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Sample records for controls cell surface

  1. Controlled surface chemistries and quantitative cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Anne L.

    2002-03-01

    Living cells experience a large number of signaling cues from their extracellular matrix. As a result of these inputs, a variety of intracellular signaling pathways are apparently initiated simultaneously. The vast array of alternative responses that result from the integration of these inputs suggests that it may be reasonable to look for cellular response not as an 'on' or 'off' condition but as a distribution of responses. A difficult challenge is to determine whether variations in responses from individual cells arise from the complexity of intracellular signals or are due to variations in the cell culture environment. By controlling surface chemistry so that every cell 'sees' the same chemical and physical environment, we can begin to assess how the distribution of cell response is affected strictly by changes in the chemistry of the cell culture surface. Using the gene for green fluorescent protein linked to the gene for the promoter of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin, we can easily probe the end product in a signaling pathway that is purported to be linked to surface protein chemistry and to cell shape. Cell response to well-controlled, well-characterized, and highly reproducible surfaces prepared using soft lithography techniques are compared with more conventional ways of preparing extracellular matrix proteins for cell culture. Using fluorescence microscopy and image analysis of populations of cells on these surfaces, we probe quantitatively the relationship between surface chemistry, cell shape and variations in gene expression endpoint.

  2. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-06

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  3. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  4. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos-Asperilla, L.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.; Alonso, C.

    2015-07-01

    In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10{sup -}3 min{sup -}1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days), due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been adsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti. (Author)

  5. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgos-Asperilla, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10−3 min−1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days, due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been a dsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti.En este trabajo, se ha estudiado la interacción in situ entre células osteoblásticas Saos-2 y una superficie de Ti de rugosidad controlada a lo largo del tiempo. El estudio de la cinética y los mecanismos de proliferación celular de adhesión se ha realizado a través de la microbalanza de cristal de cuarzo (QCM y espectroscopía de impedancia electroquímica (EIS. La velocidad de adhesión de los osteoblastos sobre la superficie de Ti obtenida a través de medidas con la QCM, sigue una reacción de primer orden, con k=2×10−3 min−1. Los ensayos de impedancia indican que, en ausencia de las células, la resistencia del Ti disminuye con el tiempo (7 días, debido a la presencia de aminoácidos y proteínas del medio de cultivo que se han adsorbido, mientras que en presencia de células, esta disminución es mucho mayor debido a los productos metabólicos generados por las células que aceleran la disolución del Ti.

  6. Engineering live cell surfaces with functional polymers via cytocompatible controlled radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jia; Lunn, David J.; Pusuluri, Anusha; Yoo, Justin I.; O'Malley, Michelle A.; Mitragotri, Samir; Soh, H. Tom; Hawker, Craig J.

    2017-06-01

    The capability to graft synthetic polymers onto the surfaces of live cells offers the potential to manipulate and control their phenotype and underlying cellular processes. Conventional grafting-to strategies for conjugating preformed polymers to cell surfaces are limited by low polymer grafting efficiency. Here we report an alternative grafting-from strategy for directly engineering the surfaces of live yeast and mammalian cells through cell surface-initiated controlled radical polymerization. By developing cytocompatible PET-RAFT (photoinduced electron transfer-reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization), synthetic polymers with narrow polydispersity (Mw/Mn cells using either covalent attachment or non-covalent insertion, while maintaining high cell viability. Compared with conventional grafting-to approaches, these methods significantly improve the efficiency of grafting polymer chains and enable the active manipulation of cellular phenotypes.

  7. Surface modifications by gas plasma control osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barradas, A.M.C.; Lachmann, K.; Hlawacek, G.; Frielink, C.; Truckenmuller, R.K.; Boerman, O.C.; Gastel, van R.; Garritsen, H.S.P.; Thomas, M.; Moroni, L.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Boer, de J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the physicochemical properties of biomaterials can control cell activity. Cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as tissue formation in vivo can be tuned by properties such as the porosity, surface micro- and nanoscale topography and chemical compositi

  8. Surface modifications by gas plasma control osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barradas, A.M.; Lachmann, K.; Hlawacek, G.; Frielink, C.; Truckenmoller, R.; Boerman, O.C.; Gastel, R. van; Garritsen, H.; Thomas, M.; Moroni, L.; Blitterswijk, C. Van; Boer, J. den

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the physicochemical properties of biomaterials can control cell activity. Cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as tissue formation in vivo can be tuned by properties such as the porosity, surface micro- and nanoscale topography and chemical compositi

  9. Polymer surface functionalities that control human embryoid body cell adhesion revealed by high throughput surface characterization of combinatorial material microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Hook, Andrew L; Taylor, Michael; Urquhart, Andrew J; Bogatyrev, Said R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R

    2010-12-01

    High throughput materials discovery using combinatorial polymer microarrays to screen for new biomaterials with new and improved function is established as a powerful strategy. Here we combine this screening approach with high throughput surface characterization (HT-SC) to identify surface structure-function relationships. We explore how this combination can help to identify surface chemical moieties that control protein adsorption and subsequent cellular response. The adhesion of human embryoid body (hEB) cells to a large number (496) of different acrylate polymers synthesized in a microarray format is screened using a high throughput procedure. To determine the role of the polymer surface properties on hEB cell adhesion, detailed HT-SC of these acrylate polymers is carried out using time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pico litre drop sessile water contact angle (WCA) measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A structure-function relationship is identified between the ToF SIMS analysis of the surface chemistry after a fibronectin (Fn) pre-conditioning step and the cell adhesion to each spot using the multivariate analysis technique partial least squares (PLS) regression. Secondary ions indicative of the adsorbed Fn correlate with increased cell adhesion whereas glycol and other functionalities from the polymers are identified that reduce cell adhesion. Furthermore, a strong relationship between the ToF SIMS spectra of bare polymers and the cell adhesion to each spot is identified using PLS regression. This identifies a role for both the surface chemistry of the bare polymer and the pre-adsorbed Fn, as-represented in the ToF SIMS spectra, in controlling cellular adhesion. In contrast, no relationship is found between cell adhesion and wettability, surface roughness, elemental or functional surface composition. The correlation between ToF SIMS data of the surfaces and the cell adhesion demonstrates

  10. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans control adhesion and invasion of breast carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Hooi Ching; Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Couchman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    phenotype of mammary carcinoma cells. Finally, both syndecan-2 and caveolin-2 were upregulated in tissue arrays from breast cancer patients compared to normal mammary tissue. Moreover their expression levels were correlated in triple negative breast cancers. Conclusion: Cell surface proteoglycans, notably...

  11. The Control of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through Modified Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Logan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells continue to receive widespread attention due to their potential to revolutionise treatments in the fields of both tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Adult stem cells, specifically mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, play a vital role in the natural events surrounding bone healing and osseointegration through being stimulated to differentiate along their osteogenic lineage and in doing so, they form new cortical and trabecular bone tissue. Understanding how to control, manipulate, and enhance the intrinsic healing events modulated through osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by the use of modified surfaces and biomaterials could potentially advance the fields of both orthopaedics and dentistry. This could be by either using surface modification to generate greater implant stability and more rapid healing following implantation or the stimulation of MSCs ex vivo for reimplantation. This review aims to gather publications targeted at promoting, enhancing, and controlling the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs through biomaterials, nanotopographies, and modified surfaces for use in implant procedures.

  12. Enhanced adhesion of osteoblastic cells on polystyrene films by independent control of surface topography and wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Yun [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Sam [School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Gumhye [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Yong, E-mail: kchoi@postech.ac.kr [School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Kon, E-mail: jkkim@postech.ac.kr [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    We independently controlled surface topography and wettability of polystyrene (PS) films by CF{sub 4} and oxygen plasma treatments, respectively, to evaluate the adhesion and proliferation of human fetal osteoblastic (hFOB) cells on the films. Among the CF{sub 4} plasma-treated PS films with the average surface roughness ranging from 0.9 to 70 nm, the highest adhesion of hFOB cells was observed on a PS film with roughness of ∼ 11 nm. When this film was additionally treated by oxygen plasma to provide a hydrophilic surface with a contact angle less than 10°, the proliferation of bone-forming cell was further enhanced. Thus, the plasma-based independent modification of PS film into an optimum nanotexture for human osteoblast cells could be appplied to materials used in bone tissue engineering. Highlights: ► New approach based on plasma treatment to independently control the surface topography and wettability ► The adhesion of human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) was enhanced on a surface with an average roughness of ∼ 11 nm. ► The adhesion and proliferation of hFOB was maximized when nanotextured surface became highly hydrophilic.

  13. Adjustment of surface chemical and physical properties with functionalized polymers to control cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaoli

    Cell-surface interaction is crucial in many cellular functions such as movement, growth, differentiation, proliferation and survival. In the present work, we have developed several strategies to design and prepare synthetic polymeric materials with selected cues to control cell attachment. To promote neuronal cell adhesion on the surfaces, biocompatible, non-adhesive PEG-based materials were modified with neurotransmitter acetylcholine functionalities to produce hydrogels with a range of porous structures, swollen states, and mechanical strengths. Mice hippocampal cells cultured on the hydrogels showed differences in number, length of processes and exhibited different survival rates, thereby highlighting the importance of chemical composition and structure in biomaterials. Similar strategies were used to prepare polymer brushes to assess how topographical cues influence neuronal cell behaviors. The brushes were prepared using the "grown from" method through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) reactions and further patterned via UV photolithography. Protein absorption tests and hippocampal neuronal cell culture of the brush patterns showed that both protein and neuronal cells can adhere to the patterns and therefore can be guided by the patterns at certain length scales. We also prepared functional polymers to discourage attachment of undesirable cells on the surfaces. For example, we synthesized PEG-perfluorinated alkyl amphiphilic surfactants to modify polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)- block-polyisoprene (SEBI or K3) triblock copolymers for marine antifouling/fouling release surface coatings. Initial results showed that the polymer coated surfaces can facilitate removal of Ulva sporelings on the surfaces. In addition, we prepared both bioactive and dual functional biopassive/bioactive antimicrobial coatings based on SEBI polymers. Incubating the polymer coated surfaces with gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus), gram

  14. Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) for controlling biological cells' adhesion using a scanning radical microjet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Helen M.L. [Department of Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan); Fukuda, H. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, 350-8585 (Japan); Akagi, T. [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan); Center for NanoBio Integration, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan); Ichiki, T. [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan) and Center for NanoBio Integration, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: ichiki@sogo.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-04-23

    A scanning radical microjet (SRMJ) equipment using oxygen microplasma has been developed and successfully applied for controlling biological cells' attachment on biocompatible polymer material, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The radical microjet has advantages in localized and high-rate surface treatment. Moreover, maskless hydrophilic patterning using SRMJ has been demonstrated to be applicable to patterned cell cultivation which is useful in emerging biotechnological field such as tissue engineering and cell-based biosensors. Since control of PDMS surface properties is an indispensable prerequisite for cells' attachment, effects of oxygen flow rates and treatment time on localized hydrophilic patterning of PDMS surfaces were first investigated for controlling HeLa cells' (human epitheloid carcinoma cell line) attachment. Relationships between surface conditions of treated PDMS films and attached cell density are also discussed based on surface properties analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  15. Myosin II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in three dimensions by minimizing cell-surface curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert S; Myers, Kenneth A; Desai, Ravi A; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S; Adelstein, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-02-01

    In many cases, cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We used endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell-surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell-surface curvature. Using microfabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between regulation of myosin II by curvature and control of curvature by myosin II drives cycles of localized cortical myosin II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration.

  16. Controlling cell adhesion via replication of laser micro/nano-textured surfaces on polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koufaki, Niki; Ranella, Anthi; Barberoglou, Marios; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), 711 10, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Aifantis, Katerina E, E-mail: stratak@iesl.forth.gr [Lab of Mechanics and Materials, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate cell adhesion and viability on highly rough polymeric surfaces with gradient roughness ratios and wettabilities prepared by microreplication of laser micro/nano-textured Si surfaces. Negative replicas on polydimethylsiloxane as well as positive ones on a photocurable (organically modified ceramic) and a biodegradable (poly(lactide-co-glycolide)) polymer have been successfully reproduced. The final culture substrates comprised from forests of micron-sized conical spikes exhibiting a range of roughness ratios and wettabilities, was achieved by changing the laser fluence used to fabricate the original template surfaces. Cell culture experiments were performed with the fibroblast NIH/3T3 and PC12 neuronal cell lines in order to investigate how these surfaces are capable of modulating different types of cellular responses including, viability, adhesion and morphology. The results showed a preferential adhesion of both cell types on the microstructured surfaces compared to the unstructured ones. In particular, the fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells show optimal adhesion for small roughness ratios, independent of the surface wettability and polymer type, indicating a non-monotonic dependence of cell adhesion on surface energy. In contrast, the PC12 cells were observed to adhere well to the patterned surfaces independent of the roughness ratio and wettability. These experimental findings are correlated with micromechanical measurements performed on the unstructured and replicated surfaces and discussed on the basis of previous observations describing the relation of cell response to surface energy and rigidity.

  17. Engineering of silicon surfaces at the micro- and nanoscales for cell adhesion and migration control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Costa V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Torres-Costa1, Gonzalo Martínez-Muñoz2, Vanessa Sánchez-Vaquero3, Álvaro Muñoz-Noval1, Laura González-Méndez3, Esther Punzón-Quijorna1,4, Darío Gallach-Pérez1, Miguel Manso-Silván1, Aurelio Climent-Font1,4, Josefa P García-Ruiz3, Raúl J Martín-Palma11Department of Applied Physics, 2Department of Computer Science, 3Department of Molecular Biology, 4Centre for Micro Analysis of Materials, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The engineering of surface patterns is a powerful tool for analyzing cellular communication factors involved in the processes of adhesion, migration, and expansion, which can have a notable impact on therapeutic applications including tissue engineering. In this regard, the main objective of this research was to fabricate patterned and textured surfaces at micron- and nanoscale levels, respectively, with very different chemical and topographic characteristics to control cell–substrate interactions. For this task, one-dimensional (1-D and two-dimensional (2-D patterns combining silicon and nanostructured porous silicon were engineered by ion beam irradiation and subsequent electrochemical etch. The experimental results show that under the influence of chemical and morphological stimuli, human mesenchymal stem cells polarize and move directionally toward or away from the particular stimulus. Furthermore, a computational model was developed aiming at understanding cell behavior by reproducing the surface distribution and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells observed experimentally.Keywords: surface patterns, silicon, hMSCs, ion-beam patterning

  18. Covalent and stable CuAAC modification of silicon surfaces for control of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vutti, Surendra; Buch-Månson, Nina; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Stable primary functionalization of metal surfaces plays a significant role in reliable secondary attachment of complex functional molecules used for the interfacing of metal objects and nanomaterials with biological systems. In principle, this can be achieved through chemical reactions either......-transfer reaction. Subsequently, D-amino acid adhesion peptides could be immobilized on the surface by use of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. This enabled the study of cell adhesion to the metal surface. In contrast to unmodified surfaces, the peptide-modified surfaces were able to maintain cell adhesion during...

  19. Surface micro- and nano-texturing of stainless steel by femtosecond laser for the control of cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Calderon, M.; Manso-Silván, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Gómez-Aranzadi, M.; García-Ruiz, J. P.; Olaizola, S. M.; Martín-Palma, R. J.

    2016-11-01

    The precise control over the interaction between cells and the surface of materials plays a crucial role in optimizing the integration of implanted biomaterials. In this regard, material surface with controlled topographic features at the micro- and nano-scales has been proved to affect the overall cell behavior and therefore the final osseointegration of implants. Within this context, femtosecond (fs) laser micro/nano machining technology was used in this work to modify the surface structure of stainless steel aiming at controlling cell adhesion and migration. The experimental results show that cells tend to attach and preferentially align to the laser-induced nanopatterns oriented in a specific direction. Accordingly, the laser-based fabrication method here described constitutes a simple, clean, and scalable technique which allows a precise control of the surface nano-patterning process and, subsequently, enables the control of cell adhesion, migration, and polarization. Moreover, since our surface-patterning approach does not involve any chemical treatments and is performed in a single step process, it could in principle be applied to most metallic materials.

  20. Photo-cross-linkable thermoresponsive star polymers designed for control of cell-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangwoo; Cho, Hong Yul; Yoon, Jeong Ae; Kwak, Yungwan; Srinivasan, Abiraman; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Paik, Hyun-jong; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2010-10-11

    Star polymers with thermoresponsive arms, consisting of 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate (MEO₂MA) and oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate with ~4 ethylene oxide units (OEOMA₃₀₀, M(n) = 300), were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). 25% of the arms contained benzophenone chain-end functionality at the star periphery. A mixture of linear poly(MEO₂MA-co-OEOMA₃₀₀)-Br macroinitiators without and with benzophenone end-group macroinitiators were (MI and Bzp-MI, respectively) cross-linked with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate to form star polymers. Formation of star polymers was monitored by GPC, and the presence of benzophenone functionality in the stars was confirmed by ¹H NMR. The UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that the star polymers exhibit the low critical solution temperature (LCST) at 27 °C, slightly lower than LCST of either MI or Bzp-MI. Commercially available tissue culture grade polystyrene surface was modified by depositing a thin film of functionalized stars and UV cross-linking (λ = 365 nm). The star polymers covalently attached onto surfaces allowed a control of cell shrinkage and attachment in response to temperature changes.

  1. Improved accuracy of cell surface shaving proteomics in Staphylococcus aureus using a false-positive control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solis, Nestor; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic treatment of intact bacterial cells is an ideal means for identifying surface-exposed peptide epitopes and has potential for the discovery of novel vaccine targets. Cell stability during such treatment, however, may become compromised and result in the release of intracellular proteins...... that complicate the final analysis. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, causing community and hospital-acquired infections, and is a serious healthcare concern due to the increasing prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistances amongst clinical isolates. We employed a cell surface "shaving" technique...... lysis and were removed from the trypsin-shaved data set. We identified 42 predicted S. aureus COL surface proteins from 260 surface-exposed peptides. Trypsin and proteinase-K digests were highly complementary with ten proteins identified by both, 16 specific to proteinase-K treatment, 13 specific...

  2. Graphite anode surface modification with controlled reduction of specific aryl diazonium salts for improved microbial fuel cells power output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Matthieu; Lapinsonnière, Laure; Rothballer, Michael; Barrière, Frédéric

    2011-10-15

    Graphite electrodes were modified with reduction of aryl diazonium salts and implemented as anodes in microbial fuel cells. First, reduction of 4-aminophenyl diazonium is considered using increased coulombic charge density from 16.5 to 200 mC/cm(2). This procedure introduced aryl amine functionalities at the surface which are neutral at neutral pH. These electrodes were implemented as anodes in "H" type microbial fuel cells inoculated with waste water, acetate as the substrate and using ferricyanide reduction at the cathode and a 1000 Ω external resistance. When the microbial anode had developed, the performances of the microbial fuel cells were measured under acetate saturation conditions and compared with those of control microbial fuel cells having an unmodified graphite anode. We found that the maximum power density of microbial fuel cell first increased as a function of the extent of modification, reaching an optimum after which it decreased for higher degree of surface modification, becoming even less performing than the control microbial fuel cell. Then, the effect of the introduction of charged groups at the surface was investigated at a low degree of surface modification. It was found that negatively charged groups at the surface (carboxylate) decreased microbial fuel cell power output while the introduction of positively charged groups doubled the power output. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the microbial anode modified with positively charged groups was covered by a dense and homogeneous biofilm. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses showed that this biofilm consisted to a large extent of bacteria from the known electroactive Geobacter genus. In summary, the extent of modification of the anode was found to be critical for the microbial fuel cell performance. The nature of the chemical group introduced at the electrode surface was also found to significantly affect the performance of the microbial fuel cells. The method used for

  3. Controlling Gel Structure to Modulate Cell Adhesion and Spreading on the Surface of Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huizhen; Gao, Meng; Ren, Ying; Lou, Ruyun; Xie, Hongguo; Yu, Weiting; Liu, Xiudong; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-08-03

    The surface properties of implanted materials or devices play critical roles in modulating cell behavior. However, the surface properties usually affect cell behaviors synergetically so that it is still difficult to separately investigate the influence of a single property on cell behavior in practical applications. In this study, alginate-chitosan (AC) microcapsules with a dense or loose gel structure were fabricated to understand the effect of gel structure on cell behavior. Cells preferentially adhered and spread on the loose gel structure microcapsules rather than on the dense ones. The two types of microcapsules exhibited nearly identical surface positive charges, roughness, stiffness, and hydrophilicity; thus, the result suggested that the gel structure was the principal factor affecting cell behavior. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the overall percentage of positively charged amino groups was similar on both microcapsules. The different gel structures led to different states and distributions of the positively charged amino groups of chitosan, so we conclude that the loose gel structure facilitated greater cell adhesion and spreading mainly because more protonated amino groups remained unbound and exposed on the surface of these microcapsules.

  4. Tailored topography control of biopolymer surfaces by ultrafast lasers for cell-substrate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusen, L.; Cazan, M.; Mustaciosu, C.; Filipescu, M.; Sandel, S.; Zamfirescu, M.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, the culture surfaces used for in vitro testing must be capable of possessing an improved interface for cell interactions and adhesion. For this reason, the materials used need to have an appropriate chemistry and architecture of its surface, resembling to the extracellular matrix. Within this context, in this work we combined the advantages of natural biopolymer characteristics (chitosan) with the flexibility in surface texturing by ultrafast laser for creating functional microstructured surfaces for cell-substrate in vitro studies. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser irradiation (λ = 775 nm and 387 nm) was used for tailoring surface morphological characteristics of chitosan based films (i.e. polymer “bubbles”, “fingertips” and “sponge-like” structures). These structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The morphology of the structures obtained was correlated with the response of oligodendrocytes cells line. In vitro tests on the patterned surface showed that early cell growth was conditioned by the microtopography and indicate possible uses of the structures in biomedical applications.

  5. Obtaining control of cell surface functionalizations via Pre-targeting and Supramolecular host guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Mark T M; Spa, Silvia J; Welling, Mick M; Ten Hove, Jan Bart; van Willigen, Danny M; Buckle, Tessa; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2017-01-06

    The use of mammalian cells for therapeutic applications is finding its way into modern medicine. However, modification or "training" of cells to make them suitable for a specific application remains complex. By envisioning a chemical toolbox that enables specific, but straight-forward and generic cellular functionalization, we investigated how membrane-receptor (pre)targeting could be combined with supramolecular host-guest interactions based on β-cyclodextrin (CD) and adamantane (Ad). The feasibility of this approach was studied in cells with membranous overexpression of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). By combining specific targeting of CXCR4, using an adamantane (Ad)-functionalized Ac-TZ14011 peptide (guest; KD = 56 nM), with multivalent host molecules that entailed fluorescent β-CD-Poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic-anhydride)-polymers with different fluorescent colors and number of functionalities, host-guest cell-surface modifications could be studied in detail. A second set of Ad-functionalized entities enabled introduction of additional surface functionalities. In addition, the attraction between CD and Ad could be used to drive cell-cell interactions. Combined we have shown that supramolecular interactions, that are based on specific targeting of an overexpressed membrane-receptor, allow specific and stable, yet reversible, surface functionalization of viable cells and how this approach can be used to influence the interaction between cells and their surroundings.

  6. Control of Cross Talk between Angiogenesis and Inflammation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Ocular Surface Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is beneficial in the treatment of ischemic heart disease and peripheral artery disease. However, it facilitates inflammatory cell filtration and inflammation cascade that disrupt the immune and angiogenesis privilege of the avascular cornea, resulting in ocular surface diseases and even vision loss. Although great progress has been achieved, healing of severe ocular surface injury and immunosuppression of corneal transplantation are the most difficult and challenging step in the treatment of ocular surface disorders. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, derived from various adult tissues, are able to differentiate into different cell types such as endothelial cells and fat cells. Although it is still under debate whether MSCs could give rise to functional corneal cells, recent results from different study groups showed that MSCs could improve corneal disease recovery through suppression of inflammation and modulation of immune cells. Thus, MSCs could become a promising tool for ocular surface disorders. In this review, we discussed how angiogenesis and inflammation are orchestrated in the pathogenesis of ocular surface disease. We overviewed and updated the knowledge of MSCs and then summarized the therapeutic potential of MSCs via control of angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune response in the treatment of ocular surface disease.

  7. SEPARATION OF CELL POPULATIONS BY SUPER-PARAMAGNETIC PARTICLES WITH CONTROLLED SURFACE FUNCTIONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lootsik M. D.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The recognition and isolation of specific mammalian cells by the biocompatible polymer coated super-paramagnetic particles with determined surface functionality were studied. The method of synthesis of nanoscaled particles on a core of iron III oxide (Fe2O3, magemit coated with a polymer shell containing reactive oligoperoxide groups for attachment of ligands is described. By using the developed superparamagnetic particles functionalized with peanut agglutinin (PNA we have separated the sub-populations of PNA+ and PNA– cells from ascites of murine Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma. In another type of experiment, the particles were opsonized with proteins of the fetal calf serum that improved biocompatibility of the particles and their ingestion by cultivated murine macrophages J774.2. Macrophages loaded with the particles were effeciently separated from the particles free cells by using the magnet. Thus, the developed surface functionalized superparamagnetic particles showed to be a versatile tool for cell separation independent on the mode of particles’ binding with cell surface or their engulfment by the targeted cells.

  8. Controlled Heterogeneous Stem Cell Differentiation on a Shape Memory Hydrogel Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanjiao; Bai, Tao; Liu, Wenguang

    2014-01-01

    The success of stem cell therapies is highly dependent on the ability to control their programmed differentiation. So far, it is commonly believed that the differentiation behavior of stem cells is supposed to be identical when they are cultured on the same homogeneous platform. However, in this report, we show that this is not always true. By utilizing a double-ion-triggered shape memory effect, the pre-seeded hMSCs were controllably located in different growth positions. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the differentiation behavior of hMSCs is highly sensitive to their growth position on a hydrogel scaffold. This work will not only enrich the mechanisms for controlling the differentiation of stem cells, but also offer a one-of-a-kind platform to achieve a heterogeneously differentiated stem cell-seeded hydrogel scaffold for complex biological applications. PMID:25068211

  9. Controlling cell-material interactions with polymer nanocomposites by use of surface modifying additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole-Warren, L. A.; Farrugia, B.; Fong, N.; Hume, E.; Simmons, A.

    2008-11-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (NC) are fabricated by incorporating well dispersed nanoscale particles within a polymer matrix. This study focuses on elastomeric polyurethane (PU) based nanocomposites, containing organically modified silicates (OMS), as bioactive materials. Nanocomposites incorporating chlorhexidine diacetate as an organic modifier (OM) were demonstrated to be antibacterial with a dose dependence related to both the silicate loading and the loading of OM. When the non-antibacterial OM dodecylamine was used, both cell and platelet adhesion were decreased on the nanocomposite surface. These results suggest that OM is released from the polymer and can impact on cell behaviour at the interface. Nanocomposites have potential use as bioactive materials in a range of biomedical applications.

  10. Programming controlled adhesion of E. coli to target surfaces, cells, and tumors with synthetic adhesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Bodelón, Gustavo; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Cuesta, Angel M; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-04-17

    In this work we report synthetic adhesins (SAs) enabling the rational design of the adhesion properties of E. coli. SAs have a modular structure comprising a stable β-domain for outer membrane anchoring and surface-exposed immunoglobulin domains with high affinity and specificity that can be selected from large repertoires. SAs are constitutively and stably expressed in an E. coli strain lacking a conserved set of natural adhesins, directing a robust, fast, and specific adhesion of bacteria to target antigenic surfaces and cells. We demonstrate the functionality of SAs in vivo, showing that, compared to wild type E. coli, lower doses of engineered E. coli are sufficient to colonize solid tumors expressing an antigen recognized by the SA. In addition, lower levels of engineered bacteria were found in non-target tissues. Therefore, SAs provide stable and specific adhesion capabilities to E. coli against target surfaces of interest for diverse applications using live bacteria.

  11. Cytomegalovirus m154 hinders CD48 cell-surface expression and promotes viral escape from host natural killer cell control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Zarama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Receptors of the signalling lymphocyte-activation molecules (SLAM family are involved in the functional regulation of a variety of immune cells upon engagement through homotypic or heterotypic interactions amongst them. Here we show that murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV dampens the surface expression of several SLAM receptors during the course of the infection of macrophages. By screening a panel of MCMV deletion mutants, we identified m154 as an immunoevasin that effectively reduces the cell-surface expression of the SLAM family member CD48, a high-affinity ligand for natural killer (NK and cytotoxic T cell receptor CD244. m154 is a mucin-like protein, expressed with early kinetics, which can be found at the cell surface of the infected cell. During infection, m154 leads to proteolytic degradation of CD48. This viral protein interferes with the NK cell cytotoxicity triggered by MCMV-infected macrophages. In addition, we demonstrate that an MCMV mutant virus lacking m154 expression results in an attenuated phenotype in vivo, which can be substantially restored after NK cell depletion in mice. This is the first description of a viral gene capable of downregulating CD48. Our novel findings define m154 as an important player in MCMV innate immune regulation.

  12. An efficient surface modification using 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine to control cell attachment via photochemical reaction in a microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kihoon; Sato, Kae; Tanaka, Yo; Xu, Yan; Sato, Moritoshi; Nakajima, Takahiro; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2010-08-07

    This report describes a direct approach for cell micropatterning in a closed glass microchannel. To control the cell adhesiveness inside the microchannel, the application of an external stimulus such as ultraviolet (UV) was indispensible. This technique focused on the use of a modified 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer, which is known to be a non-biofouling compound that is a photocleavable linker (PL), to localize cells via connection to an amino-terminated silanized surface. Using UV light illumination, the MPC polymer was selectively eliminated by photochemical reaction that controlled the cell attachment inside the microchannel. For suitable cell micropatterning in a microchannel, the optimal UV illumination time and concentration for cell suspension were investigated. After selective removal of the MPC polymer through the photomask, MC-3T3 E1 cells and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) were localized only to the UV-exposed area. In addition, the stability of patterned ECs was also confirmed by culturing for 2 weeks in a microchannel under flow conditions. Furthermore, we employed two different types of cells inside the same microchannel through multiple removal of the MPC polymer. ECs and Piccells were localized in both the upper and down streams of the microchannel, respectively. When the ECs were stimulated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP), NO was secreted from the ECs and could be detected by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in Piccells, which is a cell-based NO indicator. This technique can be a powerful tool for analyzing cell interaction research.

  13. Annexin A8 controls leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells via cell surface delivery of CD63

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeter, Michaela; Brandherm, Ines; Rossaint, Jan; Rosso, Gonzalo; Shahin, Victor; Skryabin, Boris V.; Zarbock, Alexander; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2014-04-01

    To enable leukocyte adhesion to activated endothelium, the leukocyte receptor P-selectin is released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB) to the endothelial cell surface where it is stabilized by CD63. Here we report that loss of annexin A8 (anxA8) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) strongly decreases cell surface presentation of CD63 and P-selectin, with a concomitant reduction in leukocyte rolling and adhesion. We confirm the compromised leukocyte adhesiveness in inflammatory-activated endothelial venules of anxA8-deficient mice. We find that WPB of anxA8-deficient HUVEC contain less CD63, and that this is caused by improper transport of CD63 from late multivesicular endosomes to WPB, with CD63 being retained in intraluminal vesicles. Consequently, reduced CD63 cell surface levels are seen following WPB exocytosis, resulting in enhanced P-selectin re-internalization. Our data support a model in which anxA8 affects leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells by supplying WPB with sufficient amounts of the P-selectin regulator CD63.

  14. Polymorphisms of the cell surface receptor control mouse susceptibilities to xenotropic and polytropic leukemia viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, M; Tailor, C S; Nouri, A; Kozak, S L; Kabat, D

    1999-11-01

    The differential susceptibilities of mouse strains to xenotropic and polytropic murine leukemia viruses (X-MLVs and P-MLVs, respectively) are poorly understood but may involve multiple mechanisms. Recent evidence has demonstrated that these viruses use a common cell surface receptor (the X-receptor) for infection of human cells. We describe the properties of X-receptor cDNAs with distinct sequences cloned from five laboratory and wild strains of mice and from hamsters and minks. Expression of these cDNAs in resistant cells conferred susceptibilities to the same viruses that naturally infect the animals from which the cDNAs were derived. Thus, a laboratory mouse (NIH Swiss) X-receptor conferred susceptibility to P-MLVs but not to X-MLVs, whereas those from humans, minks, and several wild mice (Mus dunni, SC-1 cells, and Mus spretus) mediated infections by both X-MLVs and P-MLVs. In contrast, X-receptors from the resistant mouse strain Mus castaneus and from hamsters were inactive as viral receptors. These results suggest that X-receptor polymorphisms are a primary cause of resistances of mice to members of the X-MLV/P-MLV family of retroviruses and are responsible for the xenotropism of X-MLVs in laboratory mice. By site-directed mutagenesis, we substituted sequences between the X-receptors of M. dunni and NIH Swiss mice. The NIH Swiss protein contains two key differences (K500E in presumptive extracellular loop 3 [ECL 3] and a T582 deletion in ECL 4) that are both required to block X-MLV infections. Accordingly, a single inverse mutation in the NIH Swiss protein conferred X-MLV susceptibility. Furthermore, expression of an X-MLV envelope glycoprotein in Chinese hamster ovary cells interfered efficiently with X-MLV and P-MLV infections mediated by X-receptors that contained K500 and/or T582 but had no effect on P-MLV infections mediated by X-receptors that lacked these amino acids. In contrast, moderate expression of a P-MLV (MCF247) envelope glycoprotein did not

  15. Laser- and UV-assisted modification of polystyrene surfaces for control of protein adsorption and cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleging, Wilhelm; Torge, Maika; Bruns, Michael; Trouillet, Vanessa; Welle, Alexander; Wilson, Sandra

    2009-03-01

    An appropriate choice of laser and process parameters enables new approaches for the fabrication of polymeric lab-on-chip devices with integrated functionalities. We will present our current research results in laser-assisted modification of polystyrene (PS) with respect to the fabrication of polymer devices for cell culture applications. For this purpose laser micro-patterning of PS and subsequent surface functionalization was investigated as function of laser and process parameters. A high power ArF-excimer laser radiation source with a pulse length of 19 ns as well as a high repetition ArF-excimer laser source with a pulse length of 5 ns were used in order to study the influence of laser pulse length on laser-induced surface oxidation. The change in surface chemistry was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The difference between laser-assisted modification versus UV-lamp assisted modification was investigated. A photolytic activation of specific areas of the polymer surface and subsequent oxidization in oxygen or ambient air leads to a chemically modified polymer surface bearing carboxylic acid groups well-suited for controlled competitive protein adsorption or protein immobilization. Finally, distinct areas for cell growth and adhesion are obtained.

  16. Controlled surface morphology and hydrophilicity of polycaprolactone toward selective differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to neural like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, Hoda; Jalilian, Farid Azizi; Wu, Chia-Yu; Kaviani, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Abassi, Naghmeh; Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neuron cells has great potential in therapy of damaged nerve tissue. It has been shown that three-dimensional biomaterials have great ability to up regulate the expression of neuronal proteins. In this study, O2 plasma technology was used to enhance hydrophilicity of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) toward selective differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. Random and aligned PCL nanofibers scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning method and their physicochemical and mechanical properties were carried out by scanning electron microscope (SEM), contact angle, and tensile measurements. Contact angle studies of PCL and plasma treated PCL (p-PCL) nanofibers revealed significant change on the surface properties PCL nanofibers from the view point of hydrophilicity. Physiochemical studies revealed that p-PCL nanofibers were extremely hydrophilic compared with untreated PCL nanofibers which were highly hydrophobic and nonabsorbent to water. Differentiation of MSCs were carried out by inducing growth factors including basic fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, and brain derived growth factor, NT3, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 media. Differentiated MSCs on nanofibrous scaffold were examined by immunofluorescence assay and was found to express the neuronal proteins; β-tubulin III and Map2, on day 15 after cell culture. The real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that p-PCL nanofibrous scaffold could upregulate expression of Map-2 and downregulate expression of Nestin genes in nerve cells differentiated from MSCs. This study indicates that mesenchymal stem cell cultured on nanofibrous scaffold have potential differentiation to neuronal cells on and could apply in nerve tissue repair.

  17. A c-di-GMP effector system controls cell adhesion by inside-out signaling and surface protein cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Newell

    Full Text Available In Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 the availability of inorganic phosphate (Pi is an environmental signal that controls biofilm formation through a cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In low Pi conditions, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE RapA is expressed, depleting cellular c-di-GMP and causing the loss of a critical outer-membrane adhesin LapA from the cell surface. This response involves an inner membrane protein LapD, which binds c-di-GMP in the cytoplasm and exerts a periplasmic output promoting LapA maintenance on the cell surface. Here we report how LapD differentially controls maintenance and release of LapA: c-di-GMP binding to LapD promotes interaction with and inhibition of the periplasmic protease LapG, which targets the N-terminus of LapA. We identify conserved amino acids in LapA required for cleavage by LapG. Mutating these residues in chromosomal lapA inhibits LapG activity in vivo, leading to retention of the adhesin on the cell surface. Mutations with defined effects on LapD's ability to control LapA localization in vivo show concomitant effects on c-di-GMP-dependent LapG inhibition in vitro. To establish the physiological importance of the LapD-LapG effector system, we track cell attachment and LapA protein localization during Pi starvation. Under this condition, the LapA adhesin is released from the surface of cells and biofilms detach from the substratum. This response requires c-di-GMP depletion by RapA, signaling through LapD, and proteolytic cleavage of LapA by LapG. These data, in combination with the companion study by Navarro et al. presenting a structural analysis of LapD's signaling mechanism, give a detailed description of a complete c-di-GMP control circuit--from environmental signal to molecular output. They describe a novel paradigm in bacterial signal transduction: regulation of a periplasmic enzyme by an inner membrane signaling protein that binds a cytoplasmic second messenger.

  18. Control of back surface reflectance from aluminum alloyed contacts on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cudzinovic, M.; Sopori, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A process for forming highly reflective aluminum back contacts with low contact resistance to silicon solar cells is described. By controlling the process conditions, it is possible to vary the silicon/aluminum interface from a specular to a diffuse reflector while maintaining a high interface reflectance. The specular interface is found to be a uniform silicon/aluminum alloy layer a few angstroms thick that has epitaxially regrown on the silicon. The diffuse interface consists of randomly distributed (111) pyramids produced by crystallographic out-diffusion of the bulk silicon. The light trapping ability of the diffuse contact is found to be close to the theoretical limit. Both types of contacts are found to have specific contact resistivities of 10{sup {minus}5} {Omega}-cm{sup 2}. The process for forming the contacts involves illuminating the devices with tungsten halogen lamps. The process is rapid (under 100 s) and low temperature (peak temperature < 580{degrees}C), making it favorable for commercial solar cell fabrication.

  19. Controlling Cell Functions and Fate with Surfaces and Hydrogels: The Role of Material Features in Cell Adhesion and Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Ventre

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In their natural environment, cells are constantly exposed to a cohort of biochemical and biophysical signals that govern their functions and fate. Therefore, materials for biomedical applications, either in vivo or in vitro, should provide a replica of the complex patterns of biological signals. Thus, the development of a novel class of biomaterials requires, on the one side, the understanding of the dynamic interactions occurring at the interface of cells and materials; on the other, it requires the development of technologies able to integrate multiple signals precisely organized in time and space. A large body of studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms underpinning cell-material interactions is mostly based on 2D systems. While these have been instrumental in shaping our understanding of the recognition of and reaction to material stimuli, they lack the ability to capture central features of the natural cellular environment, such as dimensionality, remodelling and degradability. In this work, we review the fundamental traits of material signal sensing and cell response. We then present relevant technologies and materials that enable fabricating systems able to control various aspects of cell behavior, and we highlight potential differences that arise from 2D and 3D settings.

  20. Improvement to thin film CdTe solar cells with controlled back surface oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Rugen-Hankey, S.L.; Clayton, Andrew J; Barrioz, Vincent; Kartopu, Giray; Irvine, Stuart J; McGettrick, J.D.; Hammond, D.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film CdTe solar cells were produced by MOCVD, at atmospheric pressure, under a hydrogen atmosphere (i.e. oxygen-free). Window layer alloying with zinc (forming Cd1−xZnxS) and extrinsic p-type doping with arsenic (giving CdTe:As) have been used to improve photovoltaic solar cell performances, but as-grown MOCVD-CdTe PV cells are still typically characterised by low Voc (~620–690 mV). Post-deposition annealing in air for 30 min at low temperature (170 °C) prior to evaporation of the back c...

  1. Controlled lecithin release from a hierarchical architecture on blood-contacting surface to reduce hemolysis of stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiang; Fan, Qunfu; Ye, Wei; Hou, Jianwen; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-06-25

    Hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs) caused by implant devices in vivo and nonpolyvinyl chloride containers for RBC preservation in vitro has recently gained much attention. To develop blood-contacting biomaterials with long-term antihemolysis capability, we present a facile method to construct a hydrophilic, 3D hierarchical architecture on the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/lecithin nano/microfibers. The strategy is based on electrospinning of PEO/lecithin fibers onto the surface of poly [poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] [P(PEGMEMA)]-modified SEBS, which renders SEBS suitable for RBC storage in vitro. We demonstrate that the constructed 3D architecture is composed of hydrophilic micro- and nanofibers, which transforms to hydrogel networks immediately in blood; the controlled release of lecithin is achieved by gradual dissolution of PEO/lecithin hydrogels, and the interaction of lecithin with RBCs maintains the membrane flexibility and normal RBC shape. Thus, the blood-contacting surface reduces both mechanical and oxidative damage to RBC membranes, resulting in low hemolysis of preserved RBCs. This work not only paves new way to fabricate high hemocompatible biomaterials for RBC storage in vitro, but provides basic principles to design and develop antihemolysis biomaterials for implantation in vivo.

  2. Extracellular pH dynamically controls cell surface delivery of functional TRPV5 channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers, T.T.; Oancea, E.; Groot, T. de; Topala, C.N.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Extracellular pH has long been known to affect the rate and magnitude of ion transport processes among others via regulation of ion channel activity. The Ca(2+)-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) channel constitutes the apical entry gate in Ca(2+)-transporting cells, contribu

  3. Response Surfaces for Key Controlled Variables in a Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, William G; Banta, Larry; Gorrell, Megan; Restrepo, Bernardo; Tucker, David

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid generation systems have been extensively modeled as a first step toward the development of automatic controls for the system. In most cases, it is impossible to validate mathematical models against real hardware because only a handful of hardware systems exist in the world. Data taken from the existing hardware has demonstrated significant nonlinearity, complex coupling between controlled variables, and sometimes non-intuitive behavior. This work exploits the capability of the HyPer hardware test bed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to generate data from a real recuperated gas turbine coupled with hardware simulations of a fuel cell cathode and appropriate ancillary equipment. Prior work has characterized the system only over a limited range of its operating envelope, due to the inability to manipulate multiple control inputs simultaneously. The work presented here fills the gaps using data from a 34 factorial experiment to generate quasi-continuous response surfaces describing the operating state space of the HyPer system. Polynomial correlation functions have been fitted to the data with excellent agreement. Relationships between the control inputs and critical state variables such as cathode mass flow, cathode temperature, turbine inlet and exhaust temperatures and other key system parameters are presented.

  4. Ubiquitin ligase MARCH 8 cooperates with CD83 to control surface MHC II expression in thymic epithelium and CD4 T cell selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyin; Jain, Reema; Guan, Jing; Vuong, Vivian; Ishido, Satoshi; La Gruta, Nicole L; Gray, Daniel H; Villadangos, Jose A; Mintern, Justine D

    2016-08-22

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression is tightly regulated, being subjected to cell type-specific mechanisms that closely control its levels at the cell surface. Ubiquitination by the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH 1 regulates MHC II expression in dendritic cells and B cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the related ligase MARCH 8 is responsible for regulating surface MHC II in thymic epithelial cells (TECs). March8(-/-) mice have elevated MHC II at the surface of cortical TECs and autoimmune regulator (AIRE)(-) medullary TECs (mTECs), but not AIRE(+) mTECs. Despite this, thymic and splenic CD4(+) T cell numbers and repertoires remained unaltered in March8(-/-) mice. Notably, the ubiquitination of MHC II by MARCH 8 is controlled by CD83. Mice expressing a mutated form of CD83 (Cd83(anu/anu) mice) have impaired CD4(+) T cell selection, but deleting March8 in Cd83(anu/anu) mice restored CD4(+) T cell selection to normal levels. Therefore, orchestrated regulation of MHC II surface expression in TECs by MARCH 8 and CD83 plays a major role in CD4(+) T cell selection. Our results also highlight the specialized use of ubiquitinating machinery in distinct antigen-presenting cell types, with important functional consequences and implications for therapeutic manipulation.

  5. Cell Shaving and False-Positive Control Strategies Coupled to Novel Statistical Tools to Profile Gram-Positive Bacterial Surface Proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    A powerful start to the discovery and design of novel vaccines, and for better understanding of host-pathogen interactions, is to profile bacterial surfaces using the proteolytic digestion of surface-exposed proteins under mild conditions. This "cell shaving" approach has the benefit of both identifying surface proteins and their surface-exposed epitopes, which are those most likely to interact with host cells and/or the immune system, providing a comprehensive overview of bacterial cell topography. An essential requirement for successful cell shaving is to account for (or minimize) cellular lysis that can occur during the shaving procedure and thus generate data that is biased towards non-surface (e.g., cytoplasmic) proteins. This is further complicated by the presence of "moonlighting" proteins, which are proteins predicted to be intracellular but with validated surface or extracellular functions. Here, we describe an optimized cell shaving protocol for Gram-positive bacteria that uses proteolytic digestion and a "false-positive" control to reduce the number of intracellular contaminants in these datasets. Released surface-exposed peptides are analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Additionally, the probabilities of proteins being surface exposed can be further calculated by applying novel statistical tools.

