WorldWideScience

Sample records for controlling interface growth

  1. Solidification interface shape control in a continuous Czochralski silicon growth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenlei; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Tihu; Zheng, Lili

    2006-01-01

    In a continuous Czochralski (CCZ) growth system with a shallow and replenished melt proposed earlier, large-diameter crystals may be grown at a high pull rate and reduced melt convection. The proposed system consists of two heaters. In this paper, the relationship between the solidification interface and the power levels is established. An interface control algorithm is developed to achieve the desired interface shape by adjusting the power level of the bottom heater. The control algorithm is incorporated into an existing process model, and the efficiency of the control algorithm is tested.

  2. Interface engineering for oxide electronics: tuning electronic properties by atomically controlled growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijben, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis is to develop a controlled growth with atomic precision for the realization of artificial perovskite structures, to exploit the exceptional physical properties of complex oxide materials such as high-temperature superconductors and conducting interfaces between band

  3. Dendrimer-assisted controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for enhanced thermal interface conductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amama, Placidus B; Cola, Baratunde A; Sands, Timothy D; Xu, Xianfan; Fisher, Timothy S

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with systematically varied diameter distributions and defect densities were reproducibly grown from a modified catalyst structure templated in an amine-terminated fourth-generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Thermal interface resistances of the vertically oriented MWCNT arrays as determined by a photoacoustic technique reveal a strong correlation with the quality as assessed by Raman spectroscopy. This study contributes not only to the development of an active catalyst via a wet chemical route for structure-controlled MWCNT growth, but also to the development of efficient and low-cost MWCNT-based thermal interface materials with thermal interface resistances ≤10 mm 2 K W -1

  4. Ledge-flow-controlled catalyst interface dynamics during Si nanowire growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Wirth, CT

    2008-01-01

    understanding of the role of commonly used catalysts and specifically of their interface dynamics1, 2. Although catalytic chemical vapour deposition of nanowires below the eutectic temperature has been demonstrated in many semiconductor–catalyst systems3, 4, 5, 6, growth from solid catalysts is still disputed...... as a comparative benchmark. The dominant coherent Pd silicide/Si growth interface subsequently advances by lateral propagation of ledges, driven by catalytic dissociation of disilane and coupled Pd and Si diffusion. Our results establish an atomistic framework for nanowire assembly from solid catalysts, relevant...

  5. Optimal distributed control of a diffuse interface model of tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Pierluigi; Gilardi, Gianni; Rocca, Elisabetta; Sprekels, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a distributed optimal control problem is studied for a diffuse interface model of tumor growth which was proposed by Hawkins-Daruud et al in Hawkins-Daruud et al (2011 Int. J. Numer. Math. Biomed. Eng. 28 3-24). The model consists of a Cahn-Hilliard equation for the tumor cell fraction φ coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a function σ representing the nutrient-rich extracellular water volume fraction. The distributed control u monitors as a right-hand side of the equation for σ and can be interpreted as a nutrient supply or a medication, while the cost function, which is of standard tracking type, is meant to keep the tumor cell fraction under control during the evolution. We show that the control-to-state operator is Fréchet differentiable between appropriate Banach spaces and derive the first-order necessary optimality conditions in terms of a variational inequality involving the adjoint state variables. The financial support of the FP7-IDEAS-ERC-StG #256872 (EntroPhase) and of the project Fondazione Cariplo-Regione Lombardia MEGAsTAR ‘Matematica d’Eccellenza in biologia ed ingegneria come accelleratore di una nuona strateGia per l’ATtRattività dell’ateneo pavese’ is gratefully acknowledged. The paper also benefited from the support of the MIUR-PRIN Grant 2015PA5MP7 ‘Calculus of Variations’ for PC and GG, and the GNAMPA (Gruppo Nazionale per l’Analisi Matematica, la Probabilità e le loro Applicazioni) of INdAM (Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica) for PC, GG and ER.

  6. Interfaces para control cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario

    2000-01-01

    La función de una interfaz para control cerebral basada en señales de electroencefalograma (EEG), en forma general denominada BCI (Brain control Interface), es establecer un enlace directo entre el cerebro y una máquina, sin utilizar acciones motoras directas. Una BCI permite realizar operaciones simples a partir de la interpretación de las señales de EEG. Su desarrollo está principalmente orientado hacia la ayuda a personas con discapacidades motoras severas, que poseen deterioros en el sist...

  7. Subcritical crack growth along polymer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumurthy, Charavana Kumara

    2000-10-01

    The adhesion characteristics have been investigated for a polyimide (PI)/model epoxy (ME) interface that is important for microelectronic applications. The fracture toughness (G*c) of this interface has been measured using an asymmetric double cantilever beam (ADCB) technique. The G*c is low, 10-25 J/m 2, and is sensitive to the mechanical phase angle psi. A modified ADCB setup has been used to measure the subcritical crack growth velocity v due to the stress-assisted water attack (SAWA) at various relative humidities (RH) and temperatures (T) as a function of its driving force (the strain energy release rate) G*. The threshold G* decreases remarkably. Above the threshold log v rises linearly with √ G* (a hydrolysis controlled regime) but then enters a regime where the crack velocity is almost independent of √G*, i.e., v = v* (a transport controlled regime). A model for SAWA has been developed based on thermally-activated kinetics for hydrolysis of the ester covalent bonds that bridge from one side to the other of the interface. A new technique has been developed for the determination of the fatigue crack growth under thermal (T) and hydro-thermal (HT) conditions as a function of the range in the strain energy release rate (DeltaG). Under T-fatigue, the fatigue crack growth per unit temperature cycle (da/dN) increases as a power of DeltaG, i.e., a Paris law relationship holds. The HT da/dN measured is higher than da/dN under T-fatigue conditions and has been successfully modeled as a summation of two components: (a) the da/dN due to T-fatigue and (b) the da/dN due to the SAWA along the interface for a given T-cycle. A surface modification procedure that converts a thin interpenetrated by a solvent cast ME is used to strengthen ME/PI interface. The G* c increases with the interpenetration distance w. Increasing w also improves the resistance of the PI/ME interface to SAWA with the threshold G* increasing and the water transport controlled velocity (v

  8. Biological growth in bodies with incoherent interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Digendranath; Gupta, Anurag

    2018-01-01

    A general theory of thermodynamically consistent biomechanical-biochemical growth in a body, considering mass addition in the bulk and at an incoherent interface, is developed. The incoherency arises due to incompatibility of growth and elastic distortion tensors at the interface. The incoherent interface therefore acts as an additional source of internal stress besides allowing for rich growth kinematics. All the biochemicals in the model are essentially represented in terms of nutrient concentration fields, in the bulk and at the interface. A nutrient balance law is postulated which, combined with mechanical balances and kinetic laws, yields an initial-boundary-value problem coupling the evolution of bulk and interfacial growth, on the one hand, and the evolution of growth and nutrient concentration on the other. The problem is solved, and discussed in detail, for two distinct examples: annual ring formation during tree growth and healing of cutaneous wounds in animals.

  9. Interface failure by cavity growth to coalescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    For a thin metal layer between ceramics ductile failure by the growth of voids along one of the interfaces is studied numerically. An axisymmetric cell model is used to represent an array of uniformly distributed hemispherical interface voids. The bonding to the ceramics gives rise to highly cons...

  10. Control system oriented human interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor

  11. Multi-robot control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  12. Induced- and alternating-current electro-osmotic control of the diffusion layer growth in a microchannel-membrane interface device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-11-01

    The passage of an electric current through an ionic permselective medium under an applied electric field is characterized by the formation of ionic concentration gradients, which result in regions of depleted and enriched ionic concentration at opposite ends of the medium. Induced-current electro-osmosis (ICEO) and alternating-current-electro-osmosis (ACEO) are shown to control the growth of the diffusion layer (DL) which, in turn, controls the diffusion limited ion transport through the microchannel-membrane system. We fabricated and tested devices made of a Nafion membrane connecting two opposite PDMS microchannels. An interdigitated electrode array was embedded within the microchannel with various distances from the microchannel-membrane interface. The induced ICEO (floating electrodes) / ACEO (active electrodes) vortices formed at the electrode array stir the fluid and thereby suppress the growth of the DL. The intensity of the ACEO vortices is controlled by either varying the voltage amplitude or the frequency, each having its own unique effect. Enhancement of the limiting current by on-demand control of the diffusion length is of importance in on-chip electro-dialysis, desalination and preconcentration of analytes.

  13. Interface language for diagnostic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matone, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron multichannel collimator diagnostic on TFTR is run with the help of a keyboard-entered interface language. The language allows the user to interact with the real-time control and data analysis systems in a consistent and efficient manner. It uses a vocabulary that can be abbreviated into one character commands which the proficient user may concatenate into command words. This allows the user to progress quickly from a novice to an expert operating mode. A similar type interface language could be applied to many interactive applications accepting keyboard inputs

  14. Control by personal computer and Interface 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung Mug; Park, Sun Ho

    1989-03-01

    This book consists of three chapters. The first chapter deals with basic knowledge of micro computer control which are computer system, micro computer system, control of the micro computer and control system for calculator. The second chapter describes Interface about basic knowledge such as 8255 parallel interface, 6821 parallel interface, parallel interface of personal computer, reading BCD code in parallel interface, IEEE-488 interface, RS-232C interface and transmit data in personal computer and a measuring instrument. The third chapter includes control experiment by micro computer, experiment by eight bit computer and control experiment by machine code and BASIC.

  15. Careful stoichiometry monitoring and doping control during the tunneling interface growth of an n + InAs(Si)/p + GaSb(Si) Esaki diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kazzi, S.; Alian, A.; Hsu, B.; Verhulst, A. S.; Walke, A.; Favia, P.; Douhard, B.; Lu, W.; del Alamo, J. A.; Collaert, N.; Merckling, C.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we report on the growth of pseudomorphic and highly doped InAs(Si)/GaSb(Si) heterostructures on p-type (0 0 1)-oriented GaSb substrate and the fabrication and characterization of n+/p+ Esaki tunneling diodes. We particularly study the influence of the Molecular Beam Epitaxy shutter sequences on the structural and electrical characteristics of InAs(Si)/GaSb(Si) Esaki diodes structures. We use real time Reflection High Electron Diffraction analysis to monitor different interface stoichiometry at the tunneling interface. With Atomic Force Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy analyses, we demonstrate that an "InSb-like" interface leads to a sharp and defect-free interface exhibiting high quality InAs(Si) crystal growth contrary to the "GaAs-like" one. We then prove by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy profiles that Si-diffusion at the interface allows the growth of highly Si-doped InAs/GaSb diodes without any III-V material deterioration. Finally, simulations are conducted to explain our electrical results where a high Band to Band Tunneling (BTBT) peak current density of Jp = 8 mA/μm2 is achieved.

  16. A database for TMT interface control documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Kim; Roberts, Scott; Brighton, Allan; Rogers, John

    2016-08-01

    The TMT Software System consists of software components that interact with one another through a software infrastructure called TMT Common Software (CSW). CSW consists of software services and library code that is used by developers to create the subsystems and components that participate in the software system. CSW also defines the types of components that can be constructed and their roles. The use of common component types and shared middleware services allows standardized software interfaces for the components. A software system called the TMT Interface Database System was constructed to support the documentation of the interfaces for components based on CSW. The programmer describes a subsystem and each of its components using JSON-style text files. A command interface file describes each command a component can receive and any commands a component sends. The event interface files describe status, alarms, and events a component publishes and status and events subscribed to by a component. A web application was created to provide a user interface for the required features. Files are ingested into the software system's database. The user interface allows browsing subsystem interfaces, publishing versions of subsystem interfaces, and constructing and publishing interface control documents that consist of the intersection of two subsystem interfaces. All published subsystem interfaces and interface control documents are versioned for configuration control and follow the standard TMT change control processes. Subsystem interfaces and interface control documents can be visualized in the browser or exported as PDF files.

  17. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    KAUST Repository

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  18. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    KAUST Repository

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-15

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  19. Finite element modelling of the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 with a controlled metal-oxide interface and the influence of growth stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumpicchiat, Guillaume; Pascal, Serge; Tupin, Marc; Berdin-Méric, Clotilde

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: We developed two finite element models of zirconium-based alloy oxidation using the CEA Cast3M code to simulate the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. We also studied the effect of stresses on the oxidation kinetics. The main results are: • Both models lead to parabolic oxidation kinetics in agreement with the Wagner’s theory. • The modellings enable to calculate the stress distribution in the oxide as well as in the metal. • A strong effect of the hydrostatic stress on the oxidation kinetics has been evidenced. • The stress gradient effect changes the parabolic kinetics into a sub-parabolic law closer to the experimental kinetics because of the stress gradient itself, but also because of the growth stress increase with the oxide thickness. - Abstract: Experimentally, zirconium-based alloys oxidation kinetics is sub-parabolic, by contrast with the Wagner theory which predicts a parabolic kinetics. Two finite element models have been developed to simulate this phenomenon: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. Both simulate parabolic oxidation kinetics. The growth stress effects on oxygen diffusion are studied to try to explain the gap between theory and experience. Taking into account the influence of the hydrostatic stress and its gradient into the oxygen flux expression, sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics have been simulated. The sub-parabolic behaviour of the oxidation kinetics can be explained by a non-uniform compressive stress level into the oxide layer.

  20. Transitions in a probabilistic interface growth model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S G; Moreira, J G

    2011-01-01

    We study a generalization of the Wolf–Villain (WV) interface growth model based on a probabilistic growth rule. In the WV model, particles are randomly deposited onto a substrate and subsequently move to a position nearby where the binding is strongest. We introduce a growth probability which is proportional to a power of the number n i of bindings of the site i: p i ∝n i ν . Through extensive simulations, in (1 + 1) dimensions, we find three behaviors depending on the ν value: (i) if ν is small, a crossover from the Mullins–Herring to the Edwards–Wilkinson (EW) universality class; (ii) for intermediate values of ν, a crossover from the EW to the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang (KPZ) universality class; and, finally, (iii) for large ν values, the system is always in the KPZ class. In (2 + 1) dimensions, we obtain three different behaviors: (i) a crossover from the Villain–Lai–Das Sarma to the EW universality class for small ν values; (ii) the EW class is always present for intermediate ν values; and (iii) a deviation from the EW class is observed for large ν values

  1. Interface control scheme for computer high-speed interface unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, B. K.

    1975-01-01

    Control scheme is general and performs for multiplexed and dedicated channels as well as for data-bus interfaces. Control comprises two 64-pin, dual in-line packages, each of which holds custom large-scale integrated array built with silicon-on-sapphire complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology.

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel project interface control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This implementation process philosophy is in keeping with the ongoing reengineering of the WHC Controlled Manuals to achieve interface control within the SNF Project. This plan applies to all SNF Project sub-project to sub-project, and sub-project to exteranl (both on and off the Hanford Site) interfaces

  3. Inkjet color-printer control interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.; Marshall, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Special purpose interface permits computer-driven control of inkjet printers. Inkjet printers are answer to problem of high-speed peripheral output devices for computer systems. Control interface was developed to provide high-resolution color-classification maps quickly and economically from multispectral data.

  4. 200 Area TEDF interface control document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.J.; Hildebrand, R.A.

    1994-11-15

    Because the TEDF does not have any treatment or retention capacity, strict control at the generator interface is essential to operate the TEDF in compliance with good engineering practices, Hanford site requirements, and the 216 Discharge Permit. The information in the Interface Control Document (ICD) forms the basis of understanding between all parties involved in the TEDF; DOE, WHC, and the generating facilities. The ICD defines the controlling document hierarchy; LEF, and generator responsibilities; monitoring and sampling requirements; and specifies the TEDF/Generator Interface points.

  5. 200 Area TEDF interface control document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.J.; Hildebrand, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Because the TEDF does not have any treatment or retention capacity, strict control at the generator interface is essential to operate the TEDF in compliance with good engineering practices, Hanford site requirements, and the 216 Discharge Permit. The information in the Interface Control Document (ICD) forms the basis of understanding between all parties involved in the TEDF; DOE, WHC, and the generating facilities. The ICD defines the controlling document hierarchy; LEF, and generator responsibilities; monitoring and sampling requirements; and specifies the TEDF/Generator Interface points

  6. Human performance interfaces in air traffic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hern; Yeh, Chung-Hsing

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how human performance factors in air traffic control (ATC) affect each other through their mutual interactions. The paper extends the conceptual SHEL model of ergonomics to describe the ATC system as human performance interfaces in which the air traffic controllers interact with other human performance factors including other controllers, software, hardware, environment, and organisation. New research hypotheses about the relationships between human performance interfaces of the system are developed and tested on data collected from air traffic controllers, using structural equation modelling. The research result suggests that organisation influences play a more significant role than individual differences or peer influences on how the controllers interact with the software, hardware, and environment of the ATC system. There are mutual influences between the controller-software, controller-hardware, controller-environment, and controller-organisation interfaces of the ATC system, with the exception of the controller-controller interface. Research findings of this study provide practical insights in managing human performance interfaces of the ATC system in the face of internal or external change, particularly in understanding its possible consequences in relation to the interactions between human performance factors.

  7. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Nanoparticles at Environmental Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Young-Shin; Kim, Doyoon; Neil, Chelsea W

    2016-09-20

    Mineral nucleation is a phase transformation of aqueous components to solids with an accompanying creation of new surfaces. In this evolutional, yet elusive, process, nuclei often form at environmental interfaces, which provide remarkably reactive sites for heterogeneous nucleation and growth. Naturally occurring nucleation processes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of important components in the Earth's crust, such as iron and manganese oxide minerals and calcium carbonate. However, in recent decades, these cycles have been significantly altered by anthropogenic activities, which affect the aqueous chemistry and equilibrium of both surface and subsurface systems. These alterations can trigger the dissolution of existing minerals and formation of new nanoparticles (i.e., nucleation and growth) and consequently change the porosity and permeability of geomedia in subsurface environments. Newly formed nanoparticles can also actively interact with components in natural and engineered aquatic systems, including those posing a significant hazard such as arsenic. These interactions can bilaterally influence the fate and transport of both newly formed nanoparticles and aqueous components. Due to their importance in natural and engineered processes, heterogeneous nucleation at environmental interfaces has started to receive more attention. However, a lack of time-resolved in situ analyses makes the evaluation of heterogeneous nucleation challenging because the physicochemical properties of both the nuclei and surfaces significantly and dynamically change with time and aqueous chemistry. This Account reviews our in situ kinetic studies of the heterogeneous nucleation and growth behaviors of iron(III) (hydr)oxide, calcium carbonate, and manganese (hydr)oxide minerals in aqueous systems. In particular, we utilized simultaneous small-angle and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) to investigate in situ and in real-time the effects of

  8. Java interface for asserting interactive telerobotic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Peter; Lewis, John; Stein, Matthew R.

    1997-12-01

    Many current web-based telerobotic interfaces use HyperText Markup Language (HTML) forms to assert user control on a robot. While acceptable for some tasks, a Java interface can provide better client-server interaction. The Puma Paint project is a joint effort between the Department of Computing Sciences at Villanova University and the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Wilkes University. THe project utilizes a Java applet to control a Unimation Puma 1760 robot during the task of painting on a canvas. The interface allows the user to control the paint strokes as well as the pressure of a brush on the canvas and how deep the brush is dipped into a paint jar. To provide immediate feedback, a virtual canvas models the effects of the controls as the artist paints. Live color video feedback is provided, allowing the user to view the actual results of the robot's motions. Unlike the step-at-a-time model of many web forms, the application permits the user to assert interactive control. The greater the complexity of the interaction between the robot and its environment, the greater the need for high quality information presentation to the user. The use of Java allows the sophistication of the user interface to be raised to the level required for satisfactory control. This paper describes the Puma Paint project, including the interface and communications model. It also examines the challenges of using the Internet as the medium of communications and the challenges of encoding free ranging motions for transmission from the client to the robot.

  9. Object oriented programming interfaces for accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, L.T.

    1997-01-01

    Several years ago, the AGS controls group was given the task of developing software for the RHIC accelerator. Like the AGS, the RHIC control system needs to control and monitor equipment distributed around a relatively large geographic area. A local area network connects this equipment to a collection of UNIX workstations in a central control room. Similar software had been developed for the AGS about a decade earlier, but isn't well suited for RHIC use for a number of reasons. Rather than adapt the AGS software for RHIC use, the controls group opted to start with a clean slate. To develop software that would address the shortcomings of the AGS software, while preserving the useful features that evolved through years of use. A current trend in control system design is to provide an object oriented programming interface for application developers. This talk will discuss important aspects and features of object oriented application programming interfaces (APIs) for accelerator control systems, and explore why such interfaces are becoming the norm

  10. Frontiers of controlling energy levels at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Norbert

    The alignment of electron energy levels at interfaces between semiconductors, dielectrics, and electrodes determines the function and efficiency of all electronic and optoelectronic devices. Reliable guidelines for predicting the level alignment for a given material combination and methods to adjust the intrinsic energy landscape are needed to enable efficient engineering approaches. These are sufficiently understood for established electronic materials, e.g., Si, but for the increasing number of emerging materials, e.g., organic and 2D semiconductors, perovskites, this is work in progress. The intrinsic level alignment and the underlying mechanisms at interfaces between organic and inorganic semiconductors are discussed first. Next, methods to alter the level alignment are introduced, which all base on proper charge density rearrangement at a heterojunction. As interface modification agents we use molecular electron acceptors and donors, as well as molecular photochromic switches that add a dynamic aspect and allow device multifunctionality. For 2D semiconductors surface transfer doping with molecular acceptors/donors transpires as viable method to locally tune the Fermi-level position in the energy gap. The fundamental electronic properties of a prototypical 1D interface between intrinsic and p-doped 2D semiconductor regions are derived from local (scanning probe) and area-averaged (photoemission) spectroscopy experiments. Future research opportunities for attaining unsurpassed interface control through charge density management are discussed.

  11. Interface Mediated Nucleation and Growth of Dislocations in fcc-bcc nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruifeng; Wang, Jian; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Germann, Timothy C.

    2011-03-01

    Heterophase interfaces play a crucial role in determining material strength for nanostructured materials because they can block, store, nucleate, and remove dislocations, the essential defects that enable plastic deformation. Much recent theoretical and experimental effort has been conducted on nanostructured Cu-Nb multilayer composites that exhibited extraordinarily high strength, ductility, and resistance to radiation and mechanical loading. In decreasing layer thicknesses to the order of a few tens of nanometers or less, the deformation behavior of such composites is mainly controlled by the Cu/Nb interface. In this work, we focus on the cooperative mechanisms of dislocation nucleation and growth from Cu/Nb interfaces, and their interaction with interface. Two types of experimentally observed Cu/Nb incoherent interfaces are comparatively studied. We found that the preferred dislocation nucleation sites are closely related to atomic interface structure, which in turn, depend on the orientation relationship. The activation stress and energies for an isolated Shockley dislocation loop of different sizes from specific interface sites depend strongly on dislocation size, atomic interface pattern, and loading conditions. Such findings provide important insight into the mechanical response of a wide range of fcc/bcc metallic nanocomposites via atomic interface design.

  12. TFTR centralized torus interface valve control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, G.G.; Olsen, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    A system developed especially for the TFTR to monitor and control the interface between the vacuum vessel and associated diagnostics will be described in this paper. Diagnostics which must be connected to the machine vacuum are required to do so through a Torus Interface Valve (TIV). Two types of TIV's are used on TFTR. The first type is a non-latching valve which must be held in the opened position by a sustained OPEN command, returning automatically to the closed position when the OPEN command is removed. This type of TIV is used on all systems which never insert a probe into the vacuum vessel through the TIV. The second type of TIV is a latching valve which requires a momentary OPEN command to open and a momentary CLOSE command to close. Each TIV is linked to its own dedicated logic controller. Each logic controller is hardwired to the appropriate TIV OPEN/CLOSED limit switches, probe IN/OUT limit switches, TFTR vacuum vessel pressure setpoint switches, and diagnostic pressure setpoint switches. The logic controller can be configured for local (push-button) or remote (computer) control. Each controller has a uniquely coded keyswitch to determine the configuration. Whether under local or remote control, all OPEN and CLOSE commands must be approved by the TIV controller (TIVC). In the case of systems with probes, the controller must receive a positive indication that the probe is completely backed out before a CLOSE command will be transmitted from the TIVC to the TIV. Before a valve will be opened by a controller, the differential pressure across the valve must be within certain limits

  13. Light Duty Utility Arm interface control document plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrom, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the interface control documents that will be used to identify and control interface features throughout all phases of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) development and design. After the system is built, delivered and installed in the Cold Test Facility and later at the tank farm, the Interface Control Documents can be used in maintaining the configuration control process. The Interface Control Document will consist of Interface Control Drawings and a data base directly tied to the Interface Control Drawings. The data base can be used as an index to conveniently find interface information. Design drawings and other text documents that contain interface information will appear in the database. The Interface Control Drawings will be used to document and control the data and information that define the interface boundaries between systems, subsystems and equipment. Also, the interface boundaries will define the areas of responsibility for systems and subsystems. The drawing will delineate and identify all the physical and functional interfaces that required coordination to establish and maintain compatibility between the co-functioning equipment, computer software, and the tank farm facilities. An appendix contains the Engineering interface control database system riser manual

  14. Light Duty Utility Arm interface control document plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstrom, J.W.

    1994-12-27

    This document describes the interface control documents that will be used to identify and control interface features throughout all phases of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) development and design. After the system is built, delivered and installed in the Cold Test Facility and later at the tank farm, the Interface Control Documents can be used in maintaining the configuration control process. The Interface Control Document will consist of Interface Control Drawings and a data base directly tied to the Interface Control Drawings. The data base can be used as an index to conveniently find interface information. Design drawings and other text documents that contain interface information will appear in the database. The Interface Control Drawings will be used to document and control the data and information that define the interface boundaries between systems, subsystems and equipment. Also, the interface boundaries will define the areas of responsibility for systems and subsystems. The drawing will delineate and identify all the physical and functional interfaces that required coordination to establish and maintain compatibility between the co-functioning equipment, computer software, and the tank farm facilities. An appendix contains the Engineering interface control database system riser manual.

  15. Training Manual for Elements of Interface Definition and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, Vincent R. (Editor); Kastner, Robert E. (Editor); Hartt, Henry N. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The primary thrust of this manual is to ensure that the format and information needed to control interfaces between equipment are clear and understandable. The emphasis is on controlling the engineering design of the interface and not on the functional performance requirements of the system or the internal workings of the interfacing equipment. Interface control should take place, with rare exception, at the interfacing elements and no further. There are two essential sections of the manual. Chapter 2, Principles of Interface Control, discusses how interfaces are defined. It describes different types of interfaces to be considered and recommends a format for the documentation necessary for adequate interface control. Chapter 3, The Process: Through the Design Phases, provides tailored guidance for interface definition and control. This manual can be used to improve planned or existing interface control processes during system design and development. It can also be used to refresh and update the corporate knowledge base. The information presented herein will reduce the amount of paper and data required in interface definition and control processes by as much as 50 percent and will shorten the time required to prepare an interface control document. It also highlights the essential technical parameters that ensure that flight subsystems will indeed fit together and function as intended after assembly and checkout.

  16. Simulation Control Graphical User Interface Logging Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewling, Karl B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    One of the many tasks of my project was to revise the code of the Simulation Control Graphical User Interface (SIM GUI) to enable logging functionality to a file. I was also tasked with developing a script that directed the startup and initialization flow of the various LCS software components. This makes sure that a software component will not spin up until all the appropriate dependencies have been configured properly. Also I was able to assist hardware modelers in verifying the configuration of models after they have been upgraded to a new software version. I developed some code that analyzes the MDL files to determine if any error were generated due to the upgrade process. Another one of the projects assigned to me was supporting the End-to-End Hardware/Software Daily Tag-up meeting.

  17. Chemical Control of Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

    Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

  18. Observation of carbon growth and interface structures in methanol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Kimio

    2015-11-01

    In the deposition of carbon on the surface of a tungsten tip in methanol solution by electrolysis, the growth structure of the carbon films, the interface state, and the dissolution of carbon atoms into the tungsten matrix of the substrate have been investigated with the atomic events by field ion microscopy (FIM). The carbon films preferentially condense on the W{111} plane. The interfacial reaction at the carbon atom-tungsten substrate interface is vigorous and the carbon atoms also readily dissolve into the substrate matrix to form a tungsten-carbon complex. The reaction depth of the deposited carbon depends on the magnitude of electrolytic current and the treatment duration in the methanol solution. In this work, the resolution depth of carbon was found to be approximately 270 atomic layers below the top layer of the tungsten substrate by a field evaporation technique. In the case of a low electrolytic current, the tungsten substrate surface is entirely covered with carbon atoms having a pseudomorphic structure. The field-electron emission characteristics were also evaluated for various coverages of the carbon film formed on the substrate.

  19. Development the Controller Input Power of Peripheral Interfacing Controller Using Other Micro controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syirrazie Che Soh; Harzawardi Hashim; Nor Arymaswati Abdullah; Nur Aira Abdul Rahman; Mohd Ashhar Khalid

    2011-01-01

    This Controller Input Power of a Peripheral Interfacing Controller was developed using the other micro controller. This paper discuss the switching technique are practiced using proper electronic device to develop the controller, thus enable to control the input power of a PIC in order to expand their interfacing capacity and control. This may allow the PIC could be used to acquire input and control output signal from electronic and electromechanical device and instrument as well as software in wide scale and application. (author)

  20. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Hydrate Growth on a Gas-Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2018-04-01

    We develop a continuum-scale phase-field model to study gas-liquid-hydrate systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium. We design a Gibbs free energy functional for methane-water mixtures that recovers the isobaric temperature-composition phase diagram under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The proposed free energy is incorporated into a phase-field model to study the dynamics of hydrate formation on a gas-liquid interface. We elucidate the role of initial aqueous concentration in determining the direction of hydrate growth at the interface, in agreement with experimental observations. Our model also reveals two stages of hydrate growth at an interface—controlled by a crossover in how methane is supplied from the gas and liquid phases—which could explain the persistence of gas conduits in hydrate-bearing sediments and other nonequilibrium phenomena commonly observed in natural methane hydrate systems.

  1. Predictions of mixed mode interface crack growth using a cohesive zone model for ductile fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    Special interface elements that account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence are used to analyse crack growth. In these elements the stress component tangential to the interface is accounted for, as determined by the requirement of compatibility with the surrou......Special interface elements that account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence are used to analyse crack growth. In these elements the stress component tangential to the interface is accounted for, as determined by the requirement of compatibility...

  2. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A communications system and method are provided for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. Network device interfaces associated with different data channels can coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  3. Experiencing Brain-Computer Interface Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, B.L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that extract information from the user’s brain activity and employ it in some way in an interactive system. While historically BCIs were mainly catered towards paralyzed or otherwise physically handicapped users, the last couple of years applications with

  4. Human machine interface for research reactor instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2010-01-01

    Most present design of Human Machine Interface for Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System is modular-based, comprise of several cabinets such as Reactor Protection System, Control Console, Information Console as well as Communication Console. The safety, engineering and human factor will be concerned for the design. Redundancy and separation of signal and power supply are the main factor for safety consideration. The design of Operator Interface absolutely takes consideration of human and environmental factors. Physical parameters, experiences, trainability and long-established habit patterns are very important for user interface, instead of the Aesthetic and Operator-Interface Geometry. Physical design for New Instrumentation and Control System of RTP are proposed base on the state-of- the-art Human Machine Interface design. (author)

  5. Block diagrams of the radar interface and control unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Interface and Control Unit is the heart of the radar module, which occupies one complex channel of the High-Speed Data Acquisition System of the Goldstone Solar System Radar. Block diagrams of the interface unit are presented as an aid to understanding its operation and interconnections to the rest of the radar module.

  6. A Model of Controlled Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Alberto; Lewicka, Marta

    2018-03-01

    We consider a free boundary problem for a system of PDEs, modeling the growth of a biological tissue. A morphogen, controlling volume growth, is produced by specific cells and then diffused and absorbed throughout the domain. The geometric shape of the growing tissue is determined by the instantaneous minimization of an elastic deformation energy, subject to a constraint on the volumetric growth. For an initial domain with C}^{2,α boundary, our main result establishes the local existence and uniqueness of a classical solution, up to a rigid motion.

  7. ASC-PROBA Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Finn E

    1999-01-01

    of Automation of the Technical University of Denmark. The document is structured as follows. First we present the ASC - heritage, system description, performance - then we address more specifically the environmental properties, like the EMC compatibility and thermal characteristics, and the design...... and reliability issues. Section 6 deals with the testing and the calibration procedures and in section 7 the mechanical and electrical interfaces are given. In section 8 and 9 we address issues like manufacturing, transportation and storage and to conclude we review the ASC specifications against the PROBA...

  8. Effect of residual stresses on interface crack growth by void expansion mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    Crack growth along an interface between two adjacent elastic-plastic materials in a layered solid is analysed, using special interface elements to represent the fracture process ahead of the crack-tip. These interface elements account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids to c....... The results show that the value of the T-stress component in the softer material adjacent to the interface crack plays the dominant role, such that a negative value of this stress component gives a significant increase of the interface fracture toughness.......Crack growth along an interface between two adjacent elastic-plastic materials in a layered solid is analysed, using special interface elements to represent the fracture process ahead of the crack-tip. These interface elements account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids...... to coalescence. In these elements the stress components normal to the interface and the shear stresses are given by equilibrium with the surrounding material, and the stress component tangential to the interface is determined by the requirement of compatibility with the surrounding material in the tangential...

  9. Solid-melt interface structure and growth of Cu alloy single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimitsu, Hiroshi; Kamada, Kohji.

    1983-01-01

    Crystal-melt interface behavior during the growth of Cu-base solid solutions by the Bridgman method is discussed on the basis of experimental evidence obtained by neutron diffraction topography. Advantages of neutron diffraction topography for the characterization of large single crystals, such as dealt with in this paper, are emphasized. Evidence was odserved of extremely regular crystal growth along directions, irrespective of the macroscopic growth direction. This contrasts with the previously believed (110) normal growth which is a conclusion of growth theory based on molecular kinetics at the solid-melt interface. In consequence, we believe that the kinetics at the interface is a minor factor in the meltgrowth of metal single crystals. Revised melt-growth theory should include both the growth and the formation of the regular structure as evidenced by neutron diffraction topography. (author)

  10. DIII-D Neutral Beam control system operator interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.J.; Campbell, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A centralized graphical user interface has been added to the DIII-D Neutral Beam (NB) control systems for status monitoring and remote control applications. This user interface provides for automatic data acquisition, alarm detection and supervisory control of the four NB programmable logic controllers (PLC) as well as the Mode Control PLC. These PLCs are used for interlocking, control and status of the NB vacuum pumping, gas delivery, and water cooling systems as well as beam mode status and control. The system allows for both a friendly user interface as well as a safe and convenient method of communicating with remote hardware that formerly required interns to access. In the future, to enable high level of control of PLC subsystems, complete procedures is written and executed at the touch of a screen control panel button. The system consists of an IBM compatible 486 computer running the FIX DMACS trademark for Windows trademark data acquisition and control interface software, a Texas Instruments/Siemens communication card and Phoenix Digital optical communications modules. Communication is achieved via the TIWAY (Texas Instruments protocol link utilizing both fiber optic communications and a copper local area network (LAN). Hardware and software capabilities will be reviewed. Data and alarm reporting, extended monitoring and control capabilities will also be discussed

  11. Customizing graphical user interface technology for spacecraft control centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Edward; Giancola, Peter; Gibson, Steven; Mahmot, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    The Transportable Payload Operations Control Center (TPOCC) project is applying the latest in graphical user interface technology to the spacecraft control center environment. This project of the Mission Operations Division's (MOD) Control Center Systems Branch (CCSB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed an architecture for control centers which makes use of a distributed processing approach and the latest in Unix workstation technology. The TPOCC project is committed to following industry standards and using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components wherever possible to reduce development costs and to improve operational support. TPOCC's most successful use of commercial software products and standards has been in the development of its graphical user interface. This paper describes TPOCC's successful use and customization of four separate layers of commercial software products to create a flexible and powerful user interface that is uniquely suited to spacecraft monitoring and control.

  12. ConductHome: Gesture Interface Control of Home Automation Boxes

    OpenAIRE

    J. Branstett; V. Gagneux; A. Leleu; B. Levadoux; J. Pascale

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the interface ConductHome which controls home automation systems with a Leap Motion using "invariant gesture protocols". This interface is meant to simplify the interaction of the user with its environment. A hardware part allows the Leap Motion to be carried around the house. A software part interacts with the home automation box and displays the useful information for the user. An objective of this work is the development of a natural/invariant/simpl...

  13. Biomechanical ordering and buckling due to microbial growth confined at oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria are unicellular organisms that often exist as densely populated, surface-associated communities. Bacteria are also environmental colloids and spontaneously attach and self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present results on the growth dynamics of individual rod-shaped bacteria confined to finite oil-water interfaces of varying curvature. Through experiments using microfluidic chambers and time-lapse microscopy, we study the formation of macroscopic structures observed as adsorbed bacteria grow, divide, and self-assemble in a nematic phase due to biomechanical interactions. The continued growth at the interface leads to a jammed monolayer of cells, which then causes the interface to buckle and undergo large deformations including wrinkling and tubulation. These observations highlight the interplay between physical environment, such as confinement and interface curvature, and active biological processes, such as growth, at the scale of individual agents and shape our understanding of macroscale processes such as microbial degradation of oil in the ocean.

  14. Crack Growth along Interfaces in Porous Ceramic Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    Crack growth along porous ceramic layers was studied experimentally. Double cantilever beam sandwich specimens were loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope enabling in situ observations...

  15. Internet remote control interface for a multipurpose robotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Dunnigan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Internet remote control interface for a MITSUBISHI PA10-6CE manipulator established for the purpose of the ROBOT museum exhibition during spring and summer 2004. The robotic manipulator is a part of the Intelligent Robotic Systems Laboratory at Heriot ? Watt University, which has been established to work on dynamic and kinematic aspects of manipulator control in the presence of environmental disturbances. The laboratory has been enriched by a simple vision system consisting of three web-cameras to broadcast the live images of the robots over the Internet. The Interface comprises of the TCP/IP server providing command parsing and execution using the open controller architecture of the manipulator and a client Java applet web-site providing a simple robot control interface.

  16. Speech control interface for Eurocontrol’s LINK2000+ system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Cristian ION

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues recent research of the authors, considering the use of speech recognition in air traffic control. It proposes the use of a voice control interface for Eurocontrol’s LINK2000+ system, offering an alternative means to improve air transport safety and efficiency.

  17. Tangible interfaces for virtual nuclear power plant control desk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Lapa, Celso M.F. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nomiya, Diogo [Engenharia Eletrica (UFRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cunha, Gerson G.; Landau, Luiz [Programa de Engenharia Civil (PEC/COPPE/UFRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Due to the high safety requirements for nuclear power plant operation, control desks must be designed in such a way operators can take all the procedures safely, with a good overview of all variable indicators and easy access to actuator controls. Also, operators must see alarms indication in a way they can easily identify any abnormal conditions and bring the NPP back to normal operation. The ergonomics and human factors fields have helped evaluations to improve the design of nuclear power plant control systems. Lately, the use of virtual control desks have helped even more such evaluations, by integrating in one platform both nuclear power plant dynamics simulator with a high visual fidelity control desk proto typing. Operators can interact with these virtual control desks in a similar way as with real ones. Such a virtual control desk has been under development at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, IEN/CNEN. This paper reports the latest improvements, with the use of more interaction modes, to turn operation a friendlier task. An automatic speech recognition interface has been implemented as a self-contained system, by accessing directly MS Windows Application Interface, and with online neural network training for spoken commend recognition. Thus, operators can switch among different desk views. Besides this, head tracking interfaces have been integrated with the virtual control desk, to move within desk views according to users head movements. Both marker and markerless-based head tracking interfaces have been implemented. Results are shown and commented. (author)

  18. Tangible interfaces for virtual nuclear power plant control desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Nomiya, Diogo; Cunha, Gerson G.; Landau, Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Due to the high safety requirements for nuclear power plant operation, control desks must be designed in such a way operators can take all the procedures safely, with a good overview of all variable indicators and easy access to actuator controls. Also, operators must see alarms indication in a way they can easily identify any abnormal conditions and bring the NPP back to normal operation. The ergonomics and human factors fields have helped evaluations to improve the design of nuclear power plant control systems. Lately, the use of virtual control desks have helped even more such evaluations, by integrating in one platform both nuclear power plant dynamics simulator with a high visual fidelity control desk proto typing. Operators can interact with these virtual control desks in a similar way as with real ones. Such a virtual control desk has been under development at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, IEN/CNEN. This paper reports the latest improvements, with the use of more interaction modes, to turn operation a friendlier task. An automatic speech recognition interface has been implemented as a self-contained system, by accessing directly MS Windows Application Interface, and with online neural network training for spoken commend recognition. Thus, operators can switch among different desk views. Besides this, head tracking interfaces have been integrated with the virtual control desk, to move within desk views according to users head movements. Both marker and markerless-based head tracking interfaces have been implemented. Results are shown and commented. (author)

  19. Frequency Adaptability of Harmonics Controllers for Grid-Interfaced Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Zhou, Keliang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    sensitivity of the most popular harmonic controllers for grid-interfaced converters. The frequency adaptability of these harmonic controllers is evaluated in the presence of a variable grid frequency within a specified reasonable range, e.g., +-1% of the nominal grid frequency (50 Hz). Solutions...

  20. Mobile Interfaces for Building Control Surveyors

    OpenAIRE

    Chmielewski , Jacek; Walczak , Krzysztof; Wiza , Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The problem of integrating heterogeneous back-end platforms used in public administration has been widely addressed in a number of research and development projects. In such a complex and heterogeneous environment, application of the SOA paradigm can be particularly beneficial. However, in some application domains - such as the Building Control Administration - there is an additional requirement: integration of heterogeneous front-end platforms - including access throu...

  1. Effect of anisotropic plasticity on mixed mode interface crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2007-01-01

    different anisotropic yield criteria to account for the plastic anisotropy. Conditions of small-scale yielding are assumed, and due to the mismatch of elastic properties across the interface the corresponding oscillating stress singularity field is applied as boundary conditions on the outer edge...

  2. A graphical user-interface control system at SRRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.S.; Wang, C.J.; Chen, S.J.; Jan, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    A graphical user interface control system of 1.3 GeV synchrotron radiation light source was designed and implemented for the beam transport line (BTL) and storage ring (SR). A modern control technique has been used to implement and control the third generation synchrotron light source. Two level computer hardware configuration, that includes process and console computers as a top level and VME based intelligent local controller as a bottom level, was setup and tested. Both level computers are linked by high speed Ethernet data communication network. A database includes static and dynamic databases as well as access routines were developed. In order to commission and operate the machine friendly, the graphical man machine interface was designed and coded. The graphical user interface (GUI) software was installed on VAX workstations for the BTL and SR at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC). The over all performance has been evaluated at 10Hz update rate. The results showed that the graphical operator interface control system is versatile system and can be implemented into the control system of the accelerator. It will provide the tool to control and monitor the equipments of the radiation light source especially for machine commissioning and operation

  3. Biomechatronics in medical rehabilitation biomodelling, interface, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Shane (S Q )

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the key technologies in developing biomechatronic systems for medical rehabilitation purposes. It includes a detailed analysis of biosignal processing, biomechanics modelling, neural and muscular interfaces, artificial actuators, robot-assisted training, clinical setup/implementation and rehabilitation robot control. Encompassing highly multidisciplinary themes in the engineering and medical fields, it presents researchers’ insights into the emerging technologies and developments that are being utilized in biomechatronics for medical purposes. Presenting a detailed analysis of five key areas in rehabilitation robotics: (i) biosignal processing; (ii) biomechanics modelling; (iii) neural and muscular interfaces; (iv) artificial actuators and devices; and (v) the use of neurological and muscular interfaces in rehabilitation robots control, the book describes the design of biomechatronic systems, the methods and control systems used and the implementation and testing in order to show how th...

  4. Operator interface to the ORIC control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludemann, C.A.; Casstevens, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) was built in the early 1960s with a hard-wired manual control system. Presently, it serves as a variable-energy heavy-ion cyclotron with an internal ion source, or as an energy booster for the new 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator of the Holifield Heavy Ion Facility. One factor which has kept the cyclotron the productive research tool it is today is the gradual transfer of its control functions to a computer-based system beginning in the 1970s. This particular placement of a computer between an accelerator and its operators afforded some unique challenges and opportunities that would not be encountered today. Historically, the transformation began at a time when computers were just beginning to gain acceptance as reliable operational tools. Veteran operators with tens of years of accelerator experience justifiably expressed skepticism that this improvement would aid them, particularly if they had to re-learn how to operate the machine. The confidence of the operators was gained when they realized that one of the primary principles of ergonomics was being upheld. The computer software and hardware was being designed to serve them and not the computer

  5. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1639-1658 ISSN 0951-7715 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Cahn-Hilliard equation * Darcy law * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6063/meta

  6. Digital quality control of the camera computer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description is given of how the gamma camera-computer interface works and what kind of errors can occur. Quality control tests of the interface are then described which include 1) tests of static performance e.g. uniformity, linearity, 2) tests of dynamic performance e.g. basic timing, interface count-rate, system count-rate, 3) tests of special functions e.g. gated acquisition, 4) tests of the gamma camera head, and 5) tests of the computer software. The tests described are mainly acceptance and routine tests. Many of the tests discussed are those recommended by an IAEA Advisory Group for inclusion in the IAEA control schedules for nuclear medicine instrumentation. (U.K.)

  7. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  8. PMAnalyzer: a new web interface for bacterial growth curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Daniel A; Edwards, Robert A

    2017-06-15

    Bacterial growth curves are essential representations for characterizing bacteria metabolism within a variety of media compositions. Using high-throughput, spectrophotometers capable of processing tens of 96-well plates, quantitative phenotypic information can be easily integrated into the current data structures that describe a bacterial organism. The PMAnalyzer pipeline performs a growth curve analysis to parameterize the unique features occurring within microtiter wells containing specific growth media sources. We have expanded the pipeline capabilities and provide a user-friendly, online implementation of this automated pipeline. PMAnalyzer version 2.0 provides fast automatic growth curve parameter analysis, growth identification and high resolution figures of sample-replicate growth curves and several statistical analyses. PMAnalyzer v2.0 can be found at https://edwards.sdsu.edu/pmanalyzer/ . Source code for the pipeline can be found on GitHub at https://github.com/dacuevas/PMAnalyzer . Source code for the online implementation can be found on GitHub at https://github.com/dacuevas/PMAnalyzerWeb . dcuevas08@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Effect of T-stress on crack growth along an interface between ductile and elastic solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2003-01-01

    For crack growth along an interface joining an elastic-plastic solid to an elastic substrate the effect of a non-singular stress component in the crack growth direction in the elastic-plastic solid is investigated. Conditions of small scale yielding are assumed, and due to the mismatch of elastic...

  10. Microprocessor controlled dual parameter ADC system with a CAMAC interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D G; Nickell, Jr, J D [Los Alamos Scientific Lab., NM (USA)

    1978-09-01

    Presented here is the design of a dual parameter ADC system which is controlled by a microprocessor and also interfaced to CAMAC. The system was designed to be mobile in that it may work wherever there is a CAMAC crate. In such cases where the CAMAC system is inoperative, the system may operate in a stand-alone mode.

  11. Concepts of analytical user interface evaluation method for continuous work in NPP main control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. J.; Heo, G. Y.; Jang, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual study of analytical evaluation method for computer-based user interface in the main control room of advanced nuclear power plant. User interfaces can classify them into two groups as static interface and dynamic interface. Existing evaluation and design methods of user interface have been mainly performed for the static user interface. But, it is useful for the dynamic user interface to control the complex system, and proper evaluation method for this is seldom. Therefore an evaluation method for dynamic user interface is proper for continuous works by standards of the load of cognition and the similarity of an interface

  12. EPICS-QT based graphical user interface for accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.; Singh, S.K.; Rosily, Sherry; Bhagwat, P.V.

    2016-01-01

    Particle accelerators and many industrial complex systems, require a robust and efficient control for its proper operation to achieve required beam quality, safety of its sub component and all working personnel. This control is executed via a graphical user interface through which an operator interacts with the accelerator to achieve the desired state of the machine and its output. Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is a widely used control system framework in the field of accelerator control. It acts as a middle layer between field devices and graphic user interface used by the operator. Field devices can also be made EPICS compliant by using EPICS based software in that. On the other hand Qt is a C++ framework which is widely used for creating very professional looking and user friendly graphical component. In Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), which is the first stage of the three stage Accelerator Driven System (ADS) program taken by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), it is decided that EPICS will be used for controlling the accelerator and Qt will be used for developing the various Graphic User Interface (GUI) for operation and diagnostics. This paper discuss the work carried out to achieve this goal in LEHIPA

  13. A sharp interface model for void growth in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochrainer, Thomas; El-Azab, Anter

    2015-03-01

    A thermodynamic formalism for the interaction of point defects with free surfaces in single-component solids has been developed and applied to the problem of void growth by absorption of point defects in irradiated metals. This formalism consists of two parts, a detailed description of the dynamics of defects within the non-equilibrium thermodynamic frame, and the application of the second law of thermodynamics to provide closure relations for all kinetic equations. Enforcing the principle of non-negative entropy production showed that the description of the problem of void evolution under irradiation must include a relationship between the normal fluxes of defects into the void surface and the driving thermodynamic forces for the void surface motion; these thermodynamic forces are identified for both vacancies and interstitials and the relationships between these forces and the normal point defect fluxes are established using the concepts of transition state theory. The latter theory implies that the defect accommodation into the surface is a thermally activated process. Numerical examples are given to illustrate void growth dynamics in this new formalism and to investigate the effect of the surface energy barriers on void growth. Consequences for phase field models of void growth are discussed.

  14. Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET) Interface Control Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Shon R.

    2017-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) documents the airspace adaptation and air traffic inputs of NASA's Future ATM Concepts and Evaluation Tool (FACET). Its intended audience is the project manager, project team, development team, and stakeholders interested in interfacing with the system. FACET equips Air Traffic Management (ATM) researchers and service providers with a way to explore, develop and evaluate advanced air transportation concepts before they are field-tested and eventually deployed. FACET is a flexible software tool that is capable of quickly generating and analyzing thousands of aircraft trajectories. It provides researchers with a simulation environment for preliminary testing of advanced ATM concepts. Using aircraft performance profiles, airspace models, weather data, and flight schedules, the tool models trajectories for the climb, cruise, and descent phases of flight for each type of aircraft. An advanced graphical interface displays traffic patterns in two and three dimensions, under various current and projected conditions for specific airspace regions or over the entire continental United States. The system is able to simulate a full day's dynamic national airspace system (NAS) operations, model system uncertainty, measure the impact of different decision-makers in the NAS, and provide analysis of the results in graphical form, including sector, airport, fix, and airway usage statistics. NASA researchers test and analyze the system-wide impact of new traffic flow management algorithms under anticipated air traffic growth projections on the nation's air traffic system. In addition to modeling the airspace system for NASA research, FACET has also successfully transitioned into a valuable tool for operational use. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) traffic flow managers and commercial airline dispatchers have used FACET technology for real-time operations planning. FACET integrates live air traffic data from FAA radar systems and weather data

  15. General man-machine interface used in accelerators controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutheon, M.; Di Maio, F.; Pace, A.

    1992-01-01

    A large community is now using Workstations as Accelerators Computer Controls Interface, through the concepts of windows - menus - synoptics - icons. Some standards were established for the CERN-PS control systems rejuvenation. The Booster-to-PS transfer and injection process is now entirely operated with these tools. This application constitutes a global environment providing the users with the controls, analysis, visualization of a part of an accelerator. Individual commands, measurements, and specialized programs including complex treatments are available in a homogeneous frame. Some months of experience in current operation have shown that this model can be extended to the whole project. (author)

  16. Control of a mobile robot through brain computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Jimenez Moreno

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper poses a control interface to command the movement of a mobile robot according to signals captured from the user's brain. These signals are acquired and interpreted by Emotiv EPOC device, a 14-electrode type sensor which captures electroencephalographic (EEG signals with high resolution, which, in turn, are sent to a computer for processing. One brain-computer interface (BCI was developed based on the Emotiv software and SDK in order to command the mobile robot from a distance. Functionality tests are performed with the sensor to discriminate shift intentions of a user group, as well as with a fuzzy controller to hold the direction in case of concentration loss. As conclusion, it was possible to obtain an efficient system for robot movements by brain commands.

