrA is not essential for replication. Further physiological and cell cycle experiments more rigorously supported the original hypothesis that CtrA represses replication. However, our experiments argued against another hypothesis that residual and/or replenished CtrA protein in stalked cells might prevent extra or unscheduled chromosome replication before cell division. Surprisingly, we also demonstrated that Cori CtrA binding sites are very advantageous and can become essential when cells encounter nutrients and antibiotics. Therefore, the CtrA cell cycle regulator co-ordinates replication with viable cell growth in stressful and rapidly changing environments. We argue that this new role for CtrA provided the primary selective pressure for evolving control by CtrA.

  18. p63/p73 in the control of cell cycle and cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allocati, N. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita' ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100, Chieti (Italy); Di Ilio, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita' ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100, Chieti (Italy); Fondazione ' G. d' Annunzio' , Centro Studi sull' Invecchiamento, Ce.S.I., Via Colle dell' Ara 1, 66100, Chieti (Italy); De Laurenzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita' ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100, Chieti (Italy); Fondazione ' G. d' Annunzio' , Centro Studi sull' Invecchiamento, Ce.S.I., Via Colle dell' Ara 1, 66100, Chieti (Italy); BIOUNIVERSA srl, University of Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    The p53 family apparently derives from a common ancient ancestor that dates back over a billion years, whose function was protecting the germ line from DNA damage. p63 and p73 would maintain this function through evolution while acquiring novel roles in controlling proliferation and differentiation of various tissues. p53 on the other hand would appear in early vertebrates to protect somatic cells from DNA damage with similar mechanism used by its siblings to protect germ line cells . For the predominant role played by p53 mutations in cancer this was the first family member to be identified and soon became one of the most studied genes. Its siblings were identified almost 20 years later and interestingly enough their ancestral function as guardians of the germ-line was one of the last to be identified. In this review we shortly summarize the current knowledge on the structure and function of p63 and p73.

  19. NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase beta1 subunit is peripherally associated to chromosomes during mitosis. Novel role in chromatin condensation and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifarré, Paula; Baltrons, María Antonia; Földi, Istvan; García, Agustina

    2009-01-01

    NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (GC(NO)), the major NO target, is involved in important regulatory functions in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems. GC(NO) exists as heterodimers of alpha(1/2) and beta1 subunits. Deletion of the obligate beta1 dimerizing partner abrogates NO/cGMP signaling and shortens the life span of KO mice. Localization studies in the CNS have shown that beta1 is more widespread than alpha subunits and in some areas is the only GC(NO) subunit expressed, suggesting that beta1 may have GC(NO)-independent functions. GC(NO) is predominantly cytosolic, but association to membranes and other intracellular structures has been described. Here, we show localization of beta1 in cytoplasm and nucleus of cells expressing alpha subunits and GC(NO) activity (astrocytes, C6 cells), as well as in cells devoid of alpha subunits and GC(NO) activity (microglia). In both cell types beta1 associates peripherally to chromosomes in all phases of mitosis. Immunodepletion of beta1 in C6 cells enhances chromatin condensation in an in vitro assay. Moreover, silencing beta1 by siRNA induces cell cycle re-entry as determined by flow cytometry, and increases proliferation rate in a MTT-assay, whereas infection with beta1-containing adenovirus has the opposite effect. These actions are independent of cGMP formation. We postulate that beta1 is a multifunctional protein that regulates chromatin condensation and cell cycle progression, in addition to being an obligate monomer in functional GC(NO) heterodimers.

  20. Cell cycle kinetics with supramitotic control, two cell types, and unequal division: a model of transformed embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, M; Arino, O

    1991-06-01

    We develop a mathematical model of cell cycle kinetics of transformed embryonic cells. The model includes supramitotic regulation, in which decisions regarding growth control are made at a point inside the cell division cycle and their impact extends to the next decision point, located in the next division cycle. Another feature is the presence of two varieties of cells, which switch from one to the other with given transition probabilities. The third factor considered is unequal division of cells, also defined in probabilistic terms. We provide a rigorous description of the model and derivation of its equations and analyze its asymptotic properties by defining and investigating an abstract semigroup of positive linear operators in appropriate state space. The spectral properties of the semigroup yield the balanced exponential growth law for the model. To compare the model to experimental data, we derive basic pedigree statistics, beta curves, and generation time correlations. We present numerical calculations based on measurements available for the embryonic cells. We conclude that to yield the experimentally obtained pedigree statistics, switches from one cell variety to the other must be quite infrequent.

  1. Attenuation of G{sub 2} cell cycle checkpoint control in human tumor cells is associated with increased frequencies of unrejoined chromosome breaks but not increased cytotoxicity following radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Cowan, J.; Grdina, D.J. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The contribution of G{sub 2} cell cycle checkpoint control to ionizing radiation responses was examined in ten human tumor cell lines. Most of the delay in cell cycle progression seen in the first cell cycle following radiation exposure was due to blocks in G{sub 2} and there were large cell line-to-cell line variations in the length of the G{sub 2} block. Longer delays were seen in cell lines that had mutations in p53. There was a highly significant inverse correlation between the length of G{sub 2} delay and the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks seen as chromosome terminal deletions in mitosis, and observation that supports the hypothesis that the signal for G{sub 2} delay in mammalian cells is an unrejoined chromosome break. There were also an inverse correlation between the length of G{sub 2} delay and the level of chromosome aneuploidy in each cell line, suggesting that the G{sub 2} and mitotic spindel checkpoints may be linked to each other. Attenuation in G{sub 2} checkpoint control was not associated with alterations in either the frequency of induced chromosome rearrangements or cell survival following radiation exposure suggesting that chromosome rearrangements, the major radiation-induced lethal lesion in tumor cells, form before cells enters G{sub 2}. Thus, agents that act solely to override G{sub 2} arrest should produce little radiosensitization in human tumor cells.

  2. TRAP1 is involved in BRAF regulation and downstream attenuation of ERK phosphorylation and cell-cycle progression: a novel target for BRAF-mutated colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condelli, Valentina; Piscazzi, Annamaria; Sisinni, Lorenza; Matassa, Danilo Swann; Maddalena, Francesca; Lettini, Giacomo; Simeon, Vittorio; Palladino, Giuseppe; Amoroso, Maria Rosaria; Trino, Stefania; Esposito, Franca; Landriscina, Matteo

    2014-11-15

    Human BRAF-driven tumors are aggressive malignancies with poor clinical outcome and lack of sensitivity to therapies. TRAP1 is a HSP90 molecular chaperone deregulated in human tumors and responsible for specific features of cancer cells, i.e., protection from apoptosis, drug resistance, metabolic regulation, and protein quality control/ubiquitination. The hypothesis that TRAP1 plays a regulatory function on the BRAF pathway, arising from the observation that BRAF levels are decreased upon TRAP1 interference, was tested in human breast and colorectal carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. This study shows that TRAP1 is involved in the regulation of BRAF synthesis/ubiquitination, without affecting its stability. Indeed, BRAF synthesis is facilitated in a TRAP1-rich background, whereas increased ubiquitination occurs upon disruption of the TRAP1 network that correlates with decreased protein levels. Remarkably, BRAF downstream pathway is modulated by TRAP1 regulatory activity: indeed, TRAP1 silencing induces (i) ERK phosphorylation attenuation, (ii) cell-cycle inhibition with cell accumulation in G0-G1 and G2-M transitions, and (iii) extensive reprogramming of gene expression. Interestingly, a genome-wide profiling of TRAP1-knockdown cells identified cell growth and cell-cycle regulation as the most significant biofunctions controlled by the TRAP1 network. It is worth noting that TRAP1 regulation on BRAF is conserved in human colorectal carcinomas, with the two proteins being frequently coexpressed. Finally, the dual HSP90/TRAP1 inhibitor HSP990 showed activity against the TRAP1 network and high cytostatic potential in BRAF-mutated colorectal carcinoma cells. Therefore, this novel TRAP1 function represents an attractive therapeutic window to target dependency of BRAF-driven tumors on TRAP1 translational/quality control machinery.

  3. The budding yeast Cdc48(Shp1 complex promotes cell cycle progression by positive regulation of protein phosphatase 1 (Glc7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Böhm

    Full Text Available The conserved, ubiquitin-selective AAA ATPase Cdc48 regulates numerous cellular processes including protein quality control, DNA repair and the cell cycle. Cdc48 function is tightly controlled by a multitude of cofactors mediating substrate specificity and processing. The UBX domain protein Shp1 is a bona fide substrate-recruiting cofactor of Cdc48 in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Even though Shp1 has been proposed to be a positive regulator of Glc7, the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 in S. cerevisiae, its cellular functions in complex with Cdc48 remain largely unknown. Here we show that deletion of the SHP1 gene results in severe growth defects and a cell cycle delay at the metaphase to anaphase transition caused by reduced Glc7 activity. Using an engineered Cdc48 binding-deficient variant of Shp1, we establish the Cdc48(Shp1 complex as a critical regulator of mitotic Glc7 activity. We demonstrate that shp1 mutants possess a perturbed balance of Glc7 phosphatase and Ipl1 (Aurora B kinase activities and show that hyper-phosphorylation of the kinetochore protein Dam1, a key mitotic substrate of Glc7 and Ipl1, is a critical defect in shp1. We also show for the first time a physical interaction between Glc7 and Shp1 in vivo. Whereas loss of Shp1 does not significantly affect Glc7 protein levels or localization, it causes reduced binding of the activator protein Glc8 to Glc7. Our data suggest that the Cdc48(Shp1 complex controls Glc7 activity by regulating its interaction with Glc8 and possibly further regulatory subunits.

  4. Depth of dormancy in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds is related to the progression of the cell cycle prior to the induction of dormancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, de R.D.; Bino, R.J.; Jing, H.C.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Cell cycle activities are initiated following imbibition of non-dormant seeds. However, it is not known whether cell cycle related events other than DNA replication also remain suppressed in imbibed dormant seeds. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that the transitions between the non-do

  5. The Gene Targeting Approach of Small Fragment Homologous Replacement (SFHR Alters the Expression Patterns of DNA Repair and Cell Cycle Control Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pierandrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses and molecular mechanisms activated by exogenous DNA that invades cells are only partially understood. This limits the practical use of gene targeting strategies. Small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR uses a small exogenous wild-type DNA fragment to restore the endogenous wild-type sequence; unfortunately, this mechanism has a low frequency of correction. In this study, we used a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line with a stably integrated mutated gene for enhanced green fluorescence protein. The restoration of a wild-type sequence can be detected by flow cytometry analysis. We quantitatively analyzed the expression of 84 DNA repair genes and 84 cell cycle control genes. Peculiar temporal gene expression patterns were observed for both pathways. Different DNA repair pathways, not only homologous recombination, as well as the three main cell cycle checkpoints appeared to mediate the cellular response. Eighteen genes were selected as highly significant target/effectors of SFHR. We identified a wide interconnection between SFHR, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. Our results increase the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in cell invasion by exogenous DNA and SFHR. Specific molecular targets of both the cell cycle and DNA repair machineries were selected for manipulation to enhance the practical application of SFHR.

  6. Mutation analysis of genes that control the G1/S cell cycle in melanoma: TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Nevot Miguel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of genes involved in the control of progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle in melanoma tumors in not fully known. The aim of our study was to analyse mutations in TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in melanoma tumors and melanoma cell lines Methods We analysed 39 primary and metastatic melanomas and 9 melanoma cell lines by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP. Results The single-stranded technique showed heterozygous defects in the TP53 gene in 8 of 39 (20.5% melanoma tumors: three new single point mutations in intronic sequences (introns 1 and 2 and exon 10, and three new single nucleotide polymorphisms located in introns 1 and 2 (C to T transition at position 11701 in intron 1; C insertion at position 11818 in intron 2; and C insertion at position 11875 in intron 2. One melanoma tumor exhibited two heterozygous alterations in the CDKN2A exon 1 one of which was novel (stop codon, and missense mutation. No defects were found in the remaining genes. Conclusion These results suggest that these genes are involved in melanoma tumorigenesis, although they may be not the major targets. Other suppressor genes that may be informative of the mechanism of tumorigenesis in skin melanomas should be studied.

  7. Interferon regulatory factor-1 together with reactive oxygen species promotes the acceleration of cell cycle progression by up-regulating the cyclin E and CDK2 genes during high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Long; Chen, Chao; Chi, Ya-Li; Yang, Xiang-Qun; Xu, Yan; Li, Xiao-Tong; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xiong, Shao-Hu; Shen, Man-Ru; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Sen; Hu, Kai-Meng

    2013-10-14

    The high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the development of diabetic vascular diseases. In a previous study, we confirmed that Interferon regulatory factor-1 (Irf-1) is a positive regulator of the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. However, the mechanisms remain to be determined. The levels of cyclin/CDK expression in two cell models involving Irf-1 knockdown and overexpression were quantified to explore the relationship between Irf-1 and its downstream effectors under normal or high glucose conditions. Subsequently, cells were treated with high glucose/NAC, normal glucose/H₂O₂, high glucose/U0126 or normal glucose/H₂O₂/U0126 during an incubation period. Then proliferation, cyclin/CDK expression and cell cycle distribution assays were performed to determine whether ROS/Erk1/2 signaling pathway was involved in the Irf-1-induced regulation of VSMC growth under high glucose conditions. We found that Irf-1 overexpression led to down-regulation of cyclin D1/CDK4 and inhibited cell cycle progression in VSMCs under normal glucose conditions. In high glucose conditions, Irf-1 overexpression led to an up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and an acceleration of cell cycle progression, whereas silencing of Irf-1 suppressed the expression of both proteins and inhibited the cell cycle during the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with antioxidants prevented the Irf-1 overexpression-induced proliferation of VSMCs, the up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and the acceleration of cell cycle progression in high glucose conditions. In contrast, under normal glucose conditions, H₂O₂ stimulation and Irf-1 overexpression induced cell proliferation, up-regulated cyclin E/CDK2 expression and promoted cell cycle acceleration. In addition, overexpression of Irf-1 promoted the activation of Erk1/2 and when VSMCs overexpressing Irf-1 were treated with U0126, the specific Erk1/2 inhibitor

  8. A comprehensive complex systems approach to the study and analysis of mammalian cell cycle control system in the presence of DNA damage stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroudi, Ali; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2017-09-21

    , comprehensive details of cell cycle dynamics under normal and DNA damage conditions revealing the role and value of the added new modules and elements, (ii) assess, through a global sensitivity analysis, the most influential sub-systems, modules and parameters on system response, such as G1-S and G2-M transitions, and (iii) probe deeply into the relationship between DNA damage and cell cycle progression and test the biological evidence that G1-S is relatively inefficient in arresting damaged cells compared to G2-M checkpoint. To perform sensitivity analysis, Self-Organizing Map with Correlation Coefficient Analysis (SOMCCA) is developed which shows that Growth Factor and G1-S Checkpoint sub-systems and 13 parameters in the modules within them are crucial for G1-S and G2-M transitions. To study the relative efficiency of DNA damage checkpoints, a Checkpoint Efficiency Evaluator (CEE) is developed based on perturbation studies and statistical Type II error. Accordingly, cell cycle is about 96% efficient in arresting damaged cells with G2-M checkpoint being more efficient than G1-S. Further, both checkpoint systems are near perfect (98.6%) in passing healthy cells. Thus this study has shown the efficacy of the proposed systems approach to gain a better understanding of different aspects of mammalian cell cycle system separately and as an integrated system that will also be useful in investigating targeted therapy in future cancer treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Apigenin induces DNA damage through the PKCδ-dependent activation of ATM and H2AX causing down-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle control and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Daniel; Parihar, Arti; Villamena, Frederick A.; Wang, Liwen; Freitas, Michael A.; Grotewold, Erich; Doseff, Andrea I.

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin, an abundant plant flavonoid, exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-carcinogenic activities through mechanisms yet not fully defined. In the present study, we show that the treatment of leukemia cells with apigenin resulted in the induction of DNA damage preceding the activation of the apoptotic program. Apigenin-induced DNA damage was mediated by p38 and protein kinase C-delta (PKCδ), yet was independent of reactive oxygen species or caspase activity. Treatment of monocytic leukemia cells with apigenin induced the phosphorylation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and histone H2AX, two key regulators of the DNA damage response, without affecting the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad-3-related (ATR) kinase. Silencing and pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ abrogated ATM and H2AX phosphorylation, whereas inhibition of p38 reduced H2AX phosphorylation independently of ATM. We established that apigenin delayed cell cycle progression at G1/S and increased the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, genome-wide mRNA analyses showed that apigenin-induced DNA damage led to down-regulation of genes involved in cell-cycle control and DNA repair. Taken together, the present results show that the PKCδ-dependent activation of ATM and H2AX define the signaling networks responsible for the regulation of DNA damage promoting genome-wide mRNA alterations that result in cell cycle arrest, hence contributing to the anti-carcinogenic activities of this flavonoid. PMID:22985621

  10. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Karin [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden); Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Grawé, Jan [Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 75185 (Sweden); McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L. [Department of Hematology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States); Daley, George Q. [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Welsh, Michael, E-mail: michael.welsh@mcb.uu.se [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via

  11. NDRG1 expression is related to the progression and prognosis of gastric cancer patients through modulating proliferation, invasion and cell cycle of gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaojing; Xu, Xiaoyang; Ma, Jinguo; Xue, Xiaoying; Li, Zhenhua; Deng, Peng; Zhang, Shuanglong; Zhi, Yu; Chen, Jing; Dai, Dongqiu

    2014-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor gene in many different types of tumors, but its potential function and corresponding mechanism are not yet fully elucidated. This study aims to detect the possible function of NDRG1 in gastric cancer progression. In this study, 112 paired gastric cancer tissues and corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues were utilized to identify the differential protein expression of NDRG1 by immunohistochemistry and its clinical significance was analyzed. Furthermore, 49 of 112 paired gastric specimens were used to detect the differential mRNA expression by real-time PCR. The over expression of NDRG1 in human gastric cancer cell line AGS by PcDNA3.1-NDRG1 transfection was utilized to detect the role of NDRG1 in regulating the biological behavior of gastric cancer. NDRG1 expression was significantly decreased in primary gastric cancer tissues, compared with its corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues (p < 0.05), and its decreased expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.01), invasion depth (p < 0.01) and differentiation (p < 0.05). Additionally, the overall survival rate of gastric cancer patients with high expression of NDRG1 was higher than those with low expression during the follow-up period. NDRG1 overexpression suppressed cells proliferation, invasion and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer. Furthermore, the down-regulation of NDRG1 in gastric cancer metastatic progression was correlated to E-cadherin and MMP-9. Our results verify that NDRG1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene and may play an important role in the metastasis progression and prognosis of gastric cancer.