  6. Patterned porous silicon photonic crystals with modular surface chemistry for spatial control of neural stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tiffany H.; Pei, Yi; Zhang, Douglas; Li, Yanfen; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a strategy to spatially define regions of gold and nanostructured silicon photonics, each with materials-specific surface chemistry, for azide-alkyne cycloaddition of different bioactive peptides. Neural stem cells are spatially directed to undergo neurogenesis and astrogenesis as a function of both surface properties and peptide identity.We present a strategy to spatially define regions of gold and nanostructured silicon photonics, each with materials-specific surface chemistry, for azide-alkyne cycloaddition of different bioactive peptides. Neural stem cells are spatially directed to undergo neurogenesis and astrogenesis as a function of both surface properties and peptide identity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08327c

  7. ER-mitochondria contacts control surface glycan expression and sensitivity to killer lymphocytes in glioma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Kasahara, Atsuko; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Boydell, Emma; Zamorano, Sebastian; Riccadonna, Cristina; Pellegatta, Serena; Hulo, Nicolas; Dutoit, Valérie; Derouazi, Madiha; Dietrich, Pierre Yves; Walker, Paul R; Martinvalet, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly heterogeneous aggressive primary brain tumor, with the glioma stem-like cells (GSC) being more sensitive to cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing than glioma differentiated cells (GDC). However, the mechanism behind this higher sensitivity is unclear. Here, we found that the mitochondrial morphology of GSCs modulates the ER-mitochondria contacts that regulate the surface expression of sialylated glycans and their recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. GSCs displayed diminished ER-mitochondria contacts compared to GDCs. Forced ER-mitochondria contacts in GSCs increased their cell surface expression of sialylated glycans and reduced their susceptibility to cytotoxic lymphocytes. Therefore, mitochondrial morphology and dynamism dictate the ER-mitochondria contacts in order to regulate the surface expression of certain glycans and thus play a role in GSC recognition and elimination by immune effector cells. Targeting the mitochondrial morphology, dynamism, and contacts with the ER could be an innovative strategy to deplete the cancer stem cell compartment to successfully treat glioblastoma. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Programming Surface Chemistry with Engineered Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruihua; Heyde, Keith C; Scott, Felicia Y; Paek, Sung-Ho; Ruder, Warren C

    2016-09-16

    We have developed synthetic gene networks that enable engineered cells to selectively program surface chemistry. E. coli were engineered to upregulate biotin synthase, and therefore biotin synthesis, upon biochemical induction. Additionally, two different functionalized surfaces were developed that utilized binding between biotin and streptavidin to regulate enzyme assembly on programmable surfaces. When combined, the interactions between engineered cells and surfaces demonstrated that synthetic biology can be used to engineer cells that selectively control and modify molecular assembly by exploiting surface chemistry. Our system is highly modular and has the potential to influence fields ranging from tissue engineering to drug development and delivery.

  9. Micro- and nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces for controlled vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, Cenk, E-mail: cenk.aktas@inm-gmbh.de [INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Division, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Doerrschuck, Eva; Schuh, Cathrin [Clinic of Paediatric Cardiology, Saarland University, Building 9, 66424 Homburg (Germany); Miro, Marina Martinez; Lee, Juseok [INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Division, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Puetz, Norbert; Wennemuth, Gunther [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Saarland University, Building 61, 66424 Homburg (Germany); Metzger, Wolfgang; Oberringer, Martin [Department of Trauma-, Hand- and Reconstructive Surgery, Saarland University, Building 57, 66424 Homburg (Germany); Veith, Michael [INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials, CVD/Biosurfaces Division, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Saarland, Building C 4 1, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim [Clinic of Paediatric Cardiology, Saarland University, Building 9, 66424 Homburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the micro- and nanotopography on vascular cell-surface interaction is investigated using nano- and microstructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as model substrate. Two different nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces composed of low density (LD) and high density (HD) nanowires (NWs) were synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and commercially available microstructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} plates were used for comparison. A clear diverging response of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMC) was observed on these nano- and microstructured surfaces. LD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NWs seem to enhance the proliferation of HUVECs selectively. This selective control of the cell-surface interaction by topography may represent a key issue for the future stent material design. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured alumina surfaces triggers selective adhesion and proliferation of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalyst free synthesis of nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topography induces selective cell response.

  10. Controlling Cell Function with Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrksich, Milan

    2012-02-01

    This presentation will describe the use of patterned substrates to control cell shape with examples that illustrate the ways in which cell shape can regulate cell function. Most cells are adherent and must attach to and spread on a surface in order to survive, proliferate and function. In tissue, this surface is the extracellular matrix (ECM), an insoluble scaffold formed by the assembly of several large proteins---including fibronectin, the laminins and collagens and others---but in the laboratory, the surface is prepared by adsorbing protein to glass slides. To pattern cells, gold-coated slides are patterned with microcontact printing to create geometric features that promote cell attachment and that are surrounded by inert regions. Cells attach to these substrates and spread to adopt the shape defined by the underlying pattern and remain stable in culture for several days. Examples will be described that used a series of shapes to reveal the relationship between the shape of the cell and the structure of its cytoskeleton. These geometric cues were used to control cell polarity and the tension, or contractility, present in the cytoskeleton. These rules were further used to control the shapes of mesenchymal stem cells and in turn to control the differentiation of these cells into specialized cell types. For example, stem cells that were patterned into a ``star'' shape preferentially differentiated into bone cells whereas those that were patterned into a ``flower'' shape preferred a fat cell fate. These influences of shape on differentiation depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. These examples, and others, reveal that shape is an important cue that informs cell function and that can be combined with the more common soluble cues to direct and study cell function.

  11. Cell control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This extensive report provides an essential overview of cells and their use as factory automation building blocks. The following issues are discussed in depth: Cell integration Cell software and standards Future technologies applied to cells Plus Cell control applications including: - rotary parts manufacturing - diesel engine component development - general cell control development at the General Electric Corporation - a vendor list.

  12. Cell surface engineering of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Zhao, Weian; Gupta, Ashish; Loh, Wei Li; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging the capacity to promote regeneration, stem cell therapies offer enormous hope for solving some of the most tragic illnesses, diseases, and tissue defects world-wide. However, a significant barrier to the effective implementation of cell therapies is the inability to target a large quantity of viable cells with high efficiency to tissues of interest. Systemic infusion is desired as it minimizes the invasiveness of cell therapy, and maximizes practical aspects of repeated doses. However, cell types such as mesenchymal stem cells exhibit a poor homing capability or lose their capacity to home following culture expansion (i.e. FASEB J 21:3197-3207, 2007; Circulation 108:863-868, 2003; Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation 32:1005-1011; Blood 104:3581-3587, 2004). To address this challenge, we have developed a simple platform technology to chemically attach cell adhesion molecules to the cell surface to improve the homing efficiency to specific tissues. This chemical approach involves a stepwise process including (1) treatment of cells with sulfonated biotinyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide to introduce biotin groups on the cell surface, (2) addition of streptavidin that binds to the biotin on the cell surface and presents unoccupied binding sites, and (3) attachment of biotinylated targeting ligands that promote adhesive interactions with vascular endothelium. Specifically, in our model system, a biotinylated cell rolling ligand, sialyl Lewisx (SLeX), found on the surface of leukocytes (i.e., the active site of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL-1)), is conjugated on MSC surface. The SLeX engineered MSCs exhibit a rolling response on a P-selectin coated substrate under shear stress conditions. This indicates that this approach can be used to potentially target P-selectin expressing endothelium in the more marrow or at sites of inflammation. Importantly, the surface modification has no adverse impact on MSCs' native phenotype including their multilineage

  13. Different roles of cell surface and exogenous glycosaminoglycans in controlling gene delivery by arginine-rich peptides with varied distribution of arginines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rangeetha J; Chatterjee, Anindo; Ganguli, Munia

    2013-06-01

    The role of cell surface and exogenous glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in DNA delivery by cationic peptides is controlled to a large extent by the peptide chemistry and the nature of its complex with DNA. We have previously shown that complexes formed by arginine homopeptides with DNA adopt a GAG-independent cellular internalization mechanism and show enhanced gene delivery in presence of exogenous GAGs. In contrast, lysine complexes gain cellular entry primarily by a GAG-dependent pathway and are destabilized by exogenous GAGs. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the factors governing the role of cell surface and soluble glycosaminoglycans in DNA delivery by sequences of arginine-rich peptides with altered arginine distributions (compared to homopeptide). Using peptides with clustered arginines which constitute known heparin-binding motifs and a control peptide with arginines alternating with alanines, we show that complexes formed by these peptides do not require cell surface GAGs for cellular uptake and DNA delivery. However, the charge distribution and the spacing of arginine residues affects DNA delivery efficiency of these peptides in presence of soluble GAGs, since these peptides show only a marginal increase in transfection in presence of exogenous GAGs unlike that observed with arginine homopeptides. Our results indicate that presence of arginine by itself drives these peptides to a cell surface GAG-independent route of entry to efficiently deliver functional DNA into cells in vitro. However, the inherent stability of the complexes differ when the distribution of arginines in the peptides is altered, thereby modulating its interaction with exogenous GAGs.

  14. Cell behaviour on chemically microstructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnani, Agnese; Priamo, Alfredo; Pasqui, Daniela; Barbucci, Rolando

    2003-03-03

    Micropatterned surfaces with different chemical topographies were synthesised in order to investigate the influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell behaviour. The microstructured materials were synthesised by photoimmobilising natural Hyaluronan (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS), both adequately functionalised with a photorective moiety, on glass substrates. Four different grating patterns (10, 25, 50 and 100 {mu}m) were used to pattern the hyaluronan. The micropatterned samples were analysed by Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate the chemistry and the topography of the surfaces. The spectroscopic and microscopic analysis of the microstructured surfaces revealed that the photoimmobilisation process was successful, demonstrating that the photomask patterns were well reproduced on the sample surface. The influence of chemical topographies on the cell behaviour was then analysed. Human and 3T3 fibroblasts, bovine aortic and human (HGTFN line) endothelial cells were used and their behaviour on the micropatterned surfaces was analysed in terms of adhesion, proliferation, locomotion and orientation. Both chemical and topographical controls were found to be important for cell guidance. By decreasing the stripe dimensions, a more fusiform shape of cell was observed. At the same time, the cell locomotion and orientation parallel to the structure increased. However, differences in cell behaviour were detected according to both cell type and micropattern dimensions.

  15. The Plant Cell Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne-Mie C.Emons; Kurt V.Fagerstedt

    2010-01-01

    @@ Multicellular organization and tissue construction has evolved along essentially different lines in plants and animals. Since plants do not run away, but are anchored in the soil, their tissues are more or less firm and stiff. This strength stems from the cell walls, which encase the fragile cytoplasm, and protect it.

  16. Analysis of Calcium Transients and Uniaxial Contraction Force in Single Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes on Microstructured Elastic Substrate with Spatially Controlled Surface Chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grespan, Eleonora; Martewicz, Sebastian; Serena, Elena; Le Houerou, Vincent; Rühe, Jürgen; Elvassore, Nicola

    2016-11-22

    The mechanical activity of cardiomyocytes is the result of a process called excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). A membrane depolarization wave induces a transient cytosolic calcium concentration increase that triggers activation of calcium-sensitive contractile proteins, leading to cell contraction and force generation. An experimental setup capable of acquiring simultaneously all ECC features would have an enormous impact on cardiac drug development and disease study. In this work, we develop a microengineered elastomeric substrate with tailor-made surface chemistry to measure simultaneously the uniaxial contraction force and the calcium transients generated by single human cardiomyocytes in vitro. Microreplication followed by photocuring is used to generate an array consisting of elastomeric micropillars. A second photochemical process is employed to spatially control the surface chemistry of the elastomeric pillar. As result, human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can be confined in rectangular cell-adhesive areas, which induce cell elongation and promote suspended cell anchoring between two adjacent micropillars. In this end-to-end conformation, confocal fluorescence microscopy allows simultaneous detection of calcium transients and micropillar deflection induced by a single-cell uniaxial contraction force. Computational finite elements modeling (FEM) and 3D reconstruction of the cell-pillar interface allow force quantification. The platform is used to follow calcium dynamics and contraction force evolution in hESC-CMs cultures over the course of several weeks. Our results show how a biomaterial-based platform can be a versatile tool for in vitro assaying of cardiac functional properties of single-cell human cardiomyocytes, with applications in both in vitro developmental studies and drug screening on cardiac cultures.

  17. On orbit surfacing of thermal control surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Substrates to be contaminated and contamination source were prepared. Additional information on paint spray method apparatus was obtained. Silver teflon second surface mirror samples and S 13 GLO paint samples were mounted, photographed under the microscope and measured to establish baseline data. Atomic oxygen cleaning and spray painting are being considered. Electrostatic powder and plasma spray coating systems appear to have serious drawbacks.

  18. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process....... It facilitates the understanding of the task and structure of cell controllers and uses this knowledge directly in the implementation of the system. By applying generic models CCE facilitates reuse of software components and maintenance of applications. In many enterprises, software makes up an increasing part...

  19. Crystal structures of CaSiO3 polymorphs control growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on bioceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianli; Molenda, James A; Mankoci, Steven; Zhou, Xianfeng; Murphy, William L; Sahai, Nita

    2013-10-01

    The repair and replacement of damaged or diseased human bone tissue requires a stable interface between the orthopedic implant and living tissue. The ideal material should be both osteoconductive (promote bonding to bone) and osteoinductive (induce osteogenic differentiation of cells and generate new bone). Partially resorbable bioceramic materials with both properties are developed by expensive trial-and-error methods. Structure-reactivity relationships for predicting the osteoinductive properties of ceramics would significantly increase the efficiency of developing materials for bone tissue engineering. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that the crystal structure of a bioceramic controls the release rates, subsequent surface modifications due to precipitation of new phases, and thus, the concentrations of soluble factors, and ultimately, the attachment, viability and osteogenic differentiation of human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs). To illustrate our hypothesis, we used two CaSiO3 polymorphs, pseudo-wollastonite (psw, β-CaSiO3) and wollastonite (wol, α-CaSiO3) as scaffolds for hMSC culture. Polymorphs are materials which have identical chemical composition and stoichiometry, but different crystal structures. We combined the results of detailed surface characterizations, including environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) back-scattered imaging, and spot-analysis and 2D elemental mapping by SEM-Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and surface roughness analysis; culture medium solution analyses; and molecular/genetic assays from cell culture. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that the psw polymorph, which has a strained silicate ring structure, is more osteoinductive than the wol polymorph, which has a more stable, open silicate chain structure. The observations could be attributed to easier dissolution (resorption) of psw compared to wol, which resulted in concentration profiles that were more

  20. Photosensitive chitosan to control cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nan; Cao, Xudong

    2011-09-01

    An approach to control cell adhesion using a photocleavable molecule on chitosan has been developed and studied. Photocleavable 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl chloroformate (NVOC) was introduced into chitosan to control the surface properties. The two UV illuminations with a photomask controlled the cleavage of NVOC and the presentation of deprotected amines on one chitosan surface spatially and temporally. The following immobilizations of cell repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) after the first illumination and cell adhesive sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) after the second illumination on the surface helped create surface heterogeneity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), water contact angle, and UV-visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the surfaces and photoactivation during the process. To study the cell attachment and morphology on our designed surfaces, NIH/3T3 fibroblast cell was used. Cell number and morphology on the surfaces were investigated. The cell study demonstrated the feasibility of the surfaces on the control of cell adhesion and the formation of cell patterns by UV illuminations and the following immobilizations of different biomolecules. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Patterned hybrid nanohole array surfaces for cell adhesion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Nathan P; Lou, Yi; Muth, John F; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2009-10-06

    We report the fabrication of hybrid nanohole array surfaces to study the role of the surface nanoevironment on cell adhesion and cell migration. We use polystyrene beads and reactive ion etching to control the size and the spacing between nanoholes on a tailored self-assembled monolayer inert gold surface. The arrays were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and brightfield microscopy. For cell adhesion studies, cells were seeded to these substrates to study the effect of ligand spacing on cell spreading, stress fiber formation, and focal adhesion structure and size. Finally, comparative cell migration rates were examined on the various nanohole array surfaces using time-lapse microscopy.

  2. Cell surface engineering with edible protein nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachuk, Irina; Shchepelina, Olga; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Stone, Morley; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-09-23

    Natural protein (silk fibroin) nanoshells are assembled on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells without compromising their viability. The nanoshells facilitate initial protection of the cells and allow them to function in encapsulated state for some time period, afterwards being completely biodegraded and consumed by the cells. In contrast to a traditional methanol treatment, the gentle ionic treatment suggested here stabilizes the shell silk fibroin structure but does not compromise the viability of the cells, as indicated by the fast response of the encapsulated cells, with an immediate activation by the inducer molecules. Extremely high viability rates (up to 97%) and preserved activity of encapsulated cells are facilitated by cytocompatibility of the natural proteins and the formation of highly porous shells in contrast to traditional polyelectrolyte-based materials. Moreover, in a high contrast to traditional synthetic shells, the silk proteins are biodegradable and can be consumed by cells at a later stage of growth, thus releasing the cells from their temporary protective capsules. These on-demand encapsulated cells can be considered a valuable platform for biocompatible and biodegradable cell encapsulation, controlled cell protection in a synthetic environment, transfer to a device environment, and cell implantation followed by biodegradation and consumption of protective protein shells.

  3. Femtosecond fabricated surfaces for cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Daniel; Gu, Min

    2010-08-01

    Microfabrication using femtosecond pulse lasers is enabling access to a range of structures, surfaces and materials that was not previously available for scientific and engineering applications. The ability to produce micrometre sized features directly in polymer and metal substrates is demonstrated with applications in cell biology. The size, shape and aspect ratio of the etched features can be precisely controlled through the manipulation of the fluence of the laser etching process with respect to the properties of the target material. Femtosecond laser etching of poly(methyl methacrylate) and aluminium substrates has enabled the production of micrometre resolution moulds that can be accurately replicated using soft lithography. The moulded surfaces are used in the imaging of T cells and demonstrate the improved ability to observe biological events over time periods greater than 10 h. These results indicate the great potential femtosecond pulse lasers may have in the future manufacturing of microstructured surfaces and devices.

  4. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, I.; Schasfoort, R.B.M.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on th

  5. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on th

  6. Process for control of cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, C. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method of controlling mitosis of biological cells was developed, which involved inducing a change in the intracellular ionic hierarchy accompanying the cellular electrical transmembrane potential difference (Esubm) of the cells. The ionic hierarchy may be varied by imposing changes on the relative concentrations of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-), or by directly imposing changes in the physical Esubm level across the cell surface.

  7. Nanofabrication of Nonfouling Surfaces for Micropatterning of Cell and Microtissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otsuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering techniques for cellular micropatterning are emerging as important tools to clarify the effects of the microenvironment on cellular behavior, as cells usually integrate and respond the microscale environment, such as chemical and mechanical properties of the surrounding fluid and extracellular matrix, soluble protein factors, small signal molecules, and contacts with neighboring cells. Furthermore, recent progress in cellular micropatterning has contributed to the development of cell-based biosensors for the functional characterization and detection of drugs, pathogens, toxicants, and odorants. In this regards, the ability to control shape and spreading of attached cells and cell-cell contacts through the form and dimension of the cell-adhesive patches with high precision is important. Commitment of stem cells to different specific lineages depends strongly on cell shape, implying that controlled microenvironments through engineered surfaces may not only be a valuable approach towards fundamental cell-biological studies, but also of great importance for the design of cell culture substrates for tissue engineering. To develop this kind of cellular microarray composed of a cell-resistant surface and cell attachment region, micropatterning a protein-repellent surface is important because cellular adhesion and proliferation are regulated by protein adsorption. The focus of this review is on the surface engineering aspects of biologically motivated micropatterning of two-dimensional surfaces with the aim to provide an introductory overview described in the literature. In particular, the importance of non-fouling surface chemistries is discussed.

  8. Surface gradients under electrochemical control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbenborg, Sven Olle

    2014-01-01

    Gradients are systems in which the physicochemical properties of a solution and/or surface change gradually in space and/or time. They are used for a myriad of technological and biological applications, for example for high-throughput screening, or for the investigation of biological systems. The de

  9. Metastasis-associated cell surface oncoproteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piia-Riitta eKarhemo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncoproteomics aims to the discovery of molecular markers, drug targets and pathways by studying cancer specific protein expression, localization, modification and interaction. Cell surface proteins play a central role in several pathological conditions, including cancer and its metastatic spread. However, cell surface proteins are underrepresented in proteomics analyses performed from the whole cell extracts due to their hydrophobicity and low abundance. Different methods have been developed to enrich and isolate the cell surface proteins to reduce sample complexity. Despite the method selected, the primary difficulty encountered is the solubilization of the hydrophobic transmembrane proteins from the lipid bilayer. This review focuses on proteomic analyses of metastasis-associated proteins identified using the cell surface biotinylation method. Interestingly, also certain intracellular proteins were identified from the cell surface samples. The function of these proteins at the cell surface might well differ from their function inside the cell.

  10. Hepatic stellate cells on poly(DL-lactic acid surfaces control the formation of 3D hepatocyte co-culture aggregates in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for the functional superiority of cells cultured as 3D aggregates or on 3D scaffolds over conventional 2D monolayer cultures has created interest in material and cell based methods that influence the formation and structure of multicellular aggregates in vitro. We have created a co-culture of primary rat hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells on a poly(DL-lactic acid surface, a poor substrate for rat hepatocyte adhesion, to study the dynamics of multicellular spheroid formation and the resultant cell arrangement. The poly(DL-lactic acid surface allows dynamic and rapid interaction of hepatocytes and stellate cells to form co-culture spheroids in a complex multistage process (shown by time lapse microscopy. This spheroid morphology supports enhanced cell viability relative to a mono-culture mono-layer system (measured by lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The distribution of the aggregating cell type in the final structure is related to the mechanics of formation i.e. mainly central and peripheral. This study provides a unique and generically applicable insight into the dynamics of multicellular spheroid formation where aggregation is induced by one cell type and imposed on another. This has implications for 3D cell culture models and a wide number of currently used stromal co-culture systems.

  11. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  12. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  13. Microbial cell surfaces and secretion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommassen, J.P.M.; Wosten, H.A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell surfaces, surface-exposed organelles, and secreted proteins are important for the interaction with the environment, including adhesion to hosts, protection against host defense mechanisms, nutrient acquisition, and intermicrobial competition. Here, we describe the structures of the ce

  14. Cell multiplication following partial enzymatic removal of surface coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E

    1978-08-01

    Treatment of Paramecium aurelia with trypsin or pronase (1 mg per 10(5) cells, at 0 to 4 degrees C) partially removes the surface coat and modifies significantly multiplication of cells. The division rate after 24 hours of cultivation is diminished approximately twice in the case of pronase-treated cells and 1.5 for tyrpsin-digested ciliates as compared with the control. On the second day the division rate increases rapidly and number of cell divisions exceeds the values observed in the control. After 72 hours of cultivation the division rate in both untreated and enzyme-treated cells is almost the same. It is concluded that the observed inhibition of cell fission results from the enzymatic removal of the surface coat--the integrity of this surface coat seems to be necessary in the process of cell division. The influence of environmental factors on the rate of growth is presented.

  15. Cell-surface hydrophobicity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P. F.; Riley, T. V.

    1991-01-01

    The cell-surface hydrophobicity of 100 urinary isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, cultured from symptomatic females in the general population, was assessed using a two-phase aqueous:hydrocarbon system. Relatively strong cell-surface hydrophobicity was exhibited by 79 isolates using the criteria employed, while only 2 of the remaining 21 isolates failed to demonstrate any detectable hydrophobicity. Cell-surface hydrophobicity may be a virulence factor of S. saprophyticus, important in adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. Additionally, the data support the concept that cell-surface hydrophobicity may be a useful predictor of clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from clinical sources. PMID:1993454

  16. Heat engines and heat pumps in a hydrostatic atmosphere: How surface pressure and temperature control wind power output and circulation cell size

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Shearman, P L; Li, B -L

    2015-01-01

    The gross spatial features of the atmospheric kinetic energy budget are analytically investigated. Kinetic energy generation is evaluated in a hydrostatic atmosphere where the axisymmetric circulation cells are represented by Carnot cycles. The condition that kinetic energy generation is positive in the lower atmosphere is shown to limit the poleward cell extension via a relationship between the meridional differences in surface pressure and temperature $\\Delta p_s$ and $\\Delta T_s$: an upper limit to cell size exists when $\\Delta p_s$ increases sublinearly with $\\Delta T_s$. This is the case for the Hadley cells as demonstrated here using data from MERRA re-analysis. The limited cell size necessitates the appearance of heat pumps -- circulation cells with negative work output where the low-level air moves towards colder areas. These cells consume the positive work output of heat engines -- cells where the low-level air moves towards the warmer areas -- and can in principle drive the global efficiency of atmo...

  17. Cell-mediated lympholysis of trinitrophenyl-modified autologous lymphocytes. Effector cell specificity to modified cell surface components controlled by H-2K and H-2D serological regions of the murine major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, G M; Rehn, T G; Garbarino, C A

    1975-06-01

    Splenic lymphocytes from four C57BL/10 congenic resistant mouse strains were sensitized in vitro with trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified autologous spleen cellsmthe effector cells generated were incubated with 51-Cr-labeled unmodified or TNP-modified spleen or tumor target cells, and the percentage of specific lympholysis determined. The results obtained using syngeneic-, congenic-, recombinante, and allogeneic-modified target cells indicated that TNP modification of the target cells was a necessary but insufficient requirement for lympholysis. Intra-H-2 homology either between modified stimulating cells and modified target cells or between responding lymphocytes and modified target cells was also important in the specificity for lysis. Homology at the K serological region or at K plus I-A in the B10.A and B10BR strains, and at either the D serological region or at some other region (possibly K) in the B10.D2 and C57BL/10 strains were shown to be necessary in order to detect lympholysis. Experiments using (B10itimes C57BL/10)F1 responding lymphocytes sensitized and assayed with TNP-modified parental cells indicated that the homology required for lympholysis was between modified stimulating and modified target cellsmthe possibility is raised that histocompatibility antigens may serve in the autologous system as cell surface components which are modified by viruses or autoimmune complexes to form cell-bound modified-self antigens, which are particularly suited for cell-mediated immune reactions. Evidence is presented suggesting that H-2-linked Ir genes are expressed in the TNP-modified autologous cytotoxic system. These findings imply that the major histocompatibility complex can be functionally involved both in the response potential to and in the formation of new antigenic determinants involving modified-self components.

  18. Cell attachment on ion implanted titanium surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Sreejith

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Of outmost importance for the successful use of an implant is a good adhesion of the surrounding tissue to the biomaterial. In addition to the surface composition of the implant, the surface topography also influences the properties of the adherent cells. In the present investigation, ion implanted and untreated surfaces were compared for cell adhesion and spreading.Design/methodology/approach: The surface topography of the surfaces were analyzed using AFM and the cell studies with SEM.Findings: The results of our present investigation is indicative of the fact that ion implanted titanium surface offer better cell binding affinity compared to untreated/polished surface.Practical implications: Success of non-biodegradable implants will first and foremost depend on biocompatibility, followed by the capacity of the surface topography of the implants to evince desired cell matrix, surface cell matrix interactions. In the present study, the cell growth on ion implanted Ti material is analyzed and discussed.Originality/value: In this paper, we have utilized ion implantation technique, which will produce nano-texturing of the surface without producing any detrimental effects to both the dimensions and properties of the implants.

  19. Molecularly engineered surfaces for cell biology: from static to dynamic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J Justin; Parker, Stephen G; Lu, Yong; Gaus, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Surfaces with a well-defined presentation of ligands for receptors on the cell membrane can serve as models of the extracellular matrix for studying cell adhesion or as model cell surfaces for exploring cell-cell contacts. Because such surfaces can provide exquisite control over, for example, the density of these ligands or when the ligands are presented to the cell, they provide a very precise strategy for understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to external adhesive cues. In the present feature article, we present an overview of the basic biology of cell adhesion before discussing surfaces that have a static presentation of immobile ligands. We outline the biological information that such surfaces have given us, before progressing to recently developed switchable surfaces and surfaces that mimic the lipid bilayer, having adhesive ligands that can move around the membrane and be remodeled by the cell. Finally, the feature article closes with some of the biological information that these new types of surfaces could provide.

  20. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye

    2017-01-01

    -expressed and functional. By analyses of chimeric human/mouse and human/bonobo receptors, bonobo receptor mutants, and the single nucleotide polymorphism database at NCBI, we identify an insertion/deletion variation in the third intracellular loop responsible for the intracellular retention and lack of function...... of the human ortholog. Genetic analyses of the 1000 genome database and the Inter99 cohort of 6,000 Danes establish the distribution of genotypes among ethnic groups, showing that the cell surface-expressed and functional variant is much more prevalent in the African population than in European and Asian...... populations and that this variant is partly linked with a stop codon early in the receptor sequence (rs6907580, amino acid position 57). In conclusion, our data solve a more than decade-old question of why the cloned human GPRC6A receptor is not cell surface-expressed and functional and provide a genetic...

  1. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye; Johansen, Lars Dan; Wellendorph, Petrine; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Jørgensen, Christinna V; Quan, Shi; Rui, Gao; Inoue, Asuka; Linneberg, Allan; Grarup, Niels; Jun, Wang; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-27

    GPRC6A is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by l-amino acids, which, based on analyses of knock-out mice, has been suggested to have physiological functions in metabolism and testicular function. The human ortholog is, however, mostly retained intracellularly in contrast to the cell surface-expressed murine and goldfish orthologs. The latter orthologs are Gq-coupled and lead to intracellular accumulation of inositol phosphates and calcium release. In the present study we cloned the bonobo chimpanzee GPRC6A receptor, which is 99% identical to the human receptor, and show that it is cell surface-expressed and functional. By analyses of chimeric human/mouse and human/bonobo receptors, bonobo receptor mutants, and the single nucleotide polymorphism database at NCBI, we identify an insertion/deletion variation in the third intracellular loop responsible for the intracellular retention and lack of function of the human ortholog. Genetic analyses of the 1000 genome database and the Inter99 cohort of 6,000 Danes establish the distribution of genotypes among ethnic groups, showing that the cell surface-expressed and functional variant is much more prevalent in the African population than in European and Asian populations and that this variant is partly linked with a stop codon early in the receptor sequence (rs6907580, amino acid position 57). In conclusion, our data solve a more than decade-old question of why the cloned human GPRC6A receptor is not cell surface-expressed and functional and provide a genetic framework to study human phenotypic traits in large genome sequencing projects linked with physiological measurement and biomarkers.

  2. Functions of proteoglycans at the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höök, M; Woods, A; Johansson, S;

    1986-01-01

    Proteoglycans (primarily heparan sulphate proteoglycans) are found at the surface of most adherent eukaryotic cells. Earlier studies suggest that these molecules can be associated with the cell surface principally by two different mechanisms. Proteoglycans may occur as membrane......-intercalated glycoproteins, where the core protein of the proteoglycan is anchored in the lipid interior of the plasma membrane, or they may be bound via the polysaccharide components of the molecule to specific anchoring proteins present at the cell surface. A number of functions have been proposed for cell surface......-associated proteoglycans, including: regulation of cell-substrate adhesion; regulation of cell proliferation; participation in the binding and uptake of extracellular components; and participation in the regulation of extracellular matrix formation. Evidence is discussed suggesting that the cell-associated heparan...

  3. The cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell surface of trypanosomatids is formed by the plasma membrane and a layer of sub-pellicular microtubules which are connected to the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is composed by proteins, lipids and carbohydrates which form the glycocalix. In this paper we will review briefly aspects related to the organization of the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

  4. Surface-Controlled Metal Oxide Resistive Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Ke, Jr-Jian

    2015-10-28

    To explore the surface effect on resistive random-access memory (ReRAM), the impact of surface roughness on the characteristics of ZnO ReRAM were studied. The thickness-independent resistance and the higher switching probability of ZnO ReRAM with rough surfaces indicate the importance of surface oxygen chemisorption on the switching process. Furthermore, the improvements in switching probability, switching voltage and resistance distribution observed for ReRAM with rough surfaces can be attributed to the stable oxygen adatoms under various ambience conditions. The findings validate the surface-controlled stability and uniformity of ReRAM and can serve as the guideline for developing practical device applications.

  5. Dispersion controlled by permeable surfaces: surface properties and scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Bowen; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Battiato, Ilenia

    2016-07-19

    Permeable and porous surfaces are common in natural and engineered systems. Flow and transport above such surfaces are significantly affected by the surface properties, e.g. matrix porosity and permeability. However, the relationship between such properties and macroscopic solute transport is largely unknown. In this work, we focus on mass transport in a two-dimensional channel with permeable porous walls under fully developed laminar flow conditions. By means of perturbation theory and asymptotic analysis, we derive the set of upscaled equations describing mass transport in the coupled channel–porous-matrix system and an analytical expression relating the dispersion coefficient with the properties of the surface, namely porosity and permeability. Our analysis shows that their impact on the dispersion coefficient strongly depends on the magnitude of the Péclet number, i.e. on the interplay between diffusive and advective mass transport. Additionally, we demonstrate different scaling behaviours of the dispersion coefficient for thin or thick porous matrices. Our analysis shows the possibility of controlling the dispersion coefficient, i.e. transverse mixing, by either active (i.e. changing the operating conditions) or passive mechanisms (i.e. controlling matrix effective properties) for a given Péclet number. By elucidating the impact of matrix porosity and permeability on solute transport, our upscaled model lays the foundation for the improved understanding, control and design of microporous coatings with targeted macroscopic transport features.

  6. Cell-surface remodelling during mammalian erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraith, D C; Chesterton, C J

    1982-10-15

    Current evidence suggests that the major cell-surface modification occurring during mammalian erythropoiesis could be generated by two separate mechanisms: either selective loss of membrane proteins during enucleation or endocytosis at the subsequent reticulocyte and erythrocyte stages. The former idea was tested by collecting developing rabbit erythroid cells before and after the enucleation step and comparing their cell-surface protein composition via radiolabelling and electrophoresis. Few changes were observed. Our data thus lend support to the endocytosis mechanism.

  7. Interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Thomas; Schnell, Anne; Walter, Christian; Kämmerer, Peer W; Pabst, Andreas; Lehmann, Karl M; Ziebart, Johanna; Klein, Marc O; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important role in peri-implant angiogenesis during early bone formation. Therefore, interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and titanium dental implant surfaces are of crucial interest. The aim of our in vitro study was to investigate the reactions of EPCs in contact with different commercially available implant surfaces. EPCs from buffy coats were isolated by Ficoll density gradient separation. After cell differentiation, EPC were cultured for a period of 7 days on different titanium surfaces. The test surfaces varied in roughness and hydrophilicity: acid-etched (A), sand-blasted-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), hydrophilic A (modA), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Plastic and fibronectin-coated plastic surfaces served as controls. Cell numbers and morphology were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressions of iNOS and eNOS were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell numbers were higher in the control groups compared to the cells of titanium surfaces. Initially, hydrophilic titanium surfaces (modA and modSLA) showed lower cell numbers than hydrophobic surfaces (A and SLA). After 7 days smoother surfaces (A and modA) showed increased cell numbers compared to rougher surfaces (SLA and modSLA). Cell morphology of A, modA, and control surfaces was characterized by a multitude of pseudopodia and planar cell soma architecture. SLA and modSLA promoted small and plump cell soma with little quantity of pseudopodia. The lowest VEGF level was measured on A, the highest on modSLA. The highest eNOS and iNOS expressions were found on modA surfaces. The results of this study demonstrate that biological behaviors of EPCs can be influenced by different surfaces. The modSLA surface promotes an undifferentiated phenotype of EPCs that has the ability to secrete growth factors in great quantities. In

  8. JCMT active surface control system: implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian A.

    1998-05-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii is a 15 meter sub-millimeter telescope which operates in the 350 microns to 2 millimeter region. The primary antenna surface consists of 276 panels, each of which is positioned by 3 stepper motors. In order to achieve the highest possible surface accuracy we are embarking upon a project to actively control the position of the panels adjuster system is based on a 6809 micro connected to the control computer by a GPIB interface. This system is slow and inflexible and it would prove difficult to build an active surface control system with it. Part of the upgrade project is to replace the existing micro with a 68060 VME micro. The poster paper will describe how the temperature of the antenna is monitored with the new system, how a Finite Element Analyses package transforms temperature changes into a series of panel adjuster moves, and how these moves are then applied to the surface. The FEA package will run on a high end Sun workstation. A series of DRAMA tasks distributed between the workstation and the Baja 68060 VxWorks Active Surface Control System micro will control the temperature monitoring, FEA and panel adjustment activities. Users can interact with the system via a Tcl/TK based GUI.

  9. Animation control of surface motion capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Margara; Casas, Dan; Hilton, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    Surface motion capture (SurfCap) of actor performance from multiple view video provides reconstruction of the natural nonrigid deformation of skin and clothing. This paper introduces techniques for interactive animation control of SurfCap sequences which allow the flexibility in editing and interactive manipulation associated with existing tools for animation from skeletal motion capture (MoCap). Laplacian mesh editing is extended using a basis model learned from SurfCap sequences to constrain the surface shape to reproduce natural deformation. Three novel approaches for animation control of SurfCap sequences, which exploit the constrained Laplacian mesh editing, are introduced: 1) space–time editing for interactive sequence manipulation; 2) skeleton-driven animation to achieve natural nonrigid surface deformation; and 3) hybrid combination of skeletal MoCap driven and SurfCap sequence to extend the range of movement. These approaches are combined with high-level parametric control of SurfCap sequences in a hybrid surface and skeleton-driven animation control framework to achieve natural surface deformation with an extended range of movement by exploiting existing MoCap archives. Evaluation of each approach and the integrated animation framework are presented on real SurfCap sequences for actors performing multiple motions with a variety of clothing styles. Results demonstrate that these techniques enable flexible control for interactive animation with the natural nonrigid surface dynamics of the captured performance and provide a powerful tool to extend current SurfCap databases by incorporating new motions from MoCap sequences.

  10. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...

  11. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  12. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  13. Cell-Size Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Amanda A.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of a given type maintain a characteristic cell size to function efficiently in their ecological or organismal context. They achieve this through the regulation of growth rates or by actively sensing size and coupling this signal to cell division. We focus this review on potential size-sensing mechanisms, including geometric, external cue, and titration mechanisms. Mechanisms that titrate proteins against DNA are of particular interest because they are consistent with the robust correlation of DNA content and cell size. We review the literature, which suggests that titration mechanisms may underlie cell-size sensing in Xenopus embryos, budding yeast, and Escherichia coli, whereas alternative mechanisms may function in fission yeast. PMID:26254313

  14. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  15. Surface purity control during XMASS detector refurbishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: kenkou@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kamioka observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, the University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu, 506-1205 (Japan); Kavl Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The XMASS project aims at detecting dark matter, pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, and neutrino less double beta decay using large volume of pure liquid xenon. The first physics target of the XMASS project is to detect dark matter with 835 kg liquid xenon. After the commissioning runs, XMASS detector was refurbished to minimize the background contribution mainly from PMT sealing material and we restarted data taking in November 2013. We report how we control surface purity, especially how we prevent radon daughter accumulation on the detector copper surface, during XMASS detector refurbishment. The result and future plan of XMASS are also reported.

  16. Reversible Compositional Control of Oxide Surfaces by Electrochemical Potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Mutoro, Eva

    2012-01-05

    Perovskite oxides can exhibit a wide range of interesting characteristics such as being catalytically active and electronically/ionically conducting, and thus, they have been used in a number of solid-state devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and sensors. As the surface compositions of perovskites can greatly influence the catalytic properties, knowing and controlling their surface compositions is crucial to enhance device performance. In this study, we demonstrate that the surface strontium (Sr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations of perovskite-based thin films can be controlled reversibly at elevated temperatures by applying small electrical potential biases. The surface compositional changes of La 0.8Sr 0.2CoO 3-δ (LSC 113), (La 0.5Sr 0.5) 2CoO 4±δ (LSC 214), and LSC 214-decorated LSC 113 films (LSC 113/214) were investigated in situ by utilizing synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), where the largest changes of surface Sr were found for the LSC 113/214 surface. These findings offer the potential of reversibly controlling the surface functionality of perovskites. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  18. Nanotomography of Cell Surfaces with Evanescent Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM and its application to nanotomography of cell surfaces are described. Present applications include (1 3D imaging of chromosomes in their metaphase to demonstrate axial resolution in the nanometre range, (2 measurements of cell-substrate topology, which upon cholesterol depletion shows some loosening of cell-substrate contacts, and (3 measurements of cell topology upon photodynamic therapy (PDT, which demonstrate cell swelling and maintenance of focal contacts. The potential of the method for in vitro diagnostics, but also some requirements and limitations are discussed.

  19. Shape-memory-actuated compliant control surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Brian J.; Carpenter, Bernie F.; Draper, Jerry L.; Misra, Mohan S.

    1993-09-01

    Advanced submarine stern configurations require a variety of control surfaces to actively manage aftbody boundary layer flow, vorticity, propulsor inflow and intrapropulsor flow, as well as vehicle attitude. Two necessary attributes of advanced control surface designs include (1) integrated actuation to provide placement flexibility at remote locations with minimal structural interfacing and control interconnects, and (2) improved lift efficiency and flow using variable or adaptive camber control. To demonstrate these attributes, a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated compliant control fin (CCF) with a planform area of 620 sq. cm was developed for evaluation as rudder and sternplane appendages on a radio control submarine model at velocities up to 5.1 m/s (Reynolds No. approximately equals 1,000,000) and up to 0.2 Hz full cycle actuation. A completely fixed root design was developed to reduce turbulence at the hull/fine interface, with compliant deformation of the foil to improve flow characteristics over the baseline full-flying and trailing-edge-flap designs.

  20. SURFACE TEXTURE ANALYSIS FOR FUNCTIONALITY CONTROL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 3 hours duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercises concern surface texture analysis for functionality control, in connection with three different case stories. This docume...... contains a short description of each case story, 3-D roughness parameters analysis and relation with the product’s functionality.......This document is used in connection with three exercises of 3 hours duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercises concern surface texture analysis for functionality control, in connection with three different case stories. This document...

  1. Remote control of planetary surface vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, E.

    1973-01-01

    A remotely manned system consisting of an earth-based control center and a remote rover system on the planetary surface is assumed to extend to the remote site the sensory, manipulative and certain intellectual capabilities of humans here on earth. Required system functions, including scientific payload functions, vehicle functions and ground-based human control functions are discussed and the effects of communication delay and increased remote automaticity on system performance are investigated. To accomplish the required operations for scientific exploration, the control of the remote system requires the development of techniques to deal with problems of long communication time delays so that the performance in terms of operation speed can be increased to acceptable levels. Increased operational performance can be achieved primarily by increasing the rate of useful information flow in the man-machine sensor-control loop, or by increasing the autonomous capabilities of the remote system or by both.

  2. Nanoscale Surface Plasmonics Sensor With Nanofluidic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianjun; Singhal, Sameer; Waldeck, David H.; Kofke, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Conventional quantitative protein assays of bodily fluids typically involve multiple steps to obtain desired measurements. Such methods are not well suited for fast and accurate assay measurements in austere environments such as spaceflight and in the aftermath of disasters. Consequently, there is a need for a protein assay technology capable of routinely monitoring proteins in austere environments. For example, there is an immediate need for a urine protein assay to assess astronaut renal health during spaceflight. The disclosed nanoscale surface plasmonics sensor provides a core detection method that can be integrated to a lab-on-chip device that satisfies the unmet need for such a protein assay technology. Assays based upon combinations of nanoholes, nanorings, and nanoslits with transmission surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are used for assays requiring extreme sensitivity, and are capable of detecting specific analytes at concentrations as low as picomole to femtomole level in well-controlled environments. The device operates in a transmission mode configuration in which light is directed at one planar surface of the array, which functions as an optical aperture. The incident light induces surface plasmon light transmission from the opposite surface of the array. The presence of a target analyte is detected by changes in the spectrum of light transmitted by the array when a target analyte induces a change in the refractive index of the fluid within the nanochannels. This occurs, for example, when a target analyte binds to a receptor fixed to the walls of the nanochannels in the array. Independent fluid handling capability for individual nanoarrays on a nanofluidic chip containing a plurality of nanochannel arrays allows each array to be used to sense a different target analyte and/or for paired arrays to analyze control and test samples simultaneously in parallel. The present invention incorporates transmission mode nanoplasmonics and nanofluidics into a single

  3. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  4. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  5. Adaptive Dynamic Surface Control for Generator Excitation Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiu-yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the generator excitation control system which is equipped with static var compensator (SVC and unknown parameters, a novel adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed based on neural network and tracking error transformed function with the following features: (1 the transformation of the excitation generator model to the linear systems is omitted; (2 the prespecified performance of the tracking error can be guaranteed by combining with the tracking error transformed function; (3 the computational burden is greatly reduced by estimating the norm of the weighted vector of neural network instead of the weighted vector itself; therefore, it is more suitable for the real time control; and (4 the explosion of complicity problem inherent in the backstepping control can be eliminated. It is proved that the new scheme can make the system semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results show the effectiveness of this control scheme.

  6. Methane Lunar Surface Thermal Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David W.; Sutherlin, Steven G.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.; Jurns, John M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering propulsion system concepts for future missions including human return to the lunar surface. Studies have identified cryogenic methane (LCH4) and oxygen (LO2) as a desirable propellant combination for the lunar surface ascent propulsion system, and they point to a surface stay requirement of 180 days. To meet this requirement, a test article was prepared with state-of-the-art insulation and tested in simulated lunar mission environments at NASA GRC. The primary goals were to validate design and models of the key thermal control technologies to store unvented methane for long durations, with a low-density high-performing Multi-layer Insulation (MLI) system to protect the propellant tanks from the environmental heat of low Earth orbit (LEO), Earth to Moon transit, lunar surface, and with the LCH4 initially densified. The data and accompanying analysis shows this storage design would have fallen well short of the unvented 180 day storage requirement, due to the MLI density being much higher than intended, its substructure collapse, and blanket separation during depressurization. Despite the performance issue, insight into analytical models and MLI construction was gained. Such modeling is important for the effective design of flight vehicle concepts, such as in-space cryogenic depots or in-space cryogenic propulsion stages.

  7. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    strategy. The concept has been validated and verified at Odense Steel Shipyard Ltd. in several robotic arc welding systems in the production using an application enabler, UNIX, X, SQL and (wireless) Ethernet. Integration with off-line programming, production planning, monitoring and maintenance has been...... of any production installation and in addition the software element is often very critical as it is the integrating, controlling and co-ordinating system component. As such, a CCE concept providing high quality and high functionality as well as flexibility is an important aspect of a company's automation...