  17. Optimized controllers for enhancing dynamic performance of PV interface system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Attia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic performance of PV interface system can be improved by optimizing the gains of the Proportional–Integral (PI controller. In this work, gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm are utilized to optimal tuning of PI controller gains. Performance comparison between the PV system with optimized PI gains utilizing different techniques are carried out. Finally, the dynamic behavior of the system is studied under hypothetical sudden variations in irradiance. The examination of the proposed techniques for optimal tuning of PI gains is conducted using MATLAB/SIMULINK software package. The main contribution of this work is investigating the dynamic performance of PV interfacing system with application of gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm for optimal PI parameters tuning. Keywords: Photovoltaic power systems, Gravitational search algorithm, Harmony search algorithm, Genetic algorithm, Artificial intelligence

  18. User Control Interface for W7-X Plasma Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spring, A.; Laqua, H.; Schacht, J.

    2006-01-01

    The WENDELSTEIN 7-X fusion experiment will be a highly complex device operated by a likewise complex control system. The fundamental configuration of the W7-X control system follows two major design principles: It reflects the strict hierarchy of the machine set-up with a set of subordinated components, which in turn can be run autonomously during commissioning and testing. Secondly, it links the basic machine operation (mainly given by the infrastructure status and the components readiness) and the physics program execution (i.e. plasma operation) on each hierarchy level and on different time scales. The complexity of the control system implies great demands on appropriate user interfaces: specialized tools for specific control tasks allowing a dedicated view on the subject to be controlled, hiding complexity wherever possible and reasonable, providing similar operation methods on each hierarchy level and both manual interaction possibilities and a high degree of intelligent automation. The contribution will describe the operation interface for experiment control including the necessary links to the machine operation. The users of ' Xcontrol ' will be both the W7-X session leaders during plasma discharge experiments and the components' or diagnostics' operators during autonomous mode or even laboratory experiments. The main ' Xcontrol ' features, such as program composition and validation, manual and automatic control instruments, resource survey, and process monitoring, will be presented. The implementation principles and the underlying communication will be discussed. (author)

  19. Interface-Limited Spherulitic Growth of Hydroxyapatite/Chondroitin Sulfate Composite Enamel-like Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guobin; Xu, Yifei; Wang, Xiyan; Wang, Mu

    2012-02-01

    Understanding and mimicking the growth of hard tissues such as tooth enamel may lead to innovative approaches toward engineering novel functional materials and providing new therapeutics. Up to now, in vitro growth of enamel-like materials is still a great challenge, and the microscopic formation mechanisms are far from well understood. Here we report synthesis of large-scale hydroxyapatite (HAP) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) composite films by an efficient solution-air interface growth method. The products have the characteristic hierarchical prism structures of enamel and the mechanical properties comparable to dentin. We demonstrate that the films are assembled by spherulites nucleated at the solution surface. The growth of the spherulites is limited by the interfaces between them as well as between the solution and air, leading to the ordered prism structure. The results are beneficial for a clearer understanding of the fundamentals of tooth enamel formation.

  20. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  1. Hardware interface unit for control of shuttle RMS vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Thomas S.; Hansen, Joseph M.; Manouchehri, Davoud; Forouhar, Kamran

    1994-01-01

    Vibration of the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) increases the time for task completion and reduces task safety for manipulator-assisted operations. If the dynamics of the manipulator and the payload can be physically isolated, performance should improve. Rockwell has developed a self contained hardware unit which interfaces between a manipulator arm and payload. The End Point Control Unit (EPCU) is built and is being tested at Rockwell and at the Langley/Marshall Coupled, Multibody Spacecraft Control Research Facility in NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  2. New kind of user interface for controlling MFTF diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.G.; Saroyan, R.A.; Mead, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is faced with the problem of controlling a multitude of plasma diagnostics instruments from a central, multiprocessor computer facility. A 16-bit microprocessor-based workstation allows each physicist entree into the central multiprocessor, which consists of nine Perkin-Elmer 32-bit minicomputers. The workstation provides the user interface to the larger system, with display graphics, windowing, and a physics notebook. Controlling a diagnostic is now equivalent to making entries into a traditional physics notebook

  3. A new kind of user interface for controlling MFTF diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.; Mead, J.; Saroyan, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is faced with the problem of controlling a multitude of plasma diagnostics instruments from a central, multiprocessor computer facility. A 16-bit microprocessor-based workstation allows each physicist entree into the central multiprocessor, which consists of nine Perkin-Elmer 32-bit minicomputers. The workstation provides the user interface to the larger system, with display graphics, windowing, and a physics notebook. Controlling a diagnostic is now equivalent to making entries into a traditional physics notebook

  4. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi M El-Helw

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB converter for Photovoltaic (PV arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system.

  5. The CERN PS/SL Controls Java Application Programming Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I. Deloose; J. Cuperus; P. Charrue; F. DiMaio; K. Kostro; M. Vanden Eynden; W. Watson

    1999-01-01

    The PS/SL Convergence Project was launched in March 1998. Its objective is to deliver a common control as infrastructure for the CERN accelerators by year 2001. In the framework of this convergence activity, a project was launched to develop a Java Application Programming Interface (API) between programs written in the Java language and the PS and SL accelerator equipment. This Java API was specified and developed in collaboration with TJNAF. It is based on the Java CDEV [1] package that has been extended in order to end up with a CERN/TJNAF common product. It implements a detailed model composed of devices organized in named classes that provide a property-based interface. It supports data subscription and introspection facilities. The device model is presented and the capabilities of the API are described with syntax examples. The software architecture is also described

  6. Optical label-controlled transparent metro-access network interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich

    This thesis presents results obtained during the course of my PhD research on optical signal routing and interfacing between the metropolitan and access segments of optical networks. Due to both increasing capacity demands and variety of emerging services types, new technological challenges...... control. Highlights of my research include my proposal and experimental proof of principle of an optical coherent detection based optical access network architecture providing support for a large number of users over a single distribution fiber; a spectral amplitude encoded label detection technique...... are arising for seamlessly interfacing metropolitan and access networks. Therefore, in this PhD project, I have analyzed those technological challenges and identified the key aspects to be addressed. I have also proposed and experimentally verified a number of solutions to metropolitan and access networks...

  7. Weakly nonlinear incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth at cylindrically convergent interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; He, X. T.; Wu, J. F.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ye, W. H.

    2013-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear (WN) model has been developed for the incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in cylindrical geometry. The transition from linear to nonlinear growth is analytically investigated via a third-order solutions for the cylindrical RTI initiated by a single-mode velocity perturbation. The third-order solutions can depict the early stage of the interface asymmetry due to the bubble-spike formation, as well as the saturation of the linear (exponential) growth of the fundamental mode. The WN results in planar RTI [Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 112706 (2012)] are recovered in the limit of high-mode number perturbations. The difference between the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry and in planar geometry is discussed. It is found that the interface of the inward (outward) development spike/bubble is extruded (stretched) by the additional inertial force in cylindrical geometry compared with that in planar geometry. For interfaces with small density ratios, the inward growth bubble can grow fast than the outward growth spike in cylindrical RTI. Moreover, a reduced formula is proposed to describe the WN growth of the RTI in cylindrical geometry with an acceptable precision, especially for small-amplitude perturbations. Using the reduced formula, the nonlinear saturation amplitude of the fundamental mode and the phases of the Fourier harmonics are studied. Thus, it should be included in applications where converging geometry effects play an important role, such as the supernova explosions and inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  8. Region based Brain Computer Interface for a home control application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman Aydin, Eda; Bay, Omer Faruk; Guler, Inan

    2015-08-01

    Environment control is one of the important challenges for disabled people who suffer from neuromuscular diseases. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) provides a communication channel between the human brain and the environment without requiring any muscular activation. The most important expectation for a home control application is high accuracy and reliable control. Region-based paradigm is a stimulus paradigm based on oddball principle and requires selection of a target at two levels. This paper presents an application of region based paradigm for a smart home control application for people with neuromuscular diseases. In this study, a region based stimulus interface containing 49 commands was designed. Five non-disabled subjects were attended to the experiments. Offline analysis results of the experiments yielded 95% accuracy for five flashes. This result showed that region based paradigm can be used to select commands of a smart home control application with high accuracy in the low number of repetitions successfully. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference was not observed between the level accuracies.

  9. Neural growth into a microchannel network: towards a regenerative neural interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, P.A.; Wiertz, Remy; le Feber, Jakob; Rutten, Wim

    2009-01-01

    We propose and validated a design for a highly selective 'endcap' regenerative neural interface towards a neuroprosthesis. In vitro studies using rat cortical neurons determine if a branching microchannel structure can counter fasciculated growth and cause neurites to separte from one another,

  10. In situ study of electric field controlled ion transport in the Fe/BaTiO3 interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkel, D. G.; Bessas, D.; Bazso, G.

    2018-01-01

    Electric field controlled ion transport and interface formation of iron thin films on a BaTiO3 substrate have been investigated by in situ nuclear resonance scattering and x-ray reflectometry techniques. At early stage of deposition, an iron-II oxide interface layer was observed. The hyperfine...... parameters of the interface layer were found insensitive to the evaporated layer thickness. When an electric field was applied during growth, a 10 angstrom increase of the nonmagnetic/magnetic thickness threshold and an extended magnetic transition region was measured compared to the case where no field...... was applied. The interface layer was found stable under this threshold when further evaporation occurred, contrary to the magnetic layer where the magnitude and orientation of the hyperfine magnetic field vary continuously. The obtained results of the growth mechanism and of the electric field effect...

  11. Programmable logic controller optical fibre sensor interface module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-12-01

    Most automated industrial processes use Distributed Control Systems (DCSs) or Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for automated control. PLCs tend to be more common as they have much of the functionality of DCSs, although they are generally cheaper to install and maintain. PLCs in conjunction with a human machine interface form the basis of Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, combined with communication infrastructure and Remote Terminal Units (RTUs). RTU's basically convert different sensor measurands in to digital data that is sent back to the PLC or supervisory system. Optical fibre sensors are becoming more common in industrial processes because of their many advantageous properties. Being small, lightweight, highly sensitive, and immune to electromagnetic interference, means they are an ideal solution for a variety of diverse sensing applications. Here, we have developed a PLC Optical Fibre Sensor Interface Module (OFSIM), in which an optical fibre is connected directly to the OFSIM located next to the PLC. The embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors, are highly sensitive and can detect a number of different measurands such as temperature, pressure and strain without the need for a power supply.

  12. Electromagnetic control of mass transfer at liquid/liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadi, B.

    2006-04-01

    Most metallurgical processes, such as steel refining or nuclear waste processing; the interfaces between two liquid phases are the regions of mass transfer. These transfers require the implementation of a means of stirring to accelerate the kinetics of the pollutants transfer between both phases. This thesis deals with the use of the electromagnetic forces to stir, without any material contact, the bath core and the interface in order to control or even increase the kinetic transfers. To achieve this, two complementary experimental installations were used. The first experiment allows the measurement of the Indium transfer, initially dissolved in mercury towards a covering electrolyte layer and the velocity field in mercury. The performed experiments, determine the topology of the fields flows speeds in the mercury bath, moreover the behaviour of the transfer kinetics versus the intensity of the magnetic field are established. This evolution is correlated with the dynamic behaviour of the mercury surface. The second installation allows the characterization of an element transfer (Pb, Zr or Ce) initially contained in a fluorinated salt towards an antimony matrix containing lithium. It appears that all transfers kinetics are very fast. The proposed experimental set-up is particularly efficient for Cerium transfer (limited by the interface) but does not present any action for Zirconium transfer. (author)

  13. A brain-computer interface controlled mail client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Wang, Cong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a brain-computer interface (BCI) based mail client. This system is controlled by hybrid features extracted from scalp-recorded electroencephalographic (EEG). We emulate the computer mouse by the motor imagery-based mu rhythm and the P300 potential. Furthermore, an adaptive P300 speller is included to provide text input function. With this BCI mail client, users can receive, read, write mails, as well as attach files in mail writing. The system has been tested on 3 subjects. Experimental results show that mail communication with this system is feasible.

  14. Preliminary Specifications for the PS Transverse Damper Control Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, A

    2003-01-01

    The transverse feedback system foreseen for the PS in 2004 is composed of different units to be remotely controlled and monitored: the pick-up amplifiers, the DSPU, the fine delay, the driver and power amplifiers. A special VME unit being dedicated to the pick-up amplifier ("The VMOD-TRX: a device for communication with remote instrumentation", A. Barreira Sevillano, J. Belleman, PS/BD/Note 96-02), the new interface will have to deal with the remaining parts of the loop.

  15. Passive wireless tags for tongue controlled assistive technology interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakibet, Osman O.; Horne, Robert J.; Kelly, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Tongue control with low profile, passive mouth tags is demonstrated as a human–device interface by communicating values of tongue-tag separation over a wireless link. Confusion matrices are provided to demonstrate user accuracy in targeting by tongue position. Accuracy is found to increase dramatically after short training sequences with errors falling close to 1% in magnitude with zero missed targets. The rate at which users are able to learn accurate targeting with high accuracy indicates that this is an intuitive device to operate. The significance of the work is that innovative very unobtrusive, wireless tags can be used to provide intuitive human–computer interfaces based on low cost and disposable mouth mounted technology. With the development of an appropriate reading system, control of assistive devices such as computer mice or wheelchairs could be possible for tetraplegics and others who retain fine motor control capability of their tongues. The tags contain no battery and are intended to fit directly on the hard palate, detecting tongue position in the mouth with no need for tongue piercings. PMID:27222736

  16. Control system user interface for accelerator commissioning and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrott, D.; Keeley, D.; Kolte, G.; Mikic, Z.; Lee, M.; Corbett, J.; Howry, S.; King, A.

    1991-01-01

    An Interactive Accelerator Interface Module (AIM) has been developed in a workstation environment for the purposes of assisting in the commissioning and operation of any storage ring/collider system. The function of AIM is to integrate modeling and simulation codes into accelerator and beamline control systems for the purpose of rapid on-line data analysis and error-correction, resulting in significant time-saving. A system dependent module provides for the translation of specific control system data files to appropriate input format for application programs within AIM. Interactive screen graphics, including system function diagrams, menus, beamline element status and update information are standard in AIM. AIM is currently connected to the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) control system, but is easily transportable to other facilities. This paper describes the development of AIM and its applications on SLC

  17. Accelerator-control-system interface for intelligent power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.

    1992-01-01

    A number of high-current high-precision magnet power supplies have been installed at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accelerator Complex. The units replace existing supplies, powering large dipole magnets in the ring. These bending magnets require a high-current supply that is precise and stable. The control and interface design for these power supplies represents a departure from all others on-site. The supplies have sophisticated microprocessor control on-board and communicate with the accelerator control system via RS-422 (serial communications). The units, built by Alpha Scientific Electronics, Hayward, CA use a high-level ASCII control protocol. The low-level ''front-end'' software used by the accelerator control system has been written to accommodate these new devices. They communicate with the control system through a terminal server port connected to the site-wide ethernet backbone. Details of the software implementation for the analog and digital control of the supplies through the accelerator control system will be presented

  18. User Interface Developed for Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, in conjunction with the University of Akron, is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a cross-discipline "bridge" between controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technologies. Traditionally, the controls analyst has used simulations based on large lumping techniques to generate low-order linear models convenient for designing propulsion system controls. For complex, high-speed vehicles such as the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), simulations based on CFD methods are required to capture the relevant flow physics. The use of CFD should also help reduce the development time and costs associated with experimentally tuning the control system. The initial application for this research is the High Speed Civil Transport inlet control problem. A major aspect of this research is the development of a controls/CFD interface for non-CFD experts, to facilitate the interactive operation of CFD simulations and the extraction of reduced-order, time-accurate models from CFD results. A distributed computing approach for implementing the interface is being explored. Software being developed as part of the Integrated CFD and Experiments (ICE) project provides the basis for the operating environment, including run-time displays and information (data base) management. Message-passing software is used to communicate between the ICE system and the CFD simulation, which can reside on distributed, parallel computing systems. Initially, the one-dimensional Large-Perturbation Inlet (LAPIN) code is being used to simulate a High Speed Civil Transport type inlet. LAPIN can model real supersonic inlet features, including bleeds, bypasses, and variable geometry, such as translating or variable-ramp-angle centerbodies. Work is in progress to use parallel versions of the multidimensional NPARC code.

  19. Interfacing VPSC with finite element codes. Demonstration of irradiation growth simulation in a cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-23

    This Milestone report shows good progress in interfacing VPSC with the FE codes ABAQUS and MOOSE, to perform component-level simulations of irradiation-induced deformation in Zirconium alloys. In this preliminary application, we have performed an irradiation growth simulation in the quarter geometry of a cladding tube. We have benchmarked VPSC-ABAQUS and VPSC-MOOSE predictions with VPSC-SA predictions to verify the accuracy of the VPSCFE interface. Predictions from the FE simulations are in general agreement with VPSC-SA simulations and also with experimental trends.

  20. Wearable wireless User Interface Cursor-Controller (UIC-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Nicholas; Kerr, Kevin; Aranda, Ricardo; Hickey, Richard; Esmailbeigi, Hananeh

    2017-07-01

    Controlling a computer or a smartphone's cursor allows the user to access a world full of information. For millions of people with limited upper extremities motor function, controlling the cursor becomes profoundly difficult. Our team has developed the User Interface Cursor-Controller (UIC-C) to assist the impaired individuals in regaining control over the cursor. The UIC-C is a hands-free device that utilizes the tongue muscle to control the cursor movements. The entire device is housed inside a subject specific retainer. The user maneuvers the cursor by manipulating a joystick imbedded inside the retainer via their tongue. The joystick movement commands are sent to an electronic device via a Bluetooth connection. The device is readily recognizable as a cursor controller by any Bluetooth enabled electronic device. The device testing results have shown that the time it takes the user to control the cursor accurately via the UIC-C is about three times longer than a standard computer mouse controlled via the hand. The device does not require any permanent modifications to the body; therefore, it could be used during the period of acute rehabilitation of the hands. With the development of modern smart homes, and enhancement electronics controlled by the computer, UIC-C could be integrated into a system that enables individuals with permanent impairment, the ability to control the cursor. In conclusion, the UIC-C device is designed with the goal of allowing the user to accurately control a cursor during the periods of either acute or permanent upper extremities impairment.

  1. Quality control of the gamma camera/computer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busemann-Sokole, E.

    1983-01-01

    Reporting on the conference mentioned, the author indicates that technical inspection of the gamma camera and the attached computer each by themselves is not sufficient. The parts of the interface and the hardware or software can contain sources of error. In order to obtain the best diagnostic image a number of control measurements are recommended dealing with image intensifying, intensifier offset, linearity of transformation, exclusion of 'data drop' or 'bit drop', 2-pulse timing, correct response with different counting rates, and response to triggers (electrocardiogram). The last and most important recommendation is to record in writing particulars of each inspection and control measurement, particulars and solutions of problems and modifications in hardware and software. (Auth.)

  2. Strategies to engineer tendon/ligament-to-bone interface: Biomaterials, cells and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Tellado, Sonia; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-11-01

    Integration between tendon/ligament and bone occurs through a specialized tissue interface called enthesis. The complex and heterogeneous structure of the enthesis is essential to ensure smooth mechanical stress transfer between bone and soft tissues. Following injury, the interface is not regenerated, resulting in high rupture recurrence rates. Tissue engineering is a promising strategy for the regeneration of a functional enthesis. However, the complex structural and cellular composition of the native interface makes enthesis tissue engineering particularly challenging. Thus, it is likely that a combination of biomaterials and cells stimulated with appropriate biochemical and mechanical cues will be needed. The objective of this review is to describe the current state-of-the-art, challenges and future directions in the field of enthesis tissue engineering focusing on four key parameters: (1) scaffold and biomaterials, (2) cells, (3) growth factors and (4) mechanical stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Planning instruments to control urban growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2010-01-01

    It is challenging to plan and control urban development in peri-urban areas. But if no planning is done, the result will often be unsustainable, including widespread, dispersed and uncoordinated urban growth. Spatial planning based on zoning remains the most important planning instrument and its...... success depend on regional coordination. Incentive based instruments may contrbute to growth management, but only few examples are available and their effects on urban growth patterns yet to be seen....

  4. Rapid growth of the US wildland-urban interface raises wildfire risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker C. Radeloff; David P. Helmers; H. Anu Kramer; Miranda H. Mockrin; Patricia M. Alexandre; Avi Bar-Massada; Van Butsic; Todd J. Hawbaker; Sebastián Martinuzzi; Alexandra D. Syphard; Susan I. Stewart

    2018-01-01

    The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the area where houses and wildland vegetation meet or intermingle, and where wildfire problems are most pronounced. Here we report that the WUI in the United States grew rapidly from 1990 to 2010 in terms of both number of new houses (from 30.8 to 43.4 million; 41% growth) and land area (from 581,000 to 770,000 km2...

  5. Interface crack growth for anisotropic plasticity with non-normality effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2007-01-01

    A plasticity model with a non-normality plastic flow rule is used to analyze crack growth along an interface between a solid with plastic anisotropy and an elastic substrate. The fracture process is represented in terms of a traction-separation law specified on the crack plane. A phenomenological...... an oscillating stress singularity, and with conditions of small scale yielding this solution is applied as boundary conditions on the outer edge of the region analyzed. Crack growth resistance curves are calculated numerically, and the effect of the near-tip mode mixity on the steady-state fracture toughness...

  6. Rapid growth of the US wildland-urban interface raises wildfire risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeloff, Volker C; Helmers, David P; Kramer, H Anu; Mockrin, Miranda H; Alexandre, Patricia M; Bar-Massada, Avi; Butsic, Van; Hawbaker, Todd J; Martinuzzi, Sebastián; Syphard, Alexandra D; Stewart, Susan I

    2018-03-27

    The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the area where houses and wildland vegetation meet or intermingle, and where wildfire problems are most pronounced. Here we report that the WUI in the United States grew rapidly from 1990 to 2010 in terms of both number of new houses (from 30.8 to 43.4 million; 41% growth) and land area (from 581,000 to 770,000 km 2 ; 33% growth), making it the fastest-growing land use type in the conterminous United States. The vast majority of new WUI areas were the result of new housing (97%), not related to an increase in wildland vegetation. Within the perimeter of recent wildfires (1990-2015), there were 286,000 houses in 2010, compared with 177,000 in 1990. Furthermore, WUI growth often results in more wildfire ignitions, putting more lives and houses at risk. Wildfire problems will not abate if recent housing growth trends continue.

  7. Formation of a conducting LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface studied by low-energy electron reflection during growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Torren, A. J. H.; Liao, Z.; Xu, C.; Gauquelin, N.; Yin, C.; Aarts, J.; van der Molen, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas occurring between the band insulators SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 continues to attract considerable interest, due to the possibility of dynamic control over the carrier density and due to ensuing phenomena such as magnetism and superconductivity. The formation of this conducting interface is sensitive to the growth conditions, but despite numerous investigations there are still questions about the details of the physics involved. In particular, not much is known about the electronic structure of the growing LaAlO3 layer at the growth temperature (around 800°C) in oxygen (pressure around 5 ×10-5 mbar), since analysis techniques at these conditions are not readily available. We developed a pulsed laser deposition system inside a low-energy electron microscope in order to study this issue. The setup allows for layer-by-layer growth control and in situ measurements of the angle-dependent electron reflection intensity, which can be used as a fingerprint of the electronic structure of the surface layers during growth. By using different substrate terminations and growth conditions we observe two families of reflectivity maps, which we can connect either to samples with an AlO2-rich surface and a conducting interface or to samples with a LaO-rich surface and an insulating interface. Our observations emphasize that substrate termination and stoichiometry determine the electronic structure of the growing layer, and thereby the conductance of the interface.

  8. New evaluation method of crack growth in SiC/SiC composites using interface elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, H.; Ando, M.; Lewinsohn, C.A.; Murakawa, H.

    2000-01-01

    Crack propagation behavior in SiC/SiC composites was analyzed using a new computer simulation method that included time-dependent interface elements. The simulation method was used to describe the time-dependent crack growth in SiC/SiC composites under four-point bending of single-edge-notched beam bend-bars. Two methods were used to simulate time-dependent crack growth in SiC/SiC composites due to fiber creep. In one method, the creep property was introduced into the interface elements by the general method of finite element method (FEM) analysis. In the second method, a new technique making the best use of the potential function was used to represent crack closure tractions due to creeping fibers. The stage-II slow crack growth of a general creep deformation was simulated by both methods. Additionally, stage-III crack growth and the transition from stage-II to stage-III could be simulated by the new method. The new method has the potential to completely simulate time-dependent crack growth behavior in SiC/SiC composites due to fiber creep

  9. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    OpenAIRE

    Lassnig, Mario; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Vigne, Ralph; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Garonne, Vincent; Serfon, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three des...

  10. Controlling the Accumulation of Water at Oil-Solid Interfaces with Gradient Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Qiaomu; Mei, Ran Andy; Cai, Meirong; Heng, Jerry Y Y; Yang, Zhongqiang

    2017-07-13

    In this work, we demonstrate a strategy to control the accumulation of water in the oil-solid interface using a gradient coating. Gradient chemistry on glass surface is created by vapor diffusion of organosilanes, leading to a range of contact angles from 110 to 20°. Hexadecane is placed on the gradient substrate as an oil layer, forming a "water/hexadecane/gradient solid substrate" sandwich structure. During incubation, water molecules spontaneously migrate through the micrometer-thick oil layer and result in the formation of micrometer-sized water droplets at the oil-solid interface. It turns out that water droplets at more hydrophobic regions tend to be closer to a regular spherical shape, which is attributed to their higher contact angle with the hydrophobic substrate. However, along the gradient from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the water droplets gradually form more irregular shapes, as hydrophilic surfaces pin the edges of droplets to form a distorted morphology. It indicates that more hydrophilic surfaces containing more Si-OH groups lead to a higher electrostatic interaction with water and a higher growth rate of interfacial water droplets. This work provides further insights into the mechanism of spontaneous water accumulation at oil-solid interfaces and assists in the rational design for controlling such interfacial phenomenon.

  11. Optoelectronic polarimeter controlled by a graphical user interface of Matlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilardy, J M; Torres, R; Jimenez, C J

    2017-01-01

    We show the design and implementation of an optical polarimeter using electronic control. The polarimeter has a software with a graphical user interface (GUI) that controls the optoelectronic setup and captures the optical intensity measurement, and finally, this software evaluates the Stokes vector of a state of polarization (SOP) by means of the synchronous detection of optical waves. The proposed optoelectronic polarimeter can determine the Stokes vector of a SOP in a rapid and efficient way. Using the polarimeter proposed in this paper, the students will be able to observe (in an optical bench) and understand the different interactions of the SOP when the optical waves pass through to the linear polarizers and retarder waves plates. The polarimeter prototype could be used as a main tool for the students in order to learn the theory and experimental aspects of the SOP for optical waves via the Stokes vector measurement. The proposed polarimeter controlled by a GUI of Matlab is more attractive and suitable to teach and to learn the polarization of optical waves. (paper)

  12. An optical brain computer interface for environmental control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Hasan; Shewokis, Patricia A; Bunce, Scott; Onaral, Banu

    2011-01-01

    A brain computer interface (BCI) is a system that translates neurophysiological signals detected from the brain to supply input to a computer or to control a device. Volitional control of neural activity and its real-time detection through neuroimaging modalities are key constituents of BCI systems. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a new BCI design that utilizes intention-related cognitive activity within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex using functional near infrared (fNIR) spectroscopy. fNIR is a noninvasive, safe, portable and affordable optical technique with which to monitor hemodynamic changes, in the brain's cerebral cortex. Because of its portability and ease of use, fNIR is amenable to deployment in ecologically valid natural working environments. We integrated a control paradigm in a computerized 3D virtual environment to augment interactivity. Ten healthy participants volunteered for a two day study in which they navigated a virtual environment with keyboard inputs, but were required to use the fNIR-BCI for interaction with virtual objects. Results showed that participants consistently utilized the fNIR-BCI with an overall success rate of 84% and volitionally increased their cerebral oxygenation level to trigger actions within the virtual environment.

  13. An investigation of a passively controlled haptic interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Book, W.J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-03-01

    Haptic interfaces enhance cooperation between humans and robotic manipulators by providing force and tactile feedback to the human user during the execution of arbitrary tasks. The use of active actuators in haptic displays presents a certain amount of risk since they are capable of providing unacceptable levels of energy to the systems upon which they operate. An alternative to providing numerous safeguards is to remove the sources of risk altogether. This research investigates the feasibility of trajectory control using passive devices, that is, devices that cannot add energy to the system. Passive actuators are capable only of removing energy from the system or transferring energy within the system. It is proposed that the utility of passive devices is greatly enhanced by the use of redundant actuators. In a passive system, once motion is provided to the system, presumably by a human user, passive devices may be able to modify this motion to achieve a desired resultant trajectory. A mechanically passive, 2-Degree-of-Freedom (D.O.F.) manipulator has been designed and built. It is equipped with four passive actuators: two electromagnetic brakes and two electromagnetic clutches. This paper gives a review of the literature on passive and robotics and describes the experimental test bed used in this research. Several control algorithms are investigated, resulting in the formulation of a passive control law.

  14. An investigation of a passively controlled haptic interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.T.; Book, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Haptic interfaces enhance cooperation between humans and robotic manipulators by providing force and tactile feedback to the human user during the execution of arbitrary tasks. The use of active actuators in haptic displays presents a certain amount of risk since they are capable of providing unacceptable levels of energy to the systems upon which they operate. An alternative to providing numerous safeguards is to remove the sources of risk altogether. This research investigates the feasibility of trajectory control using passive devices, that is, devices that cannot add energy to the system. Passive actuators are capable only of removing energy from the system or transferring energy within the system. It is proposed that the utility of passive devices is greatly enhanced by the use of redundant actuators. In a passive system, once motion is provided to the system, presumably by a human user, passive devices may be able to modify this motion to achieve a desired resultant trajectory. A mechanically passive, 2-Degree-of-Freedom (D.O.F.) manipulator has been designed and built. It is equipped with four passive actuators: two electromagnetic brakes and two electromagnetic clutches. This paper gives a review of the literature on passive and robotics and describes the experimental test bed used in this research. Several control algorithms are investigated, resulting in the formulation of a passive control law

  15. In-situ detection of convection and rotation striations by growth interface electromotive force spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunzhong; Tang, Feng; Yang, Xin; Yang, Mingming; Ma, Decai; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Liu, Yang; Lin, Shaopeng; Wang, Biao

    2018-04-01

    Nanoscale growth striations, induced by the crystal rotation and melt convection, are in-situ detected by the growth interface electromotive force (GEMF) spectrum during Czochralski (CZ) crystal growth. Specifically, the intensity and period of rotation and convection striations could be precisely revealed under different rotation rates. This is because the GEMF spectrum is affected by the combination effort of temperature difference in crystal rotation path and the melt flow in growth interface. Furthermore, the spectrum analysis (Fourier transform) reveals remarkable characteristics of periodic flow oscillation. More interestingly, in different rotation rates, the corresponding convection period and intensity show particular regularity that could barely be observed in semitransparent and high-temperature melt. Therefore, the GEMF spectrum reflects the subtle changes of a growing crystal that is far beyond the detecting precision of sensors in current CZ equipment. On the basis of this paper and our previous work, the real-time feedback of multiscale striations is established. GEMF spectrum could be a promising approach to reveal striation formation mechanism and optimize crystal quality.

  16. Controlling Particle Morphologies at Fluid Interfaces: Macro- and Micro- approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa Naidu

    The controlled generation of varying shaped particles is important for many applications: consumer goods, biomedical diagnostics, food processing, adsorbents and pharmaceuticals which can benefit from the availability of geometrically complex and chemically inhomogeneous particles. This thesis presents two approaches to spherical and non-spherical particle synthesis using macro and microfluidics. In the first approach, a droplet microfluidic technique is explored to fabricate spherical conducting polymer, polyaniline, particles with precise control over morphology and functionality. Microfluidics has recently emerged as an important alternate to the synthesis of complex particles. The conducting polymer, polyaniline, is widely used and known for its stability, high conductivity, and favorable redox properties. In this approach, monodisperse micron-sized polyaniline spherical particles were synthesized using two-phase droplet microfluidics from Aniline and Ammonium persulfate oxidative polymerization in an oil-based continuous phase. The morphology of the polymerized particles is porous in nature which can be used for encapsulation as well as controlled release applications. Encapsulation of an enzyme, glucose oxidase, was also performed using the technique to synthesize microspheres for glucose sensing. The polymer microspheres were characterized using SEM, UV-Vis and EDX to understand the relationship between their microstructure and stability. In the second approach, molten drop impact in a cooling aqueous medium to generate non-spherical particles was explored. Viscoelastic wax based materials are widely used in many applications and their performance and application depends on the particle morphology and size. The deformation of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface was investigated. Spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath, then deformed and as a result of solidification were arrested into various

  17. Studies on layer growth and interfaces on Ta-base thin layers by means of XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zier, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis studies on the growth and on the formation of the interfaces of Ta and TaN layers on Si and SiO 2 were performed. In the system TaN on SiO 2 no reaction on the interface could be found. As the system with the mostly disturbed interface Ta on SiO 2 was proved. Here a reduction of the SiO 2 at simultaneous oxidation of the Ta was to be observed. Additionally tantalum silicide was formed to be considered concerning the bonding state as Ta 5 Si 3 , from which a double layer of a tantalum silicide and a tantalum suboxide resulted. A whole thickness of the double layer of above 1 nm resulted. In the system Ta on Si at the deposition of the film on the interface a tantalum silicide was formed to be characterized concerning the bonding state as TaSi 2 . The thickness of the interlayer growed thereby up to 0.8 nm in form of islands. Finally in the system TaN on Si a silicon nitride formation during the deposition was observed, which was attributed to the insertion of adsorbed nitrogen from the sputtering atmosphere by recoil implantation of the sputtered Ta atoms. The silicon nitride interlayer growed thereby up to a thickness of 0.8 nm

  18. DKDP crystal growth controlled by cooling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Qi, Hongji; Shao, Jianda

    2017-08-01

    The performance of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystal directly affects beam quality, energy and conversion efficiency in the Inertial Confinement Fusion(ICF)facility, which is related with the initial saturation temperature of solution and the real-time supersaturation during the crystal growth. However, traditional method to measure the saturation temperature is neither efficient nor accurate enough. Besides, the supersaturation is often controlled by experience, which yields the higher error and leads to the instability during the crystal growth. In this paper, DKDP solution with 78% deuteration concentration is crystallized in different temperatures. We study the relation between solubility and temperature of DKDP and fit a theoretical curve with a parabola model. With the model, the measurement of saturation temperature is simplified and the control precision of the cooling rate is improved during the crystal growth, which is beneficial for optimizing the crystal growth process.

  19. The crystallization of a solid solution in a solvent and the stability of a growth interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmejac, Yves

    1971-03-01

    The potential uses of germanium-silicon alloys as thermoelectric generators in hitherto unexploited temperature ranges initiated the present study. Many delicate problems are encountered in the classical methods of preparation. An original technique was sought for crystallization in a metallic solvent. The thermodynamic equilibria between the various phases of the ternary System used were studied in order to justify the method used. The conditions (temperature and composition) were determined in which the cooling of a ternary liquid mixture induces the precipitation of a binary solid solution with the desired composition. If large crystals are to be obtained from the solid solution, metallic solvent precipitation must be replaced by a mono-directional solvent crystallization. The combined effect of a certain number of simple physical phenomena on the stability of a crystal liquid interface was studied: the morphological stability of the crystal growth interface is the first step towards obtaining perfect crystals. (author) [fr

  20. Bismuth nanowire growth under low deposition rate and its ohmic contact free of interface damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High quality bismuth (Bi nanowire and its ohmic contact free of interface damage are quite desired for its research and application. In this paper, we propose one new way to prepare high-quality single crystal Bi nanowires at a low deposition rate, by magnetron sputtering method without the assistance of template or catalyst. The slow deposition growth mechanism of Bi nanowire is successfully explained by an anisotropic corner crossing effect, which is very different from existing explanations. A novel approach free of interface damage to ohmic contact of Bi nanowire is proposed and its good electrical conductivity is confirmed by I-V characteristic measurement. Our method provides a quick and convenient way to produce high-quality Bi nanowires and construct ohmic contact for desirable devices.

  1. Visual observation of gas hydrates nucleation and growth at a water - organic liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoporev, Andrey S.; Semenov, Anton P.; Medvedev, Vladimir I.; Sizikov, Artem A.; Gushchin, Pavel A.; Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Manakov, Andrey Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Visual observation of nucleation sites of methane and methane-ethane-propane hydrates and their further growth in water - organic liquid - gas systems with/without surfactants was carried out. Sapphire Rocking Cell RCS6 with transparent sapphire cells was used. The experiments were conducted at the supercooling ΔTsub = 20.2 °C. Decane, toluene and crude oils were used as organics. Gas hydrate nucleation occurred on water - metal - gas and water - sapphire - organic liquid three-phase contact lines. At the initial stage of growth hydrate crystals rapidly covered the water - gas or water - organics interfaces (depending on the nucleation site). Further hydrate phase accrete on cell walls (sapphire surface) and into the organics volume. At this stage, growth was accompanied by water «drawing out» from under initial hydrate film formed at water - organic interface. Apparently, it takes place due to water capillary inflow in the reaction zone. It was shown that the hydrate crystal morphology depends on the organic phase composition. In the case of water-in-decane emulsion relay hydrate crystallization was observed in the whole sample, originating most likely due to the hydrate crystal intergrowth through decane. Contacts of such crystals with adjacent water droplets result in rapid hydrate crystallization on this droplet.

  2. Coupled Hydrodynamic Instability Growth on Oblique Interfaces with a Reflected Rarefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmus, A. M.; Flippo, K. A.; di Stefano, C. A.; Doss, F. W.; Hager, J. D.; Merritt, E. C.; Cardenas, T.; Schmidt, D. W.; Kline, J. L.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities play an important role in the evolution of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical phenomena. Three of the Omega-EP long pulse beams (10 ns square pulse, 14 kJ total energy, 1.1 mm spot size) drive a supported shock across a heavy-to-light, oblique, interface. Single- and double-mode initial conditions seed coupled Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) growth. At early times, growth is dominated by RM and KH, whereas at late times a rarefaction from laser turn-off reaches the interface, leading to decompression and RT growth. The addition of a thirty degree tilt does not alter mix width to within experimental error bars, even while significantly altering spike and bubble morphology. The results of single and double-mode experiments along with simulations using the multi-physics hydro-code RAGE will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956. This material is partially supported by DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program.

  3. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  4. Control of enterprise interfaces for supply chain enterprise modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Interrante, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Macfarlane, J.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Information and Computing Sciences Div.

    1995-04-01

    There is a current trend for manufacturing enterprises in a supply chain of a particular industry to join forces in an attempt to promote efficiencies and improve competitive position. Such alliances occur in the context of specific legal and business agreements such that each enterprise retains a majority of its business and manufacturing information as private and shares other information with its trading partners. Shared information may include enterprise demand projections, capacities, finished goods inventories, and aggregate production schedules. Evidence of the trend toward information sharing includes the recent emphases on vendor-managed inventories, quick response, and Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The increased competition brought on by the global marketplace is driving industries to consider the advantages of trading partner agreements. Aggregate-level forecasts, supply-chain production smoothing, and aggregate-level inventory policies can reduce holding costs, record-keeping overhead, and lead time in product development. The goal of this research is to orchestrate information exchange among trading partners to allow for aggregate-level analysis to enhance supply chain efficiency. The notion of Enterprise Interface Control (EIC) is introduced as a means of accomplishing this end.

  5. Knowledge-based control of an adaptive interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    The analysis, development strategy, and preliminary design for an intelligent, adaptive interface is reported. The design philosophy couples knowledge-based system technology with standard human factors approaches to interface development for computer workstations. An expert system has been designed to drive the interface for application software. The intelligent interface will be linked to application packages, one at a time, that are planned for multiple-application workstations aboard Space Station Freedom. Current requirements call for most Space Station activities to be conducted at the workstation consoles. One set of activities will consist of standard data management services (DMS). DMS software includes text processing, spreadsheets, data base management, etc. Text processing was selected for the first intelligent interface prototype because text-processing software can be developed initially as fully functional but limited with a small set of commands. The program's complexity then can be increased incrementally. The intelligent interface includes the operator's behavior and three types of instructions to the underlying application software are included in the rule base. A conventional expert-system inference engine searches the data base for antecedents to rules and sends the consequents of fired rules as commands to the underlying software. Plans for putting the expert system on top of a second application, a database management system, will be carried out following behavioral research on the first application. The intelligent interface design is suitable for use with ground-based workstations now common in government, industrial, and educational organizations.

  6. Scanning control and data acquisition interface for a spectroscopy diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Callejas, R.; Galindo, S.; Benitez-Read, J.S.; Pacheco-Sotelo, J.; Longoria-Gandara, L.C.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.

    2001-01-01

    This work presents the design of a PC supported interface unit that improves the operation of a mechanically driven Czerny-Turner monochromator to the point of meeting the conditions required to be useful in wavelength separation and spectrum analysis for breakdown and conditioning discharges in plasma physics diagnostics. The PC supported interface verifies and sets the position and scan range of the instrument scanning drive. The interface consists of a microcontroller and its associated circuitry. The microcontroller is also used as a data acquisition and data manipulation element. An example of obtained spectra illustrating the instrument greatly improved performance is presented

  7. Modeling and control of greenhouse crop growth

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Francisco; Guzmán, José Luis; Ramírez-Arias, Armando

    2015-01-01

    A discussion of challenges related to the modeling and control of greenhouse crop growth, this book presents state-of-the-art answers to those challenges. The authors model the subsystems involved in successful greenhouse control using different techniques and show how the models obtained can be exploited for simulation or control design; they suggest ideas for the development of physical and/or black-box models for this purpose. Strategies for the control of climate- and irrigation-related variables are brought forward. The uses of PID control and feedforward compensators, both widely used in commercial tools, are summarized. The benefits of advanced control techniques—event-based, robust, and predictive control, for example—are used to improve on the performance of those basic methods. A hierarchical control architecture is developed governed by a high-level multiobjective optimization approach rather than traditional constrained optimization and artificial intelligence techniques.  Reference trajector...

  8. How NASA KSC Controls Interfaces with the use of Motion Skeletons and Product Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will show how NASA KSC controls interfaces for Modular Product Architecture (MPA) using Locator Skeletons, Interface Skeletons, and Product Structure, to be combined together within a Motion Skeleton. The user will learn how to utilize skeleton models to communicate interface data, as successfully done at NASA KSC in their use of Motion Skeletons to control interfaces for multi-launch systems. There will be discussion of the methodology used to control design requirements through WTParts, and how to utilize product structure for non-CAD documents.

  9. Brain-Computer Interface application: auditory serial interface to control a two-class motor-imagery-based wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron-Angevin, Ricardo; Velasco-Álvarez, Francisco; Fernández-Rodríguez, Álvaro; Díaz-Estrella, Antonio; Blanca-Mena, María José; Vizcaíno-Martín, Francisco Javier

    2017-05-30

    Certain diseases affect brain areas that control the movements of the patients' body, thereby limiting their autonomy and communication capacity. Research in the field of Brain-Computer Interfaces aims to provide patients with an alternative communication channel not based on muscular activity, but on the processing of brain signals. Through these systems, subjects can control external devices such as spellers to communicate, robotic prostheses to restore limb movements, or domotic systems. The present work focus on the non-muscular control of a robotic wheelchair. A proposal to control a wheelchair through a Brain-Computer Interface based on the discrimination of only two mental tasks is presented in this study. The wheelchair displacement is performed with discrete movements. The control signals used are sensorimotor rhythms modulated through a right-hand motor imagery task or mental idle state. The peculiarity of the control system is that it is based on a serial auditory interface that provides the user with four navigation commands. The use of two mental tasks to select commands may facilitate control and reduce error rates compared to other endogenous control systems for wheelchairs. Seventeen subjects initially participated in the study; nine of them completed the three sessions of the proposed protocol. After the first calibration session, seven subjects were discarded due to a low control of their electroencephalographic signals; nine out of ten subjects controlled a virtual wheelchair during the second session; these same nine subjects achieved a medium accuracy level above 0.83 on the real wheelchair control session. The results suggest that more extensive training with the proposed control system can be an effective and safe option that will allow the displacement of a wheelchair in a controlled environment for potential users suffering from some types of motor neuron diseases.

  10. Meniscus Imaging for Crystal-Growth Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon crystal growth monitored by new video system reduces operator stress and improves conditions for observation and control of growing process. System optics produce greater magnification vertically than horizontally, so entire meniscus and melt is viewed with high resolution in both width and height dimensions.

  11. Controlled size and one-dimensional growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    875–881. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Synthesis of azamacrocycle stabilized palladium nanoparticles: Controlled size and one-dimensional growth. JEYARAMAN ATHILAKSHMI and DILLIP KUMAR CHAND. ∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, India e-mail: dillip@iitm.ac.

  12. Deep traps at GaAs/GaAs interface grown by MBE-interruption growth technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniewska, M.; Engstroem, O.

    2007-01-01

    Electron trapping centers at the GaAs/GaAs interface grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-interruption growth technique have been studied by capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Two main electron traps have been revealed with activation energies at 0.16 eV and 0.52 eV from the conduction band. Inhomogeneous spatial distributions of the traps, obtained by DLTS profiling, indicate that they are agglomerated at the interrupted interface on a concentration level of (2-3) x 10 15 cm -3 at their maximum. Their behaviour is typical of acceptor-like traps when investigating by C-V profiling as a function of temperature. Based on a comparison made with electron traps in MBE-GaAs as well as with the traps in InAs/GaAs quantum dot/quantum well (QD/QW) structures, we conclude they are the well-known EL10 and EL4 defects, respectively, and their concentrations are growth condition dependent. They may be point defect-impurity complexes. Their presence may cause interpretation and application problems of the low-dimensional InAs/GaAs structures

  13. Deep traps at GaAs/GaAs interface grown by MBE-interruption growth technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaniewska, M. [Department of Analysis of Semicoductor Nanostructures, Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: kaniew@ite.waw.pl; Engstroem, O. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    Electron trapping centers at the GaAs/GaAs interface grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-interruption growth technique have been studied by capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Two main electron traps have been revealed with activation energies at 0.16 eV and 0.52 eV from the conduction band. Inhomogeneous spatial distributions of the traps, obtained by DLTS profiling, indicate that they are agglomerated at the interrupted interface on a concentration level of (2-3) x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} at their maximum. Their behaviour is typical of acceptor-like traps when investigating by C-V profiling as a function of temperature. Based on a comparison made with electron traps in MBE-GaAs as well as with the traps in InAs/GaAs quantum dot/quantum well (QD/QW) structures, we conclude they are the well-known EL10 and EL4 defects, respectively, and their concentrations are growth condition dependent. They may be point defect-impurity complexes. Their presence may cause interpretation and application problems of the low-dimensional InAs/GaAs structures.

  14. Development of a model for on-line control of crystal growth by the AHP method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonik, M. A.; Lomokhova, A. V.; Gonik, M. M.; Kuliev, A. T.; Smirnov, A. D.

    2007-05-01

    The possibility to apply a simplified 2D model for heat transfer calculations in crystal growth by the axial heat close to phase interface (AHP) method is discussed in this paper. A comparison with global heat transfer calculations with the CGSim software was performed to confirm the accuracy of this model. The simplified model was shown to provide adequate results for the shape of the melt-crystal interface and temperature field in an opaque (Ge) and a transparent crystal (CsI:Tl). The model proposed is used for identification of the growth setup as a control object, for synthesis of a digital controller (PID controller at the present stage) and, finally, in on-line simulations of crystal growth control.

  15. Design considerations to improve cognitive ergonomic issues of unmanned vehicle interfaces utilizing video game controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppold, P; Rupp, M; Mouloua, M; Hancock, P A; Martin, J

    2012-01-01

    Unmanned (UAVs, UCAVs, and UGVs) systems still have major human factors and ergonomic challenges related to the effective design of their control interface systems, crucial to their efficient operation, maintenance, and safety. Unmanned system interfaces with a human centered approach promote intuitive interfaces that are easier to learn, and reduce human errors and other cognitive ergonomic issues with interface design. Automation has shifted workload from physical to cognitive, thus control interfaces for unmanned systems need to reduce mental workload on the operators and facilitate the interaction between vehicle and operator. Two-handed video game controllers provide wide usability within the overall population, prior exposure for new operators, and a variety of interface complexity levels to match the complexity level of the task and reduce cognitive load. This paper categorizes and provides taxonomy for 121 haptic interfaces from the entertainment industry that can be utilized as control interfaces for unmanned systems. Five categories of controllers were based on the complexity of the buttons, control pads, joysticks, and switches on the controller. This allows the selection of the level of complexity needed for a specific task without creating an entirely new design or utilizing an overly complex design.

  16. The Los Alamos accelerator control system data base: A generic instrumentation interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalesio, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    Controlling experimental-physics applications requires a control system that can be quickly integrated and easily modified. One aspect of the control system is the interface to the instrumentation. An instrumentation set has been chosen to implement the basic functions needed to monitor and control these applications. A data-driven interface to this instrumentation set provides the required quick integration of the control system. This type of interface is limited by its built-in capabilities. Therefore, these capabilities must provide an adequate range of functions to be of any use. The data-driven interface must support the instrumentation range requird, the events on which to read or control the instrumentation and a method for manipulating the data to calculate terms or close control loops. The database for the Los Alamos Accelerator Control System addresses these requirements. (orig.)

  17. Design for the human-machine interface of a digitalized reactor control-room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju; Li Duo; Yu Hui

    2005-01-01

    Digitalized technology is implemented in the instrumentation and control system of an in-construction research reactor, which advances information display in both contents and styles in a nuclear reactor control-room, and greatly improves human-machine interface. In the design for a digitalized nuclear reactor control-room there are a series of new problems and technologies should be considered seriously. This paper mainly introduces the design for the digitalized control-room of the research nuclear reactor and covered topics include design principle of human-machine interface, organization and classification of interface graphics, technologies and principles based on human factors engineering and implemented in the graphics design. (authors)

  18. A HIGH-LEVEL PYTHON INTERFACE TO THE FERMILAB ACNET CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [Fermilab; Halavanau, A. [Fermilab

    2016-10-19

    This paper discusses the implementation of a python- based high-level interface to the Fermilab acnet control system. The interface has been successfully employed during the commissioning of the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility. Specifically, we present examples of applications at FAST which include the interfacing of the elegant program to assist lattice matching, an automated emittance measurement via the quadrupole-scan method and tranverse transport matrix measurement of a superconducting RF cavity.

  19. Human growth hormone may be detrimental when used to accelerate recovery from acute tendon-bone interface injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Keith M; Oliver, Harvey A; Foley, Jack; Chen, Ding-Geng; Autenried, Peter; Duan, Shanzhong; Heiser, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    There have been few scientific studies that have examined usage of human growth hormone to accelerate recovery from injury. The hypothesis of this study was that human growth hormone would accelerate tendon-to-bone healing compared with control animals treated with placebo in a rat model of acute rotator cuff injury repair. Seventy-two rats underwent repair of acute rotator cuff injuries and were randomized into the following postoperative dosing regimens: placebo, and human growth hormone at 0.1, 1, 2, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day, administered subcutaneously once per day for fourteen days (Protocol 1). An additional twenty-four rats were randomized to receive either (1) placebo or (2) human growth hormone at 5 mg/kg, administered subcutaneously twice per day for seven days preoperatively and twenty-eight days postoperatively (Protocol 2). All rats were killed twenty-eight days postoperatively. Mechanical testing was performed. Ultimate stress, ultimate force, stiffness, energy to failure, and ultimate distension were determined. For Protocol 1, analysis of variance testing showed no significant difference between the groups with regard to ultimate stress, ultimate force, stiffness, energy to failure, or ultimate distension. In Protocol 2, ultimate force to failure was significantly worse in the human growth hormone group compared with the placebo group (21.1 ± 5.85 versus 26.3 ± 5.47 N; p = 0.035). Failure was more likely to occur through the bone than the tendon-bone interface in the human growth hormone group compared with the placebo group (p = 0.001). No significant difference was found for ultimate stress, ultimate force, stiffness, energy to failure, or ultimate distension between the groups in Protocol 2. In this rat model of acute tendon-bone injury repair, daily subcutaneous postoperative human growth hormone treatment for fourteen days failed to demonstrate a significant difference in any biomechanical parameter compared with placebo. Furthermore, subcutaneous

  20. Integrated Intelligent Modeling, Design and Control of Crystal Growth Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prasad, V

    2000-01-01

    .... This MURI program took an integrated approach towards modeling, design and control of crystal growth processes and in conjunction with growth and characterization experiments developed much better...