  12. Phosphorylation of MAP65-1 by Arabidopsis Aurora Kinases Is Required for Efficient Cell Cycle Progression1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Annika K.; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Kosetsu, Ken; Cedeño, Cesyen; Jaquinod, Michel; Njo, Maria; De Milde, Liesbeth; Tompa, Peter; Inzé, Dirk; Beeckman, Tom; Vantard, Marylin

    2017-01-01

    Aurora kinases are key effectors of mitosis. Plant Auroras are functionally divided into two clades. The alpha Auroras (Aurora1 and Aurora2) associate with the spindle and the cell plate and are implicated in controlling formative divisions throughout plant development. The beta Aurora (Aurora3) localizes to centromeres and likely functions in chromosome separation. In contrast to the wealth of data available on the role of Aurora in other kingdoms, knowledge on their function in plants is merely emerging. This is exemplified by the fact that only histone H3 and the plant homolog of TPX2 have been identified as Aurora substrates in plants. Here we provide biochemical, genetic, and cell biological evidence that the microtubule-bundling protein MAP65-1—a member of the MAP65/Ase1/PRC1 protein family, implicated in central spindle formation and cytokinesis in animals, yeasts, and plants—is a genuine substrate of alpha Aurora kinases. MAP65-1 interacts with Aurora1 in vivo and is phosphorylated on two residues at its unfolded tail domain. Its overexpression and down-regulation antagonistically affect the alpha Aurora double mutant phenotypes. Phospho-mutant analysis shows that Aurora contributes to the microtubule bundling capacity of MAP65-1 in concert with other mitotic kinases. PMID:27879390

  13. Assessment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in screening 52 DNA repair and cell cycle control genes in Fanconi anemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with bone marrow failure, birth defects and cancer susceptibility. Apart from the disease- causing mutations in FANC genes, the identification of specific DNA variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, in other candidate genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition enabling individualized treatment with improvement of the prognosis. In this study, we have assessed 95 SNPs located in 52 key genes involved in base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER, mismatch repair (MMR, double strand break (DSB repair and cell cycle control using a DNA repair chip (Asper Biotech, Estonia which includes most of the common variants for the candidate genes. The SNP genotyping was performed in five FA-D2 patients and in one FA-A patient. The polymorphisms studied were synonymous (n=10, nonsynonymous (missense (n=52 and in non-coding regions of the genome (introns and 5 ‘and 3’ untranslated regions (UTR (n=33. Polymorphisms found at the homozygous state are selected for further analysis. Our results have shown a significant inter-individual variability among patients in the type and the frequency of SNPs and also elucidate the need for further studies of polymorphisms located in ATM, APEX APE 1, XRCC1, ERCC2, MSH3, PARP4, NBS1, BARD1, CDKN1B, TP53 and TP53BP1 which may be of great importance for better clinical description of FA. In addition, the present report recommends the use of SNPs as predictive and prognostic genetic markers to individualize therapy of FA patients. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173046

  14. DNA Damage Activates a Spatially Distinct Late Cytoplasmic Cell-Cycle Checkpoint Network Controlled by MK2-Mediated RNA Stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Hasskamp, Pia; Schmedding, Ingolf; Morandell, Sandra; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Wang, XiaoZhe; Linding, Rune; Ong, Shao-En; Weaver, David; Carr, Steven A.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair. p53-defective tumor cells rewire their checkpoint response and become dependent on the p38/MK2 pathway for survival after DNA damage, despite a functional ATR-Chk1 pa

  15. DNA damage activates a spatially distinct late cytoplasmic cell-cycle checkpoint network controlled by MK2-mediated RNA stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, H Christian; Hasskamp, Pia; Schmedding, Ingolf

    2010-01-01

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair. p53-defective tumor cells rewire their checkpoint response and become dependent on the p38/MK2 pathway for survival after DNA damage, despite a functional ATR-Chk1...

  16. CD38 Expression in a Subset of Memory T Cells Is Independent of Cell Cycling as a Correlate of HIV Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Würsch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine if the expression of the activation marker CD38 can correlate with HIV disease progression independently of cycling, we performed a cluster-based multivariate correlation analysis of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts and viral loads with frequencies of CD38 and Ki67 expression on CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with untreated HIV infection, stratified in maturation subpopulations, and subpopulation subsets defined by the expression of CXCR5, CXCR3, and CCR4. The frequencies of the activated phenotypes %CD38+ Ki67− and %CD38+ Ki67+ of the CXCR5− CXCR3− CCR4+ (“pre-Th2” central memory (TCM cell subset clustered together, comprising a significant negative correlate of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts and a positive correlate of viral load in multivariate analysis. Frequency of cycling-uncoupled CD38 expression in “pre-Th2” TCM cells was a negative correlate of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts in univariate analysis, which was not the case of their %CD38+ Ki67+. CXCR5+ CXCR3− CCR4−  TCM cells were underrepresented in patients, and their absolute counts correlated negatively with their %CD38+ Ki67− but not with their % CD38+ Ki67+. Our results may imply that CD38 expression either reflects or participates in pathogenic mechanisms of HIV disease independently of cell cycling.

  17. In vivo targeting of ADAM9 gene expression using lentivirus-delivered shRNA suppresses prostate cancer growth by regulating REG4 dependent cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Ming Liu

    Full Text Available Cancer cells respond to stress by activating a variety of survival signaling pathways. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM 9 is upregulated during cancer progression and hormone therapy, functioning in part through an increase in reactive oxygen species. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo evidence that therapeutic targeting of ADAM9 gene expression by lentivirus-delivered small hairpin RNA (shRNA significantly inhibited proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines and blocked tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer bone metastasis. Cell cycle studies confirmed an increase in the G1-phase and decrease in the S-phase population of cancer cells under starvation stress conditions, which correlated with elevated intracellular superoxide levels. Microarray data showed significantly decreased levels of regenerating islet-derived family member 4 (REG4 expression in prostate cancer cells with knockdown of ADAM9 gene expression. This REG4 downregulation also resulted in induction of expression of p21(Cip1/WAF1, which negatively regulates cyclin D1 and blocks the G1/S transition. Our data reveal a novel molecular mechanism of ADAM9 in the regulation of prostate cancer cell proliferation, and suggests a combined modality of ADAM9 shRNA gene therapy and cytotoxic agents for hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancer.

  18. Quantitative analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected CD4+ cell proteome: dysregulated cell cycle progression and nuclear transport coincide with robust virus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric Y; Qian, Wei-Jun; Diamond, Deborah L; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Katze, Michael G

    2007-07-01

    Relatively little is known at the functional genomic level about the global host response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Microarray analyses by several laboratories, including our own, have revealed that HIV-1 infection causes significant changes in host mRNA abundance and regulation of several cellular biological pathways. However, it remains unclear what consequences these changes bring about at the protein level. Here we report the expression levels of approximately 3,200 proteins in the CD4(+) CEMx174 cell line after infection with the LAI strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); the proteins were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with stable isotope labeling and the accurate mass and time tag approach. Furthermore, we found that 687 (21%) proteins changed in abundance at the peak of virus production at 36 h postinfection. Pathway analysis revealed that the differential expression of proteins was concentrated in select biological pathways, exemplified by ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in ubiquitination, carrier proteins in nucleocytoplasmic transport, cyclin-dependent kinase in cell cycle progression, and pyruvate dehydrogenase of the citrate cycle pathways. Moreover, we observed changes in the abundance of proteins with known interactions with HIV-1 viral proteins. Our proteomic analysis captured changes in the host protein milieu at the time of robust virus production, depicting changes in cellular processes that may contribute to virus replication. Continuing analyses are expected to focus on blocking virus replication by targeting these pathways and their effector proteins.

  19. Detection of S-phase cell cycle progression using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation with click chemistry, an alternative to using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Suzanne B; Bradford, Jolene; Gee, Kyle R; Agnew, Brian J; Clarke, Scott T; Salic, Adrian

    2008-06-01

    The 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of cells followed by antibody staining has been the standard method for direct measurement of cells in the S-phase. Described is an improved method for the detection of S-phase cell cycle progression based upon the application of click chemistry, the copper(I)-catalyzed variant of the Huisgen [3+2] cycloaddition between a terminal alkyne and an azide. 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a nucleoside analog of thymidine that is incorporated into DNA during active DNA synthesis, just like BrdU. While the BrdU assay requires harsh chemical or enzymatic disruption of helical DNA structure to allow for direct measurement of cells in the S-phase by the anti-BrdU antibody, the EdU method does not. Elimination of this requirement results in the preservation of helical DNA structure and other cell surface epitopes, decreased assay time, and increased reproducibility.

  20. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  1. Zerumbone, a Sesquiterpene, Controls Proliferation and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Laryngeal Carcinoma Cell Line Hep-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegannathan, Srimathi Devi; Arul, Santhosh; Dayalan, Haripriya

    2016-07-01

    Zerumbone (ZER), a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet Smith, has been shown to possess antiproliferative, anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity against various types of human carcinoma. The molecular mechanism by which ZER mediates its activity against many cancer types is revealed by many studies. Upregulation of proapoptotic molecules and suppression of antiapoptotic gene expression are few of the mechanisms by which ZER mediates its effect. The present study is focused on investigating the effect of ZER on proliferation of laryngeal carcinoma cells (Hep-2). MTT assay results showed that ZER (0.01-100 μM) induced death of Hep-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner; significant suppression of proliferation of Hep-2 cells was seen with a IC50 value of 15 µM. ZER at a concentration of 15 and 30 μM for 48 h showed early signs of apoptosis as evidenced by confocal microscopy imaging. Flow cytometry studies showed that ZER induced cell cycle arrest. ZER arrested Hep-2 proliferation at S and G2/M phases of cell cycle. In conclusion, these results indicate that ZER has antiproliferative effect and arrests cell cycle in Hep-2 cells in vitro. This could be a potential anticancer drug against laryngeal carcinoma.

  2. Cell cycle progression score is a marker for five-year lung cancer-specific mortality risk in patients with resected stage I lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Takashi; Kadota, Kyuichi; Chaft, Jamie; Evans, Brent; Kidd, John; Tan, Kay See; Dycoco, Joe; Kolquist, Kathryn; Davis, Thaylon; Hamilton, Stephanie A.; Yager, Kraig; Jones, Joshua T.; Travis, William D.; Jones, David R.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goals of our study were (a) to validate a molecular expression signature (cell cycle progression [CCP] score and molecular prognostic score [mPS; combination of CCP and pathological stage {IA or IB}]) that identifies stage I lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients with a higher risk of cancer-specific death following curative-intent surgical resection, and (b) to determine whether mPS stratifies prognosis within stage I lung ADC histological subtypes. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stage I lung ADC tumor samples from 1200 patients were analyzed for 31 proliferation genes by quantitative RT-PCR. Prognostic discrimination of CCP score and mPS was assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression, using 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality as the primary outcome. Results In multivariable analysis, CCP score was a prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.6 per interquartile range; 95% CI, 1.14–2.24; P=0.006). In a multivariable model that included mPS instead of CCP, mPS was a significant prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.77; 95% CI, 1.18–2.66; P=0.006). Five-year lung cancer–specific survival differed between low-risk and high-risk mPS groups (96% vs 81%; P<0.001). In patients with intermediate-grade lung ADC of acinar and papillary subtypes, high mPS was associated with worse 5-year lung cancer–specific survival (P<0.001 and 0.015, respectively), compared with low mPS. Conclusion This study validates CCP score and mPS as independent prognostic markers for lung cancer–specific mortality and provides quantitative risk assessment, independent of known high-risk features, for stage I lung ADC patients treated with surgery alone. PMID:27153551

  3. Effect of a low-fat fish oil diet on proinflammatory eicosanoids and cell-cycle progression score in men undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galet, Colette; Gollapudi, Kiran; Stepanian, Sevan; Byrd, Joshua B; Henning, Susanne M; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Heber, David; Said, Jonathan; Cohen, Pinchas; Aronson, William J

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that a 4- to 6-week low-fat fish oil (LFFO) diet did not affect serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels (primary outcome) but resulted in lower omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratios in prostate tissue and lower prostate cancer proliferation (Ki67) as compared with a Western diet. In this post hoc analysis, the effect of the LFFO intervention on serum pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and 15-S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [15(S)-HETE], and the cell-cycle progression (CCP) score were investigated. Serum fatty acids and eicosanoids were measured by gas chromatography and ELISA. CCP score was determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Associations between serum eicosanoids, Ki67, and CCP score were evaluated using partial correlation analyses. BLT1 (LTB4 receptor) expression was determined in prostate cancer cell lines and prostatectomy specimens. Serum omega-6 fatty acids and 15(S)-HETE levels were significantly reduced, and serum omega-3 levels were increased in the LFFO group relative to the Western diet group, whereas there was no change in LTB4 levels. The CCP score was significantly lower in the LFFO compared with the Western diet group. The 15(S)-HETE change correlated with tissue Ki67 (R = 0.48; P < 0.01) but not with CCP score. The LTB4 change correlated with the CCP score (r = 0.4; P = 0.02) but not with Ki67. The LTB4 receptor BLT1 was detected in prostate cancer cell lines and human prostate cancer specimens. In conclusion, an LFFO diet resulted in decreased 15(S)-HETE levels and lower CCP score relative to a Western diet. Further studies are warranted to determine whether the LFFO diet antiproliferative effects are mediated through the LTB4/BLT1 and 15(S)-HETE pathways.

  4. MicroRNA library screening identifies growth-suppressive microRNAs that regulate genes involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Chul; Yoon, Sena; Byun, Yuree; Lee, Gangtae; Kee, Honghwan; Jeong, Yongsu; Yoon, Jaeseung; Baek, Kwanghee

    2015-12-10

    Micro(mi)RNAs play important and varied roles in tumorigenesis; however, the full repertoire of miRNAs that affect cancer cell growth is not known. In this study, an miRNA library was screened to identify those that affect the growth of A549 tumor cells. Among 300 miRNAs, miR-28-5p, -323-5p, -510-5p, -552-3p, and -608 were the most effective in inhibiting cell growth. More specifically, overexpressing miR-28-5p, -323-5p, and -510-5p induced G1 arrest, as determined by flow cytometry, whereas that of miR-608 induced cell death in a caspase-dependent manner. Moreover, several genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle progression were downregulated upon overexpression of each of the five miRNAs, with the functional targets of miR-552-3p and miR-608 confirmed by microarray, quantitative real-time PCR, and luciferase reporter assay. In miR-608-transfected cells, B cell lymphoma 2-like 1 (BCL2L1), D-type cyclin 1 (CCND1), CCND3, cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3), phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit 2 (PIK3R2), specificity protein 1 (SP1), and phosphorylated Akt were all downregulated, while Bcl-2-interacting killer (BIK) was upregulated. Moreover, miR-608 was determined to have a suppressive function on tumor growth in an NCI-H460 xenograft model. These findings provide insights into the roles of five miRNAs in growth inhibition and their potential function as cancer therapeutics.

  5. Frailty of two cell cycle checkpoints which prevent entry into mitosis and progression through early mitotic stages in higher plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, A; Giménez-Martín, G; López-Sáez, J F; de la Torre, C

    1997-11-01

    Allium cepa L. root meristems were given two short caffeine treatments spaced by 15 hours, the time which roughly corresponds to the duration of one cell cycle. In this way two subsequent cytokineses were prevented, and multinucleate cells with their in complement distributed into two, three or four nuclei were formed. Though all nuclei started to replicate synchronously in these cells, some of them (fast nuclei) completed their replication earlier than others (slow nuclei). The present report shows that two successive checkpoints operate before prometaphase in these cells. The first one prevents the entry of the fast nuclei into prophase until the slow ones have completed their replication. The second checkpoint ensures the synchronous entry into prometaphase after all nuclei have reached and finished prophase. By treating the multinucleate cells with an inhibitor of DNA synthesis at that time when fast but not slow nuclei had finished their replication, it was observed that both checkpoint mechanisms became leaky with time. Under these conditions the fast nuclei entered prophase in the presence of nuclei which were prevented from finishing the replication of their DNA. Subsequently, even prometaphase was triggered after a prolonged prophase. Finally, as expected from the presence of mitotic stages in these cells, nuclei with incompletely replicated DNA endured premature chromosome condensation. The prematurely condensed chromosomes either remained in a prometaphase-like stage until reconstitution nuclei formed or they followed the progression of the fast nuclei into metaphase and anaphase leading to the appearance of acentric chromosomal segments which after reconstitution gave rise to aneuploid nuclei containing unstable and broken DNA.

  6. Impact of siRNA targeting pirh2 on proliferation and cell cycle control of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Yuan; ZHU Liping; JIN Yang; ZHANG Xiaoju; ZHOU Qiong; BAI Ming

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of pirh2(p53-induced RING-H2)protein in the proliferation,apoptosis and cell cycle control of the lung cancer cell line A549.Pirh2 expression was detected by immunofluorescence,Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction(PCR).Cell proliferation was assessed by cell counting kit-8(CCK-8).Cell cycle control and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry.The results showed that pirh2 was expressed in the cytoplasm ofA549 cells.The inhibition of pirh2 expression by siRNA(psiRNA-pirh2)resulted in reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis.In addition,the number of G0/G1 phase cells was increased but G2/M cells were not affected significantly.Taken together,the inhibition of pirh2 expression in the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 resulted in reduced tumor cell growth via the inhibition of cell proliferation,the activation of apoptosis and the interruption of cell cycle transition.

  7. Synchronization of Caulobacter crescentus for investigation of the bacterial cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Jared M; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-04-08

    The cell cycle is important for growth, genome replication, and development in all cells. In bacteria, studies of the cell cycle have focused largely on unsynchronized cells making it difficult to order the temporal events required for cell cycle progression, genome replication, and division. Caulobacter crescentus provides an excellent model system for the bacterial cell cycle whereby cells can be rapidly synchronized in a G0 state by density centrifugation. Cell cycle synchronization experiments have been used to establish the molecular events governing chromosome replication and segregation, to map a genetic regulatory network controlling cell cycle progression, and to identify the establishment of polar signaling complexes required for asymmetric cell division. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the rapid synchronization of Caulobacter NA1000 cells. Synchronization can be performed in a large-scale format for gene expression profiling and western blot assays, as well as a small-scale format for microscopy or FACS assays. The rapid synchronizability and high cell yields of Caulobacter make this organism a powerful model system for studies of the bacterial cell cycle.

  8. Involvement of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in the regulation of cell cycle progression by PTHrP in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Natalia; Martín, María Julia; de Boland, Ana Russo; Gentili, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) is distributed in most fetal and adult tissues, and its expression correlates with the severity of colon carcinoma. Recently we obtained evidence that in Caco-2 cells, a cell line from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, exogenous PTHrP increases the number of live cells, via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PI3-kinase and induces the expression of cyclin D1, a cell cycle regulatory protein. In this study, we further investigated the role of PTHrP in the regulation of the cell cycle progression in these intestinal cells. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that PTHrP treatment diminishes the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and increases the number in both S and G2/M phases. The hormone increases the expression of CDK6 and diminishes the amount of negative cell cycle regulators p27Kip1, p15INK4B, and p53. However, PTHrP does not modify the expression of cyclin D3, CDK4, and p16INK4A. In addition, inhibitors of ERK1/2 (PD98059), p38 MAPK (SB203580), and PI3Kinase (LY294002) reversed PTHrP response in Caco-2 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PTHrP positively modulates cell cycle progression and changes the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways in Caco-2 cells.

  9. A novel technique using three-dimensionally documented biopsy mapping allows precise re-visiting of prostate cancer foci with serial surveillance of cell cycle progression gene panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukimura, Osamu; Gross, Mitchell E; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Azhar, Raed A; Matsugasumi, Toru; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Aron, Manju; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-06-01

    Conventional systematic biopsy has the shortcoming of sampling error and reveals "no evidence of cancer" with a rate of >50% on active surveillance (AS). The objective of this study is to report our initial experience of applying a 3D-documented biopsy-mapping technology to precisely re-visit geographically documented low-risk prostate cancer and to perform serial analysis of cell-cycle-progression (CCP) gene-panel. Over a period of 40 months (1/2010-4/2013), the 3D-biopsy-mapping technique, in which the spatial location of biopsy-trajectory was digitally recorded (Koelis), was carried out. A pair of diagnostic (1st-look) and surveillance (2nd-look) biopsy were performed per subject (n = 25), with median interval of 12 months. The documented biopsy-trajectory was used as a target to guide the re-visiting biopsy from the documented cancer focus, as well as the targeted field-biopsy from the un-sampled prostatic field adjacent to negative diagnostic biopsies. The accuracy of re-visiting biopsy and biopsy-derived CCP signatures were evaluated in the pair of the serial biopsy-cores. The 1st-look-biopsy revealed a total of 43 cancer lesions (1.7 per patient). The accuracy of re-visiting cancer was 86% (37/43) per lesion, 76% (65/86) per core, and 80% (20/25) per patient. This technology also provided an opportunity for 3D-targeted field-biopsy in order to potentially minimize sampling errors. The CCP gene-panel of the 1st-look (-0.59) versus 2nd-look (-0.37) samples had no significant difference (P = 0.4); which suggested consistency in the molecular signature of the known cancer foci during the short-time interval of median 12 months. Any change in CCP of the same cancer foci would be likely due to change in sampling location from the less to more significant portion in the cancer foci rather than true molecular progression. The study limitations include a small number of the patients. The 3D-documented biopsy-mapping technology achieved an encouraging re

  10. p53 and cell cycle dependent transcription of kinesin family member 23 (KIF23 is controlled via a CHR promoter element bound by DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fischer

    Full Text Available The microtubule-dependent molecular motor KIF23 (Kinesin family member 23 is one of two components of the centralspindlin complex assembled during late stages of mitosis. Formation of this complex is known as an essential step for cytokinesis. Here, we identified KIF23 as a new transcriptional target gene of the tumor suppressor protein p53. We showed that p53 reduces expression of KIF23 on the mRNA as well as the protein level in different cell types. Promoter reporter assays revealed that this repression results from downregulation of KIF23 promoter activity. CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1 was shown to be necessary to mediate p53-dependent repression. Furthermore, we identified the highly conserved cell cycle genes homology region (CHR in the KIF23 promoter to be strictly required for p53-dependent repression as well as for cell cycle-dependent expression of KIF23. Cell cycle- and p53-dependent regulation of KIF23 appeared to be controlled by differential binding of DREAM and MMB complexes to the CHR element. With this study, we describe a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation of KIF23. Considering the strongly supporting function of KIF23 in cytokinesis, its p53-dependent repression may contribute to the prevention of uncontrolled cell growth.