  8. Dynamic Surface Control and Its Application to Lateral Vehicle Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongsob Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the design and analysis methodology of dynamic surface control (DSC in Song and Hedrick, 2011, for a more general class of nonlinear systems. When rotational mechanical systems such as lateral vehicle control and robot control are considered for applications, sinusoidal functions are easily included in the equation of motions. If such a sinusoidal function is used as a forcing term for DSC, the stability analysis faces the difficulty due to highly nonlinear functions resulting from the low-pass filter dynamics. With modification of input variables to the filter dynamics, the burden of mathematical analysis can be reduced and stability conditions in linear matrix inequality form to guarantee the quadratic stability via DSC are derived for the given class of nonlinear systems. Finally, the proposed design and analysis approach are applied to lateral vehicle control for forward automated driving and backward parallel parking at a low speed as well as an illustrative example.

  9. Ride control of surface effect ships using distributed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgeir J. Sørensen

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available A ride control system for active damping of heave and pitch accelerations of Surface Effect Ships (SES is presented. It is demonstrated that distributed effects that are due to a spatially varying pressure in the air cushion result in significant vertical vibrations in low and moderate sea states. In order to achieve a high quality human comfort and crew workability it is necessary to reduce these vibrations using a control system which accounts for distributed effects due to spatial pressure variations in the air cushion. A mathematical model of the process is presented, and collocated sensor and actuator pairs are used. The process stability is ensured using a controller with appropriate passivity properties. Sensor and actuator location is also discussed. The performance of the ride control system is shown by power spectra of the vertical accelerations obtained from full scale experiments with a 35 m SES.

  10. The cell surface proteome of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Laura; Matthiesen, Jenny; Kühne, Vera; Lotter, Hannelore; Handal, Ghassan; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Schümann, Michael; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Krause, Eberhard; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Surface molecules are of major importance for host-parasite interactions. During Entamoeba histolytica infections, these interactions are predicted to be of prime importance for tissue invasion, induction of colitis and liver abscess formation. To date, however, little is known about the molecules involved in these processes, with only about 20 proteins or protein families found exposed on the E. histolytica surface. We have therefore analyzed the complete surface proteome of E. histolytica. Using cell surface biotinylation and mass spectrometry, 693 putative surface-associated proteins were identified. In silico analysis predicted that ∼26% of these proteins are membrane-associated, as they contain transmembrane domains and/or signal sequences, as well as sites of palmitoylation, myristoylation, or prenylation. An additional 25% of the identified proteins likely represent nonclassical secreted proteins. Surprisingly, no membrane-association sites could be predicted for the remaining 49% of the identified proteins. To verify surface localization, 23 proteins were randomly selected and analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Of these 23 proteins, 20 (87%) showed definite surface localization. These findings indicate that a far greater number of E. histolytica proteins than previously supposed are surface-associated, a phenomenon that may be based on the high membrane turnover of E. histolytica.

  11. Analysis of cell surface alterations in Legionella pneumophila cells treated with human apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-03-01

    Binding of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) to Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide was analysed at the molecular level by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thereby providing biophysical evidence for apoE-L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide interaction. Atomic force microscopy imaging of apoE-exposed L. pneumophila cells revealed alterations in the bacterial cell surface topography and nanomechanical properties in comparison with control bacteria. The changes induced by apoE binding to lipopolysaccharide on the surface of L. pneumophila cells may participate in: (1) impeding the penetration of host cells by the bacteria; (2) suppression of pathogen intracellular growth and eventually; and (3) inhibition of the development of infection.

  12. HOS cell adhesion on Ti6Al4V surfaces texturized by laser engraving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Amador, A.; Carreño Garcia, H.; Escobar Rivero, P.; Peña Ballesteros, D. Y.; Estupiñán Duran, H. A.

    2016-02-01

    The cell adhesion of the implant is determinate by the chemical composition, topography, wettability, surface energy and biocompatibility of the biomaterial. In this work the interaction between human osteosarcoma HOS cells and textured Ti6Al4V surfaces were evaluated. Ti6Al4V surfaces were textured using a CO2 laser in order to obtain circular spots on the surfaces. Test surfaces were uncoated (C1) used as a control surface, and surfaces with points obtained by laser engraving, with 1mm spacing (C2) and 0.5mm (C3). The HOS cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotics. No cells toxicity after one month incubation time occurred. The increased cell adhesion and cell spreading was observed after 1, 3 and 5 days without significant differences between the sample surfaces (C2 and C3) and control (uncoated) at the end of the experiment.

  13. 3D surface topology guides stem cell adhesion and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Engler, Adam J; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilizers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors.

  14. Cell patterning on polylactic acid through surface-tethered oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshiki; Arima, Yusuke; Takemoto, Naohiro; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-02-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a candidate material to prepare scaffolds for 3-D tissue regeneration. However, cells do not adhere or proliferate well on the surface of PLA because it is hydrophobic. We report a simple and rapid method for inducing cell adhesion to PLA through DNA hybridization. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and to a terminal phospholipid (ssDNA-PEG-lipid) was used for cell surface modification. Through DNA hybridization, modified cells were able to attach to PLA surfaces modified with complementary sequence (ssDNA'). Different cell types can be attached to PLA fibers and films in a spatially controlled manner by using ssDNAs with different sequences. In addition, they proliferate well in a culture medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. The coexisting modes of cell adhesion through DNA hybridization and natural cytoskeletal adhesion machinery revealed no serious effects on cell growth. The combination of a 3-D scaffold made of PLA and cell immobilization on the PLA scaffold through DNA hybridization will be useful for the preparation of 3-D tissue and organs.

  15. Hepatic Bel-7402 Cell Proliferation on Different Phospholipid Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipids are believed to be important biomaterials.However, limited information is available on their cytocompatibilities.The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of different phospholipids on the proliferation of hepatic Bel-7402 cells by comparing the adhesion, viability and proliferation of Bel-7402 cells cultured on different phospholipid surfaces.The cell adhesion, determined by counting the number of adhered cells to the surface, indicated that the cell adhesion was enhanced on charged phospolipid membranes.The cell viability evaluated by MTT[3 (4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium-bromide] showed that cells cultured on charged phospholipids have greater viability than those cultured on the control, while cells cultured on neutral phospholipids showed lower viability.The cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry demonstrated that S phase entry increased on charged phospholipids, while S phase entry decreased on neutral phospholipids.The results suggested that charged phospholipids, especially positively charged phospholipids, show better cytocompatibilities than neutral phospholipids to hepatic Bel-7402 cell.

  16. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  17. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  18. Controllable surface haptics via particle jamming and pneumatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Andrew A; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-01-01

    The combination of particle jamming and pneumatics allows the simultaneous control of shape and mechanical properties in a tactile display. A hollow silicone membrane is molded into an array of thin cells, each filled with coffee grounds such that adjusting the vacuum level in any individual cell rapidly switches it between flexible and rigid states. The array clamps over a pressure-regulated air chamber with internal mechanisms designed to pin the nodes between cells at any given height. Various sequences of cell vacuuming, node pinning, and chamber pressurization allow the surface to balloon into a variety of shapes. Experiments were performed to expand existing physical models of jamming at the inter-particle level to define the rheological characteristics of jammed systems from a macroscopic perspective, relevant to force-displacement interactions that would be experienced by human users. Force-displacement data show that a jammed cell in compression fits a Maxwell model and a cell deflected in the center while supported only at the edges fits a Zener model, each with stiffness and damping parameters that increase at higher levels of applied vacuum. This provides framework to tune and control the mechanical properties of a jamming haptic interface.

  19. Bacterial cell surface structures in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, Nataniel; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a widespread member of the family of Enterobacteriaceae that contains both non-virulent and virulent isolates. Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, especially belonging to serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8 and O:9 are etiologic agents of yersiniosis in animals and humans. Y. enterocolitica cell surface structures that play a significant role in virulence have been subject to many investigations. These include outer membrane (OM) glycolipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) and several cell surface adhesion proteins present only in virulent Y. enterocolitica, i.e., Inv, YadA and Ail. While the yadA gene is located on the Yersinia virulence plasmid the Ail, Inv, LPS and ECA are chromosomally encoded. These structures ensure the correct architecture of the OM, provide adhesive properties as well as resistance to antimicrobial peptides and to host innate immune response mechanisms.

  20. Silicon surface structure-controlled oleophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Xiu, Yonghao; Hess, Dennis W; Wong, C P

    2010-06-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces display contact angles >150 degrees with liquids that have lower surface energies than does water. The design of superoleophobic surfaces requires an understanding of the effect of the geometrical shape of etched silicon surfaces on the contact angle and hysteresis observed when different liquids are brought into contact with these surfaces. This study used liquid-based metal-assisted etching and various silane treatments to create superoleophobic surfaces on a Si(111) surface. Etch conditions such as the etch time and etch solution concentration played critical roles in establishing the oleophobicity of Si(111). When compared to Young's contact angle, the apparent contact angle showed a transition from a Cassie to a Wenzel state for low-surface-energy liquids as different silane treatments were applied to the silicon surface. These results demonstrated the relationship between the re-entrant angle of etched surface structures and the contact angle transition between Cassie and Wenzel behavior on etched Si(111) surfaces.

  1. Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roel Nusse

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control over various types of stem cells and may act as a niche factor to maintain stem cells in a self-renewing state.As currently understood,Wnt proteins bind to receptors of the Frizzled and LRP families on the cell surface.Through several cytoplasmic relay components,the signal is transduced to B-catenin,which then enters the nucleus and forms a complex with TCF to activate transcription of Wnt target genes.Wnts can also signal through tyrosine kinase receptors,in particular the ROR and RYK receptors,leading to alternative modes of Wnt signaling.During the growth of tissues,these ligands and receptors are dynamically expressed,often transcriptionally controlled by Wnt signals themselves,to ensure the right balance between proliferation and differentiation.Isolated Wnt proteins are active on a variety of stem cells,including neural,mammary and embryonic stem cells.In general,Wnt proteins act to maintain the undifferentiated state of stem cells,while other growth factors instruct the cells to proliferate.These other factors include FGF and EGF,signaling through tyrosine kinase pathways.

  2. Nanometer thickness laser ablation for spatial control of cell attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, H.; Hayes, J. P.; Kingshott, P.; Johnson, G.; Harvey, E. C.; Griesser, H. J.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate here a new method to control the location of cells on surfaces in two dimensions, which can be applied to a number of biomedical applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Two-dimensional control over cell attachment is achieved by generation of a spatially controlled surface chemistry that allows control over protein adsorption, a process which mediates cell attachment. Here, we describe the deposition of thin allylamine plasma polymer coatings on silicon wafer and perfluorinated poly(ethylene-co-propylene) substrates, followed by grafting of a protein resistant layer of poly(ethylene oxide). Spatially controlled patterning of the surface chemistry was achieved in a fast, one-step procedure by nanometer thickness controlled laser ablation using a 248 nm excimer laser. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to confirm the production of surface chemistry patterns with a resolution of approximately 1 µm, which is significantly below the dimensions of a single mammalian cell. Subsequent adsorption of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen I and fibronectin followed by cell culture experiments using bovine corneal epithelial cells confirmed that cell attachment is controlled by the surface chemistry pattern. The method is an effective tool for use in a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  3. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Lin, Liwei

    2011-05-01

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of -1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions.

  4. In vitro behaviour of endothelial cells on a titanium surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira-Filho Ricardo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells play an important role in the delivery of cells to the inflammation site, chemotaxis, cell adhesion and extravasation. Implantation of a foreign material into the human body determines inflammatory and repair reactions, involving different cell types with a plethora of released chemical mediators. The evaluation of the interaction of endothelial cells and implanted materials must take into account other parameters in addition to the analysis of maintenance of cell viability. Methods In the present investigation, we examined the behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs harvested on titanium (Ti, using histological and immunohistochemical methods. The cells, after two passages, were seeded in a standard density on commercially plate-shaped titanium pieces, and maintained for 1, 7 or 14 days. Results After 14 days, we could observe a confluent monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs on the titanium surface. Upon one-day Ti/cell contact the expression of fibronectin was predominantly cytoplasmatic and stronger than on the control surface. It was observed strong and uniform cell expression along the time of α5β1 integrin on the cells in contact with titanium. Conclusion The attachment of ECs on titanium was found to be related to cellular-derived fibronectin and the binding to its specific receptor, the α5β1 integrin. It was observed that titanium effectively serves as a suitable substrate for endothelial cell attachment, growth and proliferation. However, upon a 7-day contact with Ti, the Weibel-Palade bodies appeared to be not fully processed and exhibited an anomalous morphology, with corresponding alterations of PECAM-1 localization.

  5. Surface manipulation of biomolecules for cell microarray applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Andrew L; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2006-10-01

    Many biological events, such as cellular communication, antigen recognition, tissue repair and DNA linear transfer, are intimately associated with biomolecule interactions at the solid-liquid interface. To facilitate the study and use of these biological events for biodevice and biomaterial applications, a sound understanding of how biomolecules behave at interfaces and a concomitant ability to manipulate biomolecules spatially and temporally at surfaces is required. This is particularly true for cell microarray applications, where a range of biological processes must be duly controlled to maximize the efficiency and throughput of these devices. Of particular interest are transfected-cell microarrays (TCMs), which significantly widen the scope of microarray genomic analysis by enabling the high-throughput analysis of gene function within living cells. This article reviews this current research focus, discussing fundamental and applied research into the spatial and temporal surface manipulation of DNA, proteins and other biomolecules and the implications of this work for TCMs.

  6. Controlling surface reactions with nanopatterned surface elastic strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhisheng; Potapenko, Denis V; Osgood, Richard M

    2015-01-27

    The application of elastic lattice strain is a promising approach for tuning material properties, but the attainment of a systematic approach for introducing a high level of strain in materials so as to study its effects has been a major challenge. Here we create an array of intense locally varying strain fields on a TiO2 (110) surface by introducing highly pressurized argon nanoclusters at 6-20 monolayers under the surface. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and the continuum mechanics model, we show that strain causes the surface bridge-bonded oxygen vacancies (BBOv), which are typically present on this surface, to be absent from the strained area and generates defect-free regions. In addition, we find that the adsorption energy of hydrogen binding to oxygen (BBO) is significantly altered by local lattice strain. In particular, the adsorption energy of hydrogen on BBO rows is reduced by ∼ 35 meV when the local crystal lattice is compressed by ∼ 1.3%. Our results provide direct evidence of the influence of strain on atomic-scale surface chemical properties, and such effects may help guide future research in catalysis materials design.

  7. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  8. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  9. Electromagnetic controllable surfaces based on trapped-mode effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dmitriev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some recent results of our theoretical investigations of electromagnetically controllable surfaces. These surfaces are designed on the basis of periodic arrays made of metallic inclusions of special form which are placed on a thin substrate of active material (magnetized ferrite or optically active semiconductor. The main peculiarity of the studied structures is their capability to support the trapped-mode resonance which is a result of the antiphase current oscillations in the elements of a periodic cell. Several effects, namely: tuning the position of passband and the linear and nonlinear (bistable transmission switching are considered when an external static magnetic field or optical excitation are applied. Our numerical calculations are fulfilled in both microwave and optical regions.

  10. Surface Cleaning or Activation?Control of Surface Condition Prior to Thermo-Chemical Heat Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brigitte Haase; Juan Dong; Jens Heinlein

    2004-01-01

    Actual heat treatment processes must face increasing specifications with reference to process quality, safety and results in terms of reproducibility and repeatability. They can be met only if the parts' surface condition is controlled during manufacturing and, especially, prior to the treatment. An electrochemical method for the detection of a steel part's surface condition is presented, together with results, consequences, and mechanisms concerning surface pre-treatment before the thermochemical process. A steel surface's activity or passivity can be detected electrochemically, independently from the chemical background. The selected method was the recording of potential vs. time curves at small constant currents, using a miniaturized electrochemical cell, a (nearly) non-destructive electrolyte and a potentio-galvanostatic setup. The method enables to distinguish types of surface contamination which do not interfere with the thermochemical process, from passive layers which do and must be removed. Whereas some types of passive layers can be removed using conventional cleaning processes and agents, others are so stable that their effects can only be overcome by applying an additional activation pre-treatment, e.g. oxynitriding.

  11. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R L; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  12. Wettability influences cell behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces with different topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenco, B.N.; Marchioli, G.; Song, W; Reis, R.L.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Apeldoorn, van A.A.; Mano, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wettability and topography are recognized as critical factors influencing cell behavior on biomaterials. So far only few works have reported cell responses on surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability in combination with surface topography. The goal of this work is to study whether cell behavi

  13. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Modelling and control of laser surface treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus Benardus Engelina

    1999-01-01

    The results of laser surface treatment may vary significantly during laser surface processing. These variations arise from the sensitivity of the process to disturbances, such as varying absorptivity and the small dimensions of the work piece. To increase the reproducibility of the process, a real-t

  15. Process control of laser surface alloying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Meijer, J.; Olde Benneker, Jeroen

    1998-01-01

    In spite of the many advantages of laser surface treatment, such as high production rates and low induced thermal distortion, and its great potential for modifying the surface properties of a wide range of new and existing materials, industrial applications are still limited. This is not only

  16. Modelling and control of laser surface treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina

    1999-01-01

    The results of laser surface treatment may vary significantly during laser surface processing. These variations arise from the sensitivity of the process to disturbances, such as varying absorptivity and the small dimensions of the work piece. To increase the reproducibility of the process, a

  17. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  18. Expert S-surface control for autonomous underwater vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; PANG Yong-jie; SU Yu-min; ZHAO Fu-long; QIN Zai-bai

    2008-01-01

    S-surface control has proven to be an effective means for motion control of underwater autonomous vehicles (AUV). However there are still problems maintaining steady precision of course due to the constant need to adjust parameters,especially where there are disturbing currents. Thus an intelligent integral was introduced to improve precision. An expert S-surface control was developed to tune the parameters on-line,based on the expert system,it provides S-surface control according to practical experience and control knowledge. To prevent control output over-compensation,a fuzzy neural network was included to adjust the production rules to the knowledge base. Experiments were conducted on an AUV simulation platform,and the results show that the expert S-surface controller performs better than an S-surface controller in environments with currents,producing good steady precision of course in a robust way.

  19. Knowledge discovery of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing

    High-throughput cell culture is an emerging technology that shows promise as a tool for research in tissue engineering, drug discovery, and medical diagnostics. An important, but overlooked, challenge is the integration of experimental methods with information processing suitable for handling large databases of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. In this work the traditional global descriptions of cell behaviors and surface characteristics was shown insufficient for investigating short-distance cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions. Traditional summary metrics cannot distinguish information of cell near neighborhood from the average, global features, thus often is not suitable for studying distance-sensitive cell behaviors. The problem of traditional summary metrics was addressed by introducing individual-cell based local metrics that emphasize cell local environment. An individual-cell based local data analysis method was established. Contact inhibition of cell proliferation was used as a benchmark for the effectiveness of the local metrics and the method. Where global, summary metrics were unsuccessful, the local metrics successfully and quantitatively distinguished the contact inhibition effects of MC3T3-E1 cells on PLGA, PCL, and TCPS surfaces. In order to test the new metrics and analysis method in detail, a model of cell contact inhibition was proposed. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for validating the individual-cell based local data analysis method as well as the cell model itself. The simulation results well matched with the experimental observations. The parameters used in the cell model provided new descriptions of both cell behaviors and surface characteristics. Based on the viewpoint of individual cells, the local metrics and local data analysis method were extended to the investigation of cell-surface interactions, and a new high-throughput screening and knowledge discovery method on combinatorial libraries, local cell

  20. Development of Control Models and a Robust Multivariable Controller for Surface Shape Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, Scott Eric [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2003-06-18

    Surface shape control techniques are applied to many diverse disciplines, such as adaptive optics, noise control, aircraft flutter control and satellites, with an objective to achieve a desirable shape for an elastic body by the application of distributed control forces. Achieving the desirable shape is influenced by many factors, such as, actuator locations, sensor locations, surface precision and controller performance. Building prototypes to complete design optimizations or controller development can be costly or impractical. This shortfall, puts significant value in developing accurate modeling and control simulation approaches. This thesis focuses on the field of adaptive optics, although these developments have the potential for application in many other fields. A static finite element model is developed and validated using a large aperture interferometer system. This model is then integrated into a control model using a linear least squares algorithm and Shack-Hartmann sensor. The model is successfully exercised showing functionality for various wavefront aberrations. Utilizing a verified model shows significant value in simulating static surface shape control problems with quantifiable uncertainties. A new dynamic model for a seven actuator deformable mirror is presented and its accuracy is proven through experiment. Bond graph techniques are used to generate the state space model of the multi-actuator deformable mirror including piezo-electric actuator dynamics. Using this verified model, a robust multi-input multi-output (MIMO) H controller is designed and implemented. This controller proved superior performance as compared to a standard proportional-integral controller (PI) design.

  1. Vaccines based on the cell surface carbohydrates of pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugate vaccines, in which a cell surface carbohydrate from a micro-organism is covalently attached to an appropriate carrier protein are proving to be the most effective means to generate protective immune responses to prevent a wide range of diseases. The technology appears to be generic and applicable to a wide range of pathogens, as long as antibodies against surface carbohydrates help protect against infection. Three such vaccines, against Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis Group C and seven serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae, have already been licensed and many others are in development. This article discusses the rationale for the development and use of glycoconjugate vaccines, the mechanisms by which they elicit T cell-dependent immune responses and the implications of this for vaccine development, the role of physicochemical methods in the characterisation and quality control of these vaccines, and the novel products which are under development.

  2. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weian Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1 targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2 programming assembly of cells for tissue engineering, 3 bioimaging and sensing, and ultimately 4 manipulating cell biology.

  3. Surface modified alginate microcapsules for 3D cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-06-01

    Culture as three dimensional cell aggregates or spheroids can offer an ideal platform for tissue engineering applications and for pharmaceutical screening. Such 3D culture models, however, may suffer from the problems such as immune response and ineffective and cumbersome culture. This paper describes a simple method for producing microcapsules with alginate cores and a thin shell of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) to encapsulate mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS) cells, generating a non-fouling surface as an effective immunoisolation barrier. We demonstrated the trapping of the alginate microcapsules in a microwell array for the continuous observation and culture of a large number of encapsulated miPS cells in parallel. miPS cells cultured in the microcapsules survived well and proliferated to form a single cell aggregate. Droplet formation of monodisperse microcapsules with controlled size combined with flow cytometry provided an efficient way to quantitatively analyze the growth of encapsulated cells in a high-throughput manner. The simple and cost-effective coating technique employed to produce the core-shell microcapsules could be used in the emerging field of cell therapy. The microwell array would provide a convenient, user friendly and high-throughput platform for long-term cell culture and monitoring.

  4. E-beam-patterned hydrogels to control nanoscale surface bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsko, P.; Saaem, I.; Clancy, R.; Geller, H.; Soteropoulos, P.; Libera, M.

    2005-11-01

    We are interested in controlling the spatial distribution of proteins on surfaces at cellular and subcellular length scales. To do this, we use a variation of e-beam lithography in a field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) to radiation crosslink thin films of water- soluble polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] and poly (carboxylic acids). We can simultaneously pattern the resulting hydrogels on silicon or glass surfaces with nanoscale and microscale feature sizes. Using hydroxy-terminated PEG 6800 we create gels with swell ratios between unity and fifteen depending on the degree of radiation crosslinking, and the swelling properties can be interpreted in terms of the Flory-Rehner formulation modified for one-dimensional swelling. While lightly-crosslinked PEG gels resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion as expected, highly crosslinked PEG gels adsorb such proteins as fibronectin and laminin and consequently become adhesive to fibroblasts, macrophages, and neurons. By spatially modulating the degree of crosslinking, we can localize these cells on surfaces and, for example, direct neurite outgrowth. If instead of using hydroxy-terminated PEG we use amine- terminated PEG, we introduce the additional flexibility of creating high-swelling PEG gels that resist nonspecific protein adsorption but to which specific proteins can be covalently bound. These can be surface patterned at submicron spacings, and we can pattern 7500 nanohydrogels in a 100 micron diameter arrays in 10 seconds. This is an areal density ~104 times greater than a modern DNA/protein chip, and the required bioreagents for chip fabrication and processing are proportionately less. We can bind fibronectin and laminin to different arrays, and we show that these proteins maintain their biospecificity after binding to the nanohydrogels with high fidelity. Looking to applications in next-generation protein-chip technology, our most recent experiments compare the performance of nanohydrogel

  5. Cell size control - a mechanism for maintaining fitness and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Caldez, Matias J; Kaldis, Philipp; Björklund, Mikael

    2017-09-01

    The maintenance of cell size homeostasis has been studied for years in different cellular systems. With the focus on 'what regulates cell size', the question 'why cell size needs to be maintained' has been largely overlooked. Recent evidence indicates that animal cells exhibit nonlinear cell size dependent growth rates and mitochondrial metabolism, which are maximal in intermediate sized cells within each cell population. Increases in intracellular distances and changes in the relative cell surface area impose biophysical limitations on cells, which can explain why growth and metabolic rates are maximal in a specific cell size range. Consistently, aberrant increases in cell size, for example through polyploidy, are typically disadvantageous to cellular metabolism, fitness and functionality. Accordingly, cellular hypertrophy can potentially predispose to or worsen metabolic diseases. We propose that cell size control may have emerged as a guardian of cellular fitness and metabolic activity. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Controlling the surface nanostructure of ZnO and Al-doped ZnO thin films using electrostatic spraying for their application in 12% efficient perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Swain, Bhabani Sankar; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, ZnO and Al-doped ZnO films were deposited using the electrospraying method and studied for the first time as photoanodes for efficient perovskite solar cells. Effects of substrate temperature, deposition time, applied voltage, substrate-to-nozzle distance and flow rate (droplet size) on the morphology of ZnO were studied with the help of FE-SEM images. The major factors such as the droplet size of the spray, substrate temperature and substrate-to-nozzle distance at deposition control the film morphology. Indeed, these factors determine the density of the film, its smoothness and the flow of solution over the substrate. The droplet size was controlled by the flow rate of the spray. The substrate-to-nozzle distance and flow rate will both regulate the solution amount deposited on the surface of the substrate. The most favorable conditions for a good quality ZnO thin film were a long substrate-to-nozzle distance and lower solution flow rates. In situ droplet size measurement shows that the size and dispersion of particles were narrowed. The method was shown to have a high deposition rate and efficiency relative to well-established thin film deposition techniques such as chemical and physical vapor deposition. In addition, it also allows easy control of the microstructure and stoichiometry of the deposits. The pure ZnO film produced under optimum conditions (440 nm thick) demonstrated a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.8% when used as a photoanode for perovskite solar cells, owing to its high porosity, uniform morphology and efficient electron transport. For thicker films a drastic decrease in PCE was observed due to their low porosity. We also observed that the open-circuit voltage increases from 1010 mV to 1045 mV and also the PCE increases from 10.8% to 12.0% when pure ZnO films were doped with aluminum (Al). Under atmospheric pressure, the electrospraying system produces the reasonably uniform-sized droplets of smaller size, so the films

  7. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  8. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  9. Conditions of lateral surface confinement that promote tissue-cell integration and inhibit biofilm growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yi; Da Silva Domingues, Joana E.; Subbiandoss, Guruprakash; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Libera, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Surfaces with cell adhesiveness modulated at micro length scales can exploit differences between tissue/bacterial cell size, membrane/wall plasticity, and adhesion mechanisms to differentially control tissue-cell/material and bacteria/material interactions. This study explores the short-term interac

  10. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Growth of fibroblasts and endothelial cells on wettability gradient surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Moorlag, HE; Schakenraad, JM; VanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    The growth, spreading, and shape of human skin fibroblasts (PK 84) and human umbilical cord endothelial cells on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS) and dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DOGS) gradient surfaces were investigated in the presence of serum proteins. Gradient surfaces were prepared on glass using

  12. Control System Design for a Surface Cleaning Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai Yuyi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study a control system for a surface cleaning robot and the focus of the study is the surface cleaning robot controller design. The structural framework of the propulsion control system of the surface robot is designed based on the principle of PWM speed control. The function of each module in the control system is divided and described in detail. A kind of thinking based on an AVR microprocessor and its software and hardware design proposals are presented. Through RS485 and PC communication according to the agreed protocol, the control system achieves robot forward, backward, turn and work operations by the use of a DC motor or stepper motor, and it can therefore more successfully realize the work of a surface cleaning robot.

  13. Satellite Reentry Control Via Surface Area Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    balloon will act as a parachute that will decrease the potential energy of the object through atmospheric drag. This is most effective by objects...atmosphere. During these activities the sun releases tremendous amounts of energy and mass, producing strong winds. These winds change the earth’s atmosphere...an ant falling from a skyscraper will survive and go on to carry fifty times its own weight. Even biological cells stay at the microscopic size levels

  14. Surface position, not signaling from surrounding maternal tissues, specifies aleurone epidermal cell fate in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruis, Darren Fred; Guo, Hena; Selinger, David; Tian, Qing; Olsen, Odd-Arne

    2006-07-01

    Maize (Zea mays) endosperm consists of an epidermal-like surface layer of aleurone cells, an underlying body of starchy endosperm cells, and a basal layer of transfer cells. To determine whether surrounding maternal tissues perform a role in specifying endosperm cell fates, a maize endosperm organ culture technique was established whereby the developing endosperm is completely removed from surrounding maternal tissues. Using cell type-specific fluorescence markers, we show that aleurone cell fate specification occurs exclusively in response to surface position and does not require specific, continued maternal signal input. The starchy endosperm and aleurone cell fates are freely interchangeable throughout the lifespan of the endosperm, with internalized aleurone cells converting to starchy endosperm cells and with starchy endosperm cells that become positioned at the surface converting to aleurone cells. In contrast to aleurone and starchy endosperm cells, transfer cells fail to develop in in vitro-grown endosperm, supporting earlier indications that maternal tissue interaction is required to fully differentiate this cell type. Several parameters confirm that the maize endosperm organ cultures described herein retain the main developmental features of in planta endosperm, including fidelity of aleurone mutant phenotypes, temporal and spatial control of cell type-specific fluorescent markers, specificity of cell type transcripts, and control of mitotic cell divisions.

  15. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  16. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins.

  17. Protein adsorption to graphene surfaces controlled by chemical modification of the substrate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ogino, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated effects of the support substrate surfaces on properties of the attached graphene flakes by observing protein adsorption to the graphene surfaces on SiO2/Si substrates that are modified with self-assembled monolayers to control their hydrophilicity. Using atomic force microscopy operated in aqueous environment, we found that high-density clusters of agglomerated avidin molecules form on the graphene flakes in the areas supported by a hydrophobic substrate surface, whereas very low density of large avidin clusters form at the edge of graphene flakes in the area supported by a hydrophilic surface. These results demonstrate that hydrophilicity of the support surface affects hydrophilicity of the graphene surface also in aqueous environment and that surface modification of the support substrate is a useful technique to control protein adsorption phenomena on graphene surfaces for realization of high sensitive graphene biosensors.

  18. Cell Surface Enzymatic Engineering-Based Approaches to Improve Cellular Therapies

    KAUST Repository

    AbuElela, Ayman

    2014-06-06

    The cell surface represents the interface between the cell and its environment. As such, the cell surface controls cell–cell interactions and functions such as adhesion and migration, and will transfer external cues to regulate processes such as survival, death, and differentiation. Redefining the cell surface by temporarily (or permanently) modifying the molecular landscape of the plasma membrane affects the way in which the cell interacts with its environment and influences the information that is relayed into the cell along downstream signaling pathways. This chapter outlines the role of key enzymes, the glycosyltransferases, in posttranslationally modifying proteins and lipids to fine-tune cells, ability to migrate. These enzymes are critical in controlling the formation of a platform structure, sialyl Lewis x (sLex), on circulating cells that plays a central role in the recognition and recruitment by selectin counter receptors on endothelial cells that line blood vessels of tissues throughout the body. By developing methods to manipulate the activity of these enzymes and hence the cell surface structures that result, treatments can be envisioned that direct the migration of therapeutic cells to specific locations throughout the body and also to inhibit metastasis of detrimental cells such as circulating tumor cells.

  19. ProtEx: a novel technology to display exogenous proteins on the cell surface for immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra P; Yolcu, Esma S; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2005-11-01

    Gene therapy as an immunomodulatory approach has the potential to treat various inherited and acquired immune-based human diseases. However, its clinical application has several challenges, varying from the efficiency of gene transfer, control of gene expression, cell and tissue targeting, and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA into cells/tissues. Gene therapy is also a time- and labor-intensive procedure. As an alternative, we recently developed a novel technology, ProtEx, that allows for rapid, efficient, and durable display of exogenous proteins on the surface of cells, tissues, and organs without detectable toxicity. This technology exploits the strong binding affinity (Kd = 10(-15) M) of streptavidin with biotin and involves generation of chimeric molecules composed of the extracellular portions of immunological proteins of interest and a modified form of streptavidin, biotinylation of biological surfaces, and decoration of the modified surface with chimeric proteins. Biotin persists on the cell surface for weeks both in vitro and in vivo, thereby providing a platform to display exogenous proteins with extended cell surface kinetics. Two chimeric proteins, rat FasL (SA-FasL) and human CD80 (CD80-SA), were generated and tested for cell surface display and immunomodulatory functions. SA-FasL and CD80-SA molecules persisted on the surface of various cell types for extended periods, varying from days to weeks in vitro and in vivo. The cell surface kinetics, however, were protein and cell type dependent. SA-FasL showed potent apoptotic activity against Fas+ cells as a soluble protein or displayed on the cell surface and effectively blocked alloreactive responses. The display of CD80-SA on the surface of tumor cells, however, converted them into antigen-presenting cells for effective stimulation of autologous and allogeneic T-cell responses. ProtEx technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA

  20. A mass spectrometric-derived cell surface protein atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments.

  1. A mass spectrometric-derived cell surface protein atlas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damaris Bausch-Fluck

    Full Text Available Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa. The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments.

  2. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  3. Effect of antimicrobials applied on the surface of beef subprimals via an air-assisted electrostatic spraying system(ESS)or the Sprayed Lethality in Container(SLIC)method to control Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the efficacy of an air-assisted electrostatic spraying system (ESS) and/or the Sprayed Lethality in Container (SLIC®) method to deliver antimicrobials onto the surface of beef subprimals to reduce levels of Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia coli (STEC). In brief, beef subprimal...

  4. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  5. Controlling grass weeds on hard surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Kristoffersen, Palle; Andreasen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    malezas gramíneas. El objetivo de este experimento fue optimizar el control de Poa annua y Lolium perenne, ambas especies muy difíciles de controlar sin herbicidas. La biomasa aérea de 72 plantas por tratamiento se cosechó y los pesos secos se registraron en intervalos regulares para investigar cómo las...... y también el índice de floración de las plantas de P. annua. Sin embargo, solamente murieron unas cuantas plantas. El primer tratamiento afectó la biomasa aérea más que el segundo tratamiento. Un intervalo entre tratamientos de siete días proporcionó la mayor reducción de regeneración de L. perenne...

  6. Anchoring energy enhancement and pretilt angle control of liquid crystal alignment on polymerized surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Libo; Chien, Liang-Chy [Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Liao, Pei-Chun [Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); AU Optronics Corporation, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chen-Chun; Ting, Tien-Lun; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Su, Jenn-Jia [AU Optronics Corporation, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate enhanced surface anchoring energy and control of pretilt angle in a nematic liquid crystal cell with vertical alignment and polymerized surfaces (PS-VA). The polymerized surfaces are formed by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced phase separation of a minute amount of a reactive monomer in the vertical-aligned nematic liquid crystal. By introducing a bias voltage during UV curing, surface-localized polymer protrusions with a dimension of 100nm and a field-induced pretilt angle are observed. Experimental evidences and theoretical analyses validate that PS-VA has increased surface anchoring strength by two folds and pretilt angle has been changed from 89° to 86° compared to those of a VA cell. The enabling PS-VA cell technique with excel electro-optical properties such as very good dark state, high optical contrast, and fast rise and decay times may lead to development of a wide range of applications.

  7. Anchoring energy enhancement and pretilt angle control of liquid crystal alignment on polymerized surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Weng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate enhanced surface anchoring energy and control of pretilt angle in a nematic liquid crystal cell with vertical alignment and polymerized surfaces (PS-VA. The polymerized surfaces are formed by ultraviolet (UV irradiation-induced phase separation of a minute amount of a reactive monomer in the vertical-aligned nematic liquid crystal. By introducing a bias voltage during UV curing, surface-localized polymer protrusions with a dimension of 100nm and a field-induced pretilt angle are observed. Experimental evidences and theoretical analyses validate that PS-VA has increased surface anchoring strength by two folds and pretilt angle has been changed from 89° to 86° compared to those of a VA cell. The enabling PS-VA cell technique with excel electro-optical properties such as very good dark state, high optical contrast, and fast rise and decay times may lead to development of a wide range of applications.

  8. Adaptive Fuzzy Dynamic Surface Control for Uncertain Nonlinear Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yuan Luo; Zhi-Hao Zhu; Xin-Ping Guan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a robust adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems is proposed. A novel adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface model is built to approximate the uncertain nonlinear functions by only one fuzzy logic system. The approximation capability of this model is proved and the model is implemented to solve the problem that too many approximators are used in the controller design of uncertain nonlinear systems. The shortage of "explosion of complexity" in backstepping design procedure is overcome by using the proposed dynamic surface control method. It is proved by constructing appropriate Lyapunov candidates that all signals of closed-loop systems are semi-globaily uniformly ultimate bounded. Also, this novel controller stabilizes the states of uncertain nonlinear systems faster than the adaptive sliding mode controller (SMC). Two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the control approach proposed in this paper.

  9. Cell surface engineering of yeast for applications in white biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface engineering is a promising strategy for the molecular breeding of whole-cell biocatalysts. By using this strategy, yeasts can be constructed by the cell surface display of functional proteins; these yeasts are referred to as arming yeasts. Because reactions using arming yeasts as whole-cell biocatalysts occur on the cell surface, materials that cannot enter the cell can be used as reaction substrates. Numerous arming yeasts have therefore been constructed for a wide range of uses such as biofuel production, synthesis of valuable chemicals, adsorption or degradation of environmental pollutants, recovery of rare metal ions, and biosensors. Here, we review the science of yeast cell surface modification as well as current applications and future opportunities.

  10. Smart nanofibers with a photoresponsive surface for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guo-Dong; Xu, Li-Qun; Yao, Fang; Li, Guo-Liang; Kang, En-Tang

    2009-11-01

    A novel photocontrolled "ON-OFF" release system for the alpha-cyclodextrin-5-fluorouracial (alpha-CD-5FU) prodrug, based on host-guest interaction on the photoresponsive and cross-linked nanofiber surface, was demonstrated. The nanofibers with a stimuli-responsive surface were electrospun from the block copolymer prepared via controlled radical polymerization, followed by surface modification via "Click Chemistry", and loading of the prodrug via host-guest interaction.

  11. Optimal Control Surface Layout for an Aeroservoelastic Wingbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a technique for locating the optimal control surface layout of an aeroservoelastic Common Research Model wingbox, in the context of maneuver load alleviation and active utter suppression. The combinatorial actuator layout design is solved using ideas borrowed from topology optimization, where the effectiveness of a given control surface is tied to a layout design variable, which varies from zero (the actuator is removed) to one (the actuator is retained). These layout design variables are optimized concurrently with a large number of structural wingbox sizing variables and control surface actuation variables, in order to minimize the sum of structural weight and actuator weight. Results are presented that demonstrate interdependencies between structural sizing patterns and optimal control surface layouts, for both static and dynamic aeroelastic physics.

  12. Flexible and Safe Control of Mobile Surface Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary innovation of this work is a novel Petri net based approach for safe and flexible control of highly capable mobile surface systems, such as long-duration...

  13. Morphing Flight Control Surface for Advanced Flight Performance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project, a new Morphing Flight Control Surface (MFCS) will be developed. The distinction of the research effort is that the SenAnTech team will employ...

  14. Flexible and Safe Control of Mobile Surface Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary innovation of this work is a novel approach for flexible and safe control of highly capable mobile surface systems, such as long-duration science rovers,...

  15. Effect of Q-switched Laser Surface Texturing of Titanium on Osteoblast Cell Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisey, K. T.; Scotchford, C. A.; Martin, L.; Gill, H. S.

    Titanium and its alloys are important biomedical materials. It is known that the surface texture of implanted medical devices affects cell response. Control of cell response has the potential to enhance fixation of implants into bone and, in other applications, to prevent undesired cell adhesion. The potential use of a 100W Q-switched YAG laser miller (DMG Lasertec 60 HSC) for texturing titanium is investigated. A series of regular features with dimensions of the order of tens of micrometers are generated in the surface of titanium samples and the cell response to these features is determined. Characterisation of the laser milled features reveals features with a lengthscale of a few microns superposed on the larger scale structures, this is attributed to resolidification of molten droplets generated and propelled over the surface by individual laser pulses. The laser textured samples are exposed to osteoblast cells and it is seen that cells do respond to the features in the laser textured surfaces.

  16. Proportional control valves integrated in silicon nitride surface channel technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Maarten S.; Groenesteijn, Jarno; Meutstege, Esken; Brookhuis, Robert A.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Lötters, Joost C.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed and realized two types of proportional microcontrol valves in a silicon nitride surface channel technology process. This enables on-die integration of flow controllers with other surface channel devices, such as pressure sensors or thermal or Coriolis-based (mass) flow sensors, to o

  17. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Ziwen; Le, Ngoc D. B.; Gupta, Akash; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed.

  18. Anomalous Surface Wave Launching by Handedness Phase Control

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xueqian

    2015-10-09

    Anomalous launch of a surface wave with different handedness phase control is achieved in a terahertz metasurface based on phase discontinuities. The polarity of the phase profile of the surface waves is found to be strongly correlated to the polarization handedness, promising polarization-controllable wavefront shaping, polarization sensing, and environmental refractive-index sensing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Microarray of neuroblastoma cells on the selectively functionalized nanocrystalline diamond thin film surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Sang; Son, Hyeong-Guk; Kim, Dae-Hoon; Oh, Hong-Gi; Lee, Da-Som; Kim, Min-Hye; Lim, Ki-Moo; Song, Kwang-Soup

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) film surfaces were modified with fluorine or oxygen by plasma treatment in an O2 or C3F8 gas environment in order to induce wettability. The oxygenated-NCD (O-NCD) film surface was hydrophilic and the fluorinated-NCD (F-NCD) surface was hydrophobic. The efficiency of early cell adhesion, which is dependent on the wettability of the cell culture plate and necessary for the growth and proliferation of cells, was 89.62 ± 3.92% on the O-NCD film and 7.78 ± 0.77% on the F-NCD film surface after 3 h of cell culture. The wettability of the NCD film surface was artificially modified using a metal mask and plasma treatment to fabricate a micro-pattern. Four types of micro-patterns were fabricated (line, circle, mesh, and word) on the NCD film surface. We precisely arrayed the neuroblastoma cells on the micro-patterned NCD film surfaces by controlling the surface wettability and cell seeding density. The neuroblastoma cells adhered and proliferated along the O-NCD film surface.

  20. Control of mesenchymal stem cell phenotype and differentiation depending on cell adhesion mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Control of cell-matrix adhesion has become an important issue in the regulation of stem cell function. In this study, a maltose-binding protein (MBP-linked basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2-immobilised polystyrene surface (PS-MBP-FGF2 was applied as an artificial matrix to regulate integrin-mediated signalling. We sought to characterise human mesenchymal-stem cell (hMSC behaviour in response to two different mechanisms of cell adhesion; (i FGF2-heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG-mediated adhesion vs. (ii fibronectin (FN-integrin-mediated adhesion. Heparin inhibited hMSC adhesion to PS-MBP-FGF2 but not to FN-coated surface. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, cytoskeletal re-organisation, and cell proliferation were restricted in hMSCs adhering to PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to FN-coated surface. Expression of MSC markers, such as CD105, CD90 and CD166, decreased in hMSCs expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to expression in cells expanded on FN-coated surface. hMSCs that were expanded on FN-coated surface differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic cells more readily than those that were expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Furthermore, we characterised the N-linked glycan structures of hMSCs depending on the cell adhesion mechanism using mass spectrometry (MS-based quantitative techniques. MS analysis revealed that 2,3-sialylated glycans, a potential marker of stem cell function, were more abundant on hMSCs expanded on FN-coated surface than on those expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Thus, the differentiation potential of hMSCs is controlled by the type of adhesion substrate that might provide an idea for the design of biomaterials to control stem cell fate. Elucidation of the glycan structure on the cell membrane may help characterise hMSC function.

  1. Control of mesenchymal stem cell phenotype and differentiation depending on cell adhesion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Park, H M; Kim, Y W; Kim, Y H; Varghese, S; Seok, H K; Kim, Y G; Kim, S H

    2014-11-25

    Control of cell-matrix adhesion has become an important issue in the regulation of stem cell function. In this study, a maltose-binding protein (MBP)-linked basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2)-immobilised polystyrene surface (PS-MBP-FGF2) was applied as an artificial matrix to regulate integrin-mediated signalling. We sought to characterise human mesenchymal-stem cell (hMSC) behaviour in response to two different mechanisms of cell adhesion; (i) FGF2-heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG)-mediated adhesion vs. (ii) fibronectin (FN)-integrin-mediated adhesion. Heparin inhibited hMSC adhesion to PS-MBP-FGF2 but not to FN-coated surface. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, cytoskeletal re-organisation, and cell proliferation were restricted in hMSCs adhering to PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to FN-coated surface. Expression of MSC markers, such as CD105, CD90 and CD166, decreased in hMSCs expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2 compared to expression in cells expanded on FN-coated surface. hMSCs that were expanded on FN-coated surface differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic cells more readily than those that were expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Furthermore, we characterised the N-linked glycan structures of hMSCs depending on the cell adhesion mechanism using mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative techniques. MS analysis revealed that 2,3-sialylated glycans, a potential marker of stem cell function, were more abundant on hMSCs expanded on FN-coated surface than on those expanded on PS-MBP-FGF2. Thus, the differentiation potential of hMSCs is controlled by the type of adhesion substrate that might provide an idea for the design of biomaterials to control stem cell fate. Elucidation of the glycan structure on the cell membrane may help characterise hMSC function.

  2. [Cell surface RNA--a possible molecular receptor of adaptogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenkov, A G; Kolotygina, I M

    1984-01-01

    When RNA of the cell surface is destroyed with RNAase, the effect of adaptogenes is removed. Such effect is produced by introduction of actinomycin D 30 minutes before intake of adaptogene. Destruction of surface RNA stimulates protein synthesis. Comparison of these facts permits a hypothesis to be advanced saying that surface RNA is a receptor of adaptogenes obtained from plants of Aralia family.