  1. In situ study of electric field controlled ion transport in the Fe/BaTiO3 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, D. G.; Bessas, D.; Bazsó, G.; Jafari, A.; Rüffer, R.; Chumakov, A. I.; Khanh, N. Q.; Sajti, Sz; Celse, J.-P.; Nagy, D. L.

    2018-01-01

    Electric field controlled ion transport and interface formation of iron thin films on a BaTiO3 substrate have been investigated by in situ nuclear resonance scattering and x-ray reflectometry techniques. At early stage of deposition, an iron-II oxide interface layer was observed. The hyperfine parameters of the interface layer were found insensitive to the evaporated layer thickness. When an electric field was applied during growth, a 10 Å increase of the nonmagnetic/magnetic thickness threshold and an extended magnetic transition region was measured compared to the case where no field was applied. The interface layer was found stable under this threshold when further evaporation occurred, contrary to the magnetic layer where the magnitude and orientation of the hyperfine magnetic field vary continuously. The obtained results of the growth mechanism and of the electric field effect of the Fe/BTO system will allow the design of novel applications by creating custom oxide/metallic nanopatterns using laterally inhomogeneous electric fields during sample preparation.

  2. Interfaces in Si/Ge atomic layer superlattices on (001)Si: Effect of growth temperature and wafer misorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baribeau, J.-M.; Lockwood, D. J.; Syme, R. W. G.

    1996-08-01

    We have used x-ray diffraction, specular reflectivity, and diffuse scattering, complemented by Raman spectroscopy, to study the interfaces in a series of (0.5 nm Ge/2 nm Si)50 atomic layer superlattices on (001)Si grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the temperature range 150-650 °C. X-ray specular reflectivity revealed that the structures have a well-defined periodicity with interface widths of about 0.2-0.3 nm in the 300-590 °C temperature range. Offset reflectivity scans showed that the diffuse scattering peaks at values of perpendicular wave vector transfer corresponding to the superlattice satellite peaks, indicating that the interfaces are vertically correlated. Transverse rocking scans of satellite peaks showed a diffuse component corresponding to an interface corrugation of typical length scale of ˜0.5 μm. The wavelength of the undulations is a minimum along the miscut direction and is typically 30-40 times larger than the surface average terrace width assuming monolayer steps, independently of the magnitude of the wafer misorientation. The amplitude of the undulation evolves with growth temperature and is minimum for growth at ˜460 °C and peaks at ˜520 °C. Raman scattering showed the chemical abruptness of the interfaces at low growth temperatures and indicated a change in the growth mode near 450 °C.

  3. The high level programmer and user interface of the NSLS control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.; Smith, J.D.; Sathe, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the major components of the high level software in the NSLS upgraded control system. Both programmer and user interfaces are discussed. The use of the high-speed work stations, fast network communications, UNIX system, X-window and Motif have greatly changed and improved these interfaces

  4. COSY Control Status. First results with rapid prototyped man-machine interface for accelerator control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, U [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Haberbosch, C [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Henn, K [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Weinert, A [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    1994-12-15

    The experience gained with the COSY Control System after a six month commissioning period followed by a six month production period will be presented. The COSY Control System runs approximately 300 VME and VXI target systems using a total of about 1000 CPUs, the systems are driven by the diskless operating environment RT/OS, hosted by eight workcells. Application software is implemented using Object-Orientated programming paradigms. All accelerator components become interface functions as instances of an abstract device model class. Methods defined here present an abstract picture of the accelerator giving immediate access to device states and parameters. Operator interaction is defined by building views and controllers for the model. Higher level functions, such as defining an acceleration cycle, are easily developed and modified with the accelerator connected on-line to the model. In the first year of COSY operation the object based approach for a control system, together with a rapid prototyped man-machine interface has brought to light the potential of new functions such as on-line, real time programming on a running system yielding high programming performance. The advantages of this approach have not been, until now, fully appreciated. ((orig.))

  5. Controlling the properties of ferroelectric-nickelate interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit; Han, Myung-Geun; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick; Ahn, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectrics are a class of materials that exhibit a stable, reversible polarization making them useful for non-volatile electronic devices. In devices consisting of thin film ferroelectric PZT acting as a gate and a thin film of the conductive oxide LaNiO3 grown on LaAlO3(001) acting as a channel, we have realized a large change in room temperature channel resistance by switching the ferroelectric polarization. The effect of switching the polarization of the ferroelectric is to modify the electronic structure of the interface between the gate and channel, resulting in conduction in the otherwise insulating ferroelectric. Here, we discuss how changing the epitaxial strain and interface termination of LaNiO3 can result in larger changes in resistivity. The epitaxial strain is varied by growing the devices on LaAlO3 for tensile strain and SrTiO3 for compressive strain. An interface termination of either an atomic layer of NiO2 or LaO is achieved via atomic layering using oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE).

  6. Surfactant-mediated growth of ultrathin Ge and Si films and their interfaces: Interference-enhanced Raman study

    OpenAIRE

    Kanakaraju, S; Sood, AK; Mohan, S

    2000-01-01

    We report on the growth and interfaces of ultrathin polycrystalline Ge and Si films when they are grown on each other using ion beam sputter deposition with and without surfactant at different growth temperatures, studied using interference enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Ge films grown on Si without surfactant show Ge segregation at the interfaces forming an alloy of GexSi1-x as indicated by the Ge-Si Raman mode. However, use of Sb as surfactant strongly suppresses the intermixing. Also Si film...

  7. Long-term control of root growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  8. im4Things: An Ontology-Based Natural Language Interface for Controlling Devices in the Internet of Things

    KAUST Repository

    Noguera-Arnaldos, José Á ngel; Paredes-Valverde, Mario André s; Salas-Zá rate, Marí a Pilar; Rodriguez-Garcia, Miguel Angel; Valencia-Garcí a, Rafael; Ochoa, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    . However, the IoT also introduces new challenges, some of which arise from the large range of devices currently available and the heterogeneous interfaces provided for their control. The control and management of this variety of devices and interfaces

  9. Epitaxial growth of a monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral p-n junction with an atomically sharp interface

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ming Yang

    2015-07-30

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as molybdenum sulfide MoS2 and tungsten sulfide WSe2 have potential applications in electronics because they exhibit high on-off current ratios and distinctive electro-optical properties. Spatially connected TMDC lateral heterojunctions are key components for constructing monolayer p-n rectifying diodes, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices, and bipolar junction transistors. However, such structures are not readily prepared via the layer-stacking techniques, and direct growth favors the thermodynamically preferred TMDC alloys. We report the two-step epitaxial growth of lateral WSe2-MoS2 heterojunction, where the edge of WSe2 induces the epitaxial MoS2 growth despite a large lattice mismatch. The epitaxial growth process offers a controllable method to obtain lateral heterojunction with an atomically sharp interface.

  10. Advanced Stellar Compass - Adeos II - Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    of Automation of the Technical University of Denmark.The document is structured as follows. First we present the ASC - heritage, system description, performance - then we address more specifically the environmental properties, like the EMC compatibility and thermal characteristics, and the design...... and reliability issues. Section 6 deals with the testing and the calibration procedures and in section 7 the mechanical and electrical interfaces are given. In section 8 and 9 we address issues like manufacturing, transportation and storage, in section 10 the requirements imposed by the ASC on the system...

  11. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mag@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nomiya, Diogo V., E-mail: diogonomiya@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  12. An Object-Oriented Graphical User Interface for a Reusable Rocket Engine Intelligent Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Musgrave, Jeffrey L.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Paxson, Daniel E.; Wong, Edmond; Saus, Joseph R.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    An intelligent control system for reusable rocket engines under development at NASA Lewis Research Center requires a graphical user interface to allow observation of the closed-loop system in operation. The simulation testbed consists of a real-time engine simulation computer, a controls computer, and several auxiliary computers for diagnostics and coordination. The system is set up so that the simulation computer could be replaced by the real engine and the change would be transparent to the control system. Because of the hard real-time requirement of the control computer, putting a graphical user interface on it was not an option. Thus, a separate computer used strictly for the graphical user interface was warranted. An object-oriented LISP-based graphical user interface has been developed on a Texas Instruments Explorer 2+ to indicate the condition of the engine to the observer through plots, animation, interactive graphics, and text.

  13. Man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition: integration to a virtual control desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Aghina, Mauricio Alves C.; Nomiya, Diogo V.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports the implementation of a man-system interface based on automatic speech recognition, and its integration to a virtual nuclear power plant control desk. The later is aimed to reproduce a real control desk using virtual reality technology, for operator training and ergonomic evaluation purpose. An automatic speech recognition system was developed to serve as a new interface with users, substituting computer keyboard and mouse. They can operate this virtual control desk in front of a computer monitor or a projection screen through spoken commands. The automatic speech recognition interface developed is based on a well-known signal processing technique named cepstral analysis, and on artificial neural networks. The speech recognition interface is described, along with its integration with the virtual control desk, and results are presented. (author)

  14. The web-based user interface for EAST plasma control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.R., E-mail: rrzhang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Xiao, B.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China); Yuan, Q.P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Yang, F. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Department of Computer Science, Anhui Medical University, Anhui (China); Zhang, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China); Johnson, R.D.; Penaflor, B.G. [General Atomics, DIII-D National Fusion Facility, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The plasma control system (PCS) plays a vital role at EAST for fusion science experiments. Its software application consists of two main parts: an IDL graphical user interface for setting a large number of plasma parameters to specify each discharge, several programs for performing the real-time feedback control and managing the whole control system. The PCS user interface can be used from any X11 Windows client with privileged access to the PCS computer system. However, remote access to the PCS system via the IDL user interface becomes an extreme inconvenience due to the high network latency to draw or operate the interfaces. In order to realize lower latency for remote access to the PCS system, a web-based system has been developed for EAST recently. The setup data are retrieved from the PCS system and client-side JavaScript draws the interfaces into the user's browser. The user settings are also sent back to the PCS system for controlling discharges. These technologies allow the web-based user interface to be viewed by authorized users with a web browser and have it communicate with PCS server processes directly. It works together with the IDL interface and provides a new way to aid remote participation.

  15. The web-based user interface for EAST plasma control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.R.; Xiao, B.J.; Yuan, Q.P.; Yang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Johnson, R.D.; Penaflor, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma control system (PCS) plays a vital role at EAST for fusion science experiments. Its software application consists of two main parts: an IDL graphical user interface for setting a large number of plasma parameters to specify each discharge, several programs for performing the real-time feedback control and managing the whole control system. The PCS user interface can be used from any X11 Windows client with privileged access to the PCS computer system. However, remote access to the PCS system via the IDL user interface becomes an extreme inconvenience due to the high network latency to draw or operate the interfaces. In order to realize lower latency for remote access to the PCS system, a web-based system has been developed for EAST recently. The setup data are retrieved from the PCS system and client-side JavaScript draws the interfaces into the user's browser. The user settings are also sent back to the PCS system for controlling discharges. These technologies allow the web-based user interface to be viewed by authorized users with a web browser and have it communicate with PCS server processes directly. It works together with the IDL interface and provides a new way to aid remote participation

  16. Magnetic Control in Crystal Growth from a Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue

    Control of bulk melt crystal growth techniques is desirable for producing semiconductors with the highest purity and ternary alloys with tunable electrical properties. Because these molten materials are electrically conducting, external magnetic fields are often employed to regulate the flow in the melt. However, complicated by the coupled flow, thermal, electromagnetic and chemical physics, such magnetic control is typically empirical or even an educated guess. Two magnetic flow control mechanisms: flow damping by steady magnetic fields, and flow stirring by alternating magnetic fields, are investigated numerically. Magnetic damping during optically-heated float-zone crystal growth is modeled using a spectral collocation method. The Marangoni convection at the free melt-gas interface is suppressed when exposed to a steady axial magnetic field, measured by the Hartmann number Ha. As a result, detrimental flow instabilities are suppressed, and an almost quiescent region forms in the interior, ideal for single crystal growth. Using normal mode linear stability analyses, dominant flow instabilities are determined in a range applicable to experiments (up to Ha = 300 for Pr = 0.02, and up to Ha = 500 for Pr = 0.001). The hydrodynamic nature of the instability for small Prandtl number Pr liquid bridges is confirmed by energy analyses. Magnetic stirring is modeled for melt crystal growth in an ampule exposed to a transverse rotating magnetic field. Decoupled from the flow field at small magnetic Reynolds number, the electromagnetic field is first solved via finite element analysis. The flow field is then solved using the spectral element method. At low to moderate AC frequencies (up to a few kHz), the electromagnetic body force is dominant in the azimuthal direction, which stirs a steady axisymmetric flow primarily in the azimuthal direction. A weaker secondary flow develops in the meridional plane. However, at high AC frequencies (on the order of 10 kHz and higher), only

  17. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis for growth interface of cubic boron nitride single crystals synthesized under high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Meizhe; Xu, Bin; Cai, Lichao; Guo, Xiaofei; Yuan, Xingdong

    2018-05-01

    After rapid cooling, cubic boron nitride (c-BN) single crystals synthesized under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) are wrapped in the white film powders which are defined as growth interface. In order to make clear that the transition mechanism of c-BN single crystals, the variation of B and N atomic hybrid states in the growth interface is analyzed with the help of auger electron spectroscopy in the Li-based system. It is found that the sp2 fractions of B and N atoms decreases, and their sp3 fractions increases from the outer to the inner in the growth interface. In addition, Lithium nitride (Li3N) are not found in the growth interface by X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiment. It is suggested that lithium boron nitride (Li3BN2) is produced by the reaction of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and Li3N at the first step, and then B and N atoms transform from sp2 into sp3 state with the catalysis of Li3BN2 in c-BN single crystals synthesis process.

  18. Design of a microprocessor-based Control, Interface and Monitoring (CIM unit for turbine engine controls research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaat, J. C.; Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    High speed minicomputers were used in the past to implement advanced digital control algorithms for turbine engines. These minicomputers are typically large and expensive. It is desirable for a number of reasons to use microprocessor-based systems for future controls research. They are relatively compact, inexpensive, and are representative of the hardware that would be used for actual engine-mounted controls. The Control, Interface, and Monitoring Unit (CIM) contains a microprocessor-based controls computer, necessary interface hardware and a system to monitor while it is running an engine. It is presently being used to evaluate an advanced turbofan engine control algorithm.

  19. Interface control of atomic layer deposited oxide coatings by filtered cathodic arc deposited sublayers for improved corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, Emma, E-mail: emma.harkonen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka [DIARC-Technology Inc., Espoo (Finland); Díaz, Belén; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surfaces, CNRS (UMR 7075) – Chimie ParisTech (ENSCP), F-75005 Paris (France); Fenker, Martin [FEM Research Institute, Precious Metals and Metals Chemistry, D-73525 Schwäbisch Gmünd (Germany); Tóth, Lajos; Radnóczi, György [Research Centre for Natural Sciences HAS, (MTA TKK), Budapest (Hungary); Ritala, Mikko [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Sublayers grown with filtered cathodic arc deposition (FCAD) were added under atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide coatings for interface control and improved corrosion protection of low alloy steel. The FCAD sublayer was either Ta:O or Cr:O–Ta:O nanolaminate, and the ALD layer was Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanolaminate, Al{sub x}Ta{sub y}O{sub z} mixture or graded mixture. The total thicknesses of the FCAD/ALD duplex coatings were between 65 and 120 nm. Thorough analysis of the coatings was conducted to gain insight into the influence of the FCAD sublayer on the overall coating performance. Similar characteristics as with single FCAD and ALD coatings on steel were found in the morphology and composition of the duplex coatings. However, the FCAD process allowed better control of the interface with the steel by reducing the native oxide and preventing its regrowth during the initial stages of the ALD process. Residual hydrocarbon impurities were buried in the interface between the FCAD layer and steel. This enabled growth of ALD layers with improved electrochemical sealing properties, inhibiting the development of localized corrosion by pitting during immersion in acidic NaCl and enhancing durability in neutral salt spray testing. - Highlights: • Corrosion protection properties of ALD coatings were improved by FCAD sublayers. • The FCAD sublayer enabled control of the coating-substrate interface. • The duplex coatings offered improved sealing properties and durability in NSS. • The protective properties were maintained during immersion in a corrosive solution. • The improvements were due to a more ideal ALD growth on the homogeneous FCAD oxide.

  20. Ecological Interface Design : Sensor Failure Diagnosis in Air Traffic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijsterbosch, V.A.; Borst, C.; Mulder, M.; van Paassen, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Future air traffic control will have to rely on more advanced automation in order to support controllers in their job of safely controlling increased traffic volumes. A prerequisite for the success of such automation is that the underlying data driving it is reliable. Current technology, however,

  1. Interfacing industrial process control systems to LEP/LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabany, M.

    1992-01-01

    Modern industrial process control systems have developed to meet the needs of industry to increase the production while decreasing the costs. Although particle accelerators designers have pioneered in control systems during the seventies, it has now become possible to them to profit of industrial solutions in substitution of, or in complement with the more traditional home made ones. Adapting and integrating such industrial systems to the accelerator control area will certainly benefit to the field in terms of finance, human resources and technical facilities offered off-the-shelf by the widely experienced industrial controls community; however this cannot be done without slightly affecting the overall accelerator control architecture. The paper briefly describes the industrial controls arena and takes example on an industrial process control system recently installed at CERN to discuss in detail the related choices and issues. (author)

  2. Alignment control and atomically-scaled heteroepitaxial interface study of GaN nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyun; Liu, Baodan; Yang, Wenjin; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Xinglai; Labbé, Christophe; Portier, Xavier; An, Vladimir; Jiang, Xin

    2017-04-20

    Well-aligned GaN nanowires are promising candidates for building high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices. In this work, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of well-aligned GaN nanowires on a [0001]-oriented sapphire substrate in a simple catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition process and their alignment control. It is found that the ammonia flux plays a key role in dominating the initial nucleation of GaN nanocrystals and their orientation. Typically, significant improvement of the GaN nanowire alignment can be realized at a low NH 3 flow rate. X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy studies further verified the preferential orientation of GaN nanowires along the [0001] direction. The growth mechanism of GaN nanowire arrays is also well studied based on cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization and it is observed that GaN nanowires have good epitaxial growth on the sapphire substrate following the crystallographic relationship between (0001) GaN ∥(0001) sapphire and (101[combining macron]0) GaN ∥(112[combining macron]0) sapphire . Most importantly, periodic misfit dislocations are also experimentally observed in the interface region due to the large lattice mismatch between the GaN nanowire and the sapphire substrate, and the formation of such dislocations will favor the release of structural strain in GaN nanowires. HRTEM analysis also finds the existence of "type I" stacking faults and voids inside the GaN nanowires. Optical investigation suggests that the GaN nanowire arrays have strong emission in the UV range, suggesting their crystalline nature and chemical purity. The achievement of aligned GaN nanowires will further promote the wide applications of GaN nanostructures toward diverse high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices including nano-LEDs, photovoltaic cells, photodetectors etc.

  3. Overlayer growth and electronic properties of the Bi/GaSb(110) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavioli, Luca; Betti, Maria Grazia; Casarini, Paolo; Mariani, Carlo

    1995-06-01

    The overlayer growth and electronic properties of the Bi/GaSb(110) interface and of the two-dimensional ordered (1×1)- and (1×2)-Bi layers have been investigated by complementary spectroscopic techniques (high-resolution electron-energy-loss, photoemission, and Auger spectroscopy). Bismuth forms an epitaxial monolayer, followed by island formation (Stranski-Krastanov growth mode) covering an average surface area of 40% at a nominal coverage of 4 ML. The (1×2)-symmetry stable structural phase, obtained after annealing at ~220 °C, corresponds to an average nominal Bi coverage of about 0.7 ML, suggesting an atomic geometry different from the epitaxial-continued layer structure. The disposal of Bi atoms in the (1×2) structure should build up an ``open'' layer, as the Ga-related surface exciton quenched in the (1×1) epitaxial monolayer is present in the (1×2) stable phase. The two symmetry phases are characterized by strong absorption features at 1 eV [(1×1)-Bi] and 0.54 eV [(1×2)-Bi], related to interband electronic transitions between Bi-induced electronic states. The major Bi-related occupied electronic levels, present in the valence band of the (1×1)- and (1×2)-Bi layer, have been detected by angle-integrated ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. Both the (1×1) and (1×2) phases show a metallic nature, with a low density of electronic states at the Fermi level. Schottky barrier heights of 0.20 and 0.14 eV are estimated for the epitaxial (1×1)- and (1×2)-symmetry stage, respectively, by analyzing the space-charge layer conditions through the study of the dopant-induced free-carrier plasmon in the GaSb substrate.

  4. Improved adaptive input voltage control of a solar array interfacing current mode controlled boost power stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitbon, Moshe; Schacham, Shmuel; Suntio, Teuvo; Kuperman, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Photovoltaic generator dynamic resistance online estimation method is proposed. • Control method allowing to achieve nominal performance at all time is presented. • The method is suitable for any type of photovoltaic system. - Abstract: Nonlinear characteristics of photovoltaic generators were recently shown to significantly influence the dynamics of interfacing power stages. Moreover, since the dynamic resistance of photovoltaic generators is both operating point and environmental variables dependent, the combined dynamics exhibits these dependencies as well, burdening control challenge. Typically, linear time invariant input voltage loop controllers (e.g. Proportional-Integrative-Derivative) are utilized in photovoltaic applications, designed according to nominal operating conditions. Nevertheless, since actual dynamics is seldom nominal, closed loop performance of such systems varies as well. In this paper, adaptive control method is proposed, allowing to estimate photovoltaic generator resistance online and utilize it to modify the controller parameters such that closed loop performance remains nominal throughout the whole operation range. Unlike previously proposed method, utilizing double-grid-frequency component for estimation purposes and suffering from various drawbacks such as operation point dependence and applicability to single-phase grid connected systems only, the proposed method is based on harmonic current injection and is independent on operating point and system topology

  5. Controlling Kuka Industrial Robots : Flexible Communication Interface JOpenShowVar.

    OpenAIRE

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Hatledal, Lars Ivar; Zhang, Houxiang; Fago, Massimiliano; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2015-01-01

    JOpenShowVar is a Java open-source cross-platform communication interface to Kuka industrial robots. This novel interface allows for read-write use of the controlled manipulator variables and data structures. JOpenShowVar, which is compatible with all the Kuka industrial robots that use KUKA Robot Controller version 4 (KR C4) and KUKA Robot Controller version 2 (KR C2), runs as a client on a remote computer connected with the Kuka controller via TCP/IP. Even though only soft real-time applica...

  6. Human-system interfaces for the ABWR control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, R.; O'Neil, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The 1300-MW(electric) advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) design has been developed by General Electric Co. (G.E.) and its technical associates, Hitachi Ltd. and Toshiba Corporation, under the sponsorship of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. Key features of the ABWR include simplification, improved safety and reliability, reduced occupational exposure and radwaste, improved maneuverability, and reduced construction, fuel, and operating costs. The ABWR incorporates the best proven features from BWR designs in Japan, Europe, and the United States, combined with the broad-scope application of leading-edge technology. The first application of the ABWR design will be at TEP-CO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station units 6 and 7, which are scheduled to begin commercial operation in 1996 and 1997, respectively. The ABWR is also the lead plant in the U.S. standard plant design certification program. It is scheduled to receive final approval from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in early 1994. The development of the human system interaces (HSI) for the ABWR is an extension of the operating experience of existing man-machine interfaces currently being used at GE-designed plants

  7. Light-induced spatial control of pH-jump reaction at smart gel interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techawanitchai, Prapatsorn; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Idota, Naokazu; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-11-01

    We proposed here a 'smart' control of an interface movement of proton diffusion in temperature- and pH-responsive hydrogels using a light-induced spatial pH-jump reaction. A photoinitiated proton-releasing reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) was integrated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-o-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide) (P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm)) hydrogels. NBA-integrated hydrogels demonstrated quick release of proton upon UV irradiation, allowing the pH inside the gel to decrease below the pK(a) of P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm) within a minute. The NBA-integrated gel was shown to shrink rapidly upon UV irradiation without polymer "skin layer" formation due to a uniform decrease of pH inside the gel. Spatial control of gel shrinking was also created by irradiating UV light to a limited region of the gel through a photomask. The interface of proton diffusion ("active interface") gradually moved toward non-illuminated area. The apparent position of "active interface", however, did not change remarkably above the LCST, while protons continuously diffused outward direction. This is because the "active interface" also moved inward direction as gel shrank above the LCST. As a result, slow movement of the apparent interface was observed. The NBA-integrated gel was also successfully employed for the controlled release of an entrapped dextran in a light controlled manner. This system is highly promising as smart platforms for triggered and programmed transportation of drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Operation of a Domestic Interface Device for the HANARO Control Rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young San; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Hyung Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    The interface device for the HANARO control rod which was supplied by a foreign company put difficulties on reactor operation due to the obsolescence of the products and lukewarm technical support from the manufacturer. The development of the interface device based on domestic technology has been completed in order to solve the problems in this issue and to ensure safe and reliable reactor operation. This paper describes the development process of the domestic interface device conducted which was over 5 years, the field test results, and the reactor operation application results

  9. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Serfon, Cedric; Vigne, Ralph; Garonne, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained frontends like ...

  10. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Vigne, Ralph; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Garonne, Vincent; Serfon, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained...

  11. Hand Motion-Based Remote Control Interface with Vibrotactile Feedback for Home Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a hand-held interface system for the locomotion control of home robots. A handheld controller is proposed to implement hand motion recognition and hand motion-based robot control. The handheld controller can provide a ‘connect-and-play’ service for the users to control the home robot with visual and vibrotactile feedback. Six natural hand gestures are defined for navigating the home robots. A three-axis accelerometer is used to detect the hand motions of the user. The recorded acceleration data are analysed and classified to corresponding control commands according to their characteristic curves. A vibration motor is used to provide vibrotactile feedback to the user when an improper operation is performed. The performances of the proposed hand motion-based interface and the traditional keyboard and mouse interface have been compared in robot navigation experiments. The experimental results of home robot navigation show that the success rate of the handheld controller is 13.33% higher than the PC based controller. The precision of the handheld controller is 15.4% more than that of the PC and the execution time is 24.7% less than the PC based controller. This means that the proposed hand motion-based interface is more efficient and flexible.

  12. When soft controls get slippery: User interfaces and human error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubler, W.F.; O'Hara, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many types of products and systems that have traditionally featured physical control devices are now being designed with soft controls--input formats appearing on computer-based display devices and operated by a variety of input devices. A review of complex human-machine systems found that soft controls are particularly prone to some types of errors and may affect overall system performance and safety. This paper discusses the application of design approaches for reducing the likelihood of these errors and for enhancing usability, user satisfaction, and system performance and safety

  13. Control of heat transfer in continuous-feeding Czochralski-silicon crystal growth with a water-cooled jacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenhan; Liu, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    The continuous-feeding Czochralski method is an effective method to reduce the cost of single crystal silicon. By promoting the crystal growth rate, the cost can be reduced further. However, more latent heat will be released at the melt-crystal interface under a high crystal growth rate. In this study, a water-cooled jacket was applied to enhance the heat transfer at the melt-crystal interface. Quasi-steady-state numerical calculation was employed to investigate the impact of the water-cooled jacket on the heat transfer at the melt-crystal interface. Latent heat released during the crystal growth process at the melt-crystal interface and absorbed during feedstock melting at the feeding zone was modeled in the simulations. The results show that, by using the water-cooled jacket, heat transfer in the growing crystal is enhanced significantly. Melt-crystal interface deflection and thermal stress increase simultaneously due to the increase of radial temperature at the melt-crystal interface. With a modified heat shield design, heat transfer at the melt-crystal interface is well controlled. The crystal growth rate can be increased by 20%.

  14. Increasing software testability with standard access and control interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikora, Allen P; Some, Raphael R.; Tamir, Yuval

    2003-01-01

    We describe an approach to improving the testability of complex software systems with software constructs modeled after the hardware JTAG bus, used to provide visibility and controlability in testing digital circuits.

  15. Distributed and decentralized control architectures for converter-interfaced microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragicevic, Tomislav; Wu, Dan; Shafiee, Qobad

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives a summary on recently available technologies for decentralized and distributed control of microgrids. They can be classified into two general categories: 1) power line communication based architectures and 2) multi-agent based architectures. The essential control methods and info......This paper gives a summary on recently available technologies for decentralized and distributed control of microgrids. They can be classified into two general categories: 1) power line communication based architectures and 2) multi-agent based architectures. The essential control methods...... and information sharing algorithms applied in these architectures are reviewed and examined in a hierarchical manner, in order to point out benefits they will bring to future microgrid applications. The paper is concluded with a summary on existing methods and a discussion on future development trends....

  16. Design of Flight Control Panel Layout using Graphical User Interface in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirawan, A.; Indriyanto, T.

    2018-04-01

    This paper introduces the design of Flight Control Panel (FCP) Layout using Graphical User Interface in MATLAB. The FCP is the interface to give the command to the simulation and to monitor model variables while the simulation is running. The command accommodates by the FCP are altitude command, the angle of sideslip command, heading command, and setting command for turbulence model. The FCP was also designed to monitor the flight parameter while the simulation is running.

  17. Interface control in BaTiO3 based supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Mario; Elissalde, Catherine; Chung, U.-Chan

    2010-03-01

    Core shell BaTiO3 based particles sintered using advanced processes provide a high control of grain boundaries in bulk composites. As a result, supercapacitor behavior was evidenced which came from the balance between inner grain conductivity and grain boundary dielectric barrier. Thanks to the core-shell structure of the starting particles, improved control of the effective dielectric parameters can be achieved.

  18. Development of an interface for an ultrareliable fault-tolerant control system and an electronic servo-control unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Charles; Williamson, Michael

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center sponsors a research program for the investigation of Intelligent Flight Control Actuation systems. The use of artificial intelligence techniques in conjunction with algorithmic techniques for autonomous, decentralized fault management of flight-control actuation systems is explored under this program. The design, development, and operation of the interface for laboratory investigation of this program is documented. The interface, architecturally based on the Intel 8751 microcontroller, is an interrupt-driven system designed to receive a digital message from an ultrareliable fault-tolerant control system (UFTCS). The interface links the UFTCS to an electronic servo-control unit, which controls a set of hydraulic actuators. It was necessary to build a UFTCS emulator (also based on the Intel 8751) to provide signal sources for testing the equipment.

  19. Semiconductor growth on an oxide using a metallic surfactant and interface studies for potential gate stacks from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes Huamantinco, Andrei

    2008-05-09

    In this work the epitaxial growth of germanium on SrHfO{sub 3}(001), and the La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}/Si(001) and SrTiO{sub 3}/GaAs(001) interfaces were studied theoretically using the Projector-Augmented Wave (PAW) method. The PAW method is based on Density Functional Theory and it is implemented in the Car-Parrinello Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics. The goal of the germanium growth on SrHfO{sub 3}(001) is to form a germanium film with low density of defects and smooth morphology, to be used as channel in a transistor. The feasibility of using a third material to achieve germanium layer-by-layer growth was investigated. The formation of an ordered strontium film on a SrO-terminated oxide substrate, to be used as template for germanium overgrowth, was studied. Deposition of germanium on the strontium 1ML template results in wetting and thus a change of the growth mode to layer-by-layer. The germanium surface is then passivated and a germanium compound is initially formed with strontium at the surface and interface. The interfacial structure and valence band offsets of the La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}/Si(001) crystalline system were studied. The SrTiO{sub 3}/GaAs(001) crystalline interfaces with unpinned Fermi level were investigated. (orig.)

  20. Growth Control and Optics of Organic Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2005-01-01

      Light-emitting organic nanofibers made of phenyl molecules like para-hexaphenyl (p-6P) and grown on muscovite mica form a model system well-suited for the study of optics in the sub-wavelength regime. We demonstrate that p-6P nanofibers can be grown with high control of the morphology of indivi......  Light-emitting organic nanofibers made of phenyl molecules like para-hexaphenyl (p-6P) and grown on muscovite mica form a model system well-suited for the study of optics in the sub-wavelength regime. We demonstrate that p-6P nanofibers can be grown with high control of the morphology...... of individual nanoaggregates and also of the mutual alignment of aggregates by the use of appropriate growth conditions and substrate surfaces. The nanofibers can be detached from the substrate, thus allowing one to study the optical response under a huge variety of fundamentally different conditions, from...... individual floating aggregates to dense bunches of interacting aggregates. We show examples of linear and nonlinear optical properties of the blue-light-emitting aggregates and mention possible applications in future submicrometer-sized optoelectronics....

  1. ClusterControl: a web interface for distributing and monitoring bioinformatics applications on a Linux cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gernot; Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2004-03-22

    ClusterControl is a web interface to simplify distributing and monitoring bioinformatics applications on Linux cluster systems. We have developed a modular concept that enables integration of command line oriented program into the application framework of ClusterControl. The systems facilitate integration of different applications accessed through one interface and executed on a distributed cluster system. The package is based on freely available technologies like Apache as web server, PHP as server-side scripting language and OpenPBS as queuing system and is available free of charge for academic and non-profit institutions. http://genome.tugraz.at/Software/ClusterControl

  2. Soft brain-machine interfaces for assistive robotics: A novel control approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiatti, Lucia; Tessadori, Jacopo; Barresi, Giacinto; Mattos, Leonardo S; Ajoudani, Arash

    2017-07-01

    Robotic systems offer the possibility of improving the life quality of people with severe motor disabilities, enhancing the individual's degree of independence and interaction with the external environment. In this direction, the operator's residual functions must be exploited for the control of the robot movements and the underlying dynamic interaction through intuitive and effective human-robot interfaces. Towards this end, this work aims at exploring the potential of a novel Soft Brain-Machine Interface (BMI), suitable for dynamic execution of remote manipulation tasks for a wide range of patients. The interface is composed of an eye-tracking system, for an intuitive and reliable control of a robotic arm system's trajectories, and a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) unit, for the control of the robot Cartesian stiffness, which determines the interaction forces between the robot and environment. The latter control is achieved by estimating in real-time a unidimensional index from user's electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, which provides the probability of a neutral or active state. This estimated state is then translated into a stiffness value for the robotic arm, allowing a reliable modulation of the robot's impedance. A preliminary evaluation of this hybrid interface concept provided evidence on the effective execution of tasks with dynamic uncertainties, demonstrating the great potential of this control method in BMI applications for self-service and clinical care.

  3. Examination of Color-Lighting Control System Using Colored Paper User Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent year, Full-Color LED Lighting that can be changed to various color such as red, green, blue has been appeared with development of LED Lighting. By Color-Lighting control, users affected such as concentrating and relaxing. Therefore, Color-lighting control will spread to various place such as home, offices, stations. However color-lighting control affected some disturbance such as daylight, display when Full-Color LED controlled indoors. Also, information devices control get difficult with information technology develop. I propose Color-Lighting Control System using Colored Paper User Interface(CLC/CPUI. The purpose of CLC/CPUI is that anyone can intuitively control Full-Color LED Lighting. CLC/CPUI uses colored paper as user interface by sensing the paper. CLC/CPUI realizes lighting color that user demanded to do feedback control. I conduct accuracy verification experiment of CLC/CPUI.

  4. Force-sensed interface for control and training space robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, O. S.; Sarsadskikh, A. S.; Povalyaev, N. D.; Gorbunov, V. I.; Kulakov, F. M.; Vasilev, V. V.

    2018-05-01

    A method of positional and force-torque control of robots is proposed. Prototypes of the system and the master handle have been created. Algorithm of bias estimation and gravity compensation for force-torque sensor and force-torque trajectory correction are described.

  5. Hybrid systems: a real-time interface to control engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Thomas Juul; Heilmann, Søren; Holdgaard, Michael

    1996-01-01

    are usually investigated by control engineers that base their work on the theory of dynamic systems. The mathematical tool for this work is thus mathematical analysis, in particular the theory of differential equations. The paper gives an introduction to a general hybrid systems model for definition of system...

  6. Possibilities and expectations for improved man-machine interface in power system control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asal, H; Burrow, R K; Lindstrom, K; Mocenigo, M; Schellstede, G; Schaffer, G; Serrani, A

    1992-05-01

    The paper describes the hardware, equipment and functions provided to operators for supervising and controlling HVAC power systems. It analyzes the main elements of the man-machine interface (MMI) with particular attention to the recent possibilities afforded by computer technology and full graphic screens. Alarm management and remote control operation are briefly described.

  7. Man/machine interface for a nuclear cask remote handling control station: system design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.; Draper, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Design requirements are presented for a control station of a proposed semi-automated facility for remote handling of nuclear waste casks. Functional and operational man/machine interface: controls, displays, software format, station architecture, and work environment. In addition, some input is given to the design of remote sensing systems in the cask handling areas. 18 references, 9 figures, 12 tables

  8. Control and Automation Systems at the TSO/DSO interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestro, F.; Pilo, F.; Mauri, G.

    2017-01-01

    (Distribution Network Operator) have to assure a secure reliable and good power quality, without taking into consideration any real-time operation of the active components present in their systems. In order to accomplish their missions, DNOs will have to exploit the support of control and automation systems...... and protection systems, but also “external inputs” coming from the Transmission Networks (operated by the Transmission System Operator) and the forthcoming “smart world” (i.e. smart cities, smart transports, smart industries, smart customers etc.). The processing of all such inputs will still have...... to be subordinated to the possibility for Distribution Companies to operate their network under their ultimate responsibility (DSO – Distribution System Operators). This paper presents an overview of the activities of CIGRE C6.25 Working Group (JWG), focusing on the control and automation systems for the future...

  9. Spaceport Command and Control System User Interface Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System will be the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's newest system for launching commercial and government owned spacecraft. It's a large system with many parts all in need of testing. To improve upon testing already done by NASA engineers, the Engineering Directorate, Electrical Division (NE-E) of Kennedy Space Center has hired a group of interns each of the last few semesters to develop novel ways of improving the testing process.

  10. Economic growth and carbon emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    The question about whether environmental improvement is compatible with continued economic growth remains unclear and requires further study in a specific context. This study intends to provide insight on the potential for carbon emissions control in the absence of international agreement, and connect the empirical analysis with theoretical framework. The Chinese electricity generation sector is used as a case study to demonstrate the problem. Both social planner and private problems are examined to derive the conditions that define the optimal level of production and pollution. The private problem will be demonstrated under the emission regulation using an emission tax, an input tax and an abatement subsidy respectively. The social optimal emission flow is imposed into the private problem. To provide tractable analytical results, a Cobb-Douglas type production function is used to describe the joint production process of the desired output and undesired output (i.e., electricity and emissions). A modified Hamiltonian approach is employed to solve the system and the steady state solutions are examined for policy implications. The theoretical analysis suggests that the ratio of emissions to desired output (refer to 'emission factor'), is a function of productive capital and other parameters. The finding of non-constant emission factor shows that reducing emissions without further cutting back the production of desired outputs is feasible under some circumstances. Rather than an ad hoc specification, the optimal conditions derived from our theoretical framework are used to examine the relationship between desired output and emission level. Data comes from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Electric Power Yearbook and provincial information of electricity generation for the year of 1993-2003 are used to estimate the Cobb-Douglas type joint production by the full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method. The empirical analysis shed light on the optimal

  11. Influence of nanocrystal growth kinetics on interface roughness in nickel-aluminum multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurongzeb, D.; Holtz, M.; Daugherty, M.; Berg, J.M.; Chandolu, A.; Yun, J.; Temkin, H.

    2003-01-01

    We study the layer morphology of Ni/Al multilayer structures, with 50 nm period, as deposited and following 10 min anneals up through the melting temperature of Al. X-ray reflectivity measurement of the as-deposited film shows interference fringes, characteristic of a well-defined multilayer stack, with ∼1 nm interface roughness. Over a narrow anneal range of 360-500 deg. C these fringes diminish in amplitude and disappear, indicating elevated interface roughening. However, fringes are observed for anneal temperatures both below and above this range, indicating the presence of well-defined layers with smooth interfaces. A model, in which nanocrystal domains of intermetallic nickel aluminides form at the interfaces, is developed to quantify the annealing induced interface roughness. This model agrees well with the experimental results

  12. Controlling the orientation of nucleobases by dipole moment interaction with graphene/h-BN interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vovusha, Hakkim; Amorim, Rodrigo G.; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Sanyal, Biplab

    2018-01-01

    The interfaces in 2D hybrids of graphene and h-BN provide interesting possibilities of adsorbing and manipulating atomic and molecular entities. In this paper, with the aid of density functional theory, we demonstrate the adsorption characteristics of DNA nucleobases at different interfaces of 2D hybrid nanoflakes of graphene and h-BN. The interfaces provide stronger binding to the nucleobases in comparison to pure graphene and h-BN nanoflakes. It is also revealed that the individual dipole moments of the nucleobases and nanoflakes dictate the orientation of the nucleobases at the interfaces of the hybrid structures. The results of our study point towards a possible route to selectively control the orientation of individual molecules in biosensors.

  13. Controlling the orientation of nucleobases by dipole moment interaction with graphene/h-BN interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vovusha, Hakkim

    2018-02-08

    The interfaces in 2D hybrids of graphene and h-BN provide interesting possibilities of adsorbing and manipulating atomic and molecular entities. In this paper, with the aid of density functional theory, we demonstrate the adsorption characteristics of DNA nucleobases at different interfaces of 2D hybrid nanoflakes of graphene and h-BN. The interfaces provide stronger binding to the nucleobases in comparison to pure graphene and h-BN nanoflakes. It is also revealed that the individual dipole moments of the nucleobases and nanoflakes dictate the orientation of the nucleobases at the interfaces of the hybrid structures. The results of our study point towards a possible route to selectively control the orientation of individual molecules in biosensors.

  14. Bidirectional neural interface: Closed-loop feedback control for hybrid neural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Zane; Lim, Jeffrey; Brown, Sophie; Keller, Melissa; Bugbee, Joseph; Broccard, Frédéric D; Khraiche, Massoud L; Silva, Gabriel A; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Closed-loop neural prostheses enable bidirectional communication between the biological and artificial components of a hybrid system. However, a major challenge in this field is the limited understanding of how these components, the two separate neural networks, interact with each other. In this paper, we propose an in vitro model of a closed-loop system that allows for easy experimental testing and modification of both biological and artificial network parameters. The interface closes the system loop in real time by stimulating each network based on recorded activity of the other network, within preset parameters. As a proof of concept we demonstrate that the bidirectional interface is able to establish and control network properties, such as synchrony, in a hybrid system of two neural networks more significantly more effectively than the same system without the interface or with unidirectional alternatives. This success holds promise for the application of closed-loop systems in neural prostheses, brain-machine interfaces, and drug testing.

  15. Development of a Control and Vision Interface for an AR.Drone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AR.Drone is a remote controlled quadcopter which is low cost, and readily available for consumers. Therefore it represents a simple test-bed on which control and vision research may be conducted. However, interfacing with the AR.Drone can be a challenge for new researchers as the AR.Drone's application programming interface (API is built on low-level, bit-wise, C instructions. Therefore, this paper will demonstrate the use of an additional layer of abstraction on the AR.Drone’s API via the Robot Operating System (ROS. Using ROS, the construction of a high-level graphical user interface (GUI will be demonstrated, with the explicit aim of assisting new researchers in developing simple control and vision algorithms to interface with the AR.Drone. The GUI, formally known as the Control and Vision Interface (CVI is currently used to research and develop computer vision, simultaneous localisation and mapping (SLAM, and path planning algorithms by a number of postgraduate and undergraduate students at the school of Aeronautical, Mechanical, and Mechatronics Engineering (AMME in The University of Sydney.

  16. Control rooms and man-machine interface in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    The importance of man-machine interface for ensuring safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants has always been recognized. Since the early 1970's, the concepts of operator support and human factors have been increasingly used to better define the role of control rooms. In the late 1970's, the lessons learned from experience considerably accelerated the development of recommendations and regulatory requirements governing the resources and data available to operators in nuclear power plant control rooms, and specified the expertise required to assist them in case of need. This document summarizes the steps which have been taken and are being planned around the world to improve the man-machine interface for safe and economic power generation. It intends to present to the reader useful examples on some selected control room design and man-machine interface practices for operation and surveillance of nuclear power plants. 53 refs, 94 figs, 27 tabs

  17. Controllable gaussian-qubit interface for extremal quantum state engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Campbell, Steve; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Paternostro, Mauro

    2010-06-18

    We study state engineering through bilinear interactions between two remote qubits and two-mode gaussian light fields. The attainable two-qubit states span the entire physically allowed region in the entanglement-versus-global-purity plane. Two-mode gaussian states with maximal entanglement at fixed global and marginal entropies produce maximally entangled two-qubit states in the corresponding entropic diagram. We show that a small set of parameters characterizing extremally entangled two-mode gaussian states is sufficient to control the engineering of extremally entangled two-qubit states, which can be realized in realistic matter-light scenarios.

  18. Thin film silicon by a microwave plasma deposition technique: Growth and devices, and, interface effects in amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Basanth

    Thin film silicon (Si) was deposited by a microwave plasma CVD technique, employing double dilution of silane, for the growth of low hydrogen content Si films with a controllable microstructure on amorphous substrates at low temperatures (prepared by this technique. Such films showed a dark conductivity ˜10sp{-6} S/cm, with a conduction activation energy of 0.49 eV. Film growth and properties have been compared for deposition in Ar and He carrier systems and growth models have been proposed. Low temperature junction formation by undoped thin film silicon was examined through a thin film silicon/p-type crystalline silicon heterojunctions. The thin film silicon layers were deposited by rf glow discharge, dc magnetron sputtering and microwave plasma CVD. The hetero-interface was identified by current transport analysis and high frequency capacitance methods as the key parameter controlling the photovoltaic (PV) response. The effect of the interface on the device properties (PV, junction, and carrier transport) was examined with respect to modifications created by chemical treatment, type of plasma species, their energy and film microstructure interacting with the substrate. Thermally stimulated capacitance was used to determine the interfacial trap parameters. Plasma deposition of thin film silicon on chemically clean c-Si created electron trapping sites while hole traps were seen when a thin oxide was present at the interface. Under optimized conditions, a 10.6% efficient cell (11.5% with SiOsb2 A/R) with an open circuit voltage of 0.55 volts and a short circuit current density of 30 mA/cmsp2 was fabricated.

  19. Actuator digital interface unit (AIU). [control units for space shuttle data system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Alternate versions of the actuator interface unit are presented. One alternate is a dual-failure immune configuration which feeds a look-and-switch dual-failure immune hydraulic system. The other alternate is a single-failure immune configuration which feeds a majority voting hydraulic system. Both systems communicate with the data bus through data terminals dedicated to each user subsystem. Both operational control data and configuration control information are processed in and out of the subsystem via the data terminal which yields the actuator interface subsystem, self-managing within its failure immunity capability.

  20. Web-Based Interface for Command and Control of Network Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallick, Michael N.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2010-01-01

    This software allows for the visualization and control of a network of sensors through a Web browser interface. It is currently being deployed for a network of sensors monitoring Mt. Saint Helen s volcano; however, this innovation is generic enough that it can be deployed for any type of sensor Web. From this interface, the user is able to fully control and monitor the sensor Web. This includes, but is not limited to, sending "test" commands to individual sensors in the network, monitoring for real-world events, and reacting to those events

  1. An EMG Interface for the Control of Motion and Compliance of a Supernumerary Robotic Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irfan; Spagnoletti, Giovanni; Salvietti, Gionata; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel electromyographic (EMG) control interface to control motion and joints compliance of a supernumerary robotic finger. The supernumerary robotic fingers are a recently introduced class of wearable robotics that provides users additional robotic limbs in order to compensate or augment the existing abilities of natural limbs without substituting them. Since supernumerary robotic fingers are supposed to closely interact and perform actions in synergy with the human limbs, the control principles of extra finger should have similar behavior as human’s ones including the ability of regulating the compliance. So that, it is important to propose a control interface and to consider the actuators and sensing capabilities of the robotic extra finger compatible to implement stiffness regulation control techniques. We propose EMG interface and a control approach to regulate the compliance of the device through servo actuators. In particular, we use a commercial EMG armband for gesture recognition to be associated with the motion control of the robotic device and surface one channel EMG electrodes interface to regulate the compliance of the robotic device. We also present an updated version of a robotic extra finger where the adduction/abduction motion is realized through ball bearing and spur gears mechanism. We have validated the proposed interface with two sets of experiments related to compensation and augmentation. In the first set of experiments, different bimanual tasks have been performed with the help of the robotic device and simulating a paretic hand since this novel wearable system can be used to compensate the missing grasping abilities in chronic stroke patients. In the second set, the robotic extra finger is used to enlarge the workspace and manipulation capability of healthy hands. In both sets, the same EMG control interface has been used. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed control interface is intuitive and can

  2. Thermal system design and modeling of meniscus controlled silicon growth process for solar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenlei

    The direct conversion of solar radiation to electricity by photovoltaics has a number of significant advantages as an electricity generator. That is, solar photovoltaic conversion systems tap an inexhaustible resource which is free of charge and available anywhere in the world. Roofing tile photovoltaic generation, for example, saves excess thermal heat and preserves the local heat balance. This means that a considerable reduction of thermal pollution in densely populated city areas can be attained. A semiconductor can only convert photons with the energy of the band gap with good efficiency. It is known that silicon is not at the maximum efficiency but relatively close to it. There are several main parts for the photovoltaic materials, which include, single- and poly-crystalline silicon, ribbon silicon, crystalline thin-film silicon, amorphous silicon, copper indium diselenide and related compounds, cadmium telluride, et al. In this dissertation, we focus on melt growth of the single- and poly-crystalline silicon manufactured by Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth process, and ribbon silicon produced by the edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) process. These two methods are the most commonly used techniques for growing photovoltaic semiconductors. For each crystal growth process, we introduce the growth mechanism, growth system design, general application, and progress in the numerical simulation. Simulation results are shown for both Czochralski and EFG systems including temperature distribution of the growth system, velocity field inside the silicon melt and electromagnetic field for the EFG growth system. Magnetic field is applied on Cz system to reduce the melt convection inside crucible and this has been simulated in our numerical model. Parametric studies are performed through numerical and analytical models to investigate the relationship between heater power levels and solidification interface movement and shape. An inverse problem control scheme is developed to

  3. LAMI: A gesturally controlled three-dimensional stage Leap (Motion-based) Audio Mixing Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Wakefield, Jonathan P.; Dewey, Christopher; Gale, William

    2017-01-01

    Interface designers are increasingly exploring alternative approaches to user input/control. LAMI is a Leap (Motion-based) AMI which takes user’s hand gestures and maps these to a three-dimensional stage displayed on a computer monitor. Audio channels are visualised as spheres whose Y coordinate is spectral centroid and X and Z coordinates are controlled by hand position and represent pan and level respectively. Auxiliary send levels are controlled via wrist rotation and vertical hand positio...

  4. Controlled manipulation of the Co-Alq3 interface by rational design of Alq3 derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großmann, Nicolas; Magri, Andrea; Laux, Martin; Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Thielen, Philip; Schäfer, Bernhard; Fuhr, Olaf; Ruben, Mario; Cinchetti, Mirko; Aeschlimann, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Recently, research has revealed that molecules can be used to steer the local spin properties of ferromagnetic surfaces. One possibility to manipulate ferromagnetic-metal-molecule interfaces in a controlled way is to synthesize specific, non-magnetic molecules to obtain a desired interaction with the ferromagnetic substrate. Here, we have synthesized derivatives of the well-known semiconductor Alq 3 (with q = 8-hydroxyquinolinate), in which the 8-hydroxyquinolinate ligands are partially or completely replaced by similar ligands bearing O- or N-donor sets. The goal of this study was to investigate how the presence of (i) different donor atom sets and (ii) aromaticity in different conjugated π-systems influences the spin properties of the metal-molecule interface formed with a Co(100) surface. The spin-dependent metal-molecule-interface properties have been measured by spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, backed up by DFT calculations. Overall, our results show that, in the case of the Co-molecule interface, chemical synthesis of organic ligands leads to specific electronic properties of the interface, such as exciton formation or highly spin-polarized interface states. We find that these properties are even additive, i.e. they can be engineered into one single molecular system that incorporates all the relevant ligands.

  5. The application of standardized control and interface circuits to three dc to dc power converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Biess, J. J.; Schoenfeld, A. D.; Lalli, V. R.