  11. p53 and cell cycle dependent transcription of kinesin family member 23 (KIF23) is controlled via a CHR promoter element bound by DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin; Grundke, Inga; Sohr, Sindy; Quaas, Marianne; Hoffmann, Saskia; Knörck, Arne; Gumhold, Catalina; Rother, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule-dependent molecular motor KIF23 (Kinesin family member 23) is one of two components of the centralspindlin complex assembled during late stages of mitosis. Formation of this complex is known as an essential step for cytokinesis. Here, we identified KIF23 as a new transcriptional target gene of the tumor suppressor protein p53. We showed that p53 reduces expression of KIF23 on the mRNA as well as the protein level in different cell types. Promoter reporter assays revealed that this repression results from downregulation of KIF23 promoter activity. CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) was shown to be necessary to mediate p53-dependent repression. Furthermore, we identified the highly conserved cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) in the KIF23 promoter to be strictly required for p53-dependent repression as well as for cell cycle-dependent expression of KIF23. Cell cycle- and p53-dependent regulation of KIF23 appeared to be controlled by differential binding of DREAM and MMB complexes to the CHR element. With this study, we describe a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation of KIF23. Considering the strongly supporting function of KIF23 in cytokinesis, its p53-dependent repression may contribute to the prevention of uncontrolled cell growth.

  12. XIAO is involved in the control of organ size by contributing to the regulation of signaling and homeostasis of brassinosteroids and cell cycling in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunhe; Bao, Liang; Jeong, So-Yoon; Kim, Seong-Ki; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2012-05-01

    Organ size is determined by cell number and size, and involves two fundamental processes: cell proliferation and cell expansion. Although several plant hormones are known to play critical roles in shaping organ size by regulating the cell cycle, it is not known whether brassinosteroids (BRs) are also involved in regulating cell division. Here we identified a rice T-DNA insertion mutant for organ size, referred to as xiao, that displays dwarfism and erect leaves, typical BR-related phenotypes, together with reduced seed setting. XIAO is predicted to encode an LRR kinase. The small stature of the xiao mutant resulted from reduced organ sizes due to decreased cell numbers resulting from reduced cell division rate, as supported by the observed co-expression of XIAO with a number of genes involved in cell cycling. The xiao mutant displayed a tissue-specific enhanced BR response and greatly reduced BR contents at the whole-plant level. These results indicated that XIAO is a regulator of BR signaling and cell division. Thus, XIAO may provide a possible connection between BRs and cell-cycle regulation in controlling organ growth.

  13. In Vitro Antiproliferative Effect of Arthrocnemum indicum Extracts on Caco-2 Cancer Cells through Cell Cycle Control and Related Phenol LC-TOF-MS Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondher Boulaaba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determinate phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of the halophyte Arthrocnemum indicum shoot extracts. Moreover, the anticancer effect of this plant on human colon cancer cells and the likely underlying mechanisms were also investigated, and the major phenols were identified by LC-ESI-TOF-MS. Results showed that shoot extracts had an antiproliferative effect of about 55% as compared to the control and were characterised by substantial total polyphenol content (19 mg GAE/g DW and high antioxidant activity (IC50=40 μg/mL for DPPH test. DAPI staining revealed that these extracts decrease DNA synthesis and reduce the proliferation of Caco-2 cells which were stopped at the G2/M phase. The changes in the cell-cycle-associated proteins (cyclin B1, p38, Erk1/2, Chk1, and Chk2 correlate with the changes in cell cycle distribution. Eight phenolic compounds were also identified. In conclusion, A. indicum showed interesting antioxidant capacities associated with a significant antiproliferative effect explained by a cell cycle blocking at the G2/M phase. Taken together, these data suggest that A. indicum could be a promising candidate species as a source of anticancer molecules.

  14. Loss of C/EBP alpha cell cycle control increases myeloid progenitor proliferation and transforms the neutrophil granulocyte lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Bo T; Bryder, David; Theilgaard-Mönch, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)alpha is a myeloid-specific transcription factor that couples lineage commitment to terminal differentiation and cell cycle arrest, and is found mutated in 9% of patients who have acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously showed that mutations which......, accumulation of myeloblasts and promyelocytes, and expansion of myeloid progenitor populations--all characteristics of AML. Circulating myeloblasts and hepatic leukocyte infiltration were observed, but thrombocytopenia, anemia, and elevated leukocyte count--normally associated with AML-were absent...

  15. The tumor suppressor p53 connects ribosome biogenesis to cell cycle control: a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Michael; Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Orban, Mathias; Kellner, Markus; Eick, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Since its first description more than 30 years ago p53 has become a paradigm for a protein with versatile functions. P53 sensitizes a large variety of genetic alterations and has been entitled the guardian of the genome. Stabilization of p53 upon DNA damage is accompanied by a complex pattern of modifications, which ascertain the cellular response either in the direction of a reversible or irreversible cell cycle arrest or programmed cell death. More recently it became evident that p53 also responds to non-genotoxic cell stress, in particular if ribosome biogenesis is affected.

  16. Control of cell cycle by metabolites of prostaglandin D2 through a non-cAMP mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Fukushima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dehydration products of PGD2, 9-deoxy-9 prostaglandin D2(PGJ2), 9-deoxy-delta 9, delta 12, delta 13 dehydroprostaglandin D2 (delta 12 PGJ2), and PGA2 all contain an unsaturated cyclopentenone structure which is characteristic of prostaglandins which effectively inhibit cell growth. It has been suggested that the action of the inhibitory prostaglandins may be through a cAMP mechanism. In this study, we use S49 wild type (WT) and adenylate cyclase variant (cyc-) cells to show that PGD2 and PGJ2 are not acting via a cyclic AMP mechanism. First, the increase in cyclic AMP in wild type S-49 cells is not proportional to its effects on DNA synthesis. More importantly, when S-49 cyc- cells were exposed to PGJ2, the adenylate cyclase (cyc-) mutant had decreased DNA synthesis with no change in its nominal cAMP content. Short-term (2 hours or less) exposure of the cyc- cells to prostaglandin J2 caused an inhibition of DNA synthesis. PGJ2 caused cytolysis at high concentrations. Long-term exposure (>14 hrs) of the cells to PGJ2, delta 12PGJ2 or delta 12, delta 14PGJ2 caused a cell cycle arrest in G1 demonstrating a cell cycle specific mechanism of action for growth inhibition by naturally occurring biological products independent of cAMP.

  17. Abscisic Acid Participates in the Control of Cell Cycle Initiation Through Heme Homeostasis in the Unicellular Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Ando, Hiroyuki; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-05-01

    ABA is a phytohormone that is synthesized in response to abiotic stresses and other environmental changes, inducing various physiological responses. While ABA has been found in unicellular photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae, its function in these organisms is poorly understood. Here, we found that ABA accumulated in the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae under conditions of salt stress and that the cell cycle G1/S transition was inhibited when ABA was added to the culture medium. A gene encoding heme-scavenging tryptophan-rich sensory protein-related protein (CmTSPO; CMS231C) was positively regulated by ABA, as in Arabidopsis, and CmTSPO bound heme in vitro. The intracellular content of total heme was increased by addition of ABA, but unfettered heme decreased, presumably due to scavenging by CmTSPO. The inhibition of DNA replication by ABA was negated by addition of heme to the culture medium. Thus, we propose a regulatory role for ABA and heme in algal cell cycle initiation. Finally, we found that a C. merolae mutant that is defective in ABA production was more susceptible to salt stress, indicating the importance of ABA to stress resistance in red algae. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The Gcn2 Regulator Yih1 Interacts with the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Cdc28 and Promotes Cell Cycle Progression through G2/M in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Silva

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Yih1, when overexpressed, inhibits the eIF2 alpha kinase Gcn2 by competing for Gcn1 binding. However, deletion of YIH1 has no detectable effect on Gcn2 activity, suggesting that Yih1 is not a general inhibitor of Gcn2, and has no phenotypic defect identified so far. Thus, its physiological role is largely unknown. Here, we show that Yih1 is involved in the cell cycle. Yeast lacking Yih1 displays morphological patterns and DNA content indicative of a delay in the G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and this phenotype is independent of Gcn1 and Gcn2. Accordingly, the levels of phosphorylated eIF2α, which show a cell cycle-dependent fluctuation, are not altered in cells devoid of Yih1. We present several lines of evidence indicating that Yih1 is in a complex with Cdc28. Yih1 pulls down endogenous Cdc28 in vivo and this interaction is enhanced when Cdc28 is active, suggesting that Yih1 modulates the function of Cdc28 in specific stages of the cell cycle. We also demonstrate, by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation, that endogenous Yih1 and Cdc28 interact with each other, confirming Yih1 as a bona fide Cdc28 binding partner. Amino acid substitutions within helix H2 of the RWD domain of Yih1 enhance Yih1-Cdc28 association. Overexpression of this mutant, but not of wild type Yih1, leads to a phenotype similar to that of YIH1 deletion, supporting the view that Yih1 is involved through Cdc28 in the regulation of the cell cycle. We further show that IMPACT, the mammalian homologue of Yih1, interacts with CDK1, the mammalian counterpart of Cdc28, indicating that the involvement with the cell cycle is conserved. Together, these data provide insights into the cellular function of Yih1/IMPACT, and provide the basis for future studies on the role of this protein in the cell cycle.

  19. An Oct4-pRb axis, controlled by MiR-335, integrates stem cell self-renewal and cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeftner, Stefan; Scarola, Michele; Comisso, Elisa; Schneider, Claudio; Benetti, Roberta

    2013-04-01

    The pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) is controlled by a network of transcription factors, mi-RNAs, and signaling pathways. Here, we present a new regulatory circuit that connects miR-335, Oct4, and the Retinoblastoma pathway to control mESC self-renewal and differentiation. Oct4 drives the expression of Nipp1 and Ccnf that inhibit the activity of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complex to establish hyperphosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein 1 (pRb) as a hallmark feature of self-renewing mESCs. The Oct4-Nipp1/Ccnf-PP1-pRb axis promoting mESC self-renewal is under control of miR-335 that regulates Oct4 and Rb expression. During mESC differentiation, miR-335 upregulation co-operates with the transcriptional repression of Oct4 to facilitate the collapse of the Oct4-Nipp1/Ccnf-PP1-pRb axis, pRb dephosphorylation, the exit from self-renewal, and the establishment of a pRb-regulated cell cycle program. Our results introduce Oct4-dependent control of the Rb pathway as novel regulatory circuit controlling mESC self-renewal and differentiation.

  20. Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase (MELK: A Novel Regulator in Cell Cycle Control, Embryonic Development, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK functions as a modulator of intracellular signaling and affects various cellular and biological processes, including cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, spliceosome assembly, gene expression, embryonic development, hematopoiesis, and oncogenesis. In these cellular processes, MELK functions by binding to numerous proteins. In general, the effects of multiple protein interactions with MELK are oncogenic in nature, and the overexpression of MELK in kinds of cancer provides some evidence that it may be involved in tumorigenic process. In this review, our current knowledge of MELK function and recent discoveries in MELK signaling pathway were discussed. The regulation of MELK in cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target were also described.

  1. Use of a small molecule cell cycle inhibitor to control cell growth and improve specific productivity and product quality of recombinant proteins in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhimei; Treiber, David; McCarter, John D; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Saleem, Ramsey A; McCoy, Rebecca E; Zhang, Yuling; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Leith, Matthew; Follstad, Brian D; Dell, Brad; Grisim, Brent; Zupke, Craig; Heath, Carole; Morris, Arvia E; Reddy, Pranhitha

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to improve therapeutic recombinant protein productivity has led to ongoing assessment of appropriate strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry to establish robust processes with optimized critical variables, that is, viable cell density (VCD) and specific productivity (product per cell, qP). Even though high VCD is a positive factor for titer, uncontrolled proliferation beyond a certain cell mass is also undesirable. To enable efficient process development to achieve consistent and predictable growth arrest while maintaining VCD, as well as improving qP, without negative impacts on product quality from clone to clone, we identified an approach that directly targets the cell cycle G1-checkpoint by selectively inhibiting the function of cyclin dependent kinases (CDK) 4/6 with a small molecule compound. Results from studies on multiple recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines demonstrate that the selective inhibitor can mediate a complete and sustained G0/G1 arrest without impacting G2/M phase. Cell proliferation is consistently and rapidly controlled in all recombinant cell lines at one concentration of this inhibitor throughout the production processes with specific productivities increased up to 110 pg/cell/day. Additionally, the product quality attributes of the mAb, with regard to high molecular weight (HMW) and glycan profile, are not negatively impacted. In fact, high mannose is decreased after treatment, which is in contrast to other established growth control methods such as reducing culture temperature. Microarray analysis showed major differences in expression of regulatory genes of the glycosylation and cell cycle signaling pathways between these different growth control methods. Overall, our observations showed that cell cycle arrest by directly targeting CDK4/6 using selective inhibitor compound can be utilized consistently and rapidly to optimize process parameters, such as cell growth, qP, and glycosylation profile in

  2. EVI1 targets ΔNp63 and upregulates the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 independent of p53 to delay cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Kasturi Bala; Kuila, Nivedita; Das Mohapatra, Alok; Panda, Aditya K; Chakraborty, Soumen

    2013-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that specific transcriptional events are involved in cell cycle, proliferation and differentiation processes; however, their deregulation by proto-oncogenes are involved in the development of leukemia and tumors. One such proto-oncogene is ecotropic viral integration site I which can differentially effect cell cycle progression and proliferation, in cell types of different origin. Our data for the first time shows that ecotropic viral integration site I binds to ΔNp63 promoter element directly and down regulates its expression. Down regulation of ΔNp63 induces the expression of p21 in HT-29 cells and also in colon carcinoma cells that do not express p53 including patient samples expressing low level of p53, that eventually delay cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase. Concomitant silencing of ecotropic viral integration site I from the cells or introduction of ΔNp63 to the cells significantly rescued this phenotype, indicating the growth defect induced by ΔNp63 deficiency to be, at least in part, attributable to ecotropic viral integration site I function. The mutual regulation between ecotropic viral integration site I and ΔNp63 may constitute a novel axis which might affect the downstream pathways in cells that do not express functional p53.

  3. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  4. Proteomic analysis of ovarian cancer cells during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) reveals mechanisms of cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Mariana Lopes; Palma, Camila de Souza; Thomé, Carolina Hassibe; Lanfredi, Guilherme Pauperio; Poersch, Aline; Faça, Vitor Marcel

    2017-01-16

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-orchestrated process that culminates with loss of epithelial phenotype and gain of a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. EMT enhances cancer cell invasiveness and drug resistance, favoring metastasis. Dysregulation of transcription factors, signaling pathways, miRNAs and growth factors including EGF, TGF-beta and HGF can trigger EMT. In ovarian cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior. Here, the ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line Caov-3 was induced to EMT with EGF in order to identify specific mechanisms controlled by this process. Caov-3 cells induced to EMT were thoroughly validated and a combination of subcellular proteome enrichment, GEL-LC-MS/MS and SILAC strategy allowed consistent proteome identification and quantitation. Protein network analysis of differentially expressed proteins highlighted regulation of metabolism and cell cycle. Activation of relevant signaling pathways, such as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/Erk MAPK, in response to EGF-induced EMT was validated. Also, EMT did not affected the proliferation rate of Caov-3 cells, but led to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase regulated by increased levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, independently of p53. Furthermore, a decrease in G1 and G2 checkpoint proteins was observed, supporting the involvement of EGF-induced EMT in cell cycle control. Cancer is a complex multistep process characterized by accumulation of several hallmarks including epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which promotes cellular and microenvironmental changes resulting in invasion and migration to distant sites, favoring metastasis. EMT can be triggered by different extracellular stimuli, including growth factors such as EGF. In ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecological cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior, increasing mortality rate caused by metastasis. Our proteomic data, together

  5. Redox Changes During the Cell Cycle in the Embryonic Root Meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Simone, Ambra; Hubbard, Rachel; Viñegra de la Torre, Natanael; Velappan, Yazhini; Wilson, Michael; Considine, Michael J; Soppe, Wim J J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-05-30

    The aim of this study was to characterize redox changes in the nuclei and cytosol occurring during the mitotic cell cycle in the embryonic roots of germinating Arabidopsis seedlings, and to determine how redox cycling was modified in mutants with a decreased capacity for ascorbate synthesis. Using an in vivo reduction-oxidation (redox) reporter (roGFP2), we show that transient oxidation of the cytosol and the nuclei occurred at G1 in the synchronized dividing cells of the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, with reduction at G2 and mitosis. This redox cycle was absent from low ascorbate mutants in which nuclei were significantly more oxidized than controls. The cell cycle-dependent increase in nuclear size was impaired in the ascorbate-deficient mutants, which had fewer cells per unit area in the root proliferation zone. The transcript profile of the dry seeds and size of the imbibed seeds was strongly influenced by low ascorbate but germination, dormancy release and seed aging characteristics were unaffected. These data demonstrate the presence of a redox cycle within the plant cell cycle and that the redox state of the nuclei is an important factor in cell cycle progression. Controlled oxidation is a key feature of the early stages of the plant cell cycle. However, sustained mild oxidation restricts nuclear functions and impairs progression through the cell cycle leading to fewer cells in the root apical meristem. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  6. p53 and p73 Regulate Apoptosis but Not Cell-Cycle Progression in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells upon DNA Damage and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hanbing; Wang, Cheng; Dai, Qian; Li, Fengtian; Bergholz, Johann; Li, Zhonghan; Li, Qintong; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-12-13

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are fast proliferating cells capable of differentiating into all somatic cell types. In somatic cells, it is well documented that p53 is rapidly activated upon DNA damage to arrest the cell cycle and induce apoptosis. In mouse ESCs, p53 can also be functionally activated, but the precise biological consequences are not well characterized. Here, we demonstrated that doxorubicin treatment initially led to cell-cycle arrest at G2/M in ESCs, followed by the occurrence of massive apoptosis. Neither p53 nor its target gene p73 was required for G2/M arrest. Instead, p53 and p73 were fully responsible for apoptosis. p53 and p73 were also required for differentiation-induced apoptosis in mouse ESCs. In addition, doxorubicin treatment induced the expression of retinoblastoma protein in a p53-dependent manner. Therefore, both p53 and p73 are critical in apoptosis induced by DNA damage and differentiation.

  7. Lin-28 homologue A (LIN28A) promotes cell cycle progression via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A) expression in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-05-18

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1-17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent).