  3. FABRICATION AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF CELL OUTER MEMBRANE MIMETIC SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-ming Zong; Yong-kuan Gong

    2011-01-01

    The surface design used for improving biocompatibility is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. For mimicking the ideal surface structure of cell outer membrane, a large number of polymers bearing phosphorylcholine (PC) groups have been employed to modify the surfaces of biomaterials and medical devices. It has been demonstrated that the biocompatibility of the modified materials whose surface is required to interact with a living organism has been obviously improved by introducing PC groups. In this review, the fabrication strategies of cell outer membrane mimetic surfaces and their resulted biocompatibilities were summarized.

  4. Controlling Growth and Osteogenic Differentiation of Osteoblasts on Microgrooved Polystyrene Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lanying; Pereira, Daniel; Wang, Qibao; Barata, David Baião; Truckenmüller, Roman; Li, Zhaoyuan; Xu, Xin; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Surface topography is increasingly being recognized as an important factor to control the response of cells and tissues to biomaterials. In the current study, the aim was to obtain deeper understanding of the effect of microgrooves on shape and orientation of osteoblast-like cells and to relate this effect to their proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. To this end, two microgrooved polystyrene (PS) substrates, differing in the width of the grooves (about 2 μm and 4 μm) and distance between individual grooves (about 6 μm and 11 μm, respectively) were fabricated using a combination of photolithography and hot embossing. MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were cultured on these microgrooved surfaces, with unpatterned hot-embossed PS substrate as a control. Scanning electron- and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that on patterned surfaces, the cells aligned along the microgrooves. The cells cultured on 4 μm-grooves / 11 μm-ridges surface showed a more pronounced alignment and a somewhat smaller cell area and cell perimeter as compared to cells cultured on surface with 2 μm-grooves / 6 μm-ridges or unpatterned PS. PrestoBlue analysis and quantification of DNA amounts suggested that microgrooves used in this experiment did not have a strong effect on cell metabolic activity or proliferation. However, cell differentiation towards the osteogenic lineage was significantly enhanced when MG-63 cells were cultured on the 2/6 substrate, as compared to the 4/11 substrate or unpatterned PS. This effect on osteogenic differentiation may be related to differences in cell spreading between the substrates.

  5. Controlling Growth and Osteogenic Differentiation of Osteoblasts on Microgrooved Polystyrene Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lanying; Pereira, Daniel; Wang, Qibao; Barata, David Baião; Truckenmüller, Roman; Li, Zhaoyuan; Xu, Xin; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Surface topography is increasingly being recognized as an important factor to control the response of cells and tissues to biomaterials. In the current study, the aim was to obtain deeper understanding of the effect of microgrooves on shape and orientation of osteoblast-like cells and to relate this effect to their proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. To this end, two microgrooved polystyrene (PS) substrates, differing in the width of the grooves (about 2 μm and 4 μm) and distance between individual grooves (about 6 μm and 11 μm, respectively) were fabricated using a combination of photolithography and hot embossing. MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were cultured on these microgrooved surfaces, with unpatterned hot-embossed PS substrate as a control. Scanning electron- and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that on patterned surfaces, the cells aligned along the microgrooves. The cells cultured on 4 μm-grooves / 11 μm-ridges surface showed a more pronounced alignment and a somewhat smaller cell area and cell perimeter as compared to cells cultured on surface with 2 μm-grooves / 6 μm-ridges or unpatterned PS. PrestoBlue analysis and quantification of DNA amounts suggested that microgrooves used in this experiment did not have a strong effect on cell metabolic activity or proliferation. However, cell differentiation towards the osteogenic lineage was significantly enhanced when MG-63 cells were cultured on the 2/6 substrate, as compared to the 4/11 substrate or unpatterned PS. This effect on osteogenic differentiation may be related to differences in cell spreading between the substrates. PMID:27571520

  6. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  7. Attachment of human primary osteoblast cells to modified polyethylene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsson, Alexandra H C; Mitchell, Stephen A; Davidson, Marcus R; Johnstone, Alan J; Emmison, Neil; Bradley, Robert H

    2009-04-09

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has a long history of use in medical devices, primarily for articulating surfaces due to its inherent low surface energy which limits tissue integration. To widen the applications of UHMWPE, the surface energy can be increased. The increase in surface energy would improve the adsorption of proteins and attachment of cells to allow tissue integration, thereby allowing UHMWPE to potentially be used for a wider range of implants. The attachment and function of human primary osteoblast-like (HOB) cells to surfaces of UHMWPE with various levels of incorporated surface oxygen have been investigated. The surface modification of the UHMWPE was produced by exposure to a UV/ozone treatment. The resulting surface chemistry was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the topography and surface structure were probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which showed an increase in surface oxygen from 11 to 26 atom % with no significant change to the surface topography. The absolute root mean square roughness of both untreated and UV/ozone-treated surfaces was within 350-450 nm, and the water contact angles decreased with increasing oxygen incorporation, i.e., showing an increase in surface hydrophilicity. Cell attachment and functionality were assessed over a 21 day period for each cell-surface combination studied; these were performed using SEM and the alamarBlue assay to study cell attachment and proliferation and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis to confirm extracellular mineral deposits, and total protein assay to examine the intra- and extracellular protein expressed by the cells. HOB cells cultured for 21 days on the modified UHMWPE surfaces with 19 and 26 atom % oxygen incorporated showed significantly higher cell densities compared to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) from day 3 onward. This indicated that the cells attached and proliferated more

  8. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  9. Touching Textured Surfaces: Cells in Somatosensory Cortex Respond Both to Finger Movement and to Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darian-Smith, Ian; Sugitani, Michio; Heywood, John; Karita, Keishiro; Goodwin, Antony

    1982-11-01

    Single neurons in Brodmann's areas 3b and 1 of the macaque postcentral gyrus discharge when the monkey rubs the contralateral finger pads across a textured surface. Both the finger movement and the spatial pattern of the surface determine this discharge in each cell. The spatial features of the surface are represented unambiguously only in the responses of populations of these neurons, and not in the responses of the constituent cells.

  10. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-03-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices.

  11. Control of Cellular Arrangement by Surface Topography Induced by Plastic Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aira Matsugaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The anisotropic microstructure of bone tissue is crucial for appropriate mechanical and biological functions of bone. We recently revealed that the construction of oriented bone matrix is established by osteoblast alignment; there is a quite unique correlation between cell alignment and cell-produced bone matrix orientation governed by the molecular interactions between material surface and cells. Titanium and its alloys are one of the most attractive materials for biomedical applications. We previously succeeded in controlling cellular arrangement using the dislocations of a crystallographic slip system in titanium single crystals with hexagonal close-packing (hcp crystal lattice. Here, we induced a specific surface topography by deformation twinning and dislocation motion to control cell orientation. Dislocation and deformation twinning were introduced into α-titanium polycrystals in compression, inducing a characteristic surface structure involving nanometer-scale highly concentrated twinning traces. The plastic deformation-induced surface topography strongly influenced osteoblast orientation, causing them to align preferentially along the slip and twinning traces. This surface morphology, exhibiting a characteristic grating structure, controlled the localization of focal adhesions and subsequent elongation of stress fibers in osteoblasts. These results indicate that cellular responses against dislocation and deformation twinning are useful for controlling osteoblast alignment and the resulting bone matrix anisotropy.

  12. Polarization controlled directional propagation of Bloch surface wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Suarez, Miguel; Salut, Roland; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-03-06

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are recently developing alternative to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Due to dramatically enhanced propagation distance and strong field confinement these surface states can be successfully used in on-chip all-optical integrated devices of increased complexity. In this work we propose a highly miniaturized grating based BSW coupler which is gathering launching and directional switching functionalities in a single element. This device allows to control with polarization the propagation direction of Bloch surface waves at subwavelength scale, thus impacting a large panel of domains such as optical circuitry, function design, quantum optics, etc.

  13. Surface functionalization of nanobiomaterials for application in stem cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Deepti; Ramasamy, Keerthana; Leena, Maria; Jiménez, Constanza; Campos, Javier; Ibarra, Paula; Haidar, Ziyad S; Ramalingam, Murugan

    2016-05-01

    Stem cell-based approaches offer great application potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine owing to their ability of sensing the microenvironment and respond accordingly (dynamic behavior). Recently, the combination of nanobiomaterials with stem cells has paved a great way for further exploration. Nanobiomaterials with engineered surfaces could mimic the native microenvironment to which the seeded stem cells could adhere and migrate. Surface functionalized nanobiomaterial-based scaffolds could then be used to regulate or control the cellular functions to culture stem cells and regenerate damaged tissues or organs. Therefore, controlling the interactions between nanobiomaterials and stem cells is a critical factor. However, surface functionalization or modification techniques has provided an alternative approach for tailoring the nanobiomaterials surface in accordance to the physiological surrounding of a living cells; thereby, enhancing the structural and functional properties of the engineered tissues and organs. Currently, there are a variety of methods and technologies available to modify the surface of biomaterials according to the specific cell or tissue properties to be regenerated. This review highlights the trends in surface modification techniques for nanobiomaterials and the biological relevance in stem cell-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:554-567, 2016.

  14. Exercising Spatiotemporal Control of Cell Attachment with Optically Transparent Microelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sunny S.; Lee, Ji Youn; Verkhoturov, Stanislav; Tuleuova, Nazgul; Schweikert, Emile A.; Ramanculov, Erlan; Revzin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach of controlling cell-surface interactions through an electrochemical “switching” of biointerfacial properties of optically transparent microelectrodes. The indium tin oxide (ITO) microelectrodes, fabricated on glass substrates, were modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane to make glass and ITO regions resistant to protein and cell adhesion. Cyclic voltammetry, with potassium ferricyanide serving as a redox reporter molecule, was used to monitor el...

  15. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  16. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  17. Altered T cell surface glycosylation in HIV-1 infection results in increased susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Fukuda, Minoru; Baum, Linda G; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2003-12-01

    The massive T cell death that occurs in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection contributes profoundly to the pathophysiology associated with AIDS. The mechanisms controlling cell death of both infected and uninfected T cells ("bystander" death) are not completely understood. We have shown that HIV-1 infection of T cells results in altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins; specifically, it decreased sialylation and increased expression of core 2 O-glycans. Galectin-1 is an endogenous human lectin that recognizes these types of glycosylation changes and induces cell death of activated lymphocytes. Therefore we studied the possible contribution of galectin-1 in the pathophysiology of AIDS. O-glycan modifications were investigated on peripheral lymphocytes from AIDS patients. Oligosaccharides from CD43 and CD45 of CEM cells latently infected with HIV-1 were chemically analyzed. Consistent with our previous results, we show that HIV-1 infection results in accumulation of exposed lactosamine residues, oligosaccharides recognized by galectin-1 on cell surface glycoproteins. Both latently HIV-1-infected T cell lines and peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells from AIDS patients exhibited exposed lactosamine residues and demonstrated marked susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, in contrast to control cultures or cells from uninfected donors. The fraction of cells that died in response to galectin-1 exceeded the fraction of infected cells, indicating that death of uninfected cells occurred. Altered cell surface glycosylation of T cells during HIV-1 infection increases the susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, and this death pathway can contribute to loss of both infected and uninfected T cells in AIDS.

  18. JAM-C is an apical surface marker for neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Sandra; Worlitzer, Maik M A; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Hemmer, Kathrin; Rugani, Kirité; Werthschulte, Inga; Schön, Anna-Lena; Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Bunk, Eva C; Palm, Thomas; Ebnet, Klaus; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2012-03-20

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is an adhesive cell surface protein expressed in various cell types. JAM-C localizes to the apically localized tight junctions (TJs) between contacting endothelial and epithelial cells, where it contributes to cell-cell adhesions. Just as those epithelial cells, also neural stem cells are highly polarized along their apical-basal axis. The defining feature of all stem cells, including neural stem cells (NSCs) is their ability to self renew. This self-renewal depends on the tight control of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. In NSCs, the decision whether a division is symmetric or asymmetric largely depends on the distribution of the apical membrane and cell fate determinants on the basal pole of the cell. In this study we demonstrate that JAM-C is expressed on neural progenitor cells and neural stem cells in the embryonic as well as the adult mouse brain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in vivo JAM-C shows enrichment at the apical surface and therefore is asymmetrically distributed during cell divisions. These results define JAM-C as a novel surface marker for neural stem cells.

  19. Lack of increased expression of cell surface markers for circulating fibrocyte progenitors in limited scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, R; Medbury, H; Guiffre, A; Englert, H; Manolios, N

    2007-07-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of scleroderma is incompletely understood. Recently, a cell called the fibrocyte has been shown to be derived from circulating monocytes with the ability to produce collagen. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in the cell surface characteristics of circulating fibrocyte progenitors (monocytes) in patients with limited scleroderma compared to controls. A case-control study was performed in eight patients with limited scleroderma, which were matched with eight controls. Three-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the relative expression of cell surface markers. Statistical analysis then compared the relative expression between the two groups. In this preliminary study, there were no significant differences in the expression of circulating monocyte surface molecules involved with cell transformation, function, or migration presumed to give rise to fibrocytes, in a population of patients with limited scleroderma. Various explanations for the results are discussed.

  20. Engineered antifouling microtopographies: surface pattern effects on cell distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Joseph T; Sheats, Julian T; Brennan, Anthony B

    2014-12-23

    Microtopography has been observed to lead to altered attachment behavior for marine fouling organisms; however, quantification of this phenomenon is lacking in the scientific literature. Here, we present quantitative measurement of the disruption of normal attachment behavior of the fouling algae Ulva linza by antifouling microtopographies. The distribution of the diatom Navicula incerta was shown to be unaffected by the presence of topography. The radial distribution function was calculated for both individual zoospores and cells as well as aggregates of zoospores from attachment data for a variety topographic configurations and at a number of different attachment densities. Additionally, the screening distance and maximum values were mapped according to the location of zoospore aggregates within a single unit cell. We found that engineered topographies decreased the distance between spore aggregates compared to that for a smooth control surface; however, the distributions for individual spores were unchanged. We also found that the local attachment site geometry affected the screening distance for aggregates of zoospores, with certain geometries decreasing screening distance and others having no measurable effect. The distribution mapping techniques developed and explored in this article have yielded important insight into the design parameters for antifouling microtopographies that can be implemented in the next generation of antifouling surfaces.

  1. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Zorzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions.

  2. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  3. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  4. Interaction of Epithelial Cells with Surfaces and Surfaces Decorated by Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, Daniele; Beil, Michael; Paust, T; Huang, C; Moosmann, M; Jin, J; Heiler, T; Gröger, R; Schimmel, Thomas; Walheim, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the interface between living cells and substrate materials is of rising importance in many fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology. Cells at interfaces often form epithelia. The physical barrier that they form is one of their main functions. It is governed by the properties of the networks forming the cytoskeleton systems and by cell-to-cell contacts. Different substrates with varying surface properties modify the migration velocity of the cells. On the one hand one can change the materials composition. Organic and inorganic materials induce differing migration velocities in the same cell system. Within the same class of materials, a change of the surface stiffness or of the surface energy modifies the migration velocity, too. For our cell adhesion studies a variety of different, homogeneous substrates were used (polymers, bio-polymers, metals, oxides). In addition, an effective lithographic method, Polymer Blend Lithography (PBL), is reported, to produce patterned Self-Assem...

  5. Osteoblastlike cell adhesion on titanium surfaces modified by plasma nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jose Sandro Pereira; Amico, Sandro Campos; Rodrigues, Almir Olegario Neves; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvao; Alves, Clodomiro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of various titanium surfaces modified by cold plasma nitriding in terms of adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblastlike cells. Samples of grade 2 titanium were subjected to three different surface modification processes: polishing, nitriding by plasma direct current, and nitriding by cathodic cage discharge. To evaluate the effect of the surface treatment on the cellular response, the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblastlike cells (MC3T3) were quantified and the results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman statistical tests. Cellular morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. There was more MC3T3 cell attachment on the rougher surfaces produced by cathodic cage discharge compared with polished samples (P Plasma nitriding improves titanium surface roughness and wettability, leading to osteoblastlike cell adhesion.

  6. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications.

  7. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamgain Hitesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and mouse melanoma (B16F1 cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor

  8. The role of surface charge on the uptake and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with osteoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Liang; Mccrate, Joseph M; Li Hao [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lee, James C-M, E-mail: liha@missouri.edu [Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2011-03-11

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with different surface charges on the cellular uptake behavior and in vitro cell viability and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cell lines (osteoblast). The nanoparticles' surface charge was varied by surface modification with two carboxylic acids: 12-aminododecanoic acid (positive) and dodecanedioic acid (negative). The untreated HAP nanoparticles and dodecanoic acid modified HAP nanoparticles (neutral) were used as the control. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that surface modifications by the three carboxylic acids did not change the crystal structure of HAP nanoparticles; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the adsorption and binding of the carboxylic acids on the HAP nanoparticles' surfaces; and zeta potential measurement confirmed that the chemicals successfully modified the surface charge of HAP nanoparticles in water based solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that positively charged, negatively charged and untreated HAP nanoparticles, with similar size and shape, all penetrated into the cells and cells had more uptake of HAP nanoparticles with positive charge compared to those with negative charge, which might be attributed to the attractive or repulsive interaction between the negatively charged cell membrane and positively/negatively charged HAP nanoparticles. The neutral HAP nanoparticles could not penetrate the cell membrane due to their larger size. MTT assay and LDH assay results indicated that as compared with the polystyrene control, greater cell viability and cell proliferation were measured on MC3T3-E1 cells treated with the three kinds of HAP nanoparticles (neutral, positive, and untreated), among which positively charged HAP nanoparticles showed the strongest improvement for cell viability and cell proliferation. In summary, the surface charge of HAP nanoparticles can be modified to influence the cellular

  9. The role of surface charge on the uptake and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with osteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Mccrate, Joseph M.; C-M Lee, James; Li, Hao

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with different surface charges on the cellular uptake behavior and in vitro cell viability and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cell lines (osteoblast). The nanoparticles' surface charge was varied by surface modification with two carboxylic acids: 12-aminododecanoic acid (positive) and dodecanedioic acid (negative). The untreated HAP nanoparticles and dodecanoic acid modified HAP nanoparticles (neutral) were used as the control. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that surface modifications by the three carboxylic acids did not change the crystal structure of HAP nanoparticles; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the adsorption and binding of the carboxylic acids on the HAP nanoparticles' surfaces; and zeta potential measurement confirmed that the chemicals successfully modified the surface charge of HAP nanoparticles in water based solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that positively charged, negatively charged and untreated HAP nanoparticles, with similar size and shape, all penetrated into the cells and cells had more uptake of HAP nanoparticles with positive charge compared to those with negative charge, which might be attributed to the attractive or repulsive interaction between the negatively charged cell membrane and positively/negatively charged HAP nanoparticles. The neutral HAP nanoparticles could not penetrate the cell membrane due to their larger size. MTT assay and LDH assay results indicated that as compared with the polystyrene control, greater cell viability and cell proliferation were measured on MC3T3-E1 cells treated with the three kinds of HAP nanoparticles (neutral, positive, and untreated), among which positively charged HAP nanoparticles showed the strongest improvement for cell viability and cell proliferation. In summary, the surface charge of HAP nanoparticles can be modified to influence the cellular uptake of

  10. High resolution imaging of surface patterns of single bacterial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greif, Dominik; Wesner, Daniel [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Regtmeier, Jan, E-mail: jan.regtmeier@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Anselmetti, Dario [Experimental Biophysics and Applied Nanoscience, Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    We systematically studied the origin of surface patterns observed on single Sinorhizobium meliloti bacterial cells by comparing the complementary techniques atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Conditions ranged from living bacteria in liquid to fixed bacteria in high vacuum. Stepwise, we applied different sample modifications (fixation, drying, metal coating, etc.) and characterized the observed surface patterns. A detailed analysis revealed that the surface structure with wrinkled protrusions in SEM images were not generated de novo but most likely evolved from similar and naturally present structures on the surface of living bacteria. The influence of osmotic stress to the surface structure of living cells was evaluated and also the contribution of exopolysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by imaging two mutant strains of the bacterium under native conditions. AFM images of living bacteria in culture medium exhibited surface structures of the size of single proteins emphasizing the usefulness of AFM for high resolution cell imaging.

  11. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  12. Surface Magnetism of Cobalt Nanoislands Controlled by Atomic Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jewook; Park, Changwon; Yoon, Mina; Li, An-Ping

    2017-01-11

    Controlling the spin states of the surface and interface is key to spintronic applications of magnetic materials. Here, we report the evolution of surface magnetism of Co nanoislands on Cu(111) upon hydrogen adsorption and desorption with the hope of realizing reversible control of spin-dependent tunneling. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy reveals three types of hydrogen-induced surface superstructures, 1H-(2 × 2), 2H-(2 × 2), and 6H-(3 × 3), with increasing H coverage. The prominent magnetic surface states of Co, while being preserved at low H coverage, become suppressed as the H coverage level increases, which can then be recovered by H desorption. First-principles calculations reveal the origin of the observed magnetic surface states by capturing the asymmetry between the spin-polarized surface states and identify the role of hydrogen in controlling the magnetic states. Our study offers new insights into the chemical control of magnetism in low-dimensional systems.

  13. Multijunction Solar Cell Technology for Mars Surface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mardesich, Nick; Ewell, Richard C.; Mueller, Robert L.; Endicter, Scott; Aiken, Daniel; Edmondson, Kenneth; Fetze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells used for Mars surface applications have been commercial space qualified AM0 optimized devices. Due to the Martian atmosphere, these cells are not optimized for the Mars surface and as a result operate at a reduced efficiency. A multi-year program, MOST (Mars Optimized Solar Cell Technology), managed by JPL and funded by NASA Code S, was initiated in 2004, to develop tools to modify commercial AM0 cells for the Mars surface solar spectrum and to fabricate Mars optimized devices for verification. This effort required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and to develop and test commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum. This paper discusses the program, including results for the initial modified cells. Simulated Mars surface measurements of MER cells and Phoenix Lander cells (2007 launch) are provided to characterize the performance loss for those missions. In addition, the performance of the MER rover solar arrays is updated to reflect their more than two (2) year operation.

  14. Reconfigurable Flight Control Design for Combat Flying Wing with Multiple Control Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; WANG Lixin

    2012-01-01

    With control using redundant multiple control surface arrangement and large-deflection drag rudders,a combat flying wing has a higher probability for control surface failures.Therefore,its flight control system must be able to reconfigure after such failures.Considering three types of typical control surface failures (lock-in-place (LIP),loss-of-effectiveness (LOE) and float),flight control reconfiguration characteristic and capability of such aircraft types are analyzed.Because of the control surface redundancy,the aircraft using the dynamic inversion flight control law already has a control allocation block.In this paper,its flight control configuration during the above failures is achieved by modifying this block.It is shown that such a reconfigurable flight control design is valid,through numerical simulations of flight attitude control task.Results indicate that,in the circumstances of control surface failures with limited degree and the degradation of the flying quality level,a combat flying wing adopting this flight control reconfiguration approach based on control allocation could guarantee its flight safety and perform some flight combat missions.

  15. Fluid dynamics and noise in bacterial cell-cell and cell-surface scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, Knut; Cisneros, Luis H; Ganguly, Sujoy; Goldstein, Raymond E; 10.1073/pnas.1019079108

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial processes ranging from gene expression to motility and biofilm formation are constantly challenged by internal and external noise. While the importance of stochastic fluctuations has been appreciated for chemotaxis, it is currently believed that deterministic long-range fluid dynamical effects govern cell-cell and cell-surface scattering - the elementary events that lead to swarming and collective swimming in active suspensions and to the formation of biofilms. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the bacterial flow field generated by individual swimming Escherichia coli both far from and near to a solid surface. These experiments allowed us to examine the relative importance of fluid dynamics and rotational diffusion for bacteria. For cell-cell interactions it is shown that thermal and intrinsic stochasticity drown the effects of long-range fluid dynamics, implying that physical interactions between bacteria are determined by steric collisions and near-field lubrication forces. This dom...

  16. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-01-01

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  17. Thermal control of sequential on-surface transformation of a hydrocarbon molecule on a copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Haapasilta, Ville; Lindner, Benjamin D.; Tahara, Kazukuni; Spijker, Peter; Buitendijk, Jeroen A.; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Tobe, Yoshito; Foster, Adam S.; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    On-surface chemical reactions hold the potential for manufacturing nanoscale structures directly onto surfaces by linking carbon atoms in a single-step reaction. To fabricate more complex and functionalized structures, the control of the on-surface chemical reactions must be developed significantly. Here, we present a thermally controlled sequential three-step chemical transformation of a hydrocarbon molecule on a Cu(111) surface. With a combination of high-resolution atomic force microscopy and first-principles computations, we investigate the transformation process in step-by-step detail from the initial structure to the final product via two intermediate states. The results demonstrate that surfaces can be used as catalysing templates to obtain compounds, which cannot easily be synthesized by solution chemistry.

  18. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomechanics of cell rolling: shear flow, cell-surface adhesion, and cell deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C; Lei, X X

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics of leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) deformation and adhesion to endothelial cells (EC) has been investigated using a novel in vitro side-view flow assay. HL-60 cell rolling adhesion to surface-immobilized P-selectin was used to model the WBC-EC adhesion process. Changes in flow shear stress, cell deformability, or substrate ligand strength resulted in significant changes in the characteristic adhesion binding time, cell-surface contact and cell rolling velocity. A 2-D model indicated that cell-substrate contact area under a high wall shear stress (20 dyn/cm2) could be nearly twice of that under a low stress (0.5 dyn/cm2) due to shear flow-induced cell deformation. An increase in contact area resulted in more energy dissipation to both adhesion bonds and viscous cytoplasm, whereas the fluid energy that inputs to a cell decreased due to a flattened cell shape. The model also predicted a plateau of WBC rolling velocity as flow shear stresses further increased. Both experimental and computational studies have described how WBC deformation influences the WBC-EC adhesion process in shear flow.

  20. Controlled adsorption of cytochrome c to nanostructured gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Ines [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica (Portugal); Feio, Maria J. [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica (Portugal); Santos, Nuno C. [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Medicina Molecular (Portugal); Eaton, Peter [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica (Portugal); Serro, Ana Paula; Saramago, Benilde [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Instituto Superior Tecnico (Portugal); Pereira, Eulalia [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica (Portugal); Franco, Ricardo, E-mail: ricardo.franco@fct.unl.pt [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica (Portugal)

    2012-12-15

    Controlled electrostatic physisorption of horse heart cytochrome c (Cyt c) onto nanostructured gold surfaces was investigated using Quartz-Crystal Microbalance measurements in planar gold surfaces with or without functionalization using a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of the alkanethiol mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). MUA is a useful functionalization ligand for gold surfaces, shedding adsorbed biomolecules from the excessive electron density of the metal. A parallel analysis was conducted in the corresponding curved surfaces of 15 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), using zeta-potential and UV- visible spectroscopy. Atomic Force Microscopy of both types of functionalized gold surfaces with a MUA SAM, allowed for visualization of Cyt c deposits on the nanostructured gold surface. The amount of Cyt c adsorbed onto the gold surface could be controlled by the solution pH. For the assays conducted at pH 4.5, when MUA SAM- functionalized planar gold surfaces are positive or neutral, and Cyt c has a positive net charge, only 13 % of the planar gold surface area was coated with protein. In contrast, at pH 7.4, when MUA SAM-functionalized planar gold surfaces and Cyt c have opposite charges, a protein coverage of 28 % could be observed implying an adsorption process strongly governed by electrostatic forces. Cyt c adsorption on planar and curved gold surfaces are found to be greatly favored by the presence of a MUA-capping layer. In particular, on the AuNPs, the binding constant is three times larger than the binding constant obtained for the original citrate-capped AuNPs.

  1. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhki Yanase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors detect the refractive index (RI changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques.

  2. Neuromechanical Control for Hexapedal Robot Walking on Challenging Surfaces and Surface Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    are achieved by only changing the stiffness parameters of the VAAMs. In addition, six surfaces can be also classified by observing the motor signals generated by the controller. The performance of the controller is tested on a physical hexapod robot. Experimental results show that it can effectively walk...

  3. Control and characterization of textured, hydrophobic ionomer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyuan

    Polymer thin films are of increasing interest in many industrial and technological applications. Superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces have attracted a lot of attention for their application in self-cleaning, anti-sticking coatings, stain resistance, or anti-contamination surfaces in diverse technologies, including medical, transportation, textiles, electronics and paints. This thesis focuses on the preparation of nanometer to micrometer-size particle textured surfaces which are desirable for super water repellency. Textured surfaces consisting of nanometer to micrometer-sized lightly sulfonated polystyrene ionomer (SPS) particles were prepared by rapid evaporation of the solvent from a dilute polymer solution cast onto silica. The effect of the solvent used to spin coat the film, the molecular weight of the ionomer, and the rate of solvent evaporation were investigated. The nano-particle or micron-particle textured ionomer surfaces were prepared by either spin coating or solution casting ionomer solutions at controlled evaporation rates. The surface morphologies were consistent with a spinodal decomposition mechanism where the surface first existed as a percolated-like structure and then ripened into droplets if molecular mobility was retained for sufficient time. The SPS particles or particle aggregates were robust and resisted deformation even after annealing at 120°C for one week. The water contact angles on as-prepared surfaces were relatively low, ~ 90° since the polar groups in ionomer reduce the surface hydrophobicity. After chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane, the surface contact angles increased to ~ 109° on smooth surfaces and ~140° on the textured surfaces. Water droplets stuck to these surfaces even when tilted 90 degrees. Superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared by spraying coating ionomer solutions and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane onto textured surfaces. The

  4. Novel eukaryotic enzymes modifying cell-surface biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic extracellular matrices such as proteoglycans, sclerotinized structures, mucus, external tests, capsules, cell walls and waxes contain highly modified proteins, glycans and other composite biopolymers. Using comparative genomics and sequence profile analysis we identify several novel enzymes that could be potentially involved in the modification of cell-surface glycans or glycoproteins. Results Using sequence analysis and conservation we define the acyltransferase domain prototyped by the fungal Cas1p proteins, identify its active site residues and unify them to the superfamily of classical 10TM acyltransferases (e.g. oatA. We also identify a novel family of esterases (prototyped by the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain of Cas1p that have a similar fold as the SGNH/GDSL esterases but differ from them in their conservation pattern. Conclusions We posit that the combined action of the acyltransferase and esterase domain plays an important role in controlling the acylation levels of glycans and thereby regulates their physico-chemical properties such as hygroscopicity, resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis and physical strength. We present evidence that the action of these novel enzymes on glycans might play an important role in host-pathogen interaction of plants, fungi and metazoans. We present evidence that in plants (e.g. PMR5 and ESK1 the regulation of carbohydrate acylation by these acylesterases might also play an important role in regulation of transpiration and stress resistance. We also identify a subfamily of these esterases in metazoans (e.g. C7orf58, which are fused to an ATP-grasp amino acid ligase domain that is predicted to catalyze, in certain animals, modification of cell surface polymers by amino acid or peptides. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gaspar Jekely and Frank Eisenhaber

  5. Novel eukaryotic enzymes modifying cell-surface biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic extracellular matrices such as proteoglycans, sclerotinized structures, mucus, external tests, capsules, cell walls and waxes contain highly modified proteins, glycans and other composite biopolymers. Using comparative genomics and sequence profile analysis we identify several novel enzymes that could be potentially involved in the modification of cell-surface glycans or glycoproteins. Results Using sequence analysis and conservation we define the acyltransferase domain prototyped by the fungal Cas1p proteins, identify its active site residues and unify them to the superfamily of classical 10TM acyltransferases (e.g. oatA). We also identify a novel family of esterases (prototyped by the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain of Cas1p) that have a similar fold as the SGNH/GDSL esterases but differ from them in their conservation pattern. Conclusions We posit that the combined action of the acyltransferase and esterase domain plays an important role in controlling the acylation levels of glycans and thereby regulates their physico-chemical properties such as hygroscopicity, resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis and physical strength. We present evidence that the action of these novel enzymes on glycans might play an important role in host-pathogen interaction of plants, fungi and metazoans. We present evidence that in plants (e.g. PMR5 and ESK1) the regulation of carbohydrate acylation by these acylesterases might also play an important role in regulation of transpiration and stress resistance. We also identify a subfamily of these esterases in metazoans (e.g. C7orf58), which are fused to an ATP-grasp amino acid ligase domain that is predicted to catalyze, in certain animals, modification of cell surface polymers by amino acid or peptides. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gaspar Jekely and Frank Eisenhaber PMID:20056006

  6. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  7. Controlling Multivalent Binding through Surface Chemistry: Model Study on Streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although multivalent binding to surfaces is an important tool in nanotechnology, quantitative information about the residual valency and orientation of surface-bound molecules is missing. To address these questions, we study streptavidin (SAv) binding to commonly used biotinylated surfaces such as supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Stability and kinetics of SAv binding are characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, while the residual valency of immobilized SAv is quantified using spectroscopic ellipsometry by monitoring binding of biotinylated probes. Purpose-designed SAv constructs having controlled valencies (mono-, di-, trivalent in terms of biotin-binding sites) are studied to rationalize the results obtained on regular (tetravalent) SAv. We find that divalent interaction of SAv with biotinylated surfaces is a strict requirement for stable immobilization, while monovalent attachment is reversible and, in the case of SLBs, leads to the extraction of biotinylated lipids from the bilayer. The surface density and lateral mobility of biotin, and the SAv surface coverage are all found to influence the average orientation and residual valency of SAv on a biotinylated surface. We demonstrate how the residual valency can be adjusted to one or two biotin binding sites per immobilized SAv by choosing appropriate surface chemistry. The obtained results provide means for the rational design of surface-confined supramolecular architectures involving specific biointeractions at tunable valency. This knowledge can be used for the development of well-defined bioactive coatings, biosensors and biomimetic model systems. PMID:28234007

  8. Experimental Study of a Membrane Antenna Surface Adaptive Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Quijano, U.; Bach, V.; Hill, J.; Wang, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their ultra lightweight and high packaging efficiency, membrane reflectors are getting more and more attentions for mission architectures that need extremely large inspace deployable antennas. However how to maintain the surface shape of a membrane reflector to the instrument precision requirements is a very challenging problem. This experimental study investigated using PVDF membrane piezoelectric material as actuators to control the surface figures of membrane reflectors. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by several sets of test results.

  9. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. An electrochemically switched smart surface for peptide immobilization and conformation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Sun, Chun-Lin; Shen, Rong; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Bo; Bai, De-Cheng; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2014-08-06

    We report an electrochemically switched smart surface for controlled peptide immobilization and conformation control. This dynamic surface is based on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing surface-bound trimethoxybenzene moieties, which can undergo electrochemically modulated surface activation to be stepwisely converted to two catechol derivatives. This new smart surface can be used to realize stepwise immobilization of a peptide, and more importantly, to control peptide conformation on a surface. We demonstrate herein that with one electrochemical activation step, a linear peptide containing an RGD sequence can be attached onto the SAMs. With the subsequence activation step, the attached linear RGD peptide can be converted into cyclic conformation. The SAMs bounded with linear and cyclic RGD exhibit different adhesion behaviors to fibroblasts cells. The reaction procedure can be well-monitored by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical surface enhanced Raman microscopy (EC-SERS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is believed this robust smart surface can find wide applications in surface immobilization of bioactive moieties.

  11. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  12. Soil Carbon Dioxide Production and Surface Fluxes: Subsurface Physical Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk, D.; Kellman, L.; Beltrami, H.

    Soil respiration is a critical determinant of landscape carbon balance. Variations in soil temperature and moisture patterns are important physical processes controlling soil respiration which need to be better understood. Relationships between soil respi- ration and physical controls are typically addressed using only surface flux data but other methods also exist which permit more rigorous interpretation of soil respira- tion processes. Here we use a combination of subsurface CO_{2} concentrations, surface CO_{2} fluxes and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface envi- ronment to examine physical controls on soil CO_{2} production at four climate observatories in Eastern Canada. Results indicate that subsurface CO_{2} produc- tion is more strongly correlated to the subsurface thermal environment than the surface CO_{2} flux. Soil moisture was also found to have an important influence on sub- surface CO_{2} production, particularly in relation to the soil moisture - soil profile diffusivity relationship. Non-diffusive profile CO_{2} transport appears to be im- portant at these sites, resulting in a de-coupling of summertime surface fluxes from subsurface processes and violating assumptions that surface CO_{2} emissions are the result solely of diffusion. These results have implications for the study of soil respiration across a broad range of terrestrial environments.

  13. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement.

  14. Ellipsoidal Colloids with a Controlled Surface Roughness via Bioinspired Surface Engineering: Building Blocks for Liquid Marbles and Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengjiao; Yang, Lu; Li, Qiang; Wu, Songhai; Jia, Shaoyi; Li, Zhanyong; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the important role of the surface roughness of nano/colloidal particles and harnessing them for practical applications need novel strategies to control the particles' surface topology. Although there are many examples of spherical particles with a specific surface roughness, nonspherical ones with similar surface features are rare. The current work reports a one-step, straightforward, and bioinspired surface engineering strategy to prepare ellipsoidal particles with a controlled surface roughness. By manipulating the unique chemistry inherent to the oxidation-induced self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine (PDA), PDA coating of polymeric ellipsoids leads to a library of hybrid ellipsoidal particles (PS@PDA) with a surface that decorates with nanoscale PDA protrusions of various densities and sizes. Together with the advantages originated from the anisotropy of ellipsoids and rich chemistry of PDA, such a surface feature endows these particles with some unique properties. Evaporative drying of fluorinated PS@PDA particles produces a homogeneous coating with superhydrophobicity that arises from the two-scale hierarchal structure of microscale interparticle packing and nanoscale roughness of the constituent ellipsoids. Instead of water repelling that occurs for most of the lotus leaf-like superhydrophobic surfaces, such coating exhibits strong water adhesion that is observed with certain species of rose pedals. In addition, the as-prepared hybrid ellipsoids are very efficient in preparing liquid marble-isolated droplets covered with solid particles. Such liquid marbles can be placed onto many surfaces and might be useful for the controllable transport and manipulation of small volumes of liquids.

  15. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Controllability analysis of decentralised linear controllers for polymeric fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Maria; Aguado, Joaquin; Ansede, Xavier; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-10

    This work deals with the control of polymeric fuel cells. It includes a linear analysis of the system at different operating points, the comparison and selection of different control structures, and the validation of the controlled system by simulation. The work is based on a complex non linear model which has been linearised at several operating points. The linear analysis tools used are the Morari resiliency index, the condition number, and the relative gain array. These techniques are employed to compare the controllability of the system with different control structures and at different operating conditions. According to the results, the most promising control structures are selected and their performance with PI based diagonal controllers is evaluated through simulations with the complete non linear model. The range of operability of the examined control structures is compared. Conclusions indicate good performance of several diagonal linear controllers. However, very few have a wide operability range. (author)

  17. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  18. Membrane Tether Formation on a Cell Surface with Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yu-Qiang; GUO Hong-Lian; LIU Chun-Xiang; LI Zhao-Lin; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong; JIA Suo-Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We propose a mathematical model to analyse the membrane tether formation process on a cell surface with reservoir. Based on the experimental results, the membrane reservoir density of breast cancer cell was obtained,p = 8.02. The membrane surface viscosity between membrane and environment η is 0.021(pN.s/μm3), and the static force F0 = 5.71 pN.

  19. Microfabricated surface designs for cell culture and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, T; Chung, D J

    1994-01-01

    Grooved and holed surfaces with a well fabricated design may serve as microsubstrates for cell culture and microreactors for diagnosis. In this study, the authors prepared chemically treated, micrometer scale grooved and holed glass surfaces by combined surface modification and ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser ablation techniques, as follows. 1) Microcell-culture substrate: Amino group attached glass surfaces, prepared by the treatment with an aminopropylsilane, were condensed with a carboxylated radical initiator. Subsequently, polyacrylamide was grafted by surface initiated radical polymerization to create a very hydrophilic surface layer. Ultraviolet excimer laser beams (KrF: 248 nm) were irradiated through a microscope onto surfaces to create grooves or holes that were 10 and 50 microns in width or diameter, respectively. The depth, depending on the irradiation light strength, ranged from a few to several tenths of a micrometer. On endothelial cell (EC) seeding, ECs adhered and grew on the bottoms of the grooved or holed surface where glass was exposed on ablation. Little cell adhesion was observed on non ablated, grafted surfaces. Endothelial cells aligned along the groove, resulting in very narrow tube like tissue formation, whereas ECs tended to form a multilayered spherical aggregate in a hole. A single cell resided in a 10 microns square hole. 2) Microreactor for diagnosis: The glass surface, treated with a fluorinated silane, was ablated to create round holes. On addition of a few microliters of water, water could be quantitatively transferred into a hole because of the water repellent characteristics of non ablated, fluorinated glass. As a model of a microreactor, enzyme reactions to affect different levels of glucose were carried out in tiny holed surfaces.

  20. Study of Surface Cell Madelung Constant and Surface Free Energy of Nanosized Crystal Grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-Jia; WANG Tian-Min; CUI Min

    2005-01-01

    Surface cell Madelung constant is firstly defined in calculating surface free energy of nanosized crystal grains, which explains the physical performance of small crystals and may be great benefit to make surface analysis and study dynamics of crystal nucleus growth. A new ap- proximative expression of surface energy and relevant thermodynamic data was used in this cal- culation. A new formula and computing method for calculating the Madelung constant α of any complex crystals is proposed, and surface free energies and surface electrostatic energies of nano- sized crystal grains as well as Madelung constant of some complex crystals are theoretically cal- culated in this paper. The surface free energy of nanosized crystal grain TiO2 and surface elec- trostatic energy(absolute value) of nanosized crystal grain α-Al2O3 are found to be the biggest among other crystal grains.

  1. Study of surface cell Madelung constant and surface free energy of nanosized crystal grain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei-Jia; Wang Tian-Min; Rong Ai-Lun; Cui Min

    2006-01-01

    Surface cell Madelung constant is firstly defined for calculating the surface free energy of nanosized crystal grains,which explains the physical performance of small crystals and may be greatly beneficial to the analysis of surface states and the study of the dynamics of crystal nucleation and growth.A new approximative expression of the surface energy and relevant thermodynamic data are used in this calculation.New formula and computing method for calculating the Madelung constant α of any complex crystals are proposed,and the surface free energies and surface electrostatic energies of nanosized crystal grains and the Madelung constant of some complex crystals are theoretically calculated in this paper.The surface free energy of nanosized-crystal-grain TiO2 and the surface electrostatic energy (absolute value) of nanosized-crystal-grain α-A12O3 are found to be the biggest among all the crystal grains including those of other species.

  2. Spatially controlled cell adhesion on three-dimensional substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Christine; Reinhardt, Martina; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Leisen, Daniel; Trouillet, Vanessa; Truckenmüller, Roman; Blau, Axel; Ziegler, Christiane; Welle, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    The microenvironment of cells in vivo is defined by spatiotemporal patterns of chemical and biophysical cues. Therefore, one important goal of tissue engineering is the generation of scaffolds with defined biofunctionalization in order to control processes like cell adhesion and differentiation. Mimicking extrinsic factors like integrin ligands presented by the extracellular matrix is one of the key elements to study cellular adhesion on biocompatible scaffolds. By using special thermoformable polymer films with anchored biomolecules micro structured scaffolds, e.g. curved and micro-patterned substrates, can be fabricated. Here, we present a novel strategy for the fabrication of micro-patterned scaffolds based on the "Substrate Modification and Replication by Thermoforming" (SMART) technology: The surface of a poly lactic acid membrane, having a low forming temperature of 60 degrees C and being initially very cell attractive, was coated with a photopatterned layer of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (VAHyal) to gain spatial control over cell adhesion. Subsequently, this modified polymer membrane was thermoformed to create an array of spherical microcavities with diameters of 300 microm for 3D cell culture. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and mouse fibroblasts (L929) were used to demonstrate guided cell adhesion. HepG2 cells adhered and aggregated exclusively within these cavities without attaching to the passivated surfaces between the cavities. Also L929 cells adhering very strongly on the pristine substrate polymer were effectively patterned by the cell repellent properties of the hyaluronic acid based hydrogel. This is the first time cell adhesion was controlled by patterned functionalization of a polymeric substrate with UV curable PLL-VAHyal in thermoformed 3D microstructures.

  3. Feedback Regulation of Intracellular Hydrostatic Pressure in Surface Cells of the Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; White, Thomas W; Delamere, Nicholas A; Mathias, Richard T

    2015-11-03

    In wild-type lenses from various species, an intracellular hydrostatic pressure gradient goes from ∼340 mmHg in central fiber cells to 0 mmHg in surface cells. This gradient drives a center-to-surface flow of intracellular fluid. In lenses in which gap-junction coupling is increased, the central pressure is lower, whereas if gap-junction coupling is reduced, the central pressure is higher but surface pressure is always zero. Recently, we found that surface cell pressure was elevated in PTEN null lenses. This suggested disruption of a feedback control system that normally maintained zero surface cell pressure. Our purpose in this study was to investigate and characterize this feedback control system. We measured intracellular hydrostatic pressures in mouse lenses using a microelectrode/manometer-based system. We found that all feedback went through transport by the Na/K ATPase, which adjusted surface cell osmolarity such that pressure was maintained at zero. We traced the regulation of Na/K ATPase activity back to either TRPV4, which sensed positive pressure and stimulated activity, or TRPV1, which sensed negative pressure and inhibited activity. The inhibitory effect of TRPV1 on Na/K pumps was shown to signal through activation of the PI3K/AKT axis. The stimulatory effect of TRPV4 was shown in previous studies to go through a different signal transduction path. Thus, there is a local two-legged feedback control system for pressure in lens surface cells. The surface pressure provides a pedestal on which the pressure gradient sits, so surface pressure determines the absolute value of pressure at each radial location. We speculate that the absolute value of intracellular pressure may set the radial gradient in the refractive index, which is essential for visual acuity.

  4. Cell orientation on a stripe-micropatterned surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN JianGuo; TANG Jian; DING JianDong

    2009-01-01

    Stripe-micropatterned surfaces have recently been a unique tool to study cell orientation. In this paper,we prepared,by the photolithography transfer technique,stable gold (Au) micropatterns on PEG hydrogel surfaces with defined cell-resistant (PEG hydrogel) and cell-adhesive (gold microstripes) proparties. 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured on Au-microstripe surfaces to observe cell adhesion and orientation. Five statistical parameters were defined and used to describe cell orientation on micropatterns.With the increase of inter-stripe distance,the orientational order parameter,the ratio of long and short axes of a cell,and the occupation fraction of cells on stripes increased gradually,whereas the spreading area of a single cell decreased. The abrupt changes of these four parameters did not happen at the same inter-distance. The adhesion ratio of a cell on Au stripes over cell spreading area did not change monotonically as a function of inter-stripe distance. The combination of the 5 statistical parameters represented well the cell orientation behaviors semi-quantitatively.