    1973-01-01

    Standardized control and interface circuits were applied to the three most commonly used dc to dc converters: the buck-boost converter, the series-switching buck regulator, and the pulse-modulated parallel inverter. The two-loop ASDTIC regulation control concept was implemented by using a common analog control signal processor and a novel digital control signal processor. This resulted in control circuit standardization and superior static and dynamic performance of the three dc-to-dc converters. Power components stress control, through active peak current limiting and recovery of switching losses, was applied to enhance reliability and converter efficiency.

  6. Dynamics modeling for parallel haptic interfaces with force sensing and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Nicholas; Lawrence, Dale; Pao, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Closed-loop force control can be used on haptic interfaces (HIs) to mitigate the effects of mechanism dynamics. A single multidimensional force-torque sensor is often employed to measure the interaction force between the haptic device and the user's hand. The parallel haptic interface at the University of Colorado (CU) instead employs smaller 1D force sensors oriented along each of the five actuating rods to build up a 5D force vector. This paper shows that a particular manipulandum/hand partition in the system dynamics is induced by the placement and type of force sensing, and discusses the implications on force and impedance control for parallel haptic interfaces. The details of a "squaring down" process are also discussed, showing how to obtain reduced degree-of-freedom models from the general six degree-of-freedom dynamics formulation.

  7. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE DIGITAL HOME CONTROL INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Pastorino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An inquiry of the National Statistics Institute of Spain shows that 74% of the Spanish population with disabilities suffers some kind of limitation performing Daily Basic Activities, while 1.39 million cannot perform them at all without the assistance of specialized personnel. Digital Home Systems could mitigate disabled people’s difficulties to carry out those activities, giving the opportunity to manage home appliances through a single control. Digital Home Systems have to provide specific and adapted control interfaces based on Augmentative and Alternative Communication languages in order to be an efficient solution to the problem and to allow most vulnerable groups of people with disabilities to reach the highest level of autonomy.  This paper describes a Digital Home Interface capable of adapting layouts, styles and contents to device capability, user preferences and appliances’ features; designed with a combination of web technologies, standard languages for abstract interface definition and AAC systems.

  8. Dataglove-based interface for impedance control of manipulators in cooperative human–robot environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes-Madrid, L; Gonzalez de Santos, P

    2013-01-01

    A dataglove-based interface is presented for tracking the forces applied by the hand during contact tasks with a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) manipulator. The interface uses 11 force sensors carefully placed on the palm-side fabric of a 16 DOF dataglove. The force sensors use piezoresistive technology to measure the individual force components from the hand. Based on the dataglove measurements, these components are transformed and summed to assemble the resultant force vector. Finally, this force vector is translated into the manipulator frame using orientation measurements from an inertial measurement unit placed on the dorsal side of the dataglove. Static tests show that the dataglove-based interface can effectively measure the applied hand force, but there are inaccuracies in orientation and magnitude when compared to the load cell measurements used as the reference for error calculation. Promising results were achieved when controlling the 6 DOF manipulator based on the force readings acquired from the dataglove interface; the decoupled dynamics of the dataglove interface with respect to the robot structure yielded smooth force readings of the human intention that could be effectively used in the impedance control of the manipulator. (paper)

  9. Interface Control Document Between the Double Shell Tanks (DST) System and the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAY, T.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies the requirements and responsibilities for all parties to support waste transfer from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System of the River Protection Project (RPP). This Interface Control Document (ICD) will not attempt to control the physical portion of this interface because the physical equipment making up this interface, and any associated interface requirements, are already in place, operational and governed by existing operating specifications and other documentation. The PFP and DST Systems have a direct physical interface (the waste transfer pipeline) that travels between the 241-2 Building (TK-D5) and DST SY-102 via 244-TX double-contained receiver tank (DCRT). The purpose of the ICD process is to formalize working agreements between the RPP DST System and organization/companies internal and external to RPP. This ICD has been developed as part of the requirements basis for design of the DST System to support the Phase I Privatization effort

  10. Electromagnetic control of mass transfer at liquid/liquid interfaces; Controle electromagnetique des transferts de masse aux interfaces liquide/liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadi, B

    2006-04-15

    Most metallurgical processes, such as steel refining or nuclear waste processing; the interfaces between two liquid phases are the regions of mass transfer. These transfers require the implementation of a means of stirring to accelerate the kinetics of the pollutants transfer between both phases. This thesis deals with the use of the electromagnetic forces to stir, without any material contact, the bath core and the interface in order to control or even increase the kinetic transfers. To achieve this, two complementary experimental installations were used. The first experiment allows the measurement of the Indium transfer, initially dissolved in mercury towards a covering electrolyte layer and the velocity field in mercury. The performed experiments, determine the topology of the fields flows speeds in the mercury bath, moreover the behaviour of the transfer kinetics versus the intensity of the magnetic field are established. This evolution is correlated with the dynamic behaviour of the mercury surface. The second installation allows the characterization of an element transfer (Pb, Zr or Ce) initially contained in a fluorinated salt towards an antimony matrix containing lithium. It appears that all transfers kinetics are very fast. The proposed experimental set-up is particularly efficient for Cerium transfer (limited by the interface) but does not present any action for Zirconium transfer. (author)

  11. A control approach for the operation of DG units under variations of interfacing impedance in grid-connected mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseini, S. Kazem; Pouresmaeil, E.; Hosseinnia, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    . However, the converter-based DG interface is subjected to the unexpected uncertainties, which highly influence performance of control loop of DG unit and operation of interfaced converter. The interfacing impedance seen by interfaced VSC may considerably vary in power grid, and the stability of interfaced...... converter is highly sensitive to the impacts of this impedance changes; then, DG unit cannot inject appropriate currents. To deal with the instability problem, a control method based on fractional order active sliding mode is proposed in this paper, which is less sensitive to variations of interfacing...... impedance. A fractional sliding surface, which demonstrates the desired dynamics of system is developed and then, the controller is designed in two phases as sliding and reaching phases to keep the control loop stable. Stability issues of the control method are discussed in details and the conditions...

  12. Design of polymer-biopolymer-hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering: Through molecular control of interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Devendra

    In this dissertation, novel biomaterials are designed for bone biomaterials and bone tissue engineering applications. Novel biomaterials of hydroxyapatite with synthetic and natural polymers have been fabricated using a combination of processing routes. Initially, we investigated hydroxyapatite-polycaprolactone-polyacrylic acid composites and observed that minimal interfacial interactions between polymer and mineral led to inadequate improvement in the mechanical properties. Bioactivity experiments on these composites showed that the presence of functional groups, such as carboxylate groups, influence bioactivity of the composites. We have developed and investigated composites of hydroxyapatite with chitosan and polygalacturonic acid (PgA). Chitosan and PgA are biocompatible, biodegradable, and also electrostatically complementary to each other. This strategy led to significant improvement in mechanical properties of new composites. The nanostructure analysis using atomic force microscopy revealed a multilevel organization in these composites. Enhancement in mechanical response was attributed to stronger interfaces due to strong electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged chitosan and PgA. Further analysis using the Rietveld method showed that biopolymers have marked impact on hydroxyapatite crystal growth and also on its crystal structure. Significant changes were observed in the lattice parameters of hydroxyapatite synthesized by following biomineralization method (organics mediated mineralization). For scaffold preparation, chitosan and PgA were mixed first, and then, nano-hydroxyapatite was added. Oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, such as chitosan and PgA, spontaneously form complex upon mixing. The poly-electrolyte complex exists as nano-sized particles. Chitosan/PgA scaffolds with and without hydroxyapatite were prepared by the freeze drying method. By controlling the rate of cooling and concentration, we have produced both fibrous and sheet

  13. The computer-controlled GPIB-RS232 interface for data transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xiaowei

    1993-01-01

    A kind of RS232-GPIB interface circuit is introduced, which provides communication between the serial system and the instrument with GPIB. Port P 1 of 8031 is used to select function mode as listener, talker or others. Under the control of a personal computer, the data communication is completed both in serial and the parallel modes

  14. Experimental setup for evaluating an adaptive user interface for teleoperation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Indika B.; Peetha, Srikanth; Abubakar, Shamsudeen; Saadatzi, Mohammad Nasser; Cremer, Sven; Popa, Dan O.

    2017-05-01

    A vital part of human interactions with a machine is the control interface, which single-handedly could define the user satisfaction and the efficiency of performing a task. This paper elaborates the implementation of an experimental setup to study an adaptive algorithm that can help the user better tele-operate the robot. The formulation of the adaptive interface and associate learning algorithms are general enough to apply when the mapping between the user controls and the robot actuators is complex and/or ambiguous. The method uses a genetic algorithm to find the optimal parameters that produce the input-output mapping for teleoperation control. In this paper, we describe the experimental setup and associated results that was used to validate the adaptive interface to a differential drive robot from two different input devices; a joystick, and a Myo gesture control armband. Results show that after the learning phase, the interface converges to an intuitive mapping that can help even inexperienced users drive the system to a goal location.

  15. STIMULUS: End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkesh-Ha, Payman [University of New Mexico

    2014-09-12

    The main goal of this research grant is to develop a system-level solution leveraging novel technologies that enable network communications at 100 Gb/s or beyond. University of New Mexico in collaboration with Acadia Optronics LLC has been working on this project to develop the 100 Gb/s Network Interface Controller (NIC) under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant.

  16. Flexible software architecture for user-interface and machine control in laboratory automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutunian, E B; Meldrum, D R; Friedman, N A; Moody, S E

    1998-10-01

    We describe a modular, layered software architecture for automated laboratory instruments. The design consists of a sophisticated user interface, a machine controller and multiple individual hardware subsystems, each interacting through a client-server architecture built entirely on top of open Internet standards. In our implementation, the user-interface components are built as Java applets that are downloaded from a server integrated into the machine controller. The user-interface client can thereby provide laboratory personnel with a familiar environment for experiment design through a standard World Wide Web browser. Data management and security are seamlessly integrated at the machine-controller layer using QNX, a real-time operating system. This layer also controls hardware subsystems through a second client-server interface. This architecture has proven flexible and relatively easy to implement and allows users to operate laboratory automation instruments remotely through an Internet connection. The software architecture was implemented and demonstrated on the Acapella, an automated fluid-sample-processing system that is under development at the University of Washington.

  17. A VMEbus interface for multi-detector trigger and control system

    CERN Document Server

    Gong Pei Rong; Litroco, P

    2002-01-01

    MUSE (MUltiplicity SElector) is the trigger and control system of CHIMERA, a 4 pi charged particles detector. Initialization of MUSE can be performed via VMEbus. The author describes the design of VMEbus interface and functional module in MUSE, and briefs an application of MUSE

  18. Controlled lateral anisotropy in correlated manganite heterostructures by interface-engineered oxygen octahedral coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Zhaoliang; Huijben, Mark; Zhong, Z.; Gauquelin, N.; Macke, S.; Green, R.J.; van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; van Tendeloo, G.; Held, K.; Sawatzky, G.A.; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Controlled in-plane rotation of the magnetic easy axis in manganite heterostructures by tailoring the interface oxygen network could allow the development of correlated oxide-based magnetic tunnelling junctions with non-collinear magnetization, with possible practical applications as miniaturized

  19. Controlled capillary assembly of magnetic Janus Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Q.; Davies, G.B.; Harting, J.D.R.

    2016-01-01

    Capillary interactions can be used to direct assembly of particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces. Precisely controlling the magnitude and direction of capillary interactions to assemble particles into favoured structures for materials science purposes is desirable but challenging. In this

  20. Molecular dynamics study of growth and interface structure during aluminum deposition on Ni(1 0 0) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Hassani, A.; Makan, A.; er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Sbiaai, K.; er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Tabyaoui, A.; er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Hasnaoui, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum thin film growth on Ni(1 0 0) substrate was investigated. • Molecular dynamics simulation based on EAM interaction potential was considered. • Hexagonal and fourfold structures coexisted in the first layer. • Interface mismatch was revealed by wavy effect occurring in both lateral directions. • Film growth followed a layer-by-layer mode only in the first three deposited layers. - Abstract: We investigate aluminum thin film growth on Ni(1 0 0) substrate by means of molecular dynamics simulation. Embedded Atom Method interaction potential is considered. The simulation is performed at 300 K using an incident energy of 1 eV. The substrate-grown film interface shows the coexistence of hexagonal and fourfold structures in the first layer during the initial stage of deposition. As the deposition proceeds, the hexagonal geometry transforms to fourfold one which becomes dominant toward the end of deposition. The coverage of this layer exceeded 100%. Moreover, the deposited Al atoms with fourfold geometry adopt the lattice parameter of Ni as the thickness of deposited film increases. The interface mismatch investigation revealed that the roughness is dictated by how the Al(1 1 1) fits to the Ni(1 0 0) substrate, which may be reflected by a wavy effect occurring in both lateral directions. Furthermore, the film grows by a layer-by-layer mode with a coverage rate greater than 66.7% in the first three layers, while it follows an island mode with a coverage rate lower than the previous value (66.7%) beyond the third layer. Overall, a detailed analysis of each layer growth has established a relationship between the number of deposited atoms and the coverage rate of each layer

  1. Investigation on sense of control parameters for joystick interface in remote operated container crane application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, U. N. N.; Handroos, H.

    2017-09-01

    Introduction: This paper presents the study of sense of control parameters to improve the lack of direct motion feeling through remote operated container crane station (ROCCS) joystick interface. The investigations of the parameters in this study are important to develop the engineering parameters related to the sense of control goal in the next design process. Methodology: Structured interviews and observations were conducted to obtain the user experience data from thirteen remote container crane operators from two international terminals. Then, interview analysis, task analysis, activity analysis and time line analysis were conducted to compare and contrast the results from interviews and observations. Results: Four experience parameters were identified to support the sense of control goal in the later design improvement of the ROCC joystick interface. The significance of difficulties to control, unsynchronized movements, facilitate in control and decision making in unexpected situation as parameters to the sense of control goal were validated by' feedbacks from operators as well as analysis. Contribution: This study provides feedback directly from end users towards developing a sustainable control interface for ROCCS in specific and remote operated off-road vehicles in general.

  2. Multi-interface Level Sensors and New Development in Monitoring and Control of Oil Separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuqiang Yang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In the oil industry, huge saving may be made if suitable multi-interface levelmeasurement systems are employed for effectively monitoring crude oil separators andefficient control of their operation. A number of techniques, e.g. externally mounteddisplacers, differential pressure transmitters and capacitance rod devices, have beendeveloped to measure the separation process with gas, oil, water and other components.Because of the unavailability of suitable multi-interface level measurement systems, oilseparators are currently operated by the trial-and-error approach. In this paper someconventional techniques, which have been used for level measurement in industry, and newdevelopment are discussed.

  3. Electrical control of Faraday rotation at a liquid-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Monica; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Flatté, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    A theory is developed for the Faraday rotation of light from a monolayer of charged magnetic nanoparticles at an electrified liquid-liquid interface. The polarization fields of neighboring nanoparticles enhance the Faraday rotation. At such interfaces, and for realistic sizes and charges of nanoparticles, their adsorption-desorption can be controlled with a voltage variationFaraday rotation. A calculation based on the Maxwell-Garnett theory predicts that the corresponding redistribution of 40 nm nanoparticles of yttrium iron garnet can switch a cavity with a quality factor larger than 10(4) for light of wavelength 500 nm at normal incidence.

  4. Flexusi Interface Builder For Computer Based Accelerator Monitoring And Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Kurakin, V G; Kurakin, P V

    2004-01-01

    We have developed computer code for any desired graphics user interface designing for monitoring and control system at the executable level. This means that operator can build up measurement console consisting of virtual devices before or even during real experiment without recompiling source file. Such functionality results in number of advantages comparing with traditional programming. First of all any risk disappears to introduce bug into source code. Another important thing is the fact the both program developers and operator staff do not interface in developing ultimate product (measurement console). Thus, small team without detailed project can design even very complicated monitoring and control system. For the reason mentioned below, approach suggested is especially helpful for large complexes to be monitored and control, accelerator being among them. The program code consists of several modules, responsible for data acquisition, control and representation. Borland C++ Builder technologies based on VCL...

  5. Radial restricted solid-on-solid and etching interface-growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Sidiney G.

    2018-03-01

    An approach to generate radial interfaces is presented. A radial network recursively obtained is used to implement discrete model rules designed originally for the investigation in flat substrates. I used the restricted solid-on-solid and etching models as to test the proposed scheme. The results indicate the Kardar, Parisi, and Zhang conjecture is completely verified leading to a good agreement between the interface radius fluctuation distribution and the Gaussian unitary ensemble. The evolution of the radius agrees well with the generalized conjecture, and the two-point correlation function exhibits also a good agreement with the covariance of the Airy2 process. The approach can be used to investigate radial interfaces evolution for many other classes of universality.

  6. Brain Computer Interface for Micro-controller Driven Robot Based on Emotiv Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Parth Gargava; Krishna Asawa

    2017-01-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is developed to navigate a micro-controller based robot using Emotiv sensors. The BCI system has a pipeline of 5 stages- signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, classification and CUDA inter- facing. It shall aid in serving a prototype for physical movement of neurological patients who are unable to control or operate on their muscular movements. All stages of the pipeline are designed to process bodily actions like eye blinks to command naviga...

  7. Graphical User Interface for an Observing Control System for the UK Infrared Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M.; Bridger, A.; Wright, G. S.; Adamson, A. J.; Currie, M. J.; Economou, F.

    A Graphical user interface for the observing control system of UK Infrared Telescope has been developed as a part of the ORAC (Observatory Reduction and Acquisition Control) Project. We analyzed and designed the system using the Unified Modelling Language (UML) with the CASE tool Rational Rose 98. The system has been implemented in a modular way with Java packages using Swing and RMI. This system is component-based with pluggability. Object orientation concepts and UML notations have been applied throughout the development.

  8. Interfacing COTS Speech Recognition and Synthesis Software to a Lotus Notes Military Command and Control Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Oliver

    2002-10-01

    Speech recognition and synthesis technologies have become commercially viable over recent years. Two current market leading products in speech recognition technology are Dragon NaturallySpeaking and IBM ViaVoice. This report describes the development of speech user interfaces incorporating these products with Lotus Notes and Java applications. These interfaces enable data entry using speech recognition and allow warnings and instructions to be issued via speech synthesis. The development of a military vocabulary to improve user interaction is discussed. The report also describes an evaluation in terms of speed of the various speech user interfaces developed using Dragon NaturallySpeaking and IBM ViaVoice with a Lotus Notes Command and Control Support System Log database.

  9. Paradigm shift in plant growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Christian

    2015-06-01

    For plants to grow they need resources and appropriate conditions that these resources are converted into biomass. While acknowledging the importance of co-drivers, the classical view is still that carbon, that is, photosynthetic CO2 uptake, ranks above any other drivers of plant growth. Hence, theory and modelling of growth traditionally is carbon centric. Here, I suggest that this view is not reflecting reality, but emerged from the availability of methods and process understanding at leaf level. In most cases, poorly understood processes of tissue formation and cell growth are governing carbon demand, and thus, CO2 uptake. Carbon can only be converted into biomass to the extent chemical elements other than carbon, temperature or cell turgor permit. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Autotuning of PID controller by means of human machine interface device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Awtoniuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available More and more control systems are based on industry microprocessors like PLC controllers (Programmable Logic Controller. The most commonly used control algorithm is PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative algorithm. Autotuning procedure is not available in every PLC. These controllers are typically used in cooperation with HMI (Human Machine Interface devices. In the study two procedures of autotuning of the PID controller were implemented in the HMI device: step method and relay method. Six tuning rules for step methods and one for relay method were chosen. The autotuning procedures on simulated controlled object and PLC controller without build-in autotuning were tested. The object of control was first order system plus time delay.

  11. Hierarchical Control of Parallel AC-DC Converter Interfaces for Hybrid Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Guerrero, Josep M.; Sun, Kai

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a hierarchical control system for parallel power electronics interfaces between ac bus and dc bus in a hybrid microgrid is presented. Both standalone and grid-connected operation modes in the dc side of the microgrid are analyzed. Concretely, a three-level hierarchical control system...... equal or proportional dc load current sharing. The common secondary control level is designed to eliminate the dc bus voltage deviation produced by the droop control, with dc bus voltage in the hybrid microgrid boosted to an acceptable range. After guaranteeing the performance of the dc side standalone...

  12. Evaluation of human factors in interface design in main control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.-L.; Liang, S.-F.M.; Liu, T.-Y.Y.; Yang, Y.-J.; Chen, P.-Y.; Chuang, C.-F.

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of human factors in a new nuclear power plant was conducted prior to the beginning of any business operations. After the task analysis and observation of training, two stages of interviews were carried out with the operators in the Fourth Nuclear Power Plant (NPP4). The main concerns identified were problems resulting from the operating interface of the display and controls in the main control room, usability of procedures, and the layout of the main control room. The latent human errors and suggestions were listed, and the top three problems were analyzed. The operators indicated that the alarm design issues and the critical problem of the operating mode with the VDU were worth further study in order to provide suggestions for a new interface design for future power plants.

  13. FPGA implementation of PCI to CAMAC interface for Embedded CAMAC Controller (ECC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, K.; Behere, Anita; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    CAMAC controllers are used for control systems and nuclear physics experiments. Control applications need more number of physically distributed crates with regular scanning of all the parameters, the control being with a centralized computer. On the other hand, nuclear physics experiments need a high throughput with a large number of parameters in one or more crates. The nature of events is random hence buffering of data in LIST mode acquisition is needed. For a large number of parameters, this translates to high transfer rate. Hence it is essential that the CAMAC readout time is minimized and also the data transfer speed is improved to achieve maximum effective throughput. The ECC is designed to achieve these objectives using an embedded controller with PC architecture having PCI bus as interface for add on logic. The PCI Add-on to CAMAC interface protocol has been implemented in an AL TERA FPGA and all the functionality coded in VHDL. This paper discusses the design aspects of the FPGA implementation of the PCI to CAMAC interface. (author)

  14. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, M.; Beermann, T.; Vigne, R.; Barisits, M.; Garonne, V.; Serfon, C.

    2015-12-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for usergenerated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained frontends like web-browsers as well as remote services. This contribution will detail the reasons for these principles and the design choices taken. Additionally, the implementation, the interactions with external systems, and an evaluation of the system in production, both from a technological and user perspective, conclude this contribution.

  15. General MACOS Interface for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The General MACOS Interface (GMI) for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) enables the use of MATLAB as a front-end for JPL s critical optical modeling package, MACOS. MACOS is JPL s in-house optical modeling software, which has proven to be a superb tool for advanced systems engineering of optical systems. GMI, coupled with MACOS, allows for seamless interfacing with modeling tools from other disciplines to make possible integration of dynamics, structures, and thermal models with the addition of control systems for deformable optics and other actuated optics. This software package is designed as a tool for analysts to quickly and easily use MACOS without needing to be an expert at programming MACOS. The strength of MACOS is its ability to interface with various modeling/development platforms, allowing evaluation of system performance with thermal, mechanical, and optical modeling parameter variations. GMI provides an improved means for accessing selected key MACOS functionalities. The main objective of GMI is to marry the vast mathematical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB with the powerful optical analysis engine of MACOS, thereby providing a useful tool to anyone who can program in MATLAB. GMI also improves modeling efficiency by eliminating the need to write an interface function for each task/project, reducing error sources, speeding up user/modeling tasks, and making MACOS well suited for fast prototyping.

  16. Interfacing the septa movement (DC motors) equipment to the PS control system and the MIL1553 bus

    CERN Document Server

    Dehavay, Claude

    1995-01-01

    Continuing the rejuvenation of the PS Control system , this application replaces the Single Transceiver Hybrid used to interface the Septa Movement Fquipment by a G64 system connected to the VME crate via the MIL1553 bus. This note explains the G64 hardware interface and details the standard message as defined in the Control Protocole for Power Converter, RF and Stepping Motor equipment.

  17. Growth of aluminum oxide on silicon carbide with an atomically sharp interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Ana Gomes; Pedersen, Kjeld; Li, Zheshen

    2017-01-01

    this system up to around 600 °C (all in ultrahigh vacuum). This converts all the SiO2 into a uniform layer of Al2O3 with an atomically sharp interface between the Al2O3 and the Si surface. In the present work, the same procedures are applied to form Al2O3 on a SiC film grown on top of Si (111). The results...... indicate that a similar process, resulting in a uniform layer of 1-2 nm of Al2O3 with an atomically sharp Al2O3/SiC interface, also works in this case.......The development of SiC wafers with properties suitable for electronic device fabrication is now well established commercially. A critical issue for developing metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor devices of SiC is the choice of dielectric materials for surface passivation...

  18. The role of control in entrepreneurial growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Fleck, Emma; Krueger, Norris

    as a proxy for entrepreneurial intentions. However, little research has attempted to establish the underlying mechanisms that produce or inhibit the development of self-efficacy. Social cognitive theory links self-efficacy to the exercise of personal control. Extending these findings to entrepreneurship......In this article we seek to extend previous work on control by developing a theoretical framework for understanding the role of control in entrepreneurship. We explore power-control theory as a tool for understanding the risk-related behaviours among entrepreneurs. Self-efficacy has long been used...

  19. PointCom: semi-autonomous UGV control with intuitive interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Mitchell M.; Perlin, Victor E.; Iagnemma, Karl D.; Lupa, Robert M.; Rohde, Steven M.; Overholt, James; Fiorani, Graham

    2008-04-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) will play an important role in the nation's next-generation ground force. Advances in sensing, control, and computing have enabled a new generation of technologies that bridge the gap between manual UGV teleoperation and full autonomy. In this paper, we present current research on a unique command and control system for UGVs named PointCom (Point-and-Go Command). PointCom is a semi-autonomous command system for one or multiple UGVs. The system, when complete, will be easy to operate and will enable significant reduction in operator workload by utilizing an intuitive image-based control framework for UGV navigation and allowing a single operator to command multiple UGVs. The project leverages new image processing algorithms for monocular visual servoing and odometry to yield a unique, high-performance fused navigation system. Human Computer Interface (HCI) techniques from the entertainment software industry are being used to develop video-game style interfaces that require little training and build upon the navigation capabilities. By combining an advanced navigation system with an intuitive interface, a semi-autonomous control and navigation system is being created that is robust, user friendly, and less burdensome than many current generation systems. mand).

  20. Dynamic Analysis of Recalescence Process and Interface Growth of Eutectic Fe82B17Si1 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Liu, A. M.; Chen, Z.; Li, P. Z.; Zhang, C. H.

    2018-03-01

    By employing the glass fluxing technique in combination with cyclical superheating, the microstructural evolution of the undercooled Fe82B17Si1 alloy in the obtained undercooling range was studied. With increase in undercooling, a transition of cooling curves was detected from one recalescence to two recalescences, followed by one recalescence. The two types of cooling curves were fitted by the break equation and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model. Based on the cooling curves at different undercoolings, the recalescence rate was calculated by the multi-logistic growth model and the Boettinger-Coriel-Trivedi model. Both the recalescence features and the interface growth kinetics of the eutectic Fe82B17Si1 alloy were explored. The fitting results that were obtained using TEM (SAED), SEM and XRD were consistent with the changing rule of microstructures. Finally, the relationship between the microstructure and hardness was also investigated.

  1. [Research of controlling of smart home system based on P300 brain-computer interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjia; Yang, Chengjie

    2014-08-01

    Using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal to control external devices has always been the research focus in the field of brain-computer interface (BCI). This is especially significant for those disabilities who have lost capacity of movements. In this paper, the P300-based BCI and the microcontroller-based wireless radio frequency (RF) technology are utilized to design a smart home control system, which can be used to control household appliances, lighting system, and security devices directly. Experiment results showed that the system was simple, reliable and easy to be populirised.

  2. HoloHands: games console interface for controlling holographic optical manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C.; McPherson, M.; McDougall, C.; McGloin, D.

    2013-03-01

    The increasing number of applications for holographic manipulation techniques has sparked the development of more accessible control interfaces. Here, we describe a holographic optical tweezers experiment which is controlled by gestures that are detected by a Microsoft Kinect. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to calibrate the tweezers using the Stokes drag method and compare this to automated calibrations. We also show that multiple particle manipulation can be handled. This is a promising new line of research for gesture-based control which could find applications in a wide variety of experimental situations.

  3. HoloHands: games console interface for controlling holographic optical manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C; McPherson, M; McDougall, C; McGloin, D

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of applications for holographic manipulation techniques has sparked the development of more accessible control interfaces. Here, we describe a holographic optical tweezers experiment which is controlled by gestures that are detected by a Microsoft Kinect. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to calibrate the tweezers using the Stokes drag method and compare this to automated calibrations. We also show that multiple particle manipulation can be handled. This is a promising new line of research for gesture-based control which could find applications in a wide variety of experimental situations. (paper)

  4. Brain Computer Interface-Controlling Devices Utilizing The Alpha Brain Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Hundia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the development and testing of an interface system whereby one can control external devices by voluntarily controlling alpha waves that is through eye movement. Such a system may be used for the control of prosthetics robotic arms and external devices like wheelchairs using the alpha brain waves and the Mu rhythm. The response generated through the movement of the eye detecting and controlling the amplitude of the alpha brain waves is interfaced and processed to control Robotic systems and smart home control. In order to measure the response of alpha waves over different lobes of the brain initially I measured these signals over 32 regions using silver chloride plated electrodes. By the opening and the closure of the eyes and the movement in the up-down left-right directions and processing these movements measuring them over the occipital region I was able to differentiate the amplitude of the alpha waves generated due to these several movements. In the First session testing period subjects were asked to close and open their eyes and they were able to control limited movements of a Robot and a prosthetic arm. In the Second 2session the movement of the eyes was also considered left-right up-down along with the opening and closure during this time span they were able to control more dimensions of the robot several devices at the same time using different eye movements.

  5. Real-time image processing and control interface for remote operation of a microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Hesong; Wilder, Joseph

    1999-08-01

    A real-time image processing and control interface for remote operation of a microscope is presented in this paper. The system has achieved real-time color image display for 640 X 480 pixel images. Multi-resolution image representation can be provided for efficient transmission through the network. Through the control interface the computer can communicate with the programmable microscope via the RS232 serial ports. By choosing one of three scanning patterns, a sequence of images can be saved as BMP or PGM files to record information on an entire microscope slide. The system will be used by medical and graduate students at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for distance learning. It can be used in many network-based telepathology applications.

  6. Controlling a virtual forehand prosthesis using an adaptive and affective Human-Machine Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, I Mohammad; Firoozabadi, S M P; Golpayegani, S M R Hashemi; Hu, H

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptable Human-Machine Interface (HMI) for controlling virtual forearm prosthesis. Direct physical performance measures (obtained score and completion time) for the requested tasks were calculated. Furthermore, bioelectric signals from the forehead were recorded using one pair of electrodes placed on the frontal region of the subject head to extract the mental (affective) measures while performing the tasks. By employing the proposed algorithm and above measures, the proposed HMI can adapt itself to the subject's mental states, thus improving the usability of the interface. The quantitative results from 15 subjects show that the proposed HMI achieved better physical performance measures in comparison to a conventional non-adaptive myoelectric controller (p < 0.001).

  7. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  8. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  9. A python based interface for the tandem-linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajith Kumar, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    The control system for the Tandem-LINAC accelerator system at IUAC is a client-server design running on a network of PCs under the GNU/Linux operating system. The computers connected to the devices in the accelerator run a server program. The computers providing the user interface runs different kinds of client programs that communicates to the servers over a TCT/IP network to control/monitor the accelerator parameters. Both the programs were written in C language and some programming expertise was required to write the client programs. The addition of a Python language interface has enabled the users to write programs for specific tasks like data logging and partial automation of the operation with minimal effort. (author)

  10. Form planning Control to growth management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2016-01-01

    its so-called “comprehensive-integrated” tradition and both the steering and strategic roles of national-level planning have been largely superseded by a more “flexible” planning style fit to promote specific sectoral agendas. While the legacy of land-use planning is still embedded at the local level...... caused that spatial planning be regarded more as a cost than an asset. Accordingly, it is evident that the Danish planning domain has progressively lost political clout and the focus is changed towards facilitation and management of economic growth....

  11. Voltage Control of Rare-Earth Magnetic Moments at the Magnetic-Insulator-Metal Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Alejandro O.; Cahaya, Adam B.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-01-01

    The large spin-orbit interaction in the lanthanides implies a strong coupling between their internal charge and spin degrees of freedom. We formulate the coupling between the voltage and the local magnetic moments of rare-earth atoms with a partially filled 4 f shell at the interface between an insulator and a metal. The rare-earth-mediated torques allow the power-efficient control of spintronic devices by electric-field-induced ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization switching.

  12. Growth of fingers at an unstable diffusing interface in a porous medium or hele-shaw cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooding, R A

    1969-11-27

    Waves at an unstable horizontal interface, between 2 fluids moving vertically through a saturated porous medium, are observed to grow rapidly to become fingers (i.e., the amplitude greatly exceeds the wavelength). For a diffusing interface, in experiments using a Hele-Shaw cell, the mean amplitude taken over many fingers grows approx. as (time)U2D, followed by a transition to a growth proportional to time. Correspondingly, the mean wave number decreases approx. as (time)U-1/2D. Because of the rapid increase in amplitude, longitudinal dispersion ultimately becomes negligible relative to wave growth. To represent the observed quantities at large time, the transport equation is suitably weighted and averaged over the horizontal plane. Hyperbolic equations result, and the ascending and descending zones containing the fronts of the fingers are replaced by discontinuities. These averaged equations form an open set, but closure is achieved by assuming a law for the mean wave number based on similarity. (22 refs.)

  13. Multilevel interfaces for power plant control rooms I: An integrative review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Events that are unfamiliar to operators and that have not been anticipated by designers pose the greatest threat to system safety in nuclear power plants. The abstraction hierarchy has been proposed as a representation framework that can be adopted to design interfaces that support operators in dealing with these unanticipated events. This multilevel representation format represents a plant in terms of both physical and functional constraints. This article reviews, for the first time, the work that has been done in academia, industry, and research laboratories on multilevel interfaces based on the abstraction hierarchy. The review indicates that there are many degrees of freedom in designing an interface based on the abstraction hierarchy but that very little systematic work has been done in evaluating how best to deal with those degrees of freedom. As a result, there is very little defensible guidance to provide designers. As a first step in overcoming this barrier, a companion paper uses the results of the review presented here to develop a preliminary design space for multilevel interfaces based on the abstraction hierarchy. This space serves several worthwhile purposes relevant not only to research but also to design and regulation as well. Consequently this complementary set of papers should be of interest to researchers, designers, and regulators concerned with nuclear power-plant control rooms. 53 refs., 8 figs

  14. Interface control document between PUREX/UO3 Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    This interface control document (ICD) between PUREX/UO 3 Plant Transition (PPT) and Solid Waste Disposal Division (SWD) establishes at a top level the functional responsibilities of each division where interfaces exist between the two divisions. Since the PUREX Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions operate autonomously, it is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division's expectations regarding these interfaces. This ICD primarily deals with solid wastes generated by the PPT. In addition to delineating functional responsibilities, the ICD includes a baseline description of those wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the divisions. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes and timing for use in planning the proper waste management capabilities: the primary purpose of this ICD is to ensure defensibility of expected waste stream volumes and Characteristics for future waste management facilities. Waste descriptions must be as complete as-possible to ensure adequate treatment, storage, and disposal capability will exist. The ICD also facilitates integration of existing or planned waste management capabilities of the PUREX. Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions. The ICD does not impact or affect the existing processes or procedures for shipping, packaging, or approval for shipping wastes by generators to the Solid Waste Division

  15. Effect of precipitate-matrix interface sinks on the growth of voids in the matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailsford, A.D.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative discussion of the differing roles played by coherent and incoherent precipitates as point defect sinks is presented. Rate theory is used to obtain semiquantitative estimates of the growth of cavities in the matrix when either type of precipitate is present. Methods for deriving the sink strengths of precipitates of arbitrary shape are developed. In three materials where available microstructural information allows an analysis, precipitates are found to cause only a small relative suppression of cavity growth via the mechanisms here considered

  16. Natural interfaces for interacting with a virtual control desk of a nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves da Cunha e

    2012-01-01

    Due to very strict standards of safe operation of a nuclear power plant operators must be well trained so they can operate it within the necessary safety procedures. This is done through training simulators, which enable the user operation, as close as possible to the real control desk, and can be inserted accident situations, so they train, how to return the plant to a normal operating condition. Normally is used two types of simulator. Preferred is the full scope simulator, what is a computational dynamics program of the plant used in conjunction with a physical replica of the control desk, but this type of simulator involves a high construction cost. The second type is what uses synoptic windows of various regions of the original control desk, its construction cost is smaller, but it have a little fidelity to the original appearance of the table. Currently, with the use of virtual reality, control desks can be modeled in 3D, making the simulator interface is very similar to the appearance of the real control desk with a low cost construction. This work shows the use of natural interfaces for operator interaction with the virtual control desk, in order that it does not use any mechanical device for displaying and acting with it. For procedures that were used, such as: computer vision to recognize the position of the operator's and observation of their hands to the work of the desk controls and voice recognition. (author)

  17. FPGA implementation of a ZigBee wireless network control interface to transmit biomedical signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez López, M. A.; Goy, C. B.; Bolognini, P. C.; Herrera, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, cardiac hemodynamic monitors have incorporated new technologies based on wireless sensor networks which can implement different types of communication protocols. More precisely, a digital conductance catheter system recently developed adds a wireless ZigBee module (IEEE 802.15.4 standards) to transmit cardiac signals (ECG, intraventricular pressure and volume) which would allow the physicians to evaluate the patient's cardiac status in a noninvasively way. The aim of this paper is to describe a control interface, implemented in a FPGA device, to manage a ZigBee wireless network. ZigBee technology is used due to its excellent performance including simplicity, low-power consumption, short-range transmission and low cost. FPGA internal memory stores 8-bit signals with which the control interface prepares the information packets. These data were send to the ZigBee END DEVICE module that receives and transmits wirelessly to the external COORDINATOR module. Using an USB port, the COORDINATOR sends the signals to a personal computer for displaying. Each functional block of control interface was assessed by means of temporal diagrams. Three biological signals, organized in packets and converted to RS232 serial protocol, were sucessfully transmitted and displayed in a PC screen. For this purpose, a custom-made graphical software was designed using LabView.

  18. FPGA implementation of a ZigBee wireless network control interface to transmit biomedical signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, M A Gómez; Goy, C B; Bolognini, P C; Herrera, M C

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, cardiac hemodynamic monitors have incorporated new technologies based on wireless sensor networks which can implement different types of communication protocols. More precisely, a digital conductance catheter system recently developed adds a wireless ZigBee module (IEEE 802.15.4 standards) to transmit cardiac signals (ECG, intraventricular pressure and volume) which would allow the physicians to evaluate the patient's cardiac status in a noninvasively way. The aim of this paper is to describe a control interface, implemented in a FPGA device, to manage a ZigBee wireless network. ZigBee technology is used due to its excellent performance including simplicity, low-power consumption, short-range transmission and low cost. FPGA internal memory stores 8-bit signals with which the control interface prepares the information packets. These data were send to the ZigBee END DEVICE module that receives and transmits wirelessly to the external COORDINATOR module. Using an USB port, the COORDINATOR sends the signals to a personal computer for displaying. Each functional block of control interface was assessed by means of temporal diagrams. Three biological signals, organized in packets and converted to RS232 serial protocol, were successfully transmitted and displayed in a PC screen. For this purpose, a custom-made graphical software was designed using LabView.

  19. Multidimensional control using a mobile-phone based brain-muscle-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Scott; Joshi, Sanjay S

    2011-01-01

    Many well-known brain-computer interfaces measure signals at the brain, and then rely on the brain's ability to learn via operant conditioning in order to control objects in the environment. In our lab, we have been developing brain-muscle-computer interfaces, which measure signals at a single muscle and then rely on the brain's ability to learn neuromuscular skills via operant conditioning. Here, we report a new mobile-phone based brain-muscle-computer interface prototype for severely paralyzed persons, based on previous results from our group showing that humans may actively create specified power levels in two separate frequency bands of a single sEMG signal. Electromyographic activity on the surface of a single face muscle (Auricularis superior) is recorded with a standard electrode. This analog electrical signal is imported into an Android-based mobile phone. User-modulated power in two separate frequency band serves as two separate and simultaneous control channels for machine control. After signal processing, the Android phone sends commands to external devices via Bluetooth. Users are trained to use the device via biofeedback, with simple cursor-to-target activities on the phone screen.

  20. A multimodal interface to resolve the Midas-Touch problem in gaze controlled wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Yogesh Kumar; Cecotti, Hubert; Wong-Lin, KongFatt; Prasad, Girijesh

    2017-07-01

    Human-computer interaction (HCI) research has been playing an essential role in the field of rehabilitation. The usability of the gaze controlled powered wheelchair is limited due to Midas-Touch problem. In this work, we propose a multimodal graphical user interface (GUI) to control a powered wheelchair that aims to help upper-limb mobility impaired people in daily living activities. The GUI was designed to include a portable and low-cost eye-tracker and a soft-switch wherein the wheelchair can be controlled in three different ways: 1) with a touchpad 2) with an eye-tracker only, and 3) eye-tracker with soft-switch. The interface includes nine different commands (eight directions and stop) and integrated within a powered wheelchair system. We evaluated the performance of the multimodal interface in terms of lap-completion time, the number of commands, and the information transfer rate (ITR) with eight healthy participants. The analysis of the results showed that the eye-tracker with soft-switch provides superior performance with an ITR of 37.77 bits/min among the three different conditions (pusers.

  1. Carbon nanotube growth from catalytic nano-clusters formed by hot-ion-implantation into the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Yasushi, E-mail: yhoshino@kanagawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Arima, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Ai; Saito, Yasunao; Nakata, Jyoji [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have studied growth of chirality-controlled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from hot-implantation-formed catalytic nano-clusters in a thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. This procedure has the advantage of high controllability of the diameter and the number of clusters by optimizing the conditions of the ion implantation. In the present study, Co{sup +} ions with ion dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted in the vicinity of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface at 300 Degree-Sign C temperature. The implanted Co atoms located in the SiO{sub 2} layer has an amorphous-like structure with a cluster diameter of several nm. In contrast, implanted Co atoms in the Si substrate are found to take a cobalt silicide structure, confirmed by the high-resolution image of transmission electron microscope. CNTs are grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We have confirmed a large amount of vertically-aligned multi-walled CNTs from the Co nano-clusters formed by the hot-ion-implantation near the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  2. Controlled Directional Growth of TiO2 Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In, Su-il; Hou, Yidong; Abrams, Billie

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate how the anodization direction and growth rate of vertically aligned, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube (NT) arrays can be controlled and manipulated by the local concentration of O-2 in the electrolyte. This leads to the growth of highly active TiO2 NT arrays directly on nonconducting s...

  3. Gas-Jet Meniscus Control in Ribbon Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Vonroos, O.

    1983-01-01

    Gas jet used to control shape of meniscus and thus to regulate ribbon thickness in vertical silicon-ribbon growth. Gas jet also cools ribbon, increasing maximum possible pull speed for silicon, contact angle of 11 degrees plus or minus 1 degree required for constant thickness ribbon growth. Cooling effect of gas jet increases maximum possible pull speed.

  4. Operator interface for the PEP-II low level RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.; Claus, R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper focuses on the operational aspects of the low level RF control system being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. Subsystems requiring major operational considerations include displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors, and various client applications in the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Since commissioning of PEP-II RF is currently in-progress, only those parts of the control system used during this phase are discussed in detail. Based on past experience with the SLC control system, it is expected that effort expended during commissioning on a solid user interface will result in smoother transition to full reliable 24-hour-a-day operation

  5. Simulating Interface Growth and Defect Generation in CZT – Simulation State of the Art and Known Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gao, Fei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bylaska, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zabaras, Nicholas [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2012-11-01

    This one-year, study topic project will survey and investigate the known state-of-the-art of modeling and simulation methods suitable for performing fine-scale, fully 3-D modeling, of the growth of CZT crystals at the melt-solid interface, and correlating physical growth and post-growth conditions with generation and incorporation of defects into the solid CZT crystal. In the course of this study, this project will also identify the critical gaps in our knowledge of modeling and simulation techniques in terms of what would be needed to be developed in order to perform accurate physical simulations of defect generation in melt-grown CZT. The transformational nature of this study will be, for the first time, an investigation of modeling and simulation methods for describing microstructural evolution during crystal growth and the identification of the critical gaps in our knowledge of such methods, which is recognized as having tremendous scientific impacts for future model developments in a wide variety of materials science areas.

  6. Effect of plasticity on cleavage crack growth resistance at an interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    The mixed mode toughness of an interface joining an elastic-plastic metal to a solid which does not yield plastically is studied numerically for cases where fracture occurs by atomic separation. Thus, the length scale of the fracture process is typically much smaller than the dislocation spacing...... of a thin elastic strip of material along the metal side of the crack tip, while the metal outside the strip is described by continuum plasticity. Most of the computations use an infinitely long elastic strip to represent the elastic core region around the tip, but the approximation of using a long strip...

  7. Basic theory of diameter control in Czochralski growth using the melt-weighing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, T.H.

    1986-04-01

    The unconfined crystal growth in the Czochralski configuration is recognized as a process which is quite dependent upon successful control of the shape determining conditions. In the paper attention is focused on the meniscus region, and its relevance to the crystal diameter behaviour is discussed. The dynamic stability of the configuration is analyzed according to the Surek criterion. In contrast to earlier zeroth order arguments, the system is shown to be inherently stable at normal growth conditions if the thermal impedance of the meniscus is taken into account. General difficulties associated with small diameter growth are pointed out. Reference is made to various growth monitoring arrangements, and the melt-weighing method is described in detail. Assuming uniform growth with a flat interface, the exact relation between the force experienced by a weighing cell and the growth parameters during both stationary and non-stationary conditions is derived. Growth at a constant angle is analyzed, and a new procedure for deriving the crystal diameter is suggested

  8. Exploiting the MDM2-CK1α Protein-Protein Interface to Develop Novel Biologics That Induce UBL-Kinase-Modification and Inhibit Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huart, Anne-Sophie; MacLaine, Nicola J.; Narayan, Vikram; Hupp, Ted R.

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions forming dominant signalling events are providing ever-growing platforms for the development of novel Biologic tools for controlling cell growth. Casein Kinase 1 α (CK1α) forms a genetic and physical interaction with the murine double minute chromosome 2 (MDM2) oncoprotein resulting in degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor. Pharmacological inhibition of CK1 increases p53 protein level and induces cell death, whilst small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CK1α stabilizes p53 and induces growth arrest. We mapped the dominant protein-protein interface that stabilizes the MDM2 and CK1α complex in order to determine whether a peptide derived from the core CK1α-MDM2 interface form novel Biologics that can be used to probe the contribution of the CK1-MDM2 protein-protein interaction to p53 activation and cell viability. Overlapping peptides derived from CK1α were screened for dominant MDM2 binding sites using (i) ELISA with recombinant MDM2; (ii) cell lysate pull-down towards endogenous MDM2; (iii) MDM2-CK1α complex-based competition ELISA; and (iv) MDM2-mediated ubiquitination. One dominant peptide, peptide 35 was bioactive in all four assays and its transfection induced cell death/growth arrest in a p53-independent manner. Ectopic expression of flag-tagged peptide 35 induced a novel ubiquitin and NEDD8 modification of CK1α, providing one of the first examples whereby NEDDylation of a protein kinase can be induced. These data identify an MDM2 binding motif in CK1α which when isolated as a small peptide can (i) function as a dominant negative inhibitor of the CK1α-MDM2 interface, (ii) be used as a tool to study NEDDylation of CK1α, and (iii) reduce cell growth. Further, this approach provides a technological blueprint, complementing siRNA and chemical biology approaches, by exploiting protein-protein interactions in order to develop Biologics to manipulate novel types of signalling pathways such as cross-talk between

  9. Exploiting the MDM2-CK1α protein-protein interface to develop novel biologics that induce UBL-kinase-modification and inhibit cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Huart

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions forming dominant signalling events are providing ever-growing platforms for the development of novel Biologic tools for controlling cell growth. Casein Kinase 1 α (CK1α forms a genetic and physical interaction with the murine double minute chromosome 2 (MDM2 oncoprotein resulting in degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor. Pharmacological inhibition of CK1 increases p53 protein level and induces cell death, whilst small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CK1α stabilizes p53 and induces growth arrest. We mapped the dominant protein-protein interface that stabilizes the MDM2 and CK1α complex in order to determine whether a peptide derived from the core CK1α-MDM2 interface form novel Biologics that can be used to probe the contribution of the CK1-MDM2 protein-protein interaction to p53 activation and cell viability. Overlapping peptides derived from CK1α were screened for dominant MDM2 binding sites using (i ELISA with recombinant MDM2; (ii cell lysate pull-down towards endogenous MDM2; (iii MDM2-CK1α complex-based competition ELISA; and (iv MDM2-mediated ubiquitination. One dominant peptide, peptide 35 was bioactive in all four assays and its transfection induced cell death/growth arrest in a p53-independent manner. Ectopic expression of flag-tagged peptide 35 induced a novel ubiquitin and NEDD8 modification of CK1α, providing one of the first examples whereby NEDDylation of a protein kinase can be induced. These data identify an MDM2 binding motif in CK1α which when isolated as a small peptide can (i function as a dominant negative inhibitor of the CK1α-MDM2 interface, (ii be used as a tool to study NEDDylation of CK1α, and (iii reduce cell growth. Further, this approach provides a technological blueprint, complementing siRNA and chemical biology approaches, by exploiting protein-protein interactions in order to develop Biologics to manipulate novel types of signalling pathways such as cross

  10. of different weed control methods on Weed infestation, growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thinkexploitsint'l

    This weed control method also resulted in significantly better growth and ... proper management, it is possible to obtain 2,500 kg ha-1 (Onwueme and Sinha, 1991). ... however, time consuming, labour – intensive, strenuous and generally ...

  11. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSN 0794-5698. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth Performance of Quality Protein Maize in ... worldwide on over 159.5 million hectares in the year. 2010. ...... Fertilizer company of Nigeria, NAFCON, Port. Harcourt.

  12. Development of regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces for motor control of neuroprosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Stephen W. P.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Cederna, Paul S.

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries suffered during amputation commonly results in debilitating neuropathic pain in the affected limb. Modern prosthetic technologies allow for intuitive, simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom. However, these state-of-the-art devices require separate, independent control signals for each degree of freedom, which is currently not possible. As a result, amputees reject up to 75% of myoelectric devices preferring instead to use body-powered artificial limbs which offer subtle sensory feedback. Without meaningful and intuitive sensory feedback, even the most advanced myoelectric prostheses remain insensate, burdensome, and are associated with enormous cognitive demand and mental fatigue. The ideal prosthetic device is one which is capable of providing intuitive somatosensory feedback essential for interaction with the environment. Critical to the design of such a bioprosthetic device is the development of a reliable biologic interface between human and machine. This ideal patient-prosthetic interface allows for transmission of both afferent somatosensory information and efferent motor signals for a closed-loop feedback system of neural control. Our lab has developed the Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interface (RPNI) as a biologic nerve interface designed for stable integration of a prosthetic device with transected peripheral nerves in a residual limb. The RPNI is constructed by surgically implanting the distal end of a transected peripheral nerve into an autogenous muscle graft. Animal experiments in our lab have shown recording of motor signals from RPNI's implanted into both rodents and monkeys. Here, we achieve high amplitude EMG signals with a high signal to noise (SNR) ratio.

  13. Interface design and human factors considerations for model-based tight glycemic control in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Le Compte, Aaron; Evans, Alicia; Tan, Chia-Siong; Penning, Sophie; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to implement. Model-based methods and computerized protocols offer the opportunity to improve TGC quality and compliance. This research presents an interface design to maximize compliance, minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and minimize error based on simple human factors and end user input. The graphical user interface (GUI) design is presented by construction based on a series of simple, short design criteria based on fundamental human factors engineering and includes the use of user feedback and focus groups comprising nursing staff at Christchurch Hospital. The overall design maximizes ease of use and minimizes (unnecessary) interaction and use. It is coupled to a protocol that allows nurse staff to select measurement intervals and thus self-manage workload. The overall GUI design is presented and requires only one data entry point per intervention cycle. The design and main interface are heavily focused on the nurse end users who are the predominant users, while additional detailed and longitudinal data, which are of interest to doctors guiding overall patient care, are available via tabs. This dichotomy of needs and interests based on the end user's immediate focus and goals shows how interfaces must adapt to offer different information to multiple types of users. The interface is designed to minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and ongoing pilot trials have reported high levels of acceptance. The overall design principles, approach, and testing methods are based on fundamental human factors principles designed to reduce user effort and error and are readily generalizable. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  14. Theory of control of the dynamics of the interface between stationary and flying qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Wang; Liu Renbao; Sham, L J

    2005-01-01

    We present a scheme of control for the arbitrary interplay between a stationary qubit and a flying qubit (carried by a single-photon wavepacket) at a quantum interface composed of a three-level system coupled to a continuum through a cavity. It can be used for generation or reception of an arbitrarily shaped single-photon wavepacket. The generation process can also be controlled to create entanglement between the stationary qubit and flying qubit. The generation and reception operation can be combined to perform quantum network operations such as transfer, swap and entanglement creation for qubits at distant nodes

  15. Tools for man-machine interface development in accelerator control applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopylov, L.; Mikhev, M.; Trofimov, N.; Yurpalov, V.