  8. Lin-28 Homologue A (LIN28A) Promotes Cell Cycle Progression via Regulation of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2), Cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Cell Division Cycle 25 Homolog A (CDC25A) Expression in Cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L.; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1–17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent). PMID:22467868

  9. Inhibition of p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) activity by A77 1726 and its effect on cell proliferation and cell cycle progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doscas, Michelle E; Williamson, Ashley J; Usha, Lydia; Bogachkov, Yedida; Rao, Geetha S; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yimin; Ruby, Carl; Kaufman, Howard; Zhou, Jingsong; Williams, James W; Li, Yi; Xu, Xiulong

    2014-10-01

    Leflunomide is a novel immunomodulatory drug prescribed for treating rheumatoid arthritis. It inhibits the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, inhibited the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 and two other substrates of S6K1, insulin receptor substrate-1 and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2, in an A375 melanoma cell line. A77 1726 increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p70 S6 (S6K1), ERK1/2, and MEK through the feedback activation of the IGF-1 receptor-mediated signaling pathway. In vitro kinase assay revealed that leflunomide and A77 1726 inhibited S6K1 activity with IC50 values of approximately 55 and 80 μM, respectively. Exogenous uridine partially blocked A77 1726-induced inhibition of A375 cell proliferation. S6K1 knockdown led to the inhibition of A375 cell proliferation but did not potentiate the antiproliferative effect of A77 1726. A77 1726 stimulated bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in A375 cells but arrested the cell cycle in the S phase, which was reversed by addition of exogenous uridine or by MAP kinase pathway inhibitors but not by rapamycin and LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor). These observations suggest that A77 1726 accelerates cell cycle entry into the S phase through MAP kinase activation and that pyrimidine nucleotide depletion halts the completion of the cell cycle. Our study identified a novel molecular target of A77 1726 and showed that the inhibition of S6K1 activity was in part responsible for its antiproliferative activity. Our study also provides a novel mechanistic insight into A77 1726-induced cell cycle arrest in the S phase.

  10. Inhibition of p70 S6 Kinase (S6K1 Activity by A77 1726 and Its Effect on Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E. Doscas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Leflunomide is a novel immunomodulatory drug prescribed for treating rheumatoid arthritis. It inhibits the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, inhibited the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 and two other substrates of S6K1, insulin receptor substrate-1 and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2, in an A375 melanoma cell line. A77 1726 increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p70 S6 (S6K1, ERK1/2, and MEK through the feedback activation of the IGF-1 receptor–mediated signaling pathway. In vitro kinase assay revealed that leflunomide and A77 1726 inhibited S6K1 activity with IC50 values of approximately 55 and 80 μM, respectively. Exogenous uridine partially blocked A77 1726–induced inhibition of A375 cell proliferation. S6K1 knockdown led to the inhibition of A375 cell proliferation but did not potentiate the antiproliferative effect of A77 1726. A77 1726 stimulated bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in A375 cells but arrested the cell cycle in the S phase, which was reversed by addition of exogenous uridine or by MAP kinase pathway inhibitors but not by rapamycin and LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. These observations suggest that A77 1726 accelerates cell cycle entry into the S phase through MAP kinase activation and that pyrimidine nucleotide depletion halts the completion of the cell cycle. Our study identified a novel molecular target of A77 1726 and showed that the inhibition of S6K1 activity was in part responsible for its antiproliferative activity. Our study also provides a novel mechanistic insight into A77 1726–induced cell cycle arrest in the S phase.

  11. Inhibition of p70 S6 Kinase (S6K1) Activity by A77 1726 and Its Effect on Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progress12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doscas, Michelle E.; Williamson, Ashley J.; Usha, Lydia; Bogachkov, Yedida; Rao, Geetha S.; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yimin; Ruby, Carl; Kaufman, Howard; Zhou, Jingsong; Williams, James W.; Li, Yi; Xu, Xiulong

    2014-01-01

    Leflunomide is a novel immunomodulatory drug prescribed for treating rheumatoid arthritis. It inhibits the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, inhibited the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 and two other substrates of S6K1, insulin receptor substrate-1 and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2, in an A375 melanoma cell line. A77 1726 increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p70 S6 (S6K1), ERK1/2, and MEK through the feedback activation of the IGF-1 receptor–mediated signaling pathway. Invitro kinase assay revealed that leflunomide and A77 1726 inhibited S6K1 activity with IC50 values of approximately 55 and 80 μM, respectively. Exogenous uridine partially blocked A77 1726–induced inhibition of A375 cell proliferation. S6K1 knockdown led to the inhibition of A375 cell proliferation but did not potentiate the antiproliferative effect of A77 1726. A77 1726 stimulated bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in A375 cells but arrested the cell cycle in the S phase, which was reversed by addition of exogenous uridine or by MAP kinase pathway inhibitors but not by rapamycin and LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor). These observations suggest that A77 1726 accelerates cell cycle entry into the S phase through MAP kinase activation and that pyrimidine nucleotide depletion halts the completion of the cell cycle. Our study identified a novel molecular target of A77 1726 and showed that the inhibition of S6K1 activity was in part responsible for its antiproliferative activity. Our study also provides a novel mechanistic insight into A77 1726–induced cell cycle arrest in the S phase. PMID:25379019

  12. Sulindac and Celecoxib regulate cell cycle progression by p53/p21 up regulation to induce apoptosis during initial stages of experimental colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Vivek; Rana, Chandan; Piplani, Honit; Vaiphei, Kim; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2014-03-01

    In the present study we have elaborated the putative mechanisms could be followed by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) viz. Sulindac and Celecoxib in the regulation of cell cycle checkpoints along with tumor suppressor proteins to achieve their chemopreventive effects in the initial stages of experimental colorectal cancer. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) to produce early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis. The mRNA expression profiles of various target genes were analyzed by RT-PCR and validated by quantitative real-time PCR, whereas protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Nuclear localization of transcription factors or other nuclear proteins was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and immunofluorescence. Flowcytometry was performed to analyze the differential apoptotic events and cell cycle regulation. Molecular docking studies with different target proteins were also performed to deduce the various putative mechanisms of action followed by Sulindac and Celecoxib. We observed that DMH administration has abruptly increased the proliferation of colonic cells which is macroscopically visible in the form of multiple plaque lesions and co-relates with the disturbed molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has shown regulatory effects on cell cycle checkpoints via induction of various tumor suppressor proteins. We may conclude that Sulindac and Celecoxib could possibly follow p53/p21 mediated regulation of cell proliferation, where down regulation of NF-κB signaling and activation of PPARγ might serve as important additional events in vivo.

  13. A computational platform for robotized fluorescence microscopy (II): DNA damage, replication, checkpoint activation, and cell cycle progression by high-content high-resolution multiparameter image-cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furia, Laura; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Dissection of complex molecular-networks in rare cell populations is limited by current technologies that do not allow simultaneous quantification, high-resolution localization, and statistically robust analysis of multiple parameters. We have developed a novel computational platform (Automated Microscopy for Image CytOmetry, A.M.I.CO) for quantitative image-analysis of data from confocal or widefield robotized microscopes. We have applied this image-cytometry technology to the study of checkpoint activation in response to spontaneous DNA damage in nontransformed mammary cells. Cell-cycle profile and active DNA-replication were correlated to (i) Ki67, to monitor proliferation; (ii) phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and 53BP1, as markers of DNA-damage response (DDR); and (iii) p53 and p21, as checkpoint-activation markers. Our data suggest the existence of cell-cycle modulated mechanisms involving different functions of γH2AX and 53BP1 in DDR, and of p53 and p21 in checkpoint activation and quiescence regulation during the cell-cycle. Quantitative analysis, event selection, and physical relocalization have been then employed to correlate protein expression at the population level with interactions between molecules, measured with Proximity Ligation Analysis, with unprecedented statistical relevance. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  14. Structure related effects of flavonoid aglycones on cell cycle progression of HepG2 cells: Metabolic activation of fisetin and quercetin by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poór, Miklós; Zrínyi, Zita; Kőszegi, Tamás

    2016-10-01

    Dietary flavonoids are abundant in the Plant Kingdom and they are extensively studied because of their manifold pharmacological activities. Recent studies highlighted that cell cycle arrest plays a key role in their antiproliferative effect in different tumor cells. However, structure-activity relationship of flavonoids is poorly characterized. In our study the influence of 18 flavonoid aglycones (as well as two metabolites) on cell cycle distribution was investigated. Since flavonoids are extensively metabolized by liver cells, HepG2 tumor cell line was applied, considering the potential metabolic activation/inactivation of flavonoids. Our major observations are the followings: (1) Among the tested compounds diosmetin, fisetin, apigenin, lutelin, and quercetin provoked spectacular extent of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. (2) Inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme by entacapone decreased the antiproliferative effects of fisetin and quercetin. (3) Geraldol and isorhamnetin (3'-O-methylated metabolites of fisetin and quercetin, respectively) demonstrated significantly higher antiproliferative effect on HepG2 cells compared to the parent compounds. Based on these results, O-methylated flavonoid metabolites or their chemically modified derivatives may be suitable candidates of tumor therapy in the future.

  15. Getting to S: CDK functions and targets on the path to cell-cycle commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    How and when eukaryotic cells make the irrevocable commitment to divide remain central questions in the cell-cycle field. Parallel studies in yeast and mammalian cells seemed to suggest analogous control mechanisms operating during the G1 phase—at Start or the restriction (R) point, respectively—to integrate nutritional and developmental signals and decide between distinct cell fates: cell-cycle arrest or exit versus irreversible commitment to a round of division. Recent work has revealed molecular mechanisms underlying this decision-making process in both yeast and mammalian cells but also cast doubt on the nature and timing of cell-cycle commitment in multicellular organisms. These studies suggest an expanded temporal window of mitogen sensing under certain growth conditions, illuminate unexpected obstacles and exit ramps on the path to full cell-cycle commitment, and raise new questions regarding the functions of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that drive G1 progression and S-phase entry.

  16. Mirk/Dyrk1B mediates G0/G1 to S phase cell cycle progression and cell survival involving MAPK/ERK signaling in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Jingchun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mirk/Dyrk1B contributes to G0 arrest by destabilization of cyclin D1 and stabilization of p27kip1 to maintain the viability of quiescent human cancer cells, and it could be negatively regulated by mitogenic-activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling. This study was performed to investigate the effect of Mirk/Dyrk1B on cell cycle and survival of human cancer cells involving MAPK/ERK signaling. Methods The correlations between Mirk/Dyrk1B expression and active ERK1/2 detected by western blot in both ovarian cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells were analyzed by simple regression. Mirk/Dyrk1B unique phosphopeptides with sites associated with Mirk/Dyrk1B protein were isolated and quantitated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomics analysis. The human cancer cells were treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and/or U0126, an inhibitor of MEK for indicated duration, followed by investigating the alterations of cell cycle and apoptosis as well as related proteins examined by flow cytometry and Western blot, respectively. Results Our study demonstrated the widely expressed Mirk/Dyrk1B proteins in the human cancer cells were positively correlated with the levels of activated ERK1/2. Moreover, Mirk/Dyrk1B protein expressions consistent with the tyrosine autophosphorylated levels in the human cancer cells were increased by U0126 or growth factor-depleted culture. Conversely, knockdown of Mirk/Dyrk1B by siRNA led to up-regulated activation of c-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent changes in cell cycle proteins (cyclin D1, p27kip1, accompanied by increased growth rate and cells from G0/G1 into S of cell cycle which could be blocked by U0126 in a dose-dependent manner, indicating Mirk/Dyrk1B may sequester MAPK/ERK pathway, and vice versa. Whereas, combined Mirk siRNA and U0126 induced cell apoptosis in the human cancer cells

  17. Cell cycle-dependent activity of the volume- and Ca2+-activated anion currents in Ehrlich lettre ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Bergdahl, Andreas; Christophersen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) and other anion currents in control or modulation of cell cycle progression; however, the precise involvement of anion channels in this process is unclear. Here, Cl- currents in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites (ELA) cells were monitored...... during cell cycle progression, under three conditions: (i) after osmotic swelling (i.e., VRAC), (ii) after an increase in the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration (i.e., the Ca2+-activated Cl- current, CaCC), and (iii) under steady-state isotonic conditions. The maximal swelling-activated VRAC current......+ in the pipette), was unaltered from G0 to G1, but decreased in early S phase. A novel high-affinity anion channel inhibitor, the acidic di-aryl-urea NS3728, which inhibited both VRAC and CaCC, attenuated ELA cell growth, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between cell cycle progression and cell cycle...

  18. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of cell cycle-related proteins by F-box proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nana; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-04-01

    F-box proteins, subunits of SKP1-cullin 1-F-box protein (SCF) type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes, have been validated to play a crucial role in governing various cellular processes such as cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and metastasis. Recently, a wealth of evidence has emerged that F-box proteins is critically involved in tumorigenesis in part through governing the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cell cycle proteins, and dysregulation of this process leads to aberrant cell cycle progression and ultimately, tumorigenesis. Therefore, in this review, we describe the critical role of F-box proteins in the timely regulation of cell cycle. Moreover, we discuss how F-box proteins involve in tumorigenesis via targeting cell cycle-related proteins using biochemistry studies, engineered mouse models, and pathological gene alternations. We conclude that inhibitors of F-box proteins could have promising therapeutic potentials in part through controlling of aberrant cell cycle progression for cancer therapies.

  19. Measurement and modeling of transcriptional noise in the cell cycle regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David A; Adames, Neil R; Reischmann, Nadine; Barik, Debashis; Franck, Christopher T; Tyson, John J; Peccoud, Jean

    2013-10-01

    Fifty years of genetic and molecular experiments have revealed a wealth of molecular interactions involved in the control of cell division. In light of the complexity of this control system, mathematical modeling has proved useful in analyzing biochemical hypotheses that can be tested experimentally. Stochastic modeling has been especially useful in understanding the intrinsic variability of cell cycle events, but stochastic modeling has been hampered by a lack of reliable data on the absolute numbers of mRNA molecules per cell for cell cycle control genes. To fill this void, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to collect single molecule mRNA data for 16 cell cycle regulators in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From statistical distributions of single-cell mRNA counts, we are able to extract the periodicity, timing, and magnitude of transcript abundance during the cell cycle. We used these parameters to improve a stochastic model of the cell cycle to better reflect the variability of molecular and phenotypic data on cell cycle progression in budding yeast.

  20. dFMRP and Caprin, translational regulators of synaptic plasticity, control the cell cycle at the Drosophila mid-blastula transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulas, Ophelia; Monzo, Kathryn F; Cantin, Greg T; Ruse, Cristian; Yates, John R; Ryu, Young Hee; Sisson, John C

    2010-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms driving the conserved metazoan developmental shift referred to as the mid-blastula transition (MBT) remain mysterious. Typically, cleavage divisions give way to longer asynchronous cell cycles with the acquisition of a gap phase. In Drosophila, rapid synchronous nuclear divisions must pause at the MBT to allow the formation of a cellular blastoderm through a special form of cytokinesis termed cellularization. Drosophila Fragile X mental retardation protein (dFMRP; FMR1), a transcript-specific translational regulator, is required for cellularization. The role of FMRP has been most extensively studied in the nervous system because the loss of FMRP activity in neurons causes the misexpression of specific mRNAs required for synaptic plasticity, resulting in mental retardation and autism in humans. Here, we show that in the early embryo dFMRP associates specifically with Caprin, another transcript-specific translational regulator implicated in synaptic plasticity, and with eIF4G, a key regulator of translational initiation. dFMRP and Caprin collaborate to control the cell cycle at the MBT by directly mediating the normal repression of maternal Cyclin B mRNA and the activation of zygotic frühstart mRNA. These findings identify two new targets of dFMRP regulation and implicate conserved translational regulatory mechanisms in processes as diverse as learning, memory and early embryonic development.

  1. Bi-modal distribution of the second messenger c-di-GMP controls cell fate and asymmetry during the caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Abel

    Full Text Available Many bacteria mediate important life-style decisions by varying levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Behavioral transitions result from the coordination of complex cellular processes such as motility, surface adherence or the production of virulence factors and toxins. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for these processes have been elucidated in some cases, the global pleiotropic effects of c-di-GMP are poorly understood, primarily because c-di-GMP networks are inherently complex in most bacteria. Moreover, the quantitative relationships between cellular c-di-GMP levels and c-di-GMP dependent phenotypes are largely unknown. Here, we dissect the c-di-GMP network of Caulobacter crescentus to establish a global and quantitative view of c-di-GMP dependent processes in this organism. A genetic approach that gradually reduced the number of diguanylate cyclases identified novel c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes and unraveled c-di-GMP as an essential component of C. crescentus cell polarity and its bimodal life cycle. By varying cellular c-di-GMP concentrations, we determined dose response curves for individual c-di-GMP-dependent processes. Relating these values to c-di-GMP levels modeled for single cells progressing through the cell cycle sets a quantitative frame for the successive activation of c-di-GMP dependent processes during the C. crescentus life cycle. By reconstructing a simplified c-di-GMP network in a strain devoid of c-di-GMP we defined the minimal requirements for the oscillation of c-di-GMP levels during the C. crescentus cell cycle. Finally, we show that although all c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes were qualitatively restored by artificially adjusting c-di-GMP levels with a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, much higher levels of the second messenger are required under these conditions as compared to the contribution of homologous c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes. These experiments suggest that a common c-di-GMP pool

  2. Isolinderanolide B, a butanolide extracted from the stems of Cinnamomum subavenium, inhibits proliferation of T24 human bladder cancer cells by blocking cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kun-Hung; Lin, En-Shyh; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chen, Chung-Yi; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Isolinderanolide B (IOB), a butanolide extracted from the stems of Cinnamomum subavenium, was investigated for its antiproliferative activity in T24 human bladder cancer cells. To identity the anticancer mechanism of IOB, its effect on apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, and levels of p53, p21 Waf1/Cip1, Fas/APO-1 receptor, and Fas ligand was assayed. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the G0/G1 phase arrest is because of increase in the expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1. An enhancement in Fas/APO-1 and membrane-bound Fas ligand (mFasL) might be responsible for the apoptotic effect induced by IOB. This study reports the novel finding that the induction of p21 Waf1/Cip1 and activity of the Fas/mFas ligand apoptotic system may participate in the antiproliferative activity of IOB in T24 cells.

  3. Tl(I) and Tl(III) alter the expression of EGF-dependent signals and cyclins required for pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell-cycle resumption and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, María T L; Verstraeten, Sandra V

    2015-08-01

    The effects of thallium [Tl(I) and Tl(III)] on the PC12 cell cycle were evaluated without (EGF(-)) or with (EGF(+)) media supplementation with epidermal growth factor (EGF). The following markers of cell-cycle phases were analyzed: cyclin D1 (G1 ); E2F-1, cyclin E and cytosolic p21 (G1 →S transition); nuclear PCNA and cyclin A (S); and cyclin B1 (G2). The amount of cells in each phase and the activation of the signaling cascade triggered by EGF were also analyzed. Tl(I) and Tl(III) (5-100 μM) caused dissimilar effects on PC12 cell proliferation. In EGF(-) cells, Tl(I) increased the expression of G1 →S transition markers and nuclear PCNA, without affecting cyclin A or cyclin B1. In addition to those, cyclin B1 was also increased in EGF(+) cells. In EGF(-) cells, Tl(III) increased the expression of cyclin D1, all the G1→S and S phase markers and cyclin B1. In EGF(+) cells, Tl(III) increased cyclin D1 expression and decreased all the markers of G1 →S transition and the S phase. Even when these cations did not induce the activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in EGF(-) cells, they promoted the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. In the presence of EGF, the cations anticipated EGFR phosphorylation without affecting the kinetics of EGF-dependent ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. Altogether, results indicate that Tl(I) promoted cell proliferation in both EGF(-) and EGF(+) cells. In contrast, Tl(III) promoted the proliferation of EGF(-) cells but delayed it in EGF(+) cells, which may be related to the toxic effects of this cation in PC12 cells. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H., E-mail: grahamc@queensu.ca

    2010-11-15

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}; and knockdown of p27{sup kip1} with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  5. Complex Biological Systems Analysis of Cell Cycling Models in Carcinogenesis: I. The essential roles of modifications in the c-Myc, TP53/p53, p27 and hTERT modules in Cancer Initiation and Progression

    CERN Document Server

    Prisecaru, V I

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to the integration of results from a modular, complex biological systems analysis of nonlinear dynamics in cell cycling network transformations that are leading to carcinogenesis is proposed. Carcinogenesis is a complex process that involves dynamically inter-connected biomolecules in the intercellular, membrane, cytosolic, nuclear and nucleolar compartments that form numerous inter-related pathways referred to as networks. One such network module contains the cell cyclins whose functions are essential to cell cycling and division. Cyclins are proteins that also link to several critical pro-apoptotic and other cell cycling/division components, such as: c-Myc, p27, the tumor suppressor gene TP53 and its product-- the p53 protein with key roles in controlling DNA repair, inducing apoptosis and activating p21 (which can depress cell cyclins if activated), mdm2(with its biosynthesis activated by p53 and also, in its turn, inhibiting p53), p21, the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen(T- antigen),Rb,Bax, Ba...