  5. Toward spatial control of gold nanorod surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Jonathan R.

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) show much promise for applications in biological, optoelectronic and energy applications. The resonant generation of a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at the GNR surface results in interesting optical properties and unique interactions with molecules. Combined with their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis and facile surface functionalization, these anisotropic metal particles are excellent scaffolds for the study of the interactions between nanoscale surfaces and their chemical/biological environments. Regardless of the application, however, GNR utility will not be fully realized until the chemical nature of the surface is understood and controlled. GNRs can enhance various photophysical properties of molecules. In the case of two-photon absorption (TPA), cross-section enhancements have been shown to increase with strong distance-dependence. Here, a dual approach for the conjugation of a TPA chromophore to GNRs is presented, relying on layer-by- layer (LbL) polymer wrapping and direct thiol coating of the same parent chromophore structure. Together, these approaches allow for estimated chromophore-particle distances from nanomaterials. Surface-initiated Atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) is a popular method for grafting polymers from a surface. We demonstrate our ability to grow poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) shells on the GNR surface, toward a "smart" thermoresponsive polymer shell. The role of ligand choice, molar ratio of monomer to initiator and polymerization on presence and control of shell thickness are investigated. The introduction of a tetradentate (vs. the commonly-used tridentate) ATRP ligand was necessary for the growth of PNIPAM shells in our studies, and consideration of the molar ratio of monomer and initiator and reaction time allowed control of shell thickness and extent of aggregation.

  6. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Hansma, Paul K.; Hulst, van Niek F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect imm

  7. Sperm cell surface dynamics during activation and fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerke, A.

    2013-01-01

    Before the sperm cell can reach the oocyte it needs to be activated and to undergo a series of preparative steps. The sperm surface dynamics was studied in relation to this activation process and the modifications and removal of sperm surface components havebeen investigated. Bicarbonate-induced rad

  8. Fabrication of cell container arrays with overlaid surface topographies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truckenmuller, R.; Giselbrecht, S.; Escalante-Marun, M.; Groenendijk, M.; Papenburg, B.; Rivron, N.; Unadkat, H.; Saile, V.; Subramaniam, V.; Berg, A. van den; Blitterswijk, C. Van; Wessling, M.; Boer, J. den; Stamatialis, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents cell culture substrates in the form of microcontainer arrays with overlaid surface topographies, and a technology for their fabrication. The new fabrication technology is based on microscale thermoforming of thin polymer films whose surfaces are topographically prepatterned on a

  9. Fabrication of cell container arrays with overlaid surface topographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truckenmüller, R.K.; Giselbrecht, S.; Escalante, M.; Groenendijk, M.N.W.; Papenburg, B.J.; Rivron, N.C.; Unadkat, H.V.; Saile, V.; Subramaniam, V.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Wessling, M.; Boer, de J.; Stamatialis, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents cell culture substrates in the form of microcontainer arrays with overlaid surface topographies, and a technology for their fabrication. The new fabrication technology is based on microscale thermoforming of thin polymer films whose surfaces are topographically prepatterned on a

  10. Heterogeneous ice nucleation controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms controlling heterogeneous ice nucleation are complex and remain poorly understood. Although good ice nucleators are generally believed to match ice lattice and to bind water, counter examples are often identified. Here we show, by advanced molecular simulations, that the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on graphitic surface is controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity. Molecular level analysis reveals that the crystalline graphitic lattice with an appropriate hydrophilicity may indeed template ice basal plane by forming a strained ice layer, thus significantly enhancing its ice nucleation efficiency. Remarkably, the templating effect is found to transit from within the first contact layer of water to the second as the hydrophilicity increases, yielding an oscillating distinction between the crystalline and amorphous graphitic surfaces in their ice nucleation efficiencies. Our study sheds new light on the long-standing question of what constitutes ...

  11. Spatially controlled bacterial adhesion using surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsko, Peter; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Libera, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    We constructed surface-patterned hydrogels using low-energy focused electron beams to locally crosslink poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) thin films on silanized glass substrates. Derived from electron-beam lithography, this technique was used to create patterned hydrogels with well-defined spatial positions and degrees of swelling. We found that cells of the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis adhered to and grew on the silanized glass substrates. These cells did not, however, adhere to surfaces covered by high-swelling lightly crosslinked PEG hydrogels. This finding is consistent with the cell-repulsiveness generally attributed to PEGylated surfaces. In contrast, S. epidermidis cells did adhere to surfaces covered by low-swelling highly crosslinked hydrogels. By creating precise patterns of repulsive hydrogels combined with adhesive hydrogels or with exposed glass substrate, we were able to spatially control the adhesion of S. epidermidis. Significantly, adhesive areas small enough to trap single bacterial cells could be fabricated. The results suggest that the lateral confinement imposed by cell-repulsive hydrogels hindered the cell proliferation and development into larger bacterial colonies.

  12. Recharging Red Blood Cell Surface by Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Kliche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Similar as in vascular endothelium the negatively charged glycocalyx of erythrocytes selectively buffers sodium. Loss of glycocalyx (i.e. loss of negative charges leads to increased erythrocyte sodium sensitivity (ESS quantified by a recently developed salt-blood-test (SBT. The hypothesis was tested whether a regular 4-hour hemodialysis (4h-HD alters ESS. Methods: In 38 patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD ESS was measured before and after 4h-HD, together with standard laboratory and clinical parameters (electrolytes, acid-base status, urea, creatinine, hemoglobin, c-reactive protein and blood pressure. Results: Before 4h-HD, 20 patients (out of 38 were classified as “salt sensitive” by SBT. After 4h-HD, this number decreased to 11. Erythrocyte sodium buffering power remained virtually constant in patients with already low ESS before dialysis, whereas in patients with high ESS, 4h-HD improved the initially poor sodium buffering power by about 20%. No significant correlations could be detected between standard blood parameters and the respective ESS values except for plasma sodium concentration which was found increased by 3.1 mM in patients with high salt sensitivity. Conclusions: 4h-HD apparently recharges “run-down” erythrocytes and thus restores erythrocyte sodium buffering capacity. Besides the advantage of efficient sodium buffering in blood, erythrocytes with sufficient amounts of free negative charges at the erythrocyte surface will cause less (mechanical injury to the negatively charged endothelial surface due to efficient repulsive forces between blood and vessel wall. Hemodialysis improves erythrocyte surface properties and thus may prevent early vascular damage in patients suffering from ESRD.

  13. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  14. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  15. Microfluidic lithography of SAMs on gold to create dynamic surfaces for directed cell migration and contiguous cell cocultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M; Barrett, Devin G; Westcott, Nathan P; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2008-08-19

    A straightforward, flexible, and inexpensive method to create patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold using microfluidics-microfluidic lithography-has been developed. Using a microfluidic cassette, alkanethiols were rapidly patterned on gold surfaces to generate monolayers and mixed monolayers. The patterning methodology is flexible and, by controlling the solvent conditions and thiol concentration, permeation of alkanethiols into the surrounding PDMS microfluidic cassette can be advantageously used to create different patterned feature sizes and to generate well-defined SAM surface gradients with a single microfluidic chip. To demonstrate the utility of microfluidic lithography, multiple cell experiments were conducted. By patterning cell adhesive regions in an inert background, a combination of selective masking of the surface and centrifugation achieved spatial and temporal control of patterned cells, enabling the design of both dynamic surfaces for directed cell migration and contiguous cocultures. Cellular division and motility resulted in directed, dynamic migration, while the centrifugation-aided seeding of a second cell line produced contiguous cocultures with multiple sites for heterogeneous cell-cell interactions.

  16. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle

    -derived antigenic peptides, a function which is currently explored in immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. Additionally, membrane-bound Hsp70 can stimulate antigen presenting cells to release proinflammatory cytokines and can provide a target structure for NK cell-mediated lysis. Human cancer cells...... frequently express Hsp70 on their cell surface, whereas the corresponding normal tissues do not. In addition, several clinically applied reagents, such as alkyl-lysophospholipides, chemotherapeutic agents, and anti-inflammatory reagents, have been found to enhance Hsp70 cell surface expression on cancer...... cells. We have found that inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC-inhibitor mediated Hsp70 cell surface expression was confined...

  17. Control of transcription by cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yung Wu

    Full Text Available Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. Here we show that ploidy-associated changes in gene expression reflect transcriptional adjustment to a larger cell size, implicating cellular geometry as a key parameter in gene regulation. Using RNA-seq, we identified genes whose expression was altered in a tetraploid as compared with the isogenic haploid. A significant fraction of these genes encode cell surface proteins, suggesting an effect of the enlarged cell size on the differential regulation of these genes. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of these genes in haploid mutants that also produce enlarged size. Surprisingly, many genes differentially regulated in the tetraploid are identically regulated in the enlarged haploids, and the magnitude of change in gene expression correlates with the degree of size enlargement. These results indicate a causal relationship between cell size and transcription, with a size-sensing mechanism that alters transcription in response to size. The genes responding to cell size are enriched for those regulated by two mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and components in those pathways were found to mediate size-dependent gene regulation. Transcriptional adjustment to enlarged cell size could underlie other cellular changes associated with polyploidy. The causal relationship between cell size and transcription suggests that cell size homeostasis serves a regulatory role in transcriptome maintenance.

  18. Controlled shear filtration: A novel technique for animal cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J H; Kroner, K H

    1999-06-20

    A novel rotary microfiltration technique specifically suited for the separation of animal cells has been developed. The concept allows the independent adjustment of wall shear stress, transmembrane pressure, and residence time, allowing straightforward optimization of the microfiltration process. By using a smooth, conically shaped rotor, it is possible to establish a controlled shear field in which animal cells experience a significant hydrodynamic lift away from the membrane surface. It is shown in preliminary experiments that shear-induced cell-rupture speeds up membrane clogging and that cell debris poses the most significant problem in harvesting of BHK cell cultures by dynamic microfiltration. However, a threshold value of shear stability exists which depends on the frequency of passing the shear field, the residence time in the shear field, as well as on cell status. By operating close to this threshold value, cell viability can be maintained while concentration polarization is efficiently minimized. By applying this concept, it is possible to attain flux rates several times higher compared to conventional crossflow filtration. Controlled shear filtration (CSF) can be used for batch harvesting as well as for cell retention in high cell density systems. In batch harvesting of hIL-2 from rBHK cell culture, a constant flux rate of 290 L h-1 m-2 has been adjusted without indication of membrane clogging or fouling.

  19. Infrared-Controlled Welding of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, R.; Finnell, S. E.; Decker, H. J.; Hodor, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed apparatus for welding large arrays of solar cells to flexible circuit substrates would sense infrared emission from welding spot. Emission would provide feedback for control of welding heat. Welding platform containing optical fibers moves upward through slots in movable holding fixture to contact solar cells. Fibers pick up infrared radiation from weld area.

  20. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B.F.; Miller, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers increasingly are the materials of choice for implantable orthopaedic fixation devices. Controlled degradation of these polymers is vital for preservation of mechanical properties during tissue repair and controlled release of incorporated agents such as osteoconductive...... or anti-microbial additives. The work outlined in this paper investigates the use of low energy electron beam irradiation to surface modify polyhydroxyacid samples incorporating beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). This work uniquely demonstrates that surface modification of bioresorbable polymers through...... bioresorption, followed by characterisation. The results show that low energy e-beam irradiation enhances surface hydrolytic degradation in comparison to bulk and furthermore allows for earlier release of incorporated calcium via dissolution into the surrounding medium....

  1. Controlled crystalline structure and surface stability of cobalt nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Beerman, Michael; Pakhomov, Alexandre B; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2005-04-21

    The synthesis of monodispersed 10 nm cobalt nanocrystals with controlled crystal morphology and investigation of the surface stability of these nanocrystals are described. Depending on the surfactants used, single crystalline or multiple grain nanocrystals can be reproducibly produced. The relative surface stability of these nanocrystals is analyzed using the temperature dependences of the dc magnetic susceptibility. The novel method, which allows sensitive monitoring of the surface stability, is based on the observation that, with particle oxidation, an anomalous peak appears at 8 K in zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements. It is found that the surfactant protective layer is more important for long-term stability at room temperature, while the high-temperature oxidation rate is controlled by the crystal morphology of the nanoparticles.

  2. Preparation Of Control Space For Remeshing Of Polygonal Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Jurczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article concerns the issues of remeshing, transforming a polygonal mesh into a triangular mesh adapted to surface. From the initial polygonal mesh the curvature of surface and boundary is retrieved and used to calculate a metric tensor varying in three-dimensional space. In the proposed approach the curvature is computed using local approximation of surfaces and curves on the basis of vertices of the polygonal mesh. An essential part of the presented remeshing procedure is creation of a control space structure based on the retrieved discrete data. The subsequent process of remeshing is then supervised by the contents of this auxiliary structure. The article presents various aspects related to the procedure of initialization, creation and adjusting the control space structure.

  3. Zinc uptake by brain cells: `surface' versus `bulk'

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStasio, Gelsomina; Pochon, S.; Lorusso, G. F.; Tonner, B. P.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Oddo, Nino; Galli, Paolo; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.

    1996-08-01

    The uptake of zinc by cerebellar rat cultures upon exposure to 0022-3727/29/8/023/img12 solutions was comparatively investigated using two well known condensed matter physics techniques: synchrotron photoelectron spectromicroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The objective was to apply a strategy - well known in surface physics - to distinguish between `surface' and `bulk' phenomena. The results clearly demonstrate that exposure significantly enhances the bulk (cell cytoplasm) Zn concentration with respect to the physiological level, whereas the effect on the surface (cell membrane) is negligible.

  4. Automated Control Surface Design and Sizing for the Prandtl Plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ginneken, D.A.J.; Voskuijl, M.; Van Tooren, M.J.L.; Frediani, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of the primary flight control surfaces, in terms of size, number and location, for fixed wing aircraft (conventional or unconventional). As test case, the methodology is applied to a 300 passenger variant of the Prandtl Plane. This box wing aircraft i

  5. Modeling Alaska boreal forests with a controlled trend surface approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo Zhou; Jingjing Liang

    2012-01-01

    An approach of Controlled Trend Surface was proposed to simultaneously take into consideration large-scale spatial trends and nonspatial effects. A geospatial model of the Alaska boreal forest was developed from 446 permanent sample plots, which addressed large-scale spatial trends in recruitment, diameter growth, and mortality. The model was tested on two sets of...

  6. Optical control over bioactive ligands at supramolecular surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuhl, Jens; Sankaran, S.; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    In this communication we report for the first time the use of azobenzene modified glycoconjugates to establish optical control over bioactive ligands at a supramolecular β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) surface. Several studies were conducted to investigate the photoresponsive immobilization of proteins and

  7. A uniform, quality controlled Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Takahashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A well documented, publicly available, global data set of surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2 parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC. Many additional CO2 data, not yet made public via the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC, were retrieved from data originators, public websites and other data centres. All data were put in a uniform format following a strict protocol. Quality control was carried out according to clearly defined criteria. Regional specialists performed the quality control, using state-of-the-art web-based tools, specially developed for accomplishing this global team effort. SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data points from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968–2007. Three types of data products are available: individual cruise files, a merged complete data set and gridded products. With the rapid expansion of marine CO2 data collection and the importance of quantifying net global oceanic CO2 uptake and its changes, sustained data synthesis and data access are priorities.

  8. A uniform, quality controlled Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pfeil

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A well-documented, publicly available, global data set of surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2 parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC. Many additional CO2 data, not yet made public via the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC, were retrieved from data originators, public websites and other data centres. All data were put in a uniform format following a strict protocol. Quality control was carried out according to clearly defined criteria. Regional specialists performed the quality control, using state-of-the-art web-based tools, specially developed for accomplishing this global team effort. SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data points from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968–2007. Three types of data products are available: individual cruise files, a merged complete data set and gridded products. With the rapid expansion of marine CO2 data collection and the importance of quantifying net global oceanic CO2 uptake and its changes, sustained data synthesis and data access are priorities.

  9. Transforming ocular surface stem cell research into successful clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virender S Sangwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has only been a quarter of a century since the discovery of adult stem cells at the human corneo-scleral limbus. These limbal stem cells are responsible for generating a constant and unending supply of corneal epithelial cells throughout life, thus maintaining a stable and uniformly refractive corneal surface. Establishing this hitherto unknown association between ocular surface disease and limbal dysfunction helped usher in therapeutic approaches that successfully addressed blinding conditions such as ocular burns, which were previously considered incurable. Subsequent advances in ocular surface biology through basic science research have translated into innovations that have made the surgical technique of limbal stem cell transplantation simpler and more predictable. This review recapitulates the basic biology of the limbus and the rationale and principles of limbal stem cell transplantation in ocular surface disease. An evidence-based algorithm is presented, which is tailored to clinical considerations such as laterality of affliction, severity of limbal damage and concurrent need for other procedures. Additionally, novel findings in the form of factors influencing the survival and function of limbal stem cells after transplantation and the possibility of substituting limbal cells with epithelial stem cells of other lineages is also discussed. Finally this review focuses on the future directions in which both basic science and clinical research in this field is headed.

  10. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  11. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  12. CD44 is the principal cell surface receptor for hyaluronate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruffo, A; Stamenkovic, I; Melnick, M; Underhill, C B; Seed, B

    1990-06-29

    CD44 is a broadly distributed cell surface protein thought to mediate cell attachment to extracelular matrix components or specific cell surface ligands. We have created soluble CD44-immunoglobulin fusion proteins and characterized their reactivity with tissue sections and lymph node high endothelial cells in primary culture. The CD44 target on high endothelial cells is sensitive to enzymes that degrade hyaluronate, and binding of soluble CD44 is blocked by low concentrations of hyaluronate or high concentrations of chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates. A mouse anti-hamster hyaluonate receptor antibody reacts with COS cells expressing hamster CD44 cDNA. In sections of all tissues examined, including lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, predigestion with hyaluronidase eliminated CD44 binding.

  13. Soluble and cell surface receptors for tumor necrosis factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach, D; Engelmann, H; Nophar, Y

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) initiates its multiple effects on cell function by binding at a high affinity to specific cell surface receptors. Two different molecular species of these receptors, which are expressed differentially in different cells, have been identified. The cDNAs of both receptor...... have recently been cloned. Antibodies to one of these receptor species (the p55, type I receptor) can trigger a variety of TNF like effects by cross-linking of the receptor molecules. Thus, it is not TNF itself but its receptors that provide the signal for the response to this cytokine...... in certain pathological situations. Release of the soluble receptors from the cells seems to occur by proteolytic cleavage of the cell surface forms and appears to be a way of down-regulating the cell response to TNF. Because of their ability to bind TNF, the soluble receptors exert an inhibitory effect...

  14. Specific nature of Trichomonas vaginalis parasitism of host cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, J F; Garza, G E

    1985-01-01

    The adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to host cells was evaluated by using monolayer cultures of HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells and human fibroblast cell lines. Saturation of sites on HeLa cells was achieved, yielding a maximal T. vaginalis NYH 286-to-cell ratio of two. The ability of radiolabeled NYH 286 to compete with unlabeled trichomonads for attachment and the time, temperature, and pH-dependent nature of host cell parasitism reinforced the idea of specific parasite-cell associations. Other trichomonal isolates (JH31A, RU375, and JHHR) were also found to adhere to cell monolayers, albeit to different degrees, and all isolates produced maximal contact-dependent HeLa cell cytotoxicity. The avirulent trichomonad, Trichomonas tenax, did not adhere to cell monolayers and did not cause host cell damage. Interestingly, parasite cytadherence was greater with HeLa and HEp-2 epithelial cells than with fibroblast cells. In addition, cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells never exceeded 20% of the level of cell killing observed for epithelial cells. Elucidation of properties of the pathogenic human trichomonads that allowed for host cell surface parasitism was also attempted. Treatment of motile T. vaginalis NYH 286 with trypsin diminished cell parasitism. Incubation of trypsinized organisms in growth medium allowed for regeneration of trichomonal adherence, and cycloheximide inhibited the regeneration of attachment. Organisms poisoned with metronidazole or iodoacetate failed to attach to host cells, and adherent trichomonads exposed to metronidazole or iodoacetate were readily released from parasitized cells. Coincubation experiments with polycationic proteins and sugars and pretreatment of parasites or cells with neuraminidase or periodate had no effect on host cell parasitism. Colchicine and cytochalasin B, however, did produce some inhibition of adherence to HeLa cells. The data suggest that metabolizing T. vaginalis adheres to host cells via parasite surface

  15. Micropatterned polysaccharide surfaces via laser ablation for cell guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbucci, Rolando; Lamponi, Stefania; Pasqui, Daniela; Rossi, Antonella; Weber, Elisabetta

    2003-03-03

    Micropatterned materials were obtained by a controlled laser ablation of a photoimmobilised homogeneous layer of hyaluronic acid (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS). The photoimmobilisation was performed by coating the polysaccharide, adequately functionalised with a photoreactive group, on aminosilanised glass substrate and immobilising it on the surface under UV light. Hyal or HyalS photoimmobilised samples were then subjected to laser ablation with wavelengths in the UV regions in order to drill the pattern. Four different patterns with stripes of 100, 50, 25 and 10 {mu}m were generated. A chemical characterisation by attenuated total reflection/Fourier transform infrared (ATR/FT-IR) and time of flight-secondary ions mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) confirmed the success of the laser ablation procedure and the presence of alternating stripes of polysaccharide and native glass. The exact dimensions of the stripes were determined by atomic force microscopy. The analysis of cell behaviour in terms of adhesion, proliferation and movement using mouse fibroblasts (3T3 line) and bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) was also performed.

  16. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  17. Surface chemistry interventions to control boiler tube fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.W.; Guzonas, D.A.; Klimas, S.J

    2000-06-01

    The adsorption of ammonia, morpholine, ethanolamine, and dimethylamine onto the surfaces of colloidal magnetite and hematite was measured at 25{sup o}C. The effect of the adsorption on the surface potential was quantified by measuring the resulting shift in the isoelectric point of the corrosion products and by the direct measurement of the surface interaction force between the corrosion products and Inconel 600. These measurements have served to support the hypothesis that adsorption of amine affects the magnetite deposition rate by lowering the force of repulsion between magnetite and the surface of Inconel 600. The deposition rate of hematite increased as the oxygen concentration increased. A mechanism to account for enhanced deposition rates at high mixture qualities (> 0.35) has been identified and shown to predict behaviour that is consistent with both experimental and plant data. As a result of this investigation, several criteria are proposed to reduce the extent of corrosion product deposition on the tube bundle. Low hematite deposition is favoured by a low concentration of dissolved oxygen, and low magnetite deposition is favoured by choosing an amine for pH control that has little tendency to adsorb onto the surface of magnetite. To minimize adsorption the amine should have a high base strength and a large 'footprint' on the surface of magnetite. To prevent enhanced deposition at high mixture qualities, it is proposed that a modified amine be used that will reduce the surface tension or the elasticity of the steam-water interface or both.

  18. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  19. Friction-controlled traction force in cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Tilo; Kaufmann, Martin; Kasimir, Maria; Johne, Stephanie; Glorius, Stefan; Renner, Lars; Bobeth, Manfred; Pompe, Wolfgang; Werner, Carsten

    2011-10-19

    The force balance between the extracellular microenvironment and the intracellular cytoskeleton controls the cell fate. We report a new (to our knowledge) mechanism of receptor force control in cell adhesion originating from friction between cell adhesion ligands and the supporting substrate. Adherent human endothelial cells have been studied experimentally on polymer substrates noncovalently coated with fluorescent-labeled fibronectin (FN). The cellular traction force correlated with the mobility of FN during cell-driven FN fibrillogenesis. The experimental findings have been explained within a mechanistic two-dimensional model of the load transfer at focal adhesion sites. Myosin motor activity in conjunction with sliding of FN ligands noncovalently coupled to the surface of the polymer substrates is shown to result in a controlled traction force of adherent cells. We conclude that the friction of adhesion ligands on the supporting substrate is important for mechanotransduction and cell development of adherent cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N

    1997-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) binds to a specific cell-surface receptor, uPAR. On several cell types uPAR is present both in the full-length form and a cleaved form, uPAR(2+3), which is devoid of binding activity. The formation of uPAR(2+3) on cultured U937 cells is either direct...

  1. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties.

  2. Visuomotor control of neck surface electromyography in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Jessica R; Valentin, Juliana C; Hands, Gabrielle L; Stevens, Christina A; Langmore, Susan E; Noordzij, J Pieter; Stepp, Cara E

    2014-01-01

    To compare performance of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and age-matched controls on a visuomotor tracking task controlled via surface electromyography (sEMG). Twenty-seven adults with PD and twenty-four older controls produced dry swallows and completed a visuomotor tracking task utilizing both static and dynamic targets. sEMG was recorded at the anterior neck and submental surface during both tasks. There was no significant difference in visuomotor tracking ability between cohorts. Post hoc analyses indicated that there was no significant difference between participant groups in the strength or duration of swallows as measured by sEMG but that participants with PD showed a trend for decreased swallow durations at the anterior neck (padj = 0.067) whereas controls showed a trend for increased durations at the anterior neck (padj = 0.112), compared to the submental surface. However, there were no significant correlations between swallowing behavior and visuomotor tracking ability. There were no significant differences in visuomotor tracking performance between individuals with PD and controls. Furthermore, there was no relationship between tracking ability and swallowing behavior. We conclude that sEMG-mediated biofeedback may have limited promise as a tool for treating PD-related dysphagia.

  3. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  4. Anisotropic cell growth-regulated surface micropatterns in flower petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flower petals have not only diverse macroscopic morphologies but are rich in microscopic surface patterns, which are crucial to their biological functions. Both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis are conducted to reveal the physical mechanisms underlying the formation of minute wrinkles on flower petals. Three representative flowers, daisy, kalanchoe blossfeldiana, and Eustoma grandiflorum, are investigated as examples. A surface wrinkling model, incorporating the measured mechanical properties and growth ratio, is used to elucidate the difference in their surface morphologies. The mismatch between the anisotropic epidermal cell growth and the isotropic secretion of surficial wax is found to dictate the surface patterns.

  5. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard

    , membrane-bound Hsp70 can stimulate antigen presenting cells (APCs) to release proinflammatory cytokines and can provide a target structure for NK cell-mediated lysis. Human cancer cells frequently express Hsp70 on their cell surface, whereas the corresponding normal tissues do not. In addition, several...... clinically applied reagents, such as alkyl-lysophospholipides, chemotherapeutic agents, and anti-inflammatory reagents, have been found to enhance Hsp70 surface expression on cancer cells. We have found that inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various...... hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC-inhibitor mediated Hsp70 surface expression was confined to the apoptotic Annexin V positive cells and blocked by inhibition of apoptosis. Other chemotherapeutic inducers of apoptosis...

  6. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A;

    1988-01-01

    In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...

  7. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    Harrison, in 1914, first recognized that cells respond to physicochemical cues such as substratum topography when he observed that fibroblasts elongated while cultured on spider silk. Recently, techniques developed in the micro-electronics industry have been used to create molds for producing microscaled topographies with various shapes and spatial arrangements. Although these patterning techniques are well-established, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying cell sensing and response to microtopographies. In this work cellular micro-environments with varying surface topographies and chemistries were evaluated with marine organisms and mammalian cells to investigate cellular sensing and response. Biofouling---the accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on submerged surfaces---is an environmental and economic concern. Engineered topographies, replicated in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) and functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) hydrogels, were evaluated for inhibition of marine fouling organism attachment. Microtopographies replicated in PDMSe inhibited attachment of the marine bacterium, Cobetia marina up to 99% versus smooth. The average normalized attachment densities of cells of C. marina and zoospores of the green algae Ulva on PDMSe topographies scaled inversely with the Engineered Roughness Index (ERIII), a representation of surface energy. Attachment densities of Ulva from four assays and C. marina from two growth phases to PDMSe surfaces scaled inversely with one equation: ERI II multiplied by the Reynolds number of the organism (Re) (R 2 = 0.77). The same microtopographies created in PDMSe reduced the initial attachment density and attachment strength of cells of the diatoms Navicula incerta and Seminavis robusta compared to smooth PDMSe. The average normalized attachment density of Navicula after exposure to shear stress (48 Pa) was correlated with the contact area between the diatom and a

  8. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney, Zachary; Losacco, Joseph; McDevitt, Sophie; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Biao

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell-cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  9. Cell surface differences of Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis exposed with surface markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Arturo; Castañón, Guadalupe; Cristóbal-Ramos, Ana Ruth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the distribution of diverse cell surface coat markers were found between Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis. The presence of carbohydrate-containing components in the cell coat of the two species was detected by selective staining with ruthenium red and alcian blue. Using both markers, N. fowleri presented a thicker deposit than N. lovaniensis. The existence of exposed mannose or glucose residues was revealed by discriminatory agglutination with the plant lectin Concanavalin A. These sugar residues were also visualized at the cell surface of these parasites either by transmission electron microscopy or by fluorescein-tagged Concanavalin A. Using this lectin cap formation was induced only in N. fowleri. The anionic sites on the cell surface detected by means of cationized ferritin were more apparent in N. fowleri. Biotinylation assays confirmed that even though the two amoebae species have some analogous plasma membrane proteins, there is a clear difference in their composition.

  10. Nanotopographical Control of Stem Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. McNamara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into various lineages, and the ability to reliably direct stem cell fate determination would have tremendous potential for basic research and clinical therapy. Nanotopography provides a useful tool for guiding differentiation, as the features are more durable than surface chemistry and can be modified in size and shape to suit the desired application. In this paper, nanotopography is examined as a means to guide differentiation, and its application is described in the context of different subsets of stem cells, with a particular focus on skeletal (mesenchymal stem cells. To address the mechanistic basis underlying the topographical effects on stem cells, the likely contributions of indirect (biochemical signal-mediated and direct (force-mediated mechanotransduction are discussed. Data from proteomic research is also outlined in relation to topography-mediated fate determination, as this approach provides insight into the global molecular changes at the level of the functional effectors.

  11. Controlled chemical and morphological surface modifications via pulsed plasma polymerizations: Synthesis of ultrahydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haibo

    The RF plasma polymerization of saturated linear and cyclic perfluoroalkane monomers and vinyl acetic acid were studied in this dissertation. Film chemical compositions, deposition rates, surface wettabilities and morphologies were characterized as functions of various plasma processing conditions. Large progressive changes in chemical compositions with sequential variations in plasma duty cycle were demonstrated in polymerization of both perfluoroalkane and vinyl acetic acid monomers. As anticipated, polymer films obtained from the perfluorocarbon monomers exhibited a general trend towards more linear structures with decreasing plasma duty cycles. However, completely unexpectedly, ultrahydrophobic films were obtained from some of these monomers under restricted duty cycle and power input conditions. SEM and XPS characterizations revealed that a rough, fibrous-like surface morphology is responsible for this ultrahydrophobicity, as opposed to unusual chemical compositions. The growth of the fibrous surface is believed to arise from nucleation and hillock-like growth patterns on selectively activated sites of the growing polymer film. Surface mobility of plasma generated reactive species apparently plays an important role in the growth of the fibrous ultrahydrophobic surfaces, as shown by substrate temperature studies. Additionally, the present study revealed a number of interesting new observations of significant differences in the chemical compositions and deposition rates of polymer films obtained from the diverse range of perfluorocarbon monomers employed in this work. The ultrahydrophobic fluorocarbon films discovered in this investigation were evaluated for use in several biomaterial applications. The results obtained show excellent marine antifouling properties for these surfaces, as documented in ocean testing experiments. These surfaces have also been shown to be useful in controlling protein and peptide surface adsorptions, as well as in the inflammatory

  12. Human epithelial cells exposed to functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: interactions and cell surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanizza, C; Casciardi, S; Incoronato, F; Cavallo, D; Ursini, C L; Ciervo, A; Maiello, R; Fresegna, A M; Marcelloni, A M; Lega, D; Alvino, A; Baiguera, S

    2015-09-01

    With the expansion of the production and applications of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in several industrial and science branches, the potential adverse effects on human health have attracted attention. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate how chemical functionalization may affect MWCNT effects; however, controversial data have been reported, showing either increased or reduced toxicity. In particular, the impact of carboxylation on MWCNT cytotoxicity is far from being completely understood. The aim of this work was the evaluation of the modifications induced by carboxylated-MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) on cell surface and the study of cell-MWCNT-COOH interactions by means of field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) were incubated with MWCNTs-COOH for different exposure times and concentrations (10 μg/mL for 1, 2, 4 h; 5, 10, 20 μg/mL for 24 h). At short incubation time, MWCNTs-COOH were easily observed associated with plasma membrane and in contact with microvilli. After 24 h exposure, FESEM analysis revealed that MWCNTs-COOH induced evident changes in the cellular surface in comparison to control cells: treated cells showed blebs, holes and a depletion of the microvilli density in association with structure modifications, such as widening and/or lengthening. In particular, an increase of cells showing holes and microvilli structure alterations was observed at 20 μg/mL concentration. FESEM analysis showed nanotube agglomerates, of different sizes, entering into the cell with two different mechanisms: inward bending of the membrane followed by nanotube sinking, and nanotube internalization directly through holes. The observed morphological microvilli modifications, induced by MWCNTs-COOH, could affect epithelial functions, such as the control of surfactant production and secretion, leading to pathological conditions, such as alveolar proteinosis. More detailed studies will be, however, necessary to

  13. Biological control of surface temperature in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Gouveia, Albert D.; Shetye, Satish R.; Ravindran, P.; Platt, Trevor

    1991-01-01

    In the Arabian Sea, the southwest monsoon promotes seasonal upwelling of deep water, which supplies nutrients to the surface layer and leads to a marked increase in phytoplankton growth. Remotely sensed data on ocean color are used here to show that the resulting distribution of phytoplankton exerts a controlling influence on the seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature. This results in a corresponding modification of ocean-atmosphere heat exchange on regional and seasonal scales. It is shown that this biological mechanism may provide an important regulating influence on ocean-atmosphere interactions.

  14. Controllable wettability and morphology of electrodeposited surfaces on zinc substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Binyan; Lu, Shixiang, E-mail: shixianglu@bit.edu.cn; Xu, Wenguo, E-mail: wenguoxu60@bit.edu.cn; Cheng, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Superhydrophobic surfaces combining hierarchical micro/nanostructures were fabricated on zinc substrates by etching, electrodeposition of ZnO coatings and annealing. Such superhydrophobic surfaces offer possibilities for chemical, biological, electronic and microfluidic applications. - Highlights: • Superhydrophobic surface was fabricated via electrodeposition of ZnO and annealing. • The ZnO hierarchical micro/nanostructures contribute to the surface superhydrophobicity. • Surface wettability and morphology can be controlled by varying process conditions. • The anti-icing properties and reversible wetting behaviors of the ZnO coatings were studied. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic surfaces combining hierarchical micro/nanostructures were fabricated on zinc substrates by etching in hydrochloric acid solution, electrodeposition of ZnO coatings and subsequent thermal annealing. The optimal coatings were electrodeposited at −1.25 V for 900 s on the etched zinc substrates and then annealed at 200 °C for 60 min, which could achieve a maximum water contact angle of 170 ± 2° and an ultra-low sliding angle of approximately 0°. By conducting SEM and water CA analysis, we found that the morphology and wettability of prepared samples were controllable by the fabrication process. Interestingly, even without any additional modification, the samples prepared under different electrodeposition conditions (including Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} concentration from 5 mM to 40 mM and deposition time from 300 s to 1500 s) exhibited superhydrophobic character. The influences of the Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} concentration, deposition time, annealing temperature and annealing time on the wetting behaviors were also discussed in detail. Such superhydrophobic surfaces possess long-term stability, and good corrosion resistance as well as self-cleaning ability. In addition, the anti-icing properties of the ZnO films were investigated. These surfaces could be rapidly and

  15. Surface modification by allylamine plasma polymerization promotes osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xujie; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2014-06-25

    Tuning the material properties in order to control the cellular behavior is an important issue in tissue engineering. It is now well-established that the surface chemistry can affect cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. In this study, plasma polymerization, which is an appealing method for surface modification, was employed to generate surfaces with different chemical compositions. Allylamine (AAm), acrylic acid (AAc), 1,7-octadiene (OD), and ethanol (ET) were used as precursors for plasma polymerization in order to generate thin films rich in amine (-NH2), carboxyl (-COOH), methyl (-CH3), and hydroxyl (-OH) functional groups, respectively. The surface chemistry was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the wettability was determined by measuring the water contact angles (WCA) and the surface topography was imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effects of surface chemical compositions on the behavior of human adipose-derive stem cells (hASCs) were evaluated in vitro: Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis for cell proliferation, F-actin staining for cell morphology, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis, and Alizarin Red S staining for osteogenic differentiation. The results show that AAm-based plasma-polymerized coatings can promote the attachment, spreading, and, in turn, proliferation of hASCs, as well as promote the osteogenic differentiation of hASCs, suggesting that plasma polymerization is an appealing method for the surface modification of scaffolds used in bone tissue engineering.

  16. Controlling Protein Oligomerization with Surface Curvature on the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylowicz, Marty; Dutcher, John

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the effect of surface curvature on the conformation of beta-lactoglobulin (β LG) using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy. β LG is a model interfacial protein which stabilizes oil droplets in milk and is known to undergo structural rearrangement when adsorbed onto a surface. We reliably control nanoscale surface curvature by creating close-packed monolayers of monodisperse polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with diameters of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 140 nm, which are stable in aqueous buffer. By adsorbing β LG onto these hydrophobic surfaces and collecting force-extension curves in the fluid phase we can compare the conformation of β LG on 5 different surface curvatures with that on a flat PS film. We demonstrate a transition from oligomeric to monomeric β LG as the surface curvature is increased. Histograms of contour length from fits to peaks in the force-extension curves show a single maximum near 30 nm for β LG adsorbed onto nanoparticles with diameters less than 80 nm. For the larger nanoparticles, the histogram approaches that observed for β LG adsorbed onto a flat PS film, with maxima indicative of β LG dimers and trimers.

  17. Quality Control system for a hot-rolled metal surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mazur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The modern ideas about of quality of products are based on the principle of the absolute satisfaction of requirements of recommendations of the buyer. A presence of surface defects of steel-smelting and rolling origin is peculiar to the production of hot-rolling mill. The automatic surface inspection system (ASIS includes two digital line video cameras for the filming of the upper and lower surfaces of the flat bar, block of illumination of the upper and lower surfaces of the flat bar, computer equipment. A system that secures 100 % control of the surface of rolled metal (of the upper and lower side detects automatically and classifies the sheet defects in the real time mode was mounted in the domestic practice in the first time in 2003 on hot rolling mill 2000 JSC «Novolipetsk Iron & Steel Corporation» (NISC. The whole assortment of the mill 2000 was divided for the five groups by the outward appearance of the surface. The works on the identification of defects of hot-rolled metal and widening of data base of knowledge of ASIS were continued after the carrying out of guarantee tests. More than 10 thousand images of defects were added to the data base during the year.

  18. Cell adhesive ability of a biological foam ceramic with surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yong; Li Xiaoyu; Feng Fan; Lin Yunfeng [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liao Yunmao [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu 610044 (China); Tian, Weidong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu 610044 (China)], E-mail: drtwd@sina.com; Liu Lei [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: drliulei@163.com

    2008-11-15

    Biological foam ceramic is a promising material for tissue engineering scaffold because of its biocompatibility, biodegradation and adequate pores measured from micrometer to nanometers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion and proliferation of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) on the biological foam ceramic coated with fibronectin. ADSCs were harvested from SD rats and passaged three times prior to seeding onto biological foam surface modified with fibronectin (50 {mu}g/ml). Scaffold without surface modification served as control. To characterize cellular attachment, cells were incubated on the scaffold for 1 h and 3 h and then the cells attached onto the scaffold were counted. The difference of proliferation was appraised using MTT assay at day 1, 3, 5 and 7 before the cells reached confluence. After 7 days of culture, scanning electron microscope (SEM) was chosen to assess cell morphology and attachment of ADSCs on the biological foam ceramic. Attachment of ADSCs on the biological foam ceramic surface modified with fibronectin at 1 h or 3 h was substantially greater than that in control. MTT assay revealed that ADSCs proliferation tendency of the experimental group was nearly parallel to that of control. SEM view showed that ADSCs in the experimental groups connected more tightly and excreted more collagen than that in control. The coating of fibronectin could improve the cell adhesive ability of biological foam ceramics without evident effect on proliferation.

  19. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, Zachary, E-mail: zstickney@scu.edu; Losacco, Joseph, E-mail: jlosacco@scu.edu; McDevitt, Sophie, E-mail: smmcdevitt@scu.edu; Zhang, Zhiwen, E-mail: zzhang@scu.edu; Lu, Biao, E-mail: blu2@scu.edu

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  20. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  1. Precise manipulation of cell behaviors on surfaces for construction of tissue/organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-12-01

    The use of micro/nanotechnology has become an indispensable strategy to manipulating cell microenvironments. By employing key elements of soft lithographical technologies including self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), microcontact printing (μCP), and microfluidic pattering (μFP) and a number of switchable surfaces such as electrochemical active, photosensitive, and thermosensitive surfaces, scientists can control the adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. By combining essential in vivo conditions, various physical or pathological processes such as cell-cell interaction in wound healing and tumor metastasis could be studied on well-defined surfaces and interfaces. By integrating key elements in live tissues, in vitro models mimicking basic structure and function of vital organs such as lung, heart, blood vessel, liver, kidney, and brain have been developed and greatly increased our knowledge of these important life processes. In this review, we will focus on the recent development of these interfacial methods and their application in fundamental biology research.

  2. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed.

  3. Surface Sites for Engineering Allosteric Control in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeeyeon; Natarajan, Madhusudan; Nashine, Vishal C.; Socolich, Michael; Vo, Tina; Russ, William P.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Ranganathan, Rama

    2010-01-01

    Statistical analyses of protein families reveal networks of coevolving amino acids that functionally link distantly positioned functional surfaces. Such linkages suggest a concept for engineering allosteric control into proteins: The intramolecular networks of two proteins could be joined across their surface sites such that the activity of one protein might control the activity of the other. We tested this idea by creating PAS-DHFR, a designed chimeric protein that connects a light-sensing signaling domain from a plant member of the Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) family of proteins with Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). With no optimization, PAS-DHFR exhibited light-dependent catalytic activity that depended on the site of connection and on known signaling mechanisms in both proteins. PAS-DHFR serves as a proof of concept for engineering regulatory activities into proteins through interface design at conserved allosteric sites. PMID:18927392

  4. Robust formation control of marine surface craft using Lagrange multipliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Ivar-Andre F.; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    2006-01-01

    framework we develop robust control laws for marine surface vessels to counteract unknown, slowly varying, environmental disturbances and measurement noise. Robustness with respect to time-delays in the communication channels are addressed by linearizing the system. Simulations of tugboats subject......This paper presents a formation modelling scheme based on a set of inter-body constraint functions and Lagrangian multipliers. Formation control for a °eet of marine craft is achieved by stabilizing the auxiliary constraints such that the desired formation con¯guration appears. In the proposed...

  5. Controlling magnetism on metal surfaces with non-magnetic means: electric fields and surface charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Oleg O; Ruiz-Díaz, Pedro; Dasa, Tamene R; Stepanyuk, Valeri S

    2014-03-01

    We review the state of the art of surface magnetic property control with non-magnetic means, concentrating on metallic surfaces and techniques such as charge-doping or external electric field (EEF) application. Magneto-electric coupling via EEF-based charge manipulation is discussed as a way to tailor single adatom spins, exchange interaction between adsorbates or anisotropies of layered systems. The mechanisms of paramagnetic and spin-dependent electric field screening and the effect thereof on surface magnetism are discussed in the framework of theoretical and experimental studies. The possibility to enhance the effect of EEF by immersing the target system into an electrolyte or ionic liquid is discussed by the example of substitutional impurities and metallic alloy multilayers. A similar physics is pointed out for the case of charge traps, metallic systems decoupled from a bulk electron bath. In that case the charging provides the charge carrier density changes necessary to affect the magnetic moments and anisotropies in the system. Finally, the option of using quasi-free electrons rather than localized atomic spins for surface magnetism control is discussed with the example of Shockley-type metallic surface states confined to magnetic nanoislands.

  6. Machine-tool control system for turning nonaxisymmetric surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, S.S.; Green, W.L.

    1979-09-01

    A development program has been initiated to allow on-axis turning of nonaxisymmetric surfaces. A short-travel high-speed slide is mounted on a precision, numerically controlled, two-axis turning machine. The motion of the auxiliary slide is synchronized with the spindle and the two remaining slides. The report defines the workpiece geometry and requirements, calculations for the slide motion, techniques for real-time command generation, and planned equipment set.

  7. Colloidal crystal based plasma polymer patterning to control Pseudomonas aeruginosa attachment to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingle, Hitesh; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Thissen, Helmut; McArthur, Sally; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-12-02

    Biofilm formation on medical implants and subsequent infections are a global problem. A great deal of effort has focused on developing chemical contrasts based on micro- and nanopatterning for studying and controlling cells and bacteria at surfaces. It has been known that micro- and nanopatterns on surfaces can influence biomolecule adsorption, and subsequent cell and bacterial adhesion. However, less focus has been on precisely controlling patterns to study the initial bacterial attachment mechanisms and subsequently how the patterning influences the role played by biomolecular adsorption on biofilm formation. In this work, the authors have used colloidal self-assembly in a confined area to pattern surfaces with colloidal crystals and used them as masks during allylamine plasma polymer (AAMpp) deposition to generate highly ordered patterns from the micro- to the nanoscale. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-aldehyde was grafted to the plasma regions via "cloud point" grafting to prevent the attachment of bacteria on the plasma patterned surface regions, thereby controlling the adhesive sites by choice of the colloidal crystal morphology. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen to study the bacterial interactions with these chemically patterned surfaces. Scanning electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, and epifluorescence microscopy were used for pattern characterization, surface chemical analysis, and imaging of attached bacteria. The AAMpp influenced bacterial attachment because of the amine groups displaying a positive charge. XPS results confirm the successful grafting of PEG on the AAMpp surfaces. The results showed that PEG patterns can be used as a surface for bacterial patterning including investigating the role of biomolecular patterning on bacterial attachment. These types of patterns are easy to fabricate and could be useful in further applications in biomedical research.