    1994-01-01

    For the UNK Project a development of the Accelerator Control Applications is in the progress. These applications will use a specific Graphical User Interface for data presentation and accelerator parameter management. A number of tools have been developed based on the Motif Tool Kit. They contain a set of problem oriented screen templates and libraries. Using these tools, full scale prototype applications of the UNK Tune and Orbit measurement and correction were developed and are described, as examples. A subset of these allows the creation of the synoptic control screens from the Autocad pictures files and Oracle DB equipment descriptions. The basic concepts and a few application examples are presented. ((orig.))

  16. Method for Reading Sensors and Controlling Actuators Using Audio Interfaces of Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Rafael V.; Burlamaqui, Aquiles F.; Gonçalves, Luiz M. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel closed loop control architecture based on audio channels of several types of computing devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers, but not restricted to them. The communication is based on an audio interface that relies on the exchange of audio tones, allowing sensors to be read and actuators to be controlled. As an application example, the presented technique is used to build a low cost mobile robot, but the system can also be used in a variety of mechatronics applications and sensor networks, where smartphones are the basic building blocks. PMID:22438726

  17. Epigenetic control of mobile DNA as an interface between experience and genome change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Shapiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile DNA in the genome is subject to RNA-targeted epigenetic control. This control regulates the activity of transposons, retrotransposons and genomic proviruses. Many different life history experiences alter the activities of mobile DNA and the expression of genetic loci regulated by nearby insertions. The same experiences induce alterations in epigenetic formatting and lead to trans-generational modifications of genome expression and stability. These observations lead to the hypothesis that epigenetic formatting directed by non-coding RNA provides a molecular interface between life history events and genome alteration.

  18. Method for reading sensors and controlling actuators using audio interfaces of mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Rafael V; Burlamaqui, Aquiles F; Gonçalves, Luiz M G

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel closed loop control architecture based on audio channels of several types of computing devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers, but not restricted to them. The communication is based on an audio interface that relies on the exchange of audio tones, allowing sensors to be read and actuators to be controlled. As an application example, the presented technique is used to build a low cost mobile robot, but the system can also be used in a variety of mechatronics applications and sensor networks, where smartphones are the basic building blocks.

  19. Quality control system response to stochastic growth of amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigolotti, S.; Lizana, L.; Sneppen, K.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic model describing aggregation of misfolded proteins and degradation by the protein quality control system in a single cell. Aggregate growth is contrasted by the cell quality control system, that attacks them at different stages of the growth process, with an efficiency...... that decreases with their size. Model parameters are estimated from experimental data. Two qualitatively different behaviors emerge: a homeostatic state, where the quality control system is stable and aggregates of large sizes are not formed, and an oscillatory state, where the quality control system...

  20. Controllable Schottky barrier in GaSe/graphene heterostructure: the role of interface dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Chen; Lin, Zuzhang; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Zhimei

    2017-03-01

    The discoveries of graphene and other related two-dimensional crystals have recently led to a new technology: van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures based on these atomically thin materials. Such a paradigm has been proved promising for a wide range of applications from nanoelectronics to optoelectronics and spintronics. Here, using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structure and interface characteristics of a newly synthesized GaSe/graphene (GaSe/g) vdW heterostructure. We show that the intrinsic electronic properties of GaSe and graphene are both well preserved in the heterostructure, with a Schottky barrier formed at the GaSe/g interface. More interestingly, the band alignment between graphene and GaSe can be effectively modulated by tuning the interfacial distance or applying an external electric filed. This makes the Schottky barrier height (SBH) controllable, which is highly desirable in the electronic and optoelectronic devices based on vdW heterostructures. In particular, the tunability of the interface dipole and potential step is further uncovered to be the underlying mechanism that ensures this controllable tuning of SBH.

  1. Interfacing An Intelligent Decision-Maker To A Real-Time Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, D. C.; Smith, D. M.; Staros, C. J.

    1984-06-01

    This paper discusses some of the practical aspects of implementing expert systems in a real-time environment. There is a conflict between the needs of a process control system and the computational load imposed by intelligent decision-making software. The computation required to manage a real-time control problem is primarily concerned with routine calculations which must be executed in real time. On most current hardware, non-trivial AI software should not be forced to operate under real-time constraints. In order for the system to work efficiently, the two processes must be separated by a well-defined interface. Although the precise nature of the task separation will vary with the application, the definition of the interface will need to follow certain fundamental principles in order to provide functional separation. This interface was successfully implemented in the expert scheduling software currently running the automated chemical processing facility at Lockheed-Georgia. Potential applications of this concept in the areas of airborne avionics and robotics will be discussed.

  2. Human-system interface evaluation system for advanced control room based on SQL database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yan; Zhou Zhiwei; Bian Zhiqiang; Xu Li

    2005-01-01

    User Interface (UI) plays an important role in the advanced control room (ACR) of a nuclear power plant (NPP). In this paper, we present a rule-based ACR Human-system Interface Evaluation System (AHSIES) using expert system technology, which can evaluate UI design shortcomings, propose modification suggestions, and help designer improve the ACR interface design. AHSIES consists of four programs: the UI Editor, the Operation Procedure Manager, the Operation Simulator and the UI Design Evaluator. These four parts respectively function for: editing a set of UI icons employed as the operation screens of an advanced control room; for editing operation procedures aiming at any specified operation with simple language; for simulate the operation sequences dynamically and recording the relevant information for design performance of the UIs; and for evaluating both static and dynamic performance of the ACR UI design according to well established design guidelines and criteria with the information gained from the first three programs. Microsoft SQL Server 2000 DBMS is adopted to manage the voluminous data and its complex relationships. The preliminary test application of AHSIES for a simplified ACR UI design of a PWR NPP has shown that the expert evaluation system is capable of achieving satisfactory evaluation results. (authors)

  3. Front tracking based modeling of the solid grain growth on the adaptive control volume grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredyński, Mirosław; Łapka, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the micro-scale model of unconstrained solidification of the grain immersed in under-cooled liquid, based on the front tracking approach. For this length scale, the interface tracked through the domain is meant as the solid-liquid boundary. To prevent generation of huge meshes the energy transport equation is discretized on the adaptive control volume (c.v.) mesh. The coupling of dynamically changing mesh and moving front position is addressed. Preliminary results of simulation of a test case, the growth of single grain, are presented and discussed.

  4. FF-LYNX: protocol and interfaces for the control and readout of future Silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendola, A; Bianchi, G; Fanucci, L; Saponara, S; Tongiani, C [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione (DII-EIT), Via G. Caruso 16, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Castaldi, R; Minuti, M; Verdini, P G [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56018 Pisa (Italy); Incandela, J; Magazzu, G; Rossin, R, E-mail: Guido.Magazzu@pi.infn.i [University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), Department of Physics, 5113 Broida Hall, CA 93106 Santa Barbara (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The FF-LYNX protocol provides an innovative solution for the integrated distribution of Timing, Trigger and Control signals and the data readout in future High Energy Physics experiments. Transmitter and receiver interfaces implementing the FF-LYNX protocol have been simulated with a high-level simulator and in an FPGA based emulator. The design of the interfaces in a commercial CMOS technology as radiation tolerant and low power modules is ongoing and the submission of a test circuit is foreseen in fall 2010. The key features of the protocol are described in this paper as well as its possible application for the transmission from Silicon Trackers to trigger processors with short and constant latency of data to be used for the L1 trigger generation.

  5. Ergonomics evaluation as a powerful tool to redesign advanced interfaces of nuclear control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Isaac J.A.L. dos; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Oliveira, Mauro V.; Fernandes, Nelson; Oliveira, Helio C.L.; Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Augusto, Silas C.; Teixeira, Douglas V.; Ferraz, Fernando T.

    2007-01-01

    Ergonomics is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system. Ergonomics contributes to the design and evaluation of tasks, jobs, products, environments and systems in order to make them compatible with the needs, abilities and limitations of people. In the safe operation of nuclear power plant the performance of the control room crews plays an important role. In this respect, well-designed human-system interfaces (HSI) are crucial for safe and efficient operation of the plant, reducing the occurrence of incidents, accidents and the risks for human error. The aim of this paper is to describe a case study in which a methodological framework was applied to redesign advanced interfaces of a nuclear simulator. (author)

  6. Where have the organizers gone? - The growth control system as a foundation of physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhimin; Shang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    A model of growth control system suggests that the organizers in embryogenesis continue to exist and partially retain their function after embryogenesis. The organizers are the macroscopic singular points of the morphogen gradient and bioelectric fields. They have higher metabolic rate, higher density of gap junctions and stem cells than the surrounding tissue. The growth control model predicts that the organizers are likely to exist at the extreme points of surface or interface curvature of the body. Changes in bioelectric field at organizers precede the morphological and anatomical changes in morphogenesis and pathogenesis. Subtle perturbations at organizers can cause long lasting systemic effects. These features of organizers can be used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes such as regenerative medicine. There is increasing evidence that acupuncture points are likely to have originated from organizers in embryogenesis. Many corollaries and predictions of the growth control model have been independently confirmed in developmental biology, physiology, as well as basic and clinical acupuncture research. This model set the first example of a truly integrative biological basis of acupuncture and conventional biomedical sciences which has met the gold standard of science with multiple confirmed predictions in both fields. The growth control system is embedded in various physiological systems and is part of the foundation of physiology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modified Perfect Harmonics Cancellation Control of a Grid Interfaced SPV Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Shahani, D. T.; Verma, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    This paper deals with a grid interfaced solar photo voltaic (SPV) power generating system with modified perfect harmonic cancellation (MPHC) control for power quality improvement in terms of mitigation of the current harmonics, power factor correction, control of point of common coupling (PCC) voltage with reactive power compensation and load balancing in a three phase distribution system. The proposed grid interfaced SPV system consists of a SPV array, a dc-dc boost converter and a voltage source converter (VSC) used for the compensation of other connected linear and nonlinear loads at PCC. The reference grid currents are estimated using MPHC method and control signals are derived by using pulse width modulation (PWM) current controller of VSC. The SPV power is fed to the common dc bus of VSC and dc-dc boost converter using maximum power point tracking (MPPT). The dc link voltage of VSC is regulated by using dc voltage proportional integral (PI) controller. The analysis of the proposed SPV power generating system is carried out under dc/ac short circuit and severe SPV-SX and SPV-TX intrusion.

  8. Reversibly tethering growth factors to surfaces : guiding cell function at the cell-material interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabanas Danés, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Development of novel methodologies for tethering growth factors (GFs) to materials is highly desired for the generation of biomaterials with improved tissue repair properties. Progress in the development of biomaterials that incorporate GFs and the in vivo performance of such biomaterials in tissue

  9. Spontaneous and Fast Growth of Large‐Area Graphene Nanofilms Facilitated by Oil/Water Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Wu, Tongshun

    2012-01-01

    An efficient wet-chemical method based on soft interfacial self-assembly is developed for spontaneous, fast growth of large-area graphene nanofilms on various substrates. The graphene nanofilms produced show tunable optical properties and a highly reversible optoelectronic response. Complementary...... to chemical vapor deposition, this method could offer a fast, simple, and low-cost chemical strategy to produce graphene nanofilms....

  10. Random nucleation and growth of Pt nanoparticles at the polarized interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojánek, Antonín; Langmaier, Jan; Samec, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 599, č. 2 (2007), s. 160-166 ISSN 0022-0728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : polarized ITIES * deposition * platinum * random nucleation and growth Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.580, year: 2007

  11. TCP Transcription Factors at the Interface between Environmental Challenges and the Plant's Growth Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danisman, Selahattin

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile and as such their reactions to environmental challenges differ from those of mobile organisms. Many adaptions involve growth responses and hence, growth regulation is one of the most crucial biological processes for plant survival and fitness. The plant-specific TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF1 (TCP) transcription factor family is involved in plant development from cradle to grave, i.e., from seed germination throughout vegetative development until the formation of flowers and fruits. TCP transcription factors have an evolutionary conserved role as regulators in a variety of plant species, including orchids, tomatoes, peas, poplar, cotton, rice and the model plant Arabidopsis. Early TCP research focused on the regulatory functions of TCPs in the development of diverse organs via the cell cycle. Later research uncovered that TCP transcription factors are not static developmental regulators but crucial growth regulators that translate diverse endogenous and environmental signals into growth responses best fitted to ensure plant fitness and health. I will recapitulate the research on TCPs in this review focusing on two topics: the discovery of TCPs and the elucidation of their evolutionarily conserved roles across the plant kingdom, and the variety of signals, both endogenous (circadian clock, plant hormones) and environmental (pathogens, light, nutrients), TCPs respond to in the course of their developmental roles.

  12. Use of a graphical user interface approach for digital and physical simulation in power systems control education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoults, R.R.; Barrera-Cardiel, E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a laboratory with software and hardware structures for digital and physical simulation in the area of Power Systems Control Education. The hardware structure includes a special man-machine interface designed with a graphical user interface approach. This interface allows the user full control over the simulation and provides facilities for the study of the response of the simulated system. This approach is illustrated with the design of a control system for a physically based HVDC transmission system model

  13. Improved interface growth and enhanced flux pinning in YBCO films deposited on an advanced IBAD-MgO based template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z.; Zhao, Y.; Wu, X.; Malmivirta, M.; Huhtinen, H.; Paturi, P.

    2018-02-01

    The growth mechanism is studied from the flux pinning point of view in small-scale YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) thin films deposited on a polycrystalline hastelloy with advanced IBAD-MgO based buffer layer architecture. When compared the situation with YBCO films grown on single crystal substrates, the most critical issues that affect the suitable defect formation and thus the optimal vortex pinning landscape, have been studied as a function of the growth temperature and the film thickness evolution. We can conclude that the best critical current property in a wide applied magnetic field range is observed in films grown at relatively low temperature and having intermediate thickness. These phenomena are linked to the combination of the improved interface growth, to the film thickness related crystalline relaxation and to the formation of linear array of edge dislocations that forms the low-angle grain boundaries through the entire film thickness and thus improve the vortex pinning properties. Hence, the optimized buffer layer structure proved to be particularly suitable for new coated conductor solutions.

  14. Exciton localization and interface roughness in growth-interrupted GaAs/AlAs quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner

    2000-01-01

    of the in-plane disorder potential and the exciton localization length determines the spectral shape of the exciton luminescence. When the correlation length of the in-plane disorder potential is larger than the exciton localization length, the excitonic spectrum splits up into discrete peaks, stemming from...... regions differing in effective thickness by an integral number of monolayers. The energies of monolayers peaks, taking into account the in-plane localization energy, are found to be reproducible in wafers grown under similar conditions. We conclude that atomically smooth growth islands are formed on both...... AlAs and GaAs surfaces after growth interruption. During overgrowth, surface segregation leads to the generation of an atomic-scale disorder in the first overgrown monolayers. This results in an additional in-plane disorder potential with a much shorter correlation length than the original surface...

  15. Reward-based hypertension control by a synthetic brain-dopamine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössger, Katrin; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-11-05

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of synthetic trigger-controlled devices that can reprogram mammalian cells to interface with complex metabolic activities. In the brain, the neurotransmitter dopamine coordinates communication with target neurons via a set of dopamine receptors that control behavior associated with reward-driven learning. This dopamine transmission has recently been suggested to increase central sympathetic outflow, resulting in plasma dopamine levels that correlate with corresponding brain activities. By functionally rewiring the human dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) via the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to synthetic promoters containing cAMP response element-binding protein 1(CREB1)-specific cAMP-responsive operator modules, we have designed a synthetic dopamine-sensitive transcription controller that reversibly fine-tunes specific target gene expression at physiologically relevant brain-derived plasma dopamine levels. Following implantation of circuit-transgenic human cell lines insulated by semipermeable immunoprotective microcontainers into mice, the designer device interfaced with dopamine-specific brain activities and produced a systemic expression response when the animal's reward system was stimulated by food, sexual arousal, or addictive drugs. Reward-triggered brain activities were able to remotely program peripheral therapeutic implants to produce sufficient amounts of the atrial natriuretic peptide, which reduced the blood pressure of hypertensive mice to the normal physiologic range. Seamless control of therapeutic transgenes by subconscious behavior may provide opportunities for treatment strategies of the future.

  16. An EOG-Based Human-Machine Interface for Wheelchair Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiyun; He, Shenghong; Wang, Qihong; Gu, Zhenghui; Peng, Nengneng; Li, Kai; Zhang, Yuandong; Shao, Ming; Li, Yuanqing

    2017-07-27

    Non-manual human-machine interfaces (HMIs) have been studied for wheelchair control with the aim of helping severely paralyzed individuals regain some mobility. The challenge is to rapidly, accurately and sufficiently produce control commands, such as left and right turns, forward and backward motions, acceleration, deceleration, and stopping. In this paper, a novel electrooculogram (EOG)-based HMI is proposed for wheelchair control. Thirteen flashing buttons are presented in the graphical user interface (GUI), and each of the buttons corresponds to a command. These buttons flash on a one-by-one manner in a pre-defined sequence. The user can select a button by blinking in sync with its flashes. The algorithm detects the eye blinks from a channel of vertical EOG data and determines the user's target button based on the synchronization between the detected blinks and the button's flashes. For healthy subjects/patients with spinal cord injuries (SCIs), the proposed HMI achieved an average accuracy of 96.7%/91.7% and a response time of 3.53 s/3.67 s with 0 false positive rates (FPRs). Using only one channel of vertical EOG signals associated with eye blinks, the proposed HMI can accurately provide sufficient commands with a satisfactory response time. The proposed HMI provides a novel non-manual approach for severely paralyzed individuals to control a wheelchair. Compared with a newly established EOG-based HMI, the proposed HMI can generate more commands with higher accuracy, lower FPR and fewer electrodes.

  17. Goal selection versus process control in a brain-computer interface based on sensorimotor rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Audrey S; He, Bin

    2009-02-01

    In a brain-computer interface (BCI) utilizing a process control strategy, the signal from the cortex is used to control the fine motor details normally handled by other parts of the brain. In a BCI utilizing a goal selection strategy, the signal from the cortex is used to determine the overall end goal of the user, and the BCI controls the fine motor details. A BCI based on goal selection may be an easier and more natural system than one based on process control. Although goal selection in theory may surpass process control, the two have never been directly compared, as we are reporting here. Eight young healthy human subjects participated in the present study, three trained and five naïve in BCI usage. Scalp-recorded electroencephalograms (EEG) were used to control a computer cursor during five different paradigms. The paradigms were similar in their underlying signal processing and used the same control signal. However, three were based on goal selection, and two on process control. For both the trained and naïve populations, goal selection had more hits per run, was faster, more accurate (for seven out of eight subjects) and had a higher information transfer rate than process control. Goal selection outperformed process control in every measure studied in the present investigation.

  18. Monitoring commercial conventional facilities control with the APS control system: The Metasys-to-EPICS interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawrocki, G.J.; Seaver, C.L.; Kowalkowski, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    As controls needs at the Advanced Photon Source matured from an installation phase to an operational phase, the need to monitor the existing conventional facilities control system with the EPICS-based accelerator control system was realized. This existing conventional facilities control network is based on a proprietary system from Johnson Controls called Metasys. Initially read-only monitoring of the Metasys parameters will be provided; however, the ability for possible future expansion to full control is available. This paper describes a method of using commercially available hardware and existing EPICS software as a bridge between the Metasys and EPICS control systems

  19. Multilivel interfaces for power plant control rooms II: A preliminary design space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Events that are unfamiliar to operators and that have not been anticipated by designers pose the greatest threat to system safely in nuclear power plants. The abstraction hierarchy has been proposed as a representation frame-work that can be adopted to design interfaces that support operators in dealing with these unanticipated events. It consists of a multilevel representation format that represents a plant in terms of both physical and functional constraints. In a companion article, the work that has been done on this topic in academia, industry, and research laboratories was reviewed. On the basis of the results of that review, this article proposes a preliminary design space for multilevel interfaces based on the abstraction hierarchy. This space serves several worthwhile purposes: providing a unified framework within which to compare and contrast previous and future work in this area, providing a coherent research agenda by identifying some of the dimensions that can be meaningfully manipulated and evaluated in future experiments, and finally, serving as an input design by outlining the various decisions that need to be made in developing multilevel interfaces and the different options that are currently available for each of those decisions. Consequently this article should be of interest to researchers, designers, and regulators concerned with nuclear power-plant control rooms

  20. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Bernhard C., E-mail: bernhard.bayer@univie.ac.at [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Baehtz, Carsten [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Goddard, Caroline J. L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  1. Influence of the interface on growth rates in AlN/GaN short period superlattices via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Korakakis, D.

    2011-11-01

    AlN/GaN short period superlattices are well suited for a number of applications including, but not limited to, digital alloys, intersubband devices, and emitters. In this work, AlN/GaN superlattices with periodicities ranging from 10 to 20 Å have been grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy in order to investigate the influence of the interface on the binary alloy growth rates. The GaN growth rate at the interface was observed to decrease with increasing GaN thickness while the AlN growth rate remained constant. This has been attributed to a decrease in the decomposition rate of GaN at the hetero-interface as seen in other III-V hetero-structures.

  2. Controlling the Biomimetic Implant Interface: Modulating Antimicrobial Activity by Spacer Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Cate; Vanoosten, Sarah Kay; Boone, Kyle W.; Khvostenko, Dmytro; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection is a common cause of post-operative morbidity, often leading to implant loosening, ultimately requiring revision surgery, increased costs and worse surgical outcomes. Since implant failure starts at the implant surface, creating and controlling the bio-material interface will play a critical role in reducing infection while improving host cell-to-implant interaction. Here, we engineered a biomimetic interface based upon a chimeric peptide that incorporates a titanium binding peptide (TiBP) with an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) into a single molecule to direct binding to the implant surface and deliver an antimicrobial activity against S. mutans and S. epidermidis, two bacteria which are linked with clinical implant infections. To optimize antimicrobial activity, we investigated the design of the spacer domain separating the two functional domains of the chimeric peptide. Lengthening and changing the amino acid composition of the spacer resulted in an improvement of minimum inhibitory concentration by a three-fold against S. mutans. Surfaces coated with the chimeric peptide reduced dramatically the number of bacteria, with up to a nine-fold reduction for S. mutans and a 48-fold reduction for S. epidermidis. Ab initio predictions of antimicrobial activity based on structural features were confirmed. Host cell attachment and viability at the biomimetic interface were also improved compared to the untreated implant surface. Biomimetic interfaces formed with this chimeric peptide offer interminable potential by coupling antimicrobial and improved host cell responses to implantable titanium materials, and this peptide based approach can be extended to various biomaterials surfaces.

  3. GSK3 controls axon growth via CLASP-mediated regulation of growth cone microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Eun-Mi; Saijilafu; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Xu, Wen-Lin; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Suppression of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) activity in neurons yields pleiotropic outcomes, causing both axon growth promotion and inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that specific GSK3 substrates, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), support axon growth by regulating the stability of axonal microtubules (MTs), but the substrate(s) and mechanisms conveying axon growth inhibition remain elusive. Here we show that CLIP (cytoplasmic linker protein)-associated protein (CLASP), originally identified as a MT plus end-binding protein, displays both plus end-binding and lattice-binding activities in nerve growth cones, and reveal that the two MT-binding activities regulate axon growth in an opposing manner: The lattice-binding activity mediates axon growth inhibition induced by suppression of GSK3 activity via preventing MT protrusion into the growth cone periphery, whereas the plus end-binding property supports axon extension via stabilizing the growing ends of axonal MTs. We propose a model in which CLASP transduces GSK3 activity levels to differentially control axon growth by coordinating the stability and configuration of growth cone MTs. PMID:21937714

  4. Motion control for a walking companion robot with a novel human–robot interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqi Lv

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A walking companion robot is presented for rehabilitation from dyskinesia of lower limbs in this article. A new human–robot interface (HRI is designed which adopts one-axis force sensor and potentiometer connector to detect the motion of the user. To accompany in displacement and angle between the user and the robot precisely in real time, the common motions are classified into two elemental motion states. With distinction method of motion states, a classification scheme of motion control is adopted. The mathematical model-based control method is first introduced and the corresponding control systems are built. Due to the unavoidable deviation of the mathematical model-based control method, a force control method is proposed and the corresponding control systems are built. The corresponding simulations demonstrate that the efficiency of the two proposed control methods. The experimental data and paths of robot verify the two control methods and indicate that the force control method can better satisfy the user’s requirements.

  5. Molecular-structure control of ultrafast electron injection at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Ahmed, Ghada H.; Shaheen, Basamat; Sun, Jingya; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    Charge transfer (CT) at donor (D)/acceptor (A) interfaces is central to the functioning of photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Understanding and controlling this process on the molecular level has been proven to be crucial for optimizing

  6. A physical control interface with proprioceptive feedback and multiple degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, G. H.; Gow, D.; Sloan, Y.; Meadows, B.

    1991-01-01

    The use of the drug thalidomide by pregnant mothers in Britain resulted in a variety of deformities including the birth of children having no arms. Such children were provided with powered artificial arms with up to five degrees of freedom simultaneously controlled in real time by shoulder movement. The physiological sense of proprioception was extended from the user into the device, reducing the need for visual feedback and conscious control. With the banning of thalidomide, this technique fell into disuse but it is now being re-examined as a control mechanism for other artificial limbs and it may have other medical applications to allow patients to control formerly paralyzed limbs moved by electrical stimulation. It may also have commercial applications in robotic manipulation or physical interaction with virtual environments. To allow it to be investigated further, the original pneumatic control system has recently been converted to an electrical analogue to allow interfacing to electronic and computer-assisted systems. A harness incorporates force-sensitive resistors and linear potentiomenters for sensing position and force at the interface with the skin, and miniature electric motors and lead screws for feeding back to the user the position of the robotic arm and the forces applied to it. In the present system, control is applied to four degrees of freedom using elevation/depression and protraction/reaction of each shoulder so that each collar bone emulates a joystick. However, both electrical and mechanical components have been built in modular form to allow rapid replication and testing of a variety of force and position control strategies.

  7. Wireless brain-machine interface using EEG and EOG: brain wave classification and robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sechang; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    A brain-machine interface (BMI) links a user's brain activity directly to an external device. It enables a person to control devices using only thought. Hence, it has gained significant interest in the design of assistive devices and systems for people with disabilities. In addition, BMI has also been proposed to replace humans with robots in the performance of dangerous tasks like explosives handling/diffusing, hazardous materials handling, fire fighting etc. There are mainly two types of BMI based on the measurement method of brain activity; invasive and non-invasive. Invasive BMI can provide pristine signals but it is expensive and surgery may lead to undesirable side effects. Recent advances in non-invasive BMI have opened the possibility of generating robust control signals from noisy brain activity signals like EEG and EOG. A practical implementation of a non-invasive BMI such as robot control requires: acquisition of brain signals with a robust wearable unit, noise filtering and signal processing, identification and extraction of relevant brain wave features and finally, an algorithm to determine control signals based on the wave features. In this work, we developed a wireless brain-machine interface with a small platform and established a BMI that can be used to control the movement of a robot by using the extracted features of the EEG and EOG signals. The system records and classifies EEG as alpha, beta, delta, and theta waves. The classified brain waves are then used to define the level of attention. The acceleration and deceleration or stopping of the robot is controlled based on the attention level of the wearer. In addition, the left and right movements of eye ball control the direction of the robot.

  8. Applications of interface controlled pulsed-laser deposited polymer films in field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Danish; Ukah, Ndubuisi; Guha, Suchi; Gupta, Ram; Ghosh, Kartik

    2010-03-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation, a derivative of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), is an alternative method of depositing polymer and biomaterial films that allows homogeneous film coverage of high molecular weight organic materials for layer-by-layer growth without any laser induced damage. Polyfluorene (PF)-based conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention in organic field-effect transistors (FETs). A co-polymer of PF (PFB) was deposited as a thin film using matrix assisted PLD employing a KrF excimer laser. Electrical characteristics of FETs fabricated using these PLD grown films were compared to those of FETs using spin-coated films. We show that threshold voltages, on/off ratios, and charge carrier motilities are significantly improved in PLD grown films. This is attributed to an improved dielectric-polymer interface.

  9. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  10. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson N S; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like 'Face in a Crowd' task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the 'Crowd') using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a 'Crowd Off' condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet computers.

  11. Autonomous Control of Current and Voltage Controlled DG Interface Inverters for Reactive Power Sharing and Harmonics Compensation in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousazadeh, Seyyed Yousef; Jalilain, Alireza; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    In microgrids, Voltage Source Inverters (VSIs) interfacing Distributed Generation (DG) units can be operated in Voltage or Current Controlled Modes (VCM/CCM). In this paper, a coordinated control of CCM and VCM units for reactive power sharing and voltage harmonics compensation is proposed....... This decentralized control scheme is based on the local measurement of signals. In this way, the need for communication links is removed which results in a simpler and more reliable structure compared to the communication based control structures. To be more exact, the VCM units contribute to harmonics compensation....... Experimental and simulation studies show that the harmonics compensation is achieved by using only local measurements in presence of virtual admittance/impedance schemes of CCM/VCM units. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the reactive power sharing among the CCM and VCM units is obtained based...

  12. Molecular control of photoexcited charge transfer and recombination at a quaterthiophene/zinc oxide interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mou Weiwei; Nakano, Aiichiro; Ohmura, Satoshi; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study photoexcited charge transfer (CT) and charge recombination (CR) at an interface between a conjugated oligomer donor, quaterthiophene (QT), and an inorganic acceptor (ZnO). Simulations reveal a detrimental effect of static disorder in QT conformation on the efficiency of hybrid QT/ZnO solar cells due to increased CR. On the contrary, dynamic disorder (i.e., fluctuation of carbon-hydrogen bonds in QT) is essential for high efficiency by assisting CT. The separate controllability of CT and CR at the molecular level has impacts on molecular design for efficient solar cells and explains recent experimental observations.

  13. Chain-Branching Control of the Atomic Structure of Alkanethiol-Based Gold–Sulfur Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory structure calculations at 0 K and simulations at 300 K of observed high-resolution in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal three different atomic-interface structures for the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three isomeric butanethiols on Au(111......): direct binding to the Au(111) surface without pitting, binding to adatoms above a regular surface with extensive pitting, and binding to adatoms with local surface vacancies and some pitting. Thermal motions are shown to produce some observed STM features, with a very tight energy balance controlling...

  14. Electric-field control of magnetism via strain transfer across ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-12-23

    By taking advantage of the coupling between magnetism and ferroelectricity, ferromagnetic (FM)/ferroelectric (FE) multiferroic interfaces play a pivotal role in manipulating magnetism by electric fields. Integrating the multiferroic heterostructures into spintronic devices significantly reduces energy dissipation from Joule heating because only an electric field is required to switch the magnetic element. New concepts of storage and processing of information thus can be envisioned when the electric-field control of magnetism is a viable alternative to the traditional current based means of controlling magnetism. This article reviews some salient aspects of the electric-field effects on magnetism, providing a short overview of the mechanisms of magneto-electric (ME) coupling at the FM/FE interfaces. A particular emphasis is placed on the ME effect via interfacial magneto-elastic coupling arising from strain transfer from the FE to FM layer. Recent results that demonstrate the electric-field control of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic order, magnetic domain wall motion, and etc are described. Obstacles that need to be overcome are also discussed for making this a reality for future device applications.

  15. Electric-field control of magnetism via strain transfer across ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-01-01

    By taking advantage of the coupling between magnetism and ferroelectricity, ferromagnetic (FM)/ferroelectric (FE) multiferroic interfaces play a pivotal role in manipulating magnetism by electric fields. Integrating the multiferroic heterostructures into spintronic devices significantly reduces energy dissipation from Joule heating because only an electric field is required to switch the magnetic element. New concepts of storage and processing of information thus can be envisioned when the electric-field control of magnetism is a viable alternative to the traditional current based means of controlling magnetism. This article reviews some salient aspects of the electric-field effects on magnetism, providing a short overview of the mechanisms of magneto-electric (ME) coupling at the FM/FE interfaces. A particular emphasis is placed on the ME effect via interfacial magneto-elastic coupling arising from strain transfer from the FE to FM layer. Recent results that demonstrate the electric-field control of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic order, magnetic domain wall motion, and etc are described. Obstacles that need to be overcome are also discussed for making this a reality for future device applications. (topical review)

  16. Interfacing the septa movement (DC motor) equipment to the PS control system and the MIL1553 bus

    CERN Document Server

    Dehavay, Claude

    1993-01-01

    Continuing the rejuvenation of the PS Control system , it is planned to replace the Single Transceiver Hybrid used to interface the Septa Movement Equipment by a G64 system connected to the VME crate via the MIL1553 bus. This note explains the G64 hardware interface and details the standard message as defined in the Control Protocole for Power Converter, RF and Stepping Motor equipment.

  17. Development of EPICS Input Output Controller and User Interface for the PEFP Low Level RF Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young Gi; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The Low-Level RF (LLRF) control system of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) was developed for handling the driving frequency for Quadrupole (RFQ) and the Draft Tube Linac (DTL) cavities in 2006. The RF amplitude and phase of the accelerating field were controlled within 1% and 1 degree by stability requirements, respectively. Operators have been using the LLRF control system under the windows based text console mode as an operator interface. The LLRF control system could not be integrated with Experimental Physics Industrial Control System (EPICS) Input Output Controllers (IOC) for each subsection of PEFP facility. The main objective of this study is to supply operators of the LLRF control system with user friendly and convenient operating environment. The new LLRF control system is composed of a Verse Module Eurocard (VME) baseboard, a PCI Mezzanine Card (PMC), Board Support Package (BSP), EPICS software tool and a Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) VxWorks. A test with a dummy cavity of the new LLRF control system shows that operators can control and monitor operation parameters for a desired feedback action by using EPICS Channel Access (CA).

  18. Development of EPICS Input Output Controller and User Interface for the PEFP Low Level RF Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Young Gi; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2010-01-01

    The Low-Level RF (LLRF) control system of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) was developed for handling the driving frequency for Quadrupole (RFQ) and the Draft Tube Linac (DTL) cavities in 2006. The RF amplitude and phase of the accelerating field were controlled within 1% and 1 degree by stability requirements, respectively. Operators have been using the LLRF control system under the windows based text console mode as an operator interface. The LLRF control system could not be integrated with Experimental Physics Industrial Control System (EPICS) Input Output Controllers (IOC) for each subsection of PEFP facility. The main objective of this study is to supply operators of the LLRF control system with user friendly and convenient operating environment. The new LLRF control system is composed of a Verse Module Eurocard (VME) baseboard, a PCI Mezzanine Card (PMC), Board Support Package (BSP), EPICS software tool and a Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) VxWorks. A test with a dummy cavity of the new LLRF control system shows that operators can control and monitor operation parameters for a desired feedback action by using EPICS Channel Access (CA).

  19. Embedded System for Prosthetic Control Using Implanted Neuromuscular Interfaces Accessed Via an Osseointegrated Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastinu, Enzo; Doguet, Pascal; Botquin, Yohan; Hakansson, Bo; Ortiz-Catalan, Max

    2017-08-01

    Despite the technological progress in robotics achieved in the last decades, prosthetic limbs still lack functionality, reliability, and comfort. Recently, an implanted neuromusculoskeletal interface built upon osseointegration was developed and tested in humans, namely the Osseointegrated Human-Machine Gateway. Here, we present an embedded system to exploit the advantages of this technology. Our artificial limb controller allows for bioelectric signals acquisition, processing, decoding of motor intent, prosthetic control, and sensory feedback. It includes a neurostimulator to provide direct neural feedback based on sensory information. The system was validated using real-time tasks characterization, power consumption evaluation, and myoelectric pattern recognition performance. Functionality was proven in a first pilot patient from whom results of daily usage were obtained. The system was designed to be reliably used in activities of daily living, as well as a research platform to monitor prosthesis usage and training, machine-learning-based control algorithms, and neural stimulation paradigms.

  20. A Matlab-Based Graphical User Interface for Simulation and Control Design of a Hydrogen Mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    A Graphical User Interface (GUI) that facilitates prediction and control design tasks for a propellant mixer is described. The Hydrogen mixer is used in rocket test stand operations at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. The mixer injects gaseous hydrogen (GH2) into a stream of liquid hydrogen (LH2) to obtain a combined flow with desired thermodynamic properties. The flows of GH2 and LH2 into the mixer are regulated by two control valves, and a third control valve is installed at the exit of the mixer to regulate the combined flow. The three valves may be simultaneously operated in order to achieve any desired combination of total flow, exit temperature and mixer pressure within the range of operation. The mixer, thus, constitutes a three-input, three-output system. A mathematical model of the mixer has been obtained and validated with experimental data. The GUI presented here uses the model to predict mixer response under diverse conditions.

  1. Towards nanorod LEDs: Numerical predictions and controlled growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelper, Christopher [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Computational Electronics and Photonics, Universitaet Kassel, Wilhelmshoeher Allee 71, 34121 Kassel (Germany); Bergbauer, Werner [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Drechsel, Philipp; Sabathil, Matthias; Strassburg, Martin; Lugauer, Hans-Juergen [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstr. 4, 93055 Regensburg (Germany); Witzigmann, Bernd [Computational Electronics and Photonics, Universitaet Kassel, Wilhelmshoeher Allee 71, 34121 Kassel (Germany); Fuendling, Soenke; Li, Shunfeng; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    We present a numerical optimization of nanorod geometries with respect to the optical properties of an electrically driven LED emitting in the green spectral range. It is shown that an overall Purcell enhancement as well as directional emission can be achieved at an emission wavelength of 550 nm with nanorods of 110 nm radius. Position-controlled growth on patterned substrates demonstrates that the required dimensions are accessible by varying growth parameters and growth time in a large volume MOVPE reactor. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Kinesthetic Force Feedback and Belt Control for the Treadport Locomotion Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejrati, Babak; Crandall, Kyle L; Hollerbach, John M; Abbott, Jake J

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an improved control system for the Treadport immersive locomotion interface, with results that generalize to any treadmill that utilizes an actuated tether to enable self-selected walking speed. A new belt controller is implemented to regulate the user's position; when combined with the user's own volition, this controller also enables the user to naturally self-select their walking speed as they would when walking over ground. A new kinesthetic-force-feedback controller is designed for the tether that applies forces to the user's torso. This new controller is derived based on maintaining the user's sense of balance during belt acceleration, rather than by rendering an inertial force as was done in our prior work. Based on the results of a human-subjects study, the improvements in both controllers significantly contribute to an improved perception of realistic walking on the Treadport. The improved control system uses intuitive dynamic-system and anatomical parameters and requires no ad hoc gain tuning. The control system simply requires three measurements to be made for a given user: the user's mass, the user's height, and the height of the tether attachment point on the user's torso.

  3. Goal selection versus process control while learning to use a brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Audrey S.; Rose, Minn L.; He, Bin

    2011-06-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) can be used to accomplish a task without requiring motor output. Two major control strategies used by BCIs during task completion are process control and goal selection. In process control, the user exerts continuous control and independently executes the given task. In goal selection, the user communicates their goal to the BCI and then receives assistance executing the task. A previous study has shown that goal selection is more accurate and faster in use. An unanswered question is, which control strategy is easier to learn? This study directly compares goal selection and process control while learning to use a sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI. Twenty young healthy human subjects were randomly assigned either to a goal selection or a process control-based paradigm for eight sessions. At the end of the study, the best user from each paradigm completed two additional sessions using all paradigms randomly mixed. The results of this study were that goal selection required a shorter training period for increased speed, accuracy, and information transfer over process control. These results held for the best subjects as well as in the general subject population. The demonstrated characteristics of goal selection make it a promising option to increase the utility of BCIs intended for both disabled and able-bodied users.

  4. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eZacksenhouse

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  5. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamini, Miri; Zacksenhouse, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus, we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  6. Control of a nursing bed based on a hybrid brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nengneng Peng; Rui Zhang; Haihua Zeng; Fei Wang; Kai Li; Yuanqing Li; Xiaobin Zhuang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an intelligent nursing bed system which is controlled by a hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) involving steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) and P300. Specifically, the hybrid BCI includes an asynchronous brain switch based on SSVEP and P300, and a P300-based BCI. The brain switch is used to turn on/off the control system of the electric nursing bed through idle/control state detection, whereas the P300-based BCI is for operating the nursing bed. At the beginning, the user may focus on one group of flashing buttons in the graphic user interface (GUI) of the brain switch, which can simultaneously evoke SSVEP and P300, to switch on the control system. Here, the combination of SSVEP and P300 is used for improving the performance of the brain switch. Next, the user can control the nursing bed using the P300-based BCI. The GUI of the P300-based BCI includes 10 flashing buttons, which correspond to 10 functional operations, namely, left-side up, left-side down, back up, back down, bedpan open, bedpan close, legs up, legs down, right-side up, and right-side down. For instance, he/she can focus on the flashing button "back up" in the GUI of the P300-based BCI to activate the corresponding control such that the nursing bed is adjusted up. Eight healthy subjects participated in our experiment, and obtained an average accuracy of 93.75% and an average false positive rate (FPR) of 0.15 event/min. The effectiveness of our system was thus demonstrated.

  7. Turbogas control unit using a hydraulic interface; Control de una unidad turbogas usando una interfase hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Palacios, Ignacio Ramon; Castelo Cuevas, Luis [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: irrp@iie.org.mx; lcastelo@iie.org.mx; Escarcega Navarrete, Luis [Servi-Control Monterrey S.A. de C.V., Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)]. E-mail: lescarcega@servicontrol.com

    2010-11-15

    This paper presents the design and implementation of the control system of the Turbo Generator Unit (TGU) GE 5001, placed in Laguna Chavez power generation facility in Gomez Palacio, Dgo., Mexico. This TGU had been operating with an old control system, back to the 70's. The positioning of the control valves was carried out using a complex electro-hydraulic system. For the modernization of the control system, we use latest PLC technology and a current to pressure converter to communicate the PLC with the hydraulic control valves. The new control system helped us to obtain a best response at the start and generation phases, as well as an increase in the availability of the unit. We show the old and the new control architectures besides plot results obtained at the different operation points. [Spanish] En este articulo se presenta la implementacion y diseno del sistema de control de una Unidad Turbogas (UTG) GE-5001 de la Central Turbogas Laguna Chavez de CFE ubicada en Gomez Palacio, Durango, la cual originalmente era controlada mediante un sistema de control con tecnologia de los anos 70's. El posicionamiento de las valvulas de control se realizaba mediante un sistema electro-hidraulico complejo. Para la modernizacion del sistema de control a uno con tecnologia de punta fue necesario utilizar una interfase hidraulica por medio de un convertidor de corriente/presion (I/P) para el posicionamiento de las valvulas originales. Con la modernizacion se mejoro la respuesta del control asi como el incremento de la disponibilidad de la unidad. Se presentan la arquitectura anterior y actual de sistema de control asi como graficas de los resultados obtenidos en diferentes puntos de operacion de la UTG.

  8. Reusable Rack Interface Controller Common Software for Various Science Research Racks on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, George C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the EXPRESS (Expedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station) rack project is to provide a set of predefined interfaces for scientific payloads which allow rapid integration into a payload rack on International Space Station (ISS). VxWorks' was selected as the operating system for the rack and payload resource controller, primarily based on the proliferation of VME (Versa Module Eurocard) products. These products provide needed flexibility for future hardware upgrades to meet everchanging science research rack configuration requirements. On the International Space Station, there are multiple science research rack configurations, including: 1) Human Research Facility (HRF); 2) EXPRESS ARIS (Active Rack Isolation System); 3) WORF (Window Observational Research Facility); and 4) HHR (Habitat Holding Rack). The RIC (Rack Interface Controller) connects payloads to the ISS bus architecture for data transfer between the payload and ground control. The RIC is a general purpose embedded computer which supports multiple communication protocols, including fiber optic communication buses, Ethernet buses, EIA-422, Mil-Std-1553 buses, SMPTE (Society Motion Picture Television Engineers)-170M video, and audio interfaces to payloads and the ISS. As a cost saving and software reliability strategy, the Boeing Payload Software Organization developed reusable common software where appropriate. These reusable modules included a set of low-level driver software interfaces to 1553B. RS232, RS422, Ethernet buses, HRDL (High Rate Data Link), video switch functionality, telemetry processing, and executive software hosted on the FUC computer. These drivers formed the basis for software development of the HRF, EXPRESS, EXPRESS ARIS, WORF, and HHR RIC executable modules. The reusable RIC common software has provided extensive benefits, including: 1) Significant reduction in development flow time; 2) Minimal rework and maintenance; 3) Improved reliability; and 4) Overall

  9. Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on crystal growth mode at pentacene/Ni interface in organic thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bang Joo; Hong, Kihyon; Kim, Woong-Kwon; Kim, Kisoo; Kim, Sungjun; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2010-11-25

    We report how treatment of nickel (Ni) with O(2) plasma affects the polarity of Ni surface, crystallinity of pentacene film on the Ni, and electrical properties of pentacene organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) that use Ni as source-drain electrodes. The polar component of surface energy in Ni surface increased from 8.1 to 43.3 mJ/m(2) after O(2)-plasma treatment for 10 s. From X-ray photoelectron spectra and secondary electron emission spectra, we found that NiO(x) was formed on the O(2)-plasma-treated Ni surface and the work function of O(2)-plasma-treated Ni was 0.85 eV higher than that of untreated Ni. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy measurements showed that pentacene molecules are well aligned as a thin-film and grains grow much larger on O(2)-plasma-treated Ni than on untreated Ni. This change in the growth mode is attributed to the reduction of interaction energy between pentacene and Ni due to formation of oxide at the Ni/pentacene interface. Thus, O(2)-plasma treatment promoted the growth of well-ordered pentacene film and lowered both the hole injection barrier and the contact resistance between Ni and pentacene by forming NiO(x), enhancing the electrical property of bottom-contact OTFTs.

  10. Neural control of finger movement via intracortical brain-machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z. T.; Schroeder, K. E.; Vu, P. P.; Bullard, A. J.; Tat, D. M.; Nu, C. S.; Vaskov, A.; Nason, S. R.; Thompson, D. E.; Bentley, J. N.; Patil, P. G.; Chestek, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are a promising source of prosthesis control signals for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Previous BMI studies have primarily focused on predicting and controlling whole-arm movements; precise control of hand kinematics, however, has not been fully demonstrated. Here, we investigate the continuous decoding of precise finger movements in rhesus macaques. Approach. In order to elicit precise and repeatable finger movements, we have developed a novel behavioral task paradigm which requires the subject to acquire virtual fingertip position targets. In the physical control condition, four rhesus macaques performed this task by moving all four fingers together in order to acquire a single target. This movement was equivalent to controlling the aperture of a power grasp. During this task performance, we recorded neural spikes from intracortical electrode arrays in primary motor cortex. Main results. Using a standard Kalman filter, we could reconstruct continuous finger movement offline with an average correlation of ρ  =  0.78 between actual and predicted position across four rhesus macaques. For two of the monkeys, this movement prediction was performed in real-time to enable direct brain control of the virtual hand. Compared to physical control, neural control performance was slightly degraded; however, the monkeys were still able to successfully perform the task with an average target acquisition rate of 83.1%. The monkeys’ ability to arbitrarily specify fingertip position was also quantified using an information throughput metric. During brain control task performance, the monkeys achieved an average 1.01 bits s-1 throughput, similar to that achieved in previous studies which decoded upper-arm movements to control computer cursors using a standard Kalman filter. Significance. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of brain control of finger-level fine motor skills. We believe

  11. Organization of graphic controls for a state of the art human interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speckert, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a proposed control system organization, based on an existing design for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF). The trend of improving traditional status (output) devices such as lamps, gauges, and other single function status displays by use of computer generated color video displays in modern supervisory control environments has been extended to include control (input) devices. For MFTF, the usual arrays of knobs, switches, and physical buttons have been almost entirely replaced by graphic images of buttons which are displayed on color monitors equipped with curved transparent touchsensors. The light touch of a finger brings the operator the desired set of controls, requests a particular status display, or issues a command to the system being controlled, while banks of status monitors dynamically display his changing world. Because the operator can only interact with a portion of the total controls at any one time, the organization of these controls is critical for optimization of the man-machine interface

  12. A Hands-Free Interface for Controlling Virtual Electric-Powered Wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauseef Gulrez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on how to provide mobility to people with motor impairments with the integration of robotics and wearable computing systems. The burden of learning to control powered mobility devices should not fall entirely on the people with disabilities. Instead, the system should be able to learn the user's movements. This requires learning the degrees of freedom of user movement, and mapping these degrees of freedom onto electric-powered wheelchair (EPW controls. Such mapping cannot be static because in some cases users will eventually improve with practice. Our goal in this paper is to present a hands-free interface (HFI that can be customized to the varying needs of EPW users with appropriate mapping between the users' degrees of freedom and EPW controls. EPW users with different impairment types must learn how to operate a wheelchair with their residual body motions. EPW interfaces are often customized to fit their needs. An HFI utilizes the signals generated by the user's voluntary shoulder and elbow movements and translates them into an EPW control scheme. We examine the correlation of kinematics that occur during moderately paced repetitive elbow and shoulder movements for a range of motion. The output of upper-limb movements (shoulder and elbows was tested on six participants, and compared with an output of a precision position tracking (PPT optical system for validation. We find strong correlations between the HFI signal counts and PPT optical system during different upper-limb movements (ranged from r = 0.86 to 0.94. We also tested the HFI performance in driving the EPW in a virtual reality environment on a spinal-cord-injured (SCI patient. The results showed that the HFI was able to adapt and translate the residual mobility of the SCI patient into efficient control commands within a week's training. The results are encouraging for the development of more efficient HFIs, especially for wheelchair users.

  13. Lateral Hypothalamus as a Motivation-Cognition Interface in the Control of Feeding Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorica D. Petrovich

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Converging evidence for an essential function of the lateral hypothalamus (LHA in the control of feeding behavior has been accumulating since the classic work conducted almost 80 years ago. The LHA is also important in reward and reinforcement processes and behavioral state control. A unifying function for the LHA across these processes has not been fully established. Nonetheless, it is considered to integrate motivation with behavior. More recent work has demonstrated that the LHA is also required when cognitive processes, such as associative learning and memory control feeding behavior, suggesting it may serve as a motivation-cognition interface. Structurally, the LHA is well positioned within the cerebral hemisphere, with its extensive connectional network across the forebrain-brainstem axis, to link motivational and behavioral systems with cognitive processes. Studies that examined how learned cues control food seeking and consumption have implicated the LHA, but due to methodological limitations could not determine whether it underlies motivation, learning, or the integration of these processes. Furthermore, the identification of specific substrates has been limited by the LHA’s extraordinary complexity and heterogeneity. Recent methodological advancements with chemo-and opto-genetic approaches have enabled unprecedented specificity in interrogations of distinct neurons and their pathways in behaving animals, including manipulations during temporally distinct events. These approaches have revealed novel insights about the LHA structure and function. Recent findings that the GABA LHA neurons control feeding and food-reward learning and memory will be reviewed together with past work within the context of the LHA function as an interface between cognition and motivation.