  6. Cell cycle behavior of laboratory and field populations of the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dolah, Frances M.; Leighfield, Tod A.; Kamykowski, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    As a component of the ECOHAB Florida Regional Field Program, this study addresses cell cycle behavior and its importance to bloom formation of the Florida red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. The cell cycle of K. brevis was first studied by flow cytometry in laboratory batch cultures, and a laboratory mesocosm column, followed by field populations over the 5-year course of the ECOHAB program. Under all conditions studied, K. brevis displayed diel phased cell division with S-phase beginning a minimum of 6 h after the onset of light and continuing for 12-14 h. Mitosis occurred during the dark, and was generally completed by the start of the next day. The timing of cell cycle phases relative to the diel cycle did not differ substantially in bloom populations displaying radically different growth rates ( μmin 0.17-0.55) under different day lengths and temperature conditions. The rhythm of cell cycle progression is independent from the rhythm controlling vertical migration, as similar cell cycle distributions are found at all depths of the water column in field samples. The implications of these findings are discussed in light of our current understanding of the dinoflagellate cell cycle and the development of improved models for K. brevis bloom growth.

  7. Computational and genetic reduction of a cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán M Murray

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles.

  8. Deviating the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei elicits distinct mechanisms for inhibiting proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenciano, Ana L; Ramsey, Aaron C; Mackey, Zachary B

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery is spatially and temporally coordinated in all cells to reproduce a single exact copy of the genome per division, but its regulation in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is not well characterized. We characterized the effects of altering the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a key component of the DNA replication machinery, in bloodstream form T. brucei. This study demonstrated that tight regulation of TbPCNA levels was critical for normal proliferation and DNA replication in the parasite. Depleting TbPCNA mRNA reduced proliferation, severely diminished DNA replication, arrested the synthesis of new DNA and caused the parasites to accumulated in G2/M. Attenuating the parasite by downregulating TbPCNA caused it to become hypersensitive to hydroxyurea. Overexpressing TbPCNA in T. brucei arrested proliferation, inhibited DNA replication and prevented the parasite from exiting G2/M. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms of cell cycle arrest are associated with upregulating or downregulating TbPCNA. The findings of this study validate deregulating intra-parasite levels of TbPCNA as a potential strategy for therapeutically exploiting this target in bloodstream form T. brucei.

  9. Pathways for Genome Integrity in G2 Phase of the Cell Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Storgaard Sørensen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of genome integrity is important for normal cellular functions, organism development and the prevention of diseases, such as cancer. Cellular pathways respond immediately to DNA breaks leading to the initiation of a multi-facetted DNA damage response, which leads to DNA repair and cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle checkpoints provide the cell time to complete replication and repair the DNA damage before it can continue to the next cell cycle phase. The G2/M checkpoint plays an especially important role in ensuring the propagation of error-free copies of the genome to each daughter cell. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of DNA repair and checkpoint pathways in late S and G2 phases. This review will first describe the current understanding of normal cell cycle progression through G2 phase to mitosis. It will also discuss the DNA damage response including cell cycle checkpoint control and DNA double-strand break repair. Finally, we discuss the emerging concept that DNA repair pathways play a major role in the G2/M checkpoint pathway thereby blocking cell division as long as DNA lesions are present.

  10. Cross-talk between the circadian clock and the cell cycle in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soták, Matúš; Sumová, Alena; Pácha, Jiří

    2014-06-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timekeeper system that controls the daily rhythms of a variety of physiological processes. Accumulating evidence indicates that genetic changes or unhealthy lifestyle can lead to a disruption of circadian homeostasis, which is a risk factor for severe dysfunctions and pathologies including cancer. Cell cycle, proliferation, and cell death are closely intertwined with the circadian clock, and thus disruption of circadian rhythms appears to be linked to cancer development and progression. At the molecular level, the cell cycle machinery and the circadian clocks are controlled by similar mechanisms, including feedback loops of genes and protein products that display periodic activation and repression. Here, we review the circadian rhythmicity of genes associated with the cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis, and we highlight the potential connection between these processes, the circadian clock, and neoplastic transformations. Understanding these interconnections might have potential implications for the prevention and therapy of malignant diseases.

  11. Cdk5 phosphorylates non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 following inhibition of PP2A to induce cell cycle arrest/apoptosis and inhibits tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Ratna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is the most studied tumor suppressor and its overexpression may or may not cause cell death depending upon the genetic background of the cells. p53 is degraded by human papillomavirus (HPV E6 protein in cervical carcinoma. Several stress activated kinases are known to phosphorylate p53 and, among them cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is one of the kinase studied in neuronal cell system. Recently, the involvement of Cdk5 in phosphorylating p53 has been shown in certain cancer types. Phosphorylation at specific serine residues in p53 is essential for it to cause cell growth inhibition. Activation of p53 under non stress conditions is poorly understood. Therefore, the activation of p53 and detection of upstream kinases that phosphorylate non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 will be of therapeutic importance for cancer treatment. Results To determine the non-genotoxic effect of p53; Tet-On system was utilized and p53 inducible HPV-positive HeLa cells were developed. p53 overexpression in HPV-positive cells did not induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. However, we demonstrate that overexpressed p53 can be activated to upregulate p21 and Bax which causes G2 arrest and apoptosis, by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, we report that the upstream kinase cyclin dependent kinase 5 interacts with p53 to phosphorylate it at Serine20 and Serine46 residues thereby promoting its recruitment on p21 and bax promoters. Upregulation and translocation of Bax causes apoptosis through intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, overexpressed activated p53 specifically inhibits cell-growth and causes regression in vivo tumor growth as well. Conclusion Present study details the mechanism of activation of p53 and puts forth the possibility of p53 gene therapy to work in HPV positive cervical carcinoma.

  12. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  13. Defects in a New Class of Sulfate/Anion Transporter Link Sulfur Acclimation Responses to Intracellular Glutathione Levels and Cell Cycle Control1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Su-Chiung; Chung, Chin-Lin; Chen, Chun-Han; Lopez-Paz, Cristina; Umen, James G.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a mutation, suppressor of mating type locus3 15-1 (smt15-1), that partially suppresses the cell cycle defects caused by loss of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor-related protein encoded by the MAT3 gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. smt15-1 single mutants were also found to have a cell cycle defect leading to a small-cell phenotype. SMT15 belongs to a previously uncharacterized subfamily of putative membrane-localized sulfate/anion transporters that contain a sulfate transporter domain and are found in a widely distributed subset of eukaryotes and bacteria. Although we observed that smt15-1 has a defect in acclimation to sulfur-limited growth conditions, sulfur acclimation (sac) mutants, which are more severely defective for acclimation to sulfur limitation, do not have cell cycle defects and cannot suppress mat3. Moreover, we found that smt15-1, but not sac mutants, overaccumulates glutathione. In wild-type cells, glutathione fluctuated during the cell cycle, with highest levels in mid G1 phase and lower levels during S and M phases, while in smt15-1, glutathione levels remained elevated during S and M. In addition to increased total glutathione levels, smt15-1 cells had an increased reduced-to-oxidized glutathione redox ratio throughout the cell cycle. These data suggest a role for SMT15 in maintaining glutathione homeostasis that impacts the cell cycle and sulfur acclimation responses. PMID:25361960

  14. Cell cycle features of primate embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Marcy, Guillaume; Marchand, Mélanie; Négre, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Wolf, Don; Savatier, Pierre; Dehay, Colette

    2006-03-01

    Using flow cytometry measurements combined with quantitative analysis of cell cycle kinetics, we show that rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by an extremely rapid transit through the G1 phase, which accounts for 15% of the total cell cycle duration. Monkey ESCs exhibit a non-phasic expression of cyclin E, which is detected during all phases of the cell cycle, and do not growth-arrest in G1 after gamma-irradiation, reflecting the absence of a G1 checkpoint. Serum deprivation or pharmacological inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) did not result in any alteration in the cell cycle distribution, indicating that ESC growth does not rely on mitogenic signals transduced by the Ras/Raf/MEK pathway. Taken together, these data indicate that rhesus monkey ESCs, like their murine counterparts, exhibit unusual cell cycle features in which cell cycle control mechanisms operating during the G1 phase are reduced or absent.

  15. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  16. Disrupted cell cycle control in cultured endometrial cells from patients with endometriosis harboring the progesterone receptor polymorphism PROGINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amora, Paulo; Maciel, Thiago Trovati; Tambellini, Rodrigo; Mori, Marcelo A; Pesquero, João Bosco; Sato, Helio; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Guerreiro da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim; Schor, Eduardo

    2009-07-01

    Presently, little is understood about how endometriosis is established or maintained, or how genetic factors can predispose women to the disease. Because of the crucial role that the progesterone receptor polymorphism PROGINS plays in predisposing women to the development of endometriosis, we hypothesized that this variant may influence critical steps during endometrial cell metabolism that are involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Eutopic endometria were collected from three sources: women with endometriosis who had a single PROGINS allele (from the progesterone receptor gene); women with endometriosis who had the wild-type progesterone receptor allele; and women without endometriosis who had the wild-type allele. Cells prepared from the eutopic endometria of these women were stimulated with both estradiol and progesterone, and then examined for cell proliferation, viability, and apoptosis. The cells from women with endometriosis that carried the PROGINS allele demonstrated increased proliferation, greater viability, and decreased apoptosis following progesterone treatment. In general, these parameters were very different as compared with those of women with endometriosis but without the PROGINS allele and women in the control group. This result indicates there is a reduced level of progesterone responsiveness in women who carry the PROGINS polymorphism. Because progesterone responsiveness is known to be an important characteristic of women with endometriosis, these data support the contention that the PROGINS polymorphism enhances the endometriosis phenotype.

  17. STAGE-DEPENDENCE, SEASONAL CHANGES AND EFFECTS OF CADMIUM ON CELL CYCLE AND APOPTOTIC ACTIVITIES DURING THE SPERMATOGENIC PROGRESSION IN THE DOGFISH SHARK (SQUALUS ACANTHIAS). (R825434)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. Entrainment of the mammalian cell cycle by the circadian clock: modeling two coupled cellular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Claude; Goldbeter, Albert

    2012-05-01

    The cell division cycle and the circadian clock represent two major cellular rhythms. These two periodic processes are coupled in multiple ways, given that several molecular components of the cell cycle network are controlled in a circadian manner. For example, in the network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) that governs progression along the successive phases of the cell cycle, the synthesis of the kinase Wee1, which inhibits the G2/M transition, is enhanced by the complex CLOCK-BMAL1 that plays a central role in the circadian clock network. Another component of the latter network, REV-ERBα, inhibits the synthesis of the Cdk inhibitor p21. Moreover, the synthesis of the oncogene c-Myc, which promotes G1 cyclin synthesis, is repressed by CLOCK-BMAL1. Using detailed computational models for the two networks we investigate the conditions in which the mammalian cell cycle can be entrained by the circadian clock. We show that the cell cycle can be brought to oscillate at a period of 24 h or 48 h when its autonomous period prior to coupling is in an appropriate range. The model indicates that the combination of multiple modes of coupling does not necessarily facilitate entrainment of the cell cycle by the circadian clock. Entrainment can also occur as a result of circadian variations in the level of a growth factor controlling entry into G1. Outside the range of entrainment, the coupling to the circadian clock may lead to disconnected oscillations in the cell cycle and the circadian system, or to complex oscillatory dynamics of the cell cycle in the form of endoreplication, complex periodic oscillations or chaos. The model predicts that the transition from entrainment to 24 h or 48 h might occur when the strength of coupling to the circadian clock or the level of growth factor decrease below critical values.

  19. The Possible Crosstalk of MOB2 With NDR1/2 Kinases in Cell Cycle and DNA Damage Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Ramazan; Hergovich, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This article is the authors’ opinion of the roles of the signal transducer Mps one binder 2 (MOB2) in the control of cell cycle progression and the DNA Damage Response (DDR). We recently found that endogenous MOB2 is required to prevent the accumulation of endogenous DNA damage in order to prevent the undesired, and possibly detrimental, activation of cell cycle checkpoints. In this regard, it is noteworthy that MOB2 has been linked biochemically to the regulation of the NDR1/2 (aka STK38/STK38L) protein kinases, which themselves have functions at different steps of the cell cycle. Therefore, we are speculating in this article about the possible connections of MOB2 with NDR1/2 kinases in cell cycle and DDR Signaling.

  20. The efficiency of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining systems in repairing double-strand breaks during cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Bee

    Full Text Available This study investigated the efficiency of Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ and Homologous Recombination (HR repair systems in rejoining DNA double-strand breaks (DSB induced in CCD-34Lu cells by different γ-ray doses. The kinetics of DNA repair was assessed by analyzing the fluorescence decrease of γ-H2AX foci measured by SOID (Sum Of Integrated Density parameter and counting foci number in the time-interval 0.5-24 hours after irradiation. Comparison of the two methods showed that the SOID parameter was useful in determining the amount and the persistence of DNA damage signal after exposure to high or low doses of ionizing radiation. The efficiency of DSB rejoining during the cell cycle was assessed by distinguishing G1, S, and G2 phase cells on the basis of nuclear fluorescence of the CENP-F protein. Six hours after irradiation, γ-H2AX foci resolution was higher in G2 compared to G1 cells in which both NHEJ and HR can cooperate. The rejoining of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase cells was, moreover, decreased by RI-1, the chemical inhibitor of HR, demonstrating that homologous recombination is at work early after irradiation. The relevance of HR in DSB repair was assessed in DNA-PK-deficient M059J cells and in CCD-34Lu treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor, NU7026. In both conditions, the kinetics of γ-H2AX demonstrated that DSBs repair was markedly affected when NHEJ was absent or impaired, even in G2 phase cells in which HR should be at work. The recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites was, moreover, delayed in M059J and in NU7026 treated-CCD-34Lu, with respect to DNA-PKcs proficient cells and continued for 24 hours despite the decrease in DNA repair. The impairment of NHEJ affected the efficiency of the HR system and significantly decreased cell survival after ionizing radiation, confirming that DSB rejoining is strictly dependent on the integrity of the NHEJ repair system.

  1. Bumetanide-induced NKCC1 inhibition attenuates oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced decrease in proliferative activity and cell cycle progression arrest in cultured OPCs via p-38 MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peicai; Tang, Ronghua; Yu, Zhiyuan; Huang, Shanshan; Xie, Minjie; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-10

    The Na-K-Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1; a member of the cation-chloride co-transporter family) mediates the coupled movement of Na(+) and/or K(+) with Cl(-) across the plasma membrane of cells (Haas and Forbush, 2000, Annu. Rev. Physiol., 62, 515-534; Russell, 2000, Physiol. Rev., 80, 211-276). Although it acts as an important regulator of cell volume, secretion, and modulator of cell apoptosis and proliferation (Chen et al., 2005, J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab., 25, 54-66; Kahle et al., 2008, Nat. Clin. Pract. Neurol., 4, 490-503; Kidokoro et al., 2014, Am. J. Physiol. Ren. Physiol., 306, F1155-F1160; Wang et al., 2011, Cell. Physiol. Biochem., 28, 703-714), NKCC1׳s effects on oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and to what extent inhibition of NKCC1 alters oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced cell cycle progression. In the present study, we demonstrated that inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide attenuates the decrease in OGD-induced DNA synthesis in cultured OPCs. Western blots showed that NKCC1 inhibition led to an increased expression of cyclin D1, CDK 4, and cyclin E in OGD-treated cells. Furthermore, our results showed bumetanide attenuated the decrease in OGD-induced proliferation and arrest of cell cycle progression via the P-38 MAPK signaling cascade. Thus, NKCC1 plays important roles in the proliferation of OPCs under OGD-induced stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Analysis of Fixed Final State Optimal Control in Bilinear System Applied to Bone Marrow by Cell-Cycle Specific (CCS) Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainarli, E.; E Dewi, K.

    2017-04-01

    The research conducted by Fister & Panetta shown an optimal control model of bone marrow cells against Cell Cycle Specific chemotherapy drugs. The model used was a bilinear system model. Fister & Panetta research has proved existence, uniqueness, and characteristics of optimal control (the chemotherapy effect). However, by using this model, the amount of bone marrow at the final time could achieve less than 50 percent from the amount of bone marrow before given treatment. This could harm patients because the lack of bone marrow cells made the number of leukocytes declining and patients will experience leukemia. This research would examine the optimal control of a bilinear system that applied to fixed final state. It will be used to determine the length of optimal time in administering chemotherapy and kept bone marrow cells on the allowed level at the same time. Before simulation conducted, this paper shows that the system could be controlled by using a theory of Lie Algebra. Afterward, it shows the characteristics of optimal control. Based on the simulation, it indicates that strong chemotherapy drug given in a short time frame is the most optimal condition to keep bone marrow cells spine on the allowed level but still could put playing an effective treatment. It gives preference of the weight of treatment for keeping bone marrow cells. The result of chemotherapy’s effect (u) is not able to reach the maximum value. On the other words, it needs to make adjustments of medicine’s dosage to satisfy the final treatment condition e.g. the number of bone marrow cells should be at the allowed level.

  3. A stochastic spatiotemporal model of a response-regulator network in the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Subramanian, Kartik; Chen, Minghan; Tyson, John J.; Cao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by an elaborate molecular mechanism governing the production, activation and spatial localization of a host of interacting proteins. In previous work, we proposed a deterministic mathematical model for the spatiotemporal dynamics of six major regulatory proteins. In this paper, we study a stochastic version of the model, which takes into account molecular fluctuations of these regulatory proteins in space and time during early stages of the cell cycle of wild-type Caulobacter cells. We test the stochastic model with regard to experimental observations of increased variability of cycle time in cells depleted of the divJ gene product. The deterministic model predicts that overexpression of the divK gene blocks cell cycle progression in the stalked stage; however, stochastic simulations suggest that a small fraction of the mutants cells do complete the cell cycle normally.

  4. Selenium as an essential micronutrient: roles in cell cycle and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei

    2009-03-23

    Selenium is an essential trace element for humans and animals, and selenium deficiency is associated with several disease conditions such as immune impairment. In addition, selenium intakes that are greater than the recommended daily allowance (RDA) appear to protect against certain types of cancers. In humans and animals, cell proliferation and death must be regulated to maintain tissue homeostasis, and it has been well documented that numerous human diseases are directly related to the control of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Thus, the elucidation of the mechanisms by which selenium regulates the cell cycle and apoptosis can lead to a better understanding of the nature of selenium's essentiality and its role in disease prevention. This article reviews the status of knowledge concerning the effect of selenium on cell cycle and apoptosis.

  5. Myb-binding protein 1A (MYBBP1A is essential for early embryonic development, controls cell cycle and mitosis, and acts as a tumor suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mori

    Full Text Available MYBBP1A is a predominantly nucleolar transcriptional regulator involved in rDNA synthesis and p53 activation via acetylation. However little further information is available as to its function. Here we report that MYBBP1A is developmentally essential in the mouse prior to blastocyst formation. In cell culture, down-regulation of MYBBP1A decreases the growth rate of wild type mouse embryonic stem cells, mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and of human HeLa cells, where it also promotes apoptosis. HeLa cells either arrest at G2/M or undergo delayed and anomalous mitosis. At mitosis, MYBBP1A is localized to a parachromosomal region and gene-expression profiling shows that its down-regulation affects genes controlling chromosomal segregation and cell cycle. However, MYBBP1A down-regulation increases the growth rate of the immortalized NIH3T3 cells. Such Mybbp1a down-regulated NIH3T3 cells are more susceptible to Ras-induced transformation and cause more potent Ras-driven tumors. We conclude that MYBBP1A is an essential gene with novel roles at the pre-mitotic level and potential tumor suppressor activity.

  6. Why should we study the plant cell cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzé, Dirk

    2003-04-01

    Description of the molecular biology of plant and animal cell cycles highlights similarities and critical differences. The cell cycle is a point of control in both growth and development and deepening understanding of underlying processes and mechanisms may have many practical applications.