  8. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimin Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein “spots” were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population.

  9. Organic Based Solar Cells with Morphology Control

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Bundgaard, Eva; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    The field of organic solar cells has in the last years gone through an impressive development with efficiencies reported up to 12 %. For organic solar cells to take the leap from primarily being a laboratory scale technology to being utilized as renewable energy source, several issues need to be addressed. Among these are a more direct transfer of new materials tested on a laboratory scale to large scale production than offered by spincoating, a method offering direct control of the morpholog...

  10. Scaled multisensor inspection of extended surfaces for industrial quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Daniel; Bothe, Thorsten; Osten, Wolfgang

    2002-06-01

    Reliable real-time surface inspection of extended surfaces with high resolution is needed in several industrial applications. With respect to an efficient application to extended technical components such as aircraft or automotive parts, the inspection system has to perform a robust measurement with a ratio of less then 10-6 between depth resolution and lateral extension. This ratio is at least one order beyond the solutions that are offered by existing technologies. The concept of scaled topometry consists of arranging different optical measurement techniques with overlapping ranges of resolution systematically in order to receive characteristic surface information with the required accuracy. In such a surface inspection system, an active algorithm combines measurements on several scales of resolution and distinguishes between local fault indicating structures with different extensions and global geometric properties. The first part of this active algorithm finds indications of critical surface areas in the data of every measurement and separates them into different categories. The second part analyses the detected structures in the data with respect to their resolution and decides whether a further local measurement with a higher resolution has to be performed. The third part positions the sensors and starts the refined measurements. The fourth part finally integrates the measured local data set into the overall data mesh. We have constructed a laboratory setup capable of measuring surfaces with extensions up to 1500mm x 1000mm x 500mm (in x-, y- and z-direction respectively). Using this measurement system we will be able to separate the fault indicating structures on the surface from the global shape and to classify the detected structures according to their extensions and characteristic shapes simultaneously. The level of fault detection probability will be applicable by input parameter control.

  11. Biomimetic design of elastomer surface pattern for friction control under wet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an observation on the toe pad of a newt was carried out. It was found that the pad surface is covered with an array of polygonal cells separated by channels, similar to those of a tree frog's pad. With this micro-structure, a newt can move on wet and smooth surfaces without slipping. Inspired by the surface structure of newt toe pads, elastic micro-patterned surfaces were fabricated to understand the function of such micro-structures in friction systems. The tribological performance of the patterned surfaces was evaluated using a tribometer. Different tribological performances between micro-dimple and -pillar patterned surfaces were observed. The area density (r) of the micro-pattern is crucial for controlling the friction of the elastic surface. Distinguished from unpatterned and micro-dimple patterned surfaces, the pillar patterned surface with high area density can remain high friction at high sliding speed. It could be one of the reasons of such polygonal structures on newt's toe pads.

  12. Translational control in germline stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaidina, Maija; Lehmann, Ruth

    2014-10-13

    Stem cells give rise to tissues and organs during development and maintain their integrity during adulthood. They have the potential to self-renew or differentiate at each division. To ensure proper organ growth and homeostasis, self-renewal versus differentiation decisions need to be tightly controlled. Systematic genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster are revealing extensive regulatory networks that control the switch between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the germline. These networks, which are based primarily on mutual translational repression, act via interlocked feedback loops to provide robustness to this important fate decision.

  13. Fabrication of cell container arrays with overlaid surface topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckenmüller, Roman; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Escalante-Marun, Maryana; Groenendijk, Max; Papenburg, Bernke; Rivron, Nicolas; Unadkat, Hemant; Saile, Volker; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Albert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Wessling, Matthias; de Boer, Jan; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents cell culture substrates in the form of microcontainer arrays with overlaid surface topographies, and a technology for their fabrication. The new fabrication technology is based on microscale thermoforming of thin polymer films whose surfaces are topographically prepatterned on a micro- or nanoscale. For microthermoforming, we apply a new process on the basis of temporary back moulding of polymer films and use the novel concept of a perforated-sheet-like mould. Thermal micro- or nanoimprinting is applied for prepatterning. The novel cell container arrays are fabricated from polylactic acid (PLA) films. The thin-walled microcontainer structures have the shape of a spherical calotte merging into a hexagonal shape at their upper circumferential edges. In the arrays, the cell containers are arranged densely packed in honeycomb fashion. The inner surfaces of the highly curved container walls are provided with various topographical micro- and nanopatterns. For a first validation of the microcontainer arrays as in vitro cell culture substrates, C2C12 mouse premyoblasts are cultured in containers with microgrooved surfaces and shown to align along the grooves in the three-dimensional film substrates. In future stem-cell-biological and tissue engineering applications, microcontainers fabricated using the proposed technology may act as geometrically defined artificial microenvironments or niches.

  14. Surface modification with fibronectin or collagen to improve the cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaoyu [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Yao Jinfeng [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu 610044 (China); Yang Xiaojuan [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Tian Weidong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Chengdu 610044 (China)], E-mail: drtwd@sina.com; Liu Lei [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: drliulei@163.com

    2008-11-15

    Objective: The surface of biomaterials plays a critical role in determining bioactivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cell adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs on the surface of biomaterial which is modified with fibronectin or collagen. Materials and methods: Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) were obtained from SD rats, expanded in culture, and seeded onto scaffold surface-modified with fibronectin or collagen. To characterize cellular attachment, cells were incubated on scaffold for 1 and 2 h and then counted the cells attached onto the scaffold. The MTT assay was chosen to evaluate the proliferation at days 1, 4, 7 and 14. After 7 d of culture, scanning electron microscope was chosen to observe cell morphology and attachment of ADSCs on the scaffolds. Results: Attachment at 1 and 2 h of cells on scaffold modified with fibronectin was significantly greater than in control, but not with collagen. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs proliferation tendency was nearly parallel to that in control. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that ADSCs in experiment expanded thoroughly and excreted much extracellular materials. Conclusions: Surface modification with fibronectin or collagen can enhance the attachment of cultured ADSCs on the scaffold, but it had not evident effect to proliferation.

  15. Modified Titanium Surface-Mediated Effects on Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of titanium implants is used to enhance osseointegration. The study objective was to evaluate five modified titanium surfaces in terms of cytocompatibility and pro-osteogenic/pro-angiogenic properties for human mesenchymal stromal cells: amorphous microporous silica (AMS, bone morphogenetic protein-2 immobilized on AMS (AMS + BMP, bio-active glass (BAG and two titanium coatings with different porosity (T1; T2. Four surfaces served as controls: uncoated Ti (Ti, Ti functionalized with BMP-2 (Ti + BMP, Ti surface with a thickened titanium oxide layer (TiO2 and a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS. The proliferation of eGFP-fLuc (enhanced green fluorescence protein-firefly luciferase transfected cells was tracked non-invasively by fluorescence microscopy and bio-luminescence imaging. The implant surface-mediated effects on cell differentiation potential was tracked by determination of osteogenic and angiogenic parameters [alkaline phosphatase (ALP; osteocalcin (OC; osteoprotegerin (OPG; vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A]. Unrestrained cell proliferation was observed on (unfunctionalized Ti and AMS surfaces, whereas BAG and porous titanium coatings T1 and T2 did not support cell proliferation. An important pro-osteogenic and pro-angiogenic potential of the AMS + BMP surface was observed. In contrast, coating the Ti surface with BMP did not affect the osteogenic differentiation of the progenitor cells. A significantly slower BMP-2 release from AMS compared to Ti supports these findings. In the unfunctionalized state, Ti was found to be superior to AMS in terms of OPG and VEGF-A production. AMS is suggested to be a promising implant coating material for bioactive agents delivery.

  16. Modified Titanium Surface-Mediated Effects on Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Amol; Duyck, Joke; Braem, Annabel; Vleugels, Jozef; Petite, Hervé; Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Naert, Ignace; Martens, Johan A; Vandamme, Katleen

    2013-11-28

    Surface modification of titanium implants is used to enhance osseointegration. The study objective was to evaluate five modified titanium surfaces in terms of cytocompatibility and pro-osteogenic/pro-angiogenic properties for human mesenchymal stromal cells: amorphous microporous silica (AMS), bone morphogenetic protein-2 immobilized on AMS (AMS + BMP), bio-active glass (BAG) and two titanium coatings with different porosity (T1; T2). Four surfaces served as controls: uncoated Ti (Ti), Ti functionalized with BMP-2 (Ti + BMP), Ti surface with a thickened titanium oxide layer (TiO₂) and a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS). The proliferation of eGFP-fLuc (enhanced green fluorescence protein-firefly luciferase) transfected cells was tracked non-invasively by fluorescence microscopy and bio-luminescence imaging. The implant surface-mediated effects on cell differentiation potential was tracked by determination of osteogenic and angiogenic parameters [alkaline phosphatase (ALP); osteocalcin (OC); osteoprotegerin (OPG); vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A)]. Unrestrained cell proliferation was observed on (un)functionalized Ti and AMS surfaces, whereas BAG and porous titanium coatings T1 and T2 did not support cell proliferation. An important pro-osteogenic and pro-angiogenic potential of the AMS + BMP surface was observed. In contrast, coating the Ti surface with BMP did not affect the osteogenic differentiation of the progenitor cells. A significantly slower BMP-2 release from AMS compared to Ti supports these findings. In the unfunctionalized state, Ti was found to be superior to AMS in terms of OPG and VEGF-A production. AMS is suggested to be a promising implant coating material for bioactive agents delivery.

  17. Cell-surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells after inhibition of HDAC activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard

    2009-01-01

    We show that inhibition of HDAC activity leads to surface expression of Hsp70 on various hematopoietic cancer cells, an occurance that was not observed on naïve or activated peripheral blood cells. HDAC inhibitor-mediated Hsp70 surface expression was confined to the apoptotic Annexin V...... activity selectively induces surface expression of Hsp70 on hematopoietic cancer cells and that this may increase immunorecognition of these cells.......-positive cells and blocked by inhibition of apoptosis. Other chemotherapeutic inducers of apoptosis such as etoposide and camptothecin also led to a robust induction of Hsp70 surface expression. Hsp70 expression was, however, not caused by induction of apoptosis per se, as activated CD4 T cells remained Hsp70...

  18. Surface chemistry interventions to control boiler tube fouling - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.W.; Guzonas, D.A.; Klimas, S.J

    2004-06-15

    This is the third in a series of reports from an investigation co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) into the effectiveness of alternative amines for controlling the rate of tube-bundle fouling under steam generator (SG) operating conditions. The objectives of this investigation are to determine whether the fouling rate depends on the amine used for pH control, to identify those factors that influence the effectiveness, and use this information to optimize the selection of an amine for chemistry control and deposit control in the steam cycle and steam generator, respectively. Work to date has demonstrated that the rate of particle deposition under steam generator operating conditions is strongly influenced by surface chemistry (Turner et al., 1997; Turner et al., 1999). This dependence upon surface chemistry is illustrated by the difference between the deposition rates measured for hematite and magnetite, and by the dependence of the particle deposition rate on the amine used for pH control. Deposition rates of hematite were found to be more than 10 times greater than those for magnetite under similar test conditions (Turner et al., 1997). At 270{sup o}C and pH{sub T} 6.2, the surfaces of hematite and magnetite are predicted to be positively charged and negatively charged, respectively (Shoonen, 1994). Measurements of the point of zero charge (PZC) of magnetite at temperatures from 25{sup o}C to 290{sup o}C by Wesolowski et al. (1999) have confirmed that magnetite is negatively charged at the stated conditions. A PZC of 4.2 was measured for Alloy 600 at 25{sup o}C (Balakrishnan and Turner, un-published results), and its surface is expected to remain negatively charged for alkaline chemistry over the temperature range of interest. Therefore, there will be a repulsive force between the surfaces of magnetite particles and Alloy 600 at 270{sup o}C and pH{sub T} 6.2 that is absent for hematite particles

  19. Controlled wettability based on reversible micro-cracking on a shape memory polymer surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Liu, Yuxuan; Wang, Wenxin; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Peng

    2016-03-14

    Wettability modification on a polymer surface is of immense importance for flexible electronics and biomedical applications. Herein, controlled wettability of a styrene-based shape memory polymer has been realized by introducing micro-cracks on the polymer surface for the first time. The cracks were purposely prepared by thin metal film constrained deformation on the polymer. After the removal of the metallic film, wettability was dramatically enhanced by showing a remarkable reduction in the contact angle with water droplets from 85° to 25°. Subsequent systematic characterization techniques like XPS and SEM revealed that such observation could be attributed to the increased density of hydrophilic groups and the roughened surface. In addition, by controlling the temperature for annealing the treated polymer, the surface could be switched reversely to water-repellent. Therefore, this paper offers a smart tactic to manipulate the surface wettability of a shape memory polymer freely. The features of the controlled wettability surface such as high tenability, high stability and easy fabrication are promising for microfluidic switching and molecule/cell capture-release.

  20. Display of wasp venom allergens on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen Lars K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast surface display is a technique, where the proteins of interest are expressed as fusions with yeast surface proteins and thus remain attached to the yeast cell wall after expression. Our purpose was to study whether allergens expressed on the cell surface of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae preserve their native allergenic properties and whether the yeast native surface glycoproteins interfere with IgE binding. We chose to use the major allergens from the common wasp Vespula vulgaris venom: phospholipase A1, hyaluronidase and antigen 5 as the model. Results The proteins were expressed on the surface as fusions with a-agglutinin complex protein AGA2. The expression was confirmed by fluorescent cytometry (FACS after staining the cells with antibody against a C-tag attached to the C-terminal end of the allergens. Phospholipase A1 and hyaluronidase retained their enzymatic activities. Phospholipase A1 severely inhibited the growth of the yeast cells. Antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells bound IgE antibodies from wasp venom allergic patient sera but not from control sera as demonstrated by FACS. Moreover, antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells were capable of mediating allergen-specific histamine release from human basophils. Conclusions All the three major wasp venom allergens were expressed on the yeast surface. A high-level expression, which was observed only for antigen 5, was needed for detection of IgE binding by FACS and for induction of histamine release. The non-modified S. cerevisiae cells did not cause any unspecific reaction in FACS or histamine release assay despite the expression of high-mannose oligosaccharides. In perspective the yeast surface display may be used for allergen discovery from cDNA libraries and possibly for sublingual immunotherapy as the cells can serve as good adjuvant and can be produced in large amounts at a low price.

  1. Band energy control of molybdenum oxide by surface hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Keith T., E-mail: k.t.butler@bath.ac.uk; Walsh, Aron [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Crespo-Otero, Rachel [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Buckeridge, John; Scanlon, David O. [University College London, Kathleen Lonsdale Materials Chemistry, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Bovill, Edward; Lidzey, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-07

    The application of oxide buffer layers for improved carrier extraction is ubiquitous in organic electronics. However, the performance is highly susceptible to processing conditions. Notably, the interface stability and electronic structure is extremely sensitive to the uptake of ambient water. In this study we use density functional theory calculations to asses the effects of adsorbed water on the electronic structure of MoO{sub x}, in the context of polymer-fullerene solar cells based on PCDTBT. We obtain excellent agreement with experimental values of the ionization potential for pristine MoO{sub 3} (010). We find that IP and EA values can vary by as much as 2.5 eV depending on the oxidation state of the surface and that adsorbed water can either increase or decrease the IP and EA depending on the concentration of surface water.

  2. Monoclonal antibody to human endothelial cell surface internalization and liposome delivery in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskaya, O V; Trubetskoy, V S; Domogatsky, S P; Rudin, A V; Popov, N V; Danilov, S M; Nikolayeva, M N; Klibanov, A L; Torchilin, V P

    1988-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb), E25, is described that binds to the surface of cultured human endothelial cells. Upon binding E25 is rapidly internalized and digested intracellularly. Selective liposome targeting to the surface of the cells is performed using a biotinylated E25 antibody and an avidin-biotin system. Up to 30% of the cell-adherent liposomal lipid is internalized.

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the endothelial cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon W Fogarty

    Full Text Available We applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS to cationic gold-labeled endothelial cells to derive SERS-enhanced spectra of the bimolecular makeup of the plasma membrane. A two-step protocol with cationic charged gold nanoparticles followed by silver-intensification to generate silver nanoparticles on the cell surface was employed. This protocol of post-labelling silver-intensification facilitates the collection of SERS-enhanced spectra from the cell membrane without contribution from conjugated antibodies or other molecules. This approach generated a 100-fold SERS-enhancement of the spectral signal. The SERS spectra exhibited many vibrational peaks that can be assigned to components of the cell membrane. We were able to carry out spectral mapping using some of the enhanced wavenumbers. Significantly, the spectral maps suggest the distribution of some membrane components are was not evenly distributed over the cells plasma membrane. These results provide some possible evidence for the existence of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane and show that SERS has great potential for the study and characterization of cell surfaces.

  4. Engineered Aptamers to Probe Molecular Interactions on the Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Sana; Bhandari, Sanam; George, Shanell; Okeoma, Precious; Van, Nabeela; Zümrüt, Hazan E; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika

    2017-08-29

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of molecular interactions on the cell membrane. To decipher such interactions, molecular scaffolds can be engineered as a tool to modulate these events as they occur on the cell membrane. To guarantee reliability, scaffolds that function as modulators of cell membrane events must be coupled to a targeting moiety with superior chemical versatility. In this regard, nucleic acid aptamers are a suitable class of targeting moieties. Aptamers are inherently chemical in nature, allowing extensive site-specific chemical modification to engineer sensing molecules. Aptamers can be easily selected using a simple laboratory-based in vitro evolution method enabling the design and development of aptamer-based functional molecular scaffolds against wide range of cell surface molecules. This article reviews the application of aptamers as monitors and modulators of molecular interactions on the mammalian cell surface with the aim of increasing our understanding of cell-surface receptor response to external stimuli. The information gained from these types of studies could eventually prove useful in engineering improved medical diagnostics and therapeutics.

  5. Osteogenic properties of hydrophilic and hydrophobic titanium surfaces evaluated with osteoblast-like cells (MG63) in coculture with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Andrukhov, Oleh; Berner, Simon; Matejka, Michael; Wieland, Marco; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Schedle, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Osteogenesis on titanium (Ti) surfaces is a complex process involving cell-substrate and cell-cell interaction of osteoblasts and endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic properties of Ti surfaces on osteoblasts in the presence of endothelial cells (ECs). Osteoblast-like cells (MG63 cells) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were grown in cocultures on four kinds of Ti surfaces: acid-etched (A), coarse-grit-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), hydrophilic A (modA) and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA) surfaces. MG63 cells in single cultures served as controls. Cell ratios and cell types in cocultures were determined and isolated using flow cytometry. Cell numbers were obtained by direct cell counting. In MG63 cells, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was determined and protein levels of osteocalcin (OC) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). The mRNA levels of ALP, OC and OPG of sorted MG63 cells were determined with real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). MG63 cells proliferated in the presence of HUVECs, which showed higher cell numbers on Ti surfaces (A, SLA, modSLA) after 72h, and lower cell numbers on Ti surfaces (modA, SLA, modSLA) after 120h in comparison to single cultures. Protein and mRNA levels of ALP and OPG were higher in cocultures than in single cultures, while OC exhibited a lower expression. These three parameters were higher expressed on modA, SLA and modSLA surfaces compared to A surfaces. Cocultures of osteoblasts and endothelial cells represent the most recently developed research model for investigating osteogenesis and angiogenesis which play both a major role in bone healing. This paper investigates for the first time the osteogenic properties of titanium surfaces used for dental implants with a coculture system with osteoblast-like cells and endothelial cells: (1) In cocultures with ECs (HUVECs) osteoblast-like cells (MG63 cells) show enhanced expression

  6. Steady, subsonic, lifting surface theory for wings with swept, partial span, trailing edge control surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medan, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A method for computing the lifting pressure distribution on a wing with partial span, swept control surfaces is presented. This method is valid within the framework of linearized, steady, potential flow theory and consists of using conventional lifting surface theory in conjuction with a flap pressure mode. The cause of a numerical instability that can occur during the quadrature of the flap pressure mode is discussed, and an efficient technique to eliminate the instability is derived. This technique is valid for both the flap pressure mode and regular pressure modes and could be used to improve existing lifting surface methods. Examples of the use of the flap pressure mode and comparisons among this method, other theoretical methods, and experiments are given. Discrepancies with experiment are indicated and candidate causes are presented. It is concluded that the method can lead to an efficient and accurate solution of the mathematical problem when a partial span, trailing edge flap is involved.

  7. Control of exoenzyme production, motility and cell differentiation in Serratia liquefaciens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, Michael Christian; Eberl, Leo; Molin, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Serratia liquefaciens secretes a broad spectrum of hydrolytic enzymes to the surrounding medium and possesses the ability to differentiate into specialized swarmer cells capable of rapid surface motility. Control of exoenzyme production and swarming motility is governed by similar regulatory...

  8. Adaptive control and constrained control allocation for overactuated ocean surface vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mou; Jiang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    In this article, the constrained control allocation is proposed for overactuated ocean surface vessels with parametric uncertainties and unknown external disturbances. The constrained control allocation is transformed into a convex quadratic programming problem and a recurrent neural network is employed to solve it. To complete the control allocation, the control command is derived via the backstepping method. Adaptive tracking control is proposed for the full-state feedback case using the backstepping technique and the Lyapunov synthesis. It is proved that the proposed adaptive tracking control is able to guarantee semi-global uniform ultimate boundedness of all signals in the closed-loop system. Then, the obtained control command is distributed to each actuator of overactuated ocean vessels. Finally, simulation studies are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive tracking control and the constrained control allocation scheme.

  9. Initial attachment, subsequent cell proliferation/viability and gene expression of epithelial cells related to attachment and wound healing in response to different titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Na; Rausch-fan, Xiaohui; Wieland, Marco; Matejka, Michael; Andrukhov, Oleh; Schedle, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    A tight seal between the epithelium and the dental implant surface is required to prevent bacterial inflammation and soft tissue recession and therefore to demonstrate a long-term success. Surface hydrophilicity was recently shown to promote osseointegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of surface hydrophilicity in combination with surface topography of Ti implant surfaces on the behavior and activation/differentiation of epithelial cells using a set of in vitro experiments mimicking the implant-soft tissue contact. Hydrophobic acid-etched (A) and coarse-grit-blasted, acid-etched (SLA) surfaces and hydrophilic acid-etched (modA) and modSLA surfaces were produced. The behavior of an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HSC-2) grown on all surfaces was compared through determination of cell attachment and proliferation/viability (CCK-8 and MTT assay), time-lapse microscopy of fluorescence labeled cells and determination of gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction. Within the surfaces with similar wettability cell spreading and cell movements observed by time-lapse microscopy after one day of incubation were most pronounced on smoother (A and modA) surfaces compared to rougher (SLA and modSLA) surfaces. Within the surfaces with similar roughness the hydrophilic surfaces (modA and modSLA) showed more cell spreading and cell activity compared to the hydrophobic surfaces (A and SLA). The relative gene expressions of cytokeratin14, integrin α6, integrin β4, vinculin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, TGF-β1, and TGF-β3 were decreased in HSC-2 on all four types of Ti surfaces compared to control surfaces (tissue culture polystyrene; pmodA). These results suggest that surface hydrophilicity might positively influence the epithelial seal around dental implants. All tested titanium surfaces downregulate cell attachment, cell proliferation, expression of adhesion promoters, and cytokines involved in wound healing in HSC-2

  10. Modification of cell surface properties of Pseudomonas alcaligenes S22 during hydrocarbon biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorek, Ewa; Moszyńska, Sylwia; Olszanowski, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    Biodegradation of water insoluble hydrocarbons can be significantly increased by the addition of natural surfactants one. Very promising option is the use of saponins. The obtained results indicated that in this system, after 21 days, 92% biodegradation of diesel oil could be achieved using Pseudomonas alcaligenes. No positive effect on the biodegradation process was observed using synthetic surfactant Triton X-100. The kind of carbon source influences the cell surface properties of microorganisms. Modification of the surface cell could be observed by control of the sedimentation profile. This analytical method is a new approach in microbiological analysis.

  11. Cell surface activation of progelatinase A (proMMP—2) and cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAGASEHIDEAKI

    1998-01-01

    Gelatinase A (MMP-2) is considered to play a critical role in cell migration and invasion.The proteinase is cerceted from the cell as an inactive zymogen.In vivo it is postulated that activation of progelationase A (proMMP-2) takes place on the cell surface mediated by membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs).Recent studies have demonstrated that proMMP-2 is recruited to the cell surface by interacting with tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) bound to MT1-MMP by forming a ternary complex.Free MT1-MMP closely located to the ternary complex then activates proMMP-2 on the cell surface.MT1-MMP is found in cultured invasive cancer cells at the invadopodia.The MT-MMP/TIMP-2/MMP-2 system thus provides localized expression of proteolysis of the extracellular matrix required for cell migration.

  12. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control Method Based on Nonlinear Integral Sliding Surface for Agricultural Vehicle Steering Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taochang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic steering control is the key factor and essential condition in the realization of the automatic navigation control of agricultural vehicles. In order to get satisfactory steering control performance, an adaptive sliding mode control method based on a nonlinear integral sliding surface is proposed in this paper for agricultural vehicle steering control. First, the vehicle steering system is modeled as a second-order mathematic model; the system uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics as well as the external disturbances are regarded as the equivalent disturbances satisfying a certain boundary. Second, a transient process of the desired system response is constructed in each navigation control period. Based on the transient process, a nonlinear integral sliding surface is designed. Then the corresponding sliding mode control law is proposed to guarantee the fast response characteristics with no overshoot in the closed-loop steering control system. Meanwhile, the switching gain of sliding mode control is adaptively adjusted to alleviate the control input chattering by using the fuzzy control method. Finally, the effectiveness and the superiority of the proposed method are verified by a series of simulation and actual steering control experiments.

  13. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B. F.; Miller, A.; Helt-Hansen, J.; Buchanan, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers increasingly are the materials of choice for implantable orthopaedic fixation devices. Controlled degradation of these polymers is vital for preservation of mechanical properties during tissue repair and controlled release of incorporated agents such as osteoconductive or anti-microbial additives. The work outlined in this paper investigates the use of low energy electron beam irradiation to surface modify polyhydroxyacid samples incorporating beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). This work uniquely demonstrates that surface modification of bioresorbable polymers through electron beam irradiation allows for the early release of incorporated agents such as bioactive additives. Samples were e-beam irradiated at an energy of 125 keV and doses of either 150 kGy or 500 kGy. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were degraded in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), to simulate bioresorption, followed by characterisation. The results show that low energy e-beam irradiation enhances surface hydrolytic degradation in comparison to bulk and furthermore allows for earlier release of incorporated calcium via dissolution into the surrounding medium.

  14. Multijunction Solar Cells Optimized for the Mars Surface Solar Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Fetzer, Chris; Karam, Nasser H.; Stella, Paul; Mardesich, Nick; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an update on the performance of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) which have been continually performing for more than 3 years beyond their original 90-day missions. The paper also gives the latest results on the optimization of a multijunction solar cell that is optimized to give more power on the surface of Mars.

  15. A two-step process for controlling the surface smoothness of polyelectrolyte-based microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacík, I; Anilkumar, A V; Wang, T G

    2001-01-01

    Biocompatibility is one of the crucial requirements to be fulfilled when designing devices for immunoisolation of transplanted cells. The quality of the capsule surface (smoothness/roughness) influences the nature of cell overgrowth on it by immunocytes, which eventually may lead to the transplant failure. A microcapsule has been developed based on the polyelectrolyte complexation of the polyanions sodium alginate and cellulose sulphate with the polycation poly(methylene-co-guanidine), which was successfully tested in rodent animal models. Recently, the principles for controlling the surface smoothness of these capsules has been identified. This paper reports on a two-step process used for production of stable capsules with improved surface properties. The methodology involves separating the process of drop shape recovery and precursor capsule formation from the process of membrane formation by applying a two-reactor design. The multi-loop reactors are connected in series, and the process separation is given by the different composition of cation solutions flowing in each reactor. This process enables one to prepare the microcapsule immunoisolation device, which can differ in the extent of surface roughness and, thus, is suitable for studying the effect of surface morphology of the immunoisolation device on cell overgrowth. The effect of this process on the capsule permeability has also been evaluated.

  16. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hatzold

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well.

  17. Micromechanical and surface adhesive properties of single saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Bahman; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2017-09-01

    The adhesion and mechanical properties of a biological cell (e.g. cell membrane elasticity and adhesiveness) are often strong indicators for the state of its health. Many existing techniques for determining mechanical properties of cells require direct physical contact with a single cell or a group of cells. Physical contact with the cell can trigger complex mechanotransduction mechanisms, leading to cellular responses, and consequently interfering with measurement accuracy. In the current work, based on ultrasonic excitation and interferometric (optical) motion detection, a non-contact method for characterizing the adhesion and mechanical properties of single cells is presented. It is experimentally demonstrated that the rocking (rigid body) motion and internal vibrational resonance frequencies of a single saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) (baker’s yeast) cell can be acquired with the current approach, and the Young’s modulus and surface tension of the cell membrane as well as surface adhesion energy can be extracted from the values of these acquired resonance frequencies. The detected resonance frequency ranges for single SC cells include a rocking (rigid body) frequency of 330  ±  70 kHz and two breathing resonance frequencies of 1.53  ±  0.12 and 2.02  ±  0.31 MHz. Based on these values, the average work-of-adhesion of SC cells on a silicon substrate in aqueous medium is extracted, for the first time, as WASC-Si=16.2+/- 3.8 mJ {{m}-2} . Similarly, the surface tension and the Young’s modulus of the SC cell wall are predicted as {{σ }SC}=0.16+/- 0.02 N {{m}-1} and {{E}SC}= 9.20  ±  2.80 MPa, respectively. These results are compared to those reported in the literature by utilizing various methods, and good agreements are found. The current approach eliminates the measurement inaccuracies associated with the physical contact. Exciting and detecting cell dynamics at micro-second time-scales is significantly faster than the

  18. 3D collagen scaffolds coated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes: initial cell attachment to internal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Eri; Uo, Motohiro; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Takita, Hiroko; Ushijima, Natsumi; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Watari, Fumio; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2010-05-01

    The cell adhesion in a multiwalled carbon nanotube-coated collagen sponge (MWCNT-coated sponge) was investigated. Immediately after seeding, the cells adhered to the inner surface of the MWCNT-coated sponge and a significantly larger number of cells were observed there than for a pure collagen sponge used as control. On the MWCNT-coated sponge, the cells appeared favorable adhesion and spread in the early stages in the center part of the sponge which cells rarely attached without MWCNT-coating. It was suggested that the physical structure of MWCNTs was effective for initial adhesion of cells from the result of serum-free culture. MWCNT-coating makes the material a suitable three-dimensional scaffold for cell culturing, as opposed to other scaffold systems where such an effect is not seen.

  19. Unleashing Cancer Cells on Surfaces Exposing Motogenic IGDQ Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaglia, Valentina; Marega, Riccardo; De Leo, Federica; Michiels, Carine; Bonifazi, Davide

    2016-01-20

    Thiolated peptides bearing the Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD) motif, a highly conserved sequence of fibronectin, are used for the preparation of anisotropic self-assembled monolayers (SAM gradients) to study the whole-population migratory behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells). Ile-Gly-Asp-Gln-(IGDQ)-exposing SAMs sustain the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells by triggering focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, similarly to the analogous Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-(GRGD)-terminating surfaces. However, the biological responses of different cell lines interfaced with the SAM gradients show that only those exposing the IGDQ sequence induce significant migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. In particular, the observed migratory behavior suggests the presence of cell subpopulations associated with a "stationary" or a "migratory" phenotype, the latter determining a considerable cell migration at the sub-cm length scale. These findings are of great importance as they suggest for the first time an active role of biological surfaces exposing the IGD motif in the multicomponent orchestration of cellular signaling involved in the metastatic progression.

  20. Surface modification of hydrophobic polymers for improvement of endothelial cell-surface interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Reitsma, K.; Beugeling, T.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, J.; Kirkpatrick, C.J.; Aken, van W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the interaction of endothelial cells with polymers used in vascular prostheses. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Teflon) films were treated by means of nitrogen and oxygen plasmas. Depending on the plasma exposure time, modified PTFE surfaces showed water-contact an

  1. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind,, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2013-10-15

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank–van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  2. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind

    2013-10-01

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank-van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  3. Methods To Identify Aptamers against Cell Surface Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Ducongé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid-based ligands identified through a process of molecular evolution named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment. During the last 10-15 years, numerous aptamers have been developed specifically against targets present on or associated with the surface of human cells or infectious pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites. Several of the aptamers have been described as potent probes, rivalling antibodies, for use in flow cytometry or microscopy. Some have also been used as drugs by inhibiting or activating functions of their targets in a manner similar to neutralizing or agonistic antibodies. Additionally, it is straightforward to conjugate aptamers to other agents without losing their affinity and they have successfully been used in vitro and in vivo to deliver drugs, siRNA, nanoparticles or contrast agents to target cells. Hence, aptamers identified against cell surface biomarkers represent a promising class of ligands. This review presents the different strategies of SELEX that have been developed to identify aptamers for cell surface-associated proteins as well as some of the methods that are used to study their binding on living cells.

  4. Design and control of an embedded vision guided robotic fish with multiple control surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junzhi; Wang, Kai; Tan, Min; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development and control issues of a self-propelled robotic fish with multiple artificial control surfaces and an embedded vision system. By virtue of the hybrid propulsion capability in the body plus the caudal fin and the complementary maneuverability in accessory fins, a synthesized propulsion scheme including a caudal fin, a pair of pectoral fins, and a pelvic fin is proposed. To achieve flexible yet stable motions in aquatic environments, a central pattern generator- (CPG-) based control method is employed. Meanwhile, a monocular underwater vision serves as sensory feedback that modifies the control parameters. The integration of the CPG-based motion control and the visual processing in an embedded microcontroller allows the robotic fish to navigate online. Aquatic tests demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed mechatronic design and swimming control methods. Particularly, a pelvic fin actuated sideward swimming gait was first implemented. It is also found that the speeds and maneuverability of the robotic fish with coordinated control surfaces were largely superior to that of the swimming robot propelled by a single control surface.

  5. "Race for the Surface": Eukaryotic Cells Can Win.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vy T H; Truong, Vi Khanh; Orlowska, Anna; Ghanaati, Shahram; Barbeck, Mike; Booms, Patrick; Fulcher, Alex J; Bhadra, Chris M; Buividas, Ričardas; Baulin, Vladimir; Kirkpatrick, C James; Doran, Pauline; Mainwaring, David E; Juodkazis, Saulius; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2016-08-31

    With an aging population and the consequent increasing use of medical implants, managing the possible infections arising from implant surgery remains a global challenge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that a precise nanotopology provides an effective intervention in bacterial cocolonization enabling the proliferation of eukaryotic cells on a substratum surface, preinfected by both live Gram-negative, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Gram-positive, Staphylococcus aureus, pathogenic bacteria. The topology of the model black silicon (bSi) substratum not only favors the proliferation of eukaryotic cells but is biocompatible, not triggering an inflammatory response in the host. The attachment behavior and development of filopodia when COS-7 fibroblast cells are placed in contact with the bSi surface are demonstrated in the dynamic study, which is based on the use of real-time sequential confocal imaging. Bactericidal nanotopology may enhance the prospect for further development of inherently responsive antibacterial nanomaterials for bionic applications such as prosthetics and implants.

  6. Reciprocal control of cell proliferation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Donatis Alina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In adult tissue the quiescent state of a single cell is maintained by the steady state conditions of its own microenvironment for what concern both cell-cell as well as cell-ECM interaction and soluble factors concentration. Physiological or pathological conditions can alter this quiescent state through an imbalance of both soluble and insoluble factors that can trigger a cellular phenotypic response. The kind of cellular response depends by many factors but one of the most important is the concentration of soluble cytokines sensed by the target cell. In addition, due to the intrinsic plasticity of many cellular types, every single cell is able, in response to the same stimulus, to rapidly switch phenotype supporting minimal changes of microenviromental cytokines concentration. Wound healing is a typical condition in which epithelial, endothelial as well as mesenchymal cells are firstly subjected to activation of their motility in order to repopulate the damaged region and then they show a strong proliferative response in order to successfully complete the wound repair process. This schema constitute the leitmotif of many other physiological or pathological conditions such as development vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as well as cancer outgrowth and metastasis. Our review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the starting and, eventually, the switching of cellular phenotypic outcome in response to changes in the symmetry of the extracellular environment.

  7. CHO cell line specific prediction and control of recombinant monoclonal antibody N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Rhian K; James, David C

    2013-11-01

    Here we demonstrate that it is possible to predict and control N-glycan processing of a secreted recombinant monoclonal antibody during manufacturing process development using a combination of statistical modelling and comparative measurement of cell surface glycans using fluorescent lectins. Using design of experiments--response surface modelling (DoE-RSM) methodology to adjust the relative media concentrations of known metabolic effectors of galactosylation (manganese, galactose, and uridine) we have shown that β1,4-galactosylation of the same recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibody produced by different CHO cell lines can be precisely controlled in a cell line specific manner. For two cell lines, monoclonal antibody galactosylation could be increased by over 100% compared to control, non-supplemented cultures without a reduction in product titre and with minimal effect on cell growth. Analysis of galactosylation effector interactions by DoE-RSM indicated that Mn²⁺ alone was necessary but not sufficient to improve galactosylation, and that synergistic combinations of Gal and Urd were necessary to maximize galactosylation, whilst minimizing the deleterious effect of Urd on cell growth. To facilitate rapid cell culture process development we also tested the hypothesis that substrate-level control of cellular galactosylation would similarly affect both cell surface and secreted monoclonal antibody glycans, enabling facile indirect prediction of product glycan processing. To support this hypothesis, comparative quantitation of CHO cell surface β1,4-galactosylation by flow cytometry using fluorescent derivatives of RCA and ConA lectins revealed that substrate-controlled variation in monoclonal antibody galactosylation and cell surface galactosylation were significantly correlated. Taken together, these data show that precision control of a complex, dynamic cellular process essential for the definition of protein product molecular heterogeneity and bioactivity is

  8. Control Surface Fault Diagnosis for Small Autonomous Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    of distributions and change detection methods are employed to reach decisions about not-normal behaviour and it is shown how control surface faults can be diagnosed for a specific UAV without adding additional hardware to the platform. Only telemetry data from the aircraft is used together with a basic model...... of relations between signals within the aircraft. Frequency domain methods are shown to be robust in exploring relevant properties of the signals. The detection is shown to work on data from a real incident where an aileron gets stuck during launch of a UAV....

  9. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  10. Controllable Catalysis with Nanoparticles: Bimetallic Alloy Systems and Surface Adsorbates

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tianyou

    2016-05-16

    Transition metal nanoparticles are privileged materials in catalysis due to their high specific surface areas and abundance of active catalytic sites. While many of these catalysts are quite useful, we are only beginning to understand the underlying catalytic mechanisms. Opening the “black box” of nanoparticle catalysis is essential to achieve the ultimate goal of catalysis by design. In this Perspective we highlight recent work addressing the topic of controlled catalysis with bimetallic alloy and “designer” adsorbate-stabilized metal nanoparticles.

  11. Integration of plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein surface activation for single-cell patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2010-07-01

    Surface patterning for single-cell culture was accomplished by combining plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein-induced surface activation. Hydrophilic patterns were produced on Parylene C films deposited on glass substrates by oxygen plasma treatment through the windows of polydimethylsiloxane shadow masks. After incubation first with Pluronic F108 solution and then serum medium overnight, surface seeding with mesenchymal stem cells in serum medium resulted in single-cell patterning. The present method provides a means of surface patterning with direct implications in single-cell culture.

  12. Cell surface glycan engineering of neural stem cells augments neurotropism and improves recovery in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2015-09-13

    Neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies offer potential for neural repair in central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory and degenerative disorders. Typically, these conditions present with multifocal CNS lesions making it impractical to inject NSCs locally, thus mandating optimization of vascular delivery of the cells to involved sites. Here, we analyzed NSCs for expression of molecular effectors of cell migration and found that these cells are natively devoid of E-selectin ligands. Using glycosyltransferase-programmed stereosubstitution (GPS), we glycan engineered the cell surface of NSCs ("GPS-NSCs") with resultant enforced expression of the potent E-selectin ligand HCELL (hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand) and of an E-selectin-binding glycoform of neural cell adhesion molecule ("NCAM-E"). Following intravenous (i.v.) injection, short-term homing studies demonstrated that, compared with buffer-treated (control) NSCs, GPS-NSCs showed greater neurotropism. Administration of GPS-NSC significantly attenuated the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), with markedly decreased inflammation and improved oligodendroglial and axonal integrity, but without evidence of long-term stem cell engraftment. Notably, this effect of NSC is not a universal property of adult stem cells, as administration of GPS-engineered mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells did not improve EAE clinical course. These findings highlight the utility of cell surface glycan engineering to boost stem cell delivery in neuroinflammatory conditions and indicate that, despite the use of a neural tissue-specific progenitor cell population, neural repair in EAE results from endogenous repair and not from direct, NSC-derived cell replacement.

  13. Cell surface glycan engineering of neural stem cells augments neurotropism and improves recovery in a murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Imitola, Jaime; Starossom, Sarah C; Zhu, Bing; Wang, Yue; Lee, Jack; Ali, Amal J; Olah, Marta; Abuelela, Ayman F; Khoury, Samia J; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies offer potential for neural repair in central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory and degenerative disorders. Typically, these conditions present with multifocal CNS lesions making it impractical to inject NSCs locally, thus mandating optimization of vascular delivery of the cells to involved sites. Here, we analyzed NSCs for expression of molecular effectors of cell migration and found that these cells are natively devoid of E-selectin ligands. Using glycosyltransferase-programmed stereosubstitution (GPS), we glycan engineered the cell surface of NSCs ("GPS-NSCs") with resultant enforced expression of the potent E-selectin ligand HCELL (hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand) and of an E-selectin-binding glycoform of neural cell adhesion molecule ("NCAM-E"). Following intravenous (i.v.) injection, short-term homing studies demonstrated that, compared with buffer-treated (control) NSCs, GPS-NSCs showed greater neurotropism. Administration of GPS-NSC significantly attenuated the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), with markedly decreased inflammation and improved oligodendroglial and axonal integrity, but without evidence of long-term stem cell engraftment. Notably, this effect of NSC is not a universal property of adult stem cells, as administration of GPS-engineered mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells did not improve EAE clinical course. These findings highlight the utility of cell surface glycan engineering to boost stem cell delivery in neuroinflammatory conditions and indicate that, despite the use of a neural tissue-specific progenitor cell population, neural repair in EAE results from endogenous repair and not from direct, NSC-derived cell replacement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Surface modification of substrates for bacteria and cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baede, Tom; Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    The plasma needle is a medical device that consists of a tungsten wire placed in a tube through which helium flows. A RF voltage frequency of 13.05 MHz is applied to the wire to produce the plasma. The device has a non-thermal effect and is therefore suited for both organic and inorganic surfaces. It was designed to manipulate tissues, but can also be used to modify the bacterial adhesion properties of material surfaces. The surface modification has a number of applications, most notably cell culture and the preventive treatment of caries. The research consists of two sets of experiments. In the first experiments the effect of the plasma treatment on the wettability was studied by means of contact angle measurements. The wettability quantifies the hydrophilic behavior of a surface. Plasma treatment with the plasma needle significantly increased the wettability of the studied materials. The persistence of the wettability change was also examined. For some materials the effect was only temporary. Bacteria are very particular about the surfaces they adhere to and the wettability of the surface plays an important role in their preference. The next set of experiments dealt with the effect of plasma treatment on bacterial adhesion. This effect was measured by comparing the growth rates of E. coli and S. mutans bacteria that were cultured on both plasma and non-treated surfaces. The effect appears to be species specific.

  15. Proteomics and glycoproteomics of pluripotent stem-cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a unique cell type with promising potential in regenerative and personalized medicine. Yet the difficulty to understand and coax their seemingly stochastic differentiation and spontaneous self-renewal have largely limited their clinical applications. A call has been made by numerous researchers for a better characterization of surface proteins on these cells, in search of biomarkers that can dictate developmental stages and lineage specifications, and can help formulate mechanistic insight of stem-cell fate choices. In the past two decades, proteomics has gained significant recognition in profiling surface proteins at high throughput. This review will summarize the impact of these studies on stem-cell biology, and discuss the used proteomic techniques. A systematic comparison of all the techniques and their results is also attempted here to help reveal pros, cons, and the complementarity of the existing methods. This awareness should assist in selecting suitable strategies for stem-cell related research, and shed light on technical improvements that can be explored in the future.

  16. Fluoropolymer surface coatings to control droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Carson T; Zhang, Chuchu; Gupta, Malancha; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-06-07

    We have demonstrated the application of low surface energy fluoropolymer coatings onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices for droplet formation and extraction-induced merger of droplets. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was used to pattern fluoropolymer coatings within microchannels based on geometrical constraints. In a two-phase flow system, the range of accessible flow rates for droplet formation was greatly enhanced in the coated devices. The ability to controllably apply the coating only at the inlet facilitated a method for merging droplets. An organic spacer droplet was extracted from between a pair of aqueous droplets. The size of the organic droplet and the flow rate controlled the time to merge the aqueous droplets; the process of merging was independent of the droplet sizes. Extraction-induced droplet merging is a robust method for manipulating droplets that could be applied in translating multi-step reactions to microfluidic platforms.

  17. Surface science studies of model fuel cell electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, N.M.; Ross, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, University of California, 94720 Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss progress in the understanding of electrocatalytic reactions through the study of model systems with surface spectroscopies. Pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys have been used quite successfully as models for real (commercial) electrocatalysts. Given the sheer volume of all work in electrocatalysis that is on fuel cell reactions, we will focus on electrocatalysts for fuel cells. Since Pt is the model fuel cell electrocatalyst, we will focus entirely on studies of pure Pt and Pt bimetallic alloys. The electrode reactions discussed include hydrogen oxidation/evolution, oxygen reduction, and the electrooxidation of carbon monoxide, formic acid, and methanol. Surface spectroscopies emphasized are FTIR, STM/AFM and surface X-ray scattering (SXS). The discussion focuses on the relation between the energetics of adsorption of intermediates and the reaction pathway and kinetics, and how the energetics and kinetics relate to the extrinsic properties of the model system, e.g. surface structure and/or composition. Finally, we conclude by discussing the limitations that are reached by using pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys as models for real catalysts, and suggest some directions for developing more realistic systems.