  14. The effect of growth interruptions at the interfaces in epitaxially grown GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb multiple-quantum-wells studied with high-resolution x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvig, E; Myrvaagnes, G; Bugge, R; Haakenaasen, R; Fimland, B O

    2006-01-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy has been used to grow GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures. Growth has been interrupted at the interfaces between the wells and the barriers. During the growth interruptions, the interfaces have been exposed to Sb x (x=1, 2) and As 2 fluxes. The structures have been studied using high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and photoluminescence (PL). The As content in the interface layers has been found to have a large impact on the HRXRD curves. The As content in the interface layers has been determined by simulation of HRXRD rocking curves. We also show how highly strained interfaces cause more satellite peaks to appear in HRXRD rocking curves. PL spectra show that interrupting growth at the interfaces between wells and barriers and exposing the interfaces to an Sb soak result in flatter interfaces

  15. Controlled interface between carbon fiber and epoxy by molecular self-assembly method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jinmei; Huang Yudong; Liu Li; Cao Hailin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new treatment method based on molecular self-assembly on carbon fiber surface was proposed for obtaining a controlled interface between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix in composite system. To form the controlled interfacial region, the surfaces of carbon fibers were first metallized by electroless Ag plating, then were reacted with a series of thiols (different chain lengths and terminally functional groups) to form self-assembly monolayers (SAMs), which further reacted with epoxy resin to generate a strong adhesion interface. The morphology, structure and composition of untreated and treated carbon fiber surface were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM), surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. SERS study showed that thiols chemisorbed on Ag/carbon fiber in the form of thiolate species via the strong S-Ag coordinative bond. XPS study further confirmed the chemisorption by an S 2p 3/2 component observed at 162.2 eV. The binding energy was characteristic of silver thiolate. The interfacial shear strength of the carbon fiber/epoxy microcomposites was evaluated by the microbond technique. The results showed that there was a direct effect of the interfacial parameters changes such as chain lengths and surface functional groups on the fiber/matrix adhesion

  16. Generation of complex motor patterns in american grasshopper via current-controlled thoracic electrical interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampalmo, Susan L; Absher, Benjamin F; Bourne, W Tucker; Steves, Lida E; Vodenski, Vassil V; O'Donnell, Peter M; Erickson, Jonathan C

    2011-01-01

    Micro-air vehicles (MAVs) have attracted attention for their potential application to military applications, environmental sensing, and search and rescue missions. While progress is being made toward fabrication of a completely human-engineered MAV, another promising approach seeks to interface to, and take control of, an insect's nervous system. Cyborg insects take advantage of their innate exquisite loco-motor, navigation, and sensing abilities. Recently, several groups have demonstrated the feasibility of radio-controlled flight in the hawkmoth and beetle via electrical neural interfaces. Here, we report a method for eliciting the "jump" response in the American grasshopper (S. Americana). We found that stimulating the metathoracic T3 ganglion with constant-current square wave pulses with amplitude 186 ± 40 μA and frequency 190 ± 13 Hz reproducibly evoked (≥95% success rate) the desired motor activity in N=3 test subjects. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an insect cyborg with a synchronous neuromuscular system.

  17. On the use of peripheral autonomic signals for binary control of body–machine interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Tiago H; Guirgis, Mirna; Power, Sarah; Blain, Stefanie; Chau, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the potential of using peripheral autonomic (PA) responses as control signals for body–machine interfaces that require no physical movement was investigated. Electrodermal activity, skin temperature, heart rate and respiration rate were collected from six participants and hidden Markov models (HMMs) were used to automatically detect when a subject was performing music imagery as opposed to being at rest. Experiments were performed under controlled silent conditions as well as in the presence of continuous and startle (e.g. door slamming) ambient noise. By developing subject-specific HMMs, music imagery was detected under silent conditions with the average sensitivity and specificity of 94.2% and 93.3%, respectively. In the presence of startle noise stimuli, the system sensitivity and specificity levels of 78.8% and 80.2% were attained, respectively. In environments corrupted by continuous ambient and startle noise, the system specificity further decreased to 75.9%. To improve the system robustness against environmental noise, a startle noise detection and compensation strategy were proposed. Once in place, performance levels were shown to be comparable to those observed in silence. The obtained results suggest that PA signals, combined with HMMs, can be useful tools for the development of body–machine interfaces that allow individuals with severe motor impairments to communicate and/or to interact with their environment

  18. Roadmap for Research, Development, and Demonstration of Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Don W.; Arndt, Steven A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Dudenhoeffer, Donald D.; Hallbert, Bruce P.; Holcomb, David E.; Wood, Richard T.; Naser, Joseph A.; O'Hara, John M.; Quinn, Edward L.

    2008-01-01

    Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by a number of concerns. Although international implementation of evolutionary nuclear power plants and the progression toward new plants in the United States have spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, design and development programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for advanced reactor concepts, such as the Generation IV Program and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), introduce different plant conditions and unique plant configurations that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve programmatic goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, there are challenges that need to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to effectively and efficiently complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of digital technology

  19. Control Board Digital Interface Input Devices – Touchscreen, Trackpad, or Mouse?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Ronald L. Boring; Roger Lew

    2015-08-01

    The authors collaborated with a power utility to evaluate input devices for use in the human system interface (HSI) for a new digital Turbine Control System (TCS) at a nuclear power plant (NPP) undergoing a TCS upgrade. A standalone dynamic software simulation of the new digital TCS and a mobile kiosk were developed to conduct an input device study to evaluate operator preference and input device effectiveness. The TCS software presented the anticipated HSI for the TCS and mimicked (i.e., simulated) the turbine systems’ responses to operator commands. Twenty-four licensed operators from the two nuclear power units participated in the study. Three input devices were tested: a trackpad, mouse, and touchscreen. The subjective feedback from the survey indicates the operators preferred the touchscreen interface. The operators subjectively rated the touchscreen as the fastest and most comfortable input device given the range of tasks they performed during the study, but also noted a lack of accuracy for selecting small targets. The empirical data suggest the mouse input device provides the most consistent performance for screen navigation and manipulating on screen controls. The trackpad input device was both empirically and subjectively found to be the least effective and least desired input device.

  20. Optical readout and control interface for the BTeV pixel vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vergara-Limon, S; Sheaff, M; Vargas, M A

    2002-01-01

    Optical links will be used for sending data back and forth from the counting room to the detector in the data acquisition systems for future high energy physics experiments, including ATLAS and CMS in the LHC at CERN (Switzerland) and BTeV at Fermilab (USA). This is because they can be ultra-high speed and are relatively immune to electro-magnetic interference (EMI). The baseline design for the BTeV Pixel Vertex Detector includes two types of optical link, one to control and monitor and the other to read out the hit data from the multi-chip modules on each half-plane of the detector. The design and performance of the first prototype of the Optical Readout and Control Interface for the BTeV Pixel Vertex Detector is described.

  1. Brain Computer Interface for Micro-controller Driven Robot Based on Emotiv Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parth Gargava

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A Brain Computer Interface (BCI is developed to navigate a micro-controller based robot using Emotiv sensors. The BCI system has a pipeline of 5 stages- signal acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction, classification and CUDA inter- facing. It shall aid in serving a prototype for physical movement of neurological patients who are unable to control or operate on their muscular movements. All stages of the pipeline are designed to process bodily actions like eye blinks to command navigation of the robot. This prototype works on features learning and classification centric techniques using support vector machine. The suggested pipeline, ensures successful navigation of a robot in four directions in real time with accuracy of 93 percent.

  2. Directing Reaction Pathways through Controlled Reactant Binding at Pd-TiO2 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Bingwen; Nikolla, Eranda; Medlin, J Will

    2017-06-01

    Recent efforts to design selective catalysts for multi-step reactions, such as hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), have emphasized the preparation of active sites at the interface between two materials having different properties. However, achieving precise control over interfacial properties, and thus reaction selectivity, has remained a challenge. Here, we encapsulated Pd nanoparticles (NPs) with TiO 2 films of regulated porosity to gain a new level of control over catalyst performance, resulting in essentially 100 % HDO selectivity for two biomass-derived alcohols. This catalyst also showed exceptional reaction specificity in HDO of furfural and m-cresol. In addition to improving HDO activity by maximizing the interfacial contact between the metal and metal oxide sites, encapsulation by the nanoporous oxide film provided a significant selectivity boost by restricting the accessible conformations of aromatics on the surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A Tool for Balance Control Training Using Muscle Synergies and Multimodal Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Galeano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Balance control plays a key role in neuromotor rehabilitation after stroke or spinal cord injuries. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP is a classic technological tool to assess the status of balance control and to identify potential disorders. Despite the more accurate diagnosis generated by these tools, the current strategies to promote rehabilitation are still limited and do not take full advantage of the technologies available. This paper presents a novel balance training platform which combines a CDP device made from low-cost interfaces, such as the Nintendo Wii Balance Board and the Microsoft Kinect. In addition, it integrates a custom electrical stimulator that uses the concept of muscle synergies to promote natural interaction. The aim of the platform is to support the exploration of innovative multimodal therapies. Results include the technical validation of the platform using mediolateral and anteroposterior sways as basic balance training therapies.

  4. Toward an understanding of surface layer formation, growth, and transformation at the glass-fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, J.; Eskelsen, J. R.; Chiu, M.; Ievlev, A. V.; Ovchinnikova, O. S.; Leonard, D.; Pierce, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Silicate glass is a metastable and durable solid that has application to a number of energy and environmental challenges (e.g., microelectronics, fiber optics, and nuclear waste storage). If allowed to react with water over time silicate glass develops an altered layer at the solid-fluid interface. In this study, we used borosilicate glass (LAWB45) as a model material to develop a robust understanding of altered layer formation (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products). Experiments were conducted at high surface area-to-volume ratio (∼200,000 m-1) and 90 °C in the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus for 1.5-years to facilitate the formation of thick altered layers and allow for the effluent solution chemistry to be monitored continuously. A variety of microscopy techniques were used to characterize reacted grains and suggest the average altered layer thickness is 13.2 ± 8.3 μm with the hydrated and clay layer representing 74.8% and 25.2% of the total altered layer, respectively. The estimate of hydrated layer thickness is within the experimental error of the value estimated from the B release rate data (∼10 ± 1 μm/yr) over the 1.5-year duration. PeakForce® quantitative nanomechanical mapping results suggest the hydrated layer has a modulus that ranges between ∼20 and 40 GPa, which is in the range of porous silica that contains from ∼20 to ∼50% porosity, yet significantly lower than dense silica (∼70-80 GPa). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images confirm the presence of pores and an analysis of a higher resolution image provides a qualitative estimate of ≥22% porosity in the hydrated layer with variations in void volume with increasing distance from the unaltered glass. Chemical composition analyses, based on a combination of time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and STEM-EDS, clearly show

  5. The development of KNGR control room man-machine interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung-Jae Cho; Yeong-Cheol Shin

    2000-01-01

    KNGR MMI design has been developed for the last 7 years as a part of Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) design development. The KNGR control room has the common features of advanced control room such as large display panel, redundant compact workstations, soft control, and computerized procedure system. A conventional type safety console is provided as a backup when operation at the workstations is impossible. The strong points of an advanced control room are based on the powerful information processing and flexible graphic presentation capability of computer technology. On the other hand, workstation based design has a weak point that the amount of information to be presented in one VDU is limited. This can cause navigational overload and inconsistent interfaces and provide chances for performance errors/failures, if not designed carefully. From this background, the regulators require licensees to follow strict top-down human factor engineering design process. Analysis of operating experiences and iterative evaluations are used to address the potential problems of the KNGR advanced control room MMI design. But, further study is necessary in design area like CPS design, where experiences or design guidance is insufficient. Further study topics for KNGR advanced control room MMI design development are discussed briefly in this paper. (author)

  6. A binary motor imagery tasks based brain-computer interface for two-dimensional movement control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bin; Cao, Lei; Maysam, Oladazimi; Li, Jie; Xie, Hong; Su, Caixia; Birbaumer, Niels

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Two-dimensional movement control is a popular issue in brain-computer interface (BCI) research and has many applications in the real world. In this paper, we introduce a combined control strategy to a binary class-based BCI system that allows the user to move a cursor in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Users focus on a single moving vector to control 2D movement instead of controlling vertical and horizontal movement separately. Approach. Five participants took part in a fixed-target experiment and random-target experiment to verify the effectiveness of the combination control strategy under the fixed and random routine conditions. Both experiments were performed in a virtual 2D dimensional environment and visual feedback was provided on the screen. Main results. The five participants achieved an average hit rate of 98.9% and 99.4% for the fixed-target experiment and the random-target experiment, respectively. Significance. The results demonstrate that participants could move the cursor in the 2D plane effectively. The proposed control strategy is based only on a basic two-motor imagery BCI, which enables more people to use it in real-life applications.

  7. Software and Human-Machine Interface Development for Environmental Controls Subsystem Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the next premier launch vehicle for NASA. It is the next stage of manned space exploration from American soil, and will be the platform in which we push further beyond Earth orbit. In preparation of the SLS maiden voyage on Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), the existing ground support architecture at Kennedy Space Center required significant overhaul and updating. A comprehensive upgrade of controls systems was necessary, including programmable logic controller software, as well as Launch Control Center (LCC) firing room and local launch pad displays for technician use. Environmental control acts as an integral component in these systems, being the foremost system for conditioning the pad and extremely sensitive launch vehicle until T-0. The Environmental Controls Subsystem (ECS) required testing and modification to meet the requirements of the designed system, as well as the human factors requirements of NASA software for Validation and Verification (V&V). This term saw significant strides in the progress and functionality of the human-machine interfaces used at the launch pad, and improved integration with the controller code.

  8. Levels of automation and user control - evaluation of a turbine automation interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas (Chalmers Univ. of Technology (Sweden))

    2008-10-15

    The study was performed during the annual operator training at the Studsvik nuclear power plant simulator facility in Nykoeping, Sweden. The participating operators came from the Oskarshamn 3 nuclear power plant. In the study, seven nuclear power plant turbine operators were interviewed concerning their use of the automatic turbine system. A field study approach together with a heuristic usability evaluation was made to assess how the operators are affected by use of automation in the control room setting. The purpose of the study was to examine how operator performance is affected by varying levels of automation in nuclear power plant turbine operation. The Automatic Turbine System (ATS) was evaluated to clarify how the ATS interface design supports the operators work. The results show that during manual control the operators experience loss of speed and accuracy in performing actions together with difficulty of dividing attention between performing a task and overall monitoring, as the major problems. The positive aspects of manual operations lie in increased feeling of being in control when performing actions by hand. With higher levels of automation the problems shift to issues concerning difficulty of following the automatic sequences and loosing track in procedures. As the level of automation gets higher, the need of feedback increases which means that information presentation also becomes more important. The use of the semiautomatic, step-mode is often preferred by the operators since it combines the speed and accuracy of the automation with the ability of maintaining the feeling of being in control. Further, a number of usability related concerns was found in the ATS interface. The operators especially experience the presentation of the conditions that manage the automatic sequences as difficult to perceive. (author)

  9. Levels of automation and user control - evaluation of a turbine automation interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Jonas

    2008-10-01

    The study was performed during the annual operator training at the Studsvik nuclear power plant simulator facility in Nykoeping, Sweden. The participating operators came from the Oskarshamn 3 nuclear power plant. In the study, seven nuclear power plant turbine operators were interviewed concerning their use of the automatic turbine system. A field study approach together with a heuristic usability evaluation was made to assess how the operators are affected by use of automation in the control room setting. The purpose of the study was to examine how operator performance is affected by varying levels of automation in nuclear power plant turbine operation. The Automatic Turbine System (ATS) was evaluated to clarify how the ATS interface design supports the operators work. The results show that during manual control the operators experience loss of speed and accuracy in performing actions together with difficulty of dividing attention between performing a task and overall monitoring, as the major problems. The positive aspects of manual operations lie in increased feeling of being in control when performing actions by hand. With higher levels of automation the problems shift to issues concerning difficulty of following the automatic sequences and loosing track in procedures. As the level of automation gets higher, the need of feedback increases which means that information presentation also becomes more important. The use of the semiautomatic, step-mode is often preferred by the operators since it combines the speed and accuracy of the automation with the ability of maintaining the feeling of being in control. Further, a number of usability related concerns was found in the ATS interface. The operators especially experience the presentation of the conditions that manage the automatic sequences as difficult to perceive. (au)

  10. Expert System Control of Plant Growth in an Enclosed Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George; Lanoue, Mark; Bathel, Matthew; Ryan, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The Expert System is an enclosed, controlled environment for growing plants, which incorporates a computerized, knowledge-based software program that is designed to capture the knowledge, experience, and problem-solving skills of one or more human experts in a particular discipline. The Expert System is trained to analyze crop/plant status, to monitor the condition of the plants and the environment, and to adjust operational parameters to optimize the plant-growth process. This system is intended to provide a way to remotely control plant growth with little or no human intervention. More specifically, the term control implies an autonomous method for detecting plant states such as health (biomass) or stress and then for recommending and implementing cultivation and/or remediation to optimize plant growth and to minimize consumption of energy and nutrients. Because of difficulties associated with delivering energy and nutrients remotely, a key feature of this Expert System is its ability to minimize this effort and to achieve optimum growth while taking into account the diverse range of environmental considerations that exist in an enclosed environment. The plant-growth environment for the Expert System could be made from a variety of structures, including a greenhouse, an underground cavern, or another enclosed chamber. Imaging equipment positioned within or around the chamber provides spatially distributed crop/plant-growth information. Sensors mounted in the chamber provide data and information pertaining to environmental conditions that could affect plant development. Lamps in the growth environment structure supply illumination, and other additional equipment in the chamber supplies essential nutrients and chemicals.

  11. Expert system for controlling plant growth in a contained environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, George A. (Inventor); Lanoue, Mark Allen (Inventor); Bethel, Matthew (Inventor); Ryan, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In a system for optimizing crop growth, vegetation is cultivated in a contained environment, such as a greenhouse, an underground cavern or other enclosed space. Imaging equipment is positioned within or about the contained environment, to acquire spatially distributed crop growth information, and environmental sensors are provided to acquire data regarding multiple environmental conditions that can affect crop development. Illumination within the contained environment, and the addition of essential nutrients and chemicals are in turn controlled in response to data acquired by the imaging apparatus and environmental sensors, by an "expert system" which is trained to analyze and evaluate crop conditions. The expert system controls the spatial and temporal lighting pattern within the contained area, and the timing and allocation of nutrients and chemicals to achieve optimized crop development. A user can access the "expert system" remotely, to assess activity within the growth chamber, and can override the "expert system".

  12. A versatile Czochralski crystal growth system with automatic diameter control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Metzl, R.; Wang, W. S.; Choi, J.

    1995-07-01

    A versatile Czochralski crystal pulling system with automatic diameter control for the growth of nonlinear optical oxide crystals is discussed. Pure and doped bulk single crystals of bismuth silicon oxide (Bi12SiO20) have been successfully grown using this system. The system consists of a regular Czochralski type pulling system with provision for continuous weighing of the growing crystal to provide feedback for power control.

  13. Effects of Weed Control and Cow Dung Manure on Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted during the 2006, 2007 and 2008 rainy seasons at the Institute for Agricultural Research Samaru, in the Northern guinea savanna zone of Nigeria to evaluate the effects of weed control and cow dung manure treatments on growth of Quality Protein Maize. The trial consisted of factorial ...

  14. The Vatican & Population Growth Control: Why an American Confrontation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Stephen D.

    1983-01-01

    The Vatican, because of its position on population growth, threatens the security of all nations. Catholic countries with right-wing dictatorships cannot confront the Vatican on family planning and survive. U.S. Catholics must confront the Vatican on this issue. American lay Catholics must break the American church away from the Vatican control.…

  15. Organization of a joint operation of PC and CAMAC equipment using KK106 crate controller and MULTI interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagov, V.A.; Sirotin, A.P.; Tulaev, A.B.; Tumanov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software which permit to provide a joint operation of IBM PC/XT/AT (or compatibles) with CAMAC equipment are described. Wide-spread in the JINR the 106 type interface is used as CAMAC Dataway controller and MULTI interface is used as PC-Bus adapter. MULTI additional on-board module Baby-106 that emulates cut-down UNIBUS for 106 type interface is designed. The means offered allow PC and CAMAC modules to operate jointly both via the program transfer channel and DMA channel. Maximum (hardware) performance is obtained in DMA case. 5 refs.; 1 fig

  16. Bubble Induced Disruption of a Planar Solid-Liquid Interface During Controlled Directional Solidification in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.

    2013-01-01

    Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) experiments were conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station with the intent of better understanding the role entrained porosity/bubbles play during controlled directional solidification. The planar interface in a slowing growing succinonitrile - 0.24 wt% water alloy was being observed when a nitrogen bubble traversed the mushy zone and remained at the solid-liquid interface. Breakdown of the interface to shallow cells subsequently occurred, and was later evaluated using down-linked data from a nearby thermocouple. These results and other detrimental effects due to the presence of bubbles during solidification processing in a microgravity environment are presented and discussed.

  17. Reverse fault growth and fault interaction with frictional interfaces: insights from analogue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Emanuele; Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Seno, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    The association of faulting and folding is a common feature in mountain chains, fold-and-thrust belts, and accretionary wedges. Kinematic models are developed and widely used to explain a range of relationships between faulting and folding. However, these models may result not to be completely appropriate to explain shortening in mechanically heterogeneous rock bodies. Weak layers, bedding surfaces, or pre-existing faults placed ahead of a propagating fault tip may influence the fault propagation rate itself and the associated fold shape. In this work, we employed clay analogue models to investigate how mechanical discontinuities affect the propagation rate and the associated fold shape during the growth of reverse master faults. The simulated master faults dip at 30° and 45°, recalling the range of the most frequent dip angles for active reverse faults that occurs in nature. The mechanical discontinuities are simulated by pre-cutting the clay pack. For both experimental setups (30° and 45° dipping faults) we analyzed three different configurations: 1) isotropic, i.e. without precuts; 2) with one precut in the middle of the clay pack; and 3) with two evenly-spaced precuts. To test the repeatability of the processes and to have a statistically valid dataset we replicate each configuration three times. The experiments were monitored by collecting successive snapshots with a high-resolution camera pointing at the side of the model. The pictures were then processed using the Digital Image Correlation method (D.I.C.), in order to extract the displacement and shear-rate fields. These two quantities effectively show both the on-fault and off-fault deformation, indicating the activity along the newly-formed faults and whether and at what stage the discontinuities (precuts) are reactivated. To study the fault propagation and fold shape variability we marked the position of the fault tips and the fold profiles for every successive step of deformation. Then we compared

  18. Interface Anywhere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current paradigms for crew interfaces to the systems that require control are constrained by decades old technologies which require the crew to be physically near an...

  19. Interfaces and Communication Protocols in ATCA-Based LLRF Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Dariusz; Koprek, Waldemar; Jezynski, Tomasz; Piotrowski, Adam; Jablonski, Grzegorz; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Simrock, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    Linear accelerators driving Free Electron Lasers (FELs), such as the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) or the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), require sophisticated Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) control systems. The controller of the LLRF system should stabilize the phase and amplitude of the field in accelerating modules below 0.02% of the amplitude and 0.01 degree for phase tolerances to produce an ultra stable electron beam that meets the required conditions for Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Since the LLRF system for the XFEL must be in operation for the next 20 years, it should be reliable, reproducible and upgradeable. Having in mind all requirements of the LLRF control system, the Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) has been chosen to build a prototype of the LLRF system for the FLASH accelerator that is able to supervise 32 cavities of one RF station. The LLRF controller takes advantage of features offered by the ATCA standard. The LLRF system consists of a few ATCA carrier blades, Rear Transition Modules (RTM) and several Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMCs) that provide all necessary digital and analog hardware components. The distributed hardware of the LLRF system requires a number of communication links that should provide different latencies, bandwidths and protocols. The paper presents the general view of the ATC A-based LLRF system, discusses requirements and proposes an application for various interfaces and protocols in the distributed LLRF control system.

  20. Control of a visual keyboard using an electrocorticographic brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusienski, Dean J; Shih, Jerry J

    2011-05-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are devices that enable severely disabled people to communicate and interact with their environments using their brain waves. Most studies investigating BCI in humans have used scalp EEG as the source of electrical signals and focused on motor control of prostheses or computer cursors on a screen. The authors hypothesize that the use of brain signals obtained directly from the cortical surface will more effectively control a communication/spelling task compared to scalp EEG. A total of 6 patients with medically intractable epilepsy were tested for the ability to control a visual keyboard using electrocorticographic (ECOG) signals. ECOG data collected during a P300 visual task paradigm were preprocessed and used to train a linear classifier to subsequently predict the intended target letters. The classifier was able to predict the intended target character at or near 100% accuracy using fewer than 15 stimulation sequences in 5 of the 6 people tested. ECOG data from electrodes outside the language cortex contributed to the classifier and enabled participants to write words on a visual keyboard. This is a novel finding because previous invasive BCI research in humans used signals exclusively from the motor cortex to control a computer cursor or prosthetic device. These results demonstrate that ECOG signals from electrodes both overlying and outside the language cortex can reliably control a visual keyboard to generate language output without voice or limb movements.

  1. Integrated digital control and man-machine interface for complex remote handing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.C.; Spille, R.F.; Zimmermann, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is part of a continuing effort within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and extend the capabilities of remote manipulation and maintenance technology. The AIMS is a totally integrated approach to remote handling in hazardous environments. State-of-the-art computer systems connected through a high-speed distributed control system that supports the flexibility and expandability needed for large integrated maintenance applications. A man-Machine Interface provides high-level human interaction through a powerful color graphics menu-controlled operator console. An auxiliary control system handles the real-time processing needs for a variety of support hardware. A pair of dedicated fiber-optic-linked master/slave computer systems control the Advanced Servomanipulator master/slave arms using powerful distributed digital processing methods. The FORTH language was used as a real-time operating and development environment for the entire system, and all of these components are integrated into a control room concept that represents the latest advancements in the development of remote maintenance facilities for hazardous environments

  2. Toward brain-computer interface based wheelchair control utilizing tactually-evoked event-related potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background People with severe disabilities, e.g. due to neurodegenerative disease, depend on technology that allows for accurate wheelchair control. For those who cannot operate a wheelchair with a joystick, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) may offer a valuable option. Technology depending on visual or auditory input may not be feasible as these modalities are dedicated to processing of environmental stimuli (e.g. recognition of obstacles, ambient noise). Herein we thus validated the feasibility of a BCI based on tactually-evoked event-related potentials (ERP) for wheelchair control. Furthermore, we investigated use of a dynamic stopping method to improve speed of the tactile BCI system. Methods Positions of four tactile stimulators represented navigation directions (left thigh: move left; right thigh: move right; abdomen: move forward; lower neck: move backward) and N = 15 participants delivered navigation commands by focusing their attention on the desired tactile stimulus in an oddball-paradigm. Results Participants navigated a virtual wheelchair through a building and eleven participants successfully completed the task of reaching 4 checkpoints in the building. The virtual wheelchair was equipped with simulated shared-control sensors (collision avoidance), yet these sensors were rarely needed. Conclusion We conclude that most participants achieved tactile ERP-BCI control sufficient to reliably operate a wheelchair and dynamic stopping was of high value for tactile ERP classification. Finally, this paper discusses feasibility of tactile ERPs for BCI based wheelchair control. PMID:24428900

  3. Integrated digital control and man-machine interface for complex remote handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.C.; Spille, R.F.; Zimmermann, S.D.

    1986-12-01

    The Advanced Integrated Maintenance System (AIMS) is part of a continuing effort within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and extend the capabilities of remote manipulation and maintenance technology. The AIMS is a totally integrated approach to remote handling in hazardous environments. State-of-the-art computer systems connected through a high-speed communication network provide a real-time distributed control system that supports the flexibility and expandability needed for large integrated maintenance applications. A Man-Machine Interface provides high-level human interaction through a powerful color graphics menu-controlled operator console. An auxiliary control system handles the real-time processing needs for a variety of support hardware. A pair of dedicated fiber-optic-linked master/slave computer system control the Advanced Servomanipulator master/slave arms using powerful distributed digital processing methods. The FORTH language was used as a real-time operating and development environment for the entire system, and all of these components are integrated into a control room concept that represents the latest advancements in the development of remote maintenance facilities for hazardous environments

  4. Current Control and Performance Evaluation of Converter Interfaced Distribution Resources in Grid Connected Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SINGH Alka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Use of distributed resources is growing in developing countries like India and in developed nations too. The increased acceptance of suchresources is mainly due to their modularity, increased reliability, good power quality and environment friendly operation. These are currently being interfaced to the existing systems using voltage source inverters (VSC’s. The control of such distributed resources is significantly different than the conventional power systems mainly because the VSC’s have no inertia unlike the synchronous generators.This paper deals with the Matlab modeling and design of control aspects of one such distributed source feeding a common load. A grid connected supply is also available. The control algorithm is developed for real and reactive power sharing of the load between thedistributed source and the grid. The developed control scheme is tested for linear (R-L load as well as nonlinear loads. With suitable modifications, the control algorithm can be extended for several distributed resources connected in parallel.

  5. Brain-Machine Interface control of a robot arm using actor-critic rainforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline; Sanchez, Justin C

    2012-01-01

    Here we demonstrate how a marmoset monkey can use a reinforcement learning (RL) Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) to effectively control the movements of a robot arm for a reaching task. In this work, an actor-critic RL algorithm used neural ensemble activity in the monkey's motor cortext to control the robot movements during a two-target decision task. This novel approach to decoding offers unique advantages for BMI control applications. Compared to supervised learning decoding methods, the actor-critic RL algorithm does not require an explicit set of training data to create a static control model, but rather it incrementally adapts the model parameters according to its current performance, in this case requiring only a very basic feedback signal. We show how this algorithm achieved high performance when mapping the monkey's neural states (94%) to robot actions, and only needed to experience a few trials before obtaining accurate real-time control of the robot arm. Since RL methods responsively adapt and adjust their parameters, they can provide a method to create BMIs that are robust against perturbations caused by changes in either the neural input space or the output actions they generate under different task requirements or goals.

  6. Neuromechanism study of insect-machine interface: flight control by neural electrical stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixia Zhao

    Full Text Available The insect-machine interface (IMI is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L. via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe, ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee-machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control.

  7. Neuromechanism study of insect-machine interface: flight control by neural electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect-machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee-machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control.

  8. Neuromechanism Study of Insect–Machine Interface: Flight Control by Neural Electrical Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huixia; Zheng, Nenggan; Ribi, Willi A.; Zheng, Huoqing; Xue, Lei; Gong, Fan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-01-01

    The insect–machine interface (IMI) is a novel approach developed for man-made air vehicles, which directly controls insect flight by either neuromuscular or neural stimulation. In our previous study of IMI, we induced flight initiation and cessation reproducibly in restrained honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) via electrical stimulation of the bilateral optic lobes. To explore the neuromechanism underlying IMI, we applied electrical stimulation to seven subregions of the honeybee brain with the aid of a new method for localizing brain regions. Results showed that the success rate for initiating honeybee flight decreased in the order: α-lobe (or β-lobe), ellipsoid body, lobula, medulla and antennal lobe. Based on a comparison with other neurobiological studies in honeybees, we propose that there is a cluster of descending neurons in the honeybee brain that transmits neural excitation from stimulated brain areas to the thoracic ganglia, leading to flight behavior. This neural circuit may involve the higher-order integration center, the primary visual processing center and the suboesophageal ganglion, which is also associated with a possible learning and memory pathway. By pharmacologically manipulating the electrically stimulated honeybee brain, we have shown that octopamine, rather than dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, plays a part in the circuit underlying electrically elicited honeybee flight. Our study presents a new brain stimulation protocol for the honeybee–machine interface and has solved one of the questions with regard to understanding which functional divisions of the insect brain participate in flight control. It will support further studies to uncover the involved neurons inside specific brain areas and to test the hypothesized involvement of a visual learning and memory pathway in IMI flight control. PMID:25409523

  9. Investigating the roles of touchscreen and physical control interface characteristics on driver distraction and multitasking performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the potential of driver distraction, task performance, orientation of : attention, and perceived workload in a multitasking situation involving interaction with touchscreen : interface, compared to physical interface. Autho...

  10. Biomimetic synthesis and morphological control of metal carbonates at the air/solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shichoon; Cho, Kilwon; Son, Younggon

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic approaches can provide a means of fabricating nanostructured materials under environmentally benign conditions. In this paper, we synthesized metal carbonate films, such as calcite, strontianite, malachite, and hydrozincite films, at the air-solution interface of solutions containing corresponding metal ions by using inflowing CO 2 from the atmosphere. The addition of acidic polymers, fulfilling the role of an acidic protein in biomineralization, provided CaCO 3 nanofibers, SrCO 3 nanofibers oriented in a specific direction, and copper carbonate and zinc carbonate hydroxide thin films. The metal carbonates prepared in this study were used as precursors for the formation of metal oxide nanocrystals via pyrolysis. This work showed that various metal carbonates and metal oxides with nanostructures can be prepared by using atmospheric CO 2 . - Highlights: ► Biomimetic synthesis of metal carbonate nanofilms at the air/solution interface. ► The reaction between metal ions and carbonate ions derived from CO 2 in the air. ► Calcium, strontium, copper and zinc carbonates were formed. ► The morphologies of the nanofilms were controlled by adding the acidic polymer. ► Nanostructured metal oxides were prepared by pyrolysis of the metal carbonates.

  11. Interface control document between Analytical Services and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venetz, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    This interface control document (ICD) between Analytical Services and Solid Waste Disposal (SWD) establishes a baseline description of the support needed and the wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the two divisions. It is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division's expectations regarding levels and type of support needed. This ICD deals with the waste sampling support needed by SWD and the waste generated by the specified analytical laboratories. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes, characteristics and shipping schedules, which will be used to plan the proper support requirements. The laboratories included in this document are 222-S Laboratory Facility, the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) and the Chemical Engineering Laboratory. These three facilities provide support to the entire site and are not associated with one major program/facility. The laboratories associated with major facilities or programs such as Engineering/Environmental Development Laboratory at K Basins Operation are not within the scope of this document

  12. Effect of the growth retardant Cycocel® in controlling the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... Hydroponic culture of Gladiolus tristis: Application of paclobutrazol for flowering and height control. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 7(3): 239-243. Ninnemann H, Zeevaart JAD, Kende H, Lang A (1964). The plant growth retardant CCC as an inhibitor of gibberellin biosynthesis in. Fusarium moniliforme. Planta (Bert.) ...

  13. Control of Polymer Glass Formation Behaviour Using Molecular Diluents and Dynamic Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalara, Jayachandra Hari

    The end use application of polymeric materials is mainly determined by their viscosity, thermal stability and processability. These properties are primarily determined by the segmental relaxation time (taualpha) of the polymer and its glass state modulus, which determines its glassy mechanical response. Developing design principles to obtain rational control over these properties would enable fabrication of new polymers or polymer blends with improved thermal stability, enhanced processability and better mechanical robustness of the material. Introduction of diluents and nanostructuring of the material serve as invaluable tools for altering polymers' glass transition and associated dynamic and mechanical properties. Besides providing guidelines for technologically important improvements in processability, glassy mechanical properties, and transport behavior, diluent effects and behavior of nanostructured materials can provide insights into the fundamental physics of the glass transition, for example, by elucidating the interrelation between high- and low-frequency structural relaxation processes. It has been previously suggested that there exists a similarity between how diluents and interfaces impact the glass formation behavior of the polymer, raising the possibility that the effects of these two polymer modifications may be separate manifestations of a common set of physics in glass forming polymers. Here we address several interrelated questions in the understanding of glass formation in polymer/diluent blends and nanostructured polymers. First, what is the relationship between a diluent's molecular structure and its impact on a polymer's glass formation behavior? How does this compare to the effect of interfaces? Second, how does the introduction of diluents impact the role of interfaces in modifying polymer glass formation? Third, how does the introduction of interfaces impact metrology of the polymer glass transition? Finally, we address a major open

  14. Sporophytic control of pollen tube growth and guidance in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausser, Andreas; Kliwer, Irina; Srilunchang, Kanok-orn; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Pollen tube germination, growth, and guidance (progamic phase) culminating in sperm discharge is a multi-stage process including complex interactions between the male gametophyte as well as sporophytic tissues and the female gametophyte (embryo sac), respectively. Inter- and intra-specific crossing barriers in maize and Tripsacum have been studied and a precise description of progamic pollen tube development in maize is reported here. It was found that pollen germination and initial tube growth are rather unspecific, but an early, first crossing barrier was detected before arrival at the transmitting tract. Pollination of maize silks with Tripsacum pollen and incompatible pollination of Ga1s/Ga1s-maize silks with ga1-maize pollen revealed another two incompatibility barriers, namely transmitting tract mistargeting and insufficient growth support. Attraction and growth support by the transmitting tract seem to play key roles for progamic pollen tube growth. After leaving transmitting tracts, pollen tubes have to navigate across the ovule in the ovular cavity. Pollination of an embryo sac-less maize RNAi-line allowed the role of the female gametophyte for pollen tube guidance to be determined in maize. It was found that female gametophyte controlled guidance is restricted to a small region around the micropyle, approximately 50–100 μm in diameter. This area is comparable to the area of influence of previously described ZmEA1-based short-range female gametophyte signalling. In conclusion, the progamic phase is almost completely under sporophytic control in maize. PMID:19926683

  15. Flow-Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: A Novel Approach for Controlled Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palaniappan, Kumaranand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan [National Science and Technology Center, Thailand; Smith, Nickolaus A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dickerson, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Casson, Joanna L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Semiconductor nanowires (SC-NWs) have potential applications in diverse technologies from nanoelectronics and photonics to energy harvesting and storage due to their quantum-confined opto-electronic properties coupled with their highly anisotropic shape. Here, we explore new approaches to an important solution-based growth method known as solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. In SLS, molecular precursors are reacted in the presence of low-melting metal nanoparticles that serve as molten fluxes to catalyze the growth of the SC-NWs. The mechanism of growth is assumed to be similar to that of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, with the clear distinctions of being conducted in solution in the presence of coordinating ligands and at relatively lower temperatures (<300 C). The resultant SC-NWs are soluble in common organic solvents and solution processable, offering advantages such as simplified processing, scale-up, ultra-small diameters for quantum-confinement effects, and flexible choice of materials from group III-V to groups II-VI, IV-VI, as well as truly ternary I-III-VI semiconductors as we recently demonstrates. Despite these advantages of SLS growth, VLS offers several clear opportunities not allowed by conventional SLS. Namely, VLS allows sequential addition of precursors for facile synthesis of complex axial heterostructures. In addition, growth proceeds relatively slowly compared to SLS, allowing clear assessments of growth kinetics. In order to retain the materials and processing flexibility afforded by SLS, but add the elements of controlled growth afforded by VLS, we transformed SLS into a flow based method by adapting it to synthesis in a microfluidic system. By this new method - so-called 'flow-SLS' (FSLS) - we have now demonstrated unprecedented fabrication of multi-segmented SC-NWs, e.g., 8-segmented CdSe/ZnSe defined by either compositionally abrupt or alloyed interfaces as a function of growth conditions. In addition, we have studied growth

  16. Beyond intuitive anthropomorphic control: recent achievements using brain computer interface technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Fifer, Matthew; Rich, Matthew; Pino, Johnathan; Wester, Brock; Johannes, Matthew; Dohopolski, Chris; Helder, John; D'Angelo, Denise; Beaty, James; Bensmaia, Sliman; McLoughlin, Michael; Tenore, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) research has progressed rapidly, with BCIs shifting from animal tests to human demonstrations of controlling computer cursors and even advanced prosthetic limbs, the latter having been the goal of the Revolutionizing Prosthetics (RP) program. These achievements now include direct electrical intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the brain to provide human BCI users feedback information from the sensors of prosthetic limbs. These successes raise the question of how well people would be able to use BCIs to interact with systems that are not based directly on the body (e.g., prosthetic arms), and how well BCI users could interpret ICMS information from such devices. If paralyzed individuals could use BCIs to effectively interact with such non-anthropomorphic systems, it would offer them numerous new opportunities to control novel assistive devices. Here we explore how well a participant with tetraplegia can detect infrared (IR) sources in the environment using a prosthetic arm mounted camera that encodes IR information via ICMS. We also investigate how well a BCI user could transition from controlling a BCI based on prosthetic arm movements to controlling a flight simulator, a system with different physical dynamics than the arm. In that test, the BCI participant used environmental information encoded via ICMS to identify which of several upcoming flight routes was the best option. For both tasks, the BCI user was able to quickly learn how to interpret the ICMSprovided information to achieve the task goals.

  17. Using the Electrocorticographic Speech Network to Control a Brain-Computer Interface in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthardt, Eric C.; Gaona, Charles; Sharma, Mohit; Szrama, Nicholas; Roland, Jarod; Freudenberg, Zac; Solis, Jamie; Breshears, Jonathan; Schalk, Gerwin

    2013-01-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG) has emerged as a new signal platform for brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. Classically, the cortical physiology that has been commonly investigated and utilized for device control in humans has been brain signals from sensorimotor cortex. Hence, it was unknown whether other neurophysiological substrates, such as the speech network, could be used to further improve on or complement existing motor-based control paradigms. We demonstrate here for the first time that ECoG signals associated with different overt and imagined phoneme articulation can enable invasively monitored human patients to control a one-dimensional computer cursor rapidly and accurately. This phonetic content was distinguishable within higher gamma frequency oscillations and enabled users to achieve final target accuracies between 68 and 91% within 15 minutes. Additionally, one of the patients achieved robust control using recordings from a microarray consisting of 1 mm spaced microwires. These findings suggest that the cortical network associated with speech could provide an additional cognitive and physiologic substrate for BCI operation and that these signals can be acquired from a cortical array that is small and minimally invasive. PMID:21471638

  18. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomori, Zoltán; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Valušová, Eva; Antalík, Marián; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Holographic optical tweezers provide a contactless way to trap and manipulate several microobjects independently in space using focused laser beams. Although the methods of fast and efficient generation of optical traps are well developed, their user friendly control still lags behind. Even though several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras, or Kinect game consoles, they have not yet reached the level of natural human interface. Here we demonstrate a multi-modal ‘natural user interface’ approach that combines finger and gaze tracking with gesture and speech recognition. This allows us to select objects with an operator’s gaze and voice, to trap the objects and control their positions via tracking of finger movement in space and to run semi-automatic procedures such as acquisition of Raman spectra from preselected objects. This approach takes advantage of the power of human processing of images together with smooth control of human fingertips and downscales these skills to control remotely the motion of microobjects at microscale in a natural way for the human operator. (paper)

  19. New generation of human machine interfaces for controlling UAV through depth-based gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantecón, Tomás.; del Blanco, Carlos Roberto; Jaureguizar, Fernando; García, Narciso

    2014-06-01

    New forms of natural interactions between human operators and UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) are demanded by the military industry to achieve a better balance of the UAV control and the burden of the human operator. In this work, a human machine interface (HMI) based on a novel gesture recognition system using depth imagery is proposed for the control of UAVs. Hand gesture recognition based on depth imagery is a promising approach for HMIs because it is more intuitive, natural, and non-intrusive than other alternatives using complex controllers. The proposed system is based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier that uses spatio-temporal depth descriptors as input features. The designed descriptor is based on a variation of the Local Binary Pattern (LBP) technique to efficiently work with depth video sequences. Other major consideration is the especial hand sign language used for the UAV control. A tradeoff between the use of natural hand signs and the minimization of the inter-sign interference has been established. Promising results have been achieved in a depth based database of hand gestures especially developed for the validation of the proposed system.

  20. Man-machine interface in a submarine command and weapon control system: features and design experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan H. Aas

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Important man-machine interface (MMI issues concerning a submarine command and weapon control system (CWCS such as crew organization, automation level and decision support are discussed in this paper. Generic submarine CWCS functions and operating conditions are outlined. Detailed, dynamic and real-time prototypes were used to support the MMI design. The prototypes are described and experience with detailed prototyping is discussed. Some of the main interaction principles are summarized and a restricted example of the resulting design is given. Our design experience and current work have been used to outline future perspectives of MMI design in naval CWCSs. The need for both formal and experimental approaches is emphasized.

  1. Meteorological Support Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG) Instrumentation, Data Format, and Networks Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James; Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of instrumentation discussed at the Meteorological Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG), a reference for data formats currently used by members of the group, a summary of proposed formats for future use by the group, an overview of the data networks of the group's members. This document will be updated as new systems are introduced, old systems are retired, and when the MSICWG community necessitates a change to the formats. The MSICWG consists of personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the United States Air Force (USAF) 45th Space Wing and Weather Squadron. The purpose of the group is to coordinate the distribution of weather related data to support NASA space launch related activities.

  2. Transferring brain-computer interfaces beyond the laboratory: successful application control for motor-disabled users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, Robert; Perdikis, Serafeim; Tonin, Luca; Biasiucci, Andrea; Tavella, Michele; Creatura, Marco; Molina, Alberto; Al-Khodairy, Abdul; Carlson, Tom; Millán, José D R

    2013-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are no longer only used by healthy participants under controlled conditions in laboratory environments, but also by patients and end-users, controlling applications in their homes or clinics, without the BCI experts around. But are the technology and the field mature enough for this? Especially the successful operation of applications - like text entry systems or assistive mobility devices such as tele-presence robots - requires a good level of BCI control. How much training is needed to achieve such a level? Is it possible to train naïve end-users in 10 days to successfully control such applications? In this work, we report our experiences of training 24 motor-disabled participants at rehabilitation clinics or at the end-users' homes, without BCI experts present. We also share the lessons that we have learned through transferring BCI technologies from the lab to the user's home or clinics. The most important outcome is that 50% of the participants achieved good BCI performance and could successfully control the applications (tele-presence robot and text-entry system). In the case of the tele-presence robot the participants achieved an average performance ratio of 0.87 (max. 0.97) and for the text entry application a mean of 0.93 (max. 1.0). The lessons learned and the gathered user feedback range from pure BCI problems (technical and handling), to common communication issues among the different people involved, and issues encountered while controlling the applications. The points raised in this paper are very widely applicable and we anticipate that they might be faced similarly by other groups, if they move on to bringing the BCI technology to the end-user, to home environments and towards application prototype control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. User-friendly interfaces for control of crystallographic experiments at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szebenyi, D. M. E.; Deacon, A.; Ealick, S. E.; LaIuppa, J. M.; Thiel, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    In designing a system to collect high quality diffraction data in an efficient manner, both hardware and software must be considered. This work focuses on the data collection software used at CHESS, the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron source, with emphasis on the interface between the user and the experimental components. For each type of detector used at CHESS, there is a graphical user interface (GUI) enabling the user to easily set up and run an experiment. For the CCD detector from Area Detector Systems Corp., this is a commercial product from ADSC, customized for CHESS. For the Princeton CCD detectors, a GUI has recently been developed to streamline communication between the user and the TV6 program which controls the detector. For Fuji imaging plates, a new GUI controls operation of the oscillation camera, including the imaging plate carousel; scanning of plates is done using the software provided by Fuji. Although these GUI's are not identical, they have numerous similarities, making it easier for users to learn operation of a new detector. They also incorporate error-checking to avoid problems such as overwriting data files or collecting data with no x-rays. Common to experiments with all detectors is a GUI used for operations such as alignment of the optical table on which the oscillation camera is mounted. Integral to a good data collection system is the capability to process diffraction images, for evaluation of crystal quality, determination of data collection strategy, screening of potential derivatives, and so forth. The mccview graphical front-end has been developed to conveniently initiate processing programs, including preliminary routines (correct, getbeam), main analysis routines (xdisp, denzo, scalepack), and the strategy routine m.simulate

  4. Vision based interface system for hands free control of an intelligent wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Eun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the shift of the age structure in today's populations, the necessities for developing the devices or technologies to support them have been increasing. Traditionally, the wheelchair, including powered and manual ones, is the most popular and important rehabilitation/assistive device for the disabled and the elderly. However, it is still highly restricted especially for severely disabled. As a solution to this, the Intelligent Wheelchairs (IWs have received considerable attention as mobility aids. The purpose of this work is to develop the IW interface for providing more convenient and efficient interface to the people the disability in their limbs. Methods This paper proposes an intelligent wheelchair (IW control system for the people with various disabilities. To facilitate a wide variety of user abilities, the proposed system involves the use of face-inclination and mouth-shape information, where the direction of an IW is determined by the inclination of the user's face, while proceeding and stopping are determined by the shapes of the user's mouth. Our system is composed of electric powered wheelchair, data acquisition board, ultrasonic/infra-red sensors, a PC camera, and vision system. Then the vision system to analyze user's gestures is performed by three stages: detector, recognizer, and converter. In the detector, the facial region of the intended user is first obtained using Adaboost, thereafter the mouth region is detected based on edge information. The extracted features are sent to the recognizer, which recognizes the face inclination and mouth shape using statistical analysis and K-means clustering, respectively. These recognition results are then delivered to the converter to control the wheelchair. Result & conclusion The advantages of the proposed system include 1 accurate recognition of user's intention with minimal user motion and 2 robustness to a cluttered background and the time-varying illumination

  5. Autonomous control of inverter-interfaced Distributed Generation units for harmonic current filtering and resonance damping in an islanded microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Harmonic current filtering and resonance damping have become important concerns on the control of an islanded microgrids. To address these challenges, this paper proposes a control method of inverter-interfaced Distributed Generation (DG) units, which can autonomously share harmonic currents and ...

  6. Modified atmospheric conditions controlling fungal growth on cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose

    1997-01-01

    Effective control of fungal growth on cheese under storage conditions is of great concern for the dairy industry. Therefore we designed a research project together with the Danish dairy industry on modelling fungal growth on cheese as affected by the combined effect of storage conditions (O2 and CO......2 level, relative humidity and temperature) and the composition of the cheese. All fungal species commonly found on cheese, starter cultures as well as contaminants, were examined.The most important factors influencing fungal growth are temperature, water activity of the medium and the carbon...... a competitive advantage over other fungi in moist conditions with high carbon dioxide levels, such as inside a roquefort cheese or in gas tight grain storage. The key to success in food packaging is to recognise the food ecosystem, as it enables us to identify which micro...

  7. Controlling growth density and patterning of single crystalline silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tung-Hao; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Fu-Ken; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the usage of well-patterned Au nanoparticles (NPs) as a catalyst for one-dimensional growth of single crystalline Si nanowires (NWs) through the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The study reports the fabrication of monolayer Au NPs through the self-assembly of Au NPs on a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)-modified silicon substrate. Results indicate that the spin coating time of Au NPs plays a crucial role in determining the density of Au NPs on the surface of the silicon substrate and the later catalysis growth of Si NWs. The experiments in this study employed optical lithography to pattern Au NPs, treating them as a catalyst for Si NW growth. The patterned Si NW structures easily produced and controlled Si NW density. This approach may be useful for further studies on single crystalline Si NW-based nanodevices and their properties.

  8. On the control of brain-computer interfaces by users with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Billinger, Martin; Laparra-Hernández, José; Aloise, Fabio; García, Mariano Lloria; Faller, Josef; Scherer, Reinhold; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been proposed as a potential assistive device for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) to assist with their communication needs. However, it is unclear how well-suited BCIs are to individuals with CP. Therefore, this study aims to investigate to what extent these users are able to gain control of BCIs. This study is conducted with 14 individuals with CP attempting to control two standard online BCIs (1) based upon sensorimotor rhythm modulations, and (2) based upon steady state visual evoked potentials. Of the 14 users, 8 are able to use one or other of the BCIs, online, with a statistically significant level of accuracy, without prior training. Classification results are driven by neurophysiological activity and not seen to correlate with occurrences of artifacts. However, many of these users' accuracies, while statistically significant, would require either more training or more advanced methods before practical BCI control would be possible. The results indicate that BCIs may be controlled by individuals with CP but that many issues need to be overcome before practical application use may be achieved. This is the first study to assess the ability of a large group of different individuals with CP to gain control of an online BCI system. The results indicate that six users could control a sensorimotor rhythm BCI and three a steady state visual evoked potential BCI at statistically significant levels of accuracy (SMR accuracies; mean ± STD, 0.821 ± 0.116, SSVEP accuracies; 0.422 ± 0.069). Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quadcopter flight control using a low-cost hybrid interface with EEG-based classification and eye tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Hyung; Kim, Minho; Jo, Sungho

    2014-08-01

    We propose a wearable hybrid interface where eye movements and mental concentration directly influence the control of a quadcopter in three-dimensional space. This noninvasive and low-cost interface addresses limitations of previous work by supporting users to complete their complicated tasks in a constrained environment in which only visual feedback is provided. The combination of the two inputs augments the number of control commands to enable the flying robot to travel in eight different directions within the physical environment. Five human subjects participated in the experiments to test the feasibility of the hybrid interface. A front view camera on the hull of the quadcopter provided the only visual feedback to each remote subject on a laptop display. Based on the visual feedback, the subjects used the interface to navigate along pre-set target locations in the air. The flight performance was evaluated by comparing with a keyboard-based interface. We demonstrate the applicability of the hybrid interface to explore and interact with a three-dimensional physical space through a flying robot. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interface Control Document Between the Double-Shell Tank (DST) system and the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOFFERBER, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) describes interfaces between the Double-Shell Tanks (DST) System and Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) (figure 1). WESF is currently operational as a storage facility for cesium and strontium capsules. This ICD covers current operational interfaces and those envisioned during Terminal Clean Out (TCO) activities in the future. WESF and the DST System do not have a direct physical interface. The waste will be moved by tank trailer to the 204-AR waste unloading facility. The purpose of the ICD process is to formalize working agreements between the River Protection Project (RPP) DST System and systems/facilities operated by organizations or companies internal and external to RPP. This ICD has been developed as part of the requirements basis for design of the DST System to support the Phase I Privatization effort

  11. Development of new plant monitoring and control system with advanced man-machine interfaces NUCAMM-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hideyuki; Joge, Toshio; Miyake, Masao; Kishi, Shoichi

    1981-01-01

    BWR type nuclear power stations are the typical plants adopting central monitoring system in view of the size of the scale of system and the prevention of radiation exposure. Central control boards became large as much informations and many operating tools are concentrated on them. Recently, the unit capacity has increased, and the safety has been strengthened, therefore more improvement of the man-machine interface is required concerning the monitoring of plant operation. Hitachi Ltd. developed the central monitoring and control system for nuclear power stations ''NUCAMM-80'', concentrating related fundamental techniques such as the collection of plant informations, the expansion of automatic operation, the ergonomic re-evaluation of the arrangement of panels and subsystems, and the effective use of functional hardwares such as controlling computers and cathode ray tubes, for the purposes of improving the reliability of plant operation and the rate of operation, the reduction of the burden of operators and drastic labor saving. The fundamental policy of the development, the construction of the system, panel layout and the collection of informations, the development of the system for plant automation, the development of plant diagnosis and prevention systems, computer system and the merits of this system are described. (Kako, I.)