  7. Time scale and dimension analysis of a budding yeast cell cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Béla

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress through the eukaryotic cell division cycle is driven by an underlying molecular regulatory network. Cell cycle progression can be considered as a series of irreversible transitions from one steady state to another in the correct order. Although this view has been put forward some time ago, it has not been quantitatively proven yet. Bifurcation analysis of a model for the budding yeast cell cycle has identified only two different steady states (one for G1 and one for mitosis using cell mass as a bifurcation parameter. By analyzing the same model, using different methods of dynamical systems theory, we provide evidence for transitions among several different steady states during the budding yeast cell cycle. Results By calculating the eigenvalues of the Jacobian of kinetic differential equations we have determined the stability of the cell cycle trajectories of the Chen model. Based on the sign of the real part of the eigenvalues, the cell cycle can be divided into excitation and relaxation periods. During an excitation period, the cell cycle control system leaves a formerly stable steady state and, accordingly, excitation periods can be associated with irreversible cell cycle transitions like START, entry into mitosis and exit from mitosis. During relaxation periods, the control system asymptotically approaches the new steady state. We also show that the dynamical dimension of the Chen's model fluctuates by increasing during excitation periods followed by decrease during relaxation periods. In each relaxation period the dynamical dimension of the model drops to one, indicating a period where kinetic processes are in steady state and all concentration changes are driven by the increase of cytoplasmic growth. Conclusion We apply two numerical methods, which have not been used to analyze biological control systems. These methods are more sensitive than the bifurcation analysis used before because they identify those

  8. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  9. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 depositi...

  10. Cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in regulation of the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Singh

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is a ubiquitous, multi-step process that is essential for growth and proliferation of cells. The role of membrane lipids in cell cycle regulation is not explored well, although a large number of cytoplasmic and nuclear regulators have been identified. We focus in this work on the role of membrane cholesterol in cell cycle regulation. In particular, we have explored the stringency of the requirement of cholesterol in the regulation of cell cycle progression. For this purpose, we utilized distal and proximal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, and monitored their effect on cell cycle progression. We show that cholesterol content increases in S phase and inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis results in cell cycle arrest in G1 phase under certain conditions. Interestingly, G1 arrest mediated by cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, our results show that the requirement of cholesterol for G1 to S transition is absolute, and even immediate biosynthetic precursors of cholesterol, differing with cholesterol merely in a double bond, could not replace cholesterol for reversing the cell cycle arrest. These results are useful in the context of diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease, that are associated with impaired cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis.

  11. Physalis floridana Cell Number Regulator1 encodes a cell membrane-anchored modulator of cell cycle and negatively controls fruit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhichao; He, Chaoying

    2015-01-01

    Physalis species show a significant variation in berry size; however, the underlying molecular basis is unknown. In this work, we showed that cell division difference in the ovaries might contribute to the ultimate berry size variation within Physalis species, and that mRNA abundance of Physalis floridana Cell Number Regulator1 (PfCNR1), the putative orthologue of the tomato fruit weight 2.2 (FW2.2), was negatively correlated with cell division in the ovaries. Moreover, heterochronic expression variation of the PfCNR1 genes in the ovaries concomitantly correlated with berry weight variation within Physalis species. In transgenic Physalis, multiple organ sizes could be negatively controlled by altering PfCNR1 levels, and cell division instead of cell expansion was primarily affected. PfCNR1 was shown to be anchored in the plasma membrane and to interact with PfAG2 (an AGAMOUS-like protein determining ovary identity). The expression of PfCYCD2;1, a putative orthologue of the mitosis-specific gene CyclinD2;1 in the cell cycle was negatively correlated with the PfCNR1 mRNA levels. PfAG2 was found to selectively bind to the CArG-box in the PfCYCD2;1 promoter and to repress PfCYCD2;1 expression, thus suggesting a PfAG2-mediated pathway for PfCNR1 to regulate cell division. The interaction of PfCNR1 with PfAG2 enhanced the repression of PfCYCD2;1 expression. The nuclear import of PfAG2 was essential in the proposed pathway. Our data provide new insights into the developmental pathways of a cell membrane-anchored protein that modulates cell division and governs organ size determination. This study also sheds light on the link between organ identity and organ growth in plants.

  12. CtIP is regulated by the APC/C-Cdh1 to mediate cell cycle-dependent control of DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Harmen R.; Lafranchi, Lorenzo; Neugebauer, Christine; Fehrmann, Rudolf; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Sartori, Alessandro A.; van Vugt, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Human cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms for responding to DNA damage to maintain genome stability and prevent carcinogenesis. For instance, the cell cycle can be arrested at different stages to allow time for DNA repair. The APC/C-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase regulates mitotic exit but is also implic

  13. CtIP is regulated by the APC/C-Cdh1 to mediate cell cycle-dependent control of DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Harmen R.; Lafranchi, Lorenzo; Neugebauer, Christine; Fehrmann, Rudolf; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Sartori, Alessandro A.; van Vugt, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Human cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms for responding to DNA damage to maintain genome stability and prevent carcinogenesis. For instance, the cell cycle can be arrested at different stages to allow time for DNA repair. The APC/C-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase regulates mitotic exit but is also implic

  14. SCYL1-BP1 affects cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via Cyclin F and RRM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhi, Qiaoming; Ye, Qin; Zhou, Chengyuan; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Wei; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Di; Li, Pu; Huo, Keke

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is regulated via important biological mechanisms. Controlled expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins is crucial to maintain cell cycle progression. However, unbalanced protein expression leads to many diseases, such as cancer. Previous research suggests that SCYL1-BP1 function might be related to cell cycle progression and SCYL1-BP1 dysfunction to diseases through undefined mechanisms. In this research, an unbiased yeast two-hybrid screen was used to find protein(s) with potential biological relevance to SCYL1-BP1 function, and a novel interaction was recognized between SCYL1-BP1 and Cyclin F. This interaction was chosen as a paradigm to study SCYL1-BP1 function in cell cycle progression and its possible role in tumorigenesis. We found that SCYL1-BP1 binds to Cyclin F both in vivo and in vitro. SCYL1-BP1 overexpression promoted expression of the CCNF gene and simultaneously delayed Cyclin F protein degradation. SCYL1-BP1 knockdown reduced the expression of endogenous Cyclin F. It was also demonstrated in functional assays that SCYL1-BP1 overexpression induces G2/M arrest in cultured liver cells. Furthermore, SCYL1-BP1 sustained RRM2 protein expression by reducing its ubiquitination. Thus, we propose that SCYL1- BP1 affects the cell cycle through increasing steady state levels of Cyclin F and RRM2 proteins, thus constituting a dual regulatory circuit. This study provides a possible mechanism for SCYL1-BP1-mediated cell cycle regulation and related diseases.

  15. Pomegranate Juice Metabolites, Ellagic Acid and Urolithin A, Synergistically Inhibit Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle Control and Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Vicinanza; Yanjun Zhang; Susanne M Henning; David Heber

    2013-01-01

    Ellagitannins (ETs) from pomegranate juice (PJ) are bioactive polyphenols with chemopreventive potential against prostate cancer (PCa). ETs are not absorbed intact but are partially hydrolyzed in the gut to ellagic acid (EA). Colonic microflora can convert EA to urolithin A (UA), and EA and UA enter the circulation after PJ consumption. Here, we studied the effects of EA and UA on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in DU-145 and PC-3 androgen-independent PCa cells and whether combi...

  16. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and…

  17. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor-I extends in vitro replicative life span of skeletal muscle satellite cells by enhancing G1/S cell cycle progression via the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Abraha, T. W.; Schwartz, R. J.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest is growing in methods to extend replicative life span of non-immortalized stem cells. Using the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) transgenic mouse in which the IGF-I transgene is expressed during skeletal muscle development and maturation prior to isolation and during culture of satellite cells (the myogenic stem cells of mature skeletal muscle fibers) as a model system, we elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF-I-mediated enhancement of proliferative potential of these cells. Satellite cells from IGF-I transgenic muscles achieved at least five additional population doublings above the maximum that was attained by wild type satellite cells. This IGF-I-induced increase in proliferative potential was mediated via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt pathway, independent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, facilitating G(1)/S cell cycle progression via a down-regulation of p27(Kip1). Adenovirally mediated ectopic overexpression of p27(Kip1) in exponentially growing IGF-I transgenic satellite cells reversed the increase in cyclin E-cdk2 kinase activity, pRb phosphorylation, and cyclin A protein abundance, thereby implicating an important role for p27(Kip1) in promoting satellite cell senescence. These observations provide a more complete dissection of molecular events by which increased local expression of a growth factor in mature skeletal muscle fibers extends replicative life span of primary stem cells than previously known.

  19. Berberine attenuates high glucose-induced proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation in mesangial cells: involvement of suppression of cell cycle progression and NF-κB/AP-1 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian; Wu, Teng; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Xiaolan; Hao, Jie; Huang, Junying; Wang, Lijing; Huang, Heqing

    2014-03-25

    Berberine has been shown to have renoprotective effects on diabetes through attenuating TGF-β1 and fibronectin (FN) expression. However, how berberine regulates TGF-β1 and FN is not fully clear. Here we investigated whether berberine inhibited TGF-β1 and FN expression in high glucose-cultured mesangial cells. Berberine significantly inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and hypertrophy by increasing the cell population in G1-phase and reducing that in S-phase. In addition, berberine reversed high glucose-induced down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Waf1)/(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Berberine inhibited p65 translocation to the nucleus and c-jun phosphorylation induced by high glucose. Furthermore, berberine attenuated high glucose-induced expression of TGF-β1 and FN. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that high glucose-induced transcription activity of NF-κB and AP-1 was blocked by berberine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that high glucose increased that NF-κB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. These data indicate that berberine inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and hypertrophy by modulating cell cycle progress. In addition, berberine suppressed high glucose-induced TGF-β1 and FN expression by blocking NF-κB/AP-1 pathways.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor-I extends in vitro replicative life span of skeletal muscle satellite cells by enhancing G1/S cell cycle progression via the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Abraha, T. W.; Schwartz, R. J.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest is growing in methods to extend replicative life span of non-immortalized stem cells. Using the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) transgenic mouse in which the IGF-I transgene is expressed during skeletal muscle development and maturation prior to isolation and during culture of satellite cells (the myogenic stem cells of mature skeletal muscle fibers) as a model system, we elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF-I-mediated enhancement of proliferative potential of these cells. Satellite cells from IGF-I transgenic muscles achieved at least five additional population doublings above the maximum that was attained by wild type satellite cells. This IGF-I-induced increase in proliferative potential was mediated via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt pathway, independent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, facilitating G(1)/S cell cycle progression via a down-regulation of p27(Kip1). Adenovirally mediated ectopic overexpression of p27(Kip1) in exponentially growing IGF-I transgenic satellite cells reversed the increase in cyclin E-cdk2 kinase activity, pRb phosphorylation, and cyclin A protein abundance, thereby implicating an important role for p27(Kip1) in promoting satellite cell senescence. These observations provide a more complete dissection of molecular events by which increased local expression of a growth factor in mature skeletal muscle fibers extends replicative life span of primary stem cells than previously known.

  1. Circadian gating of the cell cycle revealed in single cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong; Pando, Bernardo F; Dong, Guogang; Golden, Susan S; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2010-03-19

    Although major progress has been made in uncovering the machinery that underlies individual biological clocks, much less is known about how multiple clocks coordinate their oscillations. We simultaneously tracked cell division events and circadian phases of individual cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus and fit the data to a model to determine when cell cycle progression slows as a function of circadian and cell cycle phases. We infer that cell cycle progression in cyanobacteria slows during a specific circadian interval but is uniform across cell cycle phases. Our model is applicable to the quantification of the coupling between biological oscillators in other organisms.

  2. 细胞周期调控在干细胞治疗中的意义%Implications of cell cycle control for stem cell therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程涛; David T Scadden

    2002-01-01

    造血干细胞(HSC)在医学中的治疗前景因其分化潜能得到实验的支持而变得日益广阔.但由于干细胞池的分子生物学特性所知有限,体外干细胞的调控与体内组织的新生仍存在一些难点,尤其是了解进入细胞周期的分子调控机制对于合理的干细胞扩增策略是必不可少的.弄清楚干/祖细胞群如何被进入细胞周期的阴性调控因子所调控,是操作干/祖细胞的依据之一.本文主要综述干细胞生物学中周期依赖激酶抑制物(CKIs)作用靶的理论问题.已表明两个CKI成员,p21cip1/waf1(p21)和p27kip1(p27)分别控制干/祖细胞池的大小.引人注意的是,它们对原始造血细胞的抑制作用的区别在于对细胞因子TGF-β1的抑制作用.因此,p21、p27及TGF-β1在造血细胞中所起的不同作用,已成为以治疗策略为目的的研究干/祖细胞群特异调控的热点.HSC移植已用于治疗遗传性缺陷病和其他越来越多的恶性疾病.如果HSC在其他组织诱导分化的能力被认识,将使其有更广阔的治疗潜能.但某些障碍限制了干细胞的广泛应用,如数量的有限和对增殖刺激的耐受都将影响干细胞在体外的扩增.深入了解干细胞的生物学特性,特别是了解自身受到严密调节的、反过来又对干细胞池起调控作用的细胞周期,是研究以治疗为目的的干细胞继续发育问题的关键.%The therapeutic promise of hematopoietic stem cell(HSC) in medicine has been expanded as broader differentiation potential has gained experimental support.However,hurdles for stem cell manipulation in vitro and tissue regeneration in vivo remain due to a limited understanding of the molecular biology of the stem cell pool.In particular,understanding the molecular control of cell cycle entry is necessary for rational stem cell expansion strategies.Understanding how the stem and progenitor cell populations are controlled by negative regulators of cell cycle

  3. Ecdysone Receptor (EcR Is Involved in the Transcription of Cell Cycle Genes in the Silkworm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenliang Qian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available EcR (ecdysone receptor-mediated ecdysone signaling pathway contributes to regulate the transcription of genes involved in various processes during insect development. In this work, we detected the expression of EcR gene in silkworm ovary-derived BmN4 cells and found that EcR RNAi result in an alteration of cell shape, indicating that EcR may orchestrate cell cycle progression. EcR RNAi and EcR overexpression analysis revealed that in the cultured BmN4 cells, EcR respectively promoted and suppressed the transcription of E2F-1 and CycE, two genes controlling cell cycle progression. Further examination demonstrated that ecdysone application in BmN4 cells not only changed the transcription of these two cell cycle genes like that under EcR overexpression, but also induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. In vivo analysis confirmed that E2F-1 expression was elevated in silk gland of silkworm larvae after ecdysone application, which is same as its response to ecdysone in BmN4 cells. However, ecdysone also promotes CycE transcription in silk gland, and this is converse with the observation in BmN4 cells. These results provide new insights into understanding the roles of EcR-mediated ecdysone signaling in the regulation of cell cycle.

  4. MFSD2A is a novel lung tumor suppressor gene modulating cell cycle and matrix attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shames David S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MFSD2A (major facilitator superfamily domain containing 2 gene maps on chromosome 1p34 within a linkage disequilibrium block containing genetic elements associated with progression of lung cancer. Results Here we show that MFSD2A expression is strongly downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines of different histotypes and in primary lung adenocarcinomas. Experimental modulation of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells is associated with alteration of mRNA levels of genes involved in cell cycle control and interaction with the extracellular matrix. Exogenous expression of MFSD2A in lung cancer cells induced a G1 block, impaired adhesion and migration in vitro, and significantly reduced tumor colony number in vitro (4- to 27-fold, P in vivo (~3-fold, P Conclusion Together these data suggest that MFSD2A is a novel lung cancer tumor suppressor gene that regulates cell cycle progression and matrix attachment.

  5. The circadian clock and cell cycle: interconnected biological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Selma; Cervantes, Marlene; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    The circadian clock governs biological timekeeping on a systemic level, helping to regulate and maintain physiological processes, including endocrine and metabolic pathways with a periodicity of 24-hours. Disruption within the circadian clock machinery has been linked to numerous pathological conditions, including cancer, suggesting that clock-dependent regulation of the cell cycle is an essential control mechanism. This review will highlight recent advances on the 'gating' controls of the circadian clock at various checkpoints of the cell cycle and also how the cell cycle can influence biological rhythms. The reciprocal influence that the circadian clock and cell cycle exert on each other suggests that these intertwined biological circuits are essential and multiple regulatory/control steps have been instated to ensure proper timekeeping.

  6. K48-linked KLF4 ubiquitination by E3 ligase Mule controls T-cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Duncan, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell proliferation is regulated by ubiquitination but the underlying molecular mechanism remains obscure. Here we report that Lys-48-linked ubiquitination of the transcription factor KLF4 mediated by the E3 ligase Mule promotes T-cell entry into S phase. Mule is elevated in T cells upon TCR...

  7. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  8. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-Ong, Dennis; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response...... in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster), described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating...

  9. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  10. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  11. Intermittent Stem Cell Cycling Balances Self-Renewal and Senescence of the C. elegans Germ Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cinquin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-renewing organs often experience a decline in function in the course of aging. It is unclear whether chronological age or external factors control this decline, or whether it is driven by stem cell self-renewal-for example, because cycling cells exhaust their replicative capacity and become senescent. Here we assay the relationship between stem cell cycling and senescence in the Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive system, defining this senescence as the progressive decline in "reproductive capacity," i.e. in the number of progeny that can be produced until cessation of reproduction. We show that stem cell cycling diminishes remaining reproductive capacity, at least in part through the DNA damage response. Paradoxically, gonads kept under conditions that preclude reproduction keep cycling and producing cells that undergo apoptosis or are laid as unfertilized gametes, thus squandering reproductive capacity. We show that continued activity is in fact beneficial inasmuch as gonads that are active when reproduction is initiated have more sustained early progeny production. Intriguingly, continued cycling is intermittent-gonads switch between active and dormant states-and in all likelihood stochastic. Other organs face tradeoffs whereby stem cell cycling has the beneficial effect of providing freshly-differentiated cells and the detrimental effect of increasing the likelihood of cancer or senescence; stochastic stem cell cycling may allow for a subset of cells to preserve proliferative potential in old age, which may implement a strategy to deal with uncertainty as to the total amount of proliferation to be undergone over an organism's lifespan.

  12. Intermittent Stem Cell Cycling Balances Self-Renewal and Senescence of the C. elegans Germ Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquin, Amanda; Chiang, Michael; Paz, Adrian; Hallman, Sam; Yuan, Oliver; Vysniauskaite, Indre; Fowlkes, Charless C; Cinquin, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Self-renewing organs often experience a decline in function in the course of aging. It is unclear whether chronological age or external factors control this decline, or whether it is driven by stem cell self-renewal-for example, because cycling cells exhaust their replicative capacity and become senescent. Here we assay the relationship between stem cell cycling and senescence in the Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive system, defining this senescence as the progressive decline in "reproductive capacity," i.e. in the number of progeny that can be produced until cessation of reproduction. We show that stem cell cycling diminishes remaining reproductive capacity, at least in part through the DNA damage response. Paradoxically, gonads kept under conditions that preclude reproduction keep cycling and producing cells that undergo apoptosis or are laid as unfertilized gametes, thus squandering reproductive capacity. We show that continued activity is in fact beneficial inasmuch as gonads that are active when reproduction is initiated have more sustained early progeny production. Intriguingly, continued cycling is intermittent-gonads switch between active and dormant states-and in all likelihood stochastic. Other organs face tradeoffs whereby stem cell cycling has the beneficial effect of providing freshly-differentiated cells and the detrimental effect of increasing the likelihood of cancer or senescence; stochastic stem cell cycling may allow for a subset of cells to preserve proliferative potential in old age, which may implement a strategy to deal with uncertainty as to the total amount of proliferation to be undergone over an organism's lifespan.