  18. Surface science studies of model fuel cell electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, N. M.; Ross, P. N.

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss progress in the understanding of electrocatalytic reactions through the study of model systems with surface spectroscopies. Pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys have been used quite successfully as models for real (commercial) electrocatalysts. Given the sheer volume of all work in electrocatalysis that is on fuel cell reactions, we will focus on electrocatalysts for fuel cells. Since Pt is the model fuel cell electrocatalyst, we will focus entirely on studies of pure Pt and Pt bimetallic alloys. The electrode reactions discussed include hydrogen oxidation/evolution, oxygen reduction, and the electrooxidation of carbon monoxide, formic acid, and methanol. Surface spectroscopies emphasized are FTIR, STM/AFM and surface X-ray scattering (SXS). The discussion focuses on the relation between the energetics of adsorption of intermediates and the reaction pathway and kinetics, and how the energetics and kinetics relate to the extrinsic properties of the model system, e.g. surface structure and/or composition. Finally, we conclude by discussing the limitations that are reached by using pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys as models for real catalysts, and suggest some directions for developing more realistic systems.

  19. Controlled reflectance surfaces with film-coupled colloidal nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Antoine; Ciraci, Cristian; Mock, Jack J.; Hill, Ryan T.; Wang, Qiang; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Smith, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and tunable absorption is essential for a variety of applications, such as the design of controlled emissivity surfaces for thermophotovoltaic devices1; tailoring of the infrared spectrum for controlled thermal dissipation2; and detector elements for imaging3. Metamaterials based on metallic elements are particularly efficient as absorbing media, because both the electrical and the magnetic properties of a metamaterial can be tuned by structured design4. To date, metamaterial absorbers in the infrared or visible range have been fabricated using lithographically patterned metallic structures2,5–9, making them inherently difficult to produce over large areas and hence reducing their applicability. We demonstrate here an extraordinarily simple method to create a metamaterial absorber by randomly adsorbing chemically synthesized silver nanocubes onto a nanoscale thick polymer spacer layer on a gold film –making no effort to control the spatial arrangement of the cubes on the film– and show that the film-coupled nanocubes provide a reflectance spectrum that can be tailored by varying the geometry. Each nanocube is the optical analog of the well-known grounded patch antenna, with a nearly identical local field structure that is modified by the plasmonic response of the metal dielectric function, and with an anomalously large absorption efficiency that can be partly attributed to an interferometric effect10. The absorptivity of large surface areas can be controlled using this method, at scales out of reach of lithographic approaches like e-beam lithography otherwise required to manipulate matter at the nanometer scale. PMID:23222613

  20. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, A; Abramov, S; Georgiou, G

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins (e.g., enzymes, single-chain antibodies, on the surface of bacterial cells) (Georgiou et al., 1993). Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article we describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on "bi-layer encagement" (Tor et al., 1989) for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA (46-159)-beta-lactamase fusion that displays beta-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 degrees C of surface anchored beta-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 degrees C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  1. Controlled locomotion of robots driven by a vibrating surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Lynch, Kevin M.

    Robots typically derive their powers of movement from onboard actuators and power sources, but other scenarios are possible where the external environment provides part or all of the necessary forcing and control. I will discuss details of a system where the ``robots'' are just planar solid objects and the requisite driving forces originate from frictional sliding-interactions with a periodically oscillated and nominally horizontal surface. For the robots to move, the temporal symmetry of the frictional forces must be broken, which is achieved here by modulating the normal force using vertical acceleration of the surface. Independent of the initial conditions and vibration waveform, a sliding locomotor reaches a unique velocity limit cycle at a given position. Its resulting motion can be described in terms of velocity fields which specify the robot's cycle-averaged velocity as a function of position. Velocity fields with non-zero spatial divergence can be generated by combining translational and rotational surface motions; this allows the simultaneous and open-loop collection, dispersal, and transport of multiple robots. Fields and field sequences can simultaneously move multiple robots between arbitrary positions and, potentially, along arbitrary trajectories. Supported by NSF CMMI #0700537.

  2. Controlled surface neutralization: A quantitative approach to study surface charging in photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S. [Surface Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukherjee, M. [Surface Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)], E-mail: manabendra.mukherjee@saha.ac.in

    2007-02-15

    Photons when used to probe poorly conducting materials induce emission of secondary electrons that are inadequately compensated from the sample ground giving rise to a phenomenon commonly known as sample charging. In case of photoemission spectroscopy of an insulating material the data obtained from the charged surface are accordingly distorted. Here we have used a controlled neutralization technique to obtain photoemission data from continuously varying equilibrium charging conditions from two dissimilar insulating polymeric systems. A quantitative scheme for data analysis has been developed to demonstrate systematic behavior in the apparently distorted spectra and the charging peak shift has been described by an effective model. It is shown that the neutralization responses are non-linear for both the systems and possess intrinsic similarity. Around a critical electron flux the neutralization of the samples appears to occur through the percolation of homogeneously dispersed surface domains.

  3. Swarm formation control utilizing elliptical surfaces and limiting functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Laura E; Fields, Mary Anne; Valavanis, Kimon P

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a strategy for organizing swarms of unmanned vehicles into a formation by utilizing artificial potential fields that were generated from normal and sigmoid functions. These functions construct the surface on which swarm members travel, controlling the overall swarm geometry and the individual member spacing. Nonlinear limiting functions are defined to provide tighter swarm control by modifying and adjusting a set of control variables that force the swarm to behave according to set constraints, formation, and member spacing. The artificial potential functions and limiting functions are combined to control swarm formation, orientation, and swarm movement as a whole. Parameters are chosen based on desired formation and user-defined constraints. This approach is computationally efficient and scales well to different swarm sizes, to heterogeneous systems, and to both centralized and decentralized swarm models. Simulation results are presented for a swarm of 10 and 40 robots that follow circle, ellipse, and wedge formations. Experimental results are included to demonstrate the applicability of the approach on a swarm of four custom-built unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs).

  4. Fluidic control over cell proliferation and chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Microscopic flows are almost always stable and laminar that allows precise control of chemical environment in micro-channels. We describe design and operation of several microfluidic devices, in which various types of environments are created for different experimental assays with live cells. In a microfluidic chemostat, colonies of non-adherent bacterial and yeast cells are trapped in micro-chambers with walls permeable for chemicals. Fast chemical exchange between the chambers and nearby flow-through channels creates essentially chemostatic medium conditions in the chambers and leads to exponential growth of the colonies up to very high cell densities. Another microfluidic device allows creation of linear concentration profiles of a pheromone (α-factor) across channels with non-adherent yeast cells, without exposure of the cells to flow or other mechanical perturbation. The concentration profile remains stable for hours enabling studies of chemotropic response of the cells to the pheromone gradient. A third type of the microfluidic devices is used to study chemotaxis of human neutrophils exposed to gradients of a chemoattractant (fMLP). The devices generate concentration profiles of various shapes, with adjustable steepness and mean concentration. The ``gradient'' of the chemoattractant can be imposed and reversed within less than a second, allowing repeated quantitative experiments.

  5. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A. [and others

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  6. Degradable polyester scaffolds with controlled surface chemistry combining minimal protein adsorption with specific bioactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafahrend, Dirk; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Beer, Meike V.; Gasteier, Peter; Möller, Martin; Boehm, Gabriele; Dalton, Paul D.; Groll, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Advanced biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering place high demands on materials and exceed the passive biocompatibility requirements previously considered acceptable for biomedical implants. Together with degradability, the activation of specific cell-material interactions and a three-dimensional environment that mimics the extracellular matrix are core challenges and prerequisites for the organization of living cells to functional tissue. Moreover, although bioactive signalling combined with minimization of non-specific protein adsorption is an advanced modification technique for flat surfaces, it is usually not accomplished for three-dimensional fibrous scaffolds used in tissue engineering. Here, we present a one-step preparation of fully synthetic, bioactive and degradable extracellular matrix-mimetic scaffolds by electrospinning, using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) as the matrix polymer. Addition of a functional, amphiphilic macromolecule based on star-shaped poly(ethylene oxide) transforms current biomedically used degradable polyesters into hydrophilic fibres, which causes the suppression of non-specific protein adsorption on the fibres’ surface. The subsequent covalent attachment of cell-adhesion-mediating peptides to the hydrophilic fibres promotes specific bioactivation and enables adhesion of cells through exclusive recognition of the immobilized binding motifs. This approach permits synthetic materials to directly control cell behaviour, for example, resembling the binding of cells to fibronectin immobilized on collagen fibres in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue.

  7. Surface proteome analysis and characterization of surface cell antigen (Sca or autotransporter family of Rickettsia typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandra T Sears

    Full Text Available Surface proteins of the obligate intracellular bacterium Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine or endemic typhus fever, comprise an important interface for host-pathogen interactions including adherence, invasion and survival in the host cytoplasm. In this report, we present analyses of the surface exposed proteins of R. typhi based on a suite of predictive algorithms complemented by experimental surface-labeling with thiol-cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and identification of labeled peptides by LC MS/MS. Further, we focus on proteins belonging to the surface cell antigen (Sca autotransporter (AT family which are known to be involved in rickettsial infection of mammalian cells. Each species of Rickettsia has a different complement of sca genes in various states; R. typhi, has genes sca1 thru sca5. In silico analyses indicate divergence of the Sca paralogs across the four Rickettsia groups and concur with previous evidence of positive selection. Transcripts for each sca were detected during infection of L929 cells and four of the five Sca proteins were detected in the surface proteome analysis. We observed that each R. typhi Sca protein is expressed during in vitro infections and selected Sca proteins were expressed during in vivo infections. Using biotin-affinity pull down assays, negative staining electron microscopy, and flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the Sca proteins in R. typhi are localized to the surface of the bacteria. All Scas were detected during infection of L929 cells by immunogold electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrate that Scas 1-3 and 5 are expressed in the spleens of infected Sprague-Dawley rats and Scas 3, 4 and 5 are expressed in cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis. Sca proteins may be crucial in the recognition and invasion of different host cell types. In short, continuous expression of all Scas may ensure that rickettsiae are primed i to infect mammalian cells should the flea bite a host, ii to remain

  8. Basic surface properties of Aedes albopictus cells: effect of Mayaro virus infection on electrostatic charge and surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezêncio, J M; Costa e Silva Filho, F; Rebello, M A

    1997-01-01

    Aedes albopictus cells possess a negative cell surface charge of -12.7 mV with an isoelectrophoretic point (IEP) located between pH 3.0 and 4.0. Infection with Mayaro virus rendered the surface of A. albopictus cells less negative reaching a zeta-potential value of -9.7 mV after 100 h of infection. Concomitantly, the IEP of the infected cells were also altered from 3.0-4.0 to 4.0-5.0. Furthermore, the contact angle measurements clearly showed qualitative alterations in the cell surface of infected cells.

  9. Distinguishing between whole cells and cell debris using surface plasmon coupled emission (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Muhammad A.; Menyuk, Curtis R.; Kostov, Yordan

    2017-02-01

    Distinguishing between intact cells, dead but still whole cells, and cell debris is an important but difficult task in life sciences. The most common way to identify dead cells is using a cell-impermeant DNA binding dye, such as propidium iodide. A healthy living cell has an intact cell membrane and will act as a barrier to the dye so that it cannot enter the cell. A dead cell has a compromised cell membrane, and it will allow the dye into the cell to bind to the DNA and become fluorescent. The dead cells therefore will be positive and the live cells will be negative. The dead cells later deteriorate quickly into debris. Different pieces of debris from a single cell can be incorrectly identified as separate dead cells. Although a flow cytometer can quickly perform numerous quantitative, sensitive measurements on each individual cell to determine the viability of cells within a large, heterogeneous population, it is bulky, expensive, and only large hospitals and laboratories can afford them. In this work, we show that the distance-dependent coupling of fluorophore light to surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) from fluorescently-labeled cells can be used to distinguish whole cells from cell debris. Once the fluorescent labels are excited by a laser, the fluorescently-labeled whole cells create two distinct intensity rings in the far-field, in contrast to fluorescently-labeled cell debris, which only creates one ring. The distinct far-field patterns can be captured by camera and used to distinguish between whole cells and cell debris.

  10. Proliferation, behavior, and cytokine gene expression of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in response to different titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Na; Schedle, Andreas; Wieland, Marco; Andrukhov, Oleh; Matejka, Michael; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2010-04-01

    Success of dental implantation is initially affected by wound healing of both, hard and soft tissues. Endothelial cells (ECs) are involved as crucial cells in the angiogenesis and inflammation process of wound healing. In the present study, proliferation, mobility, cluster formation, and gene expression of angiogenesis-related molecules of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated on titanium surfaces with different roughnesses: acid-etched (A), coarse-grit-blasted and acid-etched (SLA) surfaces, as well as on hydrophilic modified modA and modSLA surfaces. Cell behaviors were analyzed by proliferation assay and time-lapse microscopy, gene expression was analyzed by real time PCR. Results showed that cell proliferation, mobility, and cluster formation were highest on modA surfaces compared with all other surfaces. HUVECs moved slowly and exhibited seldom cell aggregation on SLA and modSLA surfaces during the whole observing period of 120 h. The gene expressions of the angiogenesis-related factors von Willebrand factor, thrombomodulin, endothelial cell protein C receptor, and adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin were most enhanced on modSLA surfaces. These results suggest that modA surface is optimal for proliferation and angiogenic behavior of ECs. However, modSLA surface seems to promote ECs to express angiogenesis-related factor genes, which play essential roles in controlling inflammation and revascularization of wound healing.

  11. Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-02

    further enable enzyme encapsulation to improve the efficiency of light-driven hydrogen fuel production. 5. Changes in key personnel, if applicable : -None ...Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W9132T-14-2-0002 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...cycloadditions to modify reactive groups within the phospholipid membrane structure and how the nature of the reactive elements, the copper catalyst

  12. Carbon nanotubes for stem cell control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Stout

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, two major advancements have transformed the world of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine—stem cells and carbon nano-dimensional materials. In the past, stem cell therapy seemed like it may present a cure for all medical ailments, but problems arose (i.e., immune system clearance, control of differentiation in the body, etc. that have hindered progress. But, with the synergy of carbon nano-dimensional materials, researchers have been able to overcome these tissue engineering and regenerative medicine obstacles and have begun developing treatments for strokes, bone failure, cardiovascular disease, and many other conditions. Here, we briefly review research involving carbon nanotubes which are relevant to the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine field with a special emphasis on carbon nanotube applications for stem cell delivery, drug delivery applications, and their use as improved medical devices.

  13. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  14. Brown spider venom toxins interact with cell surface and are endocytosed by rabbit endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowatzki, Jenifer; de Sene, Reginaldo Vieira; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Trindade, Edvaldo S; Franco, Célia Regina C

    2010-09-15

    Bites from the Loxosceles genus (brown spiders) cause severe clinical symptoms, including dermonecrotic injury, hemorrhage, hemolysis, platelet aggregation and renal failure. Histological findings of dermonecrotic lesions in animals exposed to Loxosceles intermedia venom show numerous vascular alterations. Study of the hemorrhagic consequences of the venom in endothelial cells has demonstrated that the degeneration of blood vessels results not only from degradation of the extracellular matrix molecule or massive leukocyte infiltration, but also from a direct and primary activity of the venom on endothelial cells. Exposure of an endothelial cell line in vitro to L. intermedia venom induce morphological alterations, such as cell retraction and disadhesion to the extracellular matrix. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the venom toxins and the endothelial cell surface and their possible internalization, in order to illuminate the information about the deleterious effect triggered by venom. After treating endothelial cells with venom toxins, we observed that the venom interacts with cell surface. Venom treatment also can cause a reduction of cell surface glycoconjugates. When cells were permeabilized, it was possible to verify that some venom toxins were internalized by the endothelial cells. The venom internalization involves endocytic vesicles and the venom was detected in the lysosomes. However, no damage to lysosomal integrity was observed, suggesting that the cytotoxic effect evoked by L. intermedia venom on endothelial cells is not mediated by venom internalization.

  15. Functionalized PDMS with versatile and scalable surface roughness gradients for cell culture

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu

    2015-07-21

    This manuscript describes a simple and versatile approach to engineering surface roughness gradients via combination of microfluidics and photo-polymerization. Through UV-mediated polymerization, N-isopropylacrylamide with concentration gradients are successfully grafted onto PDMS surface, leading to diverse roughness degrees on the obtained PDMS substrate. Furthermore, the extent of surface roughness can be controllably regulated via tuning the flow rate ratio between the monomer solution and deionized water. Average roughness ranging from 8.050 nm to 151.68 nm has well been achieved in this work. Such PDMS samples are also demonstrated to be capable of working as supporting substrates for controlling cell adhesion or detachment. Due to the different degrees of surface roughness on a single substrate, our method provides an effective approach for designing advanced surafecs for cell culture. Finally, the thermosensitive property of N-isopropylacrylamide makes our sample furnish as another means for controlling the cell detachment from the substrates with correspondence to the surrounding temperature.

  16. Active screen plasma nitriding enhances cell attachment to polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaklamani, Georgia, E-mail: g.kaklamani@bham.ac.uk [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bowen, James; Mehrban, Nazia [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Chemical Engineering, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dong, Hanshan [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M. [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Chemical Engineering, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stamboulis, Artemis [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a well-established technique used for the surface modification of materials, the result of which is often a product with enhanced functional performance. Here we report the modification of the chemical and mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight poly(ethylene) (UHMWPE) using 80:20 (v/v) N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} ASPN, followed by growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on the treated and untreated polymer surfaces. ASPN-treated UHMWPE showed extensive fibroblast attachment within 3 h of seeding, whereas fibroblasts did not successfully attach to untreated UHMWPE. Fibroblast-coated surfaces were maintained for up to 28 days, monitoring their metabolic activity and morphology throughout. The chemical properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing the presence of C-N, C=N, and C≡N chemical bonds. The elastic modulus, surface topography, and adhesion properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied over 28 days during sample storage under ambient conditions and during immersion in two commonly used cell culture media.

  17. Nematic twist cell: Strong chirality induced at the surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Nemitz, Ian R.; Pendery, Joel S.; Schubert, Christopher P. J.; Lemieux, Robert P.; Rosenblatt, Charles

    2013-04-01

    A nematic twist cell having a thickness gradient was filled with a mixture containing a configurationally achiral liquid crystal (LC) and chiral dopant. A chiral-based linear electrooptic effect was observed on application of an ac electric field. This "electroclinic effect" varied monotonically with d, changing sign at d =d0 where the chiral dopant exactly compensated the imposed twist. The results indicate that a significant chiral electrooptic effect always exists near the surfaces of a twist cell containing molecules that can be conformationally deracemized. Additionally, this approach can be used to measure the helical twisting power (HTP) of a chiral dopant in a liquid crystal.

  18. Highly controllable near-surface swimming of magnetic Janus nanorods: application to payload capture and manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mair, Lamar O; Carpenter, Jerome [Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Evans, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Hall, Adam R [Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC 27401 (United States); Shields, Adam; Superfine, Richard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Ford, Kris; Millard, Michael, E-mail: rsuper@physics.unc.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2011-03-30

    Directed manipulation of nanomaterials has significant implications in the field of nanorobotics, nanobiotechnology, microfluidics and directed assembly. With the goal of highly controllable nanomaterial manipulation in mind, we present a technique for the near-surface manoeuvering of magnetic nanorod swimmers and its application to controlled micromanipulation. We fabricate magnetic Janus nanorods and show that the magnetic rotation of these nanorods near a floor results in predictable translational motion. The nanorod plane of rotation is nearly parallel to the floor, the angle between rod tilt and floor being expressed by {theta}, where 0{sup 0} < {theta} < 20{sup 0}. Orthogonal magnetic fields control in-plane motion arbitrarily. Our model for translation incorporates symmetry breaking through increased drag at the no-slip surface boundary. Using this method we demonstrate considerable rod steerability. Additionally, we approach, capture, and manipulate a polystyrene microbead as proof of principle. We attach Janus nanorods to the surfaces of cells and utilize these rods to manipulate individual cells, proving the ability to manoeuver payloads with a wide range of sizes.

  19. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements of MCF7 cells adhesion in confined micro-environments

    KAUST Repository

    De Vitis, Stefania

    2015-05-01

    Undoubtedly cells can perceive the external environment, not only from a biochemical point of view with the related signalling pathways, but also from a physical and topographical perspective. In this sense controlled three dimensional micro-structures as well as patterns at the nano-scale can affect and guide the cell evolution and proliferation, due to the fact that the surrounding environment is no longer isotropic (like the flat surfaces of standard cell culturing) but possesses well defined symmetries and anisotropies. In this work regular arrays of silicon micro-pillars with hexagonal arrangement are used as culturing substrates for MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The characteristic size and spacing of the pillars are tens of microns, comparable with MCF-7 cell dimensions and then well suited to induce acceptable external stimuli. It is shown that these cells strongly modify their morphology for adapting themselves to the micro-structured landscape, by means of protrusions from the main body of the cell. Scanning electron microscopy along with both Raman micro-spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy are used for topographical and biochemical studies of the new cell arrangement. We have revealed that single MCF-7 cells exploit their capability to produce invadopodia, usually generated to invade the neighboring tissue in metastatic activity, for spanning and growing across separate pillars. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    binding. When we modify the surface of the colloidal nanopores with ionizable moieties, they can generate an electric field inside the nanopores, which repels ions of the same charge and attracts ions of the opposite charge. This allows us to electrostatically gate the ionic flux through colloidal nanopores, controlled by pH and ionic strength of the solution when surface amines or sulfonic acids are present or by irradiation with light in the case of surface spiropyran moieties. When we modify the surface of the colloidal nanopores with chiral moieties capable of stereoselective binding of enantiomers, we generate colloidal films with chiral permselectivity. By filling the colloidal nanopores with polymer brushes attached to the pore surface, we can control the ionic flux through the corresponding films and membranes electrostatically using reversibly ionizable polymer brushes. By filling the colloidal nanopores with polymer brushes whose conformation reversibly changes in response to pH, ionic strength, temperature, or small molecule binding, we can control the molecular flux sterically. There are various potential applications for surface-modified silica colloidal films and membranes. Due to their ordered nanoporous structure and mechanical durability, they are beneficial in nanofluidics, nanofiltration, separations, and fuel cells and as catalyst supports. Reversible gating of flux by external stimuli may be useful in drug release, in size-, charge-, and structure-selective separations, and in microfluidic and sensing devices.

  1. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and re...... or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton....

  2. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole...... or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton....

  3. Live Cell Surface Labeling with Fluorescent Ag Nanocluster Conjugates†

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junhua; Choi, Sungmoon; Richards, Chris I.; Antoku, Yasuko; Dickson, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    DNA-encapsulated silver clusters are readily conjugated to proteins and serve as alternatives to organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Stable and bright on the bulk and single molecule levels, Ag nanocluster fluorescence is readily observed when staining live cell surfaces. Being significantly brighter and more photostable than organics and much smaller than quantum dots with a single point of attachment, these nanomaterials offer promising new approaches for bulk and single molecule b...

  4. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Jin, E-mail: jinxxwang@263.net [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Huang, Nan [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The dopamine/PEI film with controlled amine density was successfully prepared. • The DNA aptamer was assembled onto the film via electrostatic incorporation. • The A@DPfilmscanspecificallyandeffectivelycaptureEPCs. • The A@DP film can support the survival of ECs, control the hyperplasia of SMCs. • The dynamic/co-culture models are useful for studying cells competitive adhesion. - Abstract: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  5. Surface dislocation nucleation controlled deformation of Au nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, B.; Kapelle, B.; Volkert, C. A., E-mail: volkert@ump.gwdg.de [Institute of Materials Physics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37077 (Germany); Richter, G. [Max-Plank-Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany)

    2014-11-17

    We investigate deformation in high quality Au nanowires under both tension and bending using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Defect evolution is investigated during: (1) tensile deformation of 〈110〉 oriented, initially defect-free, single crystal nanowires with cross-sectional widths between 30 and 300 nm, (2) bending deformation of the same wires, and (3) tensile deformation of wires containing coherent twin boundaries along their lengths. We observe the formation of twins and stacking faults in the single crystal wires under tension, and storage of full dislocations after bending of single crystal wires and after tension of twinned wires. The stress state dependence of the deformation morphology and the formation of stacking faults and twins are not features of bulk Au, where deformation is controlled by dislocation interactions. Instead, we attribute the deformation morphologies to the surface nucleation of either leading or trailing partial dislocations, depending on the Schmid factors, which move through and exit the wires producing stacking faults or full dislocation slip. The presence of obstacles such as neutral planes or twin boundaries hinder the egress of the freshly nucleated dislocations and allow trailing and leading partial dislocations to combine and to be stored as full dislocations in the wires. We infer that the twins and stacking faults often observed in nanoscale Au specimens are not a direct size effect but the result of a size and obstacle dependent transition from dislocation interaction controlled to dislocation nucleation controlled deformation.

  6. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  7. Surface recombination analysis in silicon-heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, R.; Gandia, J.J.; Carabe, J.; Gonzalez, N.; Torres, I. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Munoz, D.; Voz, C. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    The origin of this work is the understanding of the correlation observed between efficiency and emitter-deposition temperature in single silicon-heterojunction solar cells prepared by depositing an n-doped hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon thin film onto a p-type crystalline-silicon wafer. In order to interpret these results, surface-recombination velocities have been determined by two methods, i.e. by fitting the current-voltage characteristics to a theoretical model and by means of the Quasi-Steady-State Photoconductance Technique (QSSPC). In addition, effective diffusion lengths have been estimated from internal quantum efficiencies. The analysis of these data has led to conclude that the performance of the cells studied is limited by back-surface recombination rather than by front-heterojunction quality. A 12%-efficient cell has been prepared by combining optimum emitter-deposition conditions with back-surface-field (BSF) formation by vacuum annealing of the back aluminium contact. This result has been achieved without using any transparent conductive oxide. (author)

  8. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas A; Edwards, Marcus J; Gates, Andrew J; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S; Marshall, Matthew J; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J

    2011-06-07

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along "nanowire" appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  9. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in plant cell growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussey, P.J.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Deeks, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Plant cells grow through increases in volume and cell wall surface area. The mature morphology of a plant cell is a product of the differential rates of expansion between neighboring zones of the cell wall during this process. Filamentous actin arrays are associated with plant cell growth, and the a

  10. Simulation and Optimization of Silicon Solar Cell Back Surface Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souad TOBBECHE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, TCAD Silvaco (Technology Computer Aided Design software has been used to study the Back Surface Field (BSF effect of a p+ silicon layer for a n+pp+ silicon solar cell. To study this effect, the J-V characteristics and the external quantum efficiency (EQE are simulated under AM 1.5 illumination for two types of cells. The first solar cell is without BSF (n+p structure while the second one is with BSF (n+pp+ structure. The creation of the BSF on the rear face of the cell results in efficiency h of up to 16.06% with a short-circuit current density Jsc = 30.54 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage Voc = 0.631 V, a fill factor FF = 0.832 and a clear improvement of the spectral response obtained in the long wavelengths range. An electric field and a barrier of potential are created by the BSF and located at the junction p+/p with a maximum of 5800 V/cm and 0.15 V, respectively. The optimization of the BSF layer shows that the cell performance improves with the p+ thickness between 0.35 – 0.39 µm, the p+ doping dose is about 2 × 1014 cm-2, the maximum efficiency up to 16.19 %. The cell efficiency is more sensitive to the value of the back surface recombination velocity above a value of 103 cm/s in n+p than n+pp+ solar cell.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9565

  11. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  12. Controlling surface defects and photophysics in TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llansola-Portoles, Manuel J; Bergkamp, Jesse J; Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Sherman, Benjamin D; Kodis, Gerdenis; Dimitrijevic, Nada M; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2014-11-13

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is widely used for photocatalysis and solar cell applications, and the electronic structure of bulk TiO2 is well understood. However, the surface structure of nanoparticulate TiO2, which has a key role in properties such as solubility and catalytic activity, still remains controversial. Detailed understanding of surface defect structures may help explain reactivity and overall materials performance in a wide range of applications. In this work we address the solubility problem and surface defects control on TiO2 nanoparticles. We report the synthesis and characterization of ∼4 nm TiO2 anatase spherical nanoparticles that are soluble and stable in a wide range of organic solvents and water. By controlling the temperature during the synthesis, we are able to tailor the density of defect states on the surface of the TiO2 nanoparticles without affecting parameters such as size, shape, core crystallinity, and solubility. The morphology of both kinds of nanoparticles was determined by TEM. EPR experiments were used to characterize the surface defects, and transient absorption measurements demonstrate the influence of the TiO2 defect states on photoinduced electron transfer dynamics.

  13. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2016-12-27

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1(+) but not STRO-1(-) cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1(BRIGHT) /HSP70(-) fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2016.

  14. Quantifying Cell Adhesion through Impingement of a Controlled Microjet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Gielen, Marise V.; Hao, Zhenxia; Gac, Le Severine; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of a submerged, liquid jet onto a cell-covered surface allows assessing cell attachment on surfaces in a straightforward and quantitative manner and in real time, yielding valuable information on cell adhesion. However, this approach is insufficiently characterized for reliable and r

  15. Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell capture surface via DNA aptamer modifying dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Jinchuan; Yuan, Shuheng; Wang, Juan; Luo, Rifang; Chen, Si; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are mainly located in bone marrow and circulate, and play a crucial role in repairmen of injury endothelium. One of the most promising strategies of stents designs were considered to make in-situ endothelialization in vivo via EPC-capture biomolecules on a vascular graft to capture EPCs directly from circulatory blood. In this work, an EPC specific aptamer with a 34 bases single strand DNA sequence was conjugated onto the stent surface via dopamine/polyethyleneimine copolymer film as a platform and linker. The assembled density of DNA aptamer could be regulated by controlling dopamine percentage in this copolymer film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle (WCA) and fluorescence test confirmed the successful immobilization of DNA aptamer. To confirm its biofunctionality and cytocompatibility, the capturing cells ability of the aptamer modified surface and the effects on the growth behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were investigated. The aptamer functionalized sample revealed a good EPC-capture ability, and had a cellular friendly feature for both EPC and EC growth, while not stimulated the hyperplasia of SMCs. And, the co-culture experiment of three types of cells confirmed the specificity capturing of EPCs to aptamer modified surface, rather than ECs and SMCs. These data suggested that this aptamer functionalized surface may have a large potentiality for the application of vascular grafts with targeted endothelialization.

  16. A Simple Hydrophilic Treatment of SU-8 Surfaces for Cell Culturing and Cell Patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Stangegaard, Michael; Dufva, Hans Martin

    2005-01-01

    SU-8, an epoxy-based photoresist, widely used in constitution different mTAS systems, is incompatible with mammalian cell adhesion and culture in its native form. Here, we demonstrate a simple, cheap and robust two-step method to render a SU-8 surface hydrophilic and compatible with cell culture...

  17. A Simple Hydrophilic Treatment of SU-8 Surfaces for Cell Culturing and Cell Patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Stangegaard, Michael; Dufva, Hans Martin;

    2005-01-01

    SU-8, an epoxy-based photoresist, widely used in constitution different mTAS systems, is incompatible with mammalian cell adhesion and culture in its native form. Here, we demonstrate a simple, cheap and robust two-step method to render a SU-8 surface hydrophilic and compatible with cell culture...

  18. The design of superhydrophobic stainless steel surfaces by controlling nanostructures: A key parameter to reduce the implantation of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzaud, Jérôme; Tarrade, Jeanne; Celia, Elena; Darmanin, Thierry; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frédéric; Herry, Jean-Marie; Guilbaud, Morgan; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle

    2017-04-01

    Reducing bacterial adhesion on substrates is fundamental for various industries. In this work, new superhydrophobic surfaces are created by electrodeposition of hydrophobic polymers (PEDOT-F4 or PEDOT-H8) on stainless steel with controlled topographical features, especially at a nano-scale. Results show that anti-bioadhesive and anti-biofilm properties require the control of the surface topographical features, and should be associated with a low adhesion of water onto the surface (Cassie-Baxter state) with limited crevice features at the scale of bacterial cells (nano-scale structures).

  19. Cell surface alpha 2,6 sialylation affects adhesion of breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaoqiang; Kemmner, Wolfgang; Grigull, Sabine; Schlag, Peter M

    2002-05-15

    Tumor-associated alterations of cell surface glycosylation play a crucial role in the adhesion and metastasis of carcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alpha 2,6-sialylation on the adhesion properties of breast carcinoma cells. To this end mammary carcinoma cells, MDA-MB-435, were sense-transfected with sialyltransferase ST6Gal-I cDNA or antisense-transfected with a part of the ST6Gal-I sequence. Sense transfectants showed an enhanced ST6Gal-I mRNA expression and enzyme activity and an increased binding of the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), specific for alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid. Transfection with ST6Gal-I in the antisense direction resulted in less enzyme activity and SNA reactivity. A sense-transfected clone carrying increased amounts of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid adhered preferentially to collagen IV and showed reduced cell-cell adhesion and enhanced invasion capacity. In contrast, antisense transfection led to less collagen IV adhesion but enhanced homotypic cell-cell adhesion. In another approach, inhibition of ST6Gal-I enzyme activity by application of soluble antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. Antisense treatment resulted in reduced ST6 mRNA expression and cell surface 2,6-sialylation and significantly decreased collagen IV adhesion. Our results suggest that cell surface alpha 2,6-sialylation contributes to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion of tumor cells. Inhibition of sialytransferase ST6Gal-I by antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides might be a way to reduce the metastatic capacity of carcinoma cells.

  20. Heat-transfer resistance measurement method (HTM)-based cell detection at trace levels using a progressive enrichment approach with highly selective cell-binding surface imprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Karolien; Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Daemen, Mat; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Hendriks, Jerome J A; Bouwmans, Evelien E; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Surface-imprinted polymers allow for specific cell detection based on simultaneous recognition of the cell shape, cell size, and cell membrane functionalities by macromolecular cell imprints. In this study, the specificity of detection and the detection sensitivity for target cells within a pool of non-target cells were analyzed for a cell-specific surface-imprinted polymer combined with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique (HTM). A modified Chinese hamster ovarian cell line (CHO-ldlD) was used as a model system on which the transmembrane protein mucin-1 (MUC1) could be excessively expressed and for which the occurrence of MUC1 glycosylation could be controlled. In specific cancer cells, the overexpressed MUC1 protein typically shows an aberrant apical distribution and glycosylation. We show that surface-imprinted polymers discriminate between cell types that (1) only differ in the expression of a specific membrane protein (MUC1) or (2) only differ in the membrane protein being glycosylated or not. Moreover, surface-imprinted polymers of cells carrying different glycoforms of the same membrane protein do target both types of cells. These findings illustrate the high specificity of cell detection that can be reached by the structural imprinting of cells in polymer layers. Competitiveness between target and non-target cells was proven to negatively affect the detection sensitivity of target cells. Furthermore, we show that the detection sensitivity can be increased significantly by repetitively exposing the surface to the sample and eliminating non-specifically bound cells by flushing between consecutive cell exposures.

  1. TEMPERATURE CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE (SAW RESONATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Mohamad Ashari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW resonators are key components in oscillators, frequency synthesizers and transceivers. One of the drawbacks of SAW resonators are that its piezoelectric substrates are highly sensitive to ambient temperature resulting in performance degradation. This work propose a simple circuit design which stabalizes the temperature of the SAW resonator, making it independet of temperature change. This circuit is based on the oven control method which elevates the temperature of the resonator to a high temperature, making it tolerant to minor changes in ambient temperature.This circuit consist of a temperature sensor, heaters and a comparator which turn the heater on or off depending on the ambient temperature. Several SAW resonator were tested using this circuit. Experimental results indicate the temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF decreases from maximum of 130.44/°C to a minimum of -1.11/°C. 

  2. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Schäfer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Harris, G.; Sotillo, F.; Diao, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA))

    1990-08-15

    The primary objective of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Work this quarter concentrated on the following: washability studies, which included particle size distribution of the washability samples, and chemical analysis of washability test samples; characterization studies of induction time measurements, correlation between yield, combustible-material recovery (CMR), and heating-value recovery (HVR), and QA/QC for standard flotation tests and coal analyses; surface modification and control including testing of surface-modifying reagents, restoration of hydrophobicity to lab-oxidized coals, pH effects on coal flotation, and depression of pyritic sulfur in which pyrite depression with calcium cyanide and pyrite depression with xanthated reagents was investigated; flotation optimization and circuitry included staged reagent addition, cleaning and scavenging, and scavenging and middling recycling. Weathering studies are also discussed. 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. Paired Expression Analysis of Tumor Cell Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimas J. Orentas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive immunotherapy with antibody-based therapy or with T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs is useful to the extent that the cell surface membrane protein being targeted is not expressed on normal tissues. The most successful CAR-based (anti-CD19 or antibody-based therapy (anti-CD20 in hematologic malignancies has the side effect of eliminating the normal B cell compartment. Targeting solid tumors may not provide a similar expendable marker. Beyond antibody to Her2/NEU and EGFR, very few antibody-based and no CAR-based therapies have seen broad clinical application for solid tumors. To expand the way in which the surfaceome of solid tumors can be analyzed, we created an algorithm that defines the pairwise relative overexpression of surface antigens. This enables the development of specific immunotherapies that require the expression of two discrete antigens on the surface of the tumor target. This dyad analysis was facilitated by employing the Hotelling’s T-squared test (Hotelling–Lawley multivariate analysis of variance for two independent variables in comparison to a third constant entity (i.e., gene expression levels in normal tissues. We also present a unique consensus scoring mechanism for identifying transcripts that encode cell surface proteins. The unique application of our bioinformatics processing pipeline and statistical tools allowed us to compare the expression of two membrane protein targets as a pair, and to propose a new strategy based on implementing immunotherapies that require both antigens to be expressed on the tumor cell surface to trigger therapeutic effector mechanisms. Specifically, we found that, for MYCN amplified neuroblastoma, pairwise expression of ACVR2B or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK with GFRA3, GFRA2, Cadherin 24, or with one another provided the strongest hits. For MYCN, non-amplified stage 4 neuroblastoma, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1, or ALK paired with GFRA2, GFRA3, SSK

  5. Active Aerothermoelastic Control of Hypersonic Double-wedge Lifting Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laith K Abbas; Chen Qian; Piergiovanni Marzocca; Gürdal Zafer; Abdalla Mostafa

    2008-01-01

    Designing reentry space vehicles and high-speed aireraft requires special attention to the nonlinear thermoelastic and aerodynamic instability of their structural components. The thermal effects are important since temperature environment brings dramatic influences on the static and dynamic behaviors of flight structures in supersonic/hypersonic regimes and is likely to cause instability, catastrophic failure and oscillations resulting in structural failure due to fatigue. In order to understand the dynamic behaviors of these "hot"structures, a double-wedge lifting surface with combining freeplay and cubic structural nonlinearities in both plunging and pitching degrees-of-freedom operating in supersonic/hypersonic flight speed regimes has been analyzed. A third order piston theory aerodynamic isused to estimate the applied nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads. Also considered is the loss of torsiunal stiffness that may be incurredby lifting surfaces subject to axial stresses induced by aerodynamic heating. The aerodynamic heating effects are estimated based on theadiabatic wall temperature due to high speed airstreams. As a recently emerging technology, the active aerothermoelastic control isaimed at providing solutions to a large number of problems involving the aeronautica Faerospace flight vehicle structures. To preventsuch damaging phenomena from occurring, an application of linear and nonlinear active control methods on both flutter boundary andpost-flutter behavior has been fulfilled. In this paper, modeling issues as well as numerical simulation have been presented and pertinent conclusions outlined. It is evidenced that a serious loss of torsional stiffness may induce the dynamic instability; however active controlcan be used to expand the flutter boundary and convert unstable limit cycle oscillations (LCO) into the stable LCO and/or to shift the transition between these two states toward higher flight Mach numbers.

  6. Characteristic Changes in Cell Surface Glycosylation Accompany Intestinal Epithelial Cell (IEC) Differentiation: High Mannose Structures Dominate the Cell Surface Glycome of Undifferentiated Enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dayoung; Brune, Kristin A; Mitra, Anupam; Marusina, Alina I; Maverakis, Emanual; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-11-01

    Changes in cell surface glycosylation occur during the development and differentiation of cells and have been widely correlated with the progression of several diseases. Because of their structural diversity and sensitivity to intra- and extracellular conditions, glycans are an indispensable tool for analyzing cellular transformations. Glycans present on the surface of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) mediate interactions with billions of native microorganisms, which continuously populate the mammalian gut. A distinct feature of IECs is that they differentiate as they migrate upwards from the crypt base to the villus tip. In this study, nano-LC/ESI QTOF MS profiling was used to characterize the changes in glycosylation that correspond to Caco-2 cell differentiation. As Caco-2 cells differentiate to form a brush border membrane, a decrease in high mannose type glycans and a concurrent increase in fucosylated and sialylated complex/hybrid type glycans were observed. At day 21, when cells appear to be completely differentiated, remodeling of the cell surface glycome ceases. Differential expression of glycans during IEC maturation appears to play a key functional role in regulating the membrane-associated hydrolases and contributes to the mucosal surface innate defense mechanisms. Developing methodologies to rapidly identify changes in IEC surface glycans may lead to a rapid screening approach for a variety of disease states affecting the GI tract. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  8. Advances in the theory and application of BSF cells. [Back Surface Field solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the influence of fabrication processes and bulk material properties on the behavior of back surface field (BSF) cells is reported. It is concluded that a photovoltage is generated at the p(+), p back junction of the cell. The concept of majority carrier collection is proposed as a possible mechanism for this generation. Advantages accruing to the advent of BSF cells are outlined.

  9. Cell surface carbohydrates as prognostic markers in human carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Tumour development is usually associated with changes in cell surface carbohydrates. These are often divided into changes related to terminal carbohydrate structures, which include incomplete synthesis and modification of normally existing carbohydrates, and changes in the carbohydrate core...... structure. The latter includes chain elongation of both glycolipids and proteins, increased branching of carbohydrates in N-linked glycoproteins, and blocked synthesis of carbohydrates in O-linked mucin-like glycoproteins. In mature organisms, expression of distinct carbohydrates is restricted to specific...... cell types; within a given tissue, variation in expression may be related to cell maturation. Tumour-associated carbohydrate structures often reflect a certain stage of cellular development; most of these moieties are structures normally found in other adult or embryonic tissues. There is no unique...

  10. Exposure to High Glucose Concentration Decreases Cell Surface ABCA1 and HDL Biogenesis in Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita, Maki; Hossain, Mohammad Anwar; Lu, Rui; Tsuboi, Tomoe; Okumura-Noji, Kuniko; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2017-04-19

    To study atherosclerosis risk in diabetes, we investigated ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) biogenesis in the liver and hepatocytes under hyperglycemic conditions. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, plasma HDL decreased while ABCA1 protein increased without changing its mRNA in the liver, only in the animals that responded to the treatment to show hypoinsulinemia and fasting hyperglycemia but not in the poor responders not showing those. To study the mechanism for this finding, hepatocytes were isolated from the control and diabetic mice, and they showed no difference in expression of ABCA1 protein, its mRNA, and HDL biogenesis in 1 g/l d-glucose but showed decreased HDL biogenesis in 4.5 g/l d-glucose although ABCA1 protein increased without change in its mRNA. Similar findings were confirmed in HepG2 cells with d-glucose but not with l-glucose. Thus, these cell models reproduced the in vivo findings in hyperglycemia. Labeling of cell surface protein revealed that surface ABCA1 decreased in high concentration of d-glucose in HepG2 cells despite the increase of cellular ABCA1 while not with l-glucose. Immunostaining of ABCA1 in HepG2 cells demonstrated the decrease of surface ABCA1 but increase of intracellular ABCA1 with high d-glucose. Clearance of ABCA1 was retarded both in primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells exposed to high d-glucose but not to l-glucose, being consistent with the decrease of surface ABCA1. It is suggested that localization of ABCA1 to the cell surface is decreased in hepatocytes in hyperglycemic condition to cause decrease of HDL biogenesis.

  11. Antibody microarray analysis of cell surface antigens on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from HIV+ individuals correlates with disease stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing Qin; Wang, Bin; Belov, Larissa; Chrisp, Jeremy; Learmont, Jenny; Dyer, Wayne B; Zaunders, John; Cunningham, Anthony L; Dwyer, Dominic E; Saksena, Nitin K

    2007-11-26

    Expression levels of cell surface antigens such as CD38 and HLA-DR are related to HIV disease stages. To date, the immunophenotyping of cell surface antigens relies on flow cytometry, allowing estimation of 3-6 markers at a time. The recently described DotScan antibody microarray technology enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of cell surface antigens. This new technology provides new opportunities to identify novel differential markers expressed or co-expressed on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which could aid in defining the stage of evolution of HIV infection and the immune status of the patient. Using this new technology, we compared cell surface antigen expression on purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells between 3 HIV disease groups (long-term non-progressors controlling viremia naturally; HIV+ patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with HIV plasma viral loads <50 copies/ml; and HIV+ patients with viremia during HAART) and uninfected controls. Pairwise comparisons identified 17 statistically differential cell surface antigens including 5 novel ones (CD212b1, CD218a, CD183, CD3 epsilon and CD9), not previously reported. Notably, changes in activation marker expression were more pronounced in CD8+ T cells, whereas changes in the expression of cell membrane receptors for cytokines and chemokines were more pronounced in CD4+ T cells. Our study not only confirmed cell surface antigens previously reported to be related to HIV disease stages, but also identified 5 novel ones. Of these five, three markers point to major changes in responsiveness to certain cytokines, which are involved in Th1 responses. For the first time our study shows how density of cell surface antigens could be efficiently exploited in an array manner in relation to HIV disease stages. This new platform of identifying disease markers can be further extended to study other diseases.