  12. Cortical excitability correlates with the event-related desynchronization during brain-computer interface control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Blanchard, Caroline; Holmes, Nicholas P.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) based on motor control have been suggested as tools for stroke rehabilitation. Some initial successes have been achieved with this approach, however the mechanism by which they work is not yet fully understood. One possible part of this mechanism is a, previously suggested, relationship between the strength of the event-related desynchronization (ERD), a neural correlate of motor imagination and execution, and corticospinal excitability. Additionally, a key component of BCIs used in neurorehabilitation is the provision of visual feedback to positively reinforce attempts at motor control. However, the ability of visual feedback of the ERD to modulate the activity in the motor system has not been fully explored. Approach. We investigate these relationships via transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered at different moments in the ongoing ERD related to hand contraction and relaxation during BCI control of a visual feedback bar. Main results. We identify a significant relationship between ERD strength and corticospinal excitability, and find that our visual feedback does not affect corticospinal excitability. Significance. Our results imply that efforts to promote functional recovery in stroke by targeting increases in corticospinal excitability may be aided by accounting for the time course of the ERD.

  13. Confinement of surface waves at the air-water interface to control aerosol size and dispersity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Wilson, Rab; King, Xi; Reboud, Julien; Tassieri, Manlio; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2017-11-01

    The precise control over the size and dispersity of droplets, produced within aerosols, is of great interest across many manufacturing, food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Amongst these applications, the delivery of new classes of high value drugs to the lungs has recently attracted significant attention from pharmaceutical companies. This is commonly achieved through the mechanical excitation of surface waves at the air liquid interface of a parent liquid volume. Previous studies have established a correlation between the wavelength on the surface of liquid and the final aerosol size. In this work, we show that the droplet size distribution of aerosols can be controlled by constraining the liquid inside micron-sized cavities and coupling surface acoustic waves into different volumes of liquid inside micro-grids. In particular, we show that by reducing the characteristic physical confinement size (i.e., either the initial liquid volume or the cavities' diameters), higher harmonics of capillary waves are revealed with a consequent reduction of both aerosol mean size and dispersity. In doing so, we provide a new method for the generation and fine control of aerosols' sizes distribution.

  14. Visual perception affected by motivation and alertness controlled by a noninvasive brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimenko, Vladimir A; Runnova, Anastasia E; Zhuravlev, Maksim O; Makarov, Vladimir V; Nedayvozov, Vladimir; Grubov, Vadim V; Pchelintceva, Svetlana V; Hramov, Alexander E; Pisarchik, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    The influence of motivation and alertness on brain activity associated with visual perception was studied experimentally using the Necker cube, which ambiguity was controlled by the contrast of its ribs. The wavelet analysis of recorded multichannel electroencephalograms (EEG) allowed us to distinguish two different scenarios while the brain processed the ambiguous stimulus. The first scenario is characterized by a particular destruction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz) with a simultaneous increase in beta-wave activity (20-30 Hz), whereas in the second scenario, the beta rhythm is not well pronounced while the alpha-wave energy remains unchanged. The experiments were carried out with a group of financially motivated subjects and another group of unpaid volunteers. It was found that the first scenario occurred mainly in the motivated group. This can be explained by the increased alertness of the motivated subjects. The prevalence of the first scenario was also observed in a group of subjects to whom images with higher ambiguity were presented. We believe that the revealed scenarios can occur not only during the perception of bistable images, but also in other perceptual tasks requiring decision making. The obtained results may have important applications for monitoring and controlling human alertness in situations which need substantial attention. On the base of the obtained results we built a brain-computer interface to estimate and control the degree of alertness in real time.

  15. Motivating contributions to online forums: can locus of control moderate the effects of interface cues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyang-Sook; Sundar, S Shyam

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to encourage users to participate rather than lurk, online health forums provide authority badges (e.g., guru) to frequent contributors and popularity indicators (e.g., number of views) to their postings. Studies have shown the latter to be more effective, implying that bulletin-board users are motivated by external validation of their contributions. However, no consideration has yet been given to individual differences in the influence of such popularity indicators. Personality psychology suggests that individuals with external, rather than internal, locus of control are more likely to be other-directed and therefore more likely to be motivated by interface cues showing the bandwagon effect of their online posts. We investigate this hypothesis by analyzing data from a 2 (high vs. low authority cue) × 2 (strong vs. weak bandwagon cue) experiment with an online health community. Results show that strong bandwagon cues promote sense of community among users with internal, rather than external, locus of control. When bandwagon cues are weak, bestowal of high authority serves to heighten their sense of agency. Contrary to prediction, weak bandwagon cues appear to promote sense of community and sense of agency among those with external locus of control. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  16. Design of a Mobile Brain Computer Interface-Based Smart Multimedia Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kevin C.; Lin, Bor-Shing; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Music is a way of expressing our feelings and emotions. Suitable music can positively affect people. However, current multimedia control methods, such as manual selection or automatic random mechanisms, which are now applied broadly in MP3 and CD players, cannot adaptively select suitable music according to the user’s physiological state. In this study, a brain computer interface-based smart multimedia controller was proposed to select music in different situations according to the user’s physiological state. Here, a commercial mobile tablet was used as the multimedia platform, and a wireless multi-channel electroencephalograph (EEG) acquisition module was designed for real-time EEG monitoring. A smart multimedia control program built in the multimedia platform was developed to analyze the user’s EEG feature and select music according his/her state. The relationship between the user’s state and music sorted by listener’s preference was also examined in this study. The experimental results show that real-time music biofeedback according a user’s EEG feature may positively improve the user’s attention state. PMID:25756862

  17. Visual perception affected by motivation and alertness controlled by a noninvasive brain-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Maksimenko

    Full Text Available The influence of motivation and alertness on brain activity associated with visual perception was studied experimentally using the Necker cube, which ambiguity was controlled by the contrast of its ribs. The wavelet analysis of recorded multichannel electroencephalograms (EEG allowed us to distinguish two different scenarios while the brain processed the ambiguous stimulus. The first scenario is characterized by a particular destruction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz with a simultaneous increase in beta-wave activity (20-30 Hz, whereas in the second scenario, the beta rhythm is not well pronounced while the alpha-wave energy remains unchanged. The experiments were carried out with a group of financially motivated subjects and another group of unpaid volunteers. It was found that the first scenario occurred mainly in the motivated group. This can be explained by the increased alertness of the motivated subjects. The prevalence of the first scenario was also observed in a group of subjects to whom images with higher ambiguity were presented. We believe that the revealed scenarios can occur not only during the perception of bistable images, but also in other perceptual tasks requiring decision making. The obtained results may have important applications for monitoring and controlling human alertness in situations which need substantial attention. On the base of the obtained results we built a brain-computer interface to estimate and control the degree of alertness in real time.

  18. Eye-gaze control of the computer interface: Discrimination of zoom intent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis methodology and associated experiment were developed to assess whether definable and repeatable signatures of eye-gaze characteristics are evident, preceding a decision to zoom-in, zoom-out, or not to zoom at a computer interface. This user intent discrimination procedure can have broad application in disability aids and telerobotic control. Eye-gaze was collected from 10 subjects in a controlled experiment, requiring zoom decisions. The eye-gaze data were clustered, then fed into a multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) for optimal definition of heuristics separating the zoom-in, zoom-out, and no-zoom conditions. Confusion matrix analyses showed that a number of variable combinations classified at a statistically significant level, but practical significance was more difficult to establish. Composite contour plots demonstrated the regions in parameter space consistently assigned by the MDA to unique zoom conditions. Peak classification occurred at about 1200--1600 msec. Improvements in the methodology to achieve practical real-time zoom control are considered

  19. Self-paced brain-computer interface control of ambulation in a virtual reality environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po T.; King, Christine E.; Chui, Luis A.; Do, An H.; Nenadic, Zoran

    2012-10-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leaves affected individuals unable to ambulate. Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled lower extremity prostheses may restore intuitive and able-body-like ambulation after SCI. To test its feasibility, the authors developed and tested a novel EEG-based, data-driven BCI system for intuitive and self-paced control of the ambulation of an avatar within a virtual reality environment (VRE). Approach. Eight able-bodied subjects and one with SCI underwent the following 10-min training session: subjects alternated between idling and walking kinaesthetic motor imageries (KMI) while their EEG were recorded and analysed to generate subject-specific decoding models. Subjects then performed a goal-oriented online task, repeated over five sessions, in which they utilized the KMI to control the linear ambulation of an avatar and make ten sequential stops at designated points within the VRE. Main results. The average offline training performance across subjects was 77.2±11.0%, ranging from 64.3% (p = 0.001 76) to 94.5% (p = 6.26×10-23), with chance performance being 50%. The average online performance was 8.5±1.1 (out of 10) successful stops and 303±53 s completion time (perfect = 211 s). All subjects achieved performances significantly different than those of random walk (p prosthesis systems may be feasible.

  20. Design of a Mobile Brain Computer Interface-Based Smart Multimedia Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Tseng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Music is a way of expressing our feelings and emotions. Suitable music can positively affect people. However, current multimedia control methods, such as manual selection or automatic random mechanisms, which are now applied broadly in MP3 and CD players, cannot adaptively select suitable music according to the user’s physiological state. In this study, a brain computer interface-based smart multimedia controller was proposed to select music in different situations according to the user’s physiological state. Here, a commercial mobile tablet was used as the multimedia platform, and a wireless multi-channel electroencephalograph (EEG acquisition module was designed for real-time EEG monitoring. A smart multimedia control program built in the multimedia platform was developed to analyze the user’s EEG feature and select music according his/her state. The relationship between the user’s state and music sorted by listener’s preference was also examined in this study. The experimental results show that real-time music biofeedback according a user’s EEG feature may positively improve the user’s attention state.

  1. Mitochondrial respiratory control is lost during growth factor deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Eyal; Armour, Sean M; Thompson, Craig B

    2002-10-01

    The ability of cells to maintain a bioenergetically favorable ATP/ADP ratio confers a tight balance between cellular events that consume ATP and the rate of ATP production. However, after growth factor withdrawal, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio declines. To investigate these changes, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells isolated before the onset of apoptosis were characterized in vitro. Mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells have lost their ability to undergo matrix condensation in response to ADP, which is accompanied by a failure to perform ADP-coupled respiration. At the time of analysis, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells were not depleted of cytochrome c and cytochrome c-dependent respiration was unaffected, demonstrating that the inhibition of the respiratory rate is not due to loss of cytochrome c. Agents that disrupt the mitochondrial outer membrane, such as digitonin, or maintain outer membrane exchange of adenine nucleotide, such as Bcl-x(L), restored ADP-dependent control of mitochondrial respiration. Together, these data suggest that the regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability contributes to respiratory control.

  2. Growth Control of Cyanobacteria by Three Submerged Macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiou; Zhong, Guangrong; Yan, Hai; Liu, Hu; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To illustrate the control of harmful cyanobacterial growth and the removal of nutritients from fresh water, three submerged macrophytes were grown in the raw water of Guishui Lake. Lindernia rotundifolia, Hygrophila stricta, and Cryptocoryne crispatula were grown together in situ to assess their effectiveness in nutrient removal in microcosms. Results revealed the inhibitory effects of these species on cyanobacterial growth. In addition, water quality in the planted microcosms showed improvement when compared to the water quality of the unplanted microcosm. At all treatments studied, the chemical oxygen demand in the planted microcosms was lower than that in the unplanted microcosms, and the removal rate of all the nitrogen and phosphate in the planted microcosms was better than that of the microcosm without plants. Our study offers a useful algal control method for the lakes or reservoirs that suffer from harmful cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:22693412

  3. The Role of Control in Entrepreneurial Growth: An alternative explanation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Jones, Sally; Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard

    their implications for concrete behaviour. Methodology: We apply a critical realist ontology to develop a research framework for understanding the role of risk, control and self-efficacy in determining entrepreneurial growth. We will collect data through an online questionnaire, including both men and women from...... and boys are socialized in the family. Contribution: We develop a research framework for testing propositions concerning the role of power-control in the family and the spillover effects that PCT has on entrepreneurial growth. We extend PCT into the entrepreneurship domain and offer new insights...... as they are viewed as more vulnerable than boys. Given that PCT deals with how risk-taking/adverse behaviour originates, it may have an application value in entrepreneurship. The gender gap in risk-taking has been addressed from various perspectives in the past 30 years, however, little effort has been made...

  4. TOR and paradigm change: cell growth is controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael N

    2016-09-15

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the discovery of target of rapamycin (TOR), a highly conserved kinase and central controller of cell growth. In this Retrospective, I briefly describe the discovery of TOR and the subsequent elucidation of its cellular role. I place particular emphasis on an article by Barbet et al. from 1996, the first suggesting that TOR controls cell growth in response to nutrients. © 2016 Hall. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Electroencephalogram-Based Brain–Computer Interface and Lower-Limb Prosthesis Control: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas P. Murphy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of manipulating a prosthetic knee directly by using a brain–computer interface (BCI system in a transfemoral amputee. Although the other forms of control could be more reliable and quick (e.g., electromyography control, the electroencephalography (EEG-based BCI may provide amputees an alternative way to control a prosthesis directly from brain.MethodsA transfemoral amputee subject was trained to activate a knee-unlocking switch through motor imagery of the movement of his lower extremity. Surface scalp electrodes transmitted brain wave data to a software program that was keyed to activate the switch when the event-related desynchronization in EEG reached a certain threshold. After achieving more than 90% reliability for switch activation by EEG rhythm-feedback training, the subject then progressed to activating the knee-unlocking switch on a prosthesis that turned on a motor and unlocked a prosthetic knee. The project took place in the prosthetic department of a Veterans Administration medical center. The subject walked back and forth in the parallel bars and unlocked the knee for swing phase and for sitting down. The success of knee unlocking through this system was measured. Additionally, the subject filled out a questionnaire on his experiences.ResultsThe success of unlocking the prosthetic knee mechanism ranged from 50 to 100% in eight test segments.ConclusionThe performance of the subject supports the feasibility for BCI control of a lower extremity prosthesis using surface scalp EEG electrodes. Investigating direct brain control in different types of patients is important to promote real-world BCI applications.

  6. Optimal control of algae growth by controlling CO 2 and nutrition flow using Pontryagin Maximum Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardlijah; Jamil, Ahmad; Hanafi, Lukman; Sanjaya, Suharmadi

    2017-09-01

    There are so many benefit of algae. One of them is using for renewable energy and sustainable in the future. The greater growth of algae will increasing biodiesel production and the increase of algae growth is influenced by glucose, nutrients and photosynthesis process. In this paper, the optimal control problem of the growth of algae is discussed. The objective function is to maximize the concentration of dry algae while the control is the flow of carbon dioxide and the nutrition. The solution is obtained by applying the Pontryagin Maximum Principle. and the result show that the concentration of algae increased more than 15 %.

  7. Gaze-and-brain-controlled interfaces for human-computer and human-robot interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishkin S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human-machine interaction technology has greatly evolved during the last decades, but manual and speech modalities remain single output channels with their typical constraints imposed by the motor system’s information transfer limits. Will brain-computer interfaces (BCIs and gaze-based control be able to convey human commands or even intentions to machines in the near future? We provide an overview of basic approaches in this new area of applied cognitive research. Objective. We test the hypothesis that the use of communication paradigms and a combination of eye tracking with unobtrusive forms of registering brain activity can improve human-machine interaction. Methods and Results. Three groups of ongoing experiments at the Kurchatov Institute are reported. First, we discuss the communicative nature of human-robot interaction, and approaches to building a more e cient technology. Specifically, “communicative” patterns of interaction can be based on joint attention paradigms from developmental psychology, including a mutual “eye-to-eye” exchange of looks between human and robot. Further, we provide an example of “eye mouse” superiority over the computer mouse, here in emulating the task of selecting a moving robot from a swarm. Finally, we demonstrate a passive, noninvasive BCI that uses EEG correlates of expectation. This may become an important lter to separate intentional gaze dwells from non-intentional ones. Conclusion. The current noninvasive BCIs are not well suited for human-robot interaction, and their performance, when they are employed by healthy users, is critically dependent on the impact of the gaze on selection of spatial locations. The new approaches discussed show a high potential for creating alternative output pathways for the human brain. When support from passive BCIs becomes mature, the hybrid technology of the eye-brain-computer (EBCI interface will have a chance to enable natural, fluent, and the

  8. A Prototype Lisp-Based Soft Real-Time Object-Oriented Graphical User Interface for Control System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan; Wong, Edmond; Simon, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype Lisp-based soft real-time object-oriented Graphical User Interface for control system development is presented. The Graphical User Interface executes alongside a test system in laboratory conditions to permit observation of the closed loop operation through animation, graphics, and text. Since it must perform interactive graphics while updating the screen in real time, techniques are discussed which allow quick, efficient data processing and animation. Examples from an implementation are included to demonstrate some typical functionalities which allow the user to follow the control system's operation.

  9. GUIDANCE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM AND HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE MODERNIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.; Morris, G.

    2004-01-01

    Several nuclear power plants in the United States are starting instrumentation and control (I and C) modernization programs using digital equipment to address obsolescence issues and the need to improve plant performance while maintaining high levels of safety. As an integral part of the I and C modernization program at a nuclear power plant, the control room and other human-system interfaces (HSIs) are also being modernized. To support safe and effective operation, it is critical to plan, design, implement, train for, operate, and maintain the control room and HSI changes to take advantage of human cognitive processing abilities. A project, jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program, is developing guidance for specifying and designing control rooms, remote shut-down panels, HSIs etc. The guidance is intended for application by utilities and suppliers of control room and HSI modernization. The guidance will facilitate specification, design, implementation, operations, maintenance, training, and licensing activities. This guidance will be used to reduce the likelihood of human errors and licensing risk, to gain maximum benefit of implemented technology, and to increase performance. The guidance is of five types. The first is planning guidance to help a utility develop its plant-specific control room operating concepts, its plant-specific endpoint vision for the control room, its migration path to achieve that endpoint vision, and its regulatory, licensing, and human factors program plans. The second is process guidance for general HSI design and integration, human factors engineering analyses, verification and validation, in-service monitoring processes, etc. The third is detailed human factors engineering guidance for control room and HSI technical areas. The fourth is guidance for licensing. The fifth is guidance for special topics

  10. Controllable Grid Interface for Testing Ancillary Service Controls and Fault Performance of Utility-Scale Wind Power Generation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan; Koralewicz, Przemyslaw; Wallen, Robb; Muljadi, Eduard

    2017-02-01

    The rapid expansion of wind power has led many transmission system operators to demand modern wind power plants to comply with strict interconnection requirements. Such requirements involve various aspects of wind power plant operation, including fault ride-through and power quality performance as well as the provision of ancillary services to enhance grid reliability. During recent years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of the U.S. Department of Energy has developed a new, groundbreaking testing apparatus and methodology to test and demonstrate many existing and future advanced controls for wind generation (and other renewable generation technologies) on the multimegawatt scale and medium-voltage levels. This paper describes the capabilities and control features of NREL's 7-MVA power electronic grid simulator (also called a controllable grid interface, or CGI) that enables testing many active and reactive power control features of modern wind turbine generators -- including inertial response, primary and secondary frequency responses, and voltage regulation -- under a controlled, medium-voltage grid environment. In particular, this paper focuses on the specifics of testing the balanced and unbalanced fault ride-through characteristics of wind turbine generators under simulated strong and weak medium-voltage grid conditions. In addition, this paper provides insights on the power hardware-in-the-loop feature implemented in the CGI to emulate (in real time) the conditions that might exist in various types of electric power systems under normal operations and/or contingency scenarios. Using actual test examples and simulation results, this paper describes the value of CGI as an ultimate modeling validation tool for all types of 'grid-friendly' controls by wind generation.

  11. Bioinspired Materials for Controlling Ice Nucleation, Growth, and Recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyuan; Liu, Kai; Wang, Jianjun

    2018-05-15

    Ice formation, mainly consisting of ice nucleation, ice growth, and ice recrystallization, is ubiquitous and crucial in wide-ranging fields from cryobiology to atmospheric physics. Despite active research for more than a century, the mechanism of ice formation is still far from satisfactory. Meanwhile, nature has unique ways of controlling ice formation and can provide resourceful avenues to unravel the mechanism of ice formation. For instance, antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect living organisms from freezing damage via controlling ice formation, for example, tuning ice nucleation, shaping ice crystals, and inhibiting ice growth and recrystallization. In addition, AFP mimics can have applications in cryopreservation of cells, tissues, and organs, food storage, and anti-icing materials. Therefore, continuous efforts have been made to understand the mechanism of AFPs and design AFP inspired materials. In this Account, we first review our recent research progress in understanding the mechanism of AFPs in controlling ice formation. A Janus effect of AFPs on ice nucleation was discovered, which was achieved via selectively tethering the ice-binding face (IBF) or the non-ice-binding face (NIBF) of AFPs to solid surfaces and investigating specifically the effect of the other face on ice nucleation. Through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis, we observed ordered hexagonal ice-like water structure atop the IBF and disordered water structure atop the NIBF. Therefore, we conclude that the interfacial water plays a critical role in controlling ice formation. Next, we discuss the design and fabrication of AFP mimics with capabilities in tuning ice nucleation and controlling ice shape and growth, as well as inhibiting ice recrystallization. For example, we tuned ice nucleation via modifying solid surfaces with supercharged unfolded polypeptides (SUPs) and polyelectrolyte brushes (PBs) with different counterions. We found graphene oxide (GO) and oxidized quasi

  12. Continuous epitaxial growth of extremely strong Cu6Sn5 textures at liquid-Sn/(111)Cu interface under temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Y.; Zhao, N.; Liu, C. Y.; Dong, W.; Qiao, Y. Y.; Wang, Y. P.; Ma, H. T.

    2017-11-01

    As the diameter of solder interconnects in three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs) downsizes to several microns, how to achieve a uniform microstructure with thousands of interconnects on stacking chips becomes a critical issue in 3D IC manufacturing. We report a promising way for fabricating fully intermetallic interconnects with a regular grain morphology and a strong texture feature by soldering single crystal (111) Cu/Sn/polycrystalline Cu interconnects under the temperature gradient. Continuous epitaxial growth of η-Cu6Sn5 at cold end liquid-Sn/(111)Cu interfaces has been demonstrated. The resultant η-Cu6Sn5 grains show faceted prism textures with an intersecting angle of 60° and highly preferred orientation with their ⟨ 11 2 ¯ 0 ⟩ directions nearly paralleling to the direction of the temperature gradient. These desirable textures are maintained even after soldering for 120 min. The results pave the way for controlling the morphology and orientation of interfacial intermetallics in 3D packaging technologies.

  13. Controllable load sharing for soft adhesive interfaces on three-dimensional surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sukho; Drotlef, Dirk-Michael; Majidi, Carmel; Sitti, Metin

    2017-05-01

    For adhering to three-dimensional (3D) surfaces or objects, current adhesion systems are limited by a fundamental trade-off between 3D surface conformability and high adhesion strength. This limitation arises from the need for a soft, mechanically compliant interface, which enables conformability to nonflat and irregularly shaped surfaces but significantly reduces the interfacial fracture strength. In this work, we overcome this trade-off with an adhesion-based soft-gripping system that exhibits enhanced fracture strength without sacrificing conformability to nonplanar 3D surfaces. Composed of a gecko-inspired elastomeric microfibrillar adhesive membrane supported by a pressure-controlled deformable gripper body, the proposed soft-gripping system controls the bonding strength by changing its internal pressure and exploiting the mechanics of interfacial equal load sharing. The soft adhesion system can use up to ˜26% of the maximum adhesion of the fibrillar membrane, which is 14× higher than the adhering membrane without load sharing. Our proposed load-sharing method suggests a paradigm for soft adhesion-based gripping and transfer-printing systems that achieves area scaling similar to that of a natural gecko footpad.

  14. Using a cVEP-Based Brain-Computer Interface to Control a Virtual Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, Hannes; Finke, Andrea; Ritter, Helge

    2016-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces provide a means for controlling a device by brain activity alone. One major drawback of noninvasive BCIs is their low information transfer rate, obstructing a wider deployment outside the lab. BCIs based on codebook visually evoked potentials (cVEP) outperform all other state-of-the-art systems in that regard. Previous work investigated cVEPs for spelling applications. We present the first cVEP-based BCI for use in real-world settings to accomplish everyday tasks such as navigation or action selection. To this end, we developed and evaluated a cVEP-based on-line BCI that controls a virtual agent in a simulated, but realistic, 3-D kitchen scenario. We show that cVEPs can be reliably triggered with stimuli in less restricted presentation schemes, such as on dynamic, changing backgrounds. We introduce a novel, dynamic repetition algorithm that allows for optimizing the balance between accuracy and speed individually for each user. Using these novel mechanisms in a 12-command cVEP-BCI in the 3-D simulation results in ITRs of 50 bits/min on average and 68 bits/min maximum. Thus, this work supports the notion of cVEP-BCIs as a particular fast and robust approach suitable for real-world use.

  15. Design and Implementation of a Brain Computer Interface System for Controlling a Robotic Claw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakis, D.; Zoumis, S.; Asvestas, P.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design and implementation of a brain-computer interface (BCI) system that can control a robotic claw. The system is based on the Emotiv Epoc headset, which provides the capability of simultaneous recording of 14 EEG channels, as well as wireless connectivity by means of the Bluetooth protocol. The system is initially trained to decode what user thinks to properly formatted data. The headset communicates with a personal computer, which runs a dedicated software application, implemented under the Processing integrated development environment. The application acquires the data from the headset and invokes suitable commands to an Arduino Uno board. The board decodes the received commands and produces corresponding signals to a servo motor that controls the position of the robotic claw. The system was tested successfully on a healthy, male subject, aged 28 years. The results are promising, taking into account that no specialized hardware was used. However, tests on a larger number of users is necessary in order to draw solid conclusions regarding the performance of the proposed system.

  16. Gesture-controlled interfaces for self-service machines and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Charles J. (Inventor); Beach, Glenn (Inventor); Cavell, Brook (Inventor); Foulk, Gene (Inventor); Jacobus, Charles J. (Inventor); Obermark, Jay (Inventor); Paul, George (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A gesture recognition interface for use in controlling self-service machines and other devices is disclosed. A gesture is defined as motions and kinematic poses generated by humans, animals, or machines. Specific body features are tracked, and static and motion gestures are interpreted. Motion gestures are defined as a family of parametrically delimited oscillatory motions, modeled as a linear-in-parameters dynamic system with added geometric constraints to allow for real-time recognition using a small amount of memory and processing time. A linear least squares method is preferably used to determine the parameters which represent each gesture. Feature position measure is used in conjunction with a bank of predictor bins seeded with the gesture parameters, and the system determines which bin best fits the observed motion. Recognizing static pose gestures is preferably performed by localizing the body/object from the rest of the image, describing that object, and identifying that description. The disclosure details methods for gesture recognition, as well as the overall architecture for using gesture recognition to control of devices, including self-service machines.

  17. Affective Aspects of Perceived Loss of Control and Potential Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissmann, Sebastian; Zander, Thorsten O; Faller, Josef; Brönstrup, Jonas; Kelava, Augustin; Gramann, Klaus; Gerjets, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) focus on detecting single aspects of user states (e.g., motor imagery) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) in order to use these aspects as control input for external systems. This communication can be effective, but unaccounted mental processes can interfere with signals used for classification and thereby introduce changes in the signal properties which could potentially impede BCI classification performance. To improve BCI performance, we propose deploying an approach that potentially allows to describe different mental states that could influence BCI performance. To test this approach, we analyzed neural signatures of potential affective states in data collected in a paradigm where the complex user state of perceived loss of control (LOC) was induced. In this article, source localization methods were used to identify brain dynamics with source located outside but affecting the signal of interest originating from the primary motor areas, pointing to interfering processes in the brain during natural human-machine interaction. In particular, we found affective correlates which were related to perceived LOC. We conclude that additional context information about the ongoing user state might help to improve the applicability of BCIs to real-world scenarios.

  18. Affective Aspects of Perceived Loss of Control and Potential Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Grissmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs focus on detecting single aspects of user states (e.g., motor imagery in the electroencephalogram (EEG in order to use these aspects as control input for external systems. This communication can be effective, but unaccounted mental processes can interfere with signals used for classification and thereby introduce changes in the signal properties which could potentially impede BCI classification performance. To improve BCI performance, we propose deploying an approach that potentially allows to describe different mental states that could influence BCI performance. To test this approach, we analyzed neural signatures of potential affective states in data collected in a paradigm where the complex user state of perceived loss of control (LOC was induced. In this article, source localization methods were used to identify brain dynamics with source located outside but affecting the signal of interest originating from the primary motor areas, pointing to interfering processes in the brain during natural human-machine interaction. In particular, we found affective correlates which were related to perceived LOC. We conclude that additional context information about the ongoing user state might help to improve the applicability of BCIs to real-world scenarios.

  19. Final Report: MaRSPlus Sensor System Electrical Cable Management and Distributed Motor Control Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, Robin

    2011-01-01

    The success of JPL's Next Generation Imaging Spectrometer (NGIS) in Earth remote sensing has inspired a follow-on instrument project, the MaRSPlus Sensor System (MSS). One of JPL's responsibilities in the MSS project involves updating the documentation from the previous JPL airborne imagers to provide all the information necessary for an outside customer to operate the instrument independently. As part of this documentation update, I created detailed electrical cabling diagrams to provide JPL technicians with clear and concise build instructions and a database to track the status of cables from order to build to delivery. Simultaneously, a distributed motor control system is being developed for potential use on the proposed 2018 Mars rover mission. This system would significantly reduce the mass necessary for rover motor control, making more mass space available to other important spacecraft systems. The current stage of the project consists of a desktop computer talking to a single "cold box" unit containing the electronics to drive a motor. In order to test the electronics, I developed a graphical user interface (GUI) using MATLAB to allow a user to send simple commands to the cold box and display the responses received in a user-friendly format.

  20. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  1. A HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING PROCESS TO SUPPORT HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE DESIGN IN CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, C.; Joe, J.; Boring, R.

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is to sustain operation of the existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through a multi-pathway approach in conducting research and development (R&D). The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) System Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and other information systems in existing U.S. NPPs. Control room modernization is an important part following this pathway, and human factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been involved in conducting R&D to support migration of new digital main control room (MCR) technologies from legacy analog and legacy digital I&C. This paper describes a human factors engineering (HFE) process that supports human-system interface (HSI) design in MCR modernization activities, particularly with migration of old digital to new digital I&C. The process described in this work is an expansion from the LWRS Report INL/EXT-16-38576, and is a requirements-driven approach that aligns with NUREG-0711 requirements. The work described builds upon the existing literature by adding more detail around key tasks and decisions to make when transitioning from HSI Design into Verification and Validation (V&V). The overall objective of this process is to inform HSI design and elicit specific, measurable, and achievable human factors criteria for new digital technologies. Upon following this process, utilities should have greater confidence with transitioning from HSI design into V&V.

  2. Real-Time Control of an Articulatory-Based Speech Synthesizer for Brain Computer Interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Bocquelet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Restoring natural speech in paralyzed and aphasic people could be achieved using a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI controlling a speech synthesizer in real-time. To reach this goal, a prerequisite is to develop a speech synthesizer producing intelligible speech in real-time with a reasonable number of control parameters. We present here an articulatory-based speech synthesizer that can be controlled in real-time for future BCI applications. This synthesizer converts movements of the main speech articulators (tongue, jaw, velum, and lips into intelligible speech. The articulatory-to-acoustic mapping is performed using a deep neural network (DNN trained on electromagnetic articulography (EMA data recorded on a reference speaker synchronously with the produced speech signal. This DNN is then used in both offline and online modes to map the position of sensors glued on different speech articulators into acoustic parameters that are further converted into an audio signal using a vocoder. In offline mode, highly intelligible speech could be obtained as assessed by perceptual evaluation performed by 12 listeners. Then, to anticipate future BCI applications, we further assessed the real-time control of the synthesizer by both the reference speaker and new speakers, in a closed-loop paradigm using EMA data recorded in real time. A short calibration period was used to compensate for differences in sensor positions and articulatory differences between new speakers and the reference speaker. We found that real-time synthesis of vowels and consonants was possible with good intelligibility. In conclusion, these results open to future speech BCI applications using such articulatory-based speech synthesizer.

  3. Expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor neuropilin-1 at the human embryo-maternal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston-Buest, Dunja M; Porn, Anne C; Schanz, Andrea; Kruessel, Jan-S; Janni, Wolfgang; Hess, Alexandra P

    2011-02-01

    Angiogenesis is required for successful implantation of the invading blastocyst. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important key player in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling during the implantation process. Besides its well-characterized receptors VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) has been shown to play an additional role in the signaling process of angiogenesis in human endometrium during the menstrual cycle, as a co-receptor of VEGF. These findings led to the hypothesis that NRP-1 might play a role in the vascular remodeling process during embryo implantation and the establishment of a pregnancy. NRP-1 mRNA transcript and protein expression were investigated in human choriocarcinoma cell lines (JEG-3, Jar and BeWo) aiming to evaluate the expression of NRP-1 in vitro, as well as in human decidua of all three trimesters of pregnancy, by western blot analysis (three samples of each trimester of pregnancy). The localization of NRP-1 in human decidua of all three trimesters of pregnancy was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (five samples of each trimester of pregnancy). NRP-1 transcript and protein were expressed in all cell lines examined. Corresponding to the analysis of human tissue by western blot and the localization by immunohistochemistry, NRP-1 protein higher expressed in samples of early pregnancy in comparison to the end of pregnancy. NRP-1 was expressed in the decidua, villi and invading cytotrophoblast of all samples investigated. This is the first study clearly showing the expression of NRP-1 in human decidua and trophoblast, suggesting an important role for the VEGF co-receptor NRP-1 besides the established receptor VEGFR2 at the embryo-maternal interface during embryonic implantation and placentation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. How to determine control of growth rate in a chemostat. Using metabolic control analysis to resolve the paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, Jacky L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Groeneveld, Philip

    1994-01-01

    how, paradoxically, one can determine control of growth rate, of growth yield and of other fluxes in a chemostat. We develop metabolic control analysis for the chemostat. this analysis does not depend on the particular way in which specific growth rate varies with the concentration of the growth...

  5. In Silico Investigation of a Surgical Interface for Remote Control of Modular Miniature Robots in Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apollon Zygomalas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Modular mini-robots can be used in novel minimally invasive surgery techniques like natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES and laparoendoscopic single site (LESS surgery. The control of these miniature assistants is complicated. The aim of this study is the in silico investigation of a remote controlling interface for modular miniature robots which can be used in minimally invasive surgery. Methods. The conceptual controlling system was developed, programmed, and simulated using professional robotics simulation software. Three different modes of control were programmed. The remote controlling surgical interface was virtually designed as a high scale representation of the respective modular mini-robot, therefore a modular controlling system itself. Results. With the proposed modular controlling system the user could easily identify the conformation of the modular mini-robot and adequately modify it as needed. The arrangement of each module was always known. The in silico investigation gave useful information regarding the controlling mode, the adequate speed of rearrangements, and the number of modules needed for efficient working tasks. Conclusions. The proposed conceptual model may promote the research and development of more sophisticated modular controlling systems. Modular surgical interfaces may improve the handling and the dexterity of modular miniature robots during minimally invasive procedures.

  6. Interface Control of Ferroelectricity in an SrRuO3 /BaTiO3 /SrRuO3 Capacitor and its Critical Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yeong Jae; Kim, Yoonkoo; Kang, Sung-Jin; Nahm, Ho-Hyun; Murugavel, Pattukkannu; Kim, Jeong Rae; Cho, Myung Rae; Wang, Lingfei; Yang, Sang Mo; Yoon, Jong-Gul; Chung, Jin-Seok; Kim, Miyoung; Zhou, Hua; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Noh, Tae Won

    2017-05-01

    The atomic-scale synthesis of artificial oxide heterostructures offers new opportunities to create novel states that do not occur in nature. The main challenge related to synthesizing these structures is obtaining atomically sharp interfaces with designed termination sequences. In this study, it is demonstrated that the oxygen pressure (PO2) during growth plays an important role in controlling the interfacial terminations of SrRuO 3 /BaTiO 3 /SrRuO 3 (SRO/BTO/SRO) ferroelectric (FE) capacitors. The SRO/BTO/SRO heterostructures are grown by a pulsed laser deposition method. The top SRO/BTO interface, grown at high PO2 (around 150 mTorr), usually exhibits a mixture of RuO 2 -BaO and SrO-TiO 2 terminations. By reducing PO2, the authors obtain atomically sharp SRO/BTO top interfaces with uniform SrO-TiO 2 termination. Using capacitor devices with symmetric and uniform interfacial termination, it is demonstrated for the first time that the FE critical thickness can reach the theoretical limit of 3.5 unit cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Shaping bacterial population behavior through computer-interfaced control of individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chait, Remy; Ruess, Jakob; Bergmiller, Tobias; Tkačik, Gašper; Guet, Călin C

    2017-11-16

    Bacteria in groups vary individually, and interact with other bacteria and the environment to produce population-level patterns of gene expression. Investigating such behavior in detail requires measuring and controlling populations at the single-cell level alongside precisely specified interactions and environmental characteristics. Here we present an automated, programmable platform that combines image-based gene expression and growth measurements with on-line optogenetic expression control for hundreds of individual Escherichia coli cells over days, in a dynamically adjustable environment. This integrated platform broadly enables experiments that bridge individual and population behaviors. We demonstrate: (i) population structuring by independent closed-loop control of gene expression in many individual cells, (ii) cell-cell variation control during antibiotic perturbation, (iii) hybrid bio-digital circuits in single cells, and freely specifiable digital communication between individual bacteria. These examples showcase the potential for real-time integration of theoretical models with measurement and control of many individual cells to investigate and engineer microbial population behavior.

  8. Controlling the growth of epitaxial graphene on metalized diamond (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooil, S. P.; Wells, J. W.; Hu, D.; Evans, D. A.; Niu, Y. R.; Zakharov, A. A.; Bianchi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The 2-dimensional transformation of the diamond (111) surface to graphene has been demonstrated using ultrathin Fe films that catalytically reduce the reaction temperature needed for the conversion of sp 3 to sp 2 carbon. An epitaxial system is formed, which involves the re-crystallization of carbon at the Fe/vacuum interface and that enables the controlled growth of monolayer and multilayer graphene films. In order to study the initial stages of single and multilayer graphene growth, real time monitoring of the system was preformed within a photoemission and low energy electron microscope. It was found that the initial graphene growth occurred at temperatures as low as 500 °C, whilst increasing the temperature to 560 °C was required to produce multi-layer graphene of high structural quality. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the electronic properties of the grown material, where a graphene-like energy momentum dispersion was observed. The Dirac point for the first layer is located at 2.5 eV below the Fermi level, indicating an n-type doping of the graphene due to substrate interactions, while that of the second graphene layer lies close to the Fermi level

  9. Growth Control by Ethylene: Adjusting Phenotypes to the Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.; Sasidharan, R.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.

    2007-01-01

    Plants phenotypically adjust to environmental challenges, and the gaseous plant hormone ethylene modulates many of these growth adjustments. Ethylene can be involved in environmentally induced growth inhibition as well as growth stimulation. Still, ethylene has long been considered a growth

  10. Stiffness and position control of a prosthetic wrist by means of an EMG interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, S.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for decoding electromyographic signals from an amputee and for interfacing them with a prosthetic wrist. The model for the interface makes use of electromyographic signals from electrodes placed in agonistic and antagonistic sides of the forearm. The model

  11. Multiferroic tunnel junctions and ferroelectric control of magnetic state at interface (invited)

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Y. W.

    2015-03-03

    As semiconductor devices reach ever smaller dimensions, the challenge of power dissipation and quantum effect place a serious limit on the future device scaling. Recently, a multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ) with a ferroelectric barrier sandwiched between two ferromagnetic electrodes has drawn enormous interest due to its potential applications not only in multi-level data storage but also in electric field controlled spintronics and nanoferronics. Here, we present our investigations on four-level resistance states, giant tunneling electroresistance (TER) due to interfacial magnetoelectric coupling, and ferroelectric control of spin polarized tunneling in MFTJs. Coexistence of large tunneling magnetoresistance and TER has been observed in manganite/(Ba, Sr)TiO3/manganite MFTJs at low temperatures and room temperature four-resistance state devices were also obtained. To enhance the TER for potential logic operation with a magnetic memory, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 /La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 MFTJs were designed by utilizing a bilayer tunneling barrier in which BaTiO3 is ferroelectric and La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 is close to ferromagnetic metal to antiferromagnetic insulator phase transition. The phase transition occurs when the ferroelectric polarization is reversed, resulting in an increase of TER by two orders of magnitude. Tunneling magnetoresistance can also be controlled by the ferroelectric polarization reversal, indicating strong magnetoelectric coupling at the interface.

  12. Interface unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  13. Control of growth mode of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2009-01-01

    We have conducted an experimental study to investigate the synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The synthesis of base and tip-type of CNTs was selectively controlled by changing the catalyst size, catalyst film thickness correlated with altering the NH 3 pretreatment plasma current. These types of CNT showed distinctive properties in nanotube structure, growth rate and vertical alignment, which were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and in situ optical interference measurement. The vertically aligned behaviour of CNT was systematically studied by using a fine-patterned catalyst layer with diverse critical dimensions. Freestanding single CNT was successfully realized by optimum tip-type CNT growth, conventional photolithography and wet-etch process.

  14. Improving 6061-Al Grain Growth and Penetration across HIP-Bonded Clad Interfaces in Monolithic Fuel Plates: Initial Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCabe, Rodney J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montalvo, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Edwards, Randall L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trujillo, R. Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aikin, Beverly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vargas, Victor D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hollis, Kendall J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Forsyth, Robert T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harada, Kiichi L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-05-06

    Grain penetration across aluminum-aluminum cladding interfaces in research reactor fuel plates is desirable and was obtained by a legacy roll-bonding process, which attained 20-80% grain penetration. Significant grain penetration in monolithic fuel plates produced by Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) fabrication processing is equally desirable but has yet to be attained. The goal of this study was to modify the 6061-Al in such a way as to promote a much greater extent of crossinterface grain penetration in monolithic fuel plates fabricated by the HIP process. This study documents the outcomes of several strategies attempted to attain this goal. The grain response was characterized using light optical microscopy (LOM) electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) as a function of these prospective process modifications done to the aluminum prior to the HIP cycle. The strategies included (1) adding macroscopic gaps in the sandwiches to enhance Al flow, (2) adding engineering asperities to enhance Al flow, (3) adding stored energy (cold work), and (4) alternative cleaning and coating. Additionally, two aqueous cleaning methods were compared as baseline control conditions. The results of the preliminary scoping studies in all the categories are presented. In general, none of these approaches were able to obtain >10% grain penetration. Recommended future work includes further development of macroscopic grooving, transferred-arc cleaning, and combinations of these with one another and with other processes.

  15. Modulation of Posterior Alpha Activity by Spatial Attention Allows for Controlling A Continuous Brain-Computer Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horschig, J.M.; Oosterheert, W.; Oostenveld, R.; Jensen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that the modulation of alpha activity by covert attention can be used as a control signal in an online brain-computer interface, that it is reliable, and that it is robust. Subjects were instructed to orient covert visual attention to the left or right hemifield. We decoded the

  16. A Brain Computer Interface for Robust Wheelchair Control Application Based on Pseudorandom Code Modulated Visual Evoked Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohebbi, Ali; Engelsholm, Signe K.D.; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, a novel and minimalistic Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based wheelchair control application was developed. The system was based on pseudorandom code modulated Visual Evoked Potentials (c-VEPs). The visual stimuli in the scheme were generated based on the Gold code...

  17. Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A): Instrumentation interface control document

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) defines the specific details of the complete accomodation information between the Earth Observing System (EOS) PM Spacecraft and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A)Instrument. This is the first submittal of the ICN: it will be updated periodically throughout the life of the program. The next update is planned prior to Critical Design Review (CDR).

  18. Steric control of the donor/acceptor interface: Implications in organic photovoltaic charge generation

    KAUST Repository

    Holcombe, Thomas W.; Norton, Joseph E.; Rivnay, Jonathan; Woo, Claire; Goris, Ludwig J.; Piliego, Claudia; Griffini, Gianmarco; Sellinger, Alan; Bré das, Jean Luc; Salleo, Alberto; Frechet, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices is currently limited by modest short-circuit current densities. Approaches toward improving this output parameter may provide new avenues to advance OPV technologies and the basic science of charge transfer in organic semiconductors. This work highlights how steric control of the charge separation interface can be effectively tuned in OPV devices. By introducing an octylphenyl substituent onto the investigated polymer backbones, the thermally relaxed charge-transfer state, and potentially excited charge-transfer states, can be raised in energy. This decreases the barrier to charge separation and results in increased photocurrent generation. This finding is of particular significance for nonfullerene OPVs, which have many potential advantages such as tunable energy levels and spectral breadth, but are prone to poor exciton separation efficiencies. Computational, spectroscopic, and synthetic methods were combined to develop a structure-property relationship that correlates polymer substituents with charge-transfer state energies and, ultimately, device efficiencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. Nitrile functionalized halloysite nanotubes/poly(arylene ether nitrile) nanocomposites: Interface control, characterization, and improved properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Xinyi; Zhan, Yingqing; Zeng, Guangyong; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel nitrile functionalized HNTs were realized through the covalent bonding. • Then modified HNTs showed good dispersion and interfacial adhesion with PEN. • The modified HNTs exhibited excellent reinforcement effect on PEN. • The chemical crosslinking between HNTs and PEN further enhanced the performance of nanocomposites. - Abstract: To develop high-performance halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based nanocomposites, the two key issues need to be considered: precise interface control and the dispersal of HNTs. This study presents an efficient way to functionalize halloysite nanotubes with 3-aminophenoxy-phthalonitrile, followed by compounding with poly(arylene ether nitrile) (PEN), to prepare functional nanocomposite films. The surface functionalization of HNTs was characterized and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared with neat PEN, the tensile strength and modulus of the resulting PEN nanocomposites with 3 wt% functionalized HNTs were found to increase by 25.7% and 20.7%, respectively. The good dispersion and high capacitance of the dielectric layer resulted in PEN/HNTs nancomposites with enhanced dielectric permittivity and relatively low dielectric loss. Moreover, the addition of functional HNTs greatly improved the thermal stability of PEN, which could be further enhanced through the chemical cross-linking reaction between the functional HNTs and the PEN matrix. This work provides a new path toward obtaining advanced polymer-based nanocomposites with functional properties.

  20. Nitrile functionalized halloysite nanotubes/poly(arylene ether nitrile) nanocomposites: Interface control, characterization, and improved properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Xinyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, 8 Xindu Avenue, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610500 (China); Zhan, Yingqing, E-mail: 201599010032@swpu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, 8 Xindu Avenue, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610500 (China); Oil & Gas Field Applied Chemistry Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, 610500 (China); Zeng, Guangyong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, 8 Xindu Avenue, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610500 (China); He, Yi, E-mail: heyi007@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, 8 Xindu Avenue, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610500 (China); Oil & Gas Field Applied Chemistry Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, 610500 (China); State Key Lab of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, 8Xindu Avenue, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610500 (China)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Novel nitrile functionalized HNTs were realized through the covalent bonding. • Then modified HNTs showed good dispersion and interfacial adhesion with PEN. • The modified HNTs exhibited excellent reinforcement effect on PEN. • The chemical crosslinking between HNTs and PEN further enhanced the performance of nanocomposites. - Abstract: To develop high-performance halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based nanocomposites, the two key issues need to be considered: precise interface control and the dispersal of HNTs. This study presents an efficient way to functionalize halloysite nanotubes with 3-aminophenoxy-phthalonitrile, followed by compounding with poly(arylene ether nitrile) (PEN), to prepare functional nanocomposite films. The surface functionalization of HNTs was characterized and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared with neat PEN, the tensile strength and modulus of the resulting PEN nanocomposites with 3 wt% functionalized HNTs were found to increase by 25.7% and 20.7%, respectively. The good dispersion and high capacitance of the dielectric layer resulted in PEN/HNTs nancomposites with enhanced dielectric permittivity and relatively low dielectric loss. Moreover, the addition of functional HNTs greatly improved the thermal stability of PEN, which could be further enhanced through the chemical cross-linking reaction between the functional HNTs and the PEN matrix. This work provides a new path toward obtaining advanced polymer-based nanocomposites with functional properties.

  1. Nitrile functionalized halloysite nanotubes/poly(arylene ether nitrile) nanocomposites: Interface control, characterization, and improved properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinyi; Zhan, Yingqing; Zeng, Guangyong; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    To develop high-performance halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based nanocomposites, the two key issues need to be considered: precise interface control and the dispersal of HNTs. This study presents an efficient way to functionalize halloysite nanotubes with 3-aminophenoxy-phthalonitrile, followed by compounding with poly(arylene ether nitrile) (PEN), to prepare functional nanocomposite films. The surface functionalization of HNTs was characterized and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared with neat PEN, the tensile strength and modulus of the resulting PEN nanocomposites with 3 wt% functionalized HNTs were found to increase by 25.7% and 20.7%, respectively. The good dispersion and high capacitance of the dielectric layer resulted in PEN/HNTs nancomposites with enhanced dielectric permittivity and relatively low dielectric loss. Moreover, the addition of functional HNTs greatly improved the thermal stability of PEN, which could be further enhanced through the chemical cross-linking reaction between the functional HNTs and the PEN matrix. This work provides a new path toward obtaining advanced polymer-based nanocomposites with functional properties.

  2. Controlling a human-computer interface system with a novel classification method that uses electrooculography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shang-Lin; Liao, Lun-De; Lu, Shao-Wei; Jiang, Wei-Ling; Chen, Shi-An; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2013-08-01

    Electrooculography (EOG) signals can be used to control human-computer interface (HCI) systems, if properly classified. The ability to measure and process these signals may help HCI users to overcome many of the physical limitations and inconveniences in daily life. However, there are currently no effective multidirectional classification methods for monitoring eye movements. Here, we describe a classification method used in a wireless EOG-based HCI device for detecting eye movements in eight directions. This device includes wireless EOG signal acquisition components, wet electrodes and an EOG signal classification algorithm. The EOG classification algorithm is based on extracting features from the electrical signals corresponding to eight directions of eye movement (up, down, left, right, up-left, down-left, up-right, and down-right) and blinking. The recognition and processing of these eight different features were achieved in real-life conditions, demonstrating that this device can reliably measure the features of EOG signals. This system and its classification procedure provide an effective method for identifying eye movements. Additionally, it may be applied to study eye functions in real-life conditions in the near future.

  3. Orientation-controlled parallel assembly at the air–water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwang Soon; Hoo, Ji Hao; Baskaran, Rajashree; Böhringer, Karl F

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study with statistical analysis of a high-yield, orientation-specific fluidic self-assembly process on a preprogrammed template. We demonstrate self-assembly of thin (less than few hundred microns in thickness) parts, which is vital for many applications in miniaturized platforms but problematic for today's pick-and-place robots. The assembly proceeds row-by-row as the substrate is pulled up through an air–water interface. Experiments and analysis are presented with an emphasis on the combined effect of controlled surface waves and magnetic force. For various gap values between a magnet and Ni-patterned parts, magnetic force distributions are generated using Monte Carlo simulation and employed to predict assembly yield. An analysis of these distributions shows that a gradual decline in yield following the probability density function can be expected with degrading conditions. The experimentally determined critical magnetic force is in good agreement with a derived value from a model of competing forces acting on a part. A general set of design guidelines is also presented from the developed model and experimental data. (paper)

  4. Steric control of the donor/acceptor interface: Implications in organic photovoltaic charge generation

    KAUST Repository

    Holcombe, Thomas W.