  13. Pomegranate Juice Metabolites, Ellagic Acid and Urolithin A, Synergistically Inhibit Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle Control and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Vicinanza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellagitannins (ETs from pomegranate juice (PJ are bioactive polyphenols with chemopreventive potential against prostate cancer (PCa. ETs are not absorbed intact but are partially hydrolyzed in the gut to ellagic acid (EA. Colonic microflora can convert EA to urolithin A (UA, and EA and UA enter the circulation after PJ consumption. Here, we studied the effects of EA and UA on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in DU-145 and PC-3 androgen-independent PCa cells and whether combinations of EA and UA affected cell proliferation. EA demonstrated greater dose-dependent antiproliferative effects in both cell lines compared to UA. EA induced cell cycle arrest in S phase associated with decreased cyclin B1 and cyclin D1 levels. UA induced a G2/M arrest and increased cyclin B1 and cdc2 phosphorylation at tyrosine-15, suggesting inactivation of the cyclin B1/cdc2 kinase complex. EA induced apoptosis in both cell lines, while UA had a less pronounced proapoptotic effect only in DU-145. Cotreatment with low concentrations of EA and UA dramatically decreased cell proliferation, exhibiting synergism in PC-3 cells evaluated by isobolographic analysis and combination index. These data provide information on pomegranate metabolites for the prevention of PCa recurrence, supporting the role of gut flora-derived metabolites for cancer prevention.

  14. Pomegranate Juice Metabolites, Ellagic Acid and Urolithin A, Synergistically Inhibit Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle Control and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicinanza, Roberto; Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M; Heber, David

    2013-01-01

    Ellagitannins (ETs) from pomegranate juice (PJ) are bioactive polyphenols with chemopreventive potential against prostate cancer (PCa). ETs are not absorbed intact but are partially hydrolyzed in the gut to ellagic acid (EA). Colonic microflora can convert EA to urolithin A (UA), and EA and UA enter the circulation after PJ consumption. Here, we studied the effects of EA and UA on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in DU-145 and PC-3 androgen-independent PCa cells and whether combinations of EA and UA affected cell proliferation. EA demonstrated greater dose-dependent antiproliferative effects in both cell lines compared to UA. EA induced cell cycle arrest in S phase associated with decreased cyclin B1 and cyclin D1 levels. UA induced a G2/M arrest and increased cyclin B1 and cdc2 phosphorylation at tyrosine-15, suggesting inactivation of the cyclin B1/cdc2 kinase complex. EA induced apoptosis in both cell lines, while UA had a less pronounced proapoptotic effect only in DU-145. Cotreatment with low concentrations of EA and UA dramatically decreased cell proliferation, exhibiting synergism in PC-3 cells evaluated by isobolographic analysis and combination index. These data provide information on pomegranate metabolites for the prevention of PCa recurrence, supporting the role of gut flora-derived metabolites for cancer prevention.

  15. Integrative analysis of circadian transcriptome and metabolic network reveals the role of de novo purine synthesis in circadian control of cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Li, Guang; Görling, Benjamin; Luy, Burkhard; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an intermediate metabolite in de novo purine synthesis, showed significant circadian oscillation in larval zebrafish. We focused on IMP dehydrogenase (impdh), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo purine synthesis, with three circadian oscillating gene homologs: impdh1a, impdh1b and impdh2. Functional analysis revealed that impdh2 contributes to the daily rhythm of S phase in the cell cycle while impdh1a contributes to ocular development and pigment synthesis. The three zebrafish homologs of impdh are likely regulated by different circadian transcription factors. We propose that the circadian regulation of de novo purine synthesis that supplies crucial building blocks for DNA replication is an important mechanism conferring circadian rhythmicity on the cell cycle. Our method is widely applicable to study the impact of circadian transcriptome on metabolism in complex organisms.

  16. Use of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine labelling and flow cytometry to study cell cycle-dependent regulation of human cytomegalovirus gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebusch, Lüder; Hagemeier, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle position at the time of infection has a profound influence on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression and therefore needs consideration in the design and control of HCMV experiments. While G0/G1 cells support the immediate onset of viral transcription, cells progressing through the S and G2 cell cycle phases prevent HCMV from entering the lytic replication cycle. Here, we provide two fast and reliable protocols that allow one to determine the cell cycle distribution of the designated host cells and monitor viral protein expression as a function of the cell cycle state. Both protocols make use of the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine and "click" chemistry to label HCMV-non-permissive S phase cells in a gentle and sensitive way.

  17. Drug-induced cell cycle modulation leading to cell-cycle arrest, nuclear mis-segregation, or endoreplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cell responses to chemotherapeutic agents vary, and this may reflect different defects in DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis control. Cytometry analysis only quantifies dye-incorporation to examine DNA content and does not reflect the biological complexity of the cell cycle in drug discovery screens. Results Using population and time-lapse imaging analyses of cultured immortalized cells expressing a new version of the fluorescent cell-cycle indicator, Fucci (Fluorescent Ubiquitination-based Cell Cycle Indicator), we found great diversity in the cell-cycle alterations induced by two anticancer drugs. When treated with etoposide, an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, HeLa and NMuMG cells halted at the G2/M checkpoint. HeLa cells remained there, but NMuMG cells then overrode the checkpoint and underwent nuclear mis-segregation or avoided the checkpoint and entered the endoreplication cycle in a drug concentration dependent manner. In contrast, an inhibitor of Cdk4 led to G1 arrest or endoreplication in NMuMG cells depending upon the initial cell-cycle phase of drug exposure. Conclusions Drug-induced cell cycle modulation varied not only between different cell types or following treatment with different drugs, but also between cells treated with different concentrations of the same drug or following drug addition during different phases of the cell cycle. By combining cytometry analysis with the Fucci probe, we have developed a novel assay that fully integrates the complexity of cell cycle regulation into drug discovery screens. This assay system will represent a powerful drug-discovery tool for the development of the next generation of anti-cancer therapies. PMID:21226962

  18. Distinct regulation of cell cycle and survival in lymphocytes from patients with Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, Fernando; Muñoz, Ursula; Esteras, Noemí; Esteban, Jesús; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Martín-Requero, Angeles

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in cell cycle progression seem to be associated with neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We previously reported disturbances in the control of cell survival/death fate in immortalized lymphocytes from AD patients. These cell cycle dysfunction and impaired apoptosis were considered systemic manifestations of AD disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether these abnormalities are characteristic of AD, or they may be seen in other neurodegenerative disorders such ALS. Our results indicate that alterations in signaling molecules, Akt and ERK1/2, and in the cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitors (CDKis) p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) are detectable in lymphoblasts from AD patients, but not in ALS patients, suggesting that these variables may be considered for the development of biomarkers of AD. However, lymphocytes from ALS patients do not represent a useful model to study cell cycle-related events associated with neurodegeneration of motoneurons.

  19. Aggregation of Ribosomal Protein S6 at Nucleolus Is Cell Cycle-Controlled and Its Function in Pre-rRNA Processing Is Phosphorylation Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Hui-Peng; Duan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Li-Hua; Shao, Yong; Chen, Ke-Yan; Wang, You-Liang; Lan, Feng-Hua; Hu, Xian-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) has long been regarded as one of the primary r-proteins that functions in the early stage of 40S subunit assembly, but its actual role is still obscure. The correct forming of 18S rRNA is a key step in the nuclear synthesis of 40S subunit. In this study, we demonstrate that rpS6 participates in the processing of 30S pre-rRNA to 18S rRNA only when its C-terminal five serines are phosphorylated, however, the process of entering the nucleus and then targeting the nucleolus does not dependent its phosphorylation. Remarkably, we also find that the aggregation of rpS6 at the nucleolus correlates to the phasing of cell cycle, beginning to concentrate in the nucleolus at later S phase and disaggregate at M phase. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1649-1657, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

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    Sluder Greenfield

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromosomes but also the regulation of cell cycle. The process may involve activation of components in the spindle midzone that are required for the cell cycle, and/or degradation of components that are required for cytokinesis but may interfere with the cell cycle.

  1. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase SCF(Cyclin F) Transmits AKT Signaling to the Cell-Cycle Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Bonacci, Thomas; Wang, Xianxi; Truong, Andrew; Arceci, Anthony; Zhang, Yanqiong; Mills, Christine A; Kernan, Jennifer L; Liu, Pengda; Emanuele, Michael J

    2017-09-26

    The oncogenic AKT kinase is a key regulator of apoptosis, cell growth, and cell-cycle progression. Despite its important role in proliferation, it remains largely unknown how AKT is mechanistically linked to the cell cycle. We show here that cyclin F, a substrate receptor F-box protein for the SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, is a bona fide AKT substrate. Cyclin F expression oscillates throughout the cell cycle, a rare feature among the 69 human F-box proteins, and all of its known substrates are involved in proliferation. AKT phosphorylation of cyclin F enhances its stability and promotes assembly into productive E3 ligase complexes. Importantly, expression of mutant versions of cyclin F that cannot be phosphorylated by AKT impair cell-cycle entry. Our data suggest that cyclin F transmits mitogen signaling through AKT to the core cell-cycle machinery. This discovery has potential implications for proliferative control in malignancies where AKT is activated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A transient expression of Prospero promotes cell cycle exit of Drosophila postembryonic neurons through the regulation of Dacapo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Colonques

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation, specification and terminal differentiation must be precisely coordinated during brain development to ensure the correct production of different neuronal populations. Most Drosophila neuroblasts (NBs divide asymmetrically to generate a new NB and an intermediate progenitor called ganglion mother cell (GMC which divides only once to generate two postmitotic cells called ganglion cells (GCs that subsequently differentiate into neurons. During the asymmetric division of NBs, the homeodomain transcription factor PROSPERO is segregated into the GMC where it plays a key role as cell fate determinant. Previous work on embryonic neurogenesis has shown that PROSPERO is not expressed in postmitotic neuronal progeny. Thus, PROSPERO is thought to function in the GMC by repressing genes required for cell-cycle progression and activating genes involved in terminal differentiation. Here we focus on postembryonic neurogenesis and show that the expression of PROSPERO is transiently upregulated in the newly born neuronal progeny generated by most of the larval NBs of the OL and CB. Moreover, we provide evidence that this expression of PROSPERO in GCs inhibits their cell cycle progression by activating the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI DACAPO. These findings imply that PROSPERO, in addition to its known role as cell fate determinant in GMCs, provides a transient signal to ensure a precise timing for cell cycle exit of prospective neurons, and hence may link the mechanisms that regulate neurogenesis and those that control cell cycle progression in postembryonic brain development.

  3. Chromatin association of UHRF1 during the cell cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Gashgari, Bothayna

    2017-05-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING Finger domains 1 (UHRF1) is a nuclear protein that associates with chromatin. Regardless of the various functions of UHRF1 in the cell, one of its more important functions is its role in the maintenance of DNA methylation patterns by the recruitment of DNMT1. Studies on UHRF1 based on this function have revealed the importance of UHRF1 during the cell cycle. Moreover, based on different studies various factors were described to be involved in the regulation of UHRF1 with different functionalities that can control its binding affinity to different targets on chromatin. These factors are regulated differently in a cell cycle specific manner. In light of this, we propose that UHRF1 has different binding behaviors during the cell cycle in regard to its association with chromatin. In this project, we first analyzed the binding behavior of endogenous UHRF1 from different unsynchronized cell systems in pull-down assays with peptides and oligonucleotides. Moreover, to analyze UHRF1 binding behavior during the cell cycle, we used two different approaches. First we sorted Jurkat and HT1080 cells based on their cell cycle stage using FACS analysis. Additionally, we synchronized HeLa cells to different stages of the cell cycle by chemical treatments, and used extracts from cellsorting and cell synchronization experiments for pull-down assays. We observed that UHRF1 in different cell systems has different preferences in regard to its binding to H3 unmodified and H3K9me3. Moreover, we detected that UHRF1, in general, displays different patterns between different stages of cell cycle; however, we cannot draw a final model for UHRF1 binding pattern during cell cycle.

  4. From quiescence to proliferation : Cdk oscillations drive the mammalian cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude eGérard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently proposed a detailed model describing the dynamics of the network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks driving the mammalian cell cycle [Gérard, C. and Goldbeter, A. (2009. Temporal self-organization of the cyclin/Cdk network driving the mammalian cell cycle. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 21643-21648]. The model contains four modules, each centered around one cyclin/Cdk complex. Cyclin D/Cdk4-6 and cyclin E/Cdk2 promote progression in G1 and elicit the G1/S transition, respectively; cyclin A/Cdk2 ensures progression in S and the transition S/G2, while the activity of cyclin B/Cdk1 brings about the G2/M transition. This model shows that in the presence of sufficient amounts of growth factor the Cdk network is capable of temporal self-organization in the form of sustained oscillations, which correspond to the ordered, sequential activation of the various cyclin/Cdk complexes that control the successive phases of the cell cycle. The results suggest that the switch from cellular quiescence to cell proliferation corresponds to the transition from a stable steady state to sustained oscillations in the Cdk network. The transition depends on a finely tuned balance between factors that promote or hinder progression in the cell cycle. We show that the transition from quiescence to proliferation can occur in multiple ways that alter this balance. By resorting to bifurcation diagrams, we analyze the mechanism of oscillations in the Cdk network. Finally, we show that the complexity of the detailed model can be greatly reduced, without losing its key dynamical properties, by considering a skeleton model for the Cdk network. Using such a skeleton model for the mammalian cell cycle we show that positive feedback loops enhance the amplitude and the robustness of Cdk oscillations with respect to molecular noise. We compare the relative merits of the detailed and skeleton versions of the model for the Cdk network driving the mammalian cell cycle.

  5. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death; Regulation du cycle cellulaire et de la mort cellulaire radio-induite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaudon, V. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, Unite 350 Inserm, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  6. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Ball, David A; Peccoud, Jean; Tyson, John J

    2016-12-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  7. Delayed cell cycle progression in selenoprotein W depleted cells is regulated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4–p38–p53 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a ubiquitous, highly conserved thioredoxin-like protein whose depletion causes a p53- and p21Cip1-dependent G1-phase cell cycle arrest in breast and prostate epithelial cells. SEPW1 depletion increases phosphorylation of Ser33 in p53, which is associated with decreased p53...

  8. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Dall Schyth

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are ~22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster, described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating their involvement in fish-virus interactions. We searched for homologues of the two teleost miRNAs in other vertebrate species and investigated whether findings related to ours have been reported for these homologues. Gene synteny analysis along with gene sequence conservation suggested that the teleost fish miR-462 and miR-731 had evolved from the ancestral miR-191 and miR-425 (herein called miR-191 cluster, respectively. Whereas the miR-462 cluster locus is found between two protein-coding genes (intergenic in teleost fish genomes, the miR-191 cluster locus is found within an intron of a protein-coding gene (intragenic in the human genome. Interferon (IFN-inducible and immune-related promoter elements found upstream of the teleost miR-462 cluster locus suggested roles in immune responses to viral pathogens in fish, while in humans, the miR-191 cluster functionally associated with cell cycle regulation. Stimulation of fish cell cultures with the IFN inducer poly I:C accordingly upregulated the expression of miR-462 and miR-731, while no stimulatory effect on miR-191 and

  9. Effects of iodonium-class flavin dehydrogenase inhibitors on growth, reactive oxygen production, cell cycle progression, NADPH oxidase 1 levels, and gene expression in human colon cancer cells and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshow, James H; Gaur, Shikha; Markel, Susan; Lu, Jiamo; van Balgooy, Josephus; Synold, Timothy W; Xi, Bixin; Wu, Xiwei; Juhasz, Agnes

    2013-04-01

    Iodonium-class flavoprotein dehydrogenase inhibitors have been demonstrated to possess antiproliferative potential and to inhibit reactive oxygen production in human tumor cells, although the mechanism(s) that explains the relationship between altered cell growth and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) remains an area of active investigation. Because of the ability of these compounds to inhibit the activity of flavoprotein-containing epithelial NADPH oxidases, we chose to examine the effects of several iodonium-class flavoprotein inhibitors on human colon cancer cell lines that express high, functional levels of a single such oxidase (NADPH oxidase 1, or Nox1). We found that diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), di-2-thienyliodonium (DTI), and iodonium diphenyl inhibited the growth of Caco2, HT-29, and LS-174T colon cancer cells at concentrations (10-250nM for DPI, 0.5-2.5μM for DTI, and 155nM to 10μM for iodonium diphenyl) substantially lower than needed for DU145 human prostate cancer cells, which do not possess functional NADPH oxidase activity. Drug treatment was associated with decreased H2O2 production and diminished intracellular ROS levels, lasting up to 24h, after short-term (1-h) exposure to the iodonium analogs. Decreased tumor cell proliferation was caused, in part, by a profound block in cell cycle progression at the G1/S interface in both LS-174T and HT-29 cells exposed to either DPI or DTI; and the G1 block was produced, for LS-174T cells, by upregulation of p27 and a drug concentration-related decrease in the expression of cyclins D1, A, and E that was partially prevented by exogenous H2O2. Not only did DPI and DTI decrease intracellular ROS, they both also significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of Nox1, potentially contributing to the prolonged reduction in tumor cell reactive oxygen levels. We also found that DPI and DTI significantly decreased the growth of both HT-29 and LS-174T human tumor xenografts, at dose levels that produced

  10. A model of yeast cell-cycle regulation based on multisite phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Baumann, William T; Paul, Mark R; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J

    2010-01-01

    In order for the cell's genome to be passed intact from one generation to the next, the events of the cell cycle (DNA replication, mitosis, cell division) must be executed in the correct order, despite the considerable molecular noise inherent in any protein-based regulatory system residing in the small confines of a eukaryotic cell. To assess the effects of molecular fluctuations on cell-cycle progression in budding yeast cells, we have constructed a new model of the regulation of Cln- and Clb-dependent kinases, based on multisite phosphorylation of their target proteins and on positive and negative feedback loops involving the kinases themselves. To account for the significant role of noise in the transcription and translation steps of gene expression, the model includes mRNAs as well as proteins. The model equations are simulated deterministically and stochastically to reveal the bistable switching behavior on which proper cell-cycle progression depends and to show that this behavior is robust to the level of molecular noise expected in yeast-sized cells (∼50 fL volume). The model gives a quantitatively accurate account of the variability observed in the G1-S transition in budding yeast, which is governed by an underlying sizer+timer control system. PMID:20739927

  11. The diversity and evolution of cell cycle regulation in alpha-proteobacteria: a comparative genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengoni Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, CtrA coordinates DNA replication, cell division, and polar morphogenesis and is considered the cell cycle master regulator. CtrA activity varies during cell cycle progression and is modulated by phosphorylation, proteolysis and transcriptional control. In a phosphorylated state, CtrA binds specific DNA sequences, regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression and silences the origin of replication. Although the circuitry regulating CtrA is known in molecular detail in Caulobacter, its conservation and functionality in the other alpha-proteobacteria are still poorly understood. Results Orthologs of Caulobacter factors involved in the regulation of CtrA were systematically scanned in genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. In particular, orthologous genes of the divL-cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay, the divJ-pleC-divK two-component system, the cpdR-rcdA-clpPX proteolysis system, the methyltransferase ccrM and transcriptional regulators dnaA and gcrA were identified in representative genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. CtrA, DnaA and GcrA binding sites and CcrM putative methylation sites were predicted in promoter regions of all these factors and functions controlled by CtrA in all alphas were predicted. Conclusions The regulatory cell cycle architecture was identified in all representative alpha-proteobacteria, revealing a high diversification of circuits but also a conservation of logical features. An evolutionary model was proposed where ancient alphas already possessed all modules found in Caulobacter arranged in a variety of connections. Two schemes appeared to evolve: a complex circuit in Caulobacterales and Rhizobiales and a simpler one found in Rhodobacterales.

  12. Real-Time Cell Cycle Imaging in a 3D Cell Culture Model of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerri, Loredana; Beaumont, Kimberley A; Anfosso, Andrea; Haass, Nikolas K

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant cell cycle progression is a hallmark of solid tumors; therefore, cell cycle analysis is an invaluable technique to study cancer cell biology. However, cell cycle progression has been most commonly assessed by methods that are limited to temporal snapshots or that lack spatial information. Here, we describe a technique that allows spatiotemporal real-time tracking of cell cycle progression of individual cells in a multicellular context. The power of this system lies in the use of 3D melanoma spheroids generated from melanoma cells engineered with the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). This technique allows us to gain further and more detailed insight into several relevant aspects of solid cancer cell biology, such as tumor growth, proliferation, invasion, and drug sensitivity.

  13. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  14. Meiotic and Mitotic Cell Cycle Mutants Involved in Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Liu; Li-Jia Qu

    2008-01-01

    The alternation between diploid and haploid generations is fundamentalin the life cycles of both animals and plants.The meiotic cell cycle is common to both animals and plants gamete formation, but in animals the products of meiosis are gametes,whereas for most plants,subsequent mitotic cell cycles are needed for their formation. Clarifying the regulatory mechanisms of mitotic cell cycle progression during gametophyte development will help understanding of sexual reproduction in plants.Many mutants defective in gametophyte development and,in particular,many meiotic and mitotic cell cycle mutants in Arabidopsis male and female gametophyte development were identified through both forward and reverse genetics approaches.