  12. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, A.; Abramov, S. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel); Georgiou, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins. Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article the authors describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on bi-layer encagement for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA-{beta}-lactamase fusion that displays {beta}-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 C of surface anchored {beta}-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  13. Speed Tracking Control of a Vehicle Robot Driver System Using Multiple Sliding Surface Control Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the drawbacks of using a traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID control method for a robot driver system, such as requiring preliminary offline learning, big overshoot and large speed fluctuation, a new method for speed tracking of a robot driver system based on sliding mode control is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the coordinated control model of multiple manipulators for the robot driver is built, which achieved coordinated control of the throttle mechanical leg, clutch mechanical leg, brake mechanical leg and shift mechanical arm for the robot driver. On the basis of this, a speed tracking sliding mode controller for a vehicle robot driver is designed using the method of multiple sliding surfaces design, and the variable structure control laws of throttle and brake are designed respectively, which realize the speed tracking of the given driving test cycle. Experimental results demonstrate that compared with the PID control method, the proposed method can obviously reduce the overshoot of vehicle speed tracking control and greatly improve the accuracy of vehicle speed tracking. The vehicle speed tracking accuracy stays within a tolerance band of ±2 km/h, which meets the requirements of national vehicle test standards. Furthermore, the action of the speed tracking control in the same driving test cycle using the proposed method is consistent, so that the robot driver has good repeatability. Therefore, it can ensure the effectiveness of the vehicle emission test.

  14. Organic Based Solar Cells with Morphology Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks

    The field of organic solar cells has in the last years gone through an impressive development with efficiencies reported up to 12 %. For organic solar cells to take the leap from primarily being a laboratory scale technology to being utilized as renewable energy source, several issues need...... to be addressed. Among these are a more direct transfer of new materials tested on a laboratory scale to large scale production than offered by spincoating, a method offering direct control of the morphology in the active layer, and a more environmental friendly processing, where the vast use of organic solvents...... offers a great challenge. In this thesis the development of inks with a pre-arranged morphology was attempted by two methods. First by grafting of silicon nanoparticles with an organic phenylene vinylene oligomer, the resulting particles were analyzed by 1H-NMR, absorption spectroscopy, Atomic Force...

  15. Ovarian carcinoma cells synthesize both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate cell surface proteoglycans that mediate cell adhesion to interstitial matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokenyesi, R

    Metastatic ovarian carcinoma metastasizes by intra-peritoneal, non-hematogenous dissemination. The adhesion of the ovarian carcinoma cells to extracellular matrix components, such as types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, is essential for intra-peritoneal dissemination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cell surface proteoglycans (a class of matrix receptors) are produced by ovarian carcinoma cells, and whether these proteoglycans have a role in the adhesion of ovarian carcinoma cells to types I and III collagen and fibronectin. Proteoglycans were metabolically labeled for biochemical studies. Both phosphatidylinositol-anchored and integral membrane-type cell surface proteoglycans were found to be present on the SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cell lines. Three proteoglycan populations of differing hydrodynamic size were detected in both SK-OV-3 and NIH:OVCAR-3 cells. Digestions with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC showed that cell surface proteoglycans of SK-OV-3 cells had higher proportion of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (75:25 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio), while NIH:OVCAR-3 cells had higher proportion of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (10:90 of chondroitin sulfate:heparan sulfate ratio). RT-PCR indicated the synthesis of a unique assortment of syndecans, glypicans, and CD44 by the two cell lines. In adhesion assays performed on matrix-coated titer plates both cell lines adhered to types I and III collagen and cellular fibronectin, and cell adhesion was inhibited by preincubation of the matrix with heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, or chondroitin glycosaminoglycans. Treatment of the cells with heparitinase, chondroitinase ABC, or methylumbelliferyl xyloside also interfered with adhesion confirming the role of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate cell surface proteoglycans as matrix receptors on ovarian carcinoma cells.

  16. Quality control methods for KOOS operational sea surface temperature products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chansu; KIM Sunhwa

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface temperature SST obtained from the initial version of the Korea Operational Oceanographic System (KOOS) SST satellite have low accuracy during summer and daytime. This is attributed to the diurnal warming effect. Error estimation of SST data must be carried out to use the real-time forecasting numerical model of the KOOS. This study suggests two quality control methods for the KOOS SST system. To minimize the diurnal warming effect, SSTs of areas where wind speed is higher than 5 m/s were used. Depending on the wind threshold value, KOOS SST data for August 2014 were reduced by 0.15°C. Errors in SST data are considered to be a combination of random, sampling, and bias errors. To estimate bias error, the standard deviation of bias between KOOS SSTs and climatology SSTs were used. KOOS SST data yielded an analysis error standard deviation value similar to OSTIA and NOAA NCDC (OISST) data. The KOOS SST shows lower random and sampling errors with increasing number of observations using six satellite datasets. In further studies, the proposed quality control methods for the KOOS SST system will be applied through more long-term case studies and comparisons with other SST systems.

  17. Graphene thickness-controlled photocatalysis and surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chun-Hu

    2014-11-01

    Exceptional photocatalytic enhancement of graphene-semiconductor composites has been widely reported, but our understanding of the role that graphene plays in this enhancement remains limited, which arises from the difficulty of precisely controlling graphene hybridization. Here we present a general platform of a graphene-semiconductor hybrid panel (GHP) system wherein a precise number of layers of graphene are hybridized with photoactive semiconductors (e.g. TiO2, ZnO) to study systematically how graphene affects the photocatalysis. The results show that the graphene enhancement of the photocatalysis depends on the number of graphene layers, with the maximum performance observed at 3 layers. Photodeposited indicators of gold particles further reveal that graphene thickness governs the density of photocatalytic sites and charge transfer efficiency at the graphene-semiconductor interfaces. We suggest that quantized energy levels caused by different numbers of stacked graphene sheets along the vector normal to the graphene basal plane affect the charge transfer routes and lead to the graphene thickness-controlled photocatalysis. GHP substrates deposited with gold particles are promising, uniform substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications with the enhancement factor as high as ∼10(8) on 3-layer graphene.

  18. Laser controlled melting of pre-treated zirconia surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, S.S. [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Karatas, C. [Engineering College, Hacettepe University, (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    Laser treatment of pre-prepared zirconia surface is carried out. The pre-prepared surface, prior to laser treatment, consists of 50 {mu}m carbon film and 7% titanium carbide particles, which are imbedded in the carbon film. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser treated surface layer are examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The fracture toughness of the laser treated surface is measured and the residual stress formed at the surface vicinity is determined from the X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that the microhardness of the laser treated surface increased slightly due to the dense layer formed at the surface vicinity. However, the laser treatment process reduces the fracture toughness of the surface due to improved surface hardness and the residual stress formed in the surface vicinity.

  19. Nanoengineered surfaces for focal adhesion guidance trigger mesenchymal stem cell self-organization and tenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Maria; Ventre, Maurizio; Formisano, Lucia; Casalino, Laura; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-03-11

    The initial conditions for morphogenesis trigger a cascade of events that ultimately dictate structure and functions of tissues and organs. Here we report that surface nanopatterning can control the initial assembly of focal adhesions, hence guiding human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through the process of self-organization and differentiation. This process self-sustains, leading to the development of macroscopic tissues with molecular profiles and microarchitecture reminiscent of embryonic tendons. Therefore, material surfaces can be in principle engineered to set off the hMSC program toward tissuegenesis in a deterministic manner by providing adequate sets of initial environmental conditions.

  20. Efficient display of active lipase LipB52 with a Pichia pastoris cell surface display system and comparison with the LipB52 displayed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yushu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For industrial bioconversion processes, the utilization of surface-displayed lipase in the form of whole-cell biocatalysts is more advantageous, because the enzymes are displayed on the cell surface spontaneously, regarded as immobilized enzymes. Results Two Pichia pastoris cell surface display vectors based on the flocculation functional domain of FLO with its own secretion signal sequence or the α-factor secretion signal sequence were constructed respectively. The lipase gene lipB52 fused with the FLO gene was successfully transformed into Pichia pastoris KM71. The lipase LipB52 was expressed under the control of the AOX1 promoter and displayed on Pichia pastoris KM71 cell surface with the two Pichia pastoris cell surface display vectors. Localization of the displayed LipB52 on the cell surface was confirmed by the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. The LipB52 displayed on the Pichia pastoris cell surface exhibited activity toward p-nitrophenol ester with carbon chain length ranging from C10 to C18, and the optimum substrate was p-nitrophenol-caprate (C10, which was consistent with it displayed on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY100 cell surface. The hydrolysis activity of lipase LipB52 displayed on Pichia pastoris KM71-pLHJ047 and KM71-pLHJ048 cell surface reached 94 and 91 U/g dry cell, respectively. The optimum temperature of the displayed lipases was 40°C at pH8.0, they retained over 90% activity after incubation at 60°C for 2 hours at pH 7.0, and still retained 85% activity after incubation for 3 hours. Conclusion The LipB52 displayed on the Pichia pastoris cell surface exhibited better stability than the lipase LipB52 displayed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface. The displayed lipases exhibited similar transesterification activity. But the Pichia pastoris dry cell weight per liter (DCW/L ferment culture was about 5 times than Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lipase displayed on Pichia pastoris are more

  1. Osteoclast resorption of beta-tricalcium phosphate controlled by surface architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Noel L; ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Luo, Xiaoman; Yuan, Huipin; Everts, Vincent; Barrère-de Groot, Florence; de Bruijn, Joost D

    2014-08-01

    A resorbable bone graft substitute should mimic native bone in its capacity to support bone formation and be remodeled by osteoclasts (OCl) or other multinucleated cells such as foreign body giant cells (FBGC). We hypothesize that by changing the scale of surface architecture of beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), cellular resorption can be influenced. CD14(+) monocyte precursors were isolated from human peripheral blood (n = 4 independent donors) and differentiated into OCl or FBGC on the surface of TCP discs comprising either submicron- or micron-scale surface topographical features (TCPs and TCPb, respectively). On submicrostructured TCPs, OCl survived, fused, differentiated, and extensively resorbed the substrate; however, on microstructured TCPb, OCl survival, TRAP activation, and fusion were attenuated. Importantly, no resorption was observed on microstructured TCPb. By confocal microscopy, OCl formed on TCPs contained numerous actin rings allowing for resorption, but not on TCPb. In comparison, FBGC could not resorb either TCP material, suggesting that osteoclast-specific machinery is necessary to resorb TCP. By tuning surface architecture, it appears possible to control osteoclast resorption of calcium phosphate. This approach presents a useful strategy in the design of resorbable bone graft substitutes.

  2. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Uezumi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases.

  3. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Júnior

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (TREG cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163. In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  4. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita Júnior, D. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruvinel, W.M. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biomedicina, Universidade Católica de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Araujo, J.A.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G. [Disciplina de Imunologia Clínica e Alergia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.E.C. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25{sup +/high}CD127{sup Ø/low}FoxP3{sup +}, and effector T cells were defined as CD25{sup +}CD127{sup +}FoxP3{sup Ø}. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4{sup +}TREG and CD28{sup +}TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L{sup +}TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR{sup +}, HLA-DR{sup +}, OX40{sup +}, and CD45RO{sup +} cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L{sup +} cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L{sup +}TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  5. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  6. Epigenetic control of cell identity and plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Orlando, Valerio

    2014-04-02

    The DNA centered dogma for genetic information and cell identity is now evolving into a much more complex and flexible dimension provided by the discovery of the Epigenome. This comprises those chromosome structural and topological components that complement DNA information and contribute to genome functional organization. Current concept is that the Epigenome constitutes the dynamic molecular interface allowing the Genome to interact with the Environment. Exploring how the genome interacts with the environment is a key to fully understand cellular and complex organism mechanisms of adaptation and plasticity. Our work focuses on the role of an essential, specialized group or chromatin associated proteins named Polycomb (PcG) that control maintenance of transcription programs during development and in adult life. In particular PcG proteins exert epigenetic “memory” function by modifying chromosome structures at various levels to maintain gene silencing in particular through cell division. While in the past decade substantial progress was made in understanding PcG mechanisms acting in development and partially during cell cycle, very little is known about their role in adult post-mitotic tissues and more in general the role of the epigenome in adaptation. To this, we studied the role of PcG in the context of mammalian skeletal muscle cell differentiation. We previously reported specific dynamics of PRC2 proteins in myoblasts and myotubes, in particular the dynamics of PcG Histone H3 K27 Methyl Transferases (HMT), EZH2 and EZH1, the latter apparently replacing for EZH2 in differentiated myotubes. Ezh1 protein, although almost identical to Ezh2, shows a weak H3K27 HMT activity and its primary function remains elusive. Recent ChIPseq studies performed in differentiating muscle cells revealed that Ezh1 associates with active and not repressed regulatory regions to control RNA pol II elongation. Since H3K27 tri-methylation levels are virtually steady in non

  7. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  8. Tetraploid cells from cytokinesis failure induce aneuploidy and spontaneous transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lei; Zhang, Tianwei; Yi, Qiyi; Huang, Yun; Wang, Zheng; Hou, Heli; Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Wei; Hao, Qiaomei; Guo, Zongyou; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2012-08-01

    Most ovarian cancers originate from the ovarian surface epithelium and are characterized by aneuploid karyotypes. Aneuploidy, a consequence of chromosome instability, is an early event during the development of ovarian cancers. However, how aneuploid cells are evolved from normal diploid cells in ovarian cancers remains unknown. In the present study, cytogenetic analyses of a mouse syngeneic ovarian cancer model revealed that diploid mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells (MOSECs) experienced an intermediate tetraploid cell stage, before evolving to aneuploid (mainly near-tetraploid) cells. Using long-term live-cell imaging followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrated that tetraploid cells originally arose from cytokinesis failure of bipolar mitosis in diploid cells, and gave rise to aneuploid cells through chromosome mis-segregation during both bipolar and multipolar mitoses. Injection of the late passage aneuploid MOSECs resulted in tumor formation in C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, we reveal a pathway for the evolution of diploid to aneuploid MOSECs and elucidate a mechanism for the development of near-tetraploid ovarian cancer cells.

  9. Interaction of KSHV with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus entry is a complex process characterized by a sequence of events. Since the discovery of KSHV in 1994, tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of KSHV entry into its in vitro target cells. KSHV entry is a complex multistep process involving viral envelope glycoproteins and several cell surface molecules that is utilized by KSHV for its attachment and entry. KSHV has a broad cell tropism and the attachment and receptor engagement on target cells have an important role in determining the cell type-specific mode of entry. KSHV utilizes heparan sulfate, integrins and EphrinA2 molecules as receptors which results in the activation of host cell pre-existing signal pathways that facilitate the subsequent cascade of events resulting in the rapid entry of virus particles, trafficking towards the nucleus followed by viral and host gene expression. KSHV enters human fibroblast cells by dynamin dependant clathrin mediated endocytosis and by dynamin independent macropinocytosis in dermal endothelial cells. Once internalized into endosomes, fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membranes in an acidification dependent manner results in the release of capsids which subsequently reaches the nuclear pore vicinity leading to the delivery of viral DNA into the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the principal mechanisms that enable KSHV to interact with the host cell surface receptors as well as the mechanisms that are required to modulate cell signaling machinery for a successful entry.

  10. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of In induced superstructures on Si(5 5 7) surface during RT and HT adsorption/desorption process. • Kinetics is governed by substrate temperature which exhibits various growth modes (FM, SK, VB) under different conditions. • Strain relaxation play significant role in the commencement of desorption/rearrangement of atoms. • A consolidated phase diagram of In/Si(5 5 7) interface has been reported with new √3 × √3-R30° and 4 × 1 phases. - Abstract: This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature <500°C, growth of In follows Stranski–Krastanov growth mode while for temperature >500°C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250–340°C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520°C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560°C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580°C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  11. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  12. Evaluation of Relative Yeast Cell Surface Hydrophobicity Measured by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Colling

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop an efficient method for evaluating cell surface hydrophobicity and to apply the method to demonstrate the effects of fungal growth conditions on cell surface properties.

  13. Superhydrophilic-Superhydrophobic Patterned Surfaces as High-Density Cell Microarrays: Optimization of Reverse Transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Erica; Feng, Wenqian; Levkin, Pavel A

    2016-10-01

    High-density microarrays can screen thousands of genetic and chemical probes at once in a miniaturized and parallelized manner, and thus are a cost-effective alternative to microwell plates. Here, high-density cell microarrays are fabricated by creating superhydrophilic-superhydrophobic micropatterns in thin, nanoporous polymer substrates such that the superhydrophobic barriers confine both aqueous solutions and adherent cells within each superhydrophilic microspot. The superhydrophobic barriers confine and prevent the mixing of larger droplet volumes, and also control the spreading of droplets independent of the volume, minimizing the variability that arises due to different liquid and surface properties. Using a novel liposomal transfection reagent, ScreenFect A, the method of reverse cell transfection is optimized on the patterned substrates and several factors that affect transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity are identified. Higher levels of transfection are achieved on HOOC- versus NH2 -functionalized superhydrophilic spots, as well as when gelatin and fibronectin are added to the transfection mixture, while minimizing the amount of transfection reagent improves cell viability. Almost no diffusion of the printed transfection mixtures to the neighboring microspots is detected. Thus, superhydrophilic-superhydrophobic patterned surfaces can be used as cell microarrays and for optimizing reverse cell transfection conditions before performing further cell screenings. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Characterization of the aspects of osteoprogenitor cell interactions with physical tetracalcium phosphate anchorage on titanium implant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Chia-Ling [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Dental Medical Devices and Materials Research Center, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ya-Yuan; Liou, Cian-Hua [Alliance Global Technology Co., Ltd., Kaohsiung Medical Device Special Zone in Southern Taiwan Science Park, Kaohsiung 82151, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wencchen@fcu.edu.tw [Advanced Medical Devices and Composites Laboratory, Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-01

    Well-designed implants are used not only to modify the geometry of the implant but also to change the chemical properties of its surfaces. The present study aims to assess the biofunctional effects of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) particles as a physical anchor on the implant surface derived through sandblasting. The characteristics of the surface, cell viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity toward osteoprogenitor cells (D1) were obtained. D1 cells were cultured on a plain surface that underwent sandblasting and acid etching (SLA) (control SLA group) and on different SLA surfaces with different anchoring TTCP rates (new test groups, M and H). The mean anchoring rates were 57% (M) and 74% (H), and the anchored thickness was estimated to range from 12.6 μm to 18.3 μm. Compared with the control SLA surface on Ti substrate, the new test groups with different TTCP anchoring rates (M and H) failed to improve cell proliferation significantly but had a well-differentiated D1 cell phenotype that enhanced ALP expression in the early stage of cell cultures, specifically, at day 7. Results suggest that the SLA surface with anchored TTCP can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. This study shows the potential clinical application of the constructed geometry in TTCP anchorage on Ti for dental implant surface modification. - Highlights: • TTCP (tetracalcium phosphate) as a physical anchorage on implant is characterized. • Theoretical values of anchored thickness and capping areas were estimated. • TTCP anchored by sandblasting can accelerate progenitor bone cell mineralization. • TTCP anchored on SLA (sandblasting and acid etching) surface is a promising method.

  15. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  16. Cell-cycle control by protein kinase B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, G.J.P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Numerous cells in the body divide, and do so in a well-controlled manner. In some situations where this control is deregulated, cells may divide continuously. Such uncontrolled proliferation of cells is thought to be responsible for the onset of cancer. In order for a cell to divide in a normal set

  17. Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Furqan; Dutta, Naba K; Zannettino, Andrew; Vandyke, Kate; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2014-04-14

    The aim of this investigation was to understand and engineer the interactions between endothelial cells and the electrospun (ES) polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) nanofiber surfaces and evaluate their potential for endothelialization. Elastomeric PVDF-HFP samples were electrospun to evaluate their potential use as small diameter artificial vascular graft scaffold (SDAVG) and compared with solvent cast (SC) PVDF-HFP films. We examined the consequences of fibrinogen adsorption onto the ES and SC samples for endothelialisation. Bone marrow derived endothelial cells (BMEC) of human origin were incubated with the test and control samples and their attachment, proliferation, and viability were examined. The nature of interaction of fibrinogen with SC and ES samples was investigated in detail using ELISA, XPS, and FTIR techniques. The pristine SC and ES PVDF-HFP samples displayed hydrophobic and ultrahydrophobic behavior and accordingly, exhibited minimal BMEC growth. Fibrinogen adsorbed SC samples did not significantly enhance endothelial cell binding or proliferation. In contrast, the fibrinogen adsorbed electrospun surfaces showed a clear ability to modulate endothelial cell behavior. This system also represents an ideal model system that enables us to understand the natural interaction between cells and their extracellular environment. The research reported shows potential of ES surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

  18. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  19. SPE (tm) regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on SPE regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells for extraterrestrial surface and microgravity applications are presented. Topics covered include: hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system; electrochemical cell reactions; SPE cell voltage stability; passive water removal SPE fuel cell; fuel cell performance; SPE water electrolyzers; hydrophobic oxygen phase separator; hydrophilic/electrochemical hydrogen phase separator; and unitized regenerative fuel cell.

  20. Antibody microarray analysis of cell surface antigens on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from HIV+ individuals correlates with disease stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Anthony L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression levels of cell surface antigens such as CD38 and HLA-DR are related to HIV disease stages. To date, the immunophenotyping of cell surface antigens relies on flow cytometry, allowing estimation of 3–6 markers at a time. The recently described DotScan antibody microarray technology enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of cell surface antigens. This new technology provides new opportunities to identify novel differential markers expressed or co-expressed on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which could aid in defining the stage of evolution of HIV infection and the immune status of the patient. Results Using this new technology, we compared cell surface antigen expression on purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells between 3 HIV disease groups (long-term non-progressors controlling viremia naturally; HIV+ patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART with HIV plasma viral loads Conclusion Our study not only confirmed cell surface antigens previously reported to be related to HIV disease stages, but also identified 5 novel ones. Of these five, three markers point to major changes in responsiveness to certain cytokines, which are involved in Th1 responses. For the first time our study shows how density of cell surface antigens could be efficiently exploited in an array manner in relation to HIV disease stages. This new platform of identifying disease markers can be further extended to study other diseases.

  1. Mechanotransduction Across the Cell Surface and Through the Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Butler, James P.; Ingber, Donald E.

    1993-05-01

    Mechanical stresses were applied directly to cell surface receptors with a magnetic twisting device. The extracellular matrix receptor, integrin β_1, induced focal adhesion formation and supported a force-dependent stiffening response, whereas nonadhesion receptors did not. The cytoskeletal stiffness (ratio of stress to strain) increased in direct proportion to the applied stress and required intact microtubules and intermediate filaments as well as microfilaments. Tensegrity models that incorporate mechanically interdependent struts and strings that reorient globally in response to a localized stress mimicked this response. These results suggest that integrins act as mechanoreceptors and transmit mechanical signals to the cytoskeleton. Mechanotransduction, in turn, may be mediated simultaneously at multiple locations inside the cell through force-induced rearrangements within a tensionally integrated cytoskeleton.

  2. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Y., E-mail: yuta-n@mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 096-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 2-16-1 Tokiwadai, Ube 755-8611 (Japan); Tsusu, K.; Minami, K. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 2-16-1 Tokiwadai, Ube 755-8611 (Japan); Nakanishi, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 096-8555 (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique.

  3. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  4. Mercury reduction and cell-surface adsorption by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Haiyan [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL; Zheng, Wang [ORNL; Feng, Xinbin [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Both reduction and surface adsorption of mercuric mercury [Hg(II)] are found to occur simultaneously on G. sulfurreducens PCA cells under dark, anaerobic conditions. Reduction of Hg(II) to elemental Hg(0) initially follows a pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of < 2 h in the presence of 50 nM Hg(II) and 1011 cells L-1 in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Multiple gene deletions of the outer membrane cytochromes in this organism resulted in decrease in reduction rate from ~ 0.3 to 0.05 h-1, and reduction was nearly absent with heat-killed cells or in the cell filtrate. Adsorption of Hg(II) by cells is found to compete with, and thus inhibit, Hg(II) reduction. Depending on the Hg to cell ratio, maximum Hg(II) reduction was observed at about 5 10-19 mol Hg cell-1, but reduction terminated at a low Hg to cell ratio (< 10-20 mol Hg cell-1). This inhibitory effect is attributed to strong binding between Hg(II) and the thiol ( SH) functional groups on cells and validated by experiments in which the sorbed Hg(II) was readily exchanged by thiols (e.g., glutathione) but not by carboxylic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). We suggest that coupled Hg(II)-cell interactions, i.e., reduction and surface binding, could be important in controlling Hg species transformation and bioavailability and should therefore be considered in microbial Hg(II) uptake and methylation studies.

  5. Mercury reduction and cell-surface adsorption by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Rao, Balaji; Feng, Xinbin; Liang, Liyuan; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua

    2013-10-01

    Both reduction and surface adsorption of mercuric mercury [Hg(II)] are found to occur simultaneously on G. sulfurreducens PCA cells under dark, anaerobic conditions. Reduction of Hg(II) to elemental Hg(0) initially follows a pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of Hg(II) and 10(11) cells L(-1) in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Multiple gene deletions of the outer membrane cytochromes in this organism resulted in a decrease in reduction rate from ∼0.3 to 0.05 h(-1), and reduction was nearly absent with heat-killed cells or in the cell filtrate. Adsorption of Hg(II) by cells is found to compete with, and thus inhibit, Hg(II) reduction. Depending on the Hg to cell ratio, maximum Hg(II) reduction was observed at about 5 × 10(-19) mol Hg cell(-1), but reduction terminated at a low Hg to cell ratio (Hg cell(-1)). This inhibitory effect is attributed to bonding between Hg(II) and the thiol (-SH) functional groups on cells and validated by experiments in which the sorbed Hg(II) was readily exchanged by thiols (e.g., glutathione) but not by carboxylate compounds such as ethylenediamine-tetraacetate (EDTA). We suggest that coupled Hg(II)-cell interactions, i.e., reduction and surface binding, could be important in controlling Hg species transformation and bioavailability and should therefore be considered in microbial Hg(II) uptake and methylation studies.

  6. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu; Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha; Gupta, Govind

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature 500 °C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250-340 °C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520 °C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560 °C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580 °C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  7. Coupled Flow-Structure-Biochemistry Simulations of Dynamic Systems of Blood Cells Using an Adaptive Surface Tracking Method

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, M.H.; Kunz, R.F.; Bistline, J.E.; Dong, C.

    2009-01-01

    A method for the computation of low Reynolds number dynamic blood cell systems is presented. The specific system of interest here is interaction between cancer cells and white blood cells in an experimental flow system. Fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, six-degree-of freedom motion control and surface biochemistry analysis components are coupled in the context of adaptive octree-based grid generation. Analytical and numerical verification of the quasi-steady assumption for the fluid mecha...

  8. Central motor control failure in fibromyalgia: a surface electromyography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buskila Dan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterised by diffuse musculoskeletal pain and stiffness at multiple sites, tender points in characteristic locations, and the frequent presence of symptoms such as fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess whether the myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in patients affected by FM are central or peripheral in origin. Methods Eight female patients aged 55.6 ± 13.6 years (FM group and eight healthy female volunteers aged 50.3 ± 9.3 years (MCG were studied by means of non-invasive surface electromyography (s-EMG involving a linear array of 16 electrodes placed on the skin overlying the biceps brachii muscle, with muscle fatigue being evoked by means of voluntary and involuntary (electrically elicited contractions. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs, motor unit action potential conduction velocity distributions (mean ± SD and skewness, and the mean power frequency of the spectrum (MNF were estimated in order to assess whether there were any significant differences between the two groups and contraction types. Results The motor pattern of recruitment during voluntary contractions was altered in the FM patients, who also showed fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue (normalised conduction velocity rate of changes: -0.074 ± 0.052%/s in FM vs -0.196 ± 0.133%/s in MCG; normalised MNF rate of changes: -0.29 ± 0.16%/s in FM vs -0.66 ± 0.34%/s in MCG. Mean conduction velocity distribution and skewnesses values were higher (p Conclusion The apparent paradox of fewer myoelectrical manifestations of fatigue in FM is the electrophysiological expression of muscle remodelling in terms of the prevalence of slow conducting fatigue-resistant type I fibres. As the only between-group differences concerned voluntary contractions, they are probably more related to central motor control failure than muscle membrane alterations, which suggests pathological muscle fibre remodelling related to altered

  9. A new portable device for automatic controlled-gradient cryopreservation of blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Albeck, G; Hansen, B

    1993-01-01

    , which has proved suitable for field conditions. We report here the development and testing of a similar micro-controller regulated device, allowing unattended and automatic controlled-gradient cell freezing. The equipment exploits the temperature gradient present between the liquid N2 surface...

  10. Differential carbohydrate binding and cell surface glycosylation of human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Nadia X; Tiralongo, Joe; Madge, Paul D; von Itzstein, Mark; Day, Christopher J

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is only a modest level knowledge of the glycosylation status of immortalised cell lines that are commonly used in cancer biology as well as their binding affinities to different glycan structures. Through use of glycan and lectin microarray technology, this study has endeavoured to define the different bindings of cell surface carbohydrate structures to glycan-binding lectins. The screening of breast cancer MDA-MB435 cells, cervical cancer HeLa cells and colon cancer Caco-2, HCT116 and HCT116-FM6 cells was conducted to determine their differential bindings to a variety of glycan and lectin structures printed on the array slides. An inverse relationship between the number of glycan structures recognised and the variety of cell surface glycosylation was observed. Of the cell lines tested, it was found that four bound to sialylated structures in initial screening. Secondary screening in the presence of a neuraminidase inhibitor (4-deoxy-4-guanidino-Neu5Ac2en) significantly reduced sialic acid binding. The array technology has proven to be useful in determining the glycosylation signatures of various cell-lines as well as their glycan binding preferences. The findings of this study provide the groundwork for further investigation into the numerous glycan-lectin interactions that are exhibited by immortalised cell lines.

  11. Phospholipid polymer-based antibody immobilization for cell rolling surfaces in stem cell purification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahara, Atsushi; Chen, Hao; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-conjugated cell rolling column that successfully separates stem cell subpopulations depending on the cell surface marker density, but a large amount of the injected cells were retained in the column because of non-specific interactions. In this study, an amphiphilic copolymer, poly[2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-co-n-butyl methacrylate (nBMA)-co-N-vinyl formamide (NVf)], with phospholipid polar side groups was designed as a novel antibody-immobilizing modifier. The formamide groups in NVf units were converted to active maleimide groups. A plastic flow microfluidic chamber was coated with the copolymers, and a reduced anti-CD90 antibody was immobilized. The adipose tissue-derived stem cells isolated from the rat were injected into the flow chamber, and their rolling behavior was observed under a microscope with a high-speed camera. Non-specific cell adhesion was reduced strongly by means of this immobilization method because of the MPC unit, resulting in a high percentage of rolling cells. These results demonstrate that a surface coated with phospholipid polar groups can be used in an effective stem cell separation system based on the cell rolling process.

  12. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Barrantes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: a clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor-receptor associations; b heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional trapping, and c protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain 7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory and GABAergic (inhibitory synapses. An important function of the 7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain.

  13. Comparative evaluation of the three different surface treatments - conventional, laser and Nano technology methods in enhancing the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium discs and their effects on cell adhesion: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh; Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan; Mahadevan; Santhosh, S

    2015-04-01

    The surface area of the titanium dental implant materials can be increased by surface treatments without altering their shape and form, thereby increasing the biologic properties of the biomaterial. A good biomaterial helps in early cell adhesion and cell signaling. In this study, the commercially pure titanium surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces to form a control material and to be compared with sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces, laser treated surfaces and titanium dioxide (20 nm) Nano-particle coated surfaces. The surface elements were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in vitro using L929 fibroblasts. The results suggested that the titanium dioxide Nano-particle coated surfaces had good osteoconductivity and can be used as a potential method for coating the biomaterial.

  14. Surface Properties of Cell-treated Polyethylene Terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The materials used in artificial joints undergo degradation through fatigue and corrosive wear in human body. The lifetime for well-designed artificial joints like hip joints is at most 12 years and a patient will usually have two total joint replacements during his/her lifetime. Tissue engineering, an alternative to total joint implantation, is the replacement of damaged tissue with the tissue that is designed and constructed to meet the needs of the individual patient. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET in the form of overhead transparency films were investigated on their cell interactions and the tribological properties as an alternative tissue-engineering matrix. The base material of the transparency films is PET. Cell culture methods as well as atomic force microscope (AFM, contact angle goniometer, confocal microscope and universal tribotester were used to study the properties of the substrate materials and the interactions between the surface and the substrate materials. Results showed that cells grew on the substrate of the base materials of the PET. The tribological properties of the slides have been changed after being cell-treated.

  15. Surface chemistry of black phosphorus under a controlled oxidative environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Milligan, Cory A.; Du, Yuchen; Yang, Lingming; Wu, Yanqing; Ye, Peide D.

    2016-10-01

    Black phosphorus (BP), the bulk counterpart of monolayer phosphorene, is a relatively stable phosphorus allotrope at room temperature. However, monolayer phosphorene and ultra-thin BP layers degrade in ambient atmosphere. In this paper, we report the investigation of BP oxidation and discuss the reaction mechanism based on the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data. The kinetics of BP oxidation was examined under various well-controlled conditions, namely in 5% O2/Ar, 2.3% H2O/Ar, and 5% O2 and 2.3% H2O/Ar. At room temperature, the BP surface is demonstrated not to be oxidized at a high oxidation rate in 5% O2/Ar nor in 2.3% H2O/Ar, according to XPS, with the thickness of the oxidized phosphorus layer <5 Å for 5 h. On the other hand, in the O2/H2O mixture, a 30 Å thickness oxide layer was detected already after 2 h of the treatment. This result points to a synergetic effect of water and oxygen in the BP oxidation. The oxidation effect was also studied in applications to the electrical measurements of BP field-effect transistors (FETs) with or without passivation. The electrical performance of BP FETs with atomic layer deposition (ALD) dielectric passivation or h-BN passivation formed in a glove-box environment are also presented.

  16. Hodgkin's lymphoma: the role of cell surface receptors in regulation of tumor cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, M; Sidorenko, S P

    2010-12-01

    , it triggered activation of JNK signaling cascade. The review presents the current views on the role of cell surface receptors in maintenance of HL microenvironment favorable for HRS cells survival.

  17. Targeting pancreatic progenitor cells in human embryonic stem cell differentiation for the identification of novel cell surface markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Bettina; Segev, Hanna; Kopper, Oded; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Schulman, Margarita; Benvenisty, Nissim; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Kitsberg, Danny

    2012-09-01

    New sources of beta cells are needed in order to develop cell therapies for patients with diabetes. An alternative to forced expansion of post-mitotic beta cells is the induction of differentiation of stem-cell derived progenitor cells that have a natural self-expansion capacity into insulin-producing cells. In order to learn more about these progenitor cells at different stages along the differentiation process in which they become progressively more committed to the final beta cell fate, we took the approach of identifying, isolating and characterizing stage specific progenitor cells. We generated human embryonic stem cell (HESC) clones harboring BAC GFP reporter constructs of SOX17, a definitive endoderm marker, and PDX1, a pancreatic marker, and identified subpopulations of GFP expressing cells. Using this approach, we isolated a highly enriched population of pancreatic progenitor cells from hESCs and examined their gene expression with an emphasis on the expression of stage-specific cell surface markers. We were able to identify novel molecules that are involved in the pancreatic differentiation process, as well as stage-specific cell markers that may serve to define (alone or in combination with other markers) a specific pancreatic progenitor cell. These findings may help in optimizing conditions for ultimately generating and isolating beta cells for transplantation therapy.

  18. Comparison of alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on different Ti surfaces: modified sandblasted with large grit and acid-etched (MSLA), laser-treated, and laser and acid-treated Ti surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Jie; Kim, So-Nam

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant surface treatment on cell differentiation of osteoblast cells. For this purpose, three surfaces were compared: (1) a modified SLA (MSLA: sand-blasted with large grit, acid-etched, and immersed in 0.9% NaCl), (2) a laser treatment (LT: laser treatment) titanium surface and (3) a laser and acid-treated (LAT: laser treatment, acid-etched) titanium surface. MATERIALS AND METHODS The MSLA surfaces were considered as the control group, and LT and LAT surfaces as test groups. Alkaline phosphatase expression (ALP) was used to quantify osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell. Surface roughness was evaluated by a contact profilometer (URFPAK-SV; Mitutoyo, Kawasaki, Japan) and characterized by two parameters: mean roughness (Ra) and maximum peak-to-valley height (Rt). RESULTS Scanning electron microscope revealed that MSLA (control group) surface was not as rough as LT, LAT surface (test groups). Alkaline phosphatase expression, the measure of osteoblastic differentiation, and total ALP expression by surface-adherent cells were found to be highest at 21 days for all three surfaces tested (P.05). CONCLUSION This study suggested that MSLA and LAT surfaces exhibited more favorable environment for osteoblast differentiation when compared with LT surface, the results that are important for implant surface modification studies. PMID:27350860

  19. Development and Experimental Evaluation of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Castle, Charles H.; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide uniform cooling for a fuel cell stack, a cooling plate concept was evaluated. This concept utilized thin cooling plates to extract heat from the interior of a fuel cell stack and move this heat to a cooling manifold where it can be transferred to an external cooling fluid. The advantages of this cooling approach include a reduced number of ancillary components and the ability to directly utilize an external cooling fluid loop for cooling the fuel cell stack. A number of different types of cooling plates and manifolds were developed. The cooling plates consisted of two main types; a plate based on thermopyrolytic graphite (TPG) and a planar (or flat plate) heat pipe. The plates, along with solid metal control samples, were tested for both thermal and electrical conductivity. To transfer heat from the cooling plates to the cooling fluid, a number of manifold designs utilizing various materials were devised, constructed, and tested. A key aspect of the manifold was that it had to be electrically nonconductive so it would not short out the fuel cell stack during operation. Different manifold and cooling plate configurations were tested in a vacuum chamber to minimize convective heat losses. Cooling plates were placed in the grooves within the manifolds and heated with surface-mounted electric pad heaters. The plate temperature and its thermal distribution were recorded for all tested combinations of manifold cooling flow rates and heater power loads. This testing simulated the performance of the cooling plates and manifold within an operational fuel cell stack. Different types of control valves and control schemes were tested and evaluated based on their ability to maintain a constant temperature of the cooling plates. The control valves regulated the cooling fluid flow through the manifold, thereby controlling the heat flow to the cooling fluid. Through this work, a cooling plate and manifold system was developed that could maintain the cooling plates

  20. Biofouling control by quorum sensing inhibition and its dependence on membrane surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijin; Lee, Sangyoup; Park, Hee-Deung; Choi, Suing-Il; Hong, Seungkwan

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling control by quorum sensing (QS) inhibition and the influence of membrane surface characteristics on biofilm formation and QS inhibition were investigated. Pseudomonas putida isolated from the bio-fouled reverse osmosis (RO) membranes in a real plant was used. Acylase was chosen as a model QS inhibitor. Bacteria on the membrane coupons were quantified with the heterotrophic plate count method. Cell distribution was imaged by a confocal laser scanning microscope. Results showed that biofilm formation on the membrane was reduced by acylase as it inhibits the activity of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) which is a signal molecule of QS. It was also shown that membrane surface characteristics were influential factors affecting bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, and QS inhibition.

  1. T cell responses to hepatitis B surface antigen are detectable in non-vaccinated individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin R Weihrauch; Michael von Bergwelt-Baildon; Milos Kandic; Martin Weskott; Winfried Klamp; Joachim R(o)sier; Joachim L Schultze

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate, whether humoral hepatitis-B-vaccine non-responders also fail to mount a T cell response and to compare these results to normal vaccinees.METHODS: Fourty-seven health care employees were enrolled in this study including all available nonresponders (n = 13) with an anti-HBsAg titer 1000 kU/L as controls.PBMC from all subjects were analyzed by IFN-γ and IL-4 ELISPOT assays for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) reactive T cells.RESULTS: Non-responders and low-responders had no or only very limited T cell responses, respectively.Individuals responding to vaccination with the induction of a high anti-HBsAg titer showed a strong T cell response after the third vaccination.Surprisingly, these individuals showed response even before the first vaccination.T cell response to control antigens and mitogens was similar in all groups.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that there is no general immune deficiency in non-/low-responders.Thus,we hypothesize that the induction of anti-HBsAg responses by vaccination is significantly dependent on the pre-existing T cell repertoire against the specific antigen rather than the presence of a general T cell defect.

  2. A novel approach to determine the efficacy of patterned surfaces for biofouling control in relation to its microfluidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Partha; Nasabi, Mahyar; Lopez, Francisco Javier Tovar; Jayasuriya, Niranjali; Bhattacharya, Satinath; Deighton, Margaret; Mitchell, Arnan; Bhuiyan, Muhammed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Biofouling, the unwanted growth of sessile microorganisms on submerged surfaces, presents a serious problem for underwater structures. While biofouling can be controlled to various degrees with different microstructure-based patterned surfaces, understanding of the underlying mechanism is still imprecise. Researchers have long speculated that microtopographies might influence near-surface microfluidic conditions, thus microhydrodynamically preventing the settlement of microorganisms. It is therefore very important to identify the microfluidic environment developed on patterned surfaces and its relation with the antifouling behaviour of those surfaces. This study considered the wall shear stress distribution pattern as a significant aspect of this microfluidic environment. In this study, patterned surfaces with microwell arrays were assessed experimentally with a real-time biofilm development monitoring system using a novel microchannel-based flow cell reactor. Finally, computational fluid dynamics simulations were carried out to show how the microfluidic conditions were affecting the initial settlement of microorganisms.

  3. Expression of SLAM (CD150) cell-surface receptors on human B-cell subsets: from pro-B to plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salort, Jose; Sintes, Jordi; Llinàs, Laia; Matesanz-Isabel, Jessica; Engel, Pablo

    2011-01-30

    The SLAM (CD150) family receptors are leukocyte cell-surface glycoproteins involved in leukocyte activation. These molecules and their adaptor protein SAP contribute to the effective germinal center formation, generation of high-affinity antibody-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells, thereby facilitating long-term humoral immune response. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD48 (SLAMF2), CD84 (SLAMF5), CD150 (SLAM or SLAMF1), CD229 (Ly9 or SLAMF3), CD244 (2B4 or SLAMF4), CD319 (CRACC, CS1, or SLAMF7), and CD352 (NTB-A or SLAMF6) on human cell lines and B-cell subsets. The following subsets were assessed: pro-B, pre-B, immature-B, and mature-B cells from bone marrow; transitional and B1/B2 subsets from peripheral blood; and naïve, pre-germinal center, germinal center, memory, plasmablasts, and plasma cells from tonsil and spleen. All receptors were expressed on B cells, with the exception of CD244. SLAM family molecules were widely distributed during B-cell development, maturation and terminal differentiation into plasmablasts and plasma cells, but their expression among various B-cell subsets differed significantly. Such heterogeneous expression patterns suggest that SLAM molecules play an essential and non-redundant role in the control of humoral immune responses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  5. Distribution of Prestin on Outer Hair Cell Basolateral Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ning; ZHAI Suo-qiang; YANG Shi-ming; HAN Dong-yi; ZHAO Hong-bo

    2008-01-01

    Prestin has been identified as a motor protein responsible for outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility and is expressed on the OHC surface. Previous studies revealed that OHC eleetromotility and its associated nonlinear capacitance were mainly located at the OHC lateral wall and absent at the apical cutieular plate and the basal nucleus region. Immunofluorescent staining for prestin also failed to demonstrate prestin expression at the OHC basal ends in whole-mount preparation of the organ of Corti. However, there lacks a definitive demonstration of the pattern of prestin distribution. The OHC lateral wall has a trilaminate organization and is composed of the plasma membrane, cortical lattice, and subsurface cisternae. In this study, the location of prestin proteins in dissociated OHCs was examined using immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. We found that prestin was uniformly expressed on the basolateral surface, including the basal pole. No staining was seen on the cuticular plate and stereocilia. When co-stained with a membrane marker di-8-ANEPPS, prestin-labeling was found to be in the outer layer of the OHC lateral wall. After separating the plasma membrane from the underlying subsurface eisternae using a hypotonic extracellular solution, prestin-labeling was found to be in the plasma membrane, not the subsurface cisternae. The data show that prestin is expressed in the plasma membrane on the entire OHC basolateral surface.

  6. Cell surface and transcriptional characterization of human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Adam J; Tholpady, Ashok; Tholpady, Sunil S; Shang, Hulan; Ogle, Roy C

    2005-03-01

    Adult human subcutaneous adipose tissue contains cells with intriguing multilineage developmental plasticity, much like marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Putative stem or progenitor cells from fat have been given many different names in the literature, reflecting an early and evolving consensus regarding their phenotypic characterization. The study reported here used microarrays to evaluate over 170 genes relating to angiogenesis and extracellular matrix in undifferentiated, early-passage human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells isolated from three separate donors. The hADAS populations unanimously transcribed 66% of the screened genes, and 83% were transcribed by at least two of the three populations. The most highly transcribed genes relate to functional groupings such as cell adhesion, matrix proteins, growth factors and receptors, and proteases. The transcriptome of hADAS cells demonstrated by this work reveals many similarities to published profiles of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In addition, flow analysis of over 24 hADAS cell surface proteins (n = 7 donors) both confirms and expands on the existing literature and reveals strong intergroup correlation, despite an inconsistent nomenclature and the lack of standardized protocols for cell isolation and culture. Finally, based on flow analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction studies, our results suggest that hADAS cells do not express several proteins that are implicated as markers of "stemness" in other stem cell populations, including telomerase, CD133, and the membrane transporter ABCG2.

  7. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  8. Role of TI-VAMP and CD82 in EGFR cell-surface dynamics and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danglot, Lydia; Chaineau, Mathilde; Dahan, Maxime; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Boggetto, Nicole; Perez, Franck; Galli, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    The v-SNARE TI-VAMP (VAMP7) mediates exocytosis during neuritogenesis, phagocytosis and lysosomal secretion. It localizes to endosomes and lysosomes but also to the trans-Golgi network. Here we show that depletion of TI-VAMP enhances the endocytosis of activated EGF receptor (EGFR) without affecting constitutive endocytosis of EGFR, or transferrin uptake. This increased EGFR internalization is mainly clathrin dependent. Searching for defects in EGFR regulators, we found that TI-VAMP depletion reduces the cell surface amount of CD82, a tetraspanin known to control EGFR localization in microdomains. We further show that TI-VAMP is required for secretion from the Golgi apparatus to the cell surface, and that TI-VAMP-positive vesicles transport CD82. Quantum dots video-microscopy indicates that depletion of TI-VAMP, or its cargo CD82, restrains EGFR diffusion and the area explored by EGFR at the cell surface. Both depletions also impair MAPK signaling and enhance endocytosis of activated EGFR by increased recruitment of AP-2. These results highlight the role of TI-VAMP in the secretory pathway of a tetraspanin, and support a model in which CD82 allows EGFR entry in microdomains that control its clathrin-dependent endocytosis and signaling.

  9. Construction of a Pichia pastoris