    2011-08-10

    The performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices is currently limited by modest short-circuit current densities. Approaches toward improving this output parameter may provide new avenues to advance OPV technologies and the basic science of charge transfer in organic semiconductors. This work highlights how steric control of the charge separation interface can be effectively tuned in OPV devices. By introducing an octylphenyl substituent onto the investigated polymer backbones, the thermally relaxed charge-transfer state, and potentially excited charge-transfer states, can be raised in energy. This decreases the barrier to charge separation and results in increased photocurrent generation. This finding is of particular significance for nonfullerene OPVs, which have many potential advantages such as tunable energy levels and spectral breadth, but are prone to poor exciton separation efficiencies. Computational, spectroscopic, and synthetic methods were combined to develop a structure-property relationship that correlates polymer substituents with charge-transfer state energies and, ultimately, device efficiencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  5. End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jesse [Acadia Optronics LLC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2013-08-30

    In recent years, network bandwidth requirements have scaled multiple folds, pushing the need for the development of data exchange mechanisms at 100 Gb/s and beyond. High performance computing, climate modeling, large-scale storage, and collaborative scientific research are examples of applications that can greatly benefit by leveraging high bandwidth capabilities of the order of 100 Gb/s. Such requirements and advances in IEEE Ethernet standards, Optical Transport Unit4 (OTU4), and host-system interconnects demand a network infrastructure supporting throughput rates of the order of 100 Gb/s with a single wavelength. To address such a demand Acadia Optronics in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, proposed and developed a end-system Network Interface Controller (NIC) for the 100Gbps WANs. Acadia’s 100G NIC employs an FPGA based system with a high-performance processor interconnect (PCIe 3.0) and a high capacity optical transmission link (CXP) to provide data transmission at the rate of 100 Gbps.

  6. Learning to control a brain-machine interface for reaching and grasping by primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Reaching and grasping in primates depend on the coordination of neural activity in large frontoparietal ensembles. Here we demonstrate that primates can learn to reach and grasp virtual objects by controlling a robot arm through a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMIc that uses multiple mathematical models to extract several motor parameters (i.e., hand position, velocity, gripping force, and the EMGs of multiple arm muscles from the electrical activity of frontoparietal neuronal ensembles. As single neurons typically contribute to the encoding of several motor parameters, we observed that high BMIc accuracy required recording from large neuronal ensembles. Continuous BMIc operation by monkeys led to significant improvements in both model predictions and behavioral performance. Using visual feedback, monkeys succeeded in producing robot reach-and-grasp movements even when their arms did not move. Learning to operate the BMIc was paralleled by functional reorganization in multiple cortical areas, suggesting that the dynamic properties of the BMIc were incorporated into motor and sensory cortical representations.

  7. Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

  8. Does family control of small business lead to under exploitation of their financial growth potential? Evidence of the existence of conservative growth behavior in family controlled French SMEs.

    OpenAIRE

    Anaïs Hamelin

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a very large sample of French SMEs to study growth of small businesses. Firms are distinguished according to the intensity of family control. The estimated relationship accounts for firm characteristics of size, age, sector, and ease to access credit. The results show that firms with greater family control are prone to exhibit lower rates of sales growth than feasible, given firm internal financing resources (ie they adopt a conservative growth behavior). Because firm growth i...

  9. On the modification of metal/ceramic interfaces by low energy ion/atom bombardment during film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigsbee, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Knipe, R.K.; Hock, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Elemental Cu and Ti films have been deposited onto ceramic substrates with a plasma-aided physical vapor deposition (ion-plating) process. This paper discusses how the structure and chemistry of the metallic film and the metal/ceramic interface are modified by low energy ion and neutral atom bombardment. Emphasis is placed on determining how low energy ion/neutral atom bombardment affects the strength of the metal/ceramic interface. Analyses of the film, interface and substrate regions have employed scanning Auger microprobe, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, SEM/STEM-energy dispersive X-ray and TEM/STEM imaging and microdiffraction techniques. (Auth.)

  10. Human reliability and the man/machine interface: what do we do after the control room review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folley, J.D. Jr.; Schurman, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear industry has focused on only one aspect of the man/machine interface--human factors engineering of control rooms - to enhance nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. There are other factors that profoundly affect the reliability of the operators and maintenance personnel of NPP which, thus, affect NPP safety and availability. This paper discusses the factors of training, selection, job engineering, and work satisfaction, describing the potential effects on reactor safety of these factors at the man/machine interface. The impact of these factors on safety and plant availability is illustrated with examples of results obtained in other fields

  11. Multiple network interface core apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Keith D [Albuquerque, NM; Hemmert, Karl Scott [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-26

    A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

  12. Methodology for advanced control rooms assessment of nuclear reactors: case study using Laboratory of Human System Interface (LABIHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Eduardo Ferro; Verboonen, Monique; Carvalho, Bruno Batista de

    2005-01-01

    A control room of a nuclear reactor is a complex system that controls a thermodynamic process used to produce electric energy. The operators interact with the control room through interfaces and several monitoring stations. These interfaces present significant implications for the safety of the nuclear power plant, once they influence the activities of the operators, affect the way how operators receive information related with the status from the main systems and determine the necessary requirements so that the operators understand and supervise the main parameters. This article intends to present the methodology and the results of the evaluation carried through in the advanced control room of a compact simulator, that uses as reference a nuclear plant PWR of the Westinghouse. The structure used for evaluation of the simulator is formed by the guideline of human factors of the NRC, the NUREG 700, checklist, questionnaires and the analysis of the operator's activity. (author)

  13. Designing Closed-Loop Brain-Machine Interfaces Using Model Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs are broadly defined as systems that establish direct communications between living brain tissue and external devices, such as artificial arms. By sensing and interpreting neuronal activities to actuate an external device, BMI-based neuroprostheses hold great promise in rehabilitating motor disabled subjects, such as amputees. In this paper, we develop a control-theoretic analysis of a BMI-based neuroprosthetic system for voluntary single joint reaching task in the absence of visual feedback. Using synthetic data obtained through the simulation of an experimentally validated psycho-physiological cortical circuit model, both the Wiener filter and the Kalman filter based linear decoders are developed. We analyze the performance of both decoders in the presence and in the absence of natural proprioceptive feedback information. By performing simulations, we show that the performance of both decoders degrades significantly in the absence of the natural proprioception. To recover the performance of these decoders, we propose two problems, namely tracking the desired position trajectory and tracking the firing rate trajectory of neurons which encode the proprioception, in the model predictive control framework to design optimal artificial sensory feedback. Our results indicate that while the position trajectory based design can only recover the position and velocity trajectories, the firing rate trajectory based design can recover the performance of the motor task along with the recovery of firing rates in other cortical regions. Finally, we extend our design by incorporating a network of spiking neurons and designing artificial sensory feedback in the form of a charged balanced biphasic stimulating current.

  14. Double nerve intraneural interface implant on a human amputee for robotic hand control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Paolo M; Micera, Silvestro; Benvenuto, Antonella; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Cavallo, Giuseppe; Citi, Luca; Cipriani, Christian; Denaro, Luca; Denaro, Vincenzo; Di Pino, Giovanni; Ferreri, Florinda; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Rigosa, Jacopo; Rossini, Luca; Tombini, Mario; Dario, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The principle underlying this project is that, despite nervous reorganization following upper limb amputation, original pathways and CNS relays partially maintain their function and can be exploited for interfacing prostheses. Aim of this study is to evaluate a novel peripheral intraneural multielectrode for multi-movement prosthesis control and for sensory feed-back, while assessing cortical reorganization following the re-acquired stream of data. Four intrafascicular longitudinal flexible multielectrodes (tf-LIFE4) were implanted in the median and ulnar nerves of an amputee; they reliably recorded output signals for 4 weeks. Artificial intelligence classifiers were used off-line to analyse LIFE signals recorded during three distinct hand movements under voluntary order. Real-time control of motor output was achieved for the three actions. When applied off-line artificial intelligence reached >85% real-time correct classification of trials. Moreover, different types of current stimulation were determined to allow reproducible and localized hand/fingers sensations. Cortical organization was observed via TMS in parallel with partial resolution of symptoms due to the phantom-limb syndrome (PLS). tf-LIFE4s recorded output signals in human nerves for 4 weeks, though the efficacy of sensory stimulation decayed after 10 days. Recording from a number of fibres permitted a high percentage of distinct actions to be classified correctly. Reversal of plastic changes and alleviation of PLS represent corollary findings of potential therapeutic benefit. This study represents a breakthrough in robotic hand use in amputees. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain-machine interfaces for controlling lower-limb powered robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongtian; Eguren, David; Azorín, José M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Phat Luu, Trieu; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Lower-limb, powered robotics systems such as exoskeletons and orthoses have emerged as novel robotic interventions to assist or rehabilitate people with walking disabilities. These devices are generally controlled by certain physical maneuvers, for example pressing buttons or shifting body weight. Although effective, these control schemes are not what humans naturally use. The usability and clinical relevance of these robotics systems could be further enhanced by brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). A number of preliminary studies have been published on this topic, but a systematic understanding of the experimental design, tasks, and performance of BMI-exoskeleton systems for restoration of gait is lacking. Approach. To address this gap, we applied standard systematic review methodology for a literature search in PubMed and EMBASE databases and identified 11 studies involving BMI-robotics systems. The devices, user population, input and output of the BMIs and robot systems respectively, neural features, decoders, denoising techniques, and system performance were reviewed and compared. Main results. Results showed BMIs classifying walk versus stand tasks are the most common. The results also indicate that electroencephalography (EEG) is the only recording method for humans. Performance was not clearly presented in most of the studies. Several challenges were summarized, including EEG denoising, safety, responsiveness and others. Significance. We conclude that lower-body powered exoskeletons with automated gait intention detection based on BMIs open new possibilities in the assistance and rehabilitation fields, although the current performance, clinical benefits and several key challenging issues indicate that additional research and development is required to deploy these systems in the clinic and at home. Moreover, rigorous EEG denoising techniques, suitable performance metrics, consistent trial reporting, and more clinical trials are needed to advance the

  16. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  17. CONTROL OF A ROBOTIC ARM THROUGH A BRAIN MACHINE INTERFACE WITH MUTUAL LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    ALEXANDRE ORMIGA GALVAO BARBOSA

    2010-01-01

    Esse trabalho apresenta o desenvolvimento de uma interface cérebro-máquina (Brain Machine Interface - BMI) como um meio alternativo de comunicação para uso na robótica. O trabalho engloba o projeto e construção de um eletroencefalógrafo (EEG), assim como o desenvolvimento de todos os algoritmos computacionais e demais técnicas necessárias para o reconhecimento de atividades mentais. A interface cérebro-máquina desenvolvida é utilizada para comandar os movimentos de um manipulador robótico MA2...

  18. Apple interface for experimental instrumentation and control-Pulse counter, timer, digital-to-analog converter, step motor and relays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.H.; Cernicchiaro, G.R.C.; Cavalcante, J.T.P.D.

    1989-01-01

    An interface plate for Apple II type microcomputer developed aiming to automatize measuring systems in which a TTL pulse counter, output of analogic voltage (with resolution of 12 bits), out put of step-motor control, relay drive, and timer for real time control, are necessary to carry-out the parallel tasks, is described. An application of this plate to a thermoluminescence reader is also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  19. Display analysis with the optimal control model of the human operator. [pilot-vehicle display interface and information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, S.; Levison, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Application of the optimal control model of the human operator to problems in display analysis is discussed. Those aspects of the model pertaining to the operator-display interface and to operator information processing are reviewed and discussed. The techniques are then applied to the analysis of advanced display/control systems for a Terminal Configured Vehicle. Model results are compared with those obtained in a large, fixed-base simulation.

  20. Interface control: A modified rooting technique for enhancing field emission from multiwall carbon nanotube based bulk emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Indranil [Nanomaterials and Device Lab, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Choi, Wonbong, E-mail: choiw@fiu.edu [Nanomaterials and Device Lab, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised hopes that these materials might find wide application as cold cathodes in various electron sources. The excellent field emission properties shown by CNT-based field emitters has further stimulated this expectation. However, efficient performance of a practical field emitter, which comprises a large number of randomly or regularly oriented CNTs, is restricted primarily due to poor junctions formed between CNTs and substrates. This study is aimed at enhancing the junction performance by way of a modified 'rooting' technique-interface control. In this process, the interface between CNTs and substrate has been tailored with different metals in an attempt to improve the CNT-substrate junction performance. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized on different interface-controlled substrates, i.e. Cu, Al, W, Si and low-temperature co-fired ceramic. All the samples produced mat-type, randomly oriented MWCNT structures. Among the four different substrates studied, MWCNT-based field emitters on Cu substrate demonstrated the best field emission response, in terms of low turn-on field, high emission current, good field enhancement factor and excellent stability in long-term operation. Emitter structures and their field emission behavior were correlated and it was shown that interface control, as an advanced 'rooting' process, plays an important role in determining the emission response from a bulk field emitter.

  1. Interface control: A modified rooting technique for enhancing field emission from multiwall carbon nanotube based bulk emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Indranil; Choi, Wonbong

    2011-01-01

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised hopes that these materials might find wide application as cold cathodes in various electron sources. The excellent field emission properties shown by CNT-based field emitters has further stimulated this expectation. However, efficient performance of a practical field emitter, which comprises a large number of randomly or regularly oriented CNTs, is restricted primarily due to poor junctions formed between CNTs and substrates. This study is aimed at enhancing the junction performance by way of a modified 'rooting' technique-interface control. In this process, the interface between CNTs and substrate has been tailored with different metals in an attempt to improve the CNT-substrate junction performance. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized on different interface-controlled substrates, i.e. Cu, Al, W, Si and low-temperature co-fired ceramic. All the samples produced mat-type, randomly oriented MWCNT structures. Among the four different substrates studied, MWCNT-based field emitters on Cu substrate demonstrated the best field emission response, in terms of low turn-on field, high emission current, good field enhancement factor and excellent stability in long-term operation. Emitter structures and their field emission behavior were correlated and it was shown that interface control, as an advanced 'rooting' process, plays an important role in determining the emission response from a bulk field emitter.

  2. im4Things: An Ontology-Based Natural Language Interface for Controlling Devices in the Internet of Things

    KAUST Repository

    Noguera-Arnaldos, José Ángel

    2017-03-14

    The Internet of Things (IoT) offers opportunities for new applications and services that enable users to access and control their working and home environment from local and remote locations, aiming to perform daily life activities in an easy way. However, the IoT also introduces new challenges, some of which arise from the large range of devices currently available and the heterogeneous interfaces provided for their control. The control and management of this variety of devices and interfaces represent a new challenge for non-expert users, instead of making their life easier. Based on this understanding, in this work we present a natural language interface for the IoT, which takes advantage of Semantic Web technologies to allow non-expert users to control their home environment through an instant messaging application in an easy and intuitive way. We conducted several experiments with a group of end users aiming to evaluate the effectiveness of our approach to control home appliances by means of natural language instructions. The evaluation results proved that without the need for technicalities, the user was able to control the home appliances in an efficient way.

  3. Noncovalent Pi-Pi Stacking at the Carbon-Electrolyte Interface: Controlling the Voltage Window of Electrochemical Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengya; Westover, Andrew S; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Muralidharan, Nitin; Boire, Timothy C; Sung, Hak-Joon; Pint, Cary L

    2016-08-03

    A key parameter in the operation of an electrochemical double-layer capacitor is the voltage window, which dictates the device energy density and power density. Here we demonstrate experimental evidence that π-π stacking at a carbon-ionic liquid interface can modify the operation voltage of a supercapacitor device by up to 30%, and this can be recovered by steric hindrance at the electrode-electrolyte interface introduced by poly(ethylene oxide) polymer electrolyte additives. This observation is supported by Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry that each independently elucidates the signature of π-π stacking between imidazole groups in the ionic liquid and the carbon surface and the role this plays to lower the energy barrier for charge transfer at the electrode-electrolyte interface. This effect is further observed universally across two separate ionic liquid electrolyte systems and is validated by control experiments showing an invariant electrochemical window in the absence of a carbon-ionic liquid electrode-electrolyte interface. As interfacial or noncovalent interactions are usually neglected in the mechanistic picture of double-layer capacitors, this work highlights the importance of understanding chemical properties at supercapacitor interfaces to engineer voltage and energy capability.

  4. Spin-photon interface and spin-controlled photon switching in a nanobeam waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javadi, Alisa; Ding, Dapeng; Appel, Martin Hayhurst

    2018-01-01

    Access to the electron spin is at the heart of many protocols for integrated and distributed quantum-information processing [1-4]. For instance, interfacing the spin-state of an electron and a photon can be utilized to perform quantum gates between photons [2,5] or to entangle remote spin states [6......-9]. Ultimately, a quantum network of entangled spins constitutes a new paradigm in quantum optics [1]. Towards this goal, an integrated spin-photon interface would be a major leap forward. Here we demonstrate an efficient and optically programmable interface between the spin of an electron in a quantum dot...... and photons in a nanophotonic waveguide. The spin can be deterministically prepared with a fidelity of 96\\%. Subsequently the system is used to implement a "single-spin photonic switch", where the spin state of the electron directs the flow of photons through the waveguide. The spin-photon interface may...

  5. Brain Machine Interfaces for Robotic Control in Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will study the application of a brain machine interface (BMI) to enable crew to remotely operate and monitor robots from inside a flight vehicle, habitat...

  6. Historical Overview, Current Status, and Future Trends in Human-Computer Interfaces for Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owre, Fridtjov

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 25 yr ago, the first computer-based process control systems, including computer-generated displays, appeared. It is remarkable how slowly the human-computer interfaces (HCI's) of such systems have developed over the years. The display design approach in those early days had its roots in the topology of the process. Usually, the information came from the piping and instrumentation diagrams. Later, some important additional functions were added to the basic system, such as alarm and trend displays. Today, these functions are still the basic ones, and the end-user displays have not changed much except for improved display quality in terms of colors, font types and sizes, resolution, and object shapes, resulting from improved display hardware.Today, there are two schools of display design competing for supremacy in the process control segment of the HCI community. One can be characterized by extension and integration of current practice, while the other is more revolutionary.The extension of the current practice approach can be described in terms of added system functionality and integration. This means that important functions for the plant operator - such as signal validation, plant overview information, safety parameter displays, procedures, prediction of future states, and plant performance optimization - are added to the basic functions and integrated in a total unified HCI for the plant operator.The revolutionary approach, however, takes as its starting point the design process itself. The functioning of the plant is described in terms of the plant goals and subgoals, as well as the means available to reach these goals. Then, displays are designed representing this functional structure - in clear contrast to the earlier plant topology representation. Depending on the design approach used, the corresponding displays have various designations, e.g., function-oriented, task-oriented, or ecological displays.This paper gives a historical overview of past

  7. Direct growth of self-crystallized graphene and graphite nanoballs with Ni vapor-assisted growth: From controllable growth to material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Wen-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ze; Yeh, Chao-Hui; He, Jr-Hau; Chiu, Po-Wen; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-01-01

    A directly self-crystallized graphene layer with transfer-free process on arbitrary insulator by Ni vapor-assisted growth at growth temperatures between 950 to 1100°C via conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system was developed and demonstrated. Domain sizes of graphene were confirmed by Raman spectra from ~12 nm at growth temperature of 1000°C to ~32 nm at growth temperature of 1100°C, respectively. Furthermore, the thickness of the graphene is controllable, depending on deposition time and growth temperature. By increasing growth pressure, the growth of graphite nano-balls was preferred rather than graphene growth. The detailed formation mechanisms of graphene and graphite nanoballs were proposed and investigated in detail. Optical and electrical properties of graphene layer were measured. The direct growth of the carbon-based materials with free of the transfer process provides a promising application at nanoelectronics. PMID:24810224

  8. Direct growth of self-crystallized graphene and graphite nanoballs with Ni vapor-assisted growth: from controllable growth to material characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Wen-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ze; Yeh, Chao-Hui; He, Jr-Hau; Chiu, Po-Wen; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-05-09

    A directly self-crystallized graphene layer with transfer-free process on arbitrary insulator by Ni vapor-assisted growth at growth temperatures between 950 to 1100 °C via conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system was developed and demonstrated. Domain sizes of graphene were confirmed by Raman spectra from ~12 nm at growth temperature of 1000 °C to ~32 nm at growth temperature of 1100 °C, respectively. Furthermore, the thickness of the graphene is controllable, depending on deposition time and growth temperature. By increasing growth pressure, the growth of graphite nano-balls was preferred rather than graphene growth. The detailed formation mechanisms of graphene and graphite nanoballs were proposed and investigated in detail. Optical and electrical properties of graphene layer were measured. The direct growth of the carbon-based materials with free of the transfer process provides a promising application at nanoelectronics.

  9. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Command, Control, and Communications (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The document provides the Human System Integration(HSI) high-level functional C3 HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot. Description includes (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge C3 system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain C3 information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate C3 technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how C3 operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary C3 functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for C3 are partitioned into three categories: (1) Pilot-Air Traffic Control (ATC) Voice Communications (2) Pilot-ATC Data Communications, and (3) command and control of the unmanned aircraft (UA). Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  10. Development and human factors analysis of an augmented reality interface for multi-robot tele-operation and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sam; Lucas, Nathan P.; Ellis, R. Darin; Pandya, Abhilash

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a seamlessly controlled human multi-robot system comprised of ground and aerial robots of semiautonomous nature for source localization tasks. The system combines augmented reality interfaces capabilities with human supervisor's ability to control multiple robots. The role of this human multi-robot interface is to allow an operator to control groups of heterogeneous robots in real time in a collaborative manner. It used advanced path planning algorithms to ensure obstacles are avoided and that the operators are free for higher-level tasks. Each robot knows the environment and obstacles and can automatically generate a collision-free path to any user-selected target. It displayed sensor information from each individual robot directly on the robot in the video view. In addition, a sensor data fused AR view is displayed which helped the users pin point source information or help the operator with the goals of the mission. The paper studies a preliminary Human Factors evaluation of this system in which several interface conditions are tested for source detection tasks. Results show that the novel Augmented Reality multi-robot control (Point-and-Go and Path Planning) reduced mission completion times compared to the traditional joystick control for target detection missions. Usability tests and operator workload analysis are also investigated.

  11. Implementation of an Embedded Web Server Application for Wireless Control of Brain Computer Interface Based Home Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Eda Akman; Bay, Ömer Faruk; Güler, İnan

    2016-01-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) based environment control systems could facilitate life of people with neuromuscular diseases, reduces dependence on their caregivers, and improves their quality of life. As well as easy usage, low-cost, and robust system performance, mobility is an important functionality expected from a practical BCI system in real life. In this study, in order to enhance users' mobility, we propose internet based wireless communication between BCI system and home environment. We designed and implemented a prototype of an embedded low-cost, low power, easy to use web server which is employed in internet based wireless control of a BCI based home environment. The embedded web server provides remote access to the environmental control module through BCI and web interfaces. While the proposed system offers to BCI users enhanced mobility, it also provides remote control of the home environment by caregivers as well as the individuals in initial stages of neuromuscular disease. The input of BCI system is P300 potentials. We used Region Based Paradigm (RBP) as stimulus interface. Performance of the BCI system is evaluated on data recorded from 8 non-disabled subjects. The experimental results indicate that the proposed web server enables internet based wireless control of electrical home appliances successfully through BCIs.

  12. A novel device for head gesture measurement system in combination with eye-controlled human machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chern-Sheng; Ho, Chien-Wa; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Hung, San-Shan; Shei, Hung-Jung; Yeh, Mau-Shiun

    2006-06-01

    This study describes the design and combination of an eye-controlled and a head-controlled human-machine interface system. This system is a highly effective human-machine interface, detecting head movement by changing positions and numbers of light sources on the head. When the users utilize the head-mounted display to browse a computer screen, the system will catch the images of the user's eyes with CCD cameras, which can also measure the angle and position of the light sources. In the eye-tracking system, the program in the computer will locate each center point of the pupils in the images, and record the information on moving traces and pupil diameters. In the head gesture measurement system, the user wears a double-source eyeglass frame, so the system catches images of the user's head by using a CCD camera in front of the user. The computer program will locate the center point of the head, transferring it to the screen coordinates, and then the user can control the cursor by head motions. We combine the eye-controlled and head-controlled human-machine interface system for the virtual reality applications.

  13. Nano-Scale Interface Modification of the Co/Cu System: Metallic Surface Modifiers in the Growth of Smooth Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolny-Marszalek, M.

    2007-10-01

    This review is a collection of twelve original papers concerning growth and interface modification in the Co/Cu system. Most of this research has been carried out in the Laboratory of Surface and Thin Film Physics at the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The Laboratory was created by the author of this review in 1996 in strong collaboration with the Institute of Nuclear Physics Wilhelms-Universitaet in Muenster, Germany and the Institute of Applied Physics Ukrainian Academy of Science in Sumy, Ukraine. The big international team worked under the leadership of Dr Marta Marszalek, initially developing a multicomponent ultrahigh vacuum setup for thin film preparation and analysis, and next accompanying her in studies of the structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of Co/Cu multilayers. Systems that exhibit giant magnetoresistance effect have been receiving intensive attentions over recent years since they are possible candidates for applications in ultrahigh-density data storage and magnetoelectronic devices. The focus of this research is the growth of magnetic Co/Cu multilayers modified by using metallic surface modifiers called surfactants. The different approaches have been used. Surfactant metals were introduced once into growth process as a buffer layer or they were deposited sequentially at each interface of Co/Cu multilayers. The growth was performed by molecular beam epitaxy technique which allows to tailor carefully deposition conditions. The results showed that two approaches gave different results. Surfactant buffer layers resulted in loss of layered character of multilayers being a kind of an intermediate cluster-like phase combined with a layered area. Small amount of surfactants introduced at each interface lead to well-ordered structures with small roughness and smoother interfaces than in the case of pure Co/Cu multilayers. Despite of the differences, in both cases the improvement of magnetoresistance value was observed. The atomic scale study

  14. Nano-Scale Interface Modification of the Co/Cu System: Metallic Surface Modifiers in the Growth of Smooth Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolny-Marszalek, M [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152 Radzikowskiego str., 31-342, Cracow (Poland)

    2007-10-15

    This review is a collection of twelve original papers concerning growth and interface modification in the Co/Cu system. Most of this research has been carried out in the Laboratory of Surface and Thin Film Physics at the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The Laboratory was created by the author of this review in 1996 in strong collaboration with the Institute of Nuclear Physics Wilhelms-Universitaet in Muenster, Germany and the Institute of Applied Physics Ukrainian Academy of Science in Sumy, Ukraine. The big international team worked under the leadership of Dr Marta Marszalek, initially developing a multicomponent ultrahigh vacuum setup for thin film preparation and analysis, and next accompanying her in studies of the structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of Co/Cu multilayers. Systems that exhibit giant magnetoresistance effect have been receiving intensive attentions over recent years since they are possible candidates for applications in ultrahigh-density data storage and magnetoelectronic devices. The focus of this research is the growth of magnetic Co/Cu multilayers modified by using metallic surface modifiers called surfactants. The different approaches have been used. Surfactant metals were introduced once into growth process as a buffer layer or they were deposited sequentially at each interface of Co/Cu multilayers. The growth was performed by molecular beam epitaxy technique which allows to tailor carefully deposition conditions. The results showed that two approaches gave different results. Surfactant buffer layers resulted in loss of layered character of multilayers being a kind of an intermediate cluster-like phase combined with a layered area. Small amount of surfactants introduced at each interface lead to well-ordered structures with small roughness and smoother interfaces than in the case of pure Co/Cu multilayers. Despite of the differences, in both cases the improvement of magnetoresistance value was observed. The atomic scale study

  15. Brain-computer interface controlled gaming: evaluation of usability by severely motor restricted end-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Elisa Mira; Höhne, Johannes; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Tangermann, Michael; Kübler, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Connect-Four, a new sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) based brain-computer interface (BCI) gaming application, was evaluated by four severely motor restricted end-users; two were in the locked-in state and had unreliable eye-movement. Following the user-centred approach, usability of the BCI prototype was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate (ITR) and subjective workload) and users' satisfaction. Online performance varied strongly across users and sessions (median accuracy (%) of end-users: A=.65; B=.60; C=.47; D=.77). Our results thus yielded low to medium effectiveness in three end-users and high effectiveness in one end-user. Consequently, ITR was low (0.05-1.44bits/min). Only two end-users were able to play the game in free-mode. Total workload was moderate but varied strongly across sessions. Main sources of workload were mental and temporal demand. Furthermore, frustration contributed to the subjective workload of two end-users. Nevertheless, most end-users accepted the BCI application well and rated satisfaction medium to high. Sources for dissatisfaction were (1) electrode gel and cap, (2) low effectiveness, (3) time-consuming adjustment and (4) not easy-to-use BCI equipment. All four end-users indicated ease of use as being one of the most important aspect of BCI. Effectiveness and efficiency are lower as compared to applications using the event-related potential as input channel. Nevertheless, the SMR-BCI application was satisfactorily accepted by the end-users and two of four could imagine using the BCI application in their daily life. Thus, despite moderate effectiveness and efficiency BCIs might be an option when controlling an application for entertainment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modulation of Posterior Alpha Activity by Spatial Attention Allows for Controlling A Continuous Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horschig, Jörn M; Oosterheert, Wouter; Oostenveld, Robert; Jensen, Ole

    2015-11-01

    Here we report that the modulation of alpha activity by covert attention can be used as a control signal in an online brain-computer interface, that it is reliable, and that it is robust. Subjects were instructed to orient covert visual attention to the left or right hemifield. We decoded the direction of attention from the magnetoencephalogram by a template matching classifier and provided the classification outcome to the subject in real-time using a novel graphical user interface. Training data for the templates were obtained from a Posner-cueing task conducted just before the BCI task. Eleven subjects participated in four sessions each. Eight of the subjects achieved classification rates significantly above chance level. Subjects were able to significantly increase their performance from the first to the second session. Individual patterns of posterior alpha power remained stable throughout the four sessions and did not change with increased performance. We conclude that posterior alpha power can successfully be used as a control signal in brain-computer interfaces. We also discuss several ideas for further improving the setup and propose future research based on solid hypotheses about behavioral consequences of modulating neuronal oscillations by brain computer interfacing.

  17. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  18. Studies on layer growth and interfaces on Ta-base thin layers by means of XPS; Untersuchungen zu Schichtwachstum und Grenzflaechen an Ta-basierten Duennschichten mittels XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zier, M.

    2007-11-02

    In this thesis studies on the growth and on the formation of the interfaces of Ta and TaN layers on Si and SiO{sub 2} were performed. In the system TaN on SiO{sub 2} no reaction on the interface could be found. As the system with the mostly disturbed interface Ta on SiO{sub 2} was proved. Here a reduction of the SiO{sub 2} at simultaneous oxidation of the Ta was to be observed. Additionally tantalum silicide was formed to be considered concerning the bonding state as Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, from which a double layer of a tantalum silicide and a tantalum suboxide resulted. A whole thickness of the double layer of above 1 nm resulted. In the system Ta on Si at the deposition of the film on the interface a tantalum silicide was formed to be characterized concerning the bonding state as TaSi{sub 2}. The thickness of the interlayer growed thereby up to 0.8 nm in form of islands. Finally in the system TaN on Si a silicon nitride formation during the deposition was observed, which was attributed to the insertion of adsorbed nitrogen from the sputtering atmosphere by recoil implantation of the sputtered Ta atoms. The silicon nitride interlayer growed thereby up to a thickness of 0.8 nm.

  19. Digital Control of the Czochralski Growth of Gallium Arsenide-Controller Software Reference Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-15

    once a parameter was changed. (2) Despite of the fact that there are analog controllers on the market which feature a high degree of automation...single-zone heater is in use.) - 4 - Kfc ^&S^^ p IS’ K: i 1. Digital Control of Czochralski GaAs Crystal Growth (2) Four tachometers which are...34 if either the overlay name or the program version loaded with the overlay do not match the expected data. (It is important not to mix modules

  20. Controlled planar interface synthesis by ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding/deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Cox, M. J.; Xu, J.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) diffusion bonding/deposition instrument was designed and constructed, which can produce homophase and heterophase planar interfaces from a wide array of materials. The interfaces are synthesized in situ by diffusion bonding of two substrates with or without various interfacial layers, at temperatures up to about 1500 degree sign C. Substrate surfaces can be heat treated, ion-beam sputter cleaned, and chemically characterized in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy prior to deposition and/or bonding. Bicrystals can be synthesized by bonding two single-crystal substrates at a specified orientation. Interfacial layers can be deposited by electron beam evaporation and/or sputter deposition in any layered or alloyed combination on the substrates before bonding. The instrument can accommodate cylindrical and/or wafer type specimens whose sizes are sufficient for fracture mechanical testing to measure interface bond strength. A variety of planar interfaces of metals, semiconductors, and ceramics were synthesized. Examples of bonded stainless steel/Ti/stainless steel, Si/Si, and sapphire/sapphire interfaces are presented. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society

  1. Natural interfaces for interacting with a virtual control desk of a nuclear power plant simulator; Interfaces naturais para interacao com uma mesa de controle virtual de um simulador de uma usina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghina, Mauricio Alves da Cunha e

    2012-07-01

    Due to very strict standards of safe operation of a nuclear power plant operators must be well trained so they can operate it within the necessary safety procedures. This is done through training simulators, which enable the user operation, as close as possible to the real control desk, and can be inserted accident situations, so they train, how to return the plant to a normal operating condition. Normally is used two types of simulator. Preferred is the full scope simulator, what is a computational dynamics program of the plant used in conjunction with a physical replica of the control desk, but this type of simulator involves a high construction cost. The second type is what uses synoptic windows of various regions of the original control desk, its construction cost is smaller, but it have a little fidelity to the original appearance of the table. Currently, with the use of virtual reality, control desks can be modeled in 3D, making the simulator interface is very similar to the appearance of the real control desk with a low cost construction. This work shows the use of natural interfaces for operator interaction with the virtual control desk, in order that it does not use any mechanical device for displaying and acting with it. For procedures that were used, such as: computer vision to recognize the position of the operator's and observation of their hands to the work of the desk controls and voice recognition. (author)

  2. AAL Platform with a “De Facto” Standard Communication Interface (TICO): Training in Home Control in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillomía San Bartolomé, Miguel A.; Artigas Maestre, José Ignacio; Sánchez Agustín, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Framed within a long-term cooperation between university and special education teachers, training in alternative communication skills and home control was realized using the “TICO” interface, a communication panel editor extensively used in special education schools. From a technological view we follow AAL technology trends by integrating a successful interface in a heterogeneous services AAL platform, focusing on a functional view. Educationally, a very flexible interface in line with communication training allows dynamic adjustment of complexity, enhanced by an accessible mindset and virtual elements significance already in use, offers specific interaction feedback, adapts to the evolving needs and capacities and improves the personal autonomy and self-confidence of children at school and home. TICO-home-control was installed during the last school year in the library of a special education school to study adaptations and training strategies to enhance the autonomy opportunities of its pupils. The methodology involved a case study and structured and semi-structured observations. Five children, considered unable to use commercial home control systems were trained obtaining good results in enabling them to use an open home control system. Moreover this AAL platform has proved efficient in training children in previous cognitive steps like virtual representation and cause-effect interaction. PMID:29023383

  3. AAL Platform with a “De Facto” Standard Communication Interface (TICO: Training in Home Control in Special Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Guillomía San Bartolomé

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Framed within a long-term cooperation between university and special education teachers, training in alternative communication skills and home control was realized using the “TICO” interface, a communication panel editor extensively used in special education schools. From a technological view we follow AAL technology trends by integrating a successful interface in a heterogeneous services AAL platform, focusing on a functional view. Educationally, a very flexible interface in line with communication training allows dynamic adjustment of complexity, enhanced by an accessible mindset and virtual elements significance already in use, offers specific interaction feedback, adapts to the evolving needs and capacities and improves the personal autonomy and self-confidence of children at school and home. TICO-home-control was installed during the last school year in the library of a special education school to study adaptations and training strategies to enhance the autonomy opportunities of its pupils. The methodology involved a case study and structured and semi-structured observations. Five children, considered unable to use commercial home control systems were trained obtaining good results in enabling them to use an open home control system. Moreover this AAL platform has proved efficient in training children in previous cognitive steps like virtual representation and cause-effect interaction.

  4. AAL Platform with a "De Facto" Standard Communication Interface (TICO): Training in Home Control in Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillomía San Bartolomé, Miguel A; Falcó Boudet, Jorge L; Artigas Maestre, José Ignacio; Sánchez Agustín, Ana

    2017-10-12

    Framed within a long-term cooperation between university and special education teachers, training in alternative communication skills and home control was realized using the "TICO" interface, a communication panel editor extensively used in special education schools. From a technological view we follow AAL technology trends by integrating a successful interface in a heterogeneous services AAL platform, focusing on a functional view. Educationally, a very flexible interface in line with communication training allows dynamic adjustment of complexity, enhanced by an accessible mindset and virtual elements significance already in use, offers specific interaction feedback, adapts to the evolving needs and capacities and improves the personal autonomy and self-confidence of children at school and home. TICO-home-control was installed during the last school year in the library of a special education school to study adaptations and training strategies to enhance the autonomy opportunities of its pupils. The methodology involved a case study and structured and semi-structured observations. Five children, considered unable to use commercial home control systems were trained obtaining good results in enabling them to use an open home control system. Moreover this AAL platform has proved efficient in training children in previous cognitive steps like virtual representation and cause-effect interaction.

  5. Investigations on Substrate Temperature-Induced Growth Modes of Organic Semiconductors at Dielectric/semiconductor Interface and Their Correlation with Threshold Voltage Stability in Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, Narayanan; Maheshwari, Priya; Bhattacharya, Debarati; Tokas, Raj B; Sen, Shashwati; Honda, Yoshihide; Basu, Saibal; Pujari, Pradeep Kumar; Rao, T V Chandrasekhar

    2016-02-10

    Influence of substrate temperature on growth modes of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films at the dielectric/semiconductor interface in organic field effect transistors (OFETs) is investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging at the interface reveals a change from 'layer+island' to "island" growth mode with increasing substrate temperatures, further confirmed by probing the buried interfaces using X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and positron annihilation spectroscopic (PAS) techniques. PAS depth profiling provides insight into the details of molecular ordering while positron lifetime measurements reveal the difference in packing modes of CuPc molecules at the interface. XRR measurements show systematic increase in interface width and electron density correlating well with the change from layer + island to coalesced huge 3D islands at higher substrate temperatures. Study demonstrates the usefulness of XRR and PAS techniques to study growth modes at buried interfaces and reveals the influence of growth modes of semiconductor at the interface on hole and electron trap concentrations individually, thereby affecting hysteresis and threshold voltage stability. Minimum hole trapping is correlated to near layer by layer formation close to the interface at 100 °C and maximum to the island formation with large voids between the grains at 225 °C.

  6. PVP存在下液液界面生长法制备硒纳米线%Preparation of Selenium Nanowires by Liquid-liquid Interface Growth in the Presence of Polyvinylpyrrolidone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜义; 张娟; 刘明珠; 朱俊杰; 陈洪渊

    2005-01-01

    Nanowires of trigonal selenium were synthesized in large-scale by two step processes: reaction in homogeneous solution and growth at liquid-liquid interface. Polyvinylpyrrolidone was used as a soft template in the synthesis.

  7. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O' Hara

    2004-11-30

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  8. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification. Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.; Hill, D.; O'Hara, J.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces

  9. TA-55 facility control system upgrade project - human-system interface functional requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, W.H.; Pope, N.G.; Turner, W.J.; Brown, R.E.

    1995-11-01

    The functional requirements for that part of the Technical Area (TA)-55 Operations Center Upgrade Project that involves the human-system interface (HSI) are described in this document. The upgrade project seeks to replace completely the center's existing computerized data acquisition and display system, which consists of the field multiplexer units, Data General computer systems, and associated peripherals and software. The upgrade project has two parts-the Facility Data Acquisition Interface System (FDAIS) and the HSI. The HSI comprises software and hardware to provide a high-level graphical operator interface to the data acquisition system, as well as data archiving, alarm annunciation, and logging. The new system will be built with modern, commercially available components; it will improve reliability and maintainability, and it can be expanded for future needs

  10. Modulation spectroscopy study of the effects of growth interruptions on the interfaces of GaAsSb/GaAs multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H P; Sitarek, P; Huang, Y S; Liu, P W; Lin, J M; Lin, H H; Tiong, K K

    2006-01-01

    The effects of growth interruption times combined with Sb exposure of GaAsSb/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) have been investigated by using phototransmittance (PT), contactless electroreflectance (CER) and wavelength modulated surface photovoltage spectroscopy (WMSPS). The features originated from different portions of the samples, including interband transitions of MQWs, interfaces and GaAs, are observed and identified through a detailed comparison of the obtained spectra and theoretical calculation. A red-shift of the interband transitions and a broader lineshape of the fundamental transition are observed from samples grown under Sb exposure compared to the reference sample grown without interruption. The results can be interpreted in terms of both increases in Sb content and mixing of Sb in the GaAs interface layers. An additional feature has been observed below the GaAs region in the samples with Sb treatment. The probable origin of this additional feature is discussed

  11. Epitaxial growth of topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} film on Si(111) with atomically sharp interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Namrata [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kim, Yong Seung [Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Edrey, Eliav; Brahlek, Matthew; Horibe, Yoichi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Iida, Keiko; Tanimura, Makoto [Research Department, Nissan Arc, Ltd. Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-0061 (Japan); Li Guohong; Feng Tian; Lee, Hang-Dong; Gustafsson, Torgny; Andrei, Eva [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Oh, Seongshik, E-mail: ohsean@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2011-10-31

    Atomically sharp epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films is achieved on Si(111) substrate with molecular beam epitaxy. Two-step growth process is found to be a key to achieve interfacial-layer-free epitaxial Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films on Si substrates. With a single-step high temperature growth, second phase clusters are formed at an early stage. On the other hand, with low temperature growth, the film tends to be disordered even in the absence of a second phase. With a low temperature initial growth followed by a high temperature growth, second-phase-free atomically sharp interface is obtained between Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Si substrate, as verified by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction. The lattice constant of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is observed to relax to its bulk value during the first quintuple layer according to RHEED analysis, implying the absence of strain from the substrate. TEM shows a fully epitaxial structure of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} film down to the first quintuple layer without any second phase or an amorphous layer.

  12. Giant tunneling electroresistance effect driven by an electrically controlled spin valve at a complex oxide interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J D; Tsymbal, E Y

    2011-04-15

    A giant tunneling electroresistance effect may be achieved in a ferroelectric tunnel junction by exploiting the magnetoelectric effect at the interface between the ferroelectric barrier and a magnetic La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 electrode. Using first-principles density-functional theory we demonstrate that a few magnetic monolayers of La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 near the interface act, in response to ferroelectric polarization reversal, as an atomic-scale spin valve by filtering spin-dependent current. This produces more than an order of magnitude change in conductance, and thus constitutes a giant resistive switching effect.

  13. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  14. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly - Interacting Physical, Biogeochemical and Biolological Controls of Nutrient Cycling at Ecohydrological Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S.; Baranov, V. A.; Lewandowski, J.; Blaen, P. J.; Romeijn, P.

    2016-12-01

    The interfaces between streams, lakes and their bed sediments have for a long time been in the research focus of ecohydrologists, aquatic ecologists and biogeochemists. While over the past decades, critical understanding has been gained of the spatial patterns and temporal dynamics in nutrient cycling at sediment-freshwater interfaces, important question remain as to the actual drivers (physical, biogeochemical and biological) of the often observed hot spots and hot moments of nutrient cycling at these highly reactive systems. This study reports on a combination of laboratory manipulation, artificial stream and field experiments from reach to river network scales to investigate the interplay of physical, biogeochemical and biological drivers of interface nutrient cycling under the impact of and resilience to global environmental change. Our results indicate that biogeochemical hotspots at sediment-freshwater interfaces were controlled not only by reactant mixing ratios and residence time distributions, but strongly affected by patterns in streambed physical properties and bioavailability of organic carbon. Lab incubation experiments revealed that geology, and in particular organic matter content strongly controlled the magnitude of enhanced streambed greenhouse gas production caused by increasing water temperatures. While these findings help to improve our understanding of physical and biogeochemical controls on nutrient cycling, we only start to understand to what degree biological factors can enhance these processes even further. We found that for instance chironomid or brittle star facilitated bioturbation in has the potential to substantially enhance freshwater or marine sediment pore-water flow and respiration. We revealed that ignorance of these important biologically controls on physical exchange fluxes can lead to critical underestimation of whole system respiration and its increase under global environmental change.

  15. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Suzuki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium polyacrylate solutions. Precise surface transportation and kink incorporation processes of the particles into the colloidal crystals with attractive interactions were observed in situ at the particle level. In particular, contrary to the conventional expectations, the diffusion of particles along steps around a two-dimensional island of the growth interface was not the main route for kink incorporation. This is probably due to the number of bonds between adsorbed particles and particles in a crystal; the number exceeds the limit at which a particle easily exchanges its position to the adjacent one along the step. We also found novel desorption processes of particles from steps to terraces, attributing them to the assistance of attractive forces from additionally adsorbing particles to the particles on the steps.

  16. Safety control system and its interface to EPICS for the off-line front end of the SPES project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, J.; Andrighetto, A.; Bassato, G.; Costa, L.; Giacchini, M.; Bertocco, M.

    2012-01-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project is based on a facility for the production of neutron-rich radioactive ion beams using the isotope separation on-line technique. The SPES off-line front-end apparatus involves a number of subsystems and procedures that are potentially dangerous both for human operators and for the equipment. The high voltage power supply, the ion source complex power supplies, the target chamber handling systems and the laser source are some example of these subsystems. For that reason, a safety control system has been developed. It is based on Schneider Electrics Preventa family safety modules that control the power supply of critical subsystems in combination with safety detectors that monitor critical variables. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), model BMXP342020 from the Schneider Electrics Modicon M340 family, is used for monitoring the status of the system as well as controlling the sequence of some operations in automatic way. A touch screen, model XBTGT5330 from the Schneider Electrics Magelis family, is used as Human Machine Interface (HMI) and communicates with the PLC using MODBUS-TCP. Additionally, an interface to the EPICS control network was developed using a home-made MODBUS-TCP EPICS driver in order to integrate it to the control system of the Front End as well as present the status of the system to the users on the main control panel. (authors)

  17. Molecular-structure control of ultrafast electron injection at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-03-05

    Charge transfer (CT) at donor (D)/acceptor (A) interfaces is central to the functioning of photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Understanding and controlling this process on the molecular level has been proven to be crucial for optimizing the performance of many energy-challenge relevant devices. Here, we report the experimental observations of controlled on/off ultrafast electron transfer (ET) at cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot (QD) interfaces using femto- and nanosecond broad-band transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. The time-resolved data demonstrate how one can turn on/off the electron injection from porphyrin to the CdTe QDs. With careful control of the molecular structure, we are able to tune the electron injection at the porphyrin-CdTe QD interface from zero to very efficient and ultrafast. In addition, our data demonstrate that the ET process occurs within our temporal resolution of 120 fs, which is one of the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  18. Brain-Computer Interface Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation System for Ankle Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christine E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many neurological conditions, such as stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury, can cause chronic gait function impairment due to foot-drop. Current physiotherapy techniques provide only a limited degree of motor function recovery in these individuals, and therefore novel therapies are needed. Brain-computer interface (BCI is a relatively novel technology with a potential to restore, substitute, or augment lost motor behaviors in patients with neurological injuries. Here, we describe the first successful integration of a noninvasive electroencephalogram (EEG-based BCI with a noninvasive functional electrical stimulation (FES system that enables the direct brain control of foot dorsiflexion in able-bodied individuals. Methods A noninvasive EEG-based BCI system was integrated with a noninvasive FES system for foot dorsiflexion. Subjects underwent computer-cued epochs of repetitive foot dorsiflexion and idling while their EEG signals were recorded and stored for offline analysis. The analysis generated a prediction model that allowed EEG data to be analyzed and classified in real time during online BCI operation. The real-time online performance of the integrated BCI-FES system was tested in a group of five able-bodied subjects who used repetitive foot dorsiflexion to elicit BCI-FES mediated dorsiflexion of the contralateral foot. Results Five able-bodied subjects performed 10 alternations of idling and repetitive foot dorsifiexion to trigger BCI-FES mediated dorsifiexion of the contralateral foot. The epochs of BCI-FES mediated foot dorsifiexion were highly correlated with the epochs of voluntary foot dorsifiexion (correlation coefficient ranged between 0.59 and 0.77 with latencies ranging from 1.4 sec to 3.1 sec. In addition, all subjects achieved a 100% BCI-FES response (no omissions, and one subject had a single false alarm. Conclusions This study suggests that the integration of a noninvasive BCI with a lower

  19. Brain-computer interface controlled functional electrical stimulation system for ankle movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, An H; Wang, Po T; King, Christine E; Abiri, Ahmad; Nenadic, Zoran

    2011-08-26

    Many neurological conditions, such as stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury, can cause chronic gait function impairment due to foot-drop. Current physiotherapy techniques provide only a limited degree of motor function recovery in these individuals, and therefore novel therapies are needed. Brain-computer interface (BCI) is a relatively novel technology with a potential to restore, substitute, or augment lost motor behaviors in patients with neurological injuries. Here, we describe the first successful integration of a noninvasive electroencephalogram (EEG)-based BCI with a noninvasive functional electrical stimulation (FES) system that enables the direct brain control of foot dorsiflexion in able-bodied individuals. A noninvasive EEG-based BCI system was integrated with a noninvasive FES system for foot dorsiflexion. Subjects underwent computer-cued epochs of repetitive foot dorsiflexion and idling while their EEG signals were recorded and stored for offline analysis. The analysis generated a prediction model that allowed EEG data to be analyzed and classified in real time during online BCI operation. The real-time online performance of the integrated BCI-FES system was tested in a group of five able-bodied subjects who used repetitive foot dorsiflexion to elicit BCI-FES mediated dorsiflexion of the contralateral foot. Five able-bodied subjects performed 10 alternations of idling and repetitive foot dorsifiexion to trigger BCI-FES mediated dorsifiexion of the contralateral foot. The epochs of BCI-FES mediated foot dorsifiexion were highly correlated with the epochs of voluntary foot dorsifiexion (correlation coefficient ranged between 0.59 and 0.77) with latencies ranging from 1.4 sec to 3.1 sec. In addition, all subjects achieved a 100% BCI-FES response (no omissions), and one subject had a single false alarm. This study suggests that the integration of a noninvasive BCI with a lower-extremity FES system is feasible. With additional modifications

  20. Monitoring and evaluation of plant and hydrological controls on arsenic transport across the water sediment interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Paull, J.

    2009-12-01

    Plants and hydrology influence the transport of arsenic in wetlands by changing the dominant redox chemistry in the subsurface, and different plant and hydrological regimes can serve as effective barriers or promoters of metal transport. Inorganic arsenic, especially arsenate, binds to iron oxides in wetlands. In flooded wetland sediments, organic carbon from plants consumes oxygen and promotes reductive iron dissolution, which leads to arsenic release, while plants simultaneously create microoxic regimes around root hairs that oxidize and precipitate iron, promoting arsenic capture. Hydrology influences arsenic mobility by promoting wetting and drying cycles. Such cycles can lead to rapid shifts from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and vice versa, with lasting impact on the oxidation state of iron and, by extension, the mobility of arsenic. Remediation strategies should take these competing conditions into account, and to help inform these strategies this study examines the chemistry of an industrially contaminated wetland when the above mechanisms aggregate. The study tests whether, in bulk, plants promote iron reduction or oxidation in intermittently flooded or consistently flooded sediments, and how this impacts arsenic mobility. This research uses a novel dialysis-based monitoring technique to examine the macro-properties of arsenic transport at the sediment water interface and at depth. Dialysis-based monitoring allows long-term seasonal trends in anaerobic porewater and allows active hypothesis testing on the influence of plants on redox chemistry. This study finds that plants promote iron reduction and that iron-reducing zones tend to correlate with zones with mobile arsenic. However, one newly reported and important finding of this study is that a brief summer drought that dried and oxidized sediments with a long history of iron-reduction zone served to effectively halt iron reduction for many months, and this corresponded to a lasting decline in