  15. An unusual promoter controls cell-cycle regulation and dependence on DNA replication of the Caulobacter fliLM early flagellar operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, C M; Shapiro, L

    1993-09-01

    Transcription of flagellar genes in Caulobacter crecentus is programmed to occur during the predivisional stage of the cell cycle. The mechanism of activation of Class II flagellar genes, the highest identified genes in the Caulobacter flagellar hierarchy, is unknown. As a step toward understanding this process, we have defined cis-acting sequences necessary for expression of a Class II flagellar operon, fliLM. Deletion analysis indicated that a 55 bp DNA fragment was sufficient for normal, temporally regulated promoter activity. Transcription from this promoter-containing fragment was severely reduced when chromosomal DNA replication was inhibited. Extensive mutational analysis of the promoter region from -42 to -5 identified functionally important nucleotides at -36 and -35, between -29 and -22, and at -12, which correlates well with sequences conserved between fliLM and the analogous regions of two other Class II flagellar operons. The promoter sequence does not resemble that recognized by any known bacterial sigma factor. Models for regulation of Caulobacter early flagellar promoters are discussed in which RNA polymerase containing a novel sigma subunit interacts with an activation factor bound to the central region of the promoter.

  16. Cloning of the mouse BTG3 gene and definition of a new gene family (the BTG family) involved in the negative control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéhenneux, F; Duret, L; Callanan, M B; Bouhas, R; Hayette, S; Berthet, C; Samarut, C; Rimokh, R; Birot, A M; Wang, Q; Magaud, J P; Rouault, J P

    1997-03-01

    It is well known that loss of tumor suppressor genes and more generally of antiproliferative genes plays a key role in the development of most tumors. We report here the cloning of the mouse BTG3 gene and show that its human counterpart maps on chromosome 21. This evolutionarily conserved gene codes for a 30 kDa protein and is expressed in most adult murine and human tissues analyzed. However, we demonstrate that its expression is cell cycle dependent and peaks at the end of the G1 phase. This gene is homologous to the human BTG1, BTG2 and TOB genes which were demonstrated to act as inhibitors of cell proliferation. Its description allowed us to define better this seven gene family (the BTG gene family) at the structural level and to speculate about its physiological role in normal and tumoral cells. This family is mainly characterized by the presence of two conserved domains (BTG boxes A and B) of as yet undetermined function which are separated by a non-conserved 20-25 amino acid sequence.

  17. S-phase-dependent cell cycle disturbances caused by Aleutian mink disease parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Alexandersen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    We examined replication of the autonomous parovirus Aleutian mink disease parovirus (ADV) in relation to cell cycle progression of permissive Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that ADV caused a composite, binary pattern of cell cycle arrest. ADV-induced cell cyc...

  18. The role of the cell cycle machinery in resumption of postembryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barroco, R.M.; Poucke, van K.; Bergervoet, J.H.W.; Veylder, de L.; Groot, S.P.C.; Inze, D.; Engler, G.

    2005-01-01

    Cell cycle activity is required for plant growth and development, but its involvement in the early events that initiate seedling development remains to be clarified. We performed experiments aimed at understanding when cell cycle progression is activated during seed germination, and what its

  19. The role of the cell cycle machinery in resumption of postembryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barroco, R.M.; Poucke, van K.; Bergervoet, J.H.W.; Veylder, de L.; Groot, S.P.C.; Inze, D.; Engler, G.

    2005-01-01

    Cell cycle activity is required for plant growth and development, but its involvement in the early events that initiate seedling development remains to be clarified. We performed experiments aimed at understanding when cell cycle progression is activated during seed germination, and what its contrib

  20. The role of the cell cycle machinery in resumption of postembryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barroco, R.M.; Poucke, van K.; Bergervoet, J.H.W.; Veylder, de L.; Groot, S.P.C.; Inze, D.; Engler, G.

    2005-01-01

    Cell cycle activity is required for plant growth and development, but its involvement in the early events that initiate seedling development remains to be clarified. We performed experiments aimed at understanding when cell cycle progression is activated during seed germination, and what its contrib

  1. The same, only different - DNA damage checkpoints and their reversal throughout the cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaltiel, Indra A.; Krenning, Lenno; Bruinsma, Wytse; Medema, René H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are essential for the maintenance of the genomic integrity of proliferating cells. Following DNA damage, cells must detect the break and either transiently block cell cycle progression, to allow time for repair, or exit the cell cyc

  2. Molecular systems biology of Sic1 in yeast cell cycle regulation through multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle control is highly regulated to guarantee the precise timing of events essential for cell growth, i.e., DNA replication onset and cell division. Failure of this control plays a role in cancer and molecules called cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors (Ckis) exploit a critical function in cell cycle timing. Here we present a multiscale modeling where experimental and computational studies have been employed to investigate structure, function and temporal dynamics of the Cki Sic1 that regulates cell cycle progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Structural analyses reveal molecular details of the interaction between Sic1 and Cdk/cyclin complexes, and biochemical investigation reveals Sic1 function in analogy to its human counterpart p27(Kip1), whose deregulation leads to failure in timing of kinase activation and, therefore, to cancer. Following these findings, a bottom-up systems biology approach has been developed to characterize modular networks addressing Sic1 regulatory function. Through complementary experimentation and modeling, we suggest a mechanism that underlies Sic1 function in controlling temporal waves of cyclins to ensure correct timing of the phase-specific Cdk activities.

  3. S-phase-dependent cell cycle disturbances caused by Aleutian mink disease parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Alexandersen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    We examined replication of the autonomous parovirus Aleutian mink disease parovirus (ADV) in relation to cell cycle progression of permissive Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that ADV caused a composite, binary pattern of cell cycle arrest. ADV-induced cell cycle...... with subthreshold levels of ADV products through the late S/G(2) block and, consequently, that the binary pattern of ADV-induced cell cycle arrest may be governed merely by viral replication levels within a single S phase. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide fluorescence and bromodeoxyuridine uptake showed...... that population A cells sustained significantly higher levels of DNA replication than population B cells during the ADV-induced cell cycle arrest. Therefore, the type of ADV-induced cell cycle arrest was not trivial and could have implications for subsequent viral replication in the target cell....

  4. Role of CDC6 in DNA replication, cell cycle checkpoints, tumorigenesis and tumor progression%周期蛋白6在DNA复制、细胞周期检测点和肿瘤发生发展中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张佳华; 黄士昂

    2009-01-01

    Cell-division cycle 6 (CDC6) is one of the major proteins consisting pre-replicative complexes(Pre-RC). It controls cells cycle from G1 phase into S phase, and participates in the activation and maintenance of S-M phase checkpoint mechanisms of mitosis. Recent studies have unveiled its proto-oncogenic activity and overexpression in many kinds of human cancer cells, and it plays an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression.CDC6-driven oneogenesis may be related with INK4/ARF link and/or some alternative mechanisms.%周期蛋白6(CDC6)是组成前复制复合物(Pre-RC)的主要蛋白之一,控制细胞从G1期进入S期,同时也参与激活和维持有丝分裂S-M期检测点机制.最近的研究发现其也具有原癌基因的特性,并在人多种肿瘤细胞中存在高表达,对肿瘤发生发展起重要作用.CDC6致癌机制可能与INK4/ARF连结物信号途径和(或)某些替代机制有关.

  5. Acute effects of wheel running on adult hippocampal precursor cells in mice are not caused by changes in cell cycle length or S phase length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim J. Fischer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exercise stimulates cellular brain plasticity by extending the pool of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus. This effect has been investigated extensively, but the most immediate cellular effect induced by exercise that results in this acute increase in the number of cycling cells remained unclear. In the developing brain as well as adult pathological models, cell cycle alterations have a major influence on the balance between proliferative and neurogenic divisions. In this study we investigated whether this might also apply to the acute physiological pro-neurogenic stimulus of physical exercise in adulthood. Do changes in cell cycle precede the measurable increase in proliferation? After 5 days of voluntary wheel running, however, we measured only a very small, statistically not significant acceleration in cell cycle, which could not quantitatively explain the observed increase in proliferating cells after exercise. Thus, at this acute stage, changes at the level of cell cycle control is not the primary causal mechanism for the expansion of the precursor cell population, although with time after the stimulus changes in cell cycle of the entire population of labeled cells might be the result of the expanded pool of cells that have progressed to the advanced neurogenic stages with shorter cell cycle length.

  6. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu [Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yao, Ya-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan (China); Yang, Wen-Ming, E-mail: yangwm@nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  7. The BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) target genes are involved in the oxidative stress response and in control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Schmidt, Dominic; Manke, Thomas; Piccini, Ilaria; Sultan, Marc; Borodina, Tatiana; Balzereit, Daniela; Wruck, Wasco; Soldatov, Alexey; Vingron, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of gene expression in response to environmental signals and metabolic imbalances is a key step in maintaining cellular homeostasis. BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) is a heme-binding transcription factor repressing the transcription from a subset of MAF recognition elements at low intracellular heme levels. Upon heme binding, BACH1 is released from the MAF recognition elements, resulting in increased expression of antioxidant response genes. To systematically address the gene regulatory networks involving BACH1, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis of BACH1 target genes in HEK 293 cells with knockdown of BACH1 using three independent types of small interfering RNAs followed by transcriptome profiling using microarrays. The 59 BACH1 target genes identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing were found highly enriched in genes showing expression changes after BACH1 knockdown, demonstrating the impact of BACH1 repression on transcription. In addition to known and new BACH1 targets involved in heme degradation (HMOX1, FTL, FTH1, ME1, and SLC48A1) and redox regulation (GCLC, GCLM, and SLC7A11), we also discovered BACH1 target genes affecting cell cycle and apoptosis pathways (ITPR2, CALM1, SQSTM1, TFE3, EWSR1, CDK6, BCL2L11, and MAFG) as well as subcellular transport processes (CLSTN1, PSAP, MAPT, and vault RNA). The newly identified impact of BACH1 on genes involved in neurodegenerative processes and proliferation provides an interesting basis for future dissection of BACH1-mediated gene repression in neurodegeneration and virus-induced cancerogenesis.

  8. Cyclic di-GMP acts as a cell cycle oscillator to drive chromosome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, C; Ozaki, S; Steiner, S; Böhm, R; Abel, S; Dubey, B N; Schirmer, T; Hiller, S; Jenal, U

    2015-07-01

    Fundamental to all living organisms is the capacity to coordinate cell division and cell differentiation to generate appropriate numbers of specialized cells. Whereas eukaryotes use cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases to balance division with cell fate decisions, equivalent regulatory systems have not been described in bacteria. Moreover, the mechanisms used by bacteria to tune division in line with developmental programs are poorly understood. Here we show that Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium with an asymmetric division cycle, uses oscillating levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) to drive its cell cycle. We demonstrate that c-di-GMP directly binds to the essential cell cycle kinase CckA to inhibit kinase activity and stimulate phosphatase activity. An upshift of c-di-GMP during the G1-S transition switches CckA from the kinase to the phosphatase mode, thereby allowing replication initiation and cell cycle progression. Finally, we show that during division, c-di-GMP imposes spatial control on CckA to install the replication asymmetry of future daughter cells. These studies reveal c-di-GMP to be a cyclin-like molecule in bacteria that coordinates chromosome replication with cell morphogenesis in Caulobacter. The observation that c-di-GMP-mediated control is conserved in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens suggests a general mechanism through which this global regulator of bacterial virulence and persistence coordinates behaviour and cell proliferation.

  9. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Hervey M; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO₃)₂] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO₃)₂ for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p cell death in Pb(NO₃)₂-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO₃)₂ compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO₃)₂ inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure and its associated adverse health effects.

  10. Systematic Characterization of Cell Cycle Phase-dependent Protein Dynamics and Pathway Activities by High-content Microscopy-assisted Cell Cycle Phenotyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher Bruhn; Torsten Kroll; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is coordinated with metabolism, signaling and other complex cel-lular functions. The investigation of cellular processes in a cell cycle stage-dependent manner is often the subject of modern molecular and cell biological research. Cell cycle synchronization and immunostaining of cell cycle markers facilitate such analysis, but are limited in use due to unphysiological experimental stress, cell type dependence and often low flexibility. Here, we describe high-content microscopy-assisted cell cycle phenotyping (hiMAC), which integrates high-resolution cell cycle profiling of asynchronous cell populations with immunofluorescence microscopy. hiMAC is compatible with cell types from any species and allows for statistically pow-erful, unbiased, simultaneous analysis of protein interactions, modifications and subcellular locali-zation at all cell cycle stages within a single sample. For illustration, we provide a hiMAC analysis pipeline tailored to study DNA damage response and genomic instability using a 3–4-day protocol, which can be adjusted to any other cell cycle stage-dependent analysis.

  11. High fat diet triggers cell cycle arrest and excessive apoptosis of granulosa cells during the follicular development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yanqing; Zhang, Zhenghong; Liao, Xinghui; Wang, Zhengchao, E-mail: zcwang@fjnu.edu.cn

    2015-10-23

    The regulatory mechanism of granulosa cells (GCs) proliferation during the follicular development is complicated and multifactorial, which is essential for the oocyte growth and normal ovarian functions. To investigate the role of high fat diet (HFD) on the proliferation of GCs, 4-week old female mice were fed with HFD or normal control diet (NC) for 15 weeks or 20 weeks and then detected the expression level of some regulatory molecules of cell cycle and apoptosis. The abnormal ovarian morphology was observed at 20 weeks. Further mechanistic studies indicated that HFD induced-obesity caused elevated apoptotic levels in GCs of the ovaries in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, cell cycle progress was also impacted after HFD fed. The cell cycle inhibitors, p27{sup Kip1} and p21{sup Cip1}, were significantly induced in the ovaries from the mice in HFD group when compared with that in the ovaries from the mice in NC group. Subsequently, the expression levels of Cyclin D1, D3 and CDK4 were also significantly influenced in the ovaries from the mice fed with HFD in a time-dependent manner. The present results suggested that HFD induced-obesity may trigger cell cycle arrest and excessive apoptosis of GCs, causing the abnormal follicular development and ovarian function failure. - Highlights: • HFD induced-obesity leads to abnormal ovarian morphology. • HFD induced-obesity triggers excessive apoptosis in the ovary. • HFD induced-obesity up-regulates cell cycle inhibitors p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} in the ovary. • HFD induced-obesity causes cell cycle arrest in the ovary.

  12. Dysplasia in view of the cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG Steinbeck

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dysplasia is linked to altered tissue architecture. The lesion belongs into the diagnostic field of human pathology and is highly relevant for the clinical physician, because it breaks the criteria of hyperplasia and regeneration. Dysplasia is a precancerous disorder leading in all probability to malignant transformation if not treated. However, different descriptions do apply for dysplasia in different human tissues, and conventional pathology cannot arrive at unequivocal stringency. In contrast to the previous situation, now, dysplasia is defined by a unifying concept, which works upon cell cycle criteria. The decisive element for the proposed definition is unbalanced segregation of chromosomes and persistent genomic asymmetry through telophase, leading to aneuploid interphase nuclei. Progress of dysplasia can be estimated from the frequency of pathologic mitoses that directly measure cellular proliferation. In routine work, progress of dysplasia shall be quantified by frequency increase of aneuploidy in the increasing fraction of proliferating interphase nuclei. Thus, dysplasia is defined not only by aberrations from healthy histological architecture and normal cytological differentiation, but also by violations of the DNA standard from mitotic nuclei. The proposed classification of dysplasia measures the frequency of pathologic mitoses and the degree of genomic alterations in interphase nuclei. Both these criteria discriminate between low-grade and highgrade dysplasia and ascertain the malignant potential of a dysplastic lesion.

  13. PP2A(Cdc55) Phosphatase Imposes Ordered Cell-Cycle Phosphorylation by Opposing Threonine Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Molly; Touati, Sandra A; Kataria, Meghna; Jones, Andrew; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Uhlmann, Frank

    2017-02-02

    In the quantitative model of cell-cycle control, progression from G1 through S phase and into mitosis is ordered by thresholds of increasing cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. How such thresholds are read out by substrates that respond with the correct phosphorylation timing is not known. Here, using the budding yeast model, we show that the abundant PP2A(Cdc55) phosphatase counteracts Cdk phosphorylation during interphase and delays phosphorylation of late Cdk substrates. PP2A(Cdc55) specifically counteracts phosphorylation on threonine residues, and consequently, we find that threonine-directed phosphorylation occurs late in the cell cycle. Furthermore, the late phosphorylation of a model substrate, Ndd1, depends on threonine identity of its Cdk target sites. Our results support a model in which Cdk-counteracting phosphatases contribute to cell-cycle ordering by imposing Cdk thresholds. They also unveil a regulatory principle based on the phosphoacceptor amino acid, which is likely to apply to signaling pathways beyond cell-cycle control. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  15. Cell cycle regulation of the BRCA1/acetyl-CoA-carboxylase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, H; Suau, F; Vincent, A; Dalla Venezia, N

    2009-01-16

    Germ-line alterations in BRCA1 are associated with an increased susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. The BRCA1 protein has been implicated in multiple cellular functions. We have recently demonstrated that BRCA1 reduces acetyl-CoA-carboxylase alpha (ACCA) activity through its phospho-dependent binding to ACCA, and further established that the phosphorylation of the Ser1263 of ACCA is required for this interaction. Here, to gain more insight into the cellular conditions that trigger the BRCA1/ACCA interaction, we designed an anti-pSer1263 antibody and demonstrated that the Ser1263 of ACCA is phosphorylated in vivo, in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We further showed that the interaction between BRCA1 and ACCA is regulated during cell cycle progression. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism of regulation of ACCA distinct from the previously described phosphorylation of Ser79, and provide new insights into the control of lipogenesis through the cell cycle.

  16. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Zheng, Lemin [The Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Boda [The Department of Cardiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Wei; Lv, He [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Yuan, Yun, E-mail: yuanyun2002@sohu.com [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  17. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Kyla; Bodas, Manish; Campbell, Ryan John; Swanson, Doug; Sharma, Ajit; Vij, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97) levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) progression. The VCP inhibitor(s) (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface) were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells) proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay) and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay), and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay) as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ) treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting) of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion) as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05). Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay) and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05) as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining) that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001) by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control-DDN. Moreover

  18. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Walworth

    Full Text Available Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97 levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC progression. The VCP inhibitor(s (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay, and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05. Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05 as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001 by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control

  19. SKLB70326, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cell-cycle progression, induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and apoptosis in human hepatic carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yuanyuan; He, Haiyun [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Peng, Feng [Department of Thoracic Oncology of the Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Jiyan; Dai, Xiaoyun; Lin, Hongjun; Xu, Youzhi; Zhou, Tian; Mao, Yongqiu; Xie, Gang; Yang, Shengyong; Yu, Luoting; Yang, Li [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhao, Yinglan, E-mail: alancenxb@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 is a novel compound and has activity of anti-HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest via inhibiting the activity of CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. -- Abstract: We previously reported the potential of a novel small molecule 3-amino-6-(3-methoxyphenyl)thieno[2.3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (SKLB70326) as an anticancer agent. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effects and possible mechanisms of SKLB70326 in vitro. We found that SKLB70326 treatment significantly inhibited human hepatic carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro, and the HepG2 cell line was the most sensitive to its treatment. The inhibition of cell proliferation correlated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest, which was followed by apoptotic cell death. The SKLB70326-mediated cell-cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4 and CDK6 but not cyclin D1 or cyclin E. The phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was also observed. SKLB70326 treatment induced apoptotic cell death via the activation of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2. The expression levels of p53 and p21 were also induced by SKLB70326 treatment. Moreover, SKLB70326 treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, SKLB70326, a novel cell-cycle inhibitor, notably inhibits HepG2 cell proliferation through the induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Its potential as a candidate anticancer agent warrants further investigation.

  20. Influence of vitamin D on cell cycle, apoptosis, and some apoptosis related molecules in systemic lupus erythematosus